WorldWideScience

Sample records for greek lead findings

  1. Greek petrochemicals finds buyers for plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greek Petrochemicals (Athens) has found buyers for two polyethylene (PE) plants it ordered from U.K. contractors 10 years ago and that are currently stored in Manchester. It is understood that Thai Polyethylene (Bangkok) has been selected to acquire the 70,000-m.t./year ICI process low-density PE plant engineered by Simon-Carves. Reliance Industries is in talks to by the 50,000-m.t./year Union Carbide Unipol process high-density PE unit. The plants are to be installed at Map Ta Put, Thailand and Hazira, India, respectively

  2. Barriers in implementing research findings in cancer care: the Greek registered nurses perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiraki, Elisabeth; Karlou, Chrysoula; Papadopoulou, Despina; Spyridou, Ageliki; Kouloukoura, Chrysoula; Bare, Elpida; Merkouris, Anastasios

    2004-09-01

    This study explored Greek nurses' perceptions of the barriers to research utilization faced in every day practice. The barriers between nurses working in cancer and general hospitals, as well as between those employed at central and provincial hospitals were compared. The study used a cross-sectional design and data were collected using the "Barriers Scale" (Funk et al., 1991a, Applied Nursing Research, 4, 39-45). A convenience sample of 301 nurses was randomly selected from 12 hospitals in Greece. The two key barriers identified were related to the 'availability of research findings'. English language was perceived to range between moderate and major barrier for the vast majority of participants (n = 231, 78%). Nurses surveyed indicated the presentation of research findings as the greatest barrier while the characteristics of nurses themselves were perceived as the least important one. No significant differences were found between types of hospitals (cancer/general) and geographical areas (central/provincial). Some differences, however, were observed in relation to specific items of the scale such as feeling isolated from 'research-knowledgeable' colleagues and having insufficient time to implement new ideas. The observations reported here appear to agree with the findings in mainstream literature. The results suggest that more emphasis should be given in research methodology, statistics and critical appraisal skills at all levels of nursing education, and that efforts should be made towards increasing research availability and creating supportive environments for implementation of research findings.

  3. GREEK, INTERMEDIATE READER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAPOUNTZIS, P.; AND OTHERS

    THIS READER IS DESIGNED TO FOLLOW A BASIC INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN COMMONLY SPOKEN GREEK (DHIMOTIKI). THE SELECTIONS REPRESENT VARIOUS DEGREES OF THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE LEADING FROM DHIMOTIKI TO THE FORMAL GREEK (KATHAREVUSA). THE TEXTS OF EACH UNIT ARE MEANT TO PRESENT VARIOUS ASPECTS OF GREEK LIFE AND THOUGHT. THE DRILL SENTENCES (BOTH VOCABULARY AND…

  4. Reconsiderations about Greek homosexualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, William Armstrong

    2005-01-01

    Focusing his analysis on (mostly Athenian) vase paintings of the sixth- and early fifth-century and on a handful of texts from the late fifth- and early fourth-century (again Athenian), Dover depicted the pederastic relationship of erastes (age 20 to 30) and eromenos (age 12-18) as defined by sexual roles, active and passive, respectively. This dichotomy he connected to other sexual and social phenomena, in which the active/ penetrating role was considered proper for a male adult Athenian citizen, while the passive/penetrated role was denigrated, ridiculed, and even punished. Constructing various social and psychological theories, Foucault and Halperin, along with a host of others, have extended his analysis, but at the core has remained the Dover dogma of sexual-role dichotomization. Penetration has become such a focal point in the scholarship that anything unable to be analyzed in terms of domination is downplayed or ignored. To reduce homosexuality or same-sex behaviors to the purely physical or sexual does an injustice to the complex phenomena of the Greek male experience. From Sparta to Athens to Thebes and beyond, the Greek world incorporated pederasty into their educational systems. Pederasty became a way to lead a boy into manhood and full participation in the polis, which meant not just participation in politics but primarily the ability to benefit the city in a wide range of potential ways. Thus the education, training, and even inspiration provided in the pederastic relationship released creative forces that led to what has been called the Greek 'miracle.' From around 630 BCE we find the institution of Greek pederasty informing the art and literature to a degree yet to be fully appreciated. Moreover, this influence not only extends to the 'higher' realms of culture, but also can be seen stimulating society at all levels, from the military to athletic games, from philosophy to historiography. An understanding of sexual practices-useful, even essential, to

  5. Find Your Passion, Lead with Purpose: A Health Informaticians' Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    Health Informatics is an ever evolving, changing and dynamic field that has become the disruptive innovation shaping the future of healthcare. Health informaticians face a number of challenges in the workplace such as gaining acceptance and recognition from other healthcare providers and overcoming the resistance of healthcare providers from using technology in clinical practice. Being a health informatician is not for the faint hearted, especially as resistance to the role of health informaticians continues from both healthcare providers and hospital administrators. As health informaticians move from behind the scenes to the front line of todays modern healthcare organization, more leadership training is needed for health informaticians in dealing with the changing demands of the healthcare industry and rapid changes in technology innovations. Waking up everyday with the same passion and purpose to lead others and drive change within healthcare organizations requires the health informatician to find the internal passion that will be transformed into external actions guiding the health informatician in how they lead, communicate, work, think, and treat others within the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to help health informaticiains tap into and develop their passion for the field of health informatics so that they can lead with purpose to improve how healthcare is practiced and delivered, making a lasting change in the overall healthcare system.

  6. Mindset Changes Lead to Drastic Impairments in Rule Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ErEl, Hadas; Meiran, Nachshon

    2011-01-01

    Rule finding is an important aspect of human reasoning and flexibility. Previous studies associated rule finding "failure" with past experience with the test stimuli and stable personality traits. We additionally show that rule finding performance is severely impaired by a mindset associated with applying an instructed rule. The mindset was…

  7. Greek astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Heath, Sir Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy as a science began with the Ionian philosophers, with whom Greek philosophy and mathematics also began. While the Egyptians and Babylonians had accomplished much of astronomical worth, it remained for the unrivalled speculative genius of the Greeks, in particular, their mathematical genius, to lay the foundations of the true science of astronomy. In this classic study, a noted scholar discusses in lucid detail the specific advances made by the Greeks, many of whose ideas anticipated the discoveries of modern astronomy.Pythagoras, born at Samos about 572 B.C., was probably the first

  8. Application of X-Ray and Neutron Tomography to Study Antique Greek Bronze Coins with a High Lead Content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesser, M; Traum, R; Vondrovec, K; Vontobel, P; Lehmann, E H

    2012-01-01

    Highly leaded bronze coins of the Coin Cabinet of the Kunsthistorisches Museum (KHM) show progressive corrosion as a result of unfavourable storage conditions within historic wooden cases. In connection to a research project concerning the preservation and conservation of the antique coins the causes for the sometimes severe corrosion were studied by different analytical techniques. Radiography and tomography investigations using neutrons and X-rays were performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, i.e. the enrichment of lead in the interior of the objects was studied in a nondestructive manner. The tomography results obtained show that in addition to the lead rich areas on the obverse and reverse of the coins (often already clearly visible on the surface due to the formation of white corrosion products) a varying number of lead containing inclusions could be detected within the antique bronze coins. In addition, some information on their casting technique could be gained.

  9. Greeks, British Greek Cypriots and Londoners: a comparison of morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavreas, V G; Bebbington, P E

    1988-05-01

    This paper reports the results of a comparison of the rates of psychiatric disorder from three general population surveys in which the PSE-ID-CATEGO system was used for case-definition. These surveys were of an English sample in Camberwell, London, and of two Greek samples, the first in Athens, the second of Greek Cypriot immigrants living in Camberwell. The results show that the rates of psychiatric disorders in both Greek samples were somewhat higher than those of the Camberwell population, the differences being accounted for by higher rates of anxiety disorders, especially in women. Comparisons in terms of syndrome profiles showed that Greeks reported more symptoms of generalized anxiety than their English counterparts who, in their turn, reported higher rates of obsessive symptoms, and symptoms of social anxiety. The higher rates in the Greek samples were possibly due to an increased frequency of non-specific neurotic symptoms like worrying and tension. The results of other European community surveys with the PSE suggest that there might be a genuine and general North-South difference in the expression of psychological distress. Cultural differences in terms of personality traits and culturally sanctioned child rearing practices might account for the findings.

  10. Interpretations of Greek Mythology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, Jan

    1987-01-01

    This collection of original studies offers new interpretations of some of the best known characters and themes of Greek mythology, reflecting the complexity and fascination of the Greek imagination. Following analyses of the concept of myth and the influence of the Orient on Greek mythology, the

  11. Dreams in ancient Greek Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, K; Moschos, M M; Koukaki, E; Vasilopoulos, E; Karamanou, M; Kontaxaki, M-I; Androutsos, G

    2016-01-01

    Dreams preoccupied the Greek and Roman world in antiquity, therefore they had a prominent role in social, philosophical, religious, historical and political life of those times. They were considered as omens and prophetic signs of future events in private and public life, and that was particularly accentuated when elements of actions which took place in the plot of dreams were associated directly or indirectly with real events. This is why it was important to use them in divination, and helped the growth of superstition and folklore believes. Medicine as a science and an anthropocentric art, could not ignore the importance of dreams, having in mind their popularity in antiquity. In ancient Greek medicine dreams can be divided into two basic categories. In the first one -which is related to religious medicine-dreams experienced by religionists are classified, when resorted to great religious sanctuaries such as those of Asclepius (Asclepieia) and Amphiaraos (Amfiaraeia). These dreams were the essential element for healing in this form of religious medicine, because after pilgrims underwent purifications they went to sleep in a special dwelling of the sanctuaries called "enkoimeterion" (Greek: the place to sleep) so that the healing god would come to their dreams either to cure them or to suggest treatment. In ancient Greek literature there are many reports of these experiences, but if there may be phenomena of self-suggestion, or they could be characterized as propaganda messages from the priesthood of each sanctuary for advertising purposes. The other category concerns the references about dreams found in ancient Greek medical literature, where one can find the attempts of ancient Greek physicians to interpret these dreams in a rational way as sings either of a corporal disease or of psychological distress. This second category will be the object of our study. Despite the different ways followed by each ancient Greek physician in order to explain dreams, their

  12. Jews and Greeks in Alexandria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Klun

    2003-12-01

    soon started to enforce Greek customs, language and religion to the local population - as recorded in the Books of Maccabees and in rabbinic sources. Much more tolerant and fruitful was the situation in Alexandria, where king Ptolemaius VI even asked a Jewish scholar Aristobulus to explain him some difficult passages in the Greek version of the Hebrew Bible (Septuagint. Our God, he said to the king who had problems how to understand the spiritual being as God could have 'hands' as in Exodus 13, 9, has employed a metaphor well for the purpose of saying something elevated. Latter on the same Jewish author will turn to Platonistic philosopher when he says that God is everywhere, and thus not belong to Israel only. The descent of God upon Sinai is to be interpreted symbolically as an expression of divine activity and its omnipresent majesty. First Jewish philosopher Aristobulus so provide important information about how Jew in the second century BCE attempted to reconcile Jewish tradition and Hellenistic philosophy. Latter on his Jewish pupil Philo of Alexandria (25 BCE - 40 will continue the task, using the same spiritual (and not legalistic, as does the rabbis hermeneutical method and made the Biblical laws (Torah, prophecies (neviim and poetry (ktuvim metapors, mysteries and allegories that lead us to some higher philosophical truths.

  13. Greek Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This course in Modern Greek, consisting of 100 lesson units in 13 volumes, is one of the Defense Language Institute's Basic Course Series. The course is designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Modern Greek. (Level 5 is native-speaker proficiency.) Lesson units…

  14. Greek Gods and Heroes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter Schoon,; Sander Paarlberg,

    2001-01-01

    Many famous en less famous myths and historic events from Greek antiquity painted by Dutch and Flemish artists from the 16th and 17th century. For the first time a broad selection of paintings and prints with subjects from Greek mythology and history are exposed. Famous painters like Rembrandt,

  15. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about the health effects of lead in drinking water The law mandates no-lead products for drinking water after ... Waste, and Cleanup Lead Mold Pesticides Radon Science Water A-Z Index Laws & Regulations By Business Sector By Topic Compliance Enforcement ...

  16. Ancient Greek Terminology in Hepatopancreatobiliary Anatomy and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulas, Michail; Douvetzemis, Stergios

    2015-08-01

    Most of the terminology in medicine originates from Greek or Latin, revealing the impact of the ancient Greeks on modern medicine. However, the literature on the etymology of Greek words used routinely in medical practice is sparse. We provide a short guide to the etymology and meaning of Greek words currently used in the field of hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) anatomy and surgery. Focusing on HPB medical literature, the etymology and origin of Greek words including suffixes and prefixes are shown and analyzed. For example, anatomy (anatomia) is a Greek word derived from the prefix ana- (on, upon) and the suffix -tomy from the verb temno meaning to cut. Surgery, however, is not a Greek word. The corresponding Greek word is chirourgiki derived from cheir (hand) and ergon (action, work) meaning the action made by hands. Understanding the root of Greek terminology leads to an accurate, precise and comprehensive scientific medical language, reflecting the need for a universal medical language as a standardized means of communication within the health care sector.

  17. Greek architecture now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skousbøll, Karin Merete

    2006-01-01

    With the author's Scandinavian viewpoint the aim of this book has been an investigation into contemporary Greek architecture and at the same time providing an understanding for its essential characteristics based on the historic, cultural heritage of Hellas....

  18. Greek architecture now

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skousbøll, Karin Merete

    2006-01-01

    With the author's Scandinavian viewpoint the aim of this book has been an investigation into contemporary Greek architecture and at the same time providing an understanding for its essential characteristics based on the historic, cultural heritage of Hellas.......With the author's Scandinavian viewpoint the aim of this book has been an investigation into contemporary Greek architecture and at the same time providing an understanding for its essential characteristics based on the historic, cultural heritage of Hellas....

  19. Greek Environments: An Update on the Effects of Fraternities and Sororities on Health-Related Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher S.; Liu, Min

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigate whether Greek affiliation and living in Greek housing significantly influence college students' health-related behaviors. In addition, based on the findings, this study provides some important implications about the current practice of Greek society in higher education. The authors empirically tested a path model using…

  20. Shuttle Wing Leading Edge Root Cause NDE Team Findings and Implementation of Quantitative Flash Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    Comparison metrics can be established to reliably and repeatedly establish the health of the joggle region of the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge reinforced carbon carbon (RCC) panels. Using these metrics can greatly reduced the man hours needed to perform, wing leading edge scanning for service induced damage. These time savings have allowed for more thorough inspections to be preformed in the necessary areas with out affecting orbiter flow schedule. Using specialized local inspections allows for a larger margin of safety by allowing for more complete characterizations of panel defects. The presence of the t-seal during thermographic inspection can have adverse masking affects on ability properly characterize defects that exist in the joggle region of the RCC panels. This masking affect dictates the final specialized inspection should be preformed with the t-seal removed. Removal of the t-seal and use of the higher magnification optics has lead to the most effective and repeatable inspection method for characterizing and tracking defects in the wing leading edge. Through this study some inadequacies in the main health monitoring system for the orbiter wing leading edge have been identified and corrected. The use of metrics and local specialized inspection have lead to a greatly increased reliability and repeatable inspection of the shuttle wing leading edge.

  1. Pacemaker stimulus amplitude alteration without loss of capture: an unusual ECG finding in cardiac tamponade from pacemaker lead perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksaranjit, P; Prasidthrathsint, K

    2014-01-01

    A variation in pacemaker stimulus amplitude can represent pacemaker system dysfunction from generator malfunction, lead insulation defect, lead fracture, or artefact of digital signal processing of the electrocardiography recorder. Pacemaker lead perforation into the pericardial space typically results in loss of capture which was not demonstrated in our patient. In summary, we report an unusual ECG finding of pacemaker stimulus amplitude alteration without loss of capture in the setting of cardiac tamponade from pacemaker lead perforation. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Prototype Greek Text to Greek Sign Language Conversion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouremenos, Dimitris; Fotinea, Stavroula-Evita; Efthimiou, Eleni; Ntalianis, Klimis

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a prototype Greek text to Greek Sign Language (GSL) conversion system is presented. The system is integrated into an educational platform that addresses the needs of teaching GSL grammar and was developed within the SYNENNOESE project (Efthimiou "et al." 2004a. Developing an e-learning platform for the Greek sign…

  3. The impact of lead time reliability in freight transport: A logistics assessment of transport economics findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaert, W.E.H.; Zamparini, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers speed and reliability, measured by the average and variance of the lead time, to examine the relevance of the latter variable on inventory costs. By using a flexible simulation framework, it is shown that reducing variability does not necessarily reduce costs and might in fact

  4. Greek Teachers Programme 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The 3rd edition of this year's Greek Teachers Programme was co-organized by CERN Education Group and the Hellenic Physical Society and took place from 8 to 12 November 2015. The programme targets physics high-school teachers from all over Greece. It aims to help teachers inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers by motivating their students to understand and appreciate how science works at the world's largest physics laboratory, whereby increasing their interest in pursuing studies in STEM fields in secondary and post-secondary education. 33 teachers took part in this programme which comprised lectures by Greek members of the CERN scientific community, with visits to experimental facilities, hands-on activities and dedicated sessions on effective and creative ways through which participants may bring physics, particle physics and CERN closer to their school classroom. In 2015, more than 100 teachers took part in the three editions of the Greek Teachers Programme.

  5. Ancient Greek Calendars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Robert

    Greek festival calendars were in origin lunar, eventually being aligned with the sun through various lunisolar intercalary cycles. Each city-state had its own calendar, whose month names have some, little, or no similarity with those of other city-states. These names often reflect gods or festivals held in their honor in a given month, so there is an explicitly sacred character to the calendar. New Year's Day could also differ from one state to another, but generally began with the sighting of the first new moon after one of the four tropical points. Even the introduction of the Roman Julian calendar brought little uniformity to the eastern Greek calendars. The calendar is one of the elements which can assist in understanding the siting of Greek sacred structures.

  6. The art of providing resuscitation in Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siempos, Ilias I; Ntaidou, Theodora K; Samonis, George

    2014-12-01

    We reviewed Greek mythology to accumulate tales of resuscitation and we explored whether these tales could be viewed as indirect evidence that ancient Greeks considered resuscitation strategies similar to those currently used. Three compendia of Greek mythology: The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology, The Greek Myths by Robert Graves, and Greek Mythology by Ioannis Kakridis were used to find potentially relevant narratives. Thirteen myths that may suggest resuscitation (including 1 case of autoresuscitation) were identified. Methods to attempt mythological resuscitation included use of hands (which may correlate with basic life support procedures), a kiss on the mouth (similar to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation), application of burning torches (which might recall contemporary use of external defibrillators), and administration of drugs (a possible analogy to advanced life support procedures). A careful assessment of relevant myths demonstrated that interpretations other than medical might be more credible. Although several narratives of Greek mythology might suggest modern resuscitation techniques, they do not clearly indicate that ancient Greeks presaged scientific methods of resuscitation. Nevertheless, these elegant tales reflect humankind's optimism that a dying human might be restored to life if the appropriate procedures were implemented. Without this optimism, scientific improvement in the field of resuscitation might not have been achieved.

  7. Intentional suppression can lead to a reduction of memory strength: Behavioral and electrophysiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Thomas Waldhauser

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that the intentional suppression of unwanted memories can lead to forgetting in later memory tests. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. This study employed recognition memory testing and event-related potentials (ERPs to investigate whether intentional suppression leads to the inhibition of memory representations at an item level. In a think/no-think experiment, participants were cued to either suppress (no-think condition or retrieve (think condition previously learned words, 18 or 0 times. Performance in a final recognition test was significantly reduced for repeatedly suppressed no-think items when compared to the baseline, zero-repetition condition. ERPs recorded during the suppression of no-think items were significantly more negative-going in a time-window around 300 ms when compared to ERPs in the think condition. This reduction correlated with later recognition memory impairment. Furthermore, ERPs to no-think items from 225-450 ms were more negative-going in later phases of the experiment, suggesting a gradual reduction of memory strength with repeated suppression attempts. These effects were dissociable from correlates of recollection (500-600 ms and inhibitory control (450-500 ms that did not vary over the time-course of the experiment and appeared to be under strategic control. Our results give strong evidence that the no-think manipulation involves inhibition of memory representations at an item level.

  8. What has happened to suicides during the Greek economic crisis? Findings from an ecological study of suicides and their determinants (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachiotis, George; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2015-03-25

    There is a controversy about the impact of economic crisis on suicide rates in Greece. We analysed recent suicide data to identify who has been most affected and the relationships to economic and labour market indicators. Greece. Age-specific and sex-specific suicide rates in Greece for the period 2003-2012 were calculated using data provided by the Hellenic Statistical Authority. We performed a join-point analysis to identify discontinuities in suicide trends between 2003 and 2010, prior to austerity, and in 2011-2012, during the period of austerity. Regression models were used to assess relationships between unemployment, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and suicide rates for the entire period by age and sex. The mean suicide rate overall rose by 35% between 2010 and 2012, from 3.37 to 4.56/100,000 population. The suicide mortality rate for men increased from 5.75 (2003-2010) to 7.43/100,000 (2011-2012; p60 years. We found that each additional percentage point of unemployment was associated with a 0.19/100,000 population rise in suicides (95% CI 0.11 to 0.26) among working age men. We found a clear increase in suicides among persons of working age, coinciding with austerity measures. These findings corroborate concerns that increased suicide risk in Greece is a health hazard associated with austerity measures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Five-year incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus among cardiovascular disease-free Greek adults: Findings from the ATTICA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Pitsavos, Christos; Skoumas, Yannis; Lentzas, Yannis; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2008-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the 5-year incidence of diabetes in an adult population from Greece. Research design and methods 3042 individuals (>18 years), free of cardiovascular disease, participated in the baseline examination (during 2001–2002). Of this sample, 1012 men and 1035 women were found alive at the time of follow-up, while 32 (2.1%) men and 22 (1.4%) women died during this period. The rest were lost to follow-up. Incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was evaluated in 1806 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline. Results The age-adjusted 5-year incidence of diabetes was 5.5% (men, 5.8%; women, 5.2%). A linear trend was observed between diabetes incidence and age (5.6% increases in incidence per 1-year difference in age, p physical activity (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.35–1.02) and family history of diabetes (OR = 2.65, 95% CI 1.58–4.53), as well as fasting glucose levels (OR per 1 mg/dl = 1.05, 95% CI 1.03–1.07), were the most significant baseline predictors for diabetes, after adjusting for various potential confounders. Additionally, presence of metabolic syndrome at baseline evaluation 2.95-fold the risk of diabetes (95% CI 1.89–4.61), and showed better classification ability than the model that contained the components of the syndrome (ie, correct classification rate: 94.5% vs. 92.3%). Conclusion Our findings show that a 5.5% incidence rate of diabetes within a 5-year period, which suggests that the prevalence of this disorder in Greece is rising. Aging, heredity, and metabolic syndrome were the most significant determinants of diabetes. PMID:18827919

  10. Five-year incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus among cardiovascular disease-free Greek adults: Findings from the ATTICA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demosthenes B Panagiotakos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Demosthenes B Panagiotakos1, Christos Pitsavos2, Yannis Skoumas2, Yannis Lentzas2, Christodoulos Stefanadis21Department of Nutrition Science-Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece; 2First Cardiology Clinic, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, GreeceObjective: We evaluated the 5-year incidence of diabetes in an adult population from Greece.Research design and methods: 3042 individuals (>18 years, free of cardiovascular disease, participated in the baseline examination (during 2001–2002. Of this sample, 1012 men and 1035 women were found alive at the time of follow-up, while 32 (2.1% men and 22 (1.4% women died during this period. The rest were lost to follow-up. Incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was evaluated in 1806 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline.Results: The age-adjusted 5-year incidence of diabetes was 5.5% (men, 5.8%; women, 5.2%. A linear trend was observed between diabetes incidence and age (5.6% increases in incidence per 1-year difference in age, p < 0.001. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that age (OR per 1 yr = 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.06, waist (OR per 1 cm = 1.02, 95% CI 1.01–1.003, physical activity (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.35–1.02 and family history of diabetes (OR = 2.65, 95% CI 1.58–4.53, as well as fasting glucose levels (OR per 1 mg/dl = 1.05, 95% CI 1.03–1.07, were the most significant baseline predictors for diabetes, after adjusting for various potential confounders. Additionally, presence of metabolic syndrome at baseline evaluation 2.95-fold the risk of diabetes (95% CI 1.89–4.61, and showed better classification ability than the model that contained the components of the syndrome (ie, correct classification rate: 94.5% vs. 92.3%.Conclusion: Our findings show that a 5.5% incidence rate of diabetes within a 5-year period, which suggests that the prevalence of this disorder in Greece is rising. Aging, heredity, and metabolic syndrome were the most significant

  11. Leading US nano-scientists’ perceptions about media coverage and the public communication of scientific research findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Youngjae; Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the significant increase in the use of nanotechnology in academic research and commercial products over the past decade, there have been few studies that have explored scientists’ perceptions and attitudes about the technology. In this article, we use survey data from the leading U.S. nano-scientists to explore their perceptions about two issues: the public communication of research findings and media coverage of nanotechnology, which serves as one relatively rapid outlet for public communication. We find that leading U.S. nano-scientists do see an important connection between the public communication of research findings and public attitudes about science. Also, there is a connection between the scientists’ perceptions about media coverage and their views on the timing of public communication; scientists with positive attitudes about the media are more likely to support immediate public communication of research findings, while others believe that communication should take place only after research findings have been published through a peer-review process. We also demonstrate that journalists might have a more challenging time getting scientists to talk with them about nanotechnology news stories because nano-scientists tend to view media coverage of nanotechnology as less credible and less accurate than general science media coverage. We conclude that leading U.S. nano-scientists do feel a sense of responsibility for communicating their research findings to the public, but attitudes about the timing and the pathway of that communication vary across the group.

  12. Greek Universities: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmas, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Aspects of Greek universities discussed include: current supply and demand for higher education, locus of decision-making under the new university organization, public finance, the state of academic and financial independence, and current issues of debate, including graduate study, research, and the recognition of private universities by the…

  13. The impact of a carbon tax on Greek electricity production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassos, S.; Vlachou, A.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of proposed carbon taxes on the electric power industry, using the Greek power system as a case study, is investigated in this paper. It uses the WASP model for electric generation capacity expansion to explore the optimal expansion path under alternative carbon tax scenarios and to estimate their impact on CO 2 and other types of emissions and on electricity production costs. The findings suggest that low carbon taxes would lead to a considerable reduction of the use of conventional lignite fired power plants counterbalanced predominantly by natural gas fired plants. High carbon taxes (100-200 US dollars per ton of carbon) would lead to a drastic reduction of the use of conventional lignite fired power plants which would be mainly replaced by coal or lignite fired technologies with CO 2 removal capabilities, which are not available today but might become available within the time horizon of the present study. Hydropower and renewable sources would be the second least-cost alternatives to lignite under both low and high tax scenarios. The study provides evidence that carbon taxes also result in significant increases in the cost of producing electricity, implying adverse economic effects on electricity consumers and the Greek economy in general. (author). 35 refs, 1 fig., 7 tabs

  14. Finding European bioethical literature: an evaluation of the leading abstracting and indexing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangerau, H

    2004-06-01

    In this study the author aimed to provide information for researchers to help them with the selection of suitable databases for finding medical ethics literature. The quantity of medical ethical literature that is indexed in different existing electronic bibliographies was ascertained. Using the international journal index Ulrich's Periodicals Directory, journals on medical ethics were identified. The electronic bibliographies indexing these journals were analysed. In an additional analysis documentalists indexing bioethical literature were asked to name European journals on medical ethics. The bibliographies indexing these journals were examined. Of 290 journals on medical ethics 173 were indexed in at least one bibliography. Current Contents showed the highest coverage with 66 (22.8%) journals indexed followed by MEDLINE (22.1%). By a combined search in the top ten bibliographies with the highest coverage, a maximum coverage of 45.2% of all journals could be reached. All the bibliographies showed a tendency to index more North American than European literature. This result was verified by the supplementary analysis of a sample of continental European journals. Here EMBASE covered the highest number of journals (20.6%) followed by the Russian Academy of Sciences Bibliographies (19.2%). A medical ethics literature search has to be carried out in several databases in order to reach an adequate collection of literature. The databases one wishes to combine should be carefully chosen. There seems to be a regional bias in the most popular databases, favouring North American periodicals compared with European literature on medical ethics.

  15. Effects of blood lead levels on airflow limitations in Korean adults: Findings from the 5th KNHNES 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hye Kyung [Severance Institute for Vascular and Metabolic Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Soo, E-mail: yschang@yuhs.ac [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chul Woo [Severance Institute for Vascular and Metabolic Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    This study aimed to examine whether blood levels of heavy metals, such as lead, mercury and cadmium, are related with pulmonary function in Korean adults. This investigation included 870 Korean adults (≥40 years) who received pulmonary function testing in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) V-2, 2011. Data of blood levels of heavy metals, pulmonary function tests and anthropometric measurements were acquired. Blood lead levels showed inverse correlations with the FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio before (r=−0.276, p<0.001) and after adjustment of multiple compounding factors (r=−0.115, p=0.001). A logistic multiple regression analysis revealed that blood lead levels were a significant influencing factor for the FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio (β=−0.017, p=0.001, adjusted R{sup 2}=0.267). The odds ratios (ORs) for the FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio were significantly lower in the highest tertile group of the blood lead levels than in the lowest tertile group in Model 1 (OR=0.007, 95% CI=0.000−0.329) and Model 2 (OR=0.006, 95% CI=0.000−0.286). These findings imply that environmental exposure to lead might be an important factor that may cause airflow limitations in Korean adults. - Highlights: • Blood lead levels showed inverse correlations with the FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio. • Blood lead level was a significant influencing factor for the FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio. • ORs for FEV{sub 1}/FVC were lower in the highest blood lead group than in the lowest group. • Environmental exposure to lead might be an important factor for airflow limitations.

  16. Greek Cosmology and Cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexander

    The structure, composition, and long-term history of the cosmos were prominent topics in many ancient Greek philosophical systems. Philosophers and philosophically informed astronomers differed over whether the cosmos was finite or infinite, eternal or transient, and composed of discrete particles or continuous, homogeneous elements. The Aristotelian cosmology preferred by astronomers following Ptolemy assumed a finite, spherical shell of eternally unalterable matter enclosing a terrestrial globe composed of earth, water, air, and fire.

  17. Greek and roman calendars

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The smooth functioning of an ordered society depends on the possession of a means of regularising its activities over time. That means is a calendar, and its regularity is a function of how well it models the more or less regular movements of the celestial bodies - of the moon, the sun or the stars. Greek and Roman Calendars examines the ancient calendar as just such a time-piece, whose elements are readily described in astronomical and mathematical terms. The story of these calendars is one of a continuous struggle to maintain a correspondence with the regularity of the seasons and the sun, d

  18. Developmental surface and phonological dyslexia in both Greek and English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Andreas; Hanley, J Richard

    2017-11-01

    The hallmark of developmental surface dyslexia in English and French is inaccurate reading of words with atypical spelling-sound correspondences. According to Douklias, Masterson and Hanley (2009), surface dyslexia can also be observed in Greek (a transparent orthography for reading that does not contain words of this kind). Their findings suggested that surface dyslexia in Greek can be characterized by slow reading of familiar words, and by inaccurate spelling of words with atypical sound-spelling correspondences (Greek is less transparent for spelling than for reading). In this study, we report seven adult cases whose slow reading and impaired spelling accuracy satisfied these criteria for Greek surface dyslexia. When asked to read words with atypical grapheme-phoneme correspondences in English (their second language), their accuracy was severely impaired. A co-occurrence was also observed between impaired spelling of words with atypical phoneme-grapheme correspondences in English and Greek. These co-occurrences provide strong evidence that surface dyslexia genuinely exists in Greek and that slow reading of real words in Greek reflects the same underlying impairment as that which produces inaccurate reading of atypical words in English. Two further individuals were observed with impaired reading and spelling of nonwords in both languages, consistent with developmental phonological dyslexia. Neither of the phonological dyslexics read words slowly. In terms of computational models of reading aloud, these findings suggest that slow reading by dyslexics in transparent orthographies is the consequence of a developmental impairment of the lexical (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Zeigler, 2001; Perry, Ziegler, & Zorzi, 2010) or semantic reading route (Plaut, McClelland, Seidenberg, & Patterson, 1996). This outcome provides evidence that the neurophysiological substrate(s) that support the lexical/semantic and the phonological pathways that are involved in reading

  19. Native syntax and translation effects: Adnominal arguments in the Greek and Latin New Testament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Gianollo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the syntax of adnominal arguments in the Greek original and in the Latin Vulgate translation of the Gospels shows that word order in this domain is strikingly parallel in the two languages. The fact that faithfulness in translating evidently extends to syntax, leveling Latin to the Greek model, must not lead to the conclusion that the language of the Latin translation is artificially shaped in conformity to the Greek; rather, it shows that Latin, at this diachronic stage, shared with New Testament Greek some significant parametric settings pertaining to nominal syntax.

  20. Early Greek Typography in Milan: A Historical Note on a New Greek Typeface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the history of Greek typography, focusing on the first book to be entirely printed in Greek in 1476 and the series of new typefaces that resulted. Cites Milan as a center of Greek printing in the early history of Greek typography. Describes a revival of one of these typefaces created under the name of Milan Greek. (PA)

  1. Greek or Indigenous? From Potsherd to Identity in Early Colonial Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Søren; Jacobsen, Jan K

    2011-01-01

    Indigenous pottery plays a vital role in interpretations of the relationship between the indigenous population and the Greek settlers in south Italy. Indigenous pottery habitually turns up in otherwise Greek habitation, ritual and mortuary contexts. Whereas imported Greek or ‘colonial’ pottery from...... indigenous contexts has been dealt with in considerable detail, the finds of indigenous pottery in Greek colonial contexts have not been thoroughly investigated in the western Mediterranean. Much more scholarly attention focused on the Black Sea region has, however, concentrated on the presence of indigenous...... Scythian and Taurian pottery in the Greek apoikiai, especially in the north-western Black Sea region. Similarities in the archaeological record of the two areas are numerous. In this paper we compare the occurrence of indigenous pottery in Greek contexts in the two regions and discuss some of the different...

  2. Nasalance norms in Greek adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal sentences and four sets of oral sentences and (3) repetitions of each of 12 syllable types (8 oral and 4 nasal). The last two sets of material corpus were based on an adaptation of the Simplified Nasometric Assessment Procedures Test (SNAP test) test ( MacKay and Kummer, 1994 ) in Greek, called the G-SNAP test. Eighty monolingual healthy young adult speakers of Greek, 40 males (mean age = 21 years) and 40 females (mean age = 20.5 years), with normal hearing and speech characteristics and unremarkable history were included in the study. The Nasometer (model 6200-3) was used to derive nasalance scores. Mean normative nasalance for spoken Greek was 25.50%, based on the G-oronasal text (with 8.6% nasals). Nasalance scores did not differ significantly with respect to gender. Finally, spoken Greek consistently yielded lower nasalance scores than other languages examined in past work. The aforementioned normative data on nasalance of young adult speakers of Greek are valid across gender and have direct clinical utility as they provide valuable reference information for the diagnosis and management of Greek adults with resonance disorders caused by velar dysfunction.

  3. Findings From 12-lead Electrocardiography That Predict Circulatory Shock From Pulmonary Embolism: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shopp, Jacob D; Stewart, Lauren K; Emmett, Thomas W; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Treatment guidelines for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) recommend risk stratifying patients to assess PE severity, as those at higher risk should be considered for therapy in addition to standard anticoagulation to prevent right ventricular (RV) failure, which can cause hemodynamic collapse. The hypothesis was that 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) can aid in this determination. The objective of this study was to measure the prognostic value of specific ECG findings (the Daniel score, which includes heart rate > 100 beats/min, presence of the S1Q3T3 pattern, incomplete and complete right bundle branch block [RBBB], and T-wave inversion in leads V1-V4, plus ST elevation in lead aVR and atrial fibrillation suggestive of RV strain from acute pulmonary hypertension), in patients with acute PE. Studies were identified by a structured search of MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, Google Scholar, Scopus, and bibliographies in October 2014. Case reports, non-English papers, and those that lacked either patient outcomes or ECG findings were excluded. Papers with evidence of a predefined reference standard for PE and the results of 12-lead ECG, stratified by outcome (hemodynamic collapse, defined as circulatory shock requiring vasopressors or mechanical ventilation, or in hospital or death within 30 days) were included. Papers were assessed for selection and publication bias. The authors also assessed heterogeneity (I(2) ) and calculated the odds ratios (OR) for each ECG sign from the random effects model if I(2) > 24% and fixed effects if I(2) 100 beats/min, S1Q3T3, complete RBBB, inverted T waves in V1-V4, ST elevation in aVR, and atrial fibrillation) had likelihood and ORs with lower-limit 95% confidence intervals above unity, suggesting them to be significant predictors of hemodynamic collapse and 30-day mortality. OR data showed no evidence of publication bias, but the proportions of patients with hemodynamic collapse or death and S1Q3T3 and RBBB tended to be

  4. Voice onset time is necessary but not always sufficient to describe acquisition of voiced stops: The cases of Greek and Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eun Jong; Beckman, Mary E.; Edwards, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The age at which children master adult-like voiced stops can generally be predicted by voice onset time (VOT): stops with optional short lag are early, those with obligatory lead are late. However, Japanese voiced stops are late despite having a short lag variant, whereas Greek voiced stops are early despite having consistent voicing lead. This cross-sectional study examines the acoustics of word-initial stops produced by English-, Japanese-, and Greek-speaking children aged 2 to 5, to investigate how these seemingly exceptional mastery patterns relate to use of other phonetic correlates. Productions were analyzed for VOT, f0 and spectral tilt (H1-H2) in Japanese and English, and for amplitude trajectory in Greek and Japanese. Japanese voiceless stops have intermediate lag VOT values, so other “secondary” cues are needed to differentiate them from the voiced short lag VOT variant. Greek voiced stops are optionally prenasalized, and the amplitude trajectory for the voice bar during closure suggests that younger children use a greater degree of nasal venting to create the aerodynamic conditions necessary for voicing lead. Taken together, the findings suggest that VOT must be supplemented by measurements of other language-specific acoustic properties to explain the mastery pattern of voiced stops in some languages. PMID:23105160

  5. How geostatistics can help you find lead and galvanized water service lines: The case of Flint, MI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    In the aftermath of Flint drinking water crisis, most US cities have been scrambling to locate all lead service lines (LSLs) in their water supply systems. This information, which is most often inaccurate or lacking, is critical to assess compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule and to plan the replacement of lead and galvanized service lines (GSLs) as currently under way in Flint. This paper presents the first geospatial approach to predict the likelihood that a home has a LSL or GSL based on neighboring field data (i.e., house inspection) and secondary information (i.e., construction year and city records). The methodology is applied to the City of Flint where 3254 homes have been inspected by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality to identify service line material. GSLs and LSLs were mostly observed in houses built prior to 1934 and during World War II, respectively. City records led to the over-identification of LSLs, likely because old records were not updated as these lines were being replaced. Indicator semivariograms indicated that both types of service line are spatially clustered with a range of 1.4km for LSLs and 2.8km for GSLs. This spatial autocorrelation was integrated with secondary data using residual indicator kriging to predict the probability of finding each type of material at the tax parcel level. Cross-validation analysis using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves demonstrated the greater accuracy of the kriging model relative to the current approach targeting houses built in the forties; in particular as more field data become available. Anticipated rates of false positives and percentages of detection were computed for different sampling strategies. This approach is flexible enough to accommodate additional sources of information, such as local code and regulatory changes, historical permit records, maintenance and operation records, or customer self-reporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Greek rheumatoid arthritis patients have elevated levels of antibodies against antigens from Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, Georgios; Christopoulou, V; Routsias, J G; Babionitakis, A; Antoniadis, C; Vaiopoulos, G

    2017-03-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from different ethnic groups present elevated levels of antibodies against Proteus mirabilis. This finding implicates P. mirabilis in the development of RA. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of P. mirabilis in the etiopathogenesis of RA in Greek RA patients. In this study, 63 patients with RA and 38 healthy controls were included. Class-specific antibodies IgM, IgG, and IgA against three human cross-reactive and non-cross-reactive synthetic peptides from P. mirabilis-hemolysin (HpmB), urease C (UreC), and urease F (UreF)-were performed in all subjects, using the ELISA method. RA patients had elevated levels of IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies against HpmB and UreC Proteus peptide which are significantly different compared to healthy controls: p = 0.005, p Greek RA patients present elevated levels of antibodies against P. mirabilis antigenic epitopes, such as in North European populations, albeit Greek RA patients presenting the cross-reaction antigen in a low percentage. These results indicate that P. mirabilis through the molecular mimicry mechanism leads to inflammation and damage of the joints in RA.

  7. Translation and validation of the Greek version of the hypertension knowledge-level scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziefstratiou, Anastasia A; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Fotos, Nikolaos V; Baltopoulos, George; Brokalaki-Pananoudaki, Hero

    2015-12-01

    To translate and validate a Greek version of the Hypertension Knowledge-Level Scale. The major barrier in the management of hypertension is the lack of adherence to medications and lifestyle adjustments. Patients' knowledge of the nature of hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors is a significant factor affecting individuals' adherence. However, few instruments have been developed to assess patients' knowledge level and no one has been translated into Greek. This study used a case control study design. Data collection for this research occurred between February 7, 2013 and March 10, 2013. The sample included both hypertensives and non-hypertensives. Participants simultaneously completed the version of the Hypertension Knowledge-Level Scale. A total of 68 individuals completed the questionnaire. Coefficient alpha was 0·66 for hypertensives and 0·79 for non-hypertensives. The difference for the mean scores in the entire scale between the two samples was statistically significant. In addition, significant differences were observed in many sub-dimensions and no correlation was found between level, knowledge and age, gender and education level. Findings provide support for the validity of the Greek version of the Hypertension Knowledge-Level Scale. The translation and validation of an instrument evaluating the level of knowledge of hypertension contribute to assessing the provided educational intervention. Low knowledge level should lead to the development of new methods of education, therefore nurses will have the opportunity to amplify their role in patients' education and develop relationships based on honesty and respect. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. THE GREEKS & BLACK AND SCHOLE MODEL" TO EVALUATE OPTIONS PRICING & SENSITIVITY IN INDIAN OPTIONS MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. M. Tulasinadh*, Dr.R. Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    Derivatives’ trading is a core part of the Indian Stock Market in the Current Scenario. Trading volumes in stock options have grown up tremendously during recent years. This also leads to be high volatility in the options prices Options Pricing is crucial factor for hedging and Speculative activities. Pricing plays a vital role for option writers. In this paper we have tried to find out the price of an option in the future and its sensitivity through the Greek & Black and Scholes Option prici...

  9. [Greek nannies in Rome?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasen, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    In Roman society, parents often entrusted their newborn to a wet nurse, usually a slave or a lower-class freeborn woman, who normally lived with them. It was advised to choose with care the right person, as milk is not a neutral bodily substance but transmits many properties, physical and moral. Soranus devotes an entire chapter to the meticulous inspection of the nurse's milk and temper. The nurse's character must be checked as thoroughly as her physical health. The mind of the newborn, compared with wax, is from the start and forever impressed positively or negatively. Mnesitheus and others even advise choosing a woman resembling physically the mother, or a handsome person; Favorinus and others reject violently the recourse to wet nursing as immoral; submitting the child to the pernicious influence of a foreign non-kin person implies the destruction of family ties. Wet nurses had to follow a specific diet and to accept giving up their sexual life, which would corrupt the milk in case of a new pregnancy. Roman upper-class families attributed different qualities to nurses according to their ethnic origin: Egyptians were allegedly fond of children, Thracians robust and devoted, Spartans tough. The best were the Greeks, because they would teach Greek language - and culture - to their nurslings. The nurse's social function was extensive. Her role did not stop at the weaning period. Much evidence shows that she was a lifelong companion. In positive circumstances, she could construct non-kin relationships and became, through connections not of blood but of milk, a member of an extended family. Funerary inscriptions and literary sources show that some nurses were rewarded by freedom. Breast-feeding also created milk-ties between the nurslings, who could gain social elevation thanks to this bonding.

  10. Some Pitfalls of Translation Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Marcos, Natalio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In textual criticism it is important to detect the genesis of mistakes; sometimes the true reading is only reached through the unmasking of the wrong one. Likewise, in order to use critically the Septuagint it is indispensable to find out first its corruptions and mistranslations. The making of a Greek-Hebrew Index of the Antiochene Text in the Historical Books is an excellent occasion to observe the translation process and find out the most common errors made by the translators. A few examples will be commented concerning the following issues: inner-Greek corruptions and misleading translations caused by the graphic confusion of similar letters (paleography or sounds (phonetics, and by a different reading or vocalization of the consonantal text. In several cases this analysis may open a window towards a non-Masoretic Hebrew Vorlage.

    En crítica textual es muy importante descubrir la génesis de los errores; a veces la lectura verdadera sólo se descubre desenmascarando la falsa. De igual manera, para usar críticamente la Septuaginta es imprescindible descubrir primero las corrupciones y los errores de traducción. La confección de un índice griego-hebreo del texto antioqueno en los libros históricos es una ocasión excelente para analizar el proceso de traducción y detectar los errores más comunes cometidos por los traductores. En el artículo se estudian algunos ejemplos con relación a los siguientes fenómenos: corrupciones internas al griego y traducciones equivocadas motivadas por la confusión gráfica de letras (paleografía o sonidos (fonética semejantes y por una vocalización diferente del texto consonántico. En varios casos este análisis permite vislumbrar un texto base hebreo distinto del masorético.

  11. Children's Construction and Experience of Racism and Nationalism in Greek-Cypriot Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings that highlight children's construction and experience of racism and nationalism among a sample of Greek-Cypriot (the majority) and Turkish-speaking (the minority) children in Greek-Cypriot schools through the lens of intersectionality theory. The article first reviews previous work in relation to children, racism and…

  12. The Greek Life Self-Study: A Powerful Process for Change on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Carmen G.; Hanson, Gail Short

    1997-01-01

    Describes the work, findings, and recommendations of a self-study team that examined Greek life at a liberal arts college and the compatibility of its Greek organizations with the mission of the college. A review of changes after five years suggests the efficacy of this type of self-study. (RJM)

  13. Going Greek: The Effects of Racial Composition on White Students' Participation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mitchell J.; DeAngelo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Examines whether different levels of undergraduate racial compositions affect White student participation in social fraternities and sororities. Findings show that White students who attended nearly all-White campuses were significantly more likely to join a Greek social organization. Also notes that the role of Greek systems on the racial…

  14. Gender in modern Greek historiography

    OpenAIRE

    Papadogiannis, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses the emergence and development of the study of gender in modern Greek historiography in the broader sense, exploring works that incorporate, even to an extent, the factor of gender. It shows that despite the manifold barriers that gender historians have faced, there is a slow but steady process of diffusion of gender in modern Greek historiography in general. The article also shows that historical research on gender relations in Greece initially focused on the study of wo...

  15. An exploration of loyalty determinants in Greek wine varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis, Athanasios; Chrysochou, Polymeros

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of the market structure of Greek red and white wine varieties and to measure the loyalty behaviour of frequent wine buyers in Greece. Design/methodology/approach - The study measures brand performance and loyalty of four different Greek...... wine varieties. Based on stated preference data, basic brand performance measures are estimated through Juster purchase probabilities of brand choice. To measure loyalty behaviour, the polarisation index w (phi) is used as a measure to model both loyalty to the brand name and specific wine attributes...... and their levels. Findings - The findings of the present study point to the conclusion that each one of the four Greek wine varieties under examination exhibits its own market structure and loyalty profile, whereas price, quality certification and winemaker's size seem to function as loyalty stimulators more...

  16. Conception, complicated pregnancy, and labour of gods and heroes in Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavazzo, Christos; Trompoukis, Constantinos; Sardi, Thalia; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy and labour are holy moments in a woman's life. Even in Greek mythology we can find descriptions of them. We searched in the Greek myths to find descriptions of labours of ancient heroes and gods. We identified descriptions of extracorporeal fertilization, superfecundation, ectopic pregnancy, preterm labour, prolonged pregnancy and Caesarean section. The use of imagination could help the reader to find similarities in present or future developments in the field of obstetrics. It could be concluded that various aspects of modern obstetrical practice are described in Greek mythology.

  17. [Gods, women and pharmacy in Greek Mythology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vons, J

    2001-01-01

    The study of Greek Mythology fully justifies Herophilus's phrase: "Medicines are the hands of Gods" (third cent. B.C.). A number of Gods are said to be the inventors of the drugs which are useful to men. Their names are still alive in the scholarly or popular appellations of a great many medicinal herbs. However, insofar as the action of a drug (of a Pharmakon) remains mysterious, one finds it in essentially female practices as well as in medicine. The study of these ancient beliefs, which have survived in spite of the progress of twentieth century science, can develop the history of epistemology of pharmacy by stimulating interdisciplinary research.

  18. Effects of Two Linguistically Proximal Varieties on the Spectral and Coarticulatory Properties of Fricatives: Evidence from Athenian Greek and Cypriot Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Charalambos

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have explored the acoustic structure of fricatives, yet there has been very little acoustic research on the effects of dialects on the production of fricatives. This article investigates the effects of two linguistically proximal Modern Greek dialects, Athenian Greek and Cypriot Greek on the temporal, spectral, and coarticulatory properties of fricatives and aims to determine the acoustic properties that convey information about these two dialects. Productions of voiced and voiceless labiodental, dental, alveolar, palatal, and velar fricatives were extracted from a speaking task from typically speaking female adult speakers (25 Cypriot Greek and 20 Athenian Greek speakers). Measures were made of spectral properties, using a spectral moments analysis. The formants of the following vowel were measured and second degree polynomials of the formant contours were calculated. The findings showed that Athenian Greek and Cypriot Greek fricatives differ in all spectral properties across all places of articulation. Also, the co-articulatory effects of fricatives on following vowel were different depending on the dialect. Duration, spectral moments, and the starting frequencies of F 1, F 2, F 3, and F 4 contributed the most to the classification of dialect. These findings provide a solid evidence base for the manifestation of dialectal information in the acoustic structure of fricatives.

  19. Effects of Two Linguistically Proximal Varieties on the Spectral and Coarticulatory Properties of Fricatives: Evidence from Athenian Greek and Cypriot Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Themistocleous

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have explored the acoustic structure of fricatives, yet there has been very little acoustic research on the effects of dialects on the production of fricatives. This article investigates the effects of two linguistically proximal Modern Greek dialects, Athenian Greek and Cypriot Greek on the temporal, spectral, and coarticulatory properties of fricatives and aims to determine the acoustic properties that convey information about these two dialects. Productions of voiced and voiceless labiodental, dental, alveolar, palatal, and velar fricatives were extracted from a speaking task from typically speaking female adult speakers (25 Cypriot Greek and 20 Athenian Greek speakers. Measures were made of spectral properties, using a spectral moments analysis. The formants of the following vowel were measured and second degree polynomials of the formant contours were calculated. The findings showed that Athenian Greek and Cypriot Greek fricatives differ in all spectral properties across all places of articulation. Also, the co-articulatory effects of fricatives on following vowel were different depending on the dialect. Duration, spectral moments, and the starting frequencies of F1, F2, F3, and F4 contributed the most to the classification of dialect. These findings provide a solid evidence base for the manifestation of dialectal information in the acoustic structure of fricatives.

  20. Body symmetry and asymmetry in early Greek anatomical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico

    2008-05-01

    This historical note focuses on some of the earliest reports of human anatomy found in Greek medical literature. These passages testify the initial steps taken by Greek scientists in building a theoretical model of the human body. In these excerpts, one finds erroneous anatomical descriptions, which shed light on the epistemological approach used by these intellectual pioneers. Because of the lack of systematic dissection, it appears that early Greek anatomists developed a somewhat stylized idea of the human body that used a certain degree of symmetry. Overcoming the concept of a strict left-right bilateral parallelism in human body architecture was a challenging intellectual task that required prolonged observation of dissected corpses. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Problems of ancient and modern greek accent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Kavčič

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article are the accen­ tual features of ancient and modern Greek. The first part discusses the prob­ lems of the position of the Greek accent at the earliest stages of development and the accentual rules of Ionic-Attic, Lesbic and Doric dialect. The second and the third part present the questions of the phonetics of the ancient Greek accent and the process in which the modern Greek accent appeared.

  2. Problems of ancient and modern greek accent

    OpenAIRE

    Jerneja Kavčič

    2000-01-01

    The subject of the article are the accen­ tual features of ancient and modern Greek. The first part discusses the prob­ lems of the position of the Greek accent at the earliest stages of development and the accentual rules of Ionic-Attic, Lesbic and Doric dialect. The second and the third part present the questions of the phonetics of the ancient Greek accent and the process in which the modern Greek accent appeared.

  3. The Greek public debt problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Nikiforos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines the issue of the Greek public debt. After providing a historical discussion, we show that the austerity of the last six years has been unsuccessful in stabilizing the debt while, at the same time, it has taken a heavy toll on the economy and society. The recent experience shows that the public debt is unsustainable and therefore a restructuring is needed. An insistence on the current policies is not justifiable either on pragmatic or on moral or any other grounds. The experience of Germany in the early post-WWII period provides some useful hints for the way forward. A solution to the public debt problem is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the solution of the Greek and European crisis. A wider agenda that deals with the malaises of the Greek economy and the structural imbalances of the Eurozone is of vital importance.

  4. Greek Electoral System: Optimal Distribution of the Seats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitouras, Ch.

    2007-09-01

    The Greek parliamentary elections of 2008 and 2012 will take place according to the electoral low which had been voted by the previous house back in 2004. The parties receive a nation-wide number of seats that have to be distributed in the prefectures. It is a transportation problem where the legislator neglected its complete solution after finding a first random feasible solution.

  5. The Imperfect Unbound : A Cognitive Linguistic Approach to Greek Aspect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allan, R.J.; Bentein, Klaas; Janse, Mark; Soltic, Jorie

    2017-01-01

    In Ancient Greek narrative, the imperfect typically presents the state of affairs as ongoing in order to serve as a temporal framework for the occurrence of one or more other states of affairs. However, in narrative we also find a considerable number of imperfects (especially with verbs of motion

  6. Playing with Porn: Greek Children's Explorations in Pornography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaliki, Liza

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on the research findings of the Greek Kids Go Online project and the EU Kids Online I network research on children and online technologies in Europe, funded by the European Commission Safer Internet Programme, 2006-2009. It explores the experiences of young people aged between 9 and 17 with pornographic texts online, and…

  7. Textbooks in Greek and Latin: 1975 List

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Thomas G.

    1975-01-01

    List of textbooks in Greek and Latin for 1975. Subject, title, publisher and price are noted. Greek and Latin works are listed separately under the eight categories of texts, beginner's books, grammars, books about the language, readers and anthologies, composition, dictionaries, and New Testament Greek and Later Latin. (RM)

  8. The Implementation of the Greek Union Catalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsirikou, Anthi

    This paper is based on the results of the study of the Work Group of Bibliographic Standards for the Greek union catalog, the first stage of Greek academic library union catalog development. The first section lists the objectives of the union catalog. The state of the art of Greek academic libraries is discussed in the second section. The lack of…

  9. Ileocaecal Intussusception with a Lead Point: Unusual MDCT Findings of Active Crohn’s Disease Involving the Appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult intussusception is a rare entity accounting for 1% of all bowel obstructions. Unlike intussusceptions in children, which are idiopathic in 90% of cases, adult intussusceptions have an identifiable cause (lead point in the majority of cases. Crohn’s disease (CD may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, including the appendix. It was shown to be a predisposing factor for intussusception. Here, we report a rare case of adult intussusception with a lead point, emphasizing diagnostic input of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT in a patient with active CD that involves the appendix.

  10. The State of Marketing in Leading MNC’s and their Local Competitors in Pakistan : Findings of a Baseline Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan Amir; Farrah Arif

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research is to assess the state of marketing practices in leading multi-national companies operating in the country and their local competitors. This paper presents the findings of the first phase of the study. These findings are based on personal interviews with forty-three MNCs. The findings reveal that companies varied significantly with regard to marketing practices and processes --- both in terms of engaging in different practices and processes but also in terms of ...

  11. Photometric observations of the brightest Jupiter Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Joseph P.; Henry, Todd J.; Pewett, Tiffany D.; French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.

    2013-02-01

    We propose to finish BVRI photometric observations of the 113 brightest Jupiter Trojans from both the L4 (Greek) and the L5 (Trojan) Lagrange points using the CTIO 0.9m, in conjunction with data gathered at Lowell Observatory. With these data we will investigate any color trends and/or differences between the largest members of the two camps as well as reveal any unusual outliers worthy of extensive followup. A comprehensive database of uniform photometry does not exist for this effectively complete sample, so robust comparisons are virtually impossible at this time. These data will also enable comparisons between the Greek and Trojan swarms and other Solar System populations to discover the possible origins of the two camps, which remain surprisingly obscure. In non-photometric conditions, we will measure light curves that yield information about albedo and color changes, shapes, and rotation periods. These data will also lead to important phase curves that can be used to determine surface features and composition. Here we propose for the last southern run for this ongoing photometry program. emphThe proposed observations will comprise a significant portion of the PI's PhD thesis.

  12. Working Students at Greek Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Dimitrios M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Greece has the highest youth unemployment rate in the European Union. Even though it is clear that persistent unemployment requires bold measures in engaging young educated Greeks in the labour market, there is no coherent policy targeting that population group, especially university students. This research paper aims to explore the idea…

  13. Greek Hepatoscopy and its Criteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 1 (2016), s. 139-164 ISSN 0033-4987 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : divination * liver * signs * divinatory treatises * Greek religion Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://www.libraweb.net/articoli.php?chiave=201606401&rivista=64

  14. Homosexuality according to ancient Greek physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, K; Moschos, M M; Koukaki, E; Kontaxaki, M-I; Androutsos, G

    2017-01-01

    Homosexuality and pedophilia in ancient Greece greatly concerned many researchers who were mainly interested in highlighting the social aspect of this phenomenon in ancient Greek society. An important source on the subject was the paintings of a man and his lover in attic black and red figured pottery, up to the end of the 5th century BC. Another main source was the information that derived from the texts of ancient Greek literature, especially poetry. Homosexuality was not only referring to relationships between males, but it was also manifested in lesbian love. It is believed that in the Homeric world homosexuality was not favored. In Greek society of the archaic period, the restriction of women at home, the satisfaction of sexual needs with courtesans, the marriage for the purpose of maintaining and managing the property, put women aside, marginalizing them in terms of social life, impeding the cultivation of emotional relationships between sexes. At the same time, in the society of those times, the aristocratic ideal, the constant communication of men during military training and the war, the male nudity in sports and the promotion of beauty and bravery in athletic contests, as well as the gatherings and the entertainment of men at the symposia, created a suitable substrate in which male homosexuality could develop. In this context, pedophile relationships were developed mainly during the archaic period, as recorded on vase paintings, where a mature man developed a special relationship with a teenager of the same social class. The mature man had the role of mentor for the juvenile, he would look after him and cover his living expenses and education cost. In this relationship, exhibiting predominantly the social dimension of an initiation process and introduction to adult life, the erotic homosexual intercourse could find a place to flourish. The above-mentioned relationship could not last forever, given that this would later transform into an emotional

  15. Cases of Trephination in Ancient Greek Skulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Ζafiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trephination, or trepanning, is considered to be one of the most ancient surgical operations with an especially extensive geographical incidence, both in the New World and in the Old. In Europe, more than 200 finds of trephination have been found, from Scandinavia to the Balkans. The technique of trephination or trepanning covers overall the last 10,000 years and exhibits great versatility and adjustability in the knowledge, technical means, therapeutic needs, prejudices and social standards of each period and of each population group. Hippocrates was the one to classify for the first time the kinds of cranial fractures and define the conditions and circumstances for carrying out a trepanning.Aim: The present research aims to investigate the Greek cranial trephinations on sculls from the collection of the Anthropological Museum of the Medical School of Athens that come from archaeological excavations.Method: Skulls were examined by macroscopic observation with reflective light. Furthermore, radiographic representation of the skulls was used.Results: The anthropological researches and the studies of anthropological skeleton remains that came out during archaeological excavations from different eras and areas have given information about the medical practices in the very important geographic area of Greece and in particular, we referred to cases of Greek trephinations.

  16. Health Narratives in the Greek Translated Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Themis Panagiotis Kaniklidou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks see how meaning is constructed in translated news texts about health and science and awards a narrative potential to unforced translation shifts, moving along the theoretical lines of Baker's Narrative Theory (2006. The thematic thread of health zooms in on “emotional frames” (Nabi, 2003 of risk and fear of human health that is narrated as being 'under attack’ by potentially dangerous diseases. Themes also orbit around schemas that promote hope and optimism about science represented as coming to the rescue of man from fear of the disease. The data consists of 21 pairs of English-Greek health news articles culled from the Greek newspapers I Kathimerini, To Vima and Ta Nea. Findings point towards translation as a process that employs lexicogrammatical and intrasentential configurations to a give emphasis to the risk or hope dimensions underlying a heath or science story, b enable the reflection or emergence of a cascade of public, conceptual and master narratives.

  17. Synthesis of Findings from 15?years of Educational Reform in Thailand: Lessons on Leading Educational Change in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinger, Philip; Bryant, Darren A.

    2013-01-01

    The past two decades have been a period of active education reform throughout much of the world, and East Asia is no exception. This paper synthesizes findings from a series of empirical studies of educational reform in Thailand where an ambitious educational reform law was adopted in 1999. The purpose is to identify lessons learned about…

  18. More options lead to more searching and worse choices in finding partners for romantic relationships online: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pai-Lu; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2009-06-01

    It is not surprising that the Internet has become a means by which people expand their social networks and form close relationships. Almost every online-dating Web site provides members with search tools. However, do users truly benefit from more complete searches of a large pool of possibilities? The present study, based on the cognitive perspective, examined whether more search options triggered excessive searching, leading to worse choices and poorer selectivity. We argue that more search options lead to less selective processing by reducing users' cognitive resources, distracting them with irrelevant information, and reducing their ability to screen out inferior options. A total of 128 Taiwanese late adolescents and adults with experience in online romantic relationships participated in an experimental study. After entering the characteristics they found desirable in a partner in such a relationship, participants were randomly assigned to receive one of three levels of available profiles. The dependent measures consisted of the number of profiles searched, the average preference difference for all profiles viewed, the preference difference for the chosen profile, and the degree of selectivity. These measures were used to determine whether more attention was devoted to better alternatives and less attention to worse alternatives. The data supported the predictions. Implications and directions for further research are discussed.

  19. Negation and Nonveridicality in the History of Greek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulou, Aikaterini

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a thorough investigation of the expression primarily of sentential negation in the history of Greek, through quantitative data from representative texts from three major stages of vernacular Greek (Attic Greek, Koine, Late Medieval Greek), and qualitative data from Homeric Greek until Standard Modern. The contrast between two…

  20. Are 12-lead ECG findings associated with the risk of cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke in young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirinen, Jani; Putaala, Jukka; Aarnio, Karoliina; Aro, Aapo L; Sinisalo, Juha; Kaste, Markku; Haapaniemi, Elena; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Lehto, Mika

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) in a young patient is a disaster and recurrent cardiovascular events could add further impairment. Identifying patients with high risk of such events is therefore important. The prognostic relevance of ECG for this population is unknown. A total of 690 IS patients aged 15-49 years were included. A 12-lead ECG was obtained 1-14 d after the onset of stroke. We adjusted for demographic factors, comorbidities, and stroke characteristics, Cox regression models were used to identify independent ECG parameters associated with long-term risks of (1) any cardiovascular event, (2) cardiac events, and (3) recurrent stroke. Median follow-up time was 8.8 years. About 26.4% of patients experienced a cardiovascular event, 14.5% had cardiac events, and 14.6% recurrent strokes. ECG parameters associated with recurrent cardiovascular events were bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, left ventricular hypertrophy, and a broader QRS complex. Furthermore, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms were associated with increased risks of cardiac events. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke. A 12-lead ECG can be used for risk prediction of cardiovascular events but not for recurrent stroke in young IS patients. KEY MESSAGES ECG is an easy, inexpensive, and useful tool for identifying young ischemic stroke patients with a high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events and it has a statistically significant association with these events even after adjusting for confounding factors. Bundle branch blocks, P-terminal force, broader QRS complex, LVH according to Cornell voltage duration criteria, more leftward P-wave axis, prolonged QTc, and P-wave duration >120 ms are predictors for future cardiovascular or cardiac events in these patients. No ECG parameters were independently associated with recurrent stroke.

  1. Investigating Portfolio Assessment with Learners of the 3rd Grade in a Greek State Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Kouzouli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Assessment is a field increasingly explored in relation to the parameters it involves. The special characteristics of the learners and the interactive relationship between instruction and assessment lead to the use not only of traditional assessment techniques but also of alternative methods such as the portfolio. This study intends to investigate the implementation of a process portfolio in a Greek state primary school with a class of third graders aged between 8-9, concentrating on integration of skills. The findings show that this technique is appropriate for young learners and that it meets specific pedagogical and assessment criteria. It also exerts positive impact on metacognitive awareness, learner autonomy and positive attitude towards learning. Finally, the findings give insight to emerging problems and issues requiring further research.

  2. On Some Control Structures in Hellenistic Greek: A Comparison with Classical and Modern Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Control Structures in Ancient Greek typically involved infinitival complementation while in Modern Greek, finite complementation is the rule. Hellenistic Greek provides an interesting "way-station" between these two types of complementation, inasmuch as it is both chronologically and structurally transitional. In this contribution to the historical syntax of Greek, an analysis is offered of control structures in Hellenistic Greek, tracing the transition from the Ancient Greek type to the Modern Greek type. Based on the evidence of these three stages of Greek and the developments that the language shows with regard to innovations in the form and properties of control structures, an argument is put forth in support of the view that control is not a purely syntactic phenomenon but rather derives from the lexical semantics of the predicates involved.

  3. The Salpinx in Greek Cult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullög Nordquist

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The salpinx is not often treated by scholars of ancient Greek music, because it was mainly a military instrument. The instrument was usually not used for musical purposes, only for giving signals. In Greece the salpinx is known from the 8th century onwards. The Greek salpinx was an aerophone, usually made of bronze, and consisted of an 80 to 120 cm long, straight, tube with cylindrical bore, and with a conical or more often bell-shaped final, kodon, which could be made of bone. The bone had to be fired in order to get the right acoustic qualities, according to Aristotle. Salpinx is usually translated as "trumpet", but the type of sound generator it may have had has been discussed.

  4. Aspect in Greek Future Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Medieval Greek had three future periphrases making use of a finite verb and an infinitive: μέλλω + INF, ἔχω + INF, θέλω + INF. Given the parallel nature of the periphrases as well as the fact that the infinitive existed in both a perfective and an imperfective version, it might be expected...... of the Modern Greek verbal system: μέλλω + INF has a much higher ratio of imperfective infinitives than the two other periphrases especially in AD I, ἔχω + INF starts out using only the perfective infinitive when referring to the future, and θέλω + INF distinguishes for aspect before it gains future meaning...

  5. An exploration of loyalty determinants in Greek wine varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis, Athanasios; Chrysochou, Polymeros

    /methodology: The study concerned measuring brand performance and loyalty of 4 The study concerned measuring brand performance and loyalty of 4 different Greek wine varieties. Based on stated preference data, basic brand performance measures are estimated through Juster purchase probabilities of brand choice. To measure...... loyalty behaviour, the polarisation index (phi) is used as a measure to model loyalty both at the brand name and specific wine attributes and attribute-levels. Findings: The findings of the present study point to the conclusion that each one of the four The findings of the present study point......Purpose: This paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of the market structure of red This paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of the market structure of red and white wines from Greek wine varieties and measure loyalty behaviour of frequent wine buyers in Greece. Design...

  6. The Greek Ethnography. A critical overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Tsantiropoulos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of Greek ethnography. It argues that ethnography in Greece cannot be seen as separate from its preceding fields of history and folklore studies, alongside Greece itself being viewed as a research field by foreign anthropologists. Because of the late introduction of anthropology in Greece it followed very quickly the main theoretical stream of postmodernism in its view of Greek society. The main argument of this article is that the introduction of postmodernism in Greek Anthropology prevented a dialogue with the pre-existing field research work that had been conducted in Greece by non Greek Ethnographers and Greek Folklorists or Historians. This fact has specific consequences at the epistemological, theoretical and methodological level of contemporary Greek Ethnography.

  7. The accounting and tax legislation of the Greek football clubs

    OpenAIRE

    PANAGIOTIS E. DIMITROPOULOS

    2006-01-01

    The year 1979 was a cornerstone for the football in Greece, since it practically meant the transformation of the sport’s organization from amateurism to professionalism, establishing new rules and conditions to the management of football clubs. The increased popularity of this sport and the evolutions that took place in Europe and worldwide, forced the Greek government to establish a legislative framework for the successful management of football clubs. These interventions lead to changes in ...

  8. Showroom10: Greek designers showroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeneiadou, E.

    2017-10-01

    Showroom10 is the first exclusive Greek designer’s showroom. It represents established and upcoming Greek designers in Greece and Cyprus. The mission and main task is to successfully place the designer’s collections in the Greek, European and worldwide market. The purpose of the showroom is to put a collection in front of the appropriate buyer accelerate its revenue growth and create brand awareness. The search for new collections is one of the most important tasks and challenge of a showroom’s business. Market research, travels and fashion trade shows are some ways to stand before an interested brand. Each collection must first be selected in terms of authenticity, clear brand DNA as we call it in fashion. Secondly, must be competitive in terms of materials, designs and prices. But, are all the above enough for the global fashion market? This paper describes a case study (Showroom 10), showing a general overview about the most important phases of “designer’s road” in Greece.

  9. Hematological findings in neotropical fish Hoplias malabaricus exposed to subchronic and dietary doses of methylmercury, inorganic lead, and tributyltin chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, C.A.; Filipak Neto, F.; Mela, M.; Silva, P.H.; Randi, M.A.F.; Rabitto, I.S.; Alves Costa, J.R.M.; Pelletier, E.

    2006-01-01

    Hematological indices are gaining general acceptance as valuable tools in monitoring various aspects the health of fish exposed to contaminants. In this work some effects of methyl mercury (MeHg), inorganic lead (Pb 2+ ), and tributyltin (TBT) in a tropical fish species were evaluated by hematological methods after a trophic exposition at a subchronic level. Forty-two mature individuals of the freshwater top predator fish Hoplias malabaricus were exposed to trophic doses (each 5 days) of MeHg (0.075 μg g -1 ), Pb 2+ (21 μg g -1 ), and TBT (0.3 μg g -1 ) using young fish Astyanax sp. as prey vehicle. After 14 successive doses over 70 days, blood was sampled from exposed and control groups to evaluate hematological effects of metals on erythrocytes, total leukocytes and differential leukocytes counts, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, and red blood cell indices mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Transmission electron microscopy and image analysis of erythrocytes were also used to investigate some morphometric parameters. Results show no significant effects in MCH and MCHC for all tested metals, but differences were found in erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, and white blood cells counts. The number of leukocytes was increased in the presence of MeHg, suggesting effects on the immune system. Also the MCV increased in individuals exposed to MeHg. No ultrastructural damages were observed in red blood cells but the image analysis using light microscopy revealed differences in area, elongation, and roundness of erythrocytes from individuals exposed to Pb 2+ and TBT but not in the group exposed to MeHg. The present work shows that changes in hematological and blood indices could highlight some barely detectable metal effects in fish after laboratory exposure to contaminated food, but their application in field biomonitoring using H. malabaricus will need more detailed

  10. Death in the Modern Greek Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Pentaris, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Each culture recognizes and identifies death, dying and bereavement in unique ways. Commonly, a culture may be seen through the lens of death rituals; how those are shaped, interpreted and used by the society. This paper aims to look at the Modern Greek culture and depict its ‘visualization’ of death, as well as capture the rituals that mostly identify this specific culture. The Greek culture in overall is strongly influenced by the Greek Orthodox Church. Hence, the experiences of death, dyin...

  11. Preliminary Findings that a Targeted Intervention Leads to Altered Brain Function in Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Nash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD exhibit behavioral dysregulation, executive dysfunction, and atypical function in associated brain regions. Previous research shows early intervention mitigates these outcomes but corresponding brain changes were not studied. Given the Alert® Program for Self-Regulation improves behavioral regulation and executive function in children with FASD, we asked if this therapy also improves their neural functioning in associated regions. Twenty-one children with FASD aged 8–12 years were randomized to the Alert®-treatment (TXT; n = 10 or waitlist-control (WL; n = 11 conditions. They were assessed with a Go-NoGo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm before and after training or the wait-out period. Groups initially performed equivalently and showed no fMRI differences. At post-test, TXT outperformed WL on NoGo trials while fMRI in uncorrected results with a small-volume correction showed less activation in prefrontal, temporal, and cingulate regions. Groups also demonstrated different patterns of change over time reflecting reduced signal at post-test in selective prefrontal and parietal regions in TXT and increased in WL. In light of previous evidence indicating TXT at post-test perform similar to non-exposed children on the Go-NoGo fMRI paradigm, our findings suggest Alert® does improve functional integrity in the neural circuitry for behavioral regulation in children with FASD.

  12. Reliability and Validity of the Greek Version of the Job Content Questionnaire in Greek Health Care Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Argyriou, Evangelia; Bourna, Virginia; Bakoyannis, Giorgos

    2015-09-01

    The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), which is based on the Demand-Control-Support model, is designed to measure the psychosocial characteristics of the respondent's work, and has been identified to predict health and psychological outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of this instrument and the subsequent adaptation of its scales to the population of Greek health workers. The Greek version of the JCQ was developed by using forward- and back-translation in accordance with the JCQ policy. The reliability and validity of the measure were investigated in a sample of health workers working in a hospital in Athens, Greece. The internal consistency of the scales was examined based on Cronbach α coefficients, and the validity was evaluated subjecting the items of the three main scales of the JCQ (decision latitude, psychological job demands, and social support) to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The reliability of the scales was found to be acceptable for all the scales, except for the skill discretion subscale. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed a slightly modified version of the original construct including several items to more than one factor. Our findings suggest that the Greek JCQ is reliable and valid for investigating psychosocial job characteristics among Greek health workers.

  13. [The Greek art of medicine in Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon

    2005-06-30

    The term "ancient medicine" is often perceived as tantamount to Greek medicine, as most medical writings from the classical period originate in Greece. These texts later became the basis of Western medical thought. Even though the Romans adopted Greek medicine, it continued to be alien to them; they persisted with their practical approach to medicine alongside the Greeks' more theoretical view. This article deals with how Romans reacted to the invasion of Greek doctors, and how this is portrayed by contemporary Roman authors, especially Pliny and Celsus.

  14. Leading the way: finding genes for neurologic disease in dogs using genome-wide mRNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrander Elaine A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of dogs' unique population structure, human-like disease biology, and advantageous genomic features, the canine system has risen dramatically in popularity as a tool for discovering disease alleles that have been difficult to find by studying human families or populations. To date, disease studies in dogs have primarily employed either linkage analysis, leveraging the typically large family size, or genome-wide association, which requires only modest-sized case and control groups in dogs. Both have been successful but, like most techniques, each requires a specific combination of time and money, and there are inherent problems associated with each. Here we review the first report of mRNA-Seq in the dog, a study that provides insights into the potential value of applying high-throughput sequencing to the study of genetic diseases in dogs. Forman and colleagues apply high-throughput sequencing to a single case of canine neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration. This implementation of whole genome mRNA sequencing, the first reported in dog, is additionally unusual due to the analysis: the data was used not to examine transcript levels or annotate genes, but as a form of target capture that revealed the sequence of transcripts of genes associated with ataxia in humans. This approach entails risks. It would fail if, for example, the relevant transcripts were not sufficiently expressed for genotyping or were not associated with ataxia in humans. But here it pays off handsomely, identifying a single frameshift mutation that segregates with the disease. This work sets the stage for similar studies that take advantage of recent advances in genomics while exploiting the historical background of dog breeds to identify disease-causing mutations.

  15. Sexual Assault Supportive Attitudes: Rape Myth Acceptance and Token Resistance in Greek and Non-Greek College Students From Two University Samples in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canan, Sasha N; Jozkowski, Kristen N; Crawford, Brandon L

    2016-03-03

    Colleges are rape-prone cultures with high rates of sexual victimization. Fraternities' and sororities' relationships with sexual assault are consistent themes in literature focusing on sexual violence among college students. Previous research suggests that fraternity men are more likely to endorse rape-supportive attitudes compared with non-Greek men or sorority women. The present study examines rape-supportive attitudes as well as rape and sexual assault victimization in college students with a focus on gender and Greek-life (i.e., involvement in fraternities or sororities) status variables. College students (N = 1,002) completed a survey including the Token Resistance to Sex Scale (TRSS), Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale-Short Form (IRMA-S), and items related to past experiences of nonconsensual sex. Two regression models tested predictors of token resistance and rape myth acceptance. Chi-square analyses tested between-group differences of experiencing rape and sexual assault. Gender (p Greek status (p Greek status (p Greek men had higher token resistance and rape myth acceptance than any other group. Chi-square analyses indicate women more frequently report experiences of rape (χ 2 = 25.57, df = 1, p Greeks and non-Greeks. Gender and sexual scripting theory can help explain gender differences in attitudes and experiences. Greater endorsement of rape myth acceptance and token resistance by Greeks, who influence college party culture, could be contributing to a culture conducive to rape. Findings demonstrate a continued need for interventions focused on shifting sociocultural dynamics (e.g., traditional roles and sexual scripting) on college campuses. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. The Greek Archer Evolution in the Greek Military Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Javier Vilariño Rodríguez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The trajectory of the bow in the History of Greece is associated with the transformation that was originated inside of the military environment. The poor prominence that for many centuries was granted to the archers in the warlike context, was going to give an unexpected draft with the explosion of the Persian Wars. Later, the playwright Euripides was going to turn Herakles, one of the most famous archer of the hellenic world, into the spokesman of the change that was going to bring with it the acceptance and the definitive incorporation of these soldiers as contingent of considerable value inside the greek armies.

  17. Assessment of the Greek worry-related metacognitions: the Greek version of the Metacognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typaldou, G M; Konstantakopoulos, G; Roxanis, I; Nidos, A; Vaidakis, N; Papadimitriou, G N; Wells, A

    2014-01-01

    significant differences between genders had been found in the original study. The assumption that the differences in score levels and the gender effect might reflect cultural differences warrants further investigation. The findings of the present study indicate that the Greek version of the MCQ-30 is a comprehensible and psychometrically adequate instrument, as well as a reliable tool in assessing a range of dimensions of worry-related metacognitions in the Greek population. The Greek version of this scale facilitates crosscultural research in metacognition and wider testing of the metacognitive approach to emotional vulnerability, psychological disturbances and mental disorders.

  18. The List as Treasury in the Greek World

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, Athena

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The List as Treasury in the Greek Worldby Athena E. KirkDoctor of Philosophy in Classics University of California, Berkeley Professor Leslie V. Kurke, Chair Some of the earliest written records in the greater ancient world are lists of objects: we find catalogues of gods, kings, jewels, archaic vocabulary items, and exotic birds in Sumerian, Egyptian, Akkadian and Hittite, and many scholars surmise that a penchant for this kind of record-keeping fueled the very invention of writing. ...

  19. Adolescents' mental health and the Greek family: preventive aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierodiakonou, C S

    1988-03-01

    Preventive mental health measures can be properly planned only if the various factors leading to the adolescent's personality structure are extensively investigated. Starting with the specific attitudes of a couple towards genetic counselling, the disadvantages of urbanization and of the dissolution of the traditional extended family are discussed with regard to their effect on the younger members. Data are produced concerning the child-rearing practices of Greek in comparison to American parents and their effect on the adolescent's emotional life. Extreme dependence on the family, pressure for school achievements, lack of sexual education, etc. are characteristic of the stresses a Greek adolescent undergoes. Socio-cultural conditions, like immigration, adoption, etc. are shown to have a different psychological effect on an adolescent in Greece than in America. Specific stresses regarding the adolescent's future, like preparing for university entrance examinations, are discussed and preventive measures are proposed.

  20. The Minimalist Syntax of Control in Greek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetangianni, Konstantia

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates Control phenomena in three distinct domains of the grammar of Modem Greek (subjunctive complements, "V-ondas" adjuncts and ke-complements) and proposes a unifying syntactic account of Control by appealing to the tense properties of these domains. I argue that Control in Greek is best analyzed as an instance of…

  1. Aspects of Negation in Classical Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel J.

    1972-01-01

    Traditional grammars are criticized as having obscured or omitted many significant features of negation patterns in classical Greek. The author demonstrates that negation in Greek extensively involves semantic and syntactic factors. Certain of the factors are thoroughly embedded in the traditional approach to grammar, while others are derived from…

  2. The Greeks and the Education of Humanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Timothy J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Traces the roots of the concepts of the humanities and liberal arts education to the ancient Greeks, describing how their customs, language, philosophy, and literature have contributed to current concepts of education. Suggests that the Greek idea of education stressed the arts and mathematics but was opposed to all professionalism. (MAB)

  3. Historical Digressions in Greek Geometry Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaidis, Yannis

    1991-01-01

    Presents an attempt to combine the history of mathematics of ancient Greece with the course on theoretical geometry taught in Greek secondary schools. Three sections present the history of ancient Greek geometry, geometrical constructions using straightedges and compasses, and an application of Ptolemy's theorem in solving ancient astronomy…

  4. Learning the Greek Language via Greeklish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Karakos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning Greek as a second or foreign language has drawn the attention of many researchers throughout time. A dictionary is amongst the first things a foreign language student uses. Reading comprehension is significantly improved by the use of a dictionary, especially when this includes the way words are pronounced. We developed a assistance software for learning the Greek Language via Greeklish. Since, the basic vocabulary of a language is the basis of understanding the language itself, the dictionary proposed aims to make the basic Greek words easier to pronounce as well as to give the explanation of the word in English. The aim of this software is to provide a useful tool to learn the Greek language individually. Moreover, it aims to be involved, as an assistance tool for learning Greek as a second or foreign language.

  5. Sexuality after spinal cord injury: the Greek male's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dikaios; Sawada, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    This study explored how Greek men with spinal cord injury experience sexuality. Six men with spinal cord injury acted as key informants and data collection consisted of in-depth unstructured interviews, field notes, and a reflective log. The transcribed interviews were analyzed thematically. The themes that emerged were: Barriers, Metamorphoses, and Enjoying. Sexuality was important in the life of the informants and they were engaged in various patterns of adaptation. Rather than impairment as such, certain social beliefs and values prevalent in Greek society were found to act upon the informants in compromising ways. The results suggest that the process of reclaiming one's sexuality is a process of meaning-finding. The data support a conclusion that occupational therapists should respect the cultural nature of sexuality. Moreover, the topic of sexuality should be approached in a holistic manner, perceiving it as extending in a continuum, which may be positively or negatively affected as a result of an acquired impairment.

  6. Workplace Bullying Among the Nursing Staff of Greek Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatza, Christine; Zyga, Sofia; Tziaferi, Styliani; Prezerakos, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    In this quantitative, cross-sectional study, the authors identified the impact of workplace bullying on nursing staff employed at select Greek public hospitals. They conducted the study using the Negative Acts Questionnaire with a convenience sample of 841 participants employed by five Greek hospitals in the 1st Regional Health Authority of Attica. One third of the respondents reported having been psychologically harassed at work in the past 6 months. According to the results, the impact workplace bullying has on nursing staff varies depending on the existence of a supportive familial or friend environment and if nurses parent children. These findings demonstrate the value of family and friend support when coping with workplace bullying.

  7. The latest Greek statute laws and its consequences to the Greek renewable energy source market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarou, Stavros; Pyrgioti, Eleftheria; Agoris, Dimosthenes [University of Patras (Greece). High Voltage Laboratory

    2007-08-15

    Since the summer of 2006, the legislation governing the installation of Renewable Energy Sources electric energy production facilities in Greece has been updated by the law 3468/2006. The aim of the current study is to present a synopsis of the recently introduced statute with emphasis on the main changes imported. The objective of the law 3468/2006 is to provide favorable conditions for the infiltration of RES investors into the electric energy market, leading to benefit of the consumers and also to decreasing CO{sub 2} emissions, providing a more favorable framework for compliance to the frames of the Kyoto Protocol. The authors wish to thank Dr. George Mariatos and Mr. George Spyrou for providing support for the work reported in this paper. The research for this study was financed by the European Union (75%) and the Greek government (25%). (author)

  8. The Greeks and the Utopia: an overview through ancient Greek Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Lauriola

    2009-06-01

    term has an ancient Greek root but it does not exist in the vocabulary of ancient Greek language. Although ancient Greeks did not have a conscious concept of utopia, they, however, dreamt, wrote, proposed – with different aims - what we would call now ( paradoxically using a ‘modern’ term ‘utopic’ worlds. From the archaic to the post-classic period, we find literary expressions of utopic thought in ancient Greek culture. Such expressions constitute the basis of the modern Utopia and Utopianism with their positive and negative implications. This essay takes a more detailed look at the work of Aristophanes, considered one of the greatest Greek playwrights, and inquires whether his comedies can be considered utopias.

  9. Polysynthetic Tendencies in Modern Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charitonidis, Chariton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide a more accurate typological classification of Modern Greek. The verb in MG shows many polysynthetic traits, such as noun and adverb incorporation into the verbal complex, a large inventory of bound morphemes, pronominal marking of objects, many potential slots before the verbal head, nonconfigurational syntax, etc. On the basis of these traits, MG has similarities with polysynthetic languages such as Abkhaz, Cayuga, Chukchi, Mohawk, Nahuatl, a.o. I will show that the abundance of similar patterns between MG and polysynthesis point to the evolution of a new system away from the traditional dependent-marking strategy and simple synthesis towards head-marking and polysynthesis. Finally, I will point to the risk of undertaking a direct comparison of different language systems by discussing the pronominal head-marking strategies in MG and the North American languages.

  10. Plutarch’s Greco-Roman Imaginary: The Roman and Greek Questions as an Anthropological Macro-Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Sunčič

    2006-12-01

    Plutarch’s idealistic anthropology is characterised by the avoidance of all ambiguities and differences arising between the subjugated Greeks and the Roman invaders. The national identity of both is represented as their common , Greek-dominated cultural heritage . Plutarch’s programme of reality thus encompasses a virtual Greco-Romanity, which fuses the positive characteristics of both peoples and leads to overcoming the differences.

  11. Sensory properties and drivers of liking for Greek yogurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, N T; Shepard, L; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Greek yogurt is currently the largest growing sector in the dairy industry. Because no standard of identity exists for Greek yogurts in the United States, and they can be made by a variety of methods, variability in sensory properties is expected. Knowledge of consumer perception and specific drivers of liking will be useful information for product developers. The objective of this study was to document the sensory properties of commercial Greek yogurts and to determine drivers of liking through descriptive profiling and consumer testing. Flavor and texture attributes of commercial Greek yogurts (n = 24) were evaluated in triplicate by a trained descriptive sensory panel. An online survey (n = 520) was used to collect consumer usage and attitude information for Greek yogurts before consumer acceptance testing. Consumer acceptance testing (n = 155) was then conducted on commercial Greek yogurts (n = 10). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used for data analysis. Sensory properties of yogurt differed with fat content and manufacture (Greek vs. fortified Greek). Full-fat yogurts were characterized by firmness and denseness, whereas low- and non-fat yogurts lacked firmness, denseness, cohesiveness, and, after stirring, viscosity. Fortified Greek yogurts generally had more surface shine and jiggle and lower denseness compared with traditional Greek yogurts. Fewer flavor differences were observed among yogurts compared with texture differences. Fortified Greek yogurts displayed a burnt/beefy flavor not documented in traditional Greek yogurts, but this flavor was not evident in all fortified Greek yogurts. Consumer preferred Greek yogurts with firm, dense texture, moderate sweet aromatic, milkfat and dairy sour flavors, and moderate sour taste. Consumers were aware of the increased protein content of Greek yogurts but generally unaware of differences between strained and fortified Greek yogurts; both strained Greek and fortified Greek yogurts received

  12. Preserving Greek and Latin in the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, G. Karl

    1978-01-01

    The instructional context and some formats for the teaching of Greek and Latin are described. Internal policies of an area studies or microhumanities program in classics are outlined. The teaching of languages, literature in translation, and culture is discussed. (SW)

  13. Methodological remarks on studying prehistoric Greek religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Pakkanen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodological approach to the study of Greek religion of the period which lacks written documents, i.e. prehistory. The assumptions and interpretations of religion of that time have to be based on archaeological material. How do we define religion and cultic activity on the basis of primary archaeological material from this period, and which are the methodological tools for this difficult task? By asking questions on the nature and definition of religion and culture scholars of religion have provided us with some methodological apparatus to approach religion of the past in general, but there are models developed by archaeologists as well. Critical combination of these methodological tools leads to the best possible result. Archaeology studies the material culture of the past. History of religion studies the spiritual culture of the past. In the background the two have important theoretical and even philosophical speculations since they both deal with meanings (of things or practices and with interpretation.

  14. The Greek Ethnography. A critical overview

    OpenAIRE

    Aris Tsantiropoulos

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of Greek ethnography. It argues that ethnography in Greece cannot be seen as separate from its preceding fields of history and folklore studies, alongside Greece itself being viewed as a research field by foreign anthropologists. Because of the late introduction of anthropology in Greece it followed very quickly the main theoretical stream of postmodernism in its view of Greek society. The main argument of this article is that the introduction of postmodernis...

  15. Liberalization assessment: The Greek cruise market

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanidaki, Evangelia; Lekakou, Maria

    2011-01-01

    More than thirty years, after the metamorphosis of the cruise industry from an expensive type of vacation for the elite to an affordable alternative for the mass market, cruise shipping records high rates of growth. The Greek cruise market has been liberalized since 1999, when the Regulation of the European Commission 3577/92 came into force, allowing cruise ships flying European flags to operate in Greek waters and to use national ports as homeports. Restrictions were in force only for the n...

  16. How EURO shrinks democracy: Insights from the Greek crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lanzavecchia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of a single currency in Europe is a pure political project. What we have learned from Greek crisis is that being in the Eurozone means that creditors can destroy a national economy and seize public assets if the government steps out of line. To keep the European project alive, we here call for a fundamental reform on sovereign debt: switching from a goal to which policy is constrained, back to a tool to serve policy aims. In a distressed country, lenders has the power to forces the borrower to accept and to adopt restrictive spending policies that defend their interest at the expense of citizen’s ones. Eventually, this leads inevitably to the loss of autonomy in borrower’s decisions on fiscal policy, spending policy, public properties. If the cause for this degenerative process is the privilege on sovereign debt, then we need to find a new framework that reclassifies the public debt as functional to human development rather than individual profits. A country shall not be allowed to repay a debt that goes beyond its repayment capacity. The maximum payback capacity shall be settled before the credit is granted as a fraction of its primary balance. As such, the amount of primary balance not pledged to the repayment of the debt shall be always available to the government to undertake investments, social or security expenses and to face unexpected events. If this rule were implemented, the capital market would be automatically regulated: the debt that exceeds that threshold would be automatically written-off.

  17. Analysis of Greek small coinage from the classic period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmit, Ž.; Šemrov, A.

    2018-02-01

    A series of 25 Greek coins from the 6th to 4th centuries BC was studied by PIXE for their trace element composition, with an aim to discover the origin of their silver ore. The procedure revealed a counterfeited coin, and then concentrated on distinguishing the coins minted from the ore of Laurion on the Attica peninsula and the coins minted from other sources. Linear discriminant analysis based on the impurities and alloying elements of copper, gold, lead and bismuth revealed that discrimination is indeed possible according to a single canonical variable.

  18. Finding the optimal shape of the leading-and-trailing car of a high-speed train using design-by-morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sahuck; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Jiang, Chiyu; Marcus, Philip S.

    2017-10-01

    We present a new, general design method, called design-by-morphing for an object whose performance is determined by its shape due to hydrodynamic, aerodynamic, structural, or thermal requirements. To illustrate the method, we design a new leading-and-trailing car of a train by morphing existing, baseline leading-and-trailing cars to minimize the drag. In design-by-morphing, the morphing is done by representing the shapes with polygonal meshes and spectrally with a truncated series of spherical harmonics. The optimal design is found by computing the optimal weights of each of the baseline shapes so that the morphed shape has minimum drag. As a result of optimization, we found that with only two baseline trains that mimic current high-speed trains with low drag that the drag of the optimal train is reduced by 8.04% with respect to the baseline train with the smaller drag. When we repeat the optimization by adding a third baseline train that under-performs compared to the other baseline train, the drag of the new optimal train is reduced by 13.46% . This finding shows that bad examples of design are as useful as good examples in determining an optimal design. We show that design-by-morphing can be extended to many engineering problems in which the performance of an object depends on its shape.

  19. Ottoman Greek Education System and Greek Girls' Schools in Istanbul (19th and 20th Centuries)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daglar Macar, Oya

    2010-01-01

    Modernization efforts in education, which were initiated in the 19th century, can be seen as forerunners of the modernization attempts in the Republic period. In this article, Greek education system in the Ottoman Empire will be discussed and the effects and importance of the changes observed in Greek girls' education in 19th and 20th centuries on…

  20. Ancient Greek with Thrasymachus: A Web Site for Learning Ancient Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Alison

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a project that was begun as an attempt by two teachers of Ancient Greek to provide supplementary materials to accompany "Thrasymachus," a first-year textbook for learning ancient Greek. Provides a brief history and description of the project, the format of each chapter, a chronology for completion of materials for each chapter in the…

  1. Greek, Indian and Arabic logic

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2004-01-01

    Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic marks the initial appearance of the multi-volume Handbook of the History of Logic. Additional volumes will be published when ready, rather than in strict chronological order. Soon to appear are The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege. Also in preparation are Logic From Russell to Gödel, Logic and the Modalities in the Twentieth Century, and The Many-Valued and Non-Monotonic Turn in Logic. Further volumes will follow, including Mediaeval and Renaissance Logic and Logic: A History of its Central. In designing the Handbook of the History of Logic, the Editors have taken the view that the history of logic holds more than an antiquarian interest, and that a knowledge of logic's rich and sophisticated development is, in various respects, relevant to the research programmes of the present day. Ancient logic is no exception. The present volume attests to the distant origins of some of modern logic's most important features, such as can be found in the claim by the authors of t...

  2. The Nature of Phonetic Gradience across a Dialect Continuum: Evidence from Modern Greek Vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Charalambos

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the acoustic properties of vowels in 2 Modern Greek varieties: Standard Modern Greek (SMG) and Cypriot Greek (CG). Both varieties contain in their phonetic inventories the same 5 vowels. Forty-five female speakers between 19 and 29 years old participated in this study: 20 SMG speakers and 25 CG speakers, born and raised in Athens and Nicosia, respectively. Stimuli consisted of a set of nonsense CVCV and VCV words, each containing 1 of the 5 Greek vowels in stressed and unstressed position. Gaining insights from the controlled experimental design, the study sheds light on the gradient effects of vowel variation in Modern Greek. It shows that (1) stressed vowels are more peripheral than unstressed vowels, (2) SMG unstressed /i a u/ vowels are more raised than the corresponding CG vowels, (3) SMG unstressed vowels are shorter than CG unstressed vowels, and (4) SMG /i·u/ are more rounded than the corresponding CG vowels. Moreover, it shows that variation applies to specific subsystems, as it is the unstressed vowels that vary cross-varietally whereas the stressed vowels display only minor differences. The implications of these findings with respect to vowel raising and vowel reduction are discussed. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Health behavior and college students: does Greek affiliation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Carey, Kate B; Carey, Michael P

    2008-02-01

    The college years offer an opportunity for new experiences, personal freedom, and identity development; however, this period is also noted for the emergence of risky health behaviors that place college students at risk for health problems. Affiliation with on-campus organizations such as fraternities or sororities may increase a students' risk given the rituals and socially endorsed behaviors associated with Greek organizations. In this study, we examined alcohol and drug use, smoking, sexual behavior, eating, physical activity, and sleeping in 1,595 college students (n = 265 Greek members, n = 1,330 non-Greek members). Results show Greek members engaged in more risky health behaviors (e.g., alcohol use, cigarette smoking, sexual partners, and sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs) than non-Greek members. Greek and non-Greek members did not differ in condom use, unprotected sex, eating, and physical activity behaviors. Implications for prevention and intervention strategies among Greek members are discussed.

  4. Embedded aspect in L2 acquisition: Evidence from L1 Russian learners of Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sviatlana Karpava

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates first language (L1 influence on the second language (L2 acquisition of aspect, comparing participants with homogeneous L1 background (Russian in Mainland Greece (L2 Standard Modern Greek and Cyprus (L2 Cypriot Greek, where verb complementation takes a finite form instead of an infinitival as is possible in Russian. Focus of the experimental study lies on embedded environments, which require only perfective aspect in Greek but allow either perfective or imperfective in Russian. The findings support the Full Transfer/Full Access Hypothesis, according to which aspect is part of Universal Grammar and L2 learners can reach native-like attainment due to access to it, while at the initial stage of L2 acquisition transfer from L1 into L2 takes place.

  5. Ancient Greek psychotherapy for contemporary nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkouta, Lambrini

    2002-08-01

    Ancient Greek physicians as well as philosophers were fully cognizant of a human being's psychological function and used their particular art to influence individual or social behavior in accordance with their pursuit. This art or technique favorably compares with several of the methods currently called supportive psychotherapy. This psychotherapy was the first form of care for people with mental health problems. Nurses who base their practice on ancient Greek psychotherapy see the patient as a whole, a person who creates meaning in life. Applying the philosophical principles of ancient Greeks helps nurses understand the behavior of people with mental health problems and recognize and facilitate adaptive satisfaction of these psychological needs. In addition, psychiatric nurses are able to help distressed individuals understand their fears and anxieties, so they are freed from the causes of their symptoms that led them to seek therapy in the first place. Consequently, this understanding can make psychiatric nurses' work a living experience and add meaning to their work.

  6. Antioxidants in Greek Virgin Olive Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Kalogeropoulos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Greece is ranked third after Spain and Italy in virgin olive oil production. The number of Greek olive cultivars—excluding clonal selections—is greater than 40; however, more than 90% of the acreage is cultivated with 20 cultivars, adapted to a wide range of environmental conditions. Greek virgin olive oils, produced mainly with traditional, non-intensive cultivation practices, are mostly of exceptional quality. The benefits of consuming virgin olive oil, originally attributed to its high oleic acid content, are now considered to be the combined result of several nutrient and non-nutrient phytochemicals. The present work summarizes available data regarding natural antioxidants in Greek virgin olive oils (VOO namely, polar phenolic compounds, tocopherols, squalene, and triterpenic acids. The literature survey indicated gaps in information, which should be filled in the near future so that the intrinsic properties of this major agricultural product of Greece will be substantiated on a solid scientific basis.

  7. The Ideas of Greek High School Students about the "Ozone Layer."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin; Papantoniou, Vasso Spiliotopoulou

    1999-01-01

    Describes a study of Greek high school students' (n=116) perceptions of the ozone layer. Finds that students have a good understanding of the position and purpose of the ozone layer in terms of protection from ultraviolet rays, but students also hold misconceptions linking the ozone layer to the greenhouse effect and other forms of local…

  8. Death of a Child at Home or in Hospital: Experiences of Greek Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatou, Danai; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigates experiences of Greek mothers who cared for a child dying of cancer. Highlighted some needs during the terminal period. Fifteen mothers were interviewed and both quantitative and qualitative procedures were used to analyze findings. Family networks played a significant role in supporting mother-child units, especially when death…

  9. Impact of Job Satisfaction on Greek Nurses' Health-Related Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Ioannou

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Although Greek nurses are not satisfied with their work, those with high levels of job satisfaction had better health-related quality of life. The findings suggest that improvement of the work environment would contribute to a healthier and more satisfied nursing workforce.

  10. The influence of Greek drama on Matthew's Gospel | Warner | HTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents the Greek influence on the genre of Matthew's text. Greek and Roman tragedy is examined, from which the five basic elements of tragedy are identified. A brief examination of the characters in the Matthean text is done to identify Greek cultural influences on the structuring of the Gospel. This study offers ...

  11. The Greek library of Giannozzo Manetti (1396-1459)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haan, Annet den

    2018-01-01

    (1396-1459) helps us understand the nature of humanist Greek studies in practice in this period. My study of Manetti’s Greek skills is based on his collection of Greek manuscripts, which have been preserved as a set among the Palatini graeci in the Vatican Library. I compare the way he collected...

  12. Connecting the Greeks : Festival networks in the Hellenistic world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williamson, Christina; van Nijf, Onno; Mann, Christian; Remijssen, Sophie; Scharff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Panhellenic festivals were central to the ancient Greek world since archaic times, with places such as Delphi and Olympia defining the essence of a Greek ‘imagined community’. In the Hellenistic period, several Greek cities began to organize large-scale festivals of their own at their main

  13. Attitudes to Ancient Greek in Three Schools: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Frances

    2018-01-01

    This study comes in response to recent changes in UK policy, whereby Ancient Greek and Latin have been included alongside modern languages as part of the curriculum at Key Stage 2. It aims to understand how Ancient Greek is surviving and thriving in three different types of schools. After a short overview of the history of Greek teaching in the…

  14. Investigating the real situation of Greek solar water heating market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Kavadias, K.A.; Spyropoulos, G.

    2005-01-01

    Solar thermal applications have been acknowledged among the leading alternative solutions endeavouring to face the uncontrollable oil price variations, the gradual depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the chain environmental consequences caused by its excessive usage. Almost 30 years after the initial emergence of the commercial domestic solar water heating system (DSWHS) in the European market, the corresponding technology is qualified as quite mature. On top of this, the European Commission expects that 100,000,000 m 2 of solar collectors are to be installed in Europe by the year 2010 to facilitate durable and environment-friendly heat. In this context, the Greek DSWHSs market is highly developed worldwide, having a great experience in this major energy market segment. The present study is devoted to an extensive evaluation of the local DSWHSs market, including a discerning analysis of its time variation, taking seriously into account the corresponding annual replacement rate. Accordingly, the crucial techno-economic reasons, limiting the DSWHSs penetration in the local heat production market, are summarized and elaborated. Subsequently, the national policy measures - aiming to support the DSWHSs in the course of time - are cited, in comparison with those applied in other European countries. Next, the financial attractiveness of a DSWHS for Greek citizens is examined in the local socio-economic environment. The present work is integrated by reciting the prospects and mustering certain proposals that, if applied, could stimulate the local market. As a general comment, the outlook for penetration of new DSWHSs in the local market is rather grim, as the current techno-economic situation of solar heat cannot compete with oil and natural gas heat production, unless the remarkable social and environmental benefits of solar energy are seriously considered. Hence, the Greek State lacks stimulus to further DSWHSs installations, being strongly in support of the imported

  15. Latin and Greek in gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sean B; Carmichael, Stephen W; Pawlina, Wojciech; Spinner, Robert J

    2007-04-01

    Medical students and practitioners learn and use a vocabulary originating almost entirely from classical Latin and Greek languages. Previous generations required Latin or Greek prior to medical school, but the current generation does not have such requirements. Anecdotal evidence suggests that understanding Latin or Greek helps students to learn and practitioners to recall otherwise foreign terminology. This study evaluated students' familiarity with Latin and Greek etymologies before and after a gross anatomy course that incorporated etymologies into its curriculum. First-year medical students at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine were taught Latin and Greek etymologies through lectures and handouts during their gross anatomy course. They took a pretest and a posttest before and after the course to assess their understanding of etymologies. In addition, students from all four years of medical school, residents, and staff physicians also took a general etymology quiz to assess their understanding of etymologies. After their gross anatomy course emphasizing etymologies, first-year students scored higher on the posttest than they did on the pretest. First-year students also reported that learning etymologies enhanced anatomy learning, made the experience more enjoyable, and proved to be less difficult than they thought it would be prior to the course. Medical students, residents, and staff physicians scored almost equally on the general etymology quiz and almost equally reported that etymologies enhanced learning and recalling terminology. Medical students, residents, and staff physicians almost equally endorsed incorporating etymologies into medical education. This study provides novel scientific evidence that a basic understanding of Latin and Greek etymologies enhances performance and comfort when learning and using medical terminology.

  16. Truth Obviousness in Ancient Greek Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Halyna I. Budz

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the features of the axiomatic approach to the truth understanding in ancient Greek philosophy. Truth in the works by ancient philosophers has axiomatic essence, basing on divine origin of truth. As the truth has a divine origin, it is in reality. The reality, created by Gods is the solemn reality. Therefore, understanding of reality by man is the display of divine reality, which is true and clever. In of the context of ancient Greek philosophy, to know truth is to know so...

  17. Making a Voluntary Greek Debt Exchange Work

    OpenAIRE

    Gulati, Mitu; Zettelmeyer, Jeromin

    2012-01-01

    Within the next few months, the Greek government, is supposed to persuade private creditors holding about EUR 200bn in its bonds to voluntarily exchange their existing bonds for new bonds that pay roughly 50 percent less. This may work with large creditors whose failure to participate in a debt exchange could trigger a Greek default, but may not persuade smaller creditors, who will be told that their claims will continue to be fully serviced if they do not participate in the exchange. This pa...

  18. Electricity curtailment behaviors in Greek households: Different behaviors, different predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botetzagias, Iosif; Malesios, Chrisovaladis; Poulou, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the self-reported energy (electricity) curtailment behaviors of Greek households (N=285). • We find that the curtailment behaviors are distinct and should be studied/analyzed separately. • ‘Age’, ‘Gender’ and ‘Perceived Behavioral Control’ are statistically significant predictors of most behaviors. • The demographic/structural and the psychological predictors contribute significantly explain the variance of the behaviors. • The cluster of moral predictors does not contribute statistically significantly to the explained variance. - Abstract: This paper argues that electricity ‘curtailment’ behaviors (i.e. frequent and/or low cost or free energy saving behaviors) in households are distinct from one another and they thus should be analyzed and promoted. We test this claim with data from telephone interviews with Greek households in the capital city of Athens (N=285), analyzing the impact of a number of demographical/structural, psychological (based on the Theory of Planned Behavior) and moral (based on norms’ activation) predictors though hierarchical binary logistic regression modeling. We find that that each electricity curtailment behavior depends on a different mix of predictors with ‘Age’, ‘Gender’ and ‘Perceived Behavioral Control’ being statistically significant for most behaviors. Overall, the psychological and the demographical/structural clusters of variables substantially contribute to the explained variance of electricity curtailment behaviors. The moral cluster's contribution is not statistically significant since moral concerns are largely interwoven in the psychological constructs

  19. Do governing body and CSU nurses on clinical commissioning groups really lead a nursing agenda? Findings from a 2015 Survey of the Commissioning Nurse Leaders' Network Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Mike; Allan, Helen T; Lee, Gay; Savage, Jan; Tapson, Christine; Dixon, Roz

    2018-03-05

    This paper reports the findings from a 2015 survey of the Commissioning Nurse Leaders' Network. Our aim was to understand how governing body nurses perceive their influence and leadership on clinical commissioning groups. An online survey method was used with a census sample of 238 governing body nurses and nurses working in Commissioning Support Units, who were members of the Commissioning Nurse Leaders' Network. The response rate was 40.7% (n = 97). While most governing body nurses felt confident in their leadership role, this was less so for non-executive governing body nurses. Nurses in Commissioning Support Units were much less positive than governing body nurses about their influence on clinical commissioning groups. Governing body nurses were satisfied with their impact on clinical commissioning groups and so could be said to be leading a nursing agenda but this evidence is limited to their own perceptions and more objective or diverse measures of impact are needed. The purpose of such roles to 'represent nursing, and ensure the patient voice is heard' may be a flawed aspiration, conflating nursing leadership and patient voice. This is the first study to explore explicitly the differences between executive and non-executive governing body nurses and nurses working in commissioning support units. Achieving clinical commissioning groups' goals, including developing and embedding nursing leadership roles in clinical commissioning groups, may be threatened if the contributions of governing body nurses, and other nurses supporting clinical commissioning groups, go unrecognised within the profession, or if general practitioners or other clinical commissioning group executive members dominate decision-making on clinical commissioning groups. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Satisfaction survey of Greek inpatients with brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, G K; Birbilis, T A; Chrysou, O I; Zissimopoulos, A

    2010-01-01

    To investigate brain cancer patients' satisfaction hospitalised in a tertiary care university public hospital in Alexandroupolis, Greece, in order to improve medical, nursing, and organizational-administrative services. This cross-sectional study involved 163 patients having been hospitalised for at least 24 hours. The patients were asked to fill in a satisfaction questionnaire previously approved by the Greek Ministry of Health. Four aspects of satisfaction were investigated (medical, hotel accommodation/ organisational facilities, nursing, global). Using Principal Component Analysis, summated scales were formed and tested for internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The non parametric Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was also used and the threshold p-value for statistical significance (2-sided) was set at 0.05. The results revealed a high degree of global satisfaction (73.31%), yet satisfaction was higher for the medical (88.88%) and nursing (84.26%) services. Moreover, satisfaction derived from the accommodation facilities and the general organisation was found to be more limited (74.17%). Statistically significant differences (based on various demographic variables) in the participants' global satisfaction were not observed. On the contrary, self-assessment of health status at admission was negatively correlated with medical (r(s)=-0.157, p=0.045) and nursing (r(s)=-0.168, p=0.032) satisfaction. Greek citizenship contributed to bigger satisfaction scores in the accommodation/organisational facilities dimension (r(s)=0.158, p=0.044). Finally, age was positively linked to nursing satisfaction (r(s)=0.181, p=0.02). The present study confirmed in part the results of previously published Greek surveys assessing general patient populations. However, more studies are urgently needed to confirm these findings in a much bigger brain cancer population.

  1. Bicultural Childhood. A Case Study with Greek and Greek-Norwegian Families in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Liland, Irene Midtskog

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore Greek and Greek–Norwegian children’s experiences of migration and bicultural childhood. The period of fieldwork took place in different cities in Norway during the autumn of 2014. The methods employed are questionnaires, worksheets, mind-mapping activities and semi-structured interviews. The participants in the study were children born in Norway with one Greek-born and one Norwegian-born parent, immigrant children from Greece who had been living in Norway between on...

  2. From Assimilation to Kalomoira: Satellite Television and its Place in New York City’s Greek Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nevradakis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role that imported satellite television programming from Greece has played in the maintenance and rejuvenation of Greek cultural identity and language use within the Greek-American community of New York City—the largest and most significant in the United States. Four main concepts guide this paper, based on prior theoretical research established in the field of Diaspora studies: authenticity, assertive hybridity, cultural capital, and imagined communities. Satellite television broadcasts from Greece have targeted the audience of the Hellenic Diaspora as an extension of the homeland, and as a result, are viewed as more “authentic” than Diaspora-based broadcasts. Assertive hybridity is exemplified through satellite programming such as reality shows and the emergence of transnational pop stars such as Kalomoira, who was born and raised in New York but attained celebrity status in Greece as the result of her participation on the Greek reality show Fame Story. Finally, satellite television broadcasts from Greece have fostered the formation of a transnational imagined community, linked by the shared viewing of Greek satellite programming and the simultaneous consumption of Greek pop culture and acquisition of cultural capital. All of the above concepts are evident in the emergence of a Greek “café culture” and “sports culture”, mediated by satellite television and visible in the community’s public spaces. These findings contradict predictions often seen in the prior scholarship on the topic, which foresaw a quick erosion of Greek language use within the Greek-American community.

  3. The accounting and tax legislation of the Greek football clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PANAGIOTIS E. DIMITROPOULOS

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The year 1979 was a cornerstone for the football in Greece, since it practically meant the transformation of the sport’s organization from amateurism to professionalism, establishing new rules and conditions to the management of football clubs. The increased popularity of this sport and the evolutions that took place in Europe and worldwide, forced the Greek government to establish a legislative framework for the successful management of football clubs. These interventions lead to changes in many aspects of football management such as organizational and financial. The new legal environment of football management, required the organization of this sport into a more stable and professional base, following the financial standards of other corporations operating within the Greek state. By these means the government wanted to create a fair economic framework under which the football clubs would operate with common organizational, financial and tax administration rules. The aim of this paper is to present the characteristics of the new «capital form» establishment of the football clubs (Societe Anonyme, the main financial frame under which the new establishment has to operate and the tax obligations that originate from the aforementioned legal form.

  4. Greek Secondary School Students' Views about Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrikaki, Evangelia; Koumparou, Helen; Kyriakoudi, Margarita; Papacharalampous, Irene; Trimandili, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to give a picture of Greek students' views about biology and some of the factors that affect them. A questionnaire measuring students' intrinsic motivation to learn biology, individual interest in biology and perceived difficulty of biology, along with information about students' gender, level, parents' occupation and educational…

  5. Internships at Greek Universities: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Dimitrios M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Greece has the highest youth unemployment rate in the European Union. Even though it is clear that persistent unemployment requires bold measures so as to engage young educated Greeks in the labour market, there is no coherent policy at present targeting that population group, especially university students. This paper explores university…

  6. The Greek outside workers radiation passbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.

    1997-01-01

    Following the European Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM of the 4 December 1990, on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas, the Greek Government has adopted the Ministerial Order, published in the Official Gazette (No 9087(FOR) 1004 of 1996). The Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the competent governmental authority for radiation protection matters. Therefore it is the GAEC's responsibility of monitoring the implementation of this Order. The Order consists of 6 parts, where among others are described the obligations of outside undertakings and operators and the obligations of outside workers. One of the major elements of this Ministerial Order is the radiation passbook.The Greek Radiation Passbook is written in two languages, Greek and English. It contains worker's personal data (identity, medical examinations, training in radiation protection, etc), information concerning his employee (name, address, etc) and worker's dosimetry information such as operational and the official dosimetry (external and internal) data. The radiation passbook is provided only to category A outside workers, working in Greece or abroad. The GAEC distributed the Ministerial Order with application forms to the possible outside undertakings for their information. Until August 1997, 41 radiation passbooks have been attributed to outride workers. All of them are technicians dealing with medical equipment using ionizing radiation. (author)

  7. The Greek Financial Crisis – Theoretical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The world we live in is a product of the way we think. Our conception of reality determines what we see and what we achieve. The Greek crisis is not simply a case of high public debt, economic mismanagement or weak political will in Greece or the Eurozone. It is underpinned by economic premises, constructs and resulting practices that promote exactly the type of dilemma Greece faces today. Without addressing these conceptual issues, no lasting solution is possible. Rather it can be expected to repeat and spread to other countries and regions. This article is based on views presented by participants in a WAAS webinar examining the Greek financial crisis in the light of economic theory and practice. Wherever there are unmet social needs and underutilized social resources, such as high levels of unemployment, the potential exists to stimulate economic activity, enhance human welfare and promote resilience and sustainable entrepreneurship. Both conditions prevail in Greece today, but neither current nor anticipated policies are likely to result in near term benefits to the Greek people and the local economy nor for Europe and the world economy. It supports the view that a permanent and effective win-win solution can be found to the Greek crisis, compatible with the financial stability of the country and the welfare of its citizens within the framework of the Eurozone, but that such a solution will require a rethinking of fundamental theoretical issues and adoption of innovative policy instruments beyond those presently being contemplated.

  8. Truth Obviousness in Ancient Greek Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna I. Budz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the features of the axiomatic approach to the truth understanding in ancient Greek philosophy. Truth in the works by ancient philosophers has axiomatic essence, basing on divine origin of truth. As the truth has a divine origin, it is in reality. The reality, created by Gods is the solemn reality. Therefore, understanding of reality by man is the display of divine reality, which is true and clever. In of the context of ancient Greek philosophy, to know truth is to know something, existing in reality, in other words, something, truly existing, eternal reality. Consequently, to know truth is it to know the substantial reality base. That’s why the justification of the reality origin is the axiomatic doctrine of truth at the same time, because only fundamental principle “truly” exists and is the truth itself. The idea of fundamental principle in ancient Greek philosophy is the axiom, universal principle, which is the base of reality as a substance from ontological perspective and is realized as the truth from gnosiological perspective. Fundamental principle, as Greeks understand it, coincides with the truth, in other words, reality and thinking are identical. The idea of reality source is the universal criterion of world perception at the same time, in other words, it is the truth, which is perceived axiomatically.

  9. Latin and Greek; Intermediate and Senior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto.

    GRADES OR AGES: Secondary grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Latin and Greek. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into seven chapters, each of which is in straight-text or list form. It is offset printed and staple-bound with a paper cover. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: General objectives for the 3-year course are outlined in a brief…

  10. Textbooks in Greek and Latin: 1968 List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenheim, Ursula

    1968-01-01

    This bibliography lists separately, with price and publisher, Greek and Latin works published in the United States, Canada, and Great Britain. While bilingual and interlinear texts are omitted in favor of annotated editions of authors, the inclusion of a vocabulary or occasional translation is indicated. Entries appear in the following categories:…

  11. TEXTBOOKS IN GREEK AND LATIN, 1966 LIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHOENHEIM, URSULA

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY LISTS SEPARATELY, WITH PRICE AND PUBLISHER, GREEK AND LATIN WORKS PUBLISHED IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA. WHILE BILINGUAL AND INTERLINEAR TEXTS ARE OMITTED IN FAVOR OF ANNOTATED EDITIONS OF AUTHORS, THE INCLUSION OF A VOCABULARY OR OCCASIONAL TRANSLATION IS INDICATED. THE SECTIONS FOR EACH LANGUAGE ARE--(1) TEXTS OF CLASSICAL…

  12. Perspectives on Greek and Roman catapults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hassall

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Both the Greeks and the Romans showed great ingenuity in developing catapults as artillery weapons. Evidence of how these complicated machines worked comes from surviving descriptions, experimental reconstructions and archaeological remains. Ancient technical drawings are a valuable but relatively neglected source of information about catapult design, and one that poses challenging problems of interpretation.

  13. Outlines for translations' poetics of Greek historians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Battistin Sebastiani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper has two sections. The first discusses some theoretical assumptions that guide my practice in translating Greek historians. In the second one, I present specific examples of translations (paragraphs from Herodotus, Thucydides and Polybius which briefly indicate the realization of such assumptions.

  14. Outlines for translations' poetics of Greek historians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Battistin Sebastiani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2016v36n3p174 This paper has two sections. The first discusses some theoretical assumptions that guide my practice in translating Greek historians. In the second one, I present specific examples of translations (paragraphs from Herodotus, Thucydides and Polybius which briefly indicate the realization of such assumptions.

  15. HOSIOS. A semantic study of Greek piety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peels, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31393391X

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to understand the meaning and usage of the Ancient Greek lexeme hosios and its cognates in the period from Homer until the end of the 5th century B.C. The adjective hosios was an evaluation relating to what humans must do to please the gods; it is often translated as

  16. Greek and Roman Mythology: English, Mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargraves, Richard; Kenzel, Elaine

    The aim of the Quinmester course "Greek and Roman Mythology" is to help students understand mythological references in literature, art, music, science and technology. The subject matter includes: creation myths; myths of gods and heroes; mythological allusions in astrology, astronomy, literature, science, business, puzzles, and everyday…

  17. Temperament Styles of Greek and US Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Thomas; Hatzichristou, Chryse

    2010-01-01

    Age, gender and cross-national differences of children ages 8 through 16 in Greece (n = 400) and the United States (n = 5,400) are examined on four temperament styles: extroversion-introversion, practical-imaginative, thinking-feeling and organized-flexible styles. In general, Greek children prefer extroverted to introverted styles and organized…

  18. The Patchwork Text in Teaching Greek Tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the rewards and challenges of using the Patchwork Text to teach Greek Tragedy to Cambridge University English final-year students. The article uses close reading of the students' texts, analysis and reflection to discuss both the products and the process of Patchwork writing. (Author/AEF)

  19. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Koundi, Kalliopi; Pappa, Xenia; Sakkas, Pavlos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)...

  20. The End of the Greek City States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Dorcas

    1990-01-01

    Presents a class activity on the demise of the Hellenic period and the factors responsible for the domination of Greece by Macedonia. Asks students to decide whether the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars were justified. Focuses on the role of Demosthenes and his championing of Greek liberty. (RW)

  1. What Is Europe? The Greek Beginnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Jaroszyński

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article begins with the statement that there are three concepts of Europe historically significant. The first concept of Europe looms out in the context of the clash between the ancient Greeks and the Persians, the second one is induced by Christianity and Islam meeting head-on whereas the third concept results from the European civilization confronting the cultures of the newly discovered peoples inhabiting other continents. It is just in the context of the indicated clashes that the concept of Europe is shaped as a phenomenon diversified not only geographically but also in terms of civilization as regards other cultures or civilizations. The article then concerns with the concept of Europeanism which in the cultural sense was crystallized in Greece at the turn of the fifth and fourth centuries before Christ. It emerged on the background of the opposition between the Greeks and Asians as well as other peoples, which were referred to as barbarians by the Greeks. The article concludes that it was culture and freedom which constituted two arms of Europeanness shaped by the ancient Greeks.

  2. Dietary Habits of Greek Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperakis, S. M.; Papadimitriou, V.; Zafiropoulou, M.; Piperakis, A. S.; Zisis, P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess Greek primary (1st to 6th grade) school children's dietary habits and the factors influencing them. Our results show that children know the value of different foods. The socio-economic status of father has no effect on the attitude of children towards choosing their diet, however, mothers' educational status…

  3. Environmental assessment of the Greek transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroneos, C.; Nanaki, E.

    2007-01-01

    Transport constitutes a crucial factor to the quality of life, since many people depend greatly on access to a reliable transport system. However, there are concerns about the impacts of the transport system on the quality of life, since it constitutes one of the main sources of greenhouse gases and also gives rise to significant air pollution stemming from acidifying pollutants, ozone precursors and particulate matter. During the last decade, the demand for transport services in Greece has rapidly grown following the European trend. Transport policies have recognised the need to restrain transport growth and to improve the various transport modes. Technology and fuel improvements have resulted in decreases of emissions of certain pollutants. Taking into account the major role of road transport in Greece for both passenger and goods transport, this work is focused on the assessment of the Greek transport sector. The changes made in the Greek transport sector during the past decade as well as the adverse environmental impacts of the Greek transport sector are presented and analysed. This work aims to present, assess and investigate the progress of the Greek transport sector-over the past decade-in relation to its sustainability. The scope is to examine the effectiveness of various emission reduction measures, in terms of their effectiveness in reducing emissions from transport

  4. The Greek Education System, Brussels 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EURYDICE Central Unit, Brussels (Belgium).

    The educational policy of the Greek government rests on the basic assumption that education is a social good and something to which every citizen has a right. The state has an obligation to ensure this provision for every young person with the same level and quality of preparation. This brief but full description of the state educational system…

  5. The Johannine Literature in a Greek Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    and apocalypticism by Greek rationality, to illustrate the Prologue’s Middle Platonism, and to introduce Stoicism into John’s thinking. Finally, it demonstrates how readings of the Prologue in light of Aristotle’s theory of epigenesis have displaced the focus from the logos to the pneuma and thereby managed...

  6. The Greek media and the Kosovo crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kondopoulou

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The NATO air attacks (24/3/99-10/6/99 as an instrument of force against Serbia to terminate the abuse of the Albanian population in Kosovo, albeit supported by a significant part of the international community, were received much differently in Greece. Key to the climate of strong disagreement with the campaign was the role of the Greek media. The true reason behind the offensive was, according to them, the change in the geopolitical map to the advantage of the West, and in particular the USA. The underlying argument of this paper is that in the Kosovo crisis the media, Greek (and international, projected their own environment. It is particularly apt to examine the Greek case because of its very unique perspective that differentiated the coverage in Greece - a NATO member country - from the overall world media view. Also, the discussion is pertinent because Greek media coverage disagreed with the official government position, which although advocating a diplomatic resolution of the crisis, had to support the Alliance's decision to bomb Serbia. Furthermore, study of this case is significant because the clash of the Greek media view with the mainstream pro-NATO coverage found in many other countries generated negative views on Greece and its media on the international level. An examination of media content reveals that despite any differences concerning political or other factors, and regardless of the variations in the phrasing of the anti-NATO arguments, the overall media perspective exhibited a unanimous opposition to the bombing campaign. By placing the emphasis more or less on the same thematic areas as the world media, but by crucially reversing the line of reasoning (e.g. the refugee problem was blamed on the NATO bombing raids and not on Serbian atrocities, the Greek media invariably remained anti-war, anti-NATO and anti-Albanian in many particular cases, and in principle pro-Serb throughout. A study of the general media and the specific

  7. Philosophical Aspects of Homosexuality in Ancient Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton ADĂMUŢ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current opinion on how Greeks lived and considered love is the following: love is seen as a sensual desire, a desire of possession. What we understand today by love (feeling plus passion did not interest the Greeks. The Greek love is the love as impulse, as desire, as need of reunification, so that any erotic act is the sign of an imperfection. The lover sees in the loved one just an existence of a higher degree. Only to love something inferior is a pathologic sign, and when love is like this, the inferior cannot get the best part of the love. Therefore, more valuable is to be loved than to love. Since the Greek feels the love as a necessity, he does not make anymore the distinction between love as such and the other needs of human nature. Maybe love is the most intense need, it can as well be the deepest or the noblest, but in the end, it remains what it is – a need, and it differs from the others not by nature but by degree and harmony. I used the last term for the following reason: because needs are of a sensitive nature (bodily, love seeks to satisfy itself in harmonious bodies, and the Greek is not ashamed of the natural part (bodily of love. As much chastity the natural love generates as the need of drinking, eating (it is true that, of and among creatures man is the only one who drinks without being thirsty and eats without being hungry. The same is with the need or use of eros.

  8. Psychological profile of Greek doctors: differences among five specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, P; Gouva, M; Gourgoulianis, K; Hatzoglou, Ch; Kotrotsiou, E

    2015-09-24

    The aim of the present study was to explore the differences in the psychological profiles between genders and different specialties among Greek doctors. Five-thirty nine doctors in five different specialties, namely 115 general practitioners, 168 internists, 81 surgeons, 108 microbiologists and 67 anesthesiologists, participated in the study. 253 participants were specialized doctors and 286 participants were medical residents. The sample consisted of 280 women and 259 men. The mean age of the sample was 38.75(±7.98) years. A cross sectional survey study was conducted. Symptom Check List 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) was used to collect the data. Multivariate Analysis of Variance indicated the significant effect of specialty (Wilks' Lambda = .20, p = .000), the effect of gender (Wilks' Lambda = .90, p = .000) as well as their interaction (Wilks' Lambda = .68, p = .000) on participants' scores in SCL-90-R subscales. Internists reported high scores in 8 out of 9 subscales of SCL-90-R. Surgeons scored significantly higher compared to all other specialties in hostility(HS) subscale. Women reported statistically higher scores in almost all subscales of the SCL-90-R test compared to men, apart from HS (p = .191). Gender and specialty choice play role in the psychological profile of Greek doctors. Women and internists seem to be more prone to psychopathology. These findings should be taken into account in future studies and interventions.

  9. Cultural diversity and Ottoman heritage in contemporary Greek popular novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Trine Stauning

    Public and scholarly interest in the impact of Ottoman history and culture on the successor states is increasing. Cultural co-existence in Ottoman society is explored perhaps in an attempt to find answers in the past to contemporary challenges emerging from transnational mobility/migration. Such ...... will place the contemporary novels in relation to earlier Greek literature dealing with cultural identity in the Ottoman period from different angles (e.g. Βιζυηνός, Δέλτα, Σωτηρίου, Φακίνος, Γαλανάκη)......./migration. Such interest is obvious in international academia as well as in the cultural sphere of the countries in South-eastern Europe. In Greece, the recent celebration of the 100 years of Thessaloniki’s incorporation in the Greek state has accentuated the city’s Ottoman heritage. A plenitude of exhibitions...

  10. Public stigma towards mental illness in the Greek culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzouvara, V; Papadopoulos, C

    2014-12-01

    Mental illness stigma negatively affects the lives of individuals with mental health disorders. Studies have indicated that the type and degree of stigma significantly varies across cultures. This study aimed to add to this body of knowledge by examining the prevalence and the type of mental illness stigma among individuals who identified themselves as Greek. It also examined the influence of a range of potential within-culture stigma moderating factors, including levels of previous experience with mental illness and mental illness knowledge. A cross-sectional quantitative design was employed, and 111 participants living in England and Greece were sampled through the snowball sampling technique. Stigma prevalence was measured using the 'Community Attitudes to Mental Illness' questionnaire. The findings revealed that participants showed a high degree of sympathy for people with mental illness but also considered them to be inferior and of a lower social class, and needing strict societal control. Higher stigma was significantly associated with being educated in England (instead of Greece), higher religiosity, lower knowledge levels and lower levels personal experience of mental illness. Targeted antistigma campaigns specifically tailored for the Greek culture are required in order to help reduce stigmatizing attitudes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Perceptions of the Influence of Black Greek Affiliation on Involvement, Engagement, and Persistence on Black Male Student Success: Differences between a Historically Black University and a Predominantly White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    While there is research on the impact of Greek Letter Organization membership on college student engagement and success, the focus is primarily on the experiences of White students with mixed results. The findings in these studies include lower moral and cognitive development and less concern for social issues than their non-Greek counterparts.…

  12. Does provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling lead to higher HIV testing rate and HIV case finding in Rwandan clinics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; van Santen, Daniëla; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Lammers, Judith; Mugisha, Veronicah; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; de Naeyer, Ludwig; Asiimwe, Anita; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) is promoted as a means to increase HIV case finding. We assessed the effectiveness of PITC to increase HIV testing rate and HIV case finding among outpatients in Rwandan health facilities (HF). PITC was introduced in six HFs in 2009-2010. HIV

  13. Probabilistic safety analysis of a Greek Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the work and the results of a Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment performed for the Greek Research Reactor of the National Center for Scientific Research 'Demokritos'. Event trees have been used to study the response of the installation to various initiating events whereas fault trees have been used in the modelling of safety system failures. Using generic data, the probability of an accident leading to severe core damage (≥10% of core melted) from internal initiating events has been estimated to be 3x10 -6 per year of reactor operation. The largest contributions to the probability of small damage are made by accidents initiated by loss of cooling and excess reactivity. Large releases of radioactivity are expected with a negligibly low frequency of about 1x10 -11 /year

  14. Shaping the pain: Ancient Greek lament and its therapeutic aspect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šijaković Đurđina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, which is the first part of a wider research, I focus on different aspects of ancient Greek lament. One of its most important aspects is the therapeutic aspect: by verbalizing, revealing the pain and by sharing it with others, the pain itself is becoming more bearable both for the woman that laments and for the bereaved family. Related to this therapeutic is the creative aspect of lament: the woman that mourns has to lament in order to make it easier for herself and others; but while lamenting, she is creating something. In spite of this constructive, let us call it creative-therapeutic potential, the lament carries in itself a different, rather dark and gloomy potential, if it calls for vengeance, not reconciling with the fact of someone dear’s death. Deeply rooted in funeral ritual, a lament respects certain ritual rules, and yet it is a spontaneous expression of pain. Examining these mutually dependent aspects of lament, I will turn attention to the position of lament in Greek rites and tragedy, that summit Greek art and literature. Ritual lament within ancient tragedy is, as always when it comes to Greek culture, an inexhaustible topic. Although tragedy belongs to literary tradition, it is a trustworthy source for ancient Greek ritual practice; lament within tragedy is thus a ritual lament, and not only a literary one. Characters of many tragedies will mention the therapeutic aspect of lament, examined in this paper: they consider tears, wails and words directed to the deceased as joyful service, enjoyment, music, song precious and indispensable. This paper has its supplement, shaping the pain in few case studies. Inspired by laments of Montenegrin women, those that I have heard or read, I am re-reading Euripides’ Electra and Electra by Danilo Kiš (in which both Euripides’ drama and Montenegrin folklore is reflected, I am watching the Michalis Kakojannis’ movie Electra. Electra’s pain for loss, the one that through

  15. Beyond the East-West Dilemma: Rethinking Greekness Through Diffracted Gazes in Contemporary Greek Travelogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Karpouzou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Travel writing has been viewed as one of the main sources of national typologies and is often held responsible for the consolidation of stereotypes about otherness and for the promotion of an imperialist agenda. This paper aims to investigate conceptions of Greekness in contemporary Greek travelogues which involve a rethinking of stereotypical national representations. The analysis proceeds by proposing the method of “questioning home” in travelogues through diffracted gazes towards the traveller’s homeland as a result of his encounter with otherness. In the second part, Greekness is explored beyond the nation-state approach and the long-held national stereotype of the “Greek particularism”, Greece’s isolation because of the country’s unresolved tension between East and West. A. Vistonitis’ and M. Kassolas’s travelogues reporting their travels to the East (China and to the West (USA respectively at the end of the 20th century are examined as case-studies. Through narrators’ dialogues with their hosts and the raising of relevant political and geopolitical issues, “transnational” conceptions of Greek identity are explored: the notions of “diaspora”, “cosmopolitan citizenship”, “openness” and “connectivity” challenge the national narration based on “purity” and “exclusion”, and facilitate the investigation of potential roles for Greece in the globalized world of the early 21st century.

  16. The Table of Chords and Greek Trigonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Buscherini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trigonometry was born due to the need of ancient astronomy to calculate and to predict the movement of the heavenly bodies. However it is hard to know who the founder of this mathematical branch was: it is likely that its origins date back to Hipparchus of Nicaea who compiled the first table of chords, which are the forerunners of the modern trigonometric function “sine”. Nevertheless the most ancient existing work on trigonometry is the Almagest of Ptolemy in which the author describes the mathematical steps that are necessary for the compilation of the table of chords. These steps are based on more ancient theories and for this reason one gets the impression that they could be the result of a preparatory study. This article is not only a brief survey of Greek trigonometry but it also analyzes the Greek numeration system, the sexagesimal fractions and the arithmetical operations which were used in the calculation of the chords.

  17. Validation of a Greek version of PSS-14; a global measure of perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarou, Alexia; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Zafeiropoulou, Aggeliki; Vryonis, Marios; Skoularigis, Ioannis; Tryposkiadis, Filippos; Papageorgiou, Charalabos

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate validity of the Greek version of a global measure of perceived stress PSS-14 (Perceived Stress Scale - 14 item). The original PSS-14 (theoretical range 0-56) was translated into Greek and then back-translated. One hundred men and women (39 +/- 10 years old, 40 men) participated in the validation process. Firstly, participants completed the Greek PSS-14 and, then they were interviewed by a psychologist specializing in stress management. Cronbach's alpha (a) evaluated internal consistency of the measurement, whereas Kendall's tau-b and Bland & Altman methods assessed consistency with the clinical evaluation. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor analyses were conducted to reveal hidden factors within the data and to confirm the two-dimensional character of the scale. Mean (SD) PSS-14 score was 25(7.9). Strong internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.847) as well as moderate-to-good concordance between clinical assessment and PSS-14 (Kendall's tau-b = 0.43, p PSS-14 seems to be a valid instrument for the assessment of perceived stress in the Greek adult population living in urban areas; a finding that supports its local use in research settings as an evaluation tool measuring perceived stress, mainly as a risk factor but without diagnostic properties.

  18. Whither prometheus' liver? Greek myth and the science of regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Carl; Rasko, John E J

    2008-09-16

    Stem-cell biologists and those involved in regenerative medicine are fascinated by the story of Prometheus, the Greek god whose immortal liver was feasted on day after day by Zeus' eagle. This myth invariably provokes the question: Did the ancient Greeks know about the liver's amazing capacity for self-repair? The authors address this question by exploring the origins of Greek myth and medicine, adopting a 2-fold strategy. First, the authors consider what opportunities the ancient Greeks had to learn about the liver's structure and function. This involves a discussion of early battlefield surgery, the beginnings of anatomical research, and the ancient art of liver augury. In addition, the authors consider how the Greeks understood Prometheus' immortal liver. Not only do the authors examine the general theme of regeneration in Greek mythology, they survey several scholarly interpretations of Prometheus' torture.

  19. Origins of the historiography of modern Greek science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiniotis, Manolis

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to examine how Greek historians account for the presence of modern scientific ideas in the intellectual environment of eighteenth-century Greek-speaking society. It will also discuss the function of the history of modern Greek science in the context of Greek national historiography. As will be shown, the history of modem Greek science spent most of its life under the shadow of the history of ideas. Despite its seemingly secondary role, however, it occupied a distinctive place within national historiography because it formed the ground upon which different perceptions of the country's European identity converged. In this respect, one of the main goals of this paper is to outline the particular ideological presumptions, which shaped the historiography of modern Greek science under different historical circumstances. At the end an attempt will be made to articulate a viewpoint more in tandem with the recent methodological developments in the history of science.

  20. THE NICE CASE OF THE GREEK INSPECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Barea Romero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is described the disappearance of the Inspector of Education in the Greek educational system and the recent discussion on recovery or not on the context of political and social changes of modern Greece. This portrait is described within the political and social historical area of Greece. Finally, conclusions about the institution of inspector of education and its relevance in the European context are extracted. No direct similarities are established with the Spanish case.

  1. Greek anatomist herophilus: the father of anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Bay, Noel Si-Yang; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2010-01-01

    One of the most stirring controversies in the history of Anatomy is that Herophilus, an ancient Greek anatomist and his younger contemporary, Erasistratus, were accused of performing vivisections of living humans. However, this does not detract from the fact that Herophilus has made phenomenal anatomical observations of the human body which have contributed significantly towards the understanding of the brain, eye, liver, reproductive organs and nervous system. It is notable that he was the f...

  2. Caesarean section in Ancient Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The narrative of caesarean birth appears on several occasions in Greek mythology: in the birth of Dionysus is the God of the grape harvest and winemaking and wine; in the birth of Asclepius the God of medicine and healing; and in the birth of Adonis the God of beauty and desire. It is possible, however not obligatory, that it was not solely a fantasy but also reflected a contemporary medical practice.

  3. Using Options on Greeks as Liquidity Protection

    OpenAIRE

    David Bakstein; Sam Howison

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we suggest derivative contracts related to the Greeks of options; we show how to value them and how they can be used to manage the risk of a portfolio of derivatives. We further describe certain types of these options, namely those related to the Delta and Gamma, which can be regarded as a form of insurance against liquidity holes and transaction costs for the writer of the contract representing the underlying.

  4. Integrating science and business models of sustainability for environmentally-challenging industries such as secondary lead smelters: a systematic review and analysis of findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genaidy, A M; Sequeira, R; Tolaymat, T; Kohler, J; Wallace, S; Rinder, M

    2010-09-01

    Secondary lead smelters (SLS) represent an environmentally-challenging industry as they deal with toxic substances posing potential threats to both human and environmental health, consequently, they operate under strict government regulations. Such challenges have resulted in the significant reduction of SLS plants in the last three decades. In addition, the domestic recycling of lead has been on a steep decline in the past 10 years as the amount of lead recovered has remained virtually unchanged while consumption has increased. Therefore, one may wonder whether sustainable development can be achieved among SLS. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether a roadmap for sustainable development can be established for SLS. The following aims were established in support of the study objective: (1) to conduct a systematic review and an analysis of models of sustainable systems with a particular emphasis on SLS; (2) to document the challenges for the U.S. secondary lead smelting industry; and (3) to explore practices and concepts which act as vehicles for SLS on the road to sustainable development. An evidence-based methodology was adopted to achieve the study objective. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted to implement the aforementioned specific aims. Inclusion criteria were established to filter out irrelevant scientific papers and reports. The relevant articles were closely scrutinized and appraised to extract the required information and data for the possible development of a sustainable roadmap. The search process yielded a number of research articles which were utilized in the systematic review. Two types of models emerged: management/business and science/mathematical models. Although the management/business models explored actions to achieve sustainable growth in the industrial enterprise, science/mathematical models attempted to explain the sustainable behaviors and properties aiming at predominantly ecosystem management. As such

  5. Devastating epidemics in recent ages Greek populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiou, Antonia; Michalaki, Vasiliki; Anagnostopoulou, Helen N

    2017-12-01

    In the recent Greek ages the most devastating epidemics were plague, smallpox, leprosy and cholera. In 1816 plague struck the Ionian and Aegean Islands, mainland Greece, Constantinople and Smyrna. The Venetians ruling the Ionian Islands effectively combated plague in contrast to the Ottomans ruling all other regions. In 1922, plague appeared in Patras refugees who were expelled by the Turks from Smyrna and Asia Minor. Inoculation against smallpox was first performed in Thessaly by the Greek women, and the Greek doctors Emmanouel Timonis (1713, Oxford) and Jakovos Pylarinos (1715, Venice) made relevant scientific publications. The first leper colony opened in Chios Island. In Crete, Spinalonga was transformed into a leper island, which following the Independence War against Turkish occupation and the unification of Crete with Greece in 1913, was classified as an International Leper Hospital. Cholera struck Greece in 1853-1854 brought by the French troops during the Crimean War, and again during the Balkan Wars (1912-13) when the Bulgarian troops brought cholera to northern Greece. Due to successive wars, medical assistance was not always available, so desperate people turned many times to religion through processions in honor of local saints, for their salvation in epidemics.

  6. Towards a regional-global organizational model for leading research driven business schools. Findings from a longitudinal study in China, Europe and the USA from 2010 until 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Carsten M. Syvertsen

    2017-01-01

    The author introduces the regional-globalized organizational design model suited for business schools wishing to play leading roles in research in the global knowledge economy. Professors were interviewed and secondary sources were used in the data collection process. In the time period lasting from 2010 until 2016. Chaos theory is used to illustrate the relevance of the regional-global model analyzing six business schools in China, Europe and the USA. The research suggests that the sampled b...

  7. Genetic causes of monogenic familial hypercholesterolemia in the Greek population: Lessons, mistakes, and the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaki, Vasiliki; Drogari, Euridiki

    2016-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a leading cause of premature atherosclerosis. Genetic defects in the LDLR, APOB and PCSK9 genes cause FH, and confirmation of a gene defect is essential for an indisputable diagnosis of the disease. FH is underdiagnosed and we aimed to revise the genetic defects that have been characterized in FH patients of Greek origin and define an effective, future strategy for genetic studies. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE on genetic studies with FH patients of Greek origin. To date, no APOB and PCSK9 mutations have been found in the Greek population. It must be noted however, that only a small number of patients has been screened for PCSK9 mutations. In total, 41 LDLR defects have been characterized, with 6 common mutations c.1646G>A (p.Gly546Asp), c.858C>A (p.Ser286Arg), c.81C>G (p.Cys27Trp), c.1285G>A (p.Val429Met), c.517T>C (p.Cys173Arg), and c.1775G>A (p.Gly592Glu) that account for >80% of all mutations. Due to geographic isolation, ​founder mutations exist in a subpopulation in North West Greece and the Greek Cypriot population but not in the general population. Genetic testing should focus primarily on LDLR, and subsequently on PCSK9 and APOB. The Greek population is genetically homogeneous, which allows for a quick molecular diagnosis of the disease. Cascade screening is feasible and will certainly facilitate the identification of additional patients. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Greek Mothers’ Narratives of the Construct of Parental Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philia Issari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides a brief overview of the ‘narrative turn’ in counselling and adopts a narrative perspective and analysis to explore Greek mothers’ experiences, and meaning making of involvement in their children’s learning. Data were collected via ten narrative interviews (life-history/biographical narrative. Participants portrayed a variety of conceptions and practices regarding children’s learning and parental participation. Mothers’ stories depicted parental engagement as a complex, multifaceted, flexible and multivoiced construct which can take various forms and is open to change. The findings can inform and enrich counselling practice and prevention efforts including parenting training programmes, family community programmes and home-school link initiatives. Of particular interest for counsellors and therapists are stories of functional and dysfunctional parental involvement practices, school expectations and cultural scripts, the working mother, identity and the process of change.

  9. From Ottoman colonial rule to nation statehood: Schooling and national identity in the early Greek school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore G. Zervas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After Ottoman colonial rule, education in Greece became an important institution for the ideological construction of a Greek national identity. This paper looks at schooling in Greece just prior to the Greek Revolution and immediately after Greek Independence, and how the Greek national school system assisted in the construction of a Greek national identity. This paper is divided into several sections. The introductory section discusses how a newly independent Greek nation-state struggled to unite the Greek people under a collective national identity. While most people at the time identified with their families, communities, and Greek Orthodox Christian religion, after Greek independence people began to see themselves as members of a broader Greek nation. The section that follows provides a discussion of Greek education during Ottoman colonial rule, and how a type of Greek identity (centered around the Greek Orthodox Christian faith was maintained through the Greek Orthodox mileu. The Greek Church ran schools, and taught Greek children how to read and write, as well as the virtues of the Orthodox Christian faith. Section three of the article looks at Greek education during the early years of the Greek nation-state. In this section the general contours of the Greek educational system are delineated. The section also discusses how the organization of the Greek national school system was borrowed from extant school models found in Western Europe. Section four describes the Greek national curriculum and how the national curriculum would help to teach future generations of Greek citizens what it meant to be Greek. This is further reinforced in the Greek school textbook, which is part of the discussion in section five. Section five concludes with the role of education and its implications in uniting nations from around the world.

  10. Validation of the Greek translation of the Nursing Dimensions Inventory questionnaire (NDI-35).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrotsiou, Evagelia; Gouva, Mary; Kotrotsiou, Stiliani; Malliarou, Maria; Paralikas, Theodosios

    2014-05-08

    valid and reliable measures in Greek-speaking populations. Alphas and test-retest correlation suggest the Greek translated and validated NDI-35 questionnaire is a reliable tool for assessing nursing care. Factor analysis and focus group input suggest it is a valid tool. Nurses in different settings may perceive nursing care differently. The findings of the current paper are discussed in the context of nurse education and assessment of care.

  11. Climate change projections for Greek viticulture as simulated by a regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazoglou, Georgia; Anagnostopoulou, Christina; Koundouras, Stefanos

    2017-07-01

    Viticulture represents an important economic activity for Greek agriculture. Winegrapes are cultivated in many areas covering the whole Greek territory, due to the favorable soil and climatic conditions. Given the dependence of viticulture on climate, the vitivinicultural sector is expected to be affected by possible climatic changes. The present study is set out to investigate the impacts of climatic change in Greek viticulture, using nine bioclimatic indices for the period 1981-2100. For this purpose, reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and data from the regional climatic model Regional Climate Model Version 3 (RegCM3) are used. It was found that the examined regional climate model estimates satisfactorily these bioclimatic indices. The results of the study show that the increasing trend of temperature and drought will affect all wine-producing regions in Greece. In vineyards in mountainous regions, the impact is positive, while in islands and coastal regions, it is negative. Overall, it should be highlighted that for the first time that Greece is classified into common climatic characteristic categories, according to the international Geoviticulture Multicriteria Climatic Classification System (MCC system). According to the proposed classification, Greek viticulture regions are estimated to have similar climatic characteristics with the warmer wine-producing regions of the world up to the end of twenty-first century. Wine growers and winemakers should take the findings of the study under consideration in order to take measures for Greek wine sector adaptation and the continuation of high-quality wine production.

  12. Informal Learning in Late-Nineteenth and Early-Twentieth-Century Greece: Greek Children's Literature in Historical and Political Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervas, Theodore G.

    2013-01-01

    After Greek independence from the Ottoman Empire (1827), a newly formed Greek state looked to retrieve its past through the teaching of a Greek national history. For much of the nineteenth century Greek schools forged common religious, linguistic, and historical ties among the Greek people through the teaching of a Greek historical past (Zervas…

  13. Home advantage in Greek football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armatas, Vasilis; Pollard, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Home advantage as it relates to team performance at football was examined in Superleague Greece using nine seasons of game-by-game performance data, a total of 2160 matches. After adjusting for team ability and annual fluctuations in home advantage, there were significant differences between teams. Previous findings regarding the role of territorial protection were strengthened by the fact that home advantage was above average for the team from Xanthi (P =0.015), while lower for teams from the capital city Athens (P =0.008). There were differences between home and away teams in the incidence of most of the 13 within-game match variables, but associated effect sizes were only moderate. In contrast, outcome ratios derived from these variables, and measuring shot success, had negligible effect sizes. This supported a previous finding that home and away teams differed in the incidence of on-the-ball behaviours, but not in their outcomes. By far the most important predictor of home advantage, as measured by goal difference, was the difference between home and away teams in terms of kicked shots from inside the penalty area. Other types of shots had little effect on the final score. The absence of a running track between spectators and the playing field was also a significant predictor of goal difference, worth an average of 0.102 goals per game to the home team. Travel distance did not affect home advantage.

  14. A STRUCTURAL MODEL DESCRIBE CHINESE TRADESMEN ATTITUDES TOWARDS GREEK STUDENTS CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia D. ANASTASIADOU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tests evaluates 43 Chinese tradesmen opinios describe the main factors that influnce Greek consumers’ behavior. A structural model was constructed to represent the relationship between consumer components. The model was tested for its Convergent and Discriminant Validity. Moreover it was tested for its reliability and construct reliability. The findings from this study may be used by Chinese tradesmen to develop their marketing campains and customers.

  15. Higher Perceived Stress but Lower Cortisol Levels Found among Young Greek Adults Living in a Stressful Social Environment in Comparison with Swedish Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faresjö, Åshild; Theodorsson, Elvar; Chatziarzenis, Marios; Sapouna, Vasiliki; Claesson, Hans-Peter; Koppner, Jenny; Faresjö, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide financial crisis during recent years has raised concerns of negative public health effects. This is notably evident in southern Europe. In Greece, where the financial austerity has been especially pronounced, the prevalence of mental health problems including depression and suicide has increased, and outbreaks of infectious diseases have risen. The main objective in this study was to investigate whether different indicators of health and stress levels measured by a new biomarker based on cortisol in human hair were different amongst comparable Greek and Swedish young adults, considering that Sweden has been much less affected by the recent economic crises. In this cross-sectional comparative study, young adults from the city of Athens in Greece (n = 124) and from the city of Linkoping in Sweden (n = 112) participated. The data collection comprised answering a questionnaire with different health indicators and hair samples being analyzed for the stress hormone cortisol, a biomarker with the ability to retrospectively measure long-term cortisol exposure. The Greek young adults reported significantly higher perceived stress (p<0.0001), had experienced more serious life events (p = 0.002), had lower hope for the future (p<0.0001), and had significantly more widespread symptoms of depression (p<0.0001) and anxiety (p<0.0001) than the Swedes. But, the Greeks were found to have significantly lower cortisol levels (p<0.0001) than the Swedes, and this difference was still significant in a multivariate regression (p<0.0001), after adjustments for potential intervening variables. A variety of factors related to differences in the physical or socio-cultural environment between the two sites, might possibly explain this finding. However, a potential biological mechanism is that long-term stress exposure could lead to a lowering of the cortisol levels. This study points out a possible hypothesis that the cortisol levels of the Greek young adults might

  16. Higher perceived stress but lower cortisol levels found among young Greek adults living in a stressful social environment in comparison with Swedish young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åshild Faresjö

    Full Text Available The worldwide financial crisis during recent years has raised concerns of negative public health effects. This is notably evident in southern Europe. In Greece, where the financial austerity has been especially pronounced, the prevalence of mental health problems including depression and suicide has increased, and outbreaks of infectious diseases have risen. The main objective in this study was to investigate whether different indicators of health and stress levels measured by a new biomarker based on cortisol in human hair were different amongst comparable Greek and Swedish young adults, considering that Sweden has been much less affected by the recent economic crises. In this cross-sectional comparative study, young adults from the city of Athens in Greece (n = 124 and from the city of Linkoping in Sweden (n = 112 participated. The data collection comprised answering a questionnaire with different health indicators and hair samples being analyzed for the stress hormone cortisol, a biomarker with the ability to retrospectively measure long-term cortisol exposure. The Greek young adults reported significantly higher perceived stress (p<0.0001, had experienced more serious life events (p = 0.002, had lower hope for the future (p<0.0001, and had significantly more widespread symptoms of depression (p<0.0001 and anxiety (p<0.0001 than the Swedes. But, the Greeks were found to have significantly lower cortisol levels (p<0.0001 than the Swedes, and this difference was still significant in a multivariate regression (p<0.0001, after adjustments for potential intervening variables. A variety of factors related to differences in the physical or socio-cultural environment between the two sites, might possibly explain this finding. However, a potential biological mechanism is that long-term stress exposure could lead to a lowering of the cortisol levels. This study points out a possible hypothesis that the cortisol levels of the Greek young adults might

  17. Measuring Greek and Greek-Cypriot Students' Phonological Awareness Skills: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triga, Anastassia; Kakopsitou, Polina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new Greek phonological awareness test for preschool and primary school age children (ages 5-7) in Greece and Cyprus. A new phonological awareness test with 168 items was individually administered to 132 students (60 students in Cyprus and 72 students in Greece) from five urban, five semi-rural, and three…

  18. Teaching Ancient Greek History in Greek Compulsory Education: Textual and Ideological Continuities and Discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakosta, Konstantina

    2017-01-01

    The reality of Greek education presents a dissension in relation to the global trends regarding the existence and use of a single textbook per school subject. This reality also influences the orientation of education research. Thus, the international trend to study how textbooks affect the uptake of knowledge by the student, which is followed by…

  19. History through Art and Architecture: Ancient Greek Architecture [and] Ancient Greek Sculpture. Teacher's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ann

    This document consists of two teaching manuals designed to accompany a commercially-available "multicultural, interdisciplinary video program," consisting of four still videotape programs (72 minutes, 226 frames), one teaching poster, and these two manuals. "Teacher's Manual: Ancient Greek Architecture" covers: "Ancient…

  20. Greek loanwords in Serbian vernaculars on the territory of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlajić-Popović Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a pilot version of a more comprehensive study on Greek loanwords in Serbian vernaculars which will deal with their identification, distribution, periodisation, and adaptation. The materials excerpted from the presently existing dialectal dictionaries will be compared with the data from three classical sources on the topic: VASMER, POPOVIĆ 1953-1955, and SKOK. In this phase our goal was to find out whether there is any point in proceeding with the study of Greek loanwords in Serbian, after the results that have been reached by the three abovementioned authors. Our choice for the pilot analysis is Rečnik srpskih govora Vojvodine (RSGV because of its size, representativeness and actuality: it is the largest single dictionary (ten volumes comprising over 2,000 pages, it has covered the vastests continual territory (at the same time most distant from the line of contact with Greek, and also beyond the borders of the Balkan linguistic unity, it falls in the number of the most up-to-date ones (published in the period 2001 to 2011. The paper offers not just a linear inventory of Grecisms from RSGV, but a classification of types of divergencies from the standard body of Grecisms. It features primarily novelties - be they represented by new words (ponomarh ‘cleric’, mironisati ‘to pray in the church’, parasnik ‘unruly person’, by new semantics (buklijaš ‘horse ridden by the man who carries buklija’, Grk ‘shopkeeper’, katarka ‘long pole onto which knife for cutting the fishing-net is poised’, kolaba ‘structure for drying meat in the attic’, kondir ‘bucket for cattle; mode of cutting wine’, krevet ‘laundry; chair; the lower layer of sheaves in a stook’, liman ‘underwater source’, mira ‘extract produced by cooking large amounts of fish in little water, used as an additon to fish-stew’, paripa ‘horse farm’, by new formation (krevetnjača ‘a solid piece of wood fencing a straw

  1. Analytical Investigation Of Pigments, Ground Layer And Media Of Cartonnage Fragments From Greek Roman Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hala. A. M.

    Some cartonnage fragments from Hawara, Fayoum Excavation were examined to identify pigments, media and grounds. It belonged to the Greek-Roman period. They were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X ray analysis (EDS) equipped with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). These techniques were used to identify the composition and morphology of grounds, nature of pigments and media used in cartonnage fragments. The coarse ground layer was composed of calcite and traces of quartz. The fine ground layer used under the pigments directly was composed of calcite only. Carbon black was used as black pigment while lead oxide as red pigment, showing the influence of Roman and Greek pigments on Egyptian art in these later periods. Blue colorant was identified as cuprorivaite and yellow pigment was goethite. Animal glue was used in the four pigments as medium colored.

  2. Short Overview of the Evolution of Modern Greek State

    OpenAIRE

    Shalva Tchkadua

    2012-01-01

    In the article the author describes and analyzes the historical path of Greece, from the national liberation movement to its integration into Euro-Atlantic structures. The article briefly but clearly describes the process of the Greek national liberation movement. The author highlights the Greek nation’s fight to strengthen independence and democracy.

  3. Greek Membership: The Relationship with First-Year Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBard, Robert; Sacks, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Much has been written about the need for student involvement to build a sense of belonging on college campuses. However, when it comes to membership in Greek social organizations, such involvement has been largely cast as negative. Unlike many of the anecdotal articles critical of the influence joining a Greek social organization can have on…

  4. Teachers' Perceptions of Greek Special Education Policies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin J.; Morfidi, Eleni; Soulis, Spyros

    2013-01-01

    Special education teachers and related service providers were interviewed for their perspectives on Greek special education policies and practices and how these influenced their job preparation and duties. Specifically, they were asked about the impact of the following on their jobs: Greek law related to the education of students with…

  5. Ethnicity in the Greek Community of Des Moines, Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, Virginia K.

    This paper examines the role and variability of Greek ethnicity in Des Moines, Iowa, with special reference to the 230 persons who form the core group of the local Greek community. Operating tangentially to this core group network is another series of networks which operate intermittently to include new members of the community. Despite their low…

  6. Three Generations of Greek Americans: A Study in Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scourby, Alice

    1980-01-01

    Measures ethnic identity among three generations of Greek Americans living in the New York Metropolitan area. Shows that, though there is a generational variation, the majority of Greeks still have relatively strong attachment to their ethnic culture, despite their identification with American society. (Author/GC)

  7. Evaluating and Recommending Greek Newspapers' Websites Using Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Dimitris; Kotsiantis, Sotiris

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to evaluate Greek newspaper websites using clustering and a number of criteria obtained from the Alexa search engine. Furthermore, a recommendation approach is proposed for matching Greek online newspapers with the profiles of potential readers. The paper presents the implementation and validation of a recommender…

  8. Sin, Punishment And Forgiveness In Ancient Greek Religion: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper looks in particular at the special sin of hubris in ancient Greek religious thought. It examines what constitutes hubris and some cases in which hubris has been committed and punished. It demonstrates with examples that hubris is an unforgivable sin in ancient Greek religion and examines the reasons for this ...

  9. The Latin-Greek Connection: Building Vocabulary through Morphological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Timothy V.; Padak, Nancy; Newton, Joanna; Newton, Evangeline

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors make a case for teaching vocabulary in the elementary grades through a focus on the morphological structure of words, in particular English words that are derived through Latin and Greek roots and affixes. The authors present a set of engaging instructional ideas for the use of Latin and Greek derivations to teach…

  10. Attitudes Towards Modifications in the Orthographic Representation of Modern Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapavlou, Andreas N.

    A survey investigated the attitudes of educated Greeks about possible modifications in the orthographic representation of written Greek. Subjects were 82 students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts program in English Language and Literature offered at the University of Cyprus. The subjects were administered a 20-item Likert-type questionnaire…

  11. Factors Associated with Abnormal Eating Attitudes among Greek Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilali, Aggeliki; Galanis, Petros; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Katostaras, Theofanis

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes among Greek adolescents and identify possible risk factors associated with these attitudes. Design: Cross-sectional, school-based study. Setting: Six randomly selected schools in Patras, southern Greece. Participants: The study population consisted of 540 Greek students aged 13-18…

  12. Athletics, festivals and Greek identity in the Roman East

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nijf, Onno Martien

    2000-01-01

    Greek festivals continued to play a central part in civic life under Roman rule, but were reformed and adapted to fit the transfer of power to Rome. Participation in athletic contests expanded to include athletes from all over the Greek East. Festivals often involved imperial patronage ; the picture

  13. Alternatives to Greek-Letter Organizations Warrant a Second Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Marc C.

    2004-01-01

    Because of the discriminatory practices and lack of appeal of many predominantly White Greek-letter organizations, students of color sought the development of their own. Alpha Phi Alpha, Rho Psi, MALIK Sigma Psi, Lambda Theta Phi, and Alpha Pi Omega set the stage for later African American, Asian, African, Latino and American Indian Greek-letter…

  14. Gorgias' scepticism regarding Greek social class distinctions in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gorgias' scepticism regarding. Greek social class distinctions in the Funeral Oration (DK.82.BSa). Victor S. Alumona. Introduction. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the covert sceptical disposition o:f Gor- gias of Leontini, one of the major Sophists, regarding social class distinctions in the Greek Society of his day.

  15. Home Space: Youth Identification in the Greek Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolidis, Georgina; Pollard, Vikki

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on a larger study on schooling and diaspora using the case of the Greek community of Melbourne, Australia to examine processes of identification of young people with access to minority cultures. The Melbourne Greek community is long-standing, diverse, and well-established. Because of this, the young people involved in this study…

  16. Psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Toronto Composite Empathy Scale in Greek dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiantou, D; Lazaridou, D; Coolidge, T; Arapostathis, K N; Kotsanos, N

    2013-11-01

    Empathy levels of health practitioners are related to patient satisfaction and treatment outcomes. The Toronto Composite Empathy Scale (TCES) was recently developed to assess cognitive and emotional empathy levels in both professional and personal spheres, and tested in an English-speaking sample of dental students. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometrics of the Greek version of the TCES. The TCES was translated into Greek and administered to all of the dental students at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. A random subset of students completed the questionnaire twice for test-retest analysis. Nearly all (96.5%) of the students completed the questionnaire. The internal consistencies of each of the four subscales were generally acceptable (Cronbach's alphas: 0.676-0.805), and the scale showed good discriminant and convergent validities (r's for discriminant validity: 0.217 and 0.103; r's for convergent validity: 0.595 and 0.700). Test-retest reliabilities ranged from 0.478 to 0.779. After eliminating items that fell on both cognitive and emotional factors, a rotated factor analysis indicated that the items loaded on two cognitive and three emotional factors. Our results indicate that the Greek version of the TCES has good psychometric properties. The factor analysis indicates that the emotional and cognitive aspects of empathy are distinct, supporting the need to address both aspects in studies of empathy. The Greek version of the TCES is a reliable and valid tool for the measurement of cognitive and emotional empathy, in both professional and personal life, in Greek dental students. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Gastronomy as a form of cultural tourism: A Greek typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Polyxeni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foods, as well as other factors, such as accommodation, attractions, recreational activities and transport are key parts of the tourism product of host destinations. It has been found that in recent years, tourism choices have not been determined only by the simple biological need to eat, but also by the desire to try interesting products within an appropriate environment. Modern, experienced travelers look for destinations' quality, as linked to a deeper knowledge of the culture and lifestyle of the inhabitants of the place they are visiting. As lifestyles of people are deeply related to what and how they eat, how they prepare food and in what environment, what the rituals of food consumption are, combined with the architecture and place, a strong demand has been created for local food and a trend of what is called 'gastronomic/culinary tourism'. A survey was carried out in order to explore the forms of product supply, commercialization strategy as well as methods to promote gastronomic tourism in Greece. In particular, the search was carried out through the internet businesses in Greece involved in the field of gastronomy and tourism, using keywords such as gastronomy, Greek cuisine, Greek breakfast, wine routes, olive routes, etc. Then, the findings were classified into categories in order to evaluate their activity. The survey revealed that companies involved in the field of gastronomy are numerous and of various nature. These include restaurants, hotels, guest and rural houses, tourism agencies, food manufacturers, food markets, museums, exhibition halls, etc. Their activities are equally varied and creative (related to wine, honey, herbs, etc, cultural routes that have to do with a product, thematic museums, etc. Due to the lack of targeted central tourism policy in the field, it is proposed to further explore the field and record domestic gastronomic resources at regional administrative levels in order to effectively valorize and promote

  18. The Teaching of Controversial Issues during Elementary-Level History Instruction: Greek-Cypriot Teachers' Perceptions and Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Kambani, Froso

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a phenomenological study of 18 Greek-Cypriot teachers' perceptions and emotions in relation to the teaching of controversial issues during elementary-level history instruction. Findings indicate that although participating teachers see the general value of this approach at the elementary school level, they become less…

  19. The Puzzle of the Missing Greek Exports

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Boewer; Vasiliki Michou; Christoph Ungerer

    2014-01-01

    Why is Greece such a surprisingly closed economy? We employ a gravity model of trade to explain the appallingly poor export performance of Greece and argue that weak institutional quality accounts for a large part of this shortfall. Using a rich dataset of bilateral value-added exports of goods and services of 39 exporters and 56 importers for 18 sectors, we first estimate that Greece exports ? less than what regular international trade patterns would predict on basis of Greek GDP, the size o...

  20. Dietary Habits of Greek Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperakis, S. M.; Papadimitriou, V.; Zafiropoulou, M.; Piperakis, A. S.; Zisis, P.

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess Greek primary (1st to 6th grade) school children's dietary habits and the factors influencing them. Our results show that children know the value of different foods. The socio-economic status of father has no effect on the attitude of children towards choosing their diet, however, mothers' educational status appears to have an effect on their children's behaviour. Place of residence (urban or semi-rural areas) and gender does not influence their knowledge about different diets. It was, finally, shown that as children grow older they tend to eat less healthy foods.

  1. Greek Astronomy and the Medieval Arabic Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, George

    2002-07-01

    Islamic scholars of the Middle Ages are often credited with preserving the scientific writings of Antiquity through the Dark Ages of Europe. Saliba argues that the medieval Islamic astronomers did far more—actually correcting and improving on Greek astronomy by creating new mathematical tools to explain the motions of celestial objects. These tools were so useful that Copernicus appears to have borrowed them for use in his heliocentric cosmology. In this new light, the medieval Islamic astronomers played a fundamental role in the scientific revolution that was forged in Europe during the Renaissance.

  2. Max Raphael, dialectics and Greek art

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, P.

    2007-01-01

    The article outlines what is required for a theory of art in the late work of Max Raphael, by showing that it is a response to a problematic first formulated, but left unanswered, by Marx, and which can be seen as developed by Raphael in his writing, especially the text he devoted to a dialectic interpretation of Greek art, with special reference to temple architecture. In detailing this latter study it is possible to see how Raphael’s understanding and analysis is guided by his account of an...

  3. Max Raphael: Dialectics and Greek Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Healy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines what is required for a theory of art in the late work of Max Raphael, by showing that it is a response to a problematic first formulated, but left unanswered, by Marx, and which can be seen as developed by Raphael in his writing, especially the text he devoted to a dialectic interpretation of Greek art, with special reference to temple architecture. In detailing this latter study it is possible to see how Raphael’s understanding and analysis is guided by his account of an empirical theory of art, and contributes to its further elaboration.

  4. 77 FR 18897 - Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... ancient Hellas, where Greeks brought forth the world's first democracy and kindled a philosophical... partnerships between our people. During the American Civil War, Greek Americans served and fought to preserve our Union. Through two World Wars and a long Cold War, America and Greece stood as allies in the...

  5. Cyclopia: from Greek antiquity to medical genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantzis, George C; Tsiamis, Costas B; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie L

    2013-01-01

    Cyclops are among the best-known monsters of Greek mythology, also mentioned in art and literature. According to the most recent scientific knowledge, the malformations caused by defective development of the anterior brain and midline mesodermal structures include cyclopia (synophthalmos), ethmocephaly, cebocephaly and arrhinencephaly. These severe forebrain lesions often are accompanied by severe systemic malformations, and affected infants rarely survive. Neither true cyclopia nor synophthalmos are compatible with life because an anomalous development of the brain is involved. Thus, it is difficult to assume that ancient Greeks drew their inspiration from an adult patient suffering from cyclopia. Cyclops appear for the first time in literature in Homer's Odyssey (8th-7th century BC) and one of them, Polyphemus, is blinded by the hero of the epic poem. The description of the creature is identical with patients suffering from cyclopia; eyes are fused and above the median eye there is a proboscis, which is the result of an abnormal development of the surface ectodermal structures covering the brain. The next literature appearance of Cyclops is at the end of 7th century BC in "Theogonia", written by Hesiodus. Another interesting description is made by Euripides in his satyr play entitled 'Cyclops' (5th century BC). In conclusion, though it is not certain whether Homer's description of Cyclops was based on his personal experience or the narration of his ancestors, there is no doubt that the ophthalmological disease, cyclopia, was named after this mythical creature.

  6. The Greek crisis: Causes and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlamis Prodromos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and critically discusses the origins and causes of the Greek fiscal crisis and its implications for the euro currency as well as the SEE economies. In the aftermath of the 2007-2009 financial crisis the enormous increase in sovereign debt has emerged as an important negative outcome, since public debt was dramatically increased in an effort by the US and the European governments to reduce the accumulated growth of private debt in the years preceding the recent financial turmoil. Although Greece is the country member of the eurozone that has been in the middle of this ongoing debt crisis, since November 2009 when it was made clear that its budget deficit and mainly its public debt were not sustainable, Greece’s fiscal crisis is not directly linked to the 2007 US subprime mortgage loan market crisis. As a result of this negative downturn the Greek government happily accepted a rescue plan of 110 billion euros designed and financed by the European Union and the IMF. A lengthy austerity programme and a fiscal consolidation plan have been put forward and are to be implemented in the next three years.

  7. Greek archaic ceramics manufactured in Huelva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando González de Canales Cerisola

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the late 1980s, a group of Greek Archaic pottery characterized by a greenish yellow paste was differentiated in the city of Huelva, Spain. The origin of these vases, unknown so far in other archaeological sites, had remained undetermined. This paper proves a production in situ based on the uniqueness of the location, the formal and decorative features of the documented types, certain anomalies in the shape of an amphora and, definitely, the analytical characterization of clays by X-Ray Powder Diffraction and Neutron Activation Analysis. The former method showed the formation, during the ceramic firing process, of crystalline phases (diopside, anorthite and gehlenite compatible with the primary composition of the clay from local deposits, rich in carbonates; while the latter, showed a close similarity between the chemical composition of both pottery and local clay materials. Of great interest is the presence of gold and silver in the ceramic clays. The same analytical determinations in two samples of other poorly delimited group of Archaic Greek pottery, characterized by orange, reddish or yellowish clay, reddish slip and low quality, point out that a part or perhaps most ceramic wares of such characteristics were also locally produced.

  8. Succinct history of Greek cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Koletsis, Efstratios; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The development and evolution of Greek Cardiac Surgery (GCS) has followed the international cardiothoracic surgery after the invention of cardiopulmonary bypass machine by John Gibbon in 1953. Chronologically, the development of GCS could be divided in four periods: (a) the first or essay period (1950-1960) characterized by the lack of organization, the experimentation and hesitation from the surgeons' side, and the reluctance from the patients' side to have an operation in Greece. (b) The second or stabilization period (1960-1970) is the period during which several separate cardiovascular departments were organized and performed the first valve replacement in 1964. (c) The third or "strengthening" period (1970-1985), during which Greek surgeons were trained abroad and adopted new methods and techniques of surgical therapy. The first operations of coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic aneurysm were performed (1973-1975). Various purely Cardiothoracic Centers were founded in Athens and Thessalonica and cardiac surgery became a routine operation. However, these centers were numerically not enough to cover the demand of patients in need of cardiac surgery. (d) The fourth or maturity period (1985 till today). It is characterized by the creation of private cardiac surgery departments and the gradual establishment of new university centers at the periphery, which along with the Onassis Cardiac Center, eliminated any need for patients to leave the country.

  9. Vocabulary Development in Greek Children: A Cross-Linguistic Comparison Using the Language Development Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaeliou, Christina F.; Rescorla, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated vocabulary size and vocabulary composition in Greek children aged 1 ; 6 to 2 ; 11 using a Greek adaptation of Rescorla's Language Development Survey (LDS; Rescorla, 1989). Participants were 273 toddlers coming from monolingual Greek-speaking families. Greek LDS data were compared with US LDS data obtained from the…

  10. Unlocking Australia's Language Potential. Profiles of 9 Key Languages in Australia. Volume 8: Modern Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamis, A. M.; And Others

    The status of modern Greek in Australian society and education are detailed in this report. Chapters include discussion of these issues: the history of modern Greek in Australia (Greek immigration and settlement, public and private domains of use, language maintenance and shift, and language quality); the functions of modern Greek in Australia…

  11. Subject Area Glossary: Greek-English Vocabulary. Curriculum Bulletin Number 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    A glossary of Greek counterparts for terms used in the Chicago public schools' curricula is intended to be used by teachers of native Greek-speaking, limited-English speaking students. An introductory section outlines Greek phonology and pronunciation, and ensuing sections provide English vocabulary lists with both the Greek orthography and…

  12. Year 2 Classical Greek Magnet Elementary Schools: 1990-1991. Formative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seever, Mark

    The second implementation year of Classical Greek magnet programs in two elementary schools in the school district of Kansas City, Missouri, is evaluated. The Pitcher Classical Greek Magnet (PCGM) School and Woodland Classical Greek Magnet (WCGP) School programs emphasize a strong liberal arts education that reflects the classical Greek ideal of a…

  13. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites

  14. Processing Coordinate Subject-Verb Agreement in L1 and L2 Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsa, Maria; Tsimpli, Ianthi M; Marinis, Theodoros; Stavrou, Melita

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the processing of subject-verb (SV) number agreement with coordinate subjects in pre-verbal and post-verbal positions in Greek. Greek is a language with morphological number marked on nominal and verbal elements. Coordinate SV agreement, however, is special in Greek as it is sensitive to the coordinate subject's position: when pre-verbal, the verb is marked for plural while when post-verbal the verb can be in the singular. We conducted two experiments, an acceptability judgment task with adult monolinguals as a pre-study (Experiment 1) and a self-paced reading task as the main study (Experiment 2) in order to obtain acceptance as well as processing data. Forty adult monolingual speakers of Greek participated in Experiment 1 and a hundred and forty one in Experiment 2. Seventy one children participated in Experiment 2: 30 Albanian-Greek sequential bilingual children and 41 Greek monolingual children aged 10-12 years. The adult data in Experiment 1 establish the difference in acceptability between singular VPs in SV and VS constructions reaffirming our hypothesis. Meanwhile, the adult data in Experiment 2 show that plural verbs accelerate processing regardless of subject position. The child online data show that sequential bilingual children have longer reading times (RTs) compared to the age-matched monolingual control group. However, both child groups follow a similar processing pattern in both pre-verbal and post-verbal constructions showing longer RTs immediately after a singular verb when the subject was pre-verbal indicating a grammaticality effect. In the post-verbal coordinate subject sentences, both child groups showed longer RTs on the first subject following the plural verb due to the temporary number mismatch between the verb and the first subject. This effect was resolved in monolingual children but was still present at the end of the sentence for bilingual children indicating difficulties to reanalyze and integrate information

  15. Post-Kyoto energy consumption strategies for the Greek interconnected electric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagoumas, A.S.; Panapakidis, I.P.; Papagiannis, G.K.; Dokopoulos, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The liberalization of the Greek electric market (Law 2773/99, updated with Laws 3175/2003 and 3426/2005 for incorporating Directive 2003/54 into the Greek legislation) is in its final structural transformation, which includes the fact that from 1.7.2007 each customer can select its electricity provider. This new status together with the procedure towards the formation of a post-Kyoto plan, raise the need of examining different energy saving strategies in the consumption side for evaluating their economic and environmental consequences. Such strategies may be useful for the decision makers or the electricity retail companies. This paper examines the influence of several post-Kyoto electricity consumption strategies in the Greek interconnected electric system for the period 2005-2025. The aim of the paper is to be used as a decision makers' tool for investigating the potential of electricity consumption policies. The results show that policies related either to seasonal peak demand control, or targeting at the total electric consumption lead to significant gains and emission reduction. Moreover the influence of factors, such as the weather conditions, the discount rate of the energy investments, the fuel prices evolution and the consumers' behavior linkage with oil prices are examined

  16. Sex determination by tooth size in a sample of Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsea, A G; Moraitis, K; Leon, G; Nicopoulou-Karayianni, K; Spiliopoulou, C

    2014-08-01

    Sex assessment from tooth measurements can be of major importance for forensic and bioarchaeological investigations, especially when only teeth or jaws are available. The purpose of this study is to assess the reliability and applicability of establishing sex identity in a sample of Greek population using the discriminant function proposed by Rösing et al. (1995). The study comprised of 172 dental casts derived from two private orthodontic clinics in Athens. The individuals were randomly selected and all had clear medical history. The mesiodistal crown diameters of all the teeth were measured apart from those of the 3rd molars. The values quoted for the sample to which the discriminant function was first applied were similar to those obtained for the Greek sample. The results of the preliminary statistical analysis did not support the use of the specific discriminant function for a reliable determination of sex by means of the mesiodistal diameter of the teeth. However, there was considerable variation between different populations and this might explain the reason for lack of discriminating power of the specific function in the Greek population. In order to investigate whether a better discriminant function could be obtained using the Greek data, separate discriminant function analysis was performed on the same teeth and a different equation emerged without, however, any real improvement in the classification process, with an overall correct classification of 72%. The results showed that there were a considerably higher percentage of females correctly classified than males. The results lead to the conclusion that the use of the mesiodistal diameter of teeth is not as a reliable method as one would have expected for determining sex of human remains from a forensic context. Therefore, this method could be used only in combination with other identification approaches. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. The Greek Qur’an : Scholarship and evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Høgel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The early Greek translation of the Qur’an has received little notice, not least due to the many claims that it was a faulty and inadequate attempt of rendering the Qur’an into Greek. This article argues that the faults are very few and minor, and that the early translation (from before 870 CE) should instead be read as a serious example of early Qur’anic interpretation as well as a documentation of early Greek readership of the Qur’an.

  18. The Greek Indignants through the domestic TV news bulletins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Veneti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Greek fiscal crisis kicked off many structural changes within the Greek society. Among these the uprising of a new form of protest, the movement of “indignados” (Spanish word meaning indignants in English, aganaktismeni in Greek. The paper surveys the ways in which the specific movement was presented to the public by the domestic TV news bulletins. The proposed research relies theoretically on the framing analysis approach, aiming to elaborate on the Media point of view regarding the specific social movement. The research method is media monitoring and analysis (stemming from the research rationale of content analysis.

  19. The influence of Greek drama on Matthew’s Gospel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. McCuistion

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the Greek influence on the genre of Matthew’s text. Greek and Roman tragedy is examined, from which the five basic elements of tragedy are identified. A brief examination of the characters in the Matthean text is done to identify Greek cultural influences on the structuring of the Gospel. This study offers evidence that Matthew may have intentionally orchestrated a drama with the intent of having an understandable, attractive way to present Jesus to Jew and gentile alike.

  20. Validation of the TRUST tool in a Greek perioperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Dey, Nilanjan; Melidoniotis, Evangelos

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the TRUST questionnaire in a Greek perioperative setting. The TRUST questionnaire assesses the relationship between trust and performance. The study assessed the levels of trust and performance in the surgery and anaesthesiology department during a very stressful period for Greece (economic crisis) and offered a user friendly and robust assessment tool. The study concludes that the Greek version of the TRUST questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring team performance among Greek perioperative teams. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  1. Aligning Greek-English parallel texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiotou, Eleni; Koronakis, George; Lazari, Vassiliki

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues concerning the alignment of parallel texts written in languages with different alphabets based on an experiment of aligning texts from the proceedings of the European Parliament in Greek and English. First, we describe our implementation of the k-vec algorithm and its application to the bilingual corpus. Then the output of the algorithm is used as a starting point for an alignment procedure at a sentence level which also takes into account mark-ups of meta-information. The results of the implementation are compared to those of the application of the Church and Gale alignment algorithm on the Europarl corpus. The conclusions of this comparison can give useful insights as for the efficiency of alignment algorithms when applied to the particular bilingual corpus.

  2. Andronikos I Komnenos: A Greek Tragedy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry J. MAGOULIAS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Annals of Niketas Choniates depict Emperor Andronikos I Komnenos (1183-1185 in certain aspects of his lifestyle as a mirror image of his first cousin, Emperor Manuel I Komnenos (1143-1180. The life and death of Andronikos I Komnenos provide us with a window into the aesthetic, moral, intellectual, religious, economic and emotional world of Byzantine society in the 12th century. It was thanks to the Byzantine empire that the ancient texts were preserved and transmitted. Ancient Greek culture and reason, in particular, continued to inform Christian values while, at the same time, both could be in radical conflict. The tragic reign of Andronikos as presented by Niketas Choniates conforms to Aristotle's principles of classical drama, but there is a fundamental disagreement between the author of the Poetics and the historian as to what constitutes tragedy, which underlines this conflict.

  3. Penile representations in ancient Greek art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempelakos, L; Tsiamis, C; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E

    2013-12-01

    The presentation of the cult of phallus in ancient Greece and the artistic appearance of the phenomenon on vase figures and statues, as indicative of the significant role of the male genitalia in all fertility ceremonies. The examination of a great number of penile representations from the ancient Greek pottery and sculpture and the review of the ancient theater plays (satiric dramas and comedies ). Phallus in artistic representation is connected either with gods of fertility, such as the goat-footed and horned Pan or the ugly dwarf Priapus or the semi-animal nailed figures Satyrs, devotees of the god Dionysus accompanying him in all ritual orgiastic celebrations. Phallus also symbolizes good luck, health and sexuality: people bear or wear artificial phalli exactly like the actors as part of their costume or carry huge penises during the festive ritual processions. On the contrary, the Olympic gods or the ordinary mortals are not imaged ithyphallic; the ideal type of male beauty epitomized in classical sculpture, normally depicts genitals of average or less than average size. It is noteworthy that many of these images belong to athletes during or immediately after hard exercise with the penis shrunk. The normal size genitalia may have been simply a convention to distinguish normal people from the gods of sexuality and fertility, protectors of the reproductive process of Nature. The representation of the over-sized and erected genitalia on vase figures or statues of ancient Greek art is related to fertility gods such as Priapus, Pan and Satyrs and there is strong evidence that imagination and legend were replacing the scientific achievements in the field of erectile function for many centuries.

  4. Greek paideia and terms of probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Leon Parada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses three aspects of the conceptual framework for a doctoral dissertation research in process in the field of Mathematics Education, in particular, in the subfield of teaching and learning basic concepts of Probability Theory at the College level. It intends to contrast, sustain and elucidate the central statement that the meanings of some of these basic terms used in Probability Theory were not formally defined by any specific theory but relate to primordial ideas developed in Western culture from Ancient Greek myths. The first aspect deals with the notion of uncertainty, with that Greek thinkers described several archaic gods and goddesses of Destiny, like Parcas and Moiras, often personified in the goddess Tyche—Fortuna for the Romans—, as regarded in Werner Jaeger’s “Paideia”. The second aspect treats the idea of hazard from two different approaches: the first approach deals with hazard, denoted by Plato with the already demythologized term ‘tyche’ from the viewpoint of innate knowledge, as Jaeger points out. The second approach deals with hazard from a perspective that could be called “phenomenological”, from which Aristotle attempted to articulate uncertainty with a discourse based on the hypothesis of causality. The term ‘causal’ was opposed both to ‘casual’ and to ‘spontaneous’ (as used in the expression “spontaneous generation”, attributing uncertainty to ignorance of the future, thus respecting causal flow. The third aspect treated in the paper refers to some definitions and etymologies of some other modern words that have become technical terms in current Probability Theory, confirming the above-mentioned main proposition of this paper.

  5. Poseidon: A marine environmental monitoring, forecasting and information system for the Greek seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.H. SOUKISSIAN

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this work is twofold: i to discuss and analyze some principles, issues and problems related to the development and advancement of Operational Oceanography in Greece and ii to present a real-time monitoring and forecasting system for the Aegean Sea, which is currently under implementation. Operational Oceanography in Greece has become a necessity today, since it can provide aid to find solutions on problems related to societal, economic, environmental and scientific issues. Most of the Greek coastal regions are under pressure, susceptible to damages due to the increasing tendency of the population to move from the inland to the coast, marine environmental pollution, competitive development of the coastal market sector, etc. Moreover, the complex geomorphology of the coastal areas and the interdependence between natural processes and human activities causes significant alterations in this delicate environment. A rational treatment of these problems can be based on integrated coastal zone management (ICZM. An absolutely necessary means for establishing ICZM is the operation of marine moni- toring systems. Such a system ("POSEIDON system" is under implementation by the National Centre for Marine Research. POSEIDON is a comprehensive marine monitoring and forecasting system, that aims to improve environmental surveillance and facilitate sea transport, rescue and safety of life at sea, fishing and aquaculture, protection of the marine ecosystem, etc. POSEIDON is expected to enhance considerably the capabilities to manage, protect and develop the marine resources of the Greek Seas and to promote Greek Operational Oceanography.

  6. Large scale integration of intermittent renewable energy sources in the Greek power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voumvoulakis, Emmanouil; Asimakopoulou, Georgia; Danchev, Svetoslav; Maniatis, George; Tsakanikas, Aggelos

    2012-01-01

    As a member of the European Union, Greece has committed to achieve ambitious targets for the penetration of renewable energy sources (RES) in gross electricity consumption by 2020. Large scale integration of RES requires a suitable mixture of compatible generation units, in order to deal with the intermittency of wind velocity and solar irradiation. The scope of this paper is to examine the impact of large scale integration of intermittent energy sources, required to meet the 2020 RES target, on the generation expansion plan, the fuel mix and the spinning reserve requirements of the Greek electricity system. We perform hourly simulation of the intermittent RES generation to estimate residual load curves on a monthly basis, which are then inputted in a WASP-IV model of the Greek power system. We find that the decarbonisation effort, with the rapid entry of RES and the abolishment of the grandfathering of CO 2 allowances, will radically transform the Greek electricity sector over the next 10 years, which has wide-reaching policy implications. - Highlights: ► Greece needs 8.8 to 9.3 GW additional RES installations by 2020. ► RES capacity credit varies between 12.2% and 15.3%, depending on interconnections. ► Without institutional changes, the reserve requirements will be more than double. ► New CCGT installed capacity will probably exceed the cost-efficient level. ► Competitive pressures should be introduced in segments other than day-ahead market.

  7. Medical supplies shortages and burnout among greek health care workers during economic crisis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachiotis, George; Kourousis, Christos; Kamilaraki, Maria; Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Dounias, George; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Greece has been seriously affected by the economic crisis. In 2011 there were reports of 40% reduction to public hospital budgets. Occasional shortages of medical supplies have been reported in mass media. We attempted to pivotally investigate the frequency of medical supplies shortages in two Greek hospital units of the National Health System and to also assess their possible impact on burnout risk of health care workers. We conducted a cross-sectional study (n=303) of health care workers in two Greek hospitals who were present at the workplace during a casually selected working day (morning shift work). The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used as the measure of burnout. An additional questionnaire was used about demographics, and working conditions (duration of employment, cumulative night shifts, type of hospital including medical supplies shortages and their impact on quality of healthcare. The prevalence of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment was 44.5%, 43.2% and 51.5%, respectively. Medical supply shortages were significantly associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. This finding provides preliminary evidence that austerity has affected health care in Greece. Moreover, the medical supply shortages in Greek hospitals may reflect the unfolding humanitarian crisis of the country.

  8. On some exotic urine colors in ancient and Byzantine Greek literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudas, Pavlos C; Diamandopoulos, Athanasios A

    2011-01-01

    This work does not analyze the entire subject of uroscopy but focuses on a very small part thereof: i.e., some rare urine colors, in particular green and blue. These are so rare that most modern nephrologists have never encountered them. We conducted a small survey comparing contemporary knowledge with that of the past, with the participation of 40 Greek nephrologists (25 juniors and 15 seniors). Of these, 63% rejected the notion that green or blue urine even exists, while of those who were aware of them, only 20% had personally encountered them. According to our search of the modern literature, such colors result from either consumption of green or blue pigments, liver dysfunction or urine infection by certain bacteria. We searched and traced several passages on these rare urine colors, referred to in ancient Greek fewer than 7 different names, in the Greek medical literature of the Classical, Roman and Byzantine eras. In these passages, the authors not only gave detailed descriptions of the medical conditions of the corresponding patients but also explained this appearance of the urine. Surprisingly, in the studied texts we also found identical explanations with those in modern texts: consumption of certain foods, liver disease and inflammation. We present and comment on these passages, concluding that many uroscopical findings of antiquity were not quackery, but rather reliable medical statements based on thorough observation and rational reasoning.

  9. Illness perceptions in Greek patients with cancer: a validation of the Revised-Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannousi, Zoe; Manaras, Irene; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Samonis, George

    2010-01-01

    The Revised-Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) assesses illness perceptions according to Leventhal's self-regulatory model. The aim of this paper is to present findings on the reliability and validity of the IPQ-R in a population of Greek cancer patients. A total of 206 patients completed a Greek translation of the IPQ-R and the Greek version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The scale's reliability was investigated by examining its internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and its test-retest reliability. Structural validity was examined through factor analyses. Predictive validity was tested by regressing BDI scores on IPQ subscale scores. Inter-relationships between IPQ-R dimensions were also examined by computing Pearson's Correlation Coefficients. Cronbach's alpha showed satisfactory internal consistency for the IPQ-R subscales. Paired samples' t-test showed good test-retest reliability. Factor analysis of the IPQ-R items revealed that the Greek version reflects the structure of the original with the only difference being that the 'Consequences' and 'Emotional Representations' subscales loaded on one factor. Factor analysis of the causal dimension items revealed a different structure of Causal Representations than that of the original questionnaire yielding three main factors: Psychological Attributions, Behavioral, and External Factors. Multiple regression analyses showed that Consequences, Emotional Representations, Illness Identity, and Psychological Attributions were the best predictors for depression. Translation of the IPQ-R has good reliability and similar structure to that of the original. Difficulties to confirm the structure of Causal Representations may represent cultural differences in understanding illness causation. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Roman Polis. To new mode for Greeks of the Empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel CORTÉS COPETE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional views about the Greeks in the Roman Empire (i.e. Rome as the new leader of Hellenism, or Greek alienation within the Empire, are not enough to explain the complex process which transformed the Greeks into Romans. Firstly, a new overview is needed: when dealing with the new imperial identity, reciprocity between Rome and the provinces should be acknowledged and become a main focus. Secondly, local and regional diversity should be taken into account, even though it never meant a serious danger to the existence of a common imperial identity. That was the case with the Eastern part of the Empire: the Greek polis went through deep changes -ideological, political, social and economical-, but it became a part of the very idea of Romanness.

  11. Understanding Greek Primary School Children's Comprehension of Sun Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperakis, Stylianos M.; Papadimitriou, Vasiliki; Piperakis, Michael M.; Zisis, Panagiotis

    2003-01-01

    Assesses Greek primary school children's understanding of sun exposure during summer vacation. Results indicate that children know the damaging effects of long time exposure and the precautions that should be taken during summer bathing. (Author/SOE)

  12. Dietetics in ancient Greek philosophy: Plato's concepts of healthy diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiadas, P K; Lascaratos, J G

    2001-07-01

    Plato (5th-4th century BC), one of the most important philosophers of Greek antiquity, left a valuable spiritual heritage, compiled in his famous dialogues. His teachings extend to almost every single field of human knowledge. Among other philosophical concepts, Plato's works are imbued with the fundamental principle of moderation. This spirit is characteristically evident in his references to human diet. According to the philosopher, a moderate and thus a healthy diet, consists of cereals, legumes, fruits, milk, honey and fish. However, meat, confectionery and wine should be consumed only in moderate quantities. Excesses in food lead to ailments and therefore should be avoided. Plato considers physicians responsible for the regulation of human diet, for medicine is a science and not merely an art as in the case of cookery. The dietary pattern presented in Platonic dialogues shares many common components with the highly-reputed Mediterranean diet. As a whole, Plato's writings represent a valuable source for the study of the nutritional customs during the classical period of ancient Greece.

  13. From ancient Greek medicine to EP³OS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopakis, E P; Hellings, P W; Velegrakis, G A; Kawauchi, H

    2010-09-01

    The manuscripts of eminent Byzantine physicians from the 4th to the 14th century contain extensive information on various otorhinolaryngological issues. In their work, the early knowledge of rhinological disease from definition and symptoms to conservative treatment and surgical intervention is intriguing. Most of this meticulous knowledge was developed through time, beginning mainly from Hippocrates and the Hellenistic period. Thereafter, medicine developed through Roman and Byzantium times to finally influence European medicine and later the rest of the Western world. History of medicine reflects the history of mankind itself, and otorhinolaryngology follows closely this path. Our goal is to slim down and illuminate the most challenging of the vast amount of information on rhinological issues contained in the original Greek text of Hippocrates, and mainly in the hagiographical texts of Byzantine medical writers. In particular, we focus on rhinological diseases from antiquity till the time being, following the journey of evolution of topical and nebulizer therapy for sinonasal inflammatory diseases in Greece, from "milothris" to modern nasal sprays, leading to an understanding of the philosophy of our predecessors and the roots of modern rhinology.

  14. Depression and Anxiety in Greek Male Veterans After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypraiou, Aspa; Sarafis, Pavlos; Tsounis, Andreas; Bitsi, Georgia; Andreanides, Elias; Constantinidis, Theodoros; Kotrotsiou, Evaggelia; Malliarou, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Retirement is a turning point in human life, resulting in changes to physical and mental health status. The aim of this study was to examine the factors that are related with depression and anxiety symptoms in Greek male veterans after retirement. A total of 502 veterans participated in a cross-sectional study. Beck Depression Inventory for depression assessment and Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory for anxiety assessment were used. The Ethics Committee of the Technological Educational Institution of Thessaly granted permission for conducting the research, and informed consent was obtained from all the participants. Questionnaires were filled in electronically using a platform that was made for the specific research. Mean values, standard deviations, Student t test, nonparametric cluster analysis of variance, Pearson's and Spearman's coefficients, and linear regression were conducted, using the Statistical Program for Social Services version 19.0. Severe depression was found in 3.8% of veterans with a mean score of 6.78, whereas 23.2% displayed mild-to-moderate symptoms of depression. Mean score of state anxiety was found to be 36.55 and of trait anxiety 33.60. Veterans who were discharged because of stressful working conditions, those who have a high body mass index, consume regularly alcohol, smoke and were not satisfied by changes in their everyday life after retirement had significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety, although those who retired because of family problems had significantly more symptoms of depression. Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that dissatisfaction related to lifestyle changes had statistically significant effect on symptoms of depression and anxiety, and stressful working conditions as a leading cause for retirement had statistically significant effect on depression. Finally, according to linear regression analyses results, those who were satisfied with their professional evolution had 1.80 times lower score in

  15. GREEKS AND BARBARIANS IN HOMER’S “ODYSSEY”

    OpenAIRE

    Ştefania VOICU

    2013-01-01

    Homer’s “Odyssey”, viewed as a relevant literary source for Archaic Greece, has led to the development of different research domains through the medium of hermeneutics or text interpretation. One of these directions regards the reconstitution of social aspects pertaining to the Archaic Greek world. Given that Odysseus’ adventures unfold beyond the borders of the world known by the hero, Greek identity can only be rendered by exclusion, the exclusion of the Other: the reverse of the reprehensi...

  16. Translation and the Canon of Greek Tragedy in Chinese Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Rongnü; Zhao, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In their article "Translation and the Canon of Greek Tragedy in Chinese Literature" Rongnü Chen and Lingling Zhao discuss when and how ancient Greek drama were introduced and merged into Chinese literature. Since Aeschylus's Prometheus Bound was first translated into Chinese and published in 1932 up to now, it has been translated eight times in China from 1932 to 2013. Starting from the Chinese translations and reception of Prometheus Bound, Chen and Zhao explore why so many translators have ...

  17. Electricity market models and RES integration: The Greek case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoglou, Christos K.; Biskas, Pandelis N.; Vagropoulos, Stylianos I.; Bakirtzis, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive analysis of the Greek electricity market for the next 7-year period (2014–2020) based on an hour-by-hour simulation considering five different RES technologies, namely wind, PV, small hydro, biomass and CHP with emphasis on PV integration. The impact of RES penetration on the electricity market operation is evaluated under two different models regarding the organization of the Greek wholesale day-ahead electricity market: a mandatory power pool for year 2014 (current market design) and a power exchange for the period 2015–2020 (Target Model). An integrated software tool is used for the simulation of the current and the future day-ahead market clearing algorithm of the Greek wholesale electricity market. Simulation results indicate the impact of the anticipated large-scale RES integration, in conjunction with each market model, on specific indicators of the Greek electricity market in the long-term. - Highlights: • Analysis of the Greek electricity market for the next 7-year period (2014–2020) based on hour-by-hour simulation. • Five different RES technologies are considered with emphasis on PV integration. • A power pool (for 2014) and a power exchange (for 2015–2020) are considered. • Various market indicators are used for the analysis of the impact of the RES integration on the Greek electricity market. • Two alternative tariff schemes for the compensation of the new ground-mounted PV units from 2015 onwards are investigated

  18. Traditional perception of Greeks in Serbian oral tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konjik Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on material on Greeks from Vuk’s corpus of epic poems, we discuss the construction of ethnic stereotype of Greeks in Serbian language. However, the limitation of the paper’s possible conclusion lies in the nature of the corpus: Vuk had deliberately chosen one material over another, therefore, the corpus relating to Greeks cannot be considered as representative of the whole Serbian folk poems. Therefore, the discussion is limited to certain elements of the stereotype. Nevertheless, these Serbian epic folk poems contain many layers: historical, geographical, sociological, mythological and so on, with a strong foundation in traditional culture; thus, they provide an insight into geo-political situation of the time period, viewpoints, perspectives and experiences of other ethnic groups that Serbs have been into contact with. In particular, the relationship toward Greeks was marked with pronounced patriarchal attitude concerning others: we-others, ours-foreign, good-bad. In this sense, Greeks are portrayed as foreign, and as such, as a potential source of danger. On the other hand, Greeks are Christian Orthodox, which associates them with the category ours. In socio-economic sense, they were traders and wealthy, respected gentlemen. In epical-heroic profile, they were not considered as great heroes, but as "lousy army", and frequently, as unfaithful.

  19. Caprine and ovine Greek dairy products: The official German method generates false-positive results due to κ-casein gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsartsianidou, V; Triantafillidou, D; Karaiskou, N; Tarantili, P; Triantafillidis, G; Georgakis, E; Triantafyllidis, A

    2017-05-01

    Caseins are widely used for species identification of dairy products. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of para-κ-casein peptide is used as the official German method for the differentiation between caprine (isoform A) and ovine (isoform B) dairy products, based on their different isoelectric points. The discrimination between Greek goat and ewe dairy products using IEF has, however, been shown to be problematic because of the existence of the ewe isoform in milk from Greek indigenous dairy goats. This could be due to nucleotide polymorphisms within the goat κ-casein gene of Greek indigenous breeds, which alter the isoelectric point of the para-κ-casein peptide and lead to false positive results. Previous DNA analysis of the goat κ-casein gene has shown high levels of polymorphism; however, no such information is available for Greek indigenous dairy goats. Therefore, 87 indigenous dairy goats were sequenced at exon IV of κ-casein gene. In total, 9 polymorphic sites were detected. Three nonsynonymous point mutations were identified, which change the isoelectric point of the goat para-κ-casein peptide so that it appears identical to that of the ewe peptide. Ten composite genotypes were reconstructed and 6 of them included the problematic point mutations. For the verification of genetic results, IEF was carried out. Both goat and ewe patterns appeared in the problematic genotypes. The frequency of these genotypes could be characterized as moderate (0.23) to high (0.60) within Greek indigenous breeds. However, this is not an issue restricted to Greece, as such genotypes have been detected in various non-Greek goat breeds. In conclusion, IEF based on the official German method is certainly inappropriate for ovine and caprine discrimination concerning Greek dairy goat products, and consequently a new method should be established. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of the factor structure of the Greek adaptation of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrides, Marios; Kkeli, Natalie; Kendeou, Panayiota

    2014-06-01

    The current study aimed to confirm the factor structure and reliability of the newly translated Greek version of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) among 1753 Greek-Cypriot high school students. Results of the structural equation modeling indicated a very good fit with the original four-factor structure of the SATAQ-3 for both males and females. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the four subscales were .92 for 'Internalization-General', .82 for 'Internalization-Athlete', .94 for 'Pressure' and .88 for 'Information'. Further analyses showed no significant differences between BMI categories with respect to the Internalization-General, Internalization-Athlete and Information factors but there were significant differences on the Pressure factor. The findings of the current study support the existence of the original four-factor structure of the SATAQ-3. The validity and reliability results of the Greek version of the SATAQ-3 support its use in Greek-speaking countries or populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Instilling Aggressiveness: U.S. Advisors and Greek Combat Leadership in the Greek Civil War, 1947-1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    term effects, including the coup d’etat.15 Both of these authors are a part of a liberal revisionist movement in Greek historiography that arose...280 Van Fleet brought a definite change in tone to JUSMAPG. While Livesay pushed his advisors to make the Greeks more aggressive, he had also told...officers still pushed their counterparts “to keep up the heat” on the communists, but there was a definite shift in tone that indicates increasing

  2. Graphic indicators of pedagogic style in Greek children's drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoti, Fotini; Misailidi, Plousia; Gregoriou, Fotini

    2003-08-01

    311 Greek children's drawings of classroom life were employed to investigate the diagnostic validity of this measure in identifying teachers' pedagogic style. The sample was divided into three age groups, 6-, 8-, and 10-yr. olds, who were asked to draw pictures of themselves and their teachers in their classroom. Drawings were scored using as criteria the four graphic indicators (ratings of size, detailing, centrality, and social distance) proposed by Aronsson and Anderson in 1996. Analysis showed three out of the four indicators discriminated teacher-centered vs student-centered pedagogic style. More specifically, in the teacher-centered setting children drew the teacher of dominant size, in a central position, and as remote, while in the student-centered setting the teacher was depicted closer to the student, in a less central position, and less emphasized relative to the student. The findings are discussed with respect to the absence of age-related effects and the possibility of using children's drawings of classroom life as a measure for tapping into children's representations of pedagogic style.

  3. Estimates and influences of reflective opposite-sex norms on alcohol use among a high-risk sample of college students: Exploring Greek-affiliation and gender effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Justin F.; LaBrie, Joseph W.; Lac, Andrew; Sessoms, Ashley; Cail, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Reflective opposite sex norms are behavior that an individual believes the opposite sex prefers them to do. The current study extends research on this recently introduced construct by examining estimates and influences of reflective norms on drinking in a large high-risk heterosexual sample of male and female college students from two universities. Both gender and Greek-affiliation served as potential statistical moderators of the reflective norms and drinking relationship. All participants (N = 1790; 57% female) answered questions regarding the amount of alcohol they believe members of the opposite sex would like their opposite sex friends, dates, and sexual partners to drink. Participants also answered questions regarding their actual preferences for drinking levels in each of these three relationship categories. Overall, women overestimated how much men prefer their female friends and potential sexual partners to drink, whereas men overestimated how much women prefer their sexual partners to drink. Greek-affiliated males demonstrated higher reflective norms than non-Greek males across all relationship categories, and for dating partners, only Greek-affiliated males misperceived women’s actual preferences. Among women however, there were no differences between reflective norms estimates or the degree of misperception as a function of Greek status. Most importantly, over and above perceived same-sex social norms, higher perceived reflective norms tended to account for greater variance in alcohol consumption for Greeks (vs. non-Greeks) and males (vs. females), particularly within the friend and sexual partner contexts. The findings highlight that potential benefits might arise if existing normative feedback interventions were augmented with reflective normative feedback designed to target the discrepancy between perceived and actual drinking preferences of the opposite sex. PMID:22305289

  4. Estimates and influences of reflective opposite-sex norms on alcohol use among a high-risk sample of college students: exploring Greek-affiliation and gender effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Justin F; LaBrie, Joseph W; Lac, Andrew; Sessoms, Ashley; Cail, Jessica

    2012-05-01

    Reflective opposite sex norms are behavior that an individual believes the opposite sex prefers them to do. The current study extends research on this recently introduced construct by examining estimates and influences of reflective norms on drinking in a large high-risk heterosexual sample of male and female college students from two universities. Both gender and Greek-affiliation served as potential statistical moderators of the reflective norms and drinking relationship. All participants (N=1790; 57% female) answered questions regarding the amount of alcohol they believe members of the opposite sex would like their opposite sex friends, dates, and sexual partners to drink. Participants also answered questions regarding their actual preferences for drinking levels in each of these three relationship categories. Overall, women overestimated how much men prefer their female friends and potential sexual partners to drink, whereas men overestimated how much women prefer their sexual partners to drink. Greek-affiliated males demonstrated higher reflective norms than non-Greek males across all relationship categories, and for dating partners, only Greek-affiliated males misperceived women's actual preferences. Among women however, there were no differences between reflective norm estimates or the degree of misperception as a function of Greek status. Most importantly, over and above perceived same-sex social norms, higher perceived reflective norms tended to account for greater variance in alcohol consumption for Greeks (vs. non-Greeks) and males (vs. females), particularly within the friend and sexual partner contexts. The findings highlight that potential benefits might arise if existing normative feedback interventions were augmented with reflective normative feedback designed to target the discrepancy between perceived and actual drinking preferences of the opposite sex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  6. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivilaki, Victoria G; Dafermos, Vassilis; Kogevinas, Manolis; Bitsios, Panos; Lionis, Christos

    2009-09-09

    Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. 8 (6.7%) of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7%) with moderate and 38 (31.7%) with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68.3%. Our data confirm the validity of the Greek

  7. [Heat and Fever in ancient Greek physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, In-Sok

    2009-12-01

    This paper aims at clarifying the relationship of physiological heat and pathological heat(fever) using the theoretical scheme of Georges Canguilhem as is argued in his famous book The Normal and the Pathologic. Ancient authors had presented various views on the innate heat and pathological heat. Some argued that there is only pathological heat while others, like Galen, distinguished two different kinds of heat. Galen was the first medial author who had the clear notion of the relationship between the normal heat and the pathological heat. He conceptualized their difference as the heat conforming to nature (kata phusin) and the heat against nature (para phusin). However, the Peripatetic authors, such as ps-Alexander Aphrodisias, who laid more emphasis on physiology tended to regard pathology in continuation with physiology as Claude Bernard attempted to do it. Therefore, Canguilhem's theoretical scheme turns out to be very useful in analysing the relationship of normal heat and pathological heat as is manifested in ancient Greek physiology.

  8. Further solar alignments of Greek Byzantine churches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liritzis, I.; Vasiliou, H.

    Following the recent work on the solar alignment of Greek byzantine churches (Liritzis and Vassiliou 2006 a,b,c) the solar orientations of twenty one more churches are presented. The question examined is if the day of solar rise across the eastern direction of the church is related with the feast day of Patron Saint. Measurements were carried out with magnetic compass, inclinometer, portable GPS and appropriate corrections for the solar declination. The alignments towards eastern sunrise were examined for various angular altitudes of the perceptible horizon. At least for all Rhodean churches the patron's day is met when sun oblique path crosses horizon a few degrees beyond the intersection of extrapolated eastern axis of the church with horizons skyline. Therefore, taken the orientation as the glitter of first sunrays -early dawn- correlation of thirteen present churches are aligned near the autumnal equinox, three have relation with the feast of patron saint, four are related to the other important feast of Christianity and one seem orientated randomly. However accounting for a due east sun position a few degrees above horizon in early liturgy hours (6:30 - 9:30 am) all the Rhodean alignments coincides with Saint's name day.

  9. Cyberbullying Among Greek High School Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkiomisi, Athanasia; Gkrizioti, Maria; Gkiomisi, Athina; Anastasilakis, Dimitrios A; Kardaras, Panagiotis

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the presence of cyberbullying among Greek students and the efficacy of proposed preventive interventions. Three types of high schools (private, experimental and public) with different politics on on-line aggression were enrolled. All students of the aforementioned schools were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Around 62 % of the high school students experienced cyberbullying by electronic means, especially by cell phone, mostly the public school students (p 0.008). The bully was a stranger in more than 40 % of the cases. Over 60 % of the victims had not seeked help but dealt with the attack on their own. Only 20 % of the victims manifested sleep or eating disorders, physical/ psychological symptoms or changes in their social life as a consequence of the cyber-attack. Cyberbullying is a usual phenomenon among high school students. The bully is frequently unacquainted to the victim. Most of the victims are not physically or psychologically affected by the cyber-attack and do not share the event with anyone. There was a slight difference in the response of the students to cyberbullying among the different school politics of on-line aggression.

  10. Severe ocular injuries in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mela, Ephigenia K; Georgakopoulos, Constantinos D; Georgalis, Athanasios; Koliopoulos, John X; Gartaganis, Sotirios P

    2003-02-01

    To determine the epidemiological characteristics of severe eye injuries in childhood, in a mixed urban and rural Greek setting. Retrospective analysis of 95 cases (103 eyes) of eye injuries in children younger than 17 years of age admitted to the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Patras, Greece, during a five-year period. The data were analyzed with respect to age, sex, type, cause and mode of injury, method of management, duration of hospitalization and final visual deficit. The average age was 9.8 years and males were involved in 80% of the cases. The most common type of eye injury was mechanical closed-globe injury (71.8%). Mechanical open-globe injuries were found in 21.3% of the eyes, while burns comprised 6.7% of the injuries. Most injuries were agent-related, with blows and falls being responsible most often. Multiple operations were part of the treatment in 11.6% of the eyes; 14.5% of the eyes were blinded and 15.5% had significant final visual acuity loss. These hospital-based data suggest that there is a need for health education of both parents and children, since some injuries in children could easily have been prevented.

  11. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Koundi, Kalliopi; Pappa, Xenia; Sakkas, Pavlos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results: State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024) and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039) respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students’ origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students’ school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students’ family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7%) do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck’s depression inventory scale. Conclusions: Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students’ college life. PMID:25938913

  12. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontoangelos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ; (b The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90; (c The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; (d State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results: State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024 and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039 respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students’ origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students’ school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students’ family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7% do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck’s depression inventory scale. Conclusions: Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students’ college life.

  13. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  14. Pattern of Smoking Habit among Greek Blue and White Collar Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachiotis, George; Karydis, Ioannis; Drivas, Spyros; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of smoking in a Greek working population. A questionnaire regarding smoking habit was collected from 1,005 out of 1,200 blue and white-collar employees (response rate: 84%). The overall smoking prevalence was 48.4% and did not differ by sex, age, education, and occupation. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 25.54, with no difference observed by occupation. The above-mentioned findings, if confirmed by further research, are alarming and inconsistent with the prevalent pattern of smoking habits in the West. PMID:19578462

  15. FCJ-193 Harbouring Dissent: Greek Independent and Social Media and the Antifascist Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sky Croeser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Greek activists’ use of a range of communication technologies, including social media, blogs, citizen journalism sites, Web radio, and anonymous networks. Drawing on Anna Tsing’s theoretical model, the article examines key frictions around digital technologies that emerged within a case study of the antifascist movement in Athens, focusing on the period around the 2013 shutdown of Athens Indymedia. Drawing on interviews with activists and analysis of online communications, including issue networks and social media activity, we find that the antifascist movement itself is created and recreated through a process of productive friction, as different groups and individuals with varying ideologies and experiences work together.

  16. 3c/4e [small sigma, Greek, circumflex]-type long-bonding competes with ω-bonding in noble-gas hydrides HNgY (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn; Y = F, Cl, Br, I): a NBO/NRT perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiqiu; Li, Hong; Weinhold, Frank; Chen, Dezhan

    2016-03-21

    Noble-gas hydrides HNgY are frequently described as a single ionic form (H-Ng)(+)Y(-). We apply natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural resonance theory (NRT) analyses to a series of noble-gas hydrides HNgY (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn; Y = F, Cl, Br, I) to gain quantitative insight into the resonance bonding of these hypervalent molecules. We find that each of the studied species should be better represented as a resonance hybrid of three leading resonance structures, namely, H-Ng(+ -):Y (I), H:(- +)Ng-Y (II), and H^Y (III), in which the "ω-bonded" structures I and II arise from the complementary donor-acceptor interactions nY → σ*HNg and nH → σ*NgY, while the "long-bond" ([small sigma, Greek, circumflex]-type) structure III arises from the nNg → [small sigma, Greek, circumflex]*HY/[small sigma, Greek, circumflex]HY interaction. The bonding for all of the studied molecules can be well described in terms of the continuously variable resonance weightings of 3c/4e ω-bonding and [small sigma, Greek, circumflex]-type long-bonding motifs. Furthermore, we find that the calculated bond orders satisfy a generalized form of "conservation of bond order" that incorporates both ω-bonding and long-bonding contributions [viz., (bHNg + bNgY) + bHY = bω-bonding + blong-bonding = 1]. Such "conservation" throughout the title series implies a competitive relationship between ω-bonding and [small sigma, Greek, circumflex]-type long-bonding, whose variations are found to depend in a chemically reasonable manner on the electronegativity of Y and the outer valence-shell character of the central Ng atom. The calculated bond orders are also found to exhibit chemically reasonable correlations with bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, and bond dissociation energies, in accord with Badger's rule and related empirical relationships. Overall, the results provide electronic principles and chemical insight that may prove useful in the rational design of noble-gas hydrides of

  17. Greek School Textbooks at a Political Crossroads: (Re)Defining the Greek Citizen in the Greek School during the Reign of Colonels (1967-1974)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervas, Theodore G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes several elementary and middle school textbooks, educational decrees, and other primary sources to help shed light on how schooling, and more generally education, during what would be known as the "Reign of the Colonels" or "Military 'Junta'" attempted to reshape a Greek national identity. This paper seeks to…

  18. Small Stories of the Greek Crisis on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariza Georgalou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since it erupted in 2009, the Greek debt crisis has disrupted Greek people’s quotidian life both at a socio-political and at a personal level. In the contemporary social media ecosystem, with the massive bulk of user-produced and user-consumed content, narratives that concern this critical turning point in Greek modern history have found fertile soil to thrive. In this article, having enmeshed discourse-centered online ethnography (Androutsopoulos, 2008 with small stories research (Georgakopoulou, 2007, the dimensional approach to narratives (Ochs & Capps, 2001, and stance-taking (Du Bois, 2007, I look at how a Greek Facebook user has recounted her emotions, thoughts, opinions, and assessments toward the Greek crisis. In doing so, I point to the intertextual, multimodal, and synergetic nature of these narratives. The article argues that Facebook can function as a powerful grassroots channel for expressive storytelling within a period of major socio-political upheaval. It also shows how Facebook has stretched our conception of what (digital storytelling is as different Facebook affordances propel into different ways of narrating within the medium.

  19. Internet use for health-related purposes among Greek consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkias, Daphne; Harkiolakis, Nicholas; Thurman, Paul; Caracatsanis, Sylva

    2008-04-01

    With more than 1 billion Internet users worldwide, the World Wide Web has inevitably made its mark on the global healthcare industry. As a European Union (EU) nation, Greece has not conducted many e-health trend surveys due to the low penetration of the Internet and the continued belief among Greek consumers that the Internet cannot substitute for face-to-face contact with a physician. Yet, the extant literature does reveal a growing trend of Internet use for healthrelated information among Greek consumers over the past decade. The purpose of this study is to survey the extent of Internet use for health'related purposes among a representative sample of Greek consumers. Results indicated that Internet use among Greek consumers is rising in comparison with past surveys. Also, Greek consumers who are young, female, and well-educated seem to also trust health-related information found on the Internet as well as following recommendations they get from online health-related information.

  20. Lead Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time may lead to reduced IQ, slow learning, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), or behavioral issues. • Lead also affects other parts ... 800-424-5323) • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Lead Awareness Program http: / / www. epa. gov/ lead • EPA publication “ ...

  1. Love stories: understanding the caring journeys of aged Greek-Australian carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, Debbie; Blignault, Ilse; Perry, Astrid; Antonopoulos, Penny

    2016-03-01

    This article documents the findings of a short-term longitudinal study that explored the caring journeys of aged Greek carers providing in-home care for their spouse. Through a deeper understanding of carers' decisions and decision-making and insights from service providers and community leaders, we aimed to inform policy makers, service managers and providers about how to develop and promote culturally appropriate support services, and negotiate them with carers and care recipients in a timely way. Initially, we conducted three focus groups and one follow-up forum with service providers and Greek community leaders. Then, over a 6-month period, we conducted two in-home interviews and two telephone interviews with 12 older Greek carers. We sought to understand factors influencing carers' decision-making regarding service uptake, and we provided information about services as required. Through our thematic analysis, we found that most carers wanted to remain as independent as possible and to avoid forced separation from the one they loved, through institutionalisation. They placed great value on their caring role which, while a struggle at times, gave them a sense of meaning, purpose and belonging. We also found that carers had great resourcefulness, strength and competence. They were all in long-term relationships, had negotiated coming to a foreign country and establishing themselves and were now in the process of negotiating old age and increasing frailty while at the same time providing care and support to family and friends. Our findings suggest that services need to be communicated in ways which support what carers value, not on outdated assumptions about cultural groups, otherwise providers will perpetuate exclusion. We propose an outreach in-home service model with an emphasis on ageing well and staying at home. This model of service provision is a model of care which emphasises relationships and community, and seeks to build social and cultural capital.

  2. A survey of foot problems in community-dwelling older Greek Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot problems are common in older people and are associated with impaired mobility and quality of life. However, the characteristics of foot problems in older Australians for whom English is a second language have not been evaluated. Methods One hundred and four community-dwelling people aged 64 to 90 years with disabling foot pain (according to the case definition of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index, or MFPDI were recruited from four Greek elderly citizens clubs in Melbourne, Australia. All participants completed a Greek language questionnaire consisting of general medical history, the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 (SF-36 questionnaire, the MFPDI, and specific questions relating to foot problems and podiatry service utilisation. In addition, all participants underwent a brief clinical foot assessment. Results The MFPDI score ranged from 1 to 30 (median 14, out of a total possible score of 34. Women had significantly higher total MFPDI scores and MFPDI subscale scores. The MFPDI total score and subscale scores were significantly associated with most of the SF-36 subscale scores. The most commonly reported foot problem was difficulty finding comfortable shoes (38%, and the most commonly observed foot problem was the presence of hyperkeratotic lesions (29%. Only 13% of participants were currently receiving podiatry treatment, and 40% stated that they required more help looking after their feet. Those who reported difficulty finding comfortable shoes were more likely to be female, and those who required more help looking after their feet were more likely to be living alone and have osteoarthritis in their knees or back. Conclusions Foot problems appear to be common in older Greek Australians, have a greater impact on women, and are associated with reduced health-related quality of life. These findings are broadly similar to previous studies in English-speaking older people in Australia. However, only a small

  3. Gratiae plenum: Latin, Greek and the Cominform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Movrin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The survival of classics in the People’s Republic of Slovenia after World War II was dominated by the long shadow of the Coryphaeus of the Sciences, Joseph Stalin. Since 1945, the profile of the discipline was determined by the Communist Party, which followed the Soviet example, well-nigh destroying the classical education in the process. Fran Bradač, head of Classics at the University of Ljubljana, was removed for political reasons; the classical gymnasium belonging to the Church was closed down; Greek was struck from the curriculum of the two remaining state classical gymnasia; Latin, previously a central subject at every gymnasium, was severely reduced in 1945, only to disappear entirely in 1946. The classicists who continued to teach were forced to take ‘reorientation courses’ which enabled them to teach Russian and other more suitable subjects. By 1949, only two out of the 42 classicists employed by the Ministry of Education were actually teaching Latin. The Classics department at the university, where only two students were studying in 1949, was on the brink of closure.  Paradoxically, the classical tradition was saved by Stalin’s attack on the same Party. The Cominform conflict in 1948 astonished the Yugoslav communists and pushed them towards a tactical détente with the West, prompting a revision of some of their policies, including education. The process was led by the top echelons of the Party — such as Milovan Djilas, head of the central Agitprop, Boris Kidrič, in charge of Yugoslav economy, and Edvard Kardelj, the Party’s chief ideologue — during the Third Plenum of the Central Committee Politburo in Belgrade in December 1949. Their newly discovered love of Latin and Greek, documented in the minutes of the Politburo Plenum, was overseen only by the discriminating eye of Josip Broz Tito. Classical gymnasia were revived, Latin was reintroduced to some of the other gymnasia, students returned to study classics at the

  4. Problem drinking among at-risk college students: The examination of Greek involvement, freshman status, and history of mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Haley S; Klanecky, Alicia K; McChargue, Dennis E

    2018-02-06

    Scarce research has examined the combined effect of mental health difficulties and demographic risk factors such as freshman status and Greek affiliation in understanding college problem drinking. The current study is interested in looking at the interaction among freshman status, Greek affiliation, and mental health difficulties. Undergraduate students (N = 413) from a private and public Midwestern university completed a large online survey battery between January 2009 and April 2013. Data from both schools were aggregated for the analyses. After accounting for gender, age, and school type, the three-way interaction indicated that the highest drinking levels were reported in freshman students who reported a history of mental health problems although were not involved in Greek life. Findings are discussed in the context of perceived social norms, as well as alcohol-related screenings and intervention opportunities on college campuses.

  5. Taha Hussein and Abbas Mahmud al-Aqqad on the Greek Philosophy: A Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nabil Fouly

    2016-01-01

    Taha Hussein (1889-1973) and Abbas Mahmud al-Aqqad (1889-1964) are two prominent contemporary scholars in Egypt. This article delivered the comparison of both thoughts regarding to the Greek philosophy, while extensively influenced by the Greek philosophical tradition with two different responses. Thaha Husein so fascinated to the Greek philosophical traditions in which he developed appreciatively as found on his works. While al-Aqqad, he almost concerned on reviewing the value of the Greek p...

  6. Marketing in Greek National Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tseroni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The international financial situation in combination with an aging population and the appropriation of health services imposes the management of hospital services as a necessity for the survival of hospitals.Aim: To examine the perceptions of 450 upper administrative hospital executives (Nursing, Medicine and Administrative services in the wider region of Attica, on marketing, communication, and public relations in health-care.Population study: Four hundred and fifty (450 higher health executives from the three basic fields of services in health institutions (medical, nursing, administration constituted the total sample of the research. These people are employed at 9 of the 36 hospitals in the 3 Health Regions of Attica (H.Re.Materials and method:The type of design that was chosen (to gather data for the study of attitudes and perceptions of the health personnel of the health institutions of G.S.H (Greek System of Health is a cross- sectional survey.Results: The participating subjects, even though expressed some reservations at first, formed a favorable attitude towards marketing and its application in the field of health-care. Statistically important correlations emerged between the perceptions of executives and their socio-demographic background including age, sex, education, and profession, work experience in health-care and specifically in their current position in the services as well as statistically important differences between doctors, nurses and administrators as to their perceptions of some issues in marketing.Conclusions: From the comments in the survey it appears there is a need to apply marketing correctly when providing quality care, respecting the patients’ rights and using human and not financial criteria as a guide. Based on the results of the research, important proposals are being submitted in the areas of health-care research, education and clinical practice.

  7. Comparison of the leading-edge timing walk in pulsed TOF laser range finding with avalanche bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) switch based laser diode drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintikka, Mikko; Hallman, Lauri; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2017-12-01

    Timing walk error in pulsed time-of-flight based laser range finding was studied using two different types of laser diode drivers. The study compares avalanche bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor switch based laser pulse drivers, both producing 1.35 ns current pulse length (full width at half maximum), and investigates how the slowly rising part of the current pulse of the avalanche BJT based driver affects the leading edge timing walk. The walk error was measured to be very similar with both drivers within an input signal dynamic range of 1:10 000 (receiver bandwidth of 700 MHz) but increased rapidly with the avalanche BJT based driver at higher values of dynamic range. The slowly rising part does not exist in the current pulse produced by the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) based laser driver, and thus the MOS based driver can be utilized in a wider dynamic range.

  8. Acoustical Masks and sound aspects of Ancient Greek Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanos Vovolis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available It is impossible to imagine the ancient Greek theatre without the mask, whether it is tragedy, comedy or satyr plays. All theatrical forms that developed in Athens during the 6th and 5th centuries BC were forms of masked drama. The mask was an organic element in this new form called theatre because the mask is the medium per excellence for the embodiment of the Other and participates in the creation of the stage as a site of the dialogue between the Self andthe Other. But the mask was an organic element of the theatre because in ancient Greek theatre the mask is organically connected through its facial appearance to the ecstatic cries found in the dramatic texts and to the theatre space through its acoustical form. Acoustics permeated all aspects of the ancient Greek theatre and was a way to create even better participation for the audience enhancing its acoustico-visual and synaesthetic experience.

  9. Calcidius, witness to Greek medical theories: eye anatomy and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhouche, Béatrice

    2014-01-01

    Calcidius is the only exegete of Plato's Timaeus whose commentary on this Greek dialogue concerned with eyesight has not been lost. This document is all the more valuable since the Latin version is the only testimony regarding theories of and treatments for eye diseases--two domains in which, as can be deduced from the terms used, the commentator is dependent on Greek. The part of the commentary about eyesight is also worthy of interest because it is the only one that openly attacks the iuniores with an overtly hostile tone. We propose to study Calcidius' exegesis of Plato's Timaeus, focusing on Calcidius' portrayal of Greek ophthalmological theories and practices and his representation of a group of people he openly attacks.

  10. The art of alleviating pain in greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türe, Hatice; Türe, Uğur; Göğüş, F Yilmaz; Valavanis, Anton; Yaşargil, M Gazi

    2005-01-01

    We reviewed many of the essential Greek myths to identify the methods used at that time to relieve the pain of both illness and surgery, and we discovered many pioneering methods. Both gods and demigods implemented these methods to ease pain, to conduct surgery, and, on occasion, to kill mythological beings. The myths describe the three most common components of anesthesia: hypnosis, amnesia, and (an)algesia. Drugs and music-aided hypnosis were two of the most common methods use to treat emotional and surgical pain. This article identifies highlights in the development of concepts to treat pain in Greek mythology. The examples found in the Greek myths remind us of the historical significance of pain treatment.

  11. Right-left and the scrotum in Greek sculpture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C

    2004-04-01

    The scrotum in humans is asymmetric, the right testicle being visibly higher than the left in most men. Paradoxically, it is also the case that the right testicle is somewhat larger, rather than smaller, as might be expected. Greek classical and pre-classical art, which took great care in its attention to anatomical detail, correctly portrayed the right testicle as the higher, but then incorrectly portrayed the left testicle as visibly larger. The implication is that the Greeks used a simple mechanical theory, the left testicle being thought to be lower because it was larger and hence more subject to the pull of gravity. The present study examines data on scrotal asymmetry in more detail, and puts them in the context of Greek theories of functional differences between the right side and the left side.

  12. Representations of Late-Ottoman Thessaloniki in Contemporary Greek Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Trine Stauning

    In the late 1990s and 2000s there was an increasing historiographic as well as cultural interest in more nuanced accounts of Greek and Christian experiences during the Ottoman period. The increasing contemporary cultural plurality in Greece, that was a consequence of globalization processes...... and religious homogeneity. The historiographic interest, along with an opening towards Turkish cultural products, in particular soap operas, has been followed up by a wave of popular Greek historical novels situated in the Ottoman period (i.e. Kalpouzos, Zourgos, Themelis, Kakouri and others). The current...... on the Ottoman period, this paper will present an analysis of representations of late Ottoman Thessaloniki in a number of Greek novels published between 2005 and 2012. The paper examines the ways in which these novels represent cross-cultural and cross-religious relations in pre-national Thessaloniki...

  13. Humour among Chinese and Greek Preschool Children in Relation to Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Zhang, XiangKui; Wang, Yong; Xeromeritou, Aphrodite

    2011-01-01

    The researchers studied humour among Chinese and Greek preschool children in relation to cognitive development. The sample included 55 Chinese children and 50 Greek children ages 4½ to 5½ years. Results showed that both Chinese and Greek children's humour recognition were significantly and positively correlated to their cognitive development, but…

  14. Investigating High-School Chemical Kinetics: The Greek Chemistry Textbook and Students' Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegios, Theodoros; Salta, Katerina; Koinis, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present an analysis of how the structure and content of the Greek school textbook approaches the concepts of chemical kinetics, and an investigation of the difficulties that 11th grade Greek students face regarding these concepts. Based on the structure and content of the Greek textbook, a tool was developed and applied to…

  15. Approaches to the Writing of Greek in Late Antique Latin Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Pelttari

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of Greek words in manuscripts of Augustine and of Ausonius suggests that late Latin writers employed transliteration, rather than writing Greek letters, more often than has been thought, both for familiar loan-words in Latin and for words perceived as still Greek.

  16. Approaches to the Writing of Greek in Late Antique Latin Texts

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron Pelttari

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of Greek words in manuscripts of Augustine and of Ausonius suggests that late Latin writers employed transliteration, rather than writing Greek letters, more often than has been thought, both for familiar loan-words in Latin and for words perceived as still Greek.

  17. Diglossic Past and Present Lexicographical Practices: The Case of Two Greek Dictionaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseronis, Assimakis

    2002-01-01

    Discusses publication of two recent dictionaries of Modern Greek. Suggests their respective lexical coverage reveals the continuing survival of the underlying ideologies of the two sponsoring institutions concerning the history of the Greek language and their opposing standpoints in relation to Greek diglossia. The two dictionaries proceed from…

  18. Modeling the Greek energy system: Scenarios of clean energy use and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roinioti, Argiro; Koroneos, Christopher; Wangensteen, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    The Greek energy system is one of the most carbon intensive energy systems in Europe. Hydrocarbons and solid fuels (lignite) cover over 80% of the final energy demand. The main objective of this work is to build energy scenarios for the future – with a focus on the electricity production system – and explore how these scenarios are reflected in economic, environmental terms and in terms of energy efficiency. The main tool which is used in the scenario analysis is LEAP (Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System). The scenarios are essentially the result of developing “storylines” driven by the uncertainties which cannot be controlled by the analysts or decision makers, and technical and non-technical options the analyst or decision maker may choose from. A set of uncertainties is considered as a possible future or storyline, and one or more options can be selected as a possible strategy. The combination of a storyline and a specific strategy gives a scenario. The main uncertainties for the Greek energy system are identified and various technical options are explored. Rather than using a model which leads to optimum strategies from a set of alternatives, the model in use will apply different strategies. - Highlights: ► A demand-driven approach was used to build energy scenarios for the Greek interconnected system. ► Each Scenario consists of a possible future and a strategy. ► High RES penetration will decrease CO 2 emissions but it will also increase capital cost. ► Carbon intensity is reduced in all the scenarios.

  19. Archives of Atmospheric Lead Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dominik; Shotyk, William; Kempf, Oliver

    Environmental archives such as peat bogs, sediments, corals, trees, polar ice, plant material from herbarium collections, and human tissue material have greatly helped to assess both ancient and recent atmospheric lead deposition and its sources on a regional and global scale. In Europe detectable atmospheric lead pollution began as early as 6000years ago due to enhanced soil dust and agricultural activities, as studies of peat bogs reveal. Increased lead emissions during ancient Greek and Roman times have been recorded and identified in many long-term archives such as lake sediments in Sweden, ice cores in Greenland, and peat bogs in Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. For the period since the Industrial Revolution, other archives such as corals, trees, and herbarium collections provide similar chronologies of atmospheric lead pollution, with periods of enhanced lead deposition occurring at the turn of the century and since 1950. The main sources have been industry, including coal burning, ferrous and nonferrous smelting, and open waste incineration until c.1950 and leaded gasoline use since 1950. The greatest lead emissions to the atmosphere all over Europe occurred between 1950 and 1980 due to traffic exhaust. A marked drop in atmospheric lead fluxes found in most archives since the 1980s has been attributed to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. The isotope ratios of lead in the various archives show qualitatively similar temporal changes, for example, the immediate response to the introduction and phasing out of leaded gasoline. Isotope studies largely confirm source assessments based on lead emission inventories and allow the contributions of various anthropogenic sources to be calculated.

  20. Exergy-based comparison of two Greek industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xydis, George; Koroneos, C.; Naniki, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the potential of the increase in exergy and energy efficiency of the Greek construction and Food, Drink and Tobacco (FDT) industries has been examined using energy and exergy analysis methodology. These two industries play a vital role towards sustainable development of the country....... The continuous increase in energy use in these two industries during the years 1971–2000 shows that both remain steadily in an ascendant orbit. The aim was to analyse and compare the energy use and exergy consumption in the Greek construction and FDT industries to gain insights into each sector's efficiency...

  1. Follow-up study of indoor radon in Greek buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouvas, A.; Xanthos, S.; Kolovou, M.; Potiriadis, C.; Takoudis, G.; Guilhot, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (NTL-AUTh) and the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) have a continuous collaboration on indoor radon measurements in Greek buildings since 1999. In the present work, the existing database was enriched with 590 indoor radon measurements in 295 houses and 76 indoor radon measurements in 38 workplaces. In total in the present work, 1948 indoor radon measurements in 974 buildings performed by the NTL-AUTh and GAEC from 1999 to 2012 in 8 of the 13 administrative regions of Greece are presented and discussed. (authors)

  2. GREEKS AND BARBARIANS IN HOMER’S “ODYSSEY”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefania VOICU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Homer’s “Odyssey”, viewed as a relevant literary source for Archaic Greece, has led to the development of different research domains through the medium of hermeneutics or text interpretation. One of these directions regards the reconstitution of social aspects pertaining to the Archaic Greek world. Given that Odysseus’ adventures unfold beyond the borders of the world known by the hero, Greek identity can only be rendered by exclusion, the exclusion of the Other: the reverse of the reprehensible deeds or aspects of the Other comes to define the real, or at least desirable, characteristics of the one operating the exclusion.

  3. According to the Italian Documents Greek Occupation in Saruhan Sanjak

    OpenAIRE

    ÇELEBİ, Mevlüt

    2016-01-01

    Also Izmir included in the discussion on the future of Western Anatolia, began while continuing World War I. Italy and Greece wanted to dominate the region.  After the war, the competition between the two countries continued in the Paris Peace Conference. In the Paris Peace Conference, Britain, the United States and France have supported Greece and they let Greek troop’s invasion of Izmir. In Anatolia, starting with the Greek occupation of Izmir on 15 May 1919 expands in a short time. Manisa ...

  4. "Protected" marine shelled molluscs: thriving in Greek seafood restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KATSANEVAKIS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available International agreements as well as European and national legislation prohibit exploitation and trading of a number of edible marine shelled molluscs, due to either significant declines in their populations or destructive fishing practices. However, enforcement of existing legislation in Greece is ineffective and many populations of “protected” species continue to decline, mainly due to poaching. The extent of illegal trading of protected bivalves and gastropods in Greek seafood restaurants was investigated by interviewing owners or managers of 219 such restaurants in 92 localities. Interviews were based on questionnaires regarding the frequency of availability in the menus and the origin of twenty-one species or groups of species, among which eight are protected - illegally exploited. Forty-two percent of the surveyed restaurants were found to serve at least one of the protected ¬- illegally exploited species. Among the illegally traded species, Lithophaga lithophaga, Pecten jacobaeus, and Pinnanobilis were served in a relatively high proportion of the surveyed restaurants (22.8%, 19.2%, and 16.4% respectively, outrunning many commercial species. In many cases these species were always or often available (11.4%, 4.6% and 5.0% respectively. There was substantial spatial variation in the proportion of restaurants that illegally served protected species with differing patterns for each species; very high proportions of illegal trading were observed in some marine regions (e.g., date mussels were served in >65% of the seafood restaurants along the coastline of Evvoikos Gulf. In most cases the illegally traded species were of local origin, while there was no finding of illegally imported molluscs from other countries. The strategy for enforcement of existing legislation should be greatly improved otherwise protection of shelled molluscs will remain ineffective.

  5. Physical activity and mammographic parenchymal patterns among Greek postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmara, Eleni A; Papacharalambous, Xenofon N; Kouloulias, Vassilios E; Maridaki, D Maria; Baltopoulos, J Panayiotis

    2011-05-01

    To examine whether physical activity during the last five years is related to later breast mammographic density in postmenopausal Greek women. We designed a cross-sectional study in 724 women, of ages 45-67 years. An interview-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information on duration and intensity of recreational physical activity during five years preceding study recruitment. Mammograms were evaluated according to BIRADS classification and BIRADS score was also estimated. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations between physical activity index and breast density according to the BIRADS classification methods. We observed a statistically significant inverse association of mammographic breast density measured by the BIRADS classification method and recreational exercise (OR=-0.10; 95% CI -0.018, -0.001; p=0.022). For one unit increase in physical activity as expressed by the MET-h/week score, the odds of lower versus higher breast density categories are 1.105 greater, given that all of the other variables in the model are held constant. A modifying effect by age at recruitment was evident among participants, with a stronger inverse association between recreational activity and mammographic breast density among older women (OR=-0.036; 95% CI -0.063, -0.009; p=0.009). An inverse association between physical activity and BIRADS score was evident, not reaching statistical significance (OR=0.00; 95% CI -0.009, 0.008; p=0.887). Mammographic breast area was lower in postmenopausal women who participated in sports/recreational physical activity compared to inactive controls. Increasing physical activity levels among postmenopausal women might be a reasonable approach to reduce mammographic density. However, until more physical activity and mammographic breast density studies are conducted that confirm our findings, they have to be interpreted with caution, due to the retrospective nature of our data and the possibility of

  6. Macroeconomic and industry-specific determinants of Greek bank profitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zampara, K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the external factors that influence the profitability of a typical Greek systemic bank over the period 2001 – 2014. Design/Methodology/Approach: A conceptual framework incorporating two fundamental groups of const ructs, namely, macroeconomic forces and industry related factors, was developed. Two constructs were examined in the former: GDP growth rate and unemployment rate, whilst two attributes were explored in the latter; the bank's market share, both in terms of deposits and in terms of assets, and the banking market growth, also both in terms of the market's total assets and total deposits. In order to isolate the effects of the ongoing financial crisis, the research was undertaken for two periods, firstly 2001 to 2014 and secondly, the period 2001 - 2011, which excluded the deep recession. Consequently, multiple regression analysis was conducted and linear models were specified by means of OLS. Findings: The empirical analysis revealed that both macroeconomic forces and industry-related factors affect bank profitability. As far as the macroeconomic factors are concerned, unemployment rate has a negative impact, whereas the GDP growth rate has a positive impact on bank profitability. The industry -related factors, rate of growth of the industry's deposits and bank's assets market share have a positive impact on the financial performance of the bank. Finally, the rate of growth of the industry's assets and the bank's deposits market share have a negative effect on bank profitability. Originality/Value: This study reveals the mechanism determining bank profitability over a recent period that includes the financial crisis. Moreover, understanding the impact of macroeconomic forces as well as industry related attributes on bank profitability may enable banks to focus on the most critical factors in their decision process.

  7. Greek language: analysis of the cardiologic anatomical etymology: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezas, Georges; Werneck, Alexandre Lins

    2012-01-01

    The Greek language, the root of most Latin anatomical terms, is deeply present in the Anatomical Terminology. Many studies seek to analyze etymologically the terms stemming from the Greek words. In most of these studies, the terms appear defined according to the etymological understanding of the respective authors at the time of its creation. Therefore, it is possible that the terms currently used are not consistent with its origin in ancient Greek words. We selected cardiologic anatomical terms derived from Greek words, which are included in the International Anatomical Terminology. We performed an etymological analysis using the Greek roots present in the earliest terms. We compared the cardiologic anatomical terms currently used in Greece and Brazil to the Greek roots originating from the ancient Greek language. We used morphological decomposition of Greek roots, prefixes, and suffixes. We also verified their use on the same lexicons and texts from the ancient Greek language. We provided a list comprising 30 cardiologic anatomical terms that have their origins in ancient Greek as well as their component parts in the International Anatomical Terminology. We included the terms in the way they were standardized in Portuguese, English, and Modern Greek as well as the roots of the ancient Greek words that originated them. Many works deal with the true origin of words (etymology) but most of them neither returns to the earliest roots nor relate them to their use in texts of ancient Greek language. By comparing the world's greatest studies on the etymology of Greek words, this paper tries to clarify the differences between the true origin of the Greek anatomical terms as well as the origins of the cardiologic anatomical terms more accepted today in Brazil by health professionals.

  8. The Greek Crisis and the Generalization of Euro in European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian PERPELEA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In December 1991 the question of a single European currency is born, perhaps the most powerful glue of a united Europe. It might sound weird, the Greek crisis finds its root causes in ambiguity and inconsistency that treaty and, in the depths of contemporary history, the decision by Churchill and Stalin to bring Greece, East-European with the most powerful communist movement in the area, under the Western sphere of influence. So it is that Greece, after has experienced extreme political (kingdom, civil war, republic, military dictatorship and strong passions left, is admitted in 1981, the EEC “(... treated recklessly and tolerant European partners who did not exercise any control over them, nor have forced on performance targets.” So, ideal conditions for real “debauchery” that this country financially practiced under the nose of the EU, especially after entering the euro zone. As a result, the global crisis was “the occasion and not the cause” of the crisis and it finds its roots in Greek behaviour – governments and the public alike. The rational “solutions” are actually are... is only one – agreement with the EU because GREXIT, although possible, is ...inconceivable.

  9. C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions are a frequent cause of Huntington disease phenocopies in the Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Kartanou, Chrisoula; Kladi, Athina; Panas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 has been identified as the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia in many populations, including the Greek. Recently, C9ORF72 expansions were reported as the most common genetic cause of Huntington disease (HD) phenocopies in a UK population. In the present study, we screened a selected cohort of 40 Greek patients with HD phenocopies for C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions using repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction. We identified 2 patients (5%) with pathologic expansions. The first patient had chorea, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, cognitive impairment, and a positive family history, fulfilling the strictest criteria for HD phenocopy. The second patient was sporadic and had parkinsonism, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive impairment, corresponding to a broader definition of HD phenocopy. These findings identify C9ORF72 expansions as a frequent cause of HD phenocopies in the Greek population, confirming recent findings in other populations and supporting proposed diagnostic testing for C9ORF72 expansions in patients with HD-like syndromes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Event and fault tree model for reliability analysis of the greek research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fault trees and event trees are widely used in industry to model and to evaluate the reliability of safety systems. Detailed analyzes in nuclear installations require the combination of these two techniques. This work uses the methods of fault tree (FT) and event tree (ET) to perform the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) in research reactors. The PSA according to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) is divided into Level 1, Level 2 and level 3. At Level 1, conceptually safety systems act to prevent the accident, at Level 2, the accident occurred and seeks to minimize the consequences, known as stage management of the accident, and at Level 3 are determined consequences. This paper focuses on Level 1 studies, and searches through the acquisition of knowledge consolidation of methodologies for future reliability studies. The Greek Research Reactor, GRR - 1, was used as a case example. The LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) was chosen as the initiating event and from there were developed the possible accident sequences, using event tree, which could lead damage to the core. Furthermore, for each of the affected systems, the possible accidents sequences were made fault tree and evaluated the probability of each event top of the FT. The studies were conducted using a commercial computational tool SAPHIRE. The results thus obtained, performance or failure to act of the systems analyzed were considered satisfactory. This work is directed to the Greek Research Reactor due to data availability. (author)

  11. Exact phi (cursive,open) Greek1,3 boundary flows in the tricritical Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the tricritical Ising model on a strip or cylinder under the integrable perturbation by the thermal phi (cursive,open) Greek 1,3 boundary field. This perturbation induces five distinct renormalization group (RG) flows between Cardy type boundary conditions labelled by the Kac labels (r,s). We study these boundary RG flows in detail for all excitations. Exact thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA) equations are derived using the lattice approach by considering the continuum scaling limit of the A 4 lattice model with integrable boundary conditions. Fixing the bulk weights to their critical values, the integrable boundary weights admit a thermodynamic boundary field ξ which induces the flow and, in the continuum scaling limit, plays the role of the perturbing boundary field phi Greek 1,3 . The excitations are completely classified, in terms of string content, by (m,n) systems and quantum numbers but the string content changes by either two or three well-defined mechanisms along the flow. We identify these mechanisms and obtain the induced maps between the relevant finitized Virasoro characters. We also solve the TBA equations numerically to determine the boundary flows for the leading excitations

  12. Biodiversity and Microbial Resistance of Lactobacilli Isolated From the Traditional Greek Cheese Kopanisti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Rozos

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Kopanisti is a Greek artisan cheese produced from raw milk in the island of Mykonos, Greece. The milk is left to rest for 12–24 h and then the rennet is added. After its formation the curd is left to drain for 2–3 days and is ready either for consumption (as tyrovolia fresh cheese, or with the addition of extra salt, the curd is left to ripen through further fermentation and surface development of Penicillium fungi, aprocess leading to the production of the traditional Greek cheese Kopanisti. From 120 samples of kopanisti, 574 Lactobacillus strains were isolated, distributed in 17 species (16 of them isolated from tyrovolia as well. Strains from 15 species were found resistant or multiresistant against 15 antimicrobial agents, representing all categories of antibiotics. Analysis revealed that the resistance was moderated during ripening of the curd from tyrovolia to Kopanisti. Resistance against penicillin G, ampicillin/sulbactam, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, trimethoprim, metronidazole, vancomycin, teichoplanin, and quinupristin/dalvopristin was significantly enhanced, while the resistance against ampicillin, erythromycin, oxytetracycline, gentamycin, and fucidic acid was significantly reduced. These changes during ripening suggest that resistance to antimicrobials is a dynamic process subjected to environmental factors. The biodiversity of isolated Lactobacillus strains is impressive and explains the exquisite sensorial characteristics of the cheese. However, the extent of the resistance is alarming.

  13. Evolution of the Greek national regime for water resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampa, Eleftheria; Bressers, Johannes T.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper characterizes and explains the development of the Greek national water regime, based on a framework from institutional resource regime theory. The specific framework combines public resource policies with property rights and operationalizes the concept of integration for resource regimes.

  14. Asymptotics for Greeks under the constant elasticity of variance model

    OpenAIRE

    Kritski, Oleg L.; Zalmezh, Vladimir F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the asymptotics for Greeks of European-style options and the risk-neutral density function calculated under the constant elasticity of variance model. Formulae obtained help financial engineers to construct a perfect hedge with known behaviour and to price any options on financial assets.

  15. A Program on Preventing Sexual Assault Directed toward Greek Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tamara; Boyd, Cynthia

    This paper discusses a program that uses the leadership and status of Greek system officers to prevent sexual assault at a large university. This program aims to prevent future assaults by altering the conditions of a rape-prone culture. The presentation comprises a definition and two examples of acquaintance rape situations, a discussion of…

  16. The Integration of Traditional Greek Dance in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartzonika, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    This paper researches the statutory educational regulations used as a foundation to introduce traditional Greek dance in the school curriculum and which transformed it into a taught subject with connections to the ideological-political and social conditions prevalent in Greece at the time. It particularly concerns the connection between the aims…

  17. Exploring the function of relative sentences in New Testament Greek ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The traditional view of the function of relative sentences in the Greek New Testament differed markedly from that in many modern languages. This view was challenged in the mid-1980s and a number of striking correspondences with a variety of modern (and some classical) languages were pointed out, despite some ...

  18. Going Greek: Academics, Personal Change, and Life after College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routon, Wesley; Walker, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Social Greek-letter organizations, more commonly known as fraternities (male-only) and sororities (female-only), are a longstanding tradition at colleges and universities in the United States. They claim to instill leadership skills in and offer a support network for members. However, in this article Wesley Routon and Jay Walker state that…

  19. Some syntactic features of relative constructions in the Greek New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. In the Greek New Testament, relative sentences that are introduced by relative pronouns alone, apart from the adverbial uses, are the most frequent subordinate sentence type. The research reported on in this paper aimed to investigate and describe a number of syntactic features of relative constructions in the ...

  20. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of South Italic Greek-type pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer spectroscopic (M.S.) study of 19 South Italic Greek-type ceramics was carried out. Two groups can be distinguished, on the grounds of Fe 3+ -sites content. However, the results of archeological and neutron activation analysis run contrary to this classification. (author)

  1. Innovative teaching and learning of biblical Greek: A contextualised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching biblical Greek as compulsory module to tertiary theology students can be challenging. When students doubt the general value of studying this ancient language or experience anxiety during the learning process, they are prevented from attaining higher cognitive levels of learning with the result of students failing to ...

  2. Academic Freedom and Student Grading in Greek Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Antigoni

    2011-01-01

    The issue of who has the final say on academic standards (grading), academics or managers, has hitherto not arisen in Greece. Professors entitled to research, to teach and to inquire is a freedom expressed by the Greek Constitution. This article presents a contemporary view and raises concerns about the future and the longevity of academic freedom…

  3. What Greek Secondary School Students Believe about Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarakou, Georgia; Athanasiadis, Ilias; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what Greek secondary school students (grades 8 and 11) believe about the greenhouse effect and climate change. A total of 626 students completed a closed-form questionnaire consisting of statements regarding the causes, impacts and solutions for this global environmental issue. The possible influence of…

  4. Acculturative Stress and Adjustment Experiences of Greek International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulakis, Mixalis; Dike, Craig A.; Massa, Amber C.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated eight Greek international college students' experiences of acculturation and acculturative stress at a mid-western university in the United States. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and Consensual Qualitative Research methodology was utilized for data analysis to identify contextual themes and…

  5. Examining Greek Special Education Teachers' Individual and Collaborative Teaching Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfidi, Eleni; Samaras, Anastasia P.

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors examine Greek special education teachers' individual and collaborative teaching experiences in the context of their literacy instruction. The Five Foci Framework, situated in Vygotskian theory, is utilized in the study's design to examine special education teachers' individual and collaborative experiences…

  6. Black Greek-Lettered Organizations and Civic Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephanie Y.

    2004-01-01

    This article discuss the potential impact of Black Greek-Lettered Organizations (BGLOs) in advancing African American civil and political rights. During the antebellum years and Jim Crow era, barriers to Black voting included enslavement, anti-literacy laws, violence and intimidation, grandfather clauses, gerrymandering, literacy requirements,…

  7. The Greek Electricity Market Reforms: Political and Regulatory Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danias, Nikolaos; Kim Swales, John; McGregor, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The paper tracks the evolution of the Greek electricity market since the beginning of the liberalization process. Its progress is benchmarked against the criteria suggested by Littlechild (2006b). The Littlechild framework highlights key remaining deficiencies in the stances and policies adopted which need to be resolved in order for liberalization to proceed successfully. The focus is on the agendas of the Greek government, other domestic political forces and the European Union. A central requirement is the clear commitment to liberalization by the Greek government. In particular the government needs to give up political control over the previous vertically integrated, state-controlled electricity firm, Public Power Company (PPC), and allow more decision making powers and genuine independence to the market regulator. Liberalization is rendered more difficult by the present financial and economic crisis in Greece. - Highlights: • Greek electricity market liberalization is benchmarked against the Littlechild standard electricity market reform model. • Although the majority of the model requirements are met, liberalization in Greece is only partially successful. • Some elements of liberalization are qualitatively more significant than others. • More fundamental political economy issues need to be addressed in order for the liberalization to progress. • Financial crisis in Greece adds extra challenges

  8. Epidemiological Study of Greek University Students' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounenou, Kalliope; Koutra, Aikaterini; Katsiadrami, Aristea; Diacogiannis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, 805 Greek students participated by filling in self-report questionnaires studying depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), general health status (General Health Questionnaire), general psychopathology (Symptom Checklist-90-R), and personal demographic features. Some of the more prevalent findings…

  9. Criticisms of Segal's Interpretation of the Ancient Greek Pentathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Robert Knight

    This paper examines the ancient Greek pentathlon as it was conducted during the Olympic games. The pentathlon was comprised of five sub-exercises: (1) the jump; (2) the discus throw; (3) the javelin throw; (4) the stade run; and (5) wrestling. Using scholarship in the fields of archaeology, ancient poetry and legends, and pictorial evidence such…

  10. Job security and job satisfaction among Greek fitness instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koustelios, Athanasios; Kouli, Olga; Theodorakis, Nicholas

    2003-08-01

    In analyzing the relation between job satisfaction and job security, a sample of 97 Greek fitness instructors, 18 to 42 years of age, showed statistically significant positive correlations between job security and job satisfaction (pjob security was correlated with pay .54, promotion .43, job itself .41, and the organization as a whole .43.

  11. Greek University Students with Dyslexia: An Interview Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoltzis, Aglaia; Polychronopoulou, Stavroula

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a study exploring the personal and educational experiences of Greek students with dyslexia in higher education. Interviews with 16 students with dyslexia (11 male and five female) were conducted to investigate how they experienced school, peer relations, labelling, family support, university, self-esteem and how they made their…

  12. GREEK AND LATIN IN THE HIGH SCHOOLS, ANOTHER PROPOSAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANDERSSON, THEODORE

    UNLESS TEACHERS OF CLASSICAL LANGUAGES ARE WILLING OR ABLE TO TEACH READING, AS DISTINCT FROM DECIPHERING AND TRANSLATING, CLASSICAL LANGUAGES IN HIGH SCHOOLS ARE DOOMED. TWO OTHER PROPOSALS THE PROFESSION SHOULD ACT UPON ARE THAT THE REASONABLE MINIMUM FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL STUDY OF GREEK AND/OR LATIN SHOULD BE 4 YEARS AND THAT EXPERIMENTATION…

  13. Gendered Pedagogic Identities and Academic Professionalism in Greek Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouroufli, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Feminist scholarship has considered how pedagogical identities and emotions are implicated in the gender politics of belonging and othering in higher education. This paper examines how gendered and embodied pedagogy is mobilised in Greek medical schools to construct notions of the ideal academic and assert women's position women in Academic…

  14. Greek Young Adults with Specific Learning Disabilities Seeking Learning Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonti, Eleni; Bampalou, Christina E.; Kouimtzi, Eleni M.; Kyritsis, Zacharias

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the reasons why Greek young adults with Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) seek learning assessments. The study sample consisted of 106 adults meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for SLD. Data were collected through self-report records (clinical interview) of adults…

  15. The Ethical Power of Music: Ancient Greek and Chinese Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhwen

    2004-01-01

    Both the ancient Chinese and Greeks from around the fifth century B.C. to around third century A.D. recognized the immense impact that music has on the development of one's personality, and both regarded it as crucial in the cultivation of proper disposition in youth. Music's power over one's ethos--that is, human disposition--was emphasized by…

  16. CLASSIFICATION OF GREEK FAG US WOODLANDS: A PRELIMINARY SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    E. BERGMEIER; P. DIMOPOULOS

    1999-01-01

    Almost 1000 published and unpublished phytosociological relevés of Greek Fagus forests are classified and the clusters interpreted with respect to ecology and phytogeography. A synoptic table is presented. Three ecological groups of communities are distinguished, viz. mesophilous, acidic and xerothermic Fagus woodlands. Differentiation within each group reveals chiefly phytogeographical as well as further ecological patterns. Geographical distributions and ecological preferences of...

  17. Between passive and middle : Evidence from Greek and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulikov, L.I.; Lavidas, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on verbs that can appear with two non-active voice morphologies in Greek. The starting point of the study is a comparison to the Vedic verbs that can also have two different, though formally related, non-active morphologies. In Vedic, these belong to the semantic class of verbs

  18. Macronutrient content and food exchanges for 48 Greek Mediterranean dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Aggeli, Maria; Andrioti, Elena; Detopoulou, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to facilitate the translation of traditional Greek Mediterranean recipes into food exchanges for diabetes. Moreover, it provides a useful food list for meal planning, which can be used by health professionals and nutritionists, as well as researchers and the public. A total of 48 traditional Greek Mediterranean dishes were selected in order to include appetisers, sauces, salads, pies, dishes with vegetables and legumes as well as egg, pasta, rice, meat, fish and poultry-based dishes. The macronutrient content of each recipe (carbohydrate, fat, protein and dietary fibre) was estimated with the use of the USDA database and Greek food composition tables. Then, in order to calculate the food exchanges per serve, an approximation method was followed as suggested in the literature. The Mediterranean Greek dishes contain a considerable amount of vegetables and dietary fibre, and their energy content mainly derives from olive oil. For each serve, carbohydrate, non-starchy vegetable, protein (lean, medium or high fat), milk and fat exchanges are provided. Moreover, the type of fat that each recipe contains is reported. The presented data offer a chance for health professionals to efficiently plan Mediterranean-type meals, ensuring more sophisticated dietetic advice, higher standards of medical nutrition therapy and greater patient self-efficacy. © 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  19. The Perfective Past Tense in Greek Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, Nikolitsa; Clahsen, Harald

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of a group of eight Greek-speaking adolescents with Down Syndrome (DS) (aged 12.1-18.7) to handle the perfective past tense using an acceptability judgement task. The performance of the DS participants was compared with that of 16 typically-developing children whose chronological age was matched with the mental…

  20. Reforms, Leadership and Quality Management in Greek Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Antigoni

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on research to form an understanding of how to account whether and how quality management (QM) has been adopted in Greek higher education. Greece only recently introduced quality assurance policies. In this study, I will describe governmental reforms related to QM policies until 2010. An issue that is frequently addressed…

  1. Performing Greek Tragedy in School-I, II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeburn, David

    1964-01-01

    This booklet addresses itself to the problem of whether Greek tragedy can be produced today in schools as a vital theatrical experience. The main thesis of the first of two articles points out that while a producer's first concern must be to communicate the context and spirit of a particular drama to a modern audience, he must also bring out the…

  2. Greek Teachers' Experience and Perceptions of Child Abuse/Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibou-Nakou, I.; Markos, A.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper focuses on teachers' experiences of child abuse/neglect cases, teachers' awareness of reporting or discounting, and their ways of responding to a hypothetical disclosure of abuse/neglect. A total of 1877 teachers in Greek public schools participated from a national teacher in-service training across the country; of them, 306…

  3. [The Greek illustrations of the human diseases: Mount Athos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Philippe Charlier deals with the whole illustrations of human diseases either from religious texts or works of art. He tends to pass in review the skeletal and anatomic illustrations of the illness which has been a repetitive subject since the ancient Greeks. The author points out their common features and their amazing differences in the examples of Mount Athos.

  4. Shaping space: facial asymmetries in fifth-century Greek sculpture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochscheid, H.; Hamel, R.; Wootton, W.; Russell, B.; Libonati, E.

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of optical correction in Classical Greek sculpture has been attested by both ancient authors and modern scholars. Despite the apparent normalcy of optical correction in sculpture, however, there are no obvious reasons for it and how such correction worked in statues is a question

  5. Motor perception and anatomical realism in Classical Greek art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoyles, J R

    1998-07-01

    The rise of anatomical realism in sculpture with the Classical Greeks puzzles art historians. Recently, it has been discovered that the motor cortex perceives motor actions. I argue that Classical artists discovered a new aesthetic based on using art to stimulate not just, as previously, the visual cortex, but also the motor one.

  6. "Innovations" On Hold: Sex Education in the Greek Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerouki, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the way sex and relationships education programs, as part of Health Education extra curriculum activities, have been implemented in the Greek primary schools. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents and discusses data from an anonymous survey research questionnaire distributed to the 68 Elementary…

  7. New Readings in Greek Mathematics: Sources, Problems, Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Wilbur R.

    1990-01-01

    The field of ancient Greek mathematics is discussed in terms of how representative is the surviving corpus of the ancient achievement in mathematics, the patterns of thought by which they were discovered, and the construction of mathematics during this period. The research being done in this field is described. (KR)

  8. Dr. Jefferson Helm, Sr.: A Hoosier Greek Revivalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Lorna E.

    1984-01-01

    Helm was a successful physican and politician in Rush County, Indiana, during the mid-nineteenth century. He exemplified the ideals of the Greek Revival movement of the period, and he chose the architecture of that movement for his own house, a fine example of the Western Reserve style. (IS)

  9. The Change from SOV to SVO in Ancient Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Examines the distribution of clause types in ancient Greek during the Homeric (pre-800 B.C.) and Hellenistic (ca. 100 A.D.) periods, as well as an intermediate period (ca. 450 B.C.), delineating the evolution from a subject-object-verb (SOV) to a subject-verb-object (SVO) structure. (49 references) (MDM)

  10. Doctors in ancient Greek and Roman rhetorical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Craig A

    2013-10-01

    This article collects and examines all references to doctors in rhetorical exercises used in ancient Greek and Roman schools in the Roman Empire. While doctors are sometimes portrayed positively as philanthropic, expert practitioners of their divinely sanctioned art, they are more often depicted as facing charges for poisoning their patients.

  11. Ritualizing the Use of Coins in Ancient Greek Sanctuaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The article explores aspects of the monetization of the Greek sanctuaries, more specifically how space was created to accommodate coins as objects and their use within the sacred sphere. Except in a limited number of cases, our understanding is still quite fragmented. Where most research has...

  12. A theology of the Greek version of Proverbs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-17

    Jul 17, 2015 ... problems, a prominent one being that the Old Greek has not yet been determined systematically.4 ... Thematic issues. One of the definite advantages of an exegetical commentary is that one can analyse passages contextually.5 This ensures that researchers do ...... clothes or armour that fit well (Pi P 4.80).

  13. Gorgias' scepticism regarding Greek social class distinctions in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Later in Greek history, there were men who exhibited extraordinary leadership qualities that could have conferred on them the appellations of nobility similar to those of Achilles. Among these were the heroes of Marathon: Callimachus, the strategos of that year, Aeschylus, Miltiades, Themistocles. In the heyday of. Athens, its ...

  14. Modern Greek dictionaries and the ideology of standardization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tseronis, A.; Iordanidou, A.; Georgakopoulou, A.; Silk, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analysis and evaluation of the four most recent and authoritative general monolingual dictionaries of Greek as texts produced by an identifiable agent and addressed to an identifiable public, that contribute to the ideology of standardization. Our claim is that we can

  15. The Greek evil eye, African witchcraft, and Western ethnocentrism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    Abstract. The aim of this study is to illustrate the ethnocentrism of Western thought by projecting its own science-oriented culture onto cultures with different beliefs. A comparative study between African witchcraft and the Greek phenomenon of the evil eye will be done to investigate whether similar reasons can be given for ...

  16. The influence of Greek drama on Matthew's Gospel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... The purpose of this article is to present the Greek influence on the genre of Matthew's text. Firstly, there will be an ... important to these groups, the dynamic of memory was bound to be different'. Page 1 of 9. Scan this QR ..... This same type of crescendo is obvious in Matthew, with Jesus building from the ...

  17. The Greek Financial Crisis: Discourses of Difference or Solidarity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickes, Hans; Otten, Tina; Weymann, Laura Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    The so-called Greek Financial Crisis, which has been the object of close attention in the German media since the end of 2009, has caused a public debate on who should be held responsible for the decline of crisis-hit Greece, the common currency and the Eurozone. The media's enduring and controversial public discussion has lately been referred to…

  18. An Examination of Drunkorexia, Greek Affiliation, and Alcohol Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Rose Marie; Galante, Marina; Trivedi, Rudra; Kahrs, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relation between Greek affiliation, the College Life Alcohol Salience Scale, alcohol consumption, disordered eating, and drunkorexia (i.e., using disordered eating practices as compensation for calories consumed through alcohol). A total of 349 college students (254 females, 89 males) participated in the…

  19. Grammatical Abilities of Greek-Speaking Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Arhonto; Marinis, Theodoros; Kotsopoulou, Angeliki; Francis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates pronoun reference and verbs with nonactive morphology in high-functioning Greek-speaking children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). It is motivated by problems with reflexive pronouns demonstrated by English-speaking children with ASD and the fact that reflexivity is also expressed via nonactive (reflexive) verbs in…

  20. Acoustics of ancient Greek and Roman theaters in use today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Angelakis, Konstantinos

    2006-01-01

    In the Mediteranan area a large number of open, ancient Greek and Roman theatres are still today facing a busy schedule of performances including both classical and contemporary works of dance, drama, concerts, and opera. During the EU funded ``Erato'' project and a subsequent master thesis project...

  1. Identifying intimate partner violence (IPV) during the postpartum period in a Greek sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivilaki, Victoria G; Dafermos, Vassilis; Daglas, Maria; Antoniou, Evagelia; Tsopelas, Nicholas D; Theodorakis, Pavlos N; Brown, Judith B; Lionis, Christos

    2010-12-01

    Research has highlighted the wide impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) and the public health role of community health professionals in detection of victimized women. The purpose of this study was to identify postpartum emotional and physical abuse and to validate the Greek version of the Women Abuse Screening Tool (WAST) along with its sensitivity and specificity. Five hundred seventy-nine mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of two public hospitals in Athens, Greece. Participants were randomly selected by clinic or shift. The WAST and the Partner Violence Screen (PVS) surveys were administered in random order to the mothers from September 2007 to January 2008. The WAST was compared with the PVS as a criterion standard. Agreement between the screening instruments was examined. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent sample t tests, reliability coefficients, explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation, and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis-also called structural equation modeling-of principal components was conducted by Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Two hundred four (35.6%) of the mothers screened were identified as experiencing IPV. Scores on the WAST correlated well with those on the PVS; the internal consistency of the WAST Greek version-tested using Cronbach's alpha coefficient-was found to be 0.926 and that of Guttman's split-half coefficient was 0.924. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of the WAST, demonstrating a two-factor structure. The area under ROC curve (AUC) was found to be 0.824, and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 0/1 fitted the model sensitivity at 99.7% and model specificity at 64.4%. Our data confirm the validity of the Greek version of the WAST in identifying IPV

  2. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Dysarthria in Greek with a Focus on Lexical Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakyritsis, Ioannis

    The field of motor speech disorders in Greek is substantially underresearched. Additionally, acoustic studies on lexical stress in dysarthria are generally very rare (Kim et al. 2010). This dissertation examined the acoustic and perceptual effects of Greek dysarthria focusing on lexical stress. Additional possibly deviant speech characteristics were acoustically analyzed. Data from three dysarthric participants and matched controls was analyzed using a case study design. The analysis of lexical stress was based on data drawn from a single word repetition task that included pairs of disyllabic words differentiated by stress location. This data was acoustically analyzed in terms of the use of the acoustic cues for Greek stress. The ability of the dysarthric participants to signal stress in single words was further assessed in a stress identification task carried out by 14 naive Greek listeners. Overall, the acoustic and perceptual data indicated that, although all three dysarthric speakers presented with some difficulty in the patterning of stressed and unstressed syllables, each had different underlying problems that gave rise to quite distinct patterns of deviant speech characteristics. The atypical use of lexical stress cues in Anna's data obscured the prominence relations of stressed and unstressed syllables to the extent that the position of lexical stress was usually not perceptually transparent. Chris and Maria on the other hand, did not have marked difficulties signaling lexical stress location, although listeners were not 100% successful in the stress identification task. For the most part, Chris' atypical phonation patterns and Maria's very slow rate of speech did not interfere with lexical stress signaling. The acoustic analysis of the lexical stress cues was generally in agreement with the participants' performance in the stress identification task. Interestingly, in all three dysarthric participants, but more so in Anna, targets stressed on the 1st

  3. Greek pre-service physical education teachers’ beliefs about curricular orientations: Instrument validation and examination of four important goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolis Adamakis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The way people interpret reality is influenced by their mental constructions, their cognitive abilities and their beliefs. Physical Education (PE students have a wide range of formed beliefs concerning the purposes of PE, which cannot be easily modified, even during undergraduate studies. OBJECTIVE: This study validated the scores from a previously constructed questionnaire and investigated the Physical Education students’ belief systems toward the Greek curricular outcome goals. METHODS: Students (N = 483; males = 259, females = 224 from a Greek Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Science shared their beliefs about curricular outcomes. They completed the Greek version of the four factor instrument “Attitudes/beliefs toward curriculum in physical education”. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted for the validation of the instrument and MANOVAs followed in order to control for group differences. Finally, a profile analysis was run in order to determine if PE students considered each goal to be equally important. RESULTS: The validation of the instrument confirmed the proposed four factors dependant model. Both internal consistency and the confirmatory factor analysis fit indices produced valid and reliable scores. The profile analysis was significant, indicating that students did not view the outcome goals as equally important. The leading goal was physical activity and fitness, followed by self-actualization, social development and motor skill development. MANOVA results for comparisons between sub-groups revealed significant differences only between genders. CONCLUSIONS: Between groups similarities and differences are discussed, focusing on the classification of the four important outcome goals. Currently, Greek Physical Education students consider physical activity and fitness outcome goal as the most important, while motor skill development is considered the least important one.

  4. The Enigma of Quality in Greek Higher Education. A mixed methods study of introducing quality management into Greek higher education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, A.; Papadimitriou, Antigoni

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the adoption of quality management in Greek universities as an outcome of organizational processes. It examined a period in the first decade of the 21st century when program evaluation and quality management were heavily debated in Greece. The study recognizes that higher

  5. An Intensive Approach to Latin and Greek: The Latin/Greek Institute of the City University of New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Floyd L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes two total immersion summer programs, one in Latin and one in Greek, each lasting two and a half months, with daily class instruction involving four hours per day, plus three hours of optional classes. In addition, students must spend six to eight hours doing homework each night. (MES)

  6. The Longitudinal Contribution of Early Morphological Awareness Skills to Reading Fluency and Comprehension in Greek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolitsis, George; Grigorakis, Ioannis; Georgiou, George K.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the role of three morphological awareness (MA) skills (inflection, derivation, and compounding) in word reading fluency and reading comprehension in a relatively transparent orthography (Greek). Two hundred and fifteen (104 girls; Mage = 67.40 months, at kindergarten) Greek children were followed from kindergarten (K) to grade 2 (G2). In K and grade 1 (G1), they were tested on measures of MA (two inflectional, two derivational, and three compounding), letter knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), and general cognitive ability (vocabulary and non-verbal IQ). At the end of G1 and G2, they were also tested on word reading fluency and reading comprehension. The results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that the inflectional and derivational aspects of MA in K as well as all aspects of MA in G1 accounted for 2–5% of unique variance in reading comprehension. None of the MA skills predicted word reading fluency, after controlling for the effects of vocabulary and RAN. These findings suggest that the MA skills, even when assessed as early as in kindergarten, play a significant role in reading comprehension development. PMID:29081759

  7. How efficient are Greek hospitals? A case study using a double bootstrap DEA approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounetas, Kostas; Papathanassopoulos, Fotis

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure Greek hospital performance using different input-output combinations, and to identify the factors that influence their efficiency thus providing policy makers with valuable input for the decision-making process. Using a unique dataset, we estimated the productive efficiency of each hospital through a bootstrapped data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. In a second stage, we explored, using a bootstrapped truncated regression, the impact of environmental factors on hospitals' technical and scale efficiency. Our results reveal that over 80% of the examined hospitals appear to have a technical efficiency lower than 0.8, while the majority appear to be scale efficient. Moreover, efficiency performance differed with inclusion of medical examinations as an additional variable. On the other hand, bed occupancy ratio appeared to affect both technical and scale efficiency in a rather interesting way, while the adoption of advanced medical equipment and the type of hospital improves scale and technical efficiency, correspondingly. The findings of this study on Greek hospitals' performance are not encouraging. Furthermore, our results raise questions regarding the number of hospitals that should operate, and which type of hospital is more efficient. Finally, the results indicate the role of medical equipment in performance, confirming its misallocation in healthcare expenditure.

  8. Subjective Risk Assessment and Perception in the Greek and English Bakery Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Kavadi, Zafira; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Papantonopoulos, Sotiris

    2009-01-01

    Several factors influencing risk perception in the area of occupational health and safety are known, but there is still lack of a full understanding of the ways in which people characterize risk. This study aimed to provide an insight of employee risk assessment and perception in the bakery industry. 87 British and 64 Greek employees in two comparable bakery companies were asked to estimate and evaluate hazards at their workplace. The participants' judgments of 12 hazards—according to 7 risk aspects—were collected and analyzed. Subjective assessment on important occupational hazards included handling heavy loads, repetitiveness, high temperatures, high rate of work, stressful deadlines, and noise. Although limited in the population involved, our findings revealed strong cross-national differences in employee risk perception of specific groups of hazards in the bakery industry. Additional interviews revealed evidence that Greek employees' risk perception depends mostly on work experience while British employees were aware of risks due to company health and safety policy, recognizing that safety is the responsibility of both the management and the worker. Cross-national (cultural) factors that influence workforce risk perception and attitudes towards safety have to be taken into account by technical experts and policy makers in the designing of prevention strategies and risk communication. PMID:20041018

  9. The Longitudinal Contribution of Early Morphological Awareness Skills to Reading Fluency and Comprehension in Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Manolitsis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the role of three morphological awareness (MA skills (inflection, derivation, and compounding in word reading fluency and reading comprehension in a relatively transparent orthography (Greek. Two hundred and fifteen (104 girls; Mage = 67.40 months, at kindergarten Greek children were followed from kindergarten (K to grade 2 (G2. In K and grade 1 (G1, they were tested on measures of MA (two inflectional, two derivational, and three compounding, letter knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN, and general cognitive ability (vocabulary and non-verbal IQ. At the end of G1 and G2, they were also tested on word reading fluency and reading comprehension. The results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that the inflectional and derivational aspects of MA in K as well as all aspects of MA in G1 accounted for 2–5% of unique variance in reading comprehension. None of the MA skills predicted word reading fluency, after controlling for the effects of vocabulary and RAN. These findings suggest that the MA skills, even when assessed as early as in kindergarten, play a significant role in reading comprehension development.

  10. Subjective Risk Assessment and Perception in the Greek and English Bakery Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, E.C.; Kavadi, Z.; Bakoyannis, G.; Papantonopoulos, S.

    2010-01-01

    Several factors influencing risk perception in the area of occupational health and safety are known, but there is still lack of a full understanding of the ways in which people characterize risk. This study aimed to provide an insight of employee risk assessment and perception in the bakery industry. 87 British and 64 Greek employees in two comparable bakery companies were asked to estimate and evaluate hazards at their workplace. The participants judgments of 12 hazards according to 7 risk aspects were collected and analyzed. Subjective assessment on important occupational hazards included handling heavy loads, repetitiveness, high temperatures, high rate of work, stressful deadlines, and noise. Although limited in the population involved, our findings revealed strong cross-national differences in employee risk perception of specific groups of hazards in the bakery industry. Additional interviews revealed evidence that Greek employees risk perception depends mostly on work experience while British employees were aware of risks due to company health and safety policy, recognizing that safety is the responsibility of both the management and the worker. Cross-national (cultural) factors that influence workforce risk perception and attitudes towards safety have to be taken into account by technical experts and policy makers in the designing of prevention strategies and risk communication.

  11. Subjective Risk Assessment and Perception in the Greek and English Bakery Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos C. Alexopoulos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Several factors influencing risk perception in the area of occupational health and safety are known, but there is still lack of a full understanding of the ways in which people characterize risk. This study aimed to provide an insight of employee risk assessment and perception in the bakery industry. 87 British and 64 Greek employees in two comparable bakery companies were asked to estimate and evaluate hazards at their workplace. The participants' judgments of 12 hazards—according to 7 risk aspects—were collected and analyzed. Subjective assessment on important occupational hazards included handling heavy loads, repetitiveness, high temperatures, high rate of work, stressful deadlines, and noise. Although limited in the population involved, our findings revealed strong cross-national differences in employee risk perception of specific groups of hazards in the bakery industry. Additional interviews revealed evidence that Greek employees' risk perception depends mostly on work experience while British employees were aware of risks due to company health and safety policy, recognizing that safety is the responsibility of both the management and the worker. Cross-national (cultural factors that influence workforce risk perception and attitudes towards safety have to be taken into account by technical experts and policy makers in the designing of prevention strategies and risk communication.

  12. Harnessing the opportunities of austerity: a detailed mapping of the Greek transportation sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraklis Stamos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, shortly after the global economic crisis of 2008, Greece has entered into a deep recession phase. The multifaceted presence of austerity is experienced in an increasing number of sectors of the country. The Greek transportation sector is not immune to this state of affairs. The ongoing crisis had a significant impact on its economic (investment, employment, exports-imports turnover as well as its operational (transportation intensity, throughput, performance aspects and capabilities. In this paper, a detailed mapping of these impacts is laid out, correlating transport-related characteristics, trends and estimations with the respective economic ones. Specifically, the paper presents analyses of the Greek passenger and freight transportation, following a data-driven approach over several areas. Findings show a substantial decrease of activities overall. Paradoxically, however, austerity can also be said to offer opportunities, such as the development of innovative, cost-effective and outward-looking business schemes, for handling transportation-related issues. In the face of these opportunities, authorities and stakeholders have recently turned their attention to ways of harnessing them as they may arise. The paper conducts a detailed analysis of these efforts to discover prospects for development in the midst of austerity, and highlights the steps currently being taken in that direction.

  13. Impact of Job Satisfaction on Greek Nurses' Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Panagiotis; Katsikavali, Vassiliki; Galanis, Petros; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Papadatou, Danai; Sourtzi, Panayota

    2015-12-01

    Employee job satisfaction and its relationship with health and quality of life has been an issue of major concern over the past decades. Nurses experience difficult working conditions that affect their job satisfaction, health, and quality of life. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in three general hospitals and their respective health centers. Stratified random sampling by level of education was used, and 508 nurses and nursing assistants were included. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire, which included the Measure of Job Satisfaction, the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, as well as demographic details, education, and work conditions data, was used. Greek nurses were found to be dissatisfied with their job according to the total score of the job satisfaction scale, although personal satisfaction and satisfaction with support had had higher scores. Their general health was reported as average, because of physical and mental health problems, low vitality, low energy, and increased physical pain. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that males and those wishing to stay in the job had higher physical and mental health. Increased job satisfaction was related to increased physical and mental health. Although Greek nurses are not satisfied with their work, those with high levels of job satisfaction had better health-related quality of life. The findings suggest that improvement of the work environment would contribute to a healthier and more satisfied nursing workforce.

  14. The Longitudinal Contribution of Early Morphological Awareness Skills to Reading Fluency and Comprehension in Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolitsis, George; Grigorakis, Ioannis; Georgiou, George K

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the role of three morphological awareness (MA) skills (inflection, derivation, and compounding) in word reading fluency and reading comprehension in a relatively transparent orthography (Greek). Two hundred and fifteen (104 girls; M age = 67.40 months, at kindergarten) Greek children were followed from kindergarten (K) to grade 2 (G2). In K and grade 1 (G1), they were tested on measures of MA (two inflectional, two derivational, and three compounding), letter knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), and general cognitive ability (vocabulary and non-verbal IQ). At the end of G1 and G2, they were also tested on word reading fluency and reading comprehension. The results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that the inflectional and derivational aspects of MA in K as well as all aspects of MA in G1 accounted for 2-5% of unique variance in reading comprehension. None of the MA skills predicted word reading fluency, after controlling for the effects of vocabulary and RAN. These findings suggest that the MA skills, even when assessed as early as in kindergarten, play a significant role in reading comprehension development.

  15. Lead in alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, J C; Pickford, C J; White, G F

    1986-01-01

    Following the finding that blood lead concentrations in middle-aged men were positively associated with alcohol consumption, the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution recommended that information on lead in alcoholic beverages be obtained. The results reported here were obtained in response to the Royal Commission's request. About 90% of canned and bottled beers contained less than or equal to 10 micrograms/l of lead, whereas nearly half the draught beers sampled contained greater than 10 micrograms/l and 4% contained greater than 100 micrograms/l. Opening the cans and bottles and pouring the contents into a glass had no significant effect on the lead concentration in the beer. All wines sampled directly from the bottle, that is without pouring, contained less than 250 micrograms/l of lead. However the lead concentration in some wines contained in lead-capped bottles increased significantly when the wine was poured from the bottle, in one instance the increment was 1890 micrograms/l. It is concluded that consumption of beer containing 50 micrograms/l of lead could make a substantial contribution to blood lead concentrations in man. Consumption of 1 l/day of wine containing 150 micrograms/l of lead could also make a major contribution to blood lead concentrations. Lead contamination of wine when it is poured from a bottle, which had been lead-capped, can sometimes greatly increase lead concentrations in the wine.

  16. The validity of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire in a Greek sample: Tests of measurement invariance and latent mean differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaousis, Ioannis; Zouraraki, Chrysoula; Karamaouna, Penny; Karagiannopoulou, Leda; Giakoumaki, Stella G

    2015-10-01

    The Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) is a widely used scale for measuring schizotypal characteristics modeled on DSM-III-R criteria for schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). The aim of this study was to examine the factorial structure of the Greek SPQ, its factorial invariance across gender and different age groups and possible gender and age group differences at latent mean level. Eight hundred sixty-five community participants completed the Greek version of the SPQ. With regard to the factorial structure of the original first-order model, the results showed that a seven-factor model (sub-scales "no close friends" with "constricted affect" and "ideas of reference" with "unusual perceptual experiences" were combined) was replicated adequately. Furthermore, the second-order "paranoid" model provided also adequate fit. With regard to the factorial invariance of the SPQ across gender and age, the analysis revealed that both, the first- and second-order models showed measurement invariance (configural, metric and structural) across gender and age groups (17-35 vs. 36-70). Latent mean differences across gender and age groups were also found. Based on these findings, we can conclude that the Greek version of the SPQ is a psychometrically sound instrument for measuring schizotypal characteristics and a useful screening tool for SPD across gender and age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Attitudes and behaviours of Greeks concerning blood donation: recruitment and retention campaigns should be focused on need rather than altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalargirou, Aikaterini A; Beloukas, Apostolos I; Kosma, Alexandra G; Nanou, Christina I; Saridi, Maria I; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2014-07-01

    Blood supplies in Greece are insufficient to meet the high transfusion needs arising from car accidents and treatment of thalassaemia. This study was designed to determine Greeks' opinions about blood donation, in order to identify the reasons for the lack of motivation to donate and allow experts to establish better recruitment campaigns for the enrichment of the donor pool, based on our findings. The opinions of randomly selected Greek citizens (n=800) about volunteer blood donation were assessed by means of a standardised, anonymous questionnaire. The results were analysed using the χ(2) test and Spearman's correlation coefficient. With regards to attitudes towards intention to donate, only 7.1% were indifferent, while 88.0% of the individuals believed that donating blood was an "offer". Reasons for not donating mainly involved safety (36.0%) and fear (24.0%), whereas need (77.9%) was the most fundamental positive motivation. Of the people enrolled in the present study, 10.0% were active donors, 31.3% occasional donors, 15.0% rare donors and 36.6% non-donors. The considerable percentages of occasional and rare donors in comparison with the low proportion of active donors in the Greek donor pool indicates that "need" is a more important motivation for blood donation than altruism in Greece. These results could be useful for establishing advertising campaigns on blood donation and for a more direct approach to the population, aiming for a change in mentality in favour of active blood donation.

  18. Validity and reliability of the Greek version of the xerostomia questionnaire in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memtsa, Pinelopi Theopisti; Tolia, Maria; Tzitzikas, Ioannis; Bizakis, Ioannis; Pistevou-Gombaki, Kyriaki; Charalambidou, Martha; Iliopoulou, Chrysoula; Kyrgias, George

    2017-03-01

    Xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck (H&N) cancer has serious effects on patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of the self-reported eight-item xerostomia questionnaire (XQ) in patients treated with radiotherapy for H&N cancer. The XQ was translated into Greek and administered to 100 XQ patients. An exploratory factor analysis was performed. Reliability measures were calculated. Several types of validity were evaluated. The observer-rated scoring system was also used. The mean XQ value was 41.92 (SD 22.71). Factor analysis revealed the unidimensional nature of the questionnaire. High reliability measures (ICC, Cronbach's α, Pearson coefficients) were obtained. Patients differed statistically significantly in terms of XQ score, depending on the RTOG/EORTC classification. The Greek version of XQ is valid and reliable. Its score is well related to observer's findings and it can be used to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy on the subjective feeling of xerostomia.

  19. Greek Islands in Crisis: Social Vulnerability and the Need for Integrated Territorial Development Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadakis, Nikos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study is structured around the relationship between insularity and social vulnerability, while research inevitably focuses on unemployment, youth unemployment, Neets and poverty with specific emphasis to the territorial dimension of poverty and social exclusion. For the latter, general findings at European level are drawn from the ESPON TIPSE Project, the main objective of which was to explore and reveal regional-scale patterns, inequalities and processes and their relationship with each territorial context. Furthermore, by the paper, some local findings are drawn concerning the Greek insular and micro-insular space. The question concerning this space is to what extent blue growth potential can create inclusive prosperity in coastal and island areas and how we can measure and effectively monitor this phenomenon.

  20. From Infertility to Successful Third-Party Reproduction: The Trajectory of Greek Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatou, Danai; Papaligoura, Zaira G; Bellali, Thalia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of our phenomenological hermeneutic study was to explore the lived experiences of Greek infertile women who achieve a pregnancy through the use of sperm, oocyte, or embryo donation or surrogate motherhood. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 infertile women. Findings suggest that conceiving a child through assisted reproductive technologies (ART) is lived as a highly distressing experience, comprising long waiting periods for medical results, several failed attempts, and treatment options with uncertain outcomes. The analysis of women's accounts revealed a constitutive pattern, journeying between hope and despair, and three associated themes: (a) coping with uncertainty and treatment failures, (b) exploring options and decision making, and (c) being supported by spouse and professionals. Findings illuminate the specific meaning-based coping processes, decision-making patterns, and sources of support that help women who pursue treatment until they give birth to a child, to manage highly stressful situations and critical decisions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Physical activity and sedentary behaviours in Greek-Cypriot children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jago Russell

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no data on physical activity and sedentary behaviours of Greek-Cypriot children and adolescents, and no study to date examined the association between these two behaviours in this population. The purpose of this study was to document the prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behaviours among Greek-Cypriot adolescents and examine the association between physical activity and a range of sedentary behaviours. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between physical activity and sedentary behaviours. Methods A cross-sectional study among 1,966 Greek-Cypriot children and adolescents was conducted in 2008/2009. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire across primary, middle, high and technical/vocational schools. Results Overall 52.3% and 52.4% of the participants met physical activity and television viewing guidelines respectively. Boys and younger children were more likely to meet guidelines. Boys who attended sports clubs for two or more times per week were more likely to be physically active (OR = 3.4, and those who listened to music for one or less than one hour per day were less likely to be physically active (OR = 0.6. Girls who attended sports clubs for two or more times per week and who watched television for two or less than two hours per day were more likely to be physically active, (OR = 3.0 and OR = 1.5 respectively. Girls who reported travelling by car/bus/motorbike for one or less than one hour per day were more likely to actively travel to school (OR = 1.8. Conclusions Findings from this study provide limited support for the displacement hypothesis whereby sedentary behaviours displace physically active time. About 50.0% of Greek children and adolescents in Cyprus meet existing physical activity and television viewing guidelines. Encouraging children to attend sports clubs for at least two times per week may markedly improve their physical activity levels.

  2. Psychometric evaluation and feasibility of the Greek Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (GR-PSQI) in patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotronoulas, Grigorios C; Papadopoulou, Constantina N; Papapetrou, Anastasia; Patiraki, Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    Quality of sleep in patients with cancer is regarded as of utmost importance. The aim of the present study was to assess psychometric properties and feasibility of the Greek version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (GR-PSQI). Following a "forward-backward" procedure, the scale was translated into Greek. The GR-PSQI was administered as a self-report instrument to 209 consecutive patients with cancer during active-phase chemotherapy treatment. For stability analysis purposes, a subgroup of 60 patients completed the GR-PSQI on two occasions, 14-21 days apart. All participants also completed the Insomnia Severity Index, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale-Greek version, a Sleep Quality-Visual Analogue Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Greek version. Validity and reliability analyses were performed for GR-PSQI data. The Chronbach's alpha for the global GR-PSQI score was 0.76. Test-retest reliability analysis for the global GR-PSQI score yielded a high intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.82 (p quality of nocturnal sleep] and [daily disturbances and management of sleep problems]. This construct was further supported by its high correlations with similar content instruments, as well as by the instrument's ability to discriminate well between contrasting groups of patients with different levels of anxiety, depression and performance status. The present findings support the GR-PSQI as a reliable, stable over time and valid sleep quality instrument when administered to patients with cancer during chemotherapy treatment; however, it is suggested that the use of a two-factor scoring method (instead of the traditional unidimensional) could improve its sensitivity in this patient group.

  3. A COMPARATIVE STUDY of HEALTH UNITS of the 6TH GREEK HEALTH REGION DURING an ECONOMIC CRISIS PERIOD through DATA ENVELOPMENT ANALYSIS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios I. Farantos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the change in relative efficiency through a comparative study on the efficiency of health units within a Greek health region during an economic crisis environment, with the aid of a new application. The study is designed to collect data from the 6th Greek health region and to process that data with the use of Data Envelopment Analysis software. The study methodology extends to the application of the study of efficiency of organisations and the integration of the analysis in an interpretation framework within the economic crisis. The study refers to similar hospital clinics (pathological within one of the largest Greek health regions in order for the results to be comparable. We estimate and calculate the DEA sizes based on the CRS, VRS and SE models of the Health Units of a Greek health region, with the use of a new application which calculates the change of overall relative Efficiency during the crisis. The study of the change in the efficiency of health units leads to useful conclusions on the negative changes in the observed efficiency of the units and the integration of the studies on the change of efficiency in the Integrated crisis management. The study ranks the efficient and inefficient units and suggests ways of improvement. This study allows for further case studies in the future and the completion of the integrated crisis management model through comparative studies on the efficiency of systems.

  4. Barriers to teaching ocean science in Greek schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, Martha; McHugh, Patricia; Domegan, Christine; Gotensparre, Susan; Fauville, Geraldine; Parr, Jon

    2017-04-01

    Most European citizens are not aware of the full extent of the medical, economic, social, political and environmental importance of the sea to Europe and beyond. Most citizens are not aware of how our day-to-day actions can have a cumulative effect on the health of the ocean - a necessary resource that must be protected for all life on the planet Earth to exist. In other words, European citizens lack a sense of "Ocean Literacy" - an understanding of the ocean's influence on us and our influence on the ocean. Sea Change, a 3.5 million EU-funded project started in March 2015, is designed to bring about a fundamental 'Sea Change' in the way European citizens view their relationship with the sea, by empowering them as 'Ocean Literate' citizens - to take direct and sustainable action towards healthy seas and ocean, healthy communities and ultimately, a healthy planet. The project involves 17 partners from nine countries across Europe and will bring about real actions using behavior change and social engagement methodologies. Building upon the latest research on citizen and stakeholder attitudes, perceptions and values, the Sea Change partnership will design and implement mobilisation activities focused on education, community, government agencies, policy makers and citizens. Eight consultations were held around Europe with regards to barriers to teaching ocean science at schools. All project partners used a Collective Intelligence (CI) methodology to involve target group(s) in active, direct participation for Sea Change. CI is a "barriers and value" structuring methodology, a process of critical learning and reflection followed by action, and then by more critical learning to enable mobilisation, design and development 'with' people rather than on their behalf. In Greece, the consultation was carried out by HCMR, the lead partner for Greece. Participants were recruited through personal contact and existing education networks that the HCMR has previously worked with. In

  5. Lead poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help if this information is not immediately available. Poison Control If someone has severe symptoms from possible ... be caused by lead poisoning, call your local poison control center. Your local poison center can be ...

  6. Subject-Verb Agreement, Object Clitics and Wh-Questions in Bilingual French-Greek SLI: The Case Study of a French-Greek-Speaking Child with SLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakaki, Stavroula; Chrysomallis, Marie-Annick; Petraki, Evangelia

    2011-01-01

    In this study we investigate the linguistic performance of a school age French-Greek simultaneous bilingual boy with specific language impairment (SLI) on the production of subject-verb agreement, object clitic pronouns and wh-questions. In addition, we compare his performance on these linguistic structures with that of two French-Greek bilingual…

  7. Preservative Monitoring of a Greek Woman with Hydrops Fetalis due to Parvovirus B19 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharias Fasoulakis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primate erythroparvovirus 1 (parvovirus B19 is a member of the Erythrovirus genus of the Parvoviridae family and it is one of the few members of the family known to be pathogenic in human. B19 infection is common and widespread with the virus being associated with numerous rheumatologic and haematologic manifestations. More specifically, maternal infection with parvovirus B19 during pregnancy can cause severe anemia which may lead to nonimmune hydrops or fetal demise, as a result of fetal erythroid progenitor cells infection with shortened half-life of erythrocytes. We present a rare case reported in the Greek population, of subclinical transient reticulocytopenia due to B19 parvovirus infection, in an asymptomatic pregnant woman, without medical history of hemoglobinopathy, and with the presence of hydrops fetalis during the third trimester of her pregnancy.

  8. Prenatal ultrasound findings observed in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: data from the registry of congenital malformations in Auvergne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debost-Legrand, Anne; Goumy, Carole; Laurichesse-Delmas, Hélène; Déchelotte, Pierre; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie; Lémery, Didier; Francannet, Christine; Gallot, Denis

    2013-12-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is associated with facial dysmorphism including high forehead, high nasal bridge, hypertelorism and severe mental retardation. WHS results from a 4p16.3 deletion. Only a small number of reports have been made on the prenatal ultrasound findings observed in WHS. Here we report our experience on 10 cases of WHS ascertained prenatally between 1983 and 2009 through the CEMC-Auvergne registry of congenital malformations. The assumption that a "Greek warrior helmet" facies is pathognomonic of WHS could lead to misdiagnosis. Other clinical findings such as severe and early onset intrauterine growth retardation, facial dysmorphism (high forehead, high nasal bridge, low-set ears, micrognathia, hypertelorism), atrial or ventricular septal defect, and renal dysplasia should help obstetricians to suspect the diagnosis of WHS prenatally. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hyman Minsky's financial instability hypothesis and the Greek debt crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Beshenov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to analyze the current debt crisis in Greece based on the financial instability hypothesis developed by Hyman Minsky. This article shows that the hypothesis provides an understanding of how an economy endogenously becomes “financially fragile” and thus prone to crises. The authors analyze how public and private sector behavior in the Greek economy led to the country's debt crisis. In particular, based on a sample of 36 Greek companies, the authors show that between 2001 and 2014, the majority of those companies had switched to fragile financial structures. Special attention is devoted to the negative consequences of applying the neoclassical doctrine of “austerity measures” in Greece as the principal “anti-crisis” concept of mainstream economic science.

  10. The evolution of Greek fauna since classical times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Sidiropoulos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the Greek fauna of classical and late antiquity and changes up to the present day. The main sources for the fauna of antiquity are historical, geographical and zoological texts, as well as descriptions from travellers who visited Greece. The study of the texts of classical and late antiquity was based on the following classical authors: Xenophon, Aristotle, Aristophanes Byzantios, Pliny, Dio Chrysostom, Plutarch, Pausanias and Aelian. Some species that were present in the Greek fauna of classical and late antiquity, such as the lion and the leopard, are today extinct in Greece, whereas some other species that are now common, such as the cat, the chicken and the peacock, were introduced about that time or a little earlier from other regions. Some other species that are also common today, such as the wild rabbit and the pheasant, were unknown at that time, as they appeared later in Greece from other areas.

  11. Greek's health, waiting for the 'deus ex machina'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanourgiakis, John; Kanoupakis, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Greece from May 2010 has been following Troika's (European Commission, European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund) austere policies in all over the public finance sector. Troika's instructions which are adopted by the politicians resulted to depressed and weak citizens. The consequences in health care sector are becoming visible across the society. A big part of Greek's society is uninsured without any access to public health care system. The vulnerable social groups confront catastrophic health care expenditures and impoverishment with no social net protection. Greeks are paying the price of their irrational way of living. The current paper has gathered from the literature the early effects of the implementation of these policies on public health and healthcare.

  12. Natural desulfurization in coal-fired units using Greek lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konidaris, Dimitrios N

    2010-10-01

    This paper analyzes the natural desulfurization process taking place in coal-fired units using Greek lignite. The dry scrubbing capability of Greek lignite appears to be extremely high under special conditions, which can make it possible for the units to operate within the legislative limits of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. According to this study on several lignite-fired power stations in northern Greece, it was found that sulfur oxide emissions depend on coal rank, sulfur content, and calorific value. On the other hand, SO2 emission is inversely proportional to the parameter gammaCO2(max), which is equal to the maximum carbon dioxide (CO2) content by volume of dry flue gas under stoichiometric combustion. The desulfurization efficiency is positively correlated to the molar ratio of decomposed calcium carbonate to sulfur and negatively correlated to the free calcium oxide content of fly ash.

  13. Multidimensional body-self relations questionnaire-appearance scales: psychometric properties of the Greek version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrides, Marios; Kkeli, Natalie

    2013-12-01

    The psychometric properties of a Greek version of the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire-Appearance Scales (MBSRQ-AS) were studied. A total of 1,312 high school students (463 boys, 849 girls) were administered the Greek MBSRQ-AS, the Greek Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised (ASI-R) and the Greek Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3). An exploratory factor analysis revealed that the Greek MBSRQ-AS items significantly loaded with the scale's main factors. Internal consistencies of the subscales ranged from .76 to .86. Test-retest reliabilities ranged from .75 to .93. Convergent validity was also confirmed as the Greek MBSRQ-AS subscales correlated positively with the ASI-R and the SATAQ-3.

  14. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Carolyn M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire into Greek language and discuss possibilities of its use in primary care settings. Methods A modified version of the English self-administered questionnaire consisting of 30 items was used. Internationally recommended methodology, mandating forward translation, backward translation, reconciliation and pretesting steps, was followed. Tool validation included assessing item internal consistency, using the alpha coefficient of Cronbach. Reproducibility (test – retest reliability was measured by the kappa correlation coefficient. Criterion validity was calculated for selected parts of the questionnaire by correlating respondents' research experience with relevant research item scores. An exploratory factor analysis highlighted how the items group together, using a Varimax (oblique rotation and subsequent Cronbach's alpha assessment. Results The psychometric properties of the Greek version of the TNA questionnaire for nursing staff employed in primary care were good. Internal consistency of the instrument was very good, Cronbach's alpha was found to be 0.985 (p 1.0, KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy = 0.680 and Bartlett's test of sphericity, p Conclusion The translated and adapted Greek version is comparable with the original English instrument in terms of validity and reliability and it is suitable to assess professional development needs of nursing staff in Greek primary care settings.

  15. Determinants of bank profitability: Evidence from the Greek banking sector

    OpenAIRE

    Alexiou Constantinos; Sofoklis Voyazas

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of bank-specific and macroeconomic determinants of bank profitability, using an empirical framework that incorporates the traditional Structure-Conduct- Performance (SCP) hypothesis. A panel data approach has been adopted and effectively applied to six Greek banks. The evidence generated suggests that for any consistent or systematic size the profitability relationship is relatively weak. Most of the bank-specific determinants were found to significantly af...

  16. Attitudes towards bilingualism : the case of two Greek islands

    OpenAIRE

    Kostoulas-Makrakis, Nelly; Karantzola, Eleni; Athanassiadis, Elias

    2006-01-01

    Bilingualism, and more recently plurilingualism, is attracting considerable attention due to the increasing influx of people with different ethnolinguistic background to Western societies as well as the fact that we live in a globalised world. This study presents the results of a large-scale survey administered to 1,727 students enrolled in Greek schools in the islands of Rhodes and Symi during the scholastic year 2002-2003. Using an adapted version of Baker’s questionnaire ...

  17. The Greek EEZ: Principles of a Geopolitical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Th. MAZIS; Dr. Georgios-Alexandros SGOUROS

    2012-01-01

    This paper comprises three parts. The first part presents and substantiates Greece's legal position with regard to the process of unilaterally establishing an EEZ and analyses the basic concepts, the terms and conditions of this process before resorting to the International Court of the Law of the Sea (International Court of Hamburg). The second part presents the various scenarios, based on the Voronoi chartographic method, with regard to the delineation of the Greek-Turkish-Cypriot EEZ, with...

  18. CLASSIFICATION OF GREEK FAG US WOODLANDS: A PRELIMINARY SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. BERGMEIER

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Almost 1000 published and unpublished phytosociological relevés of Greek Fagus forests are classified and the clusters interpreted with respect to ecology and phytogeography. A synoptic table is presented. Three ecological groups of communities are distinguished, viz. mesophilous, acidic and xerothermic Fagus woodlands. Differentiation within each group reveals chiefly phytogeographical as well as further ecological patterns. Geographical distributions and ecological preferences of each community are outlined and some syntaxonomic conclusions briefly discussed.

  19. CLASSIFICATION OF GREEK FAG US WOODLANDS: A PRELIMINARY SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. DIMOPOULOS

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost 1000 published and unpublished phytosociological relevés of Greek Fagus forests are classified and the clusters interpreted with respect to ecology and phytogeography. A synoptic table is presented. Three ecological groups of communities are distinguished, viz. mesophilous, acidic and xerothermic Fagus woodlands. Differentiation within each group reveals chiefly phytogeographical as well as further ecological patterns. Geographical distributions and ecological preferences of each community are outlined and some syntaxonomic conclusions briefly discussed.

  20. Uterine cancer in the writings of ancient Greek physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Sgantzos, Markos; Deligeoroglou, Efthimios; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present the views on uterine cancer of the ancient Greek physicians. We emphasize on uterine's cancer aetiology according to the dominant in antiquity humoural theory, on its surgical treatment suggested by Soranus of Ephesus, and in the vivid description provided by Aretaeus of Cappadocia. During that period, uterine cancer was considered as an incurable and painful malignancy and its approach was mainly palliative.

  1. Greek mathematical thought and the origin of algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    Important study focuses on the revival and assimilation of ancient Greek mathematics in the 13th-16th centuries, via Arabic science, and the 16th-century development of symbolic algebra. This brought about the crucial change in the concept of number that made possible modern science - in which the symbolic ""form"" of a mathematical statement is completely inseparable from its ""content"" of physical meaning. Includes a translation of Vieta's Introduction to the Analytical Art. 1968 edition. Bibliography.

  2. The computation of Greeks with multilevel Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvestre Burgos; M. B. Giles

    2011-01-01

    In mathematical finance, the sensitivities of option prices to various market parameters, also known as the “Greeks”, reflect the exposure to different sources of risk. Computing these is essential to predict the impact of market moves on portfolios and to hedge them adequately. This is commonly done using Monte Carlo simulations. However, obtaining accurate estimates of the Greeks can be computationally costly. Multilevel Monte Carlo offers complexity improvements over standard Monte Carl...

  3. Reflections on “Reflections on the Greek Revolution”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay offers a critique of Ernst Gombrich’s account of the Greek Revolution. I hope to show, however, that three major pivots of his argument -- the initiating rôle of the narrative, the continuing process of the refinement of "realism" and the breakdown of that process in the late Roman Empire cannot bear the weight assigned to them. On careful examination Gombrich's delicately balanced argument, with its artful rhetoric, collapses.

  4. Technology and culture in Greek and Roman antiquity

    OpenAIRE

    Cuomo, Serafina

    2007-01-01

    The technological achievements of the Greeks and Romans continue to fascinate and excite admiration. But what was the place of technology in their cultures? Through five case-studies, this book sets ancient technical knowledge in its political, social and intellectual context. It explores the definition of the techne of medicine in classical Athens, the development of new military technology in Hellenistic times, the self-image of technicians through funerary art in the early Roman Empire, th...

  5. Validation of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire into Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Oikonomidou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary care physicians face challenges in diagnosing and managing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ meets the standards of validity, reliability, and practicability. This paper reports on the validation of the Greek translation of the RDQ. RDQ is a condition specific instrument. For the validation of the questionnaire, the internal consistency of its items was established using the alpha coefficient of Chronbach. The reproducibility (test-retest reliability was measured by kappa correlation coefficient and the criterion of validity was calculated against the diagnosis of another questionnaire already translated and validated into Greek (IDGP using kappa correlation coefficient. A factor analysis was also performed. Greek RDQ showed a high overall internal consistency (alpha value: 0.91 for individual comparison. All 8 items regarding heartburn and regurgitation, GERD, had good reproducibility (Cohen’s κ 0.60-0.79, while the remaining 4 items about dyspepsia had a moderate reproducibility (Cohen’s κ=’ 0.40-0.59 The kappa coefficient for criterion validity for GERD was rather poor (0.20, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.36 and the overall agreement between the results of the RDQ questionnaire and those based on the IDGP questionnaire was 70.5%. Factor analysis indicated 3 factors with Eigenvalue over 1.0, and responsible for 76.91% of variance. Regurgitation items correlated more strongly with the third component but pain behind sternum and upper stomach pain correlated with the second component. The Greek version of RDQ seems to be a reliable and valid instrument following the pattern of the original questionnaire, and could be used in primary care research in Greece.

  6. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  7. A Thermote, a Novel Thermal Element Simplifying the Finding of a Medium's Entropy Emerges as a Sensible Dark Matter Candidate from Primordial Black Holes with a Mass in Range of Axion's, a Leading Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Erlan H.

    2017-06-01

    Black holes acting as dark matter have been predicted, e.g., via a duality theory in (Feria 2011, Proc. IEEE Int’l Conf. on SMC, Alaska, USA) and via observations in (Kashlinsky 2016, AJL). Here a thermote, a novel thermal element simplifying the finding of a medium’s entropy, emerges as a dark matter candidate from primordial black holes with a mass in range of axion's, a leading candidate. The thermote energy, eT, is defined as the average thermal energy contributed to a particle’s motion by the medium’s degrees of freedom (DoF) and is thus given by eT=NDoFkBT/2 where NDoF is the DoF number (e.g., NDoF=2 for a black-hole since only in its event-horizon particle motions can occur) and kBT/2 is the thermal energy contributed by each degree of freedom (kB is the Boltzmann constant and T is temperature). The entropy S of a spherical homogeneous medium is then simply stated as S=(kB/2)E/eT where E=Mc2 is the medium's rest-energy, with M its point-mass and c the speed of light, and eT=NDoFkBT/2 is the thermote's kinetic-energy. This simple equation naturally surfaced from a rest/kinetic or retention/motion mass-energy duality theory where, e.g., black-holes and vacuums form together such a duality with black holes offering the least resistance to mass-energy rest, or retention, and vacuums offering the least resistance to mass-energy kinetics, or motions. In turn, this duality theory has roots in the universal cybernetics duality principle (UCDP) stating “synergistic physical and mathematical dualities arise in efficient system designs” (Feria 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/2.1201407.005429, SPIE Newsroom). Our thermote based entropy finding method is applicable to spherical homogeneous mediums such as black-holes, photon-gases, and flexible-phase (Feria 2016, Proc. IEEE Int’l Conf. on Smart Cloud, Columbia University, NY, USA), where the thermote of a primordial black hole, with NDoF=2 and a CMB radiation temperature of T=2.725 kelvin, emerges as a

  8. Diabetes knowledge among Greek Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Bougioukli, Vasiliki; Iosifidou, Parthena; Vasiloglou, Maria F; Gerama, Maria-Assimina; Mitsos, Dimitrios; Chrysanthakopoulou, Ioanna; Tsigga, Maria; Kazakos, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes knowledge has been shown to improve glycemic control and associate with several demographic parameters. In Greece, a country with high obesity rates, disease knowledge has never been evaluated in diabetic patients. This cross sectional study aimed to assess diabetes knowledge and its associations between social and demographic parameters, among Greek type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred fifty nine patients with T2DM were recruited from an urban and a rural clinic in Greece. Diabetes knowledge was assessed with the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT). Basic anthropometry was performed. Data regarding glycemic control and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from the patients' medical files. Greek T2DM patients demonstrated poor disease knowledge (mean DKT score 8.3±2.2/14.0 and mean DKT as a percent of correct answers 59.6±15.8%). No differences were observed between sex, place of residence, or glycemic control, among subjects. Patients with higher education demonstrated greater diabetes knowledge. Simple obesity with concurrent central obesity or suboptimal glycemic control decreased diabetes knowledge among participants. Additionally, waist circumference was inversely correlated to diabetes knowledge. Based on the DKT, Greek patients exhibit poor diabetes knowledge. This study provides evidence for the need for better diabetes education in order to ameliorate disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Minimising generation of acid whey during Greek yoghurt manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uduwerella, Gangani; Chandrapala, Jayani; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2017-08-01

    Greek yoghurt, a popular dairy product, generates large amounts of acid whey as a by-product during manufacturing. Post-processing treatment of this stream presents one of the main concerns for the industry. The objective of this study was to manipulate initial milk total solids content (15, 20 or 23 g/100 g) by addition of milk protein concentrate, thus reducing whey expulsion. Such an adjustment was investigated from the technological standpoint including starter culture performance, chemical and physical properties of manufactured Greek yoghurt and generated acid whey. A comparison was made to commercially available products. Increasing protein content in regular yoghurt reduced the amount of acid whey during whey draining. This protein fortification also enhanced the Lb. bulgaricus growth rate and proteolytic activity. Best structural properties including higher gel strength and lower syneresis were observed in the Greek yoghurt produced with 20 g/100 g initial milk total solid compared to manufactured or commercially available products, while acid whey generation was lowered due to lower drainage requirement.

  10. Nietzsche and Wagner: rebirth of the greek drama

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestre, Laura Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The  aim  of  this  paper  is  to  point  out how Nietzsche  and  Wagner’s  works  contributed  to  the renewal  of  Ancient  Greek  drama.  The  thesis  which  is  going  to  be  defended  in  this  paper  is  that Nietzsche  and  Wagner  followed  different   paths:  while  Nietzsche  stood  as  the  representative  of  the  duality apolinean -dionysiac from  Ancient  Greek  drama,  Wagner,  in his Musikdramas ,  began  to  combine  ideas  of  christian  morality with  the  Ancient  Greek  ...

  11. Exposure of greek population from residential radon - latest results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade the Medical Physics Department-University of Athens has performed radon measurements in Greek dwellings using passive methods . The Medical Physics Department-University of Athens has measured about 1,500 dwellings at different locations in Greece. The duration of the measurements was 6 or 12 months. The detectors were installed in the bedroom, at ground floor or first floor if possible, although in same cases in the area of greater Athens, measurements of upper floors have also been performed. The Medical Physics Department-University of Athens has designed a radon survey project which is in progress. As part of this project the geographic region of Kriti (5% of the total area of Greece, (∼ 5% of the Greek population) and the geographic region of Greater Athens (∼ 0.4% of the total area of Greece, - 30% of the Greek population), have been fully surveyed. The minimum concentration occurred from the measurements of Medical Physics Department-University of Athens was 3 Bq/m -3 - at the region of greater Athens - and the maximum was 1291.3 Bq/m-3, at the area of Arnea Chalkidikis. Except from the above areas/regions, other locations in Greece have been or being surveyed too. (authors)

  12. Greek mythology: the eye, ophthalmology, eye disease, and blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompoukis, Constantinos; Kourkoutas, Dimitrios

    2007-06-01

    In distant eras, mythology was a form of expression used by many peoples. A study of the Greek myths reveals concealed medical knowledge, in many cases relating to the eye. An analysis was made of the ancient Greek texts for mythological references relating to an understanding of vision, visual abilities, the eye, its congenital and acquired abnormalities, blindness, and eye injuries and their treatment. The Homeric epics contain anatomical descriptions of the eyes and the orbits, and an elementary knowledge of physiology is also apparent. The concept of the visual field can be seen in the myth of Argos Panoptes. Many myths describe external eye disease ("knyzosis"), visual disorders (amaurosis), and cases of blinding that, depending on the story, are ascribed to various causes. In addition, ocular motility abnormalities, congenital anomalies (cyclopia), injuries, and special treatments, such as the "licking" method, are mentioned. The study of mythological references to the eye reveals reliable medical observations of the ancient Greeks, which are concealed within the myths.

  13. Greek Immigrants in Australia: Implications for Culturally Sensitive Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Savvas Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This exploratory research examined adjustment challenges, resiliencies, attitudes, emotional health, economic stability, criminal involvement, victimization and service experiences, and some cultural propensities of Greek Immigrants (GIs) in Australia using a convenient multi-generational sample (n = 123; response rate = .5). Data were collected via surveys, telephone, and personal-interviews in four major Australian cities. Among other things, the study revealed that Greek identity and cultural customs are often significant to first generation GIs. Adjustment challenges upon entry include primarily language, housing, and transportation difficulties, nostalgia for relatives and the motherland, unfamiliarity with socio-cultural systems, unemployment, money challenges, and lack of friendships. Christian faith, the extended family, family values and traditions, cultural pride for ancient Greek achievements, and a hard 'work ethic' are notable resiliencies that support GIs in their struggles and solidify their pursuit for happiness and success. Financial concerns, aging, and nostalgia for relatives and the motherland were the primary causes of socio-emotional instability. Attitudinal differences in the respondents based on age, gender, and socio-economic status, cross-cultural comparisons, and recommendations for culturally-sensitive practice with GIs are analyzed and methodological limitations illuminated. Future research needs in the field are also highlighted.

  14. Development and validation of a Greek language version of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index

    OpenAIRE

    Kaoulla, Patricia; Frescos, Nicoletta; Menz, Hylton B

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI) is a 19 item questionnaire used to assess the severity and impact of foot pain. The aim of this study was to develop a Greek-language version of the MFPDI and to assess the instrument's psychometric properties. Methods The MFPDI was translated into Greek by three bilingual content experts and two bilingual language experts, and then back-translated into English to assess for equivalence. The final Greek version was admi...

  15. Embedded aspect in L2 acquisition: Evidence from L1 Russian learners of Greek

    OpenAIRE

    Sviatlana Karpava; Kleanthes K. Grohmann

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates first language (L1) influence on the second language (L2) acquisition of aspect, comparing participants with homogeneous L1 background (Russian) in Mainland Greece (L2 Standard Modern Greek) and Cyprus (L2 Cypriot Greek), where verb complementation takes a finite form instead of an infinitival as is possible in Russian. Focus of the experimental study lies on embedded environments, which require only perfective aspect in Greek but allow either perfective or imperfective...

  16. GREEK MYTHOLOGY AS SEEN IN RICK RIORDAN’S THE LIGHTNING THIEF

    OpenAIRE

    Hikmat, Muhamad Nurul

    2012-01-01

    The novel by Rick Riordan entitled The Lightning Thief is written based on Greek Mythology. This mythology is The Greek’s manifestation of culture that ages thousands years. To reveal the representation of Greek Mythology in The Lightning Thief as a cultural manifestation, study and analysis is conducted through dynamic structuralism approach focusing on plot, characters and settings (factual structure) of the novel. The plot is originated from three Greek heroes’ stories. The characters invo...

  17. Lead grids

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    One of the 150 lead grids used in the multiwire proportional chamber g-ray detector. The 0.75 mm diameter holes are spaced 1 mm centre to centre. The grids were made by chemical cutting techniques in the Godet Workshop of the SB Physics.

  18. Leading men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Nielsen, Tønnes

    2016-01-01

    Through a systematic comparison of c. 50 careers leading to the koinarchate or high priesthood of Asia, Bithynia, Galatia, Lycia, Macedonia and coastal Pontus, as described in funeral or honorary inscriptions of individual koinarchs, it is possible to identify common denominators but also disting...

  19. USE OF MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING OF OLD GREEK FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav M. Shovkovyi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Work is devoted to determination of sphere of the use of modern information technologies in the process of teaching the ancient Greek language for students of higher educational establishments. The necessity of the use of electronic dictionaries and internet-resources is grounded during teaching of normative course of grammar of ancient Greek language, ancient Greek textual criticism, and also disciplines of extralinguistic block. An electronic dictionary and internet-resources is able to provide mobility, plenitude of information. Theoretical positions of the article must be fixed in basis of development of site which will have complete information about a culture and way of life of ancient greeks.

  20. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF VALUE ORIENTATIONS IN RUSSIAN AND GREEK STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E N Polyanskaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the problem of the value orientations of modern young people, who begin their independent life in the current conditions of the difficult changes in the political, social and economic life of the countries. Greece and Russia are two of the countries, which are in crisis due to the globalisation processes. The article gives the details of the results of the empirical study of the value orientations in Greek and Russian students and presents their comparative analysis. It identifies the similarity of the value orientations in Greek and Russian students, which appears in the fact that the value of health (it seems quite difficult to achieve and the value of self-development and self-improvement (an easily achievable value are important to the students of both groups; and the values of creativity and financially-secure life (the value, which is difficult to achieve have little significance. The significant differences between the groups lie in the fact, that the Russian group is dominated by the people with the focus on business, the value of interesting work is important to them, they are more focused on business activity, as well as on love, and the interpersonal relations are less significant for them. The Greek students are often focused on themselves, on their families; freedom in actions, confidence and friendship are more important to them. The peculiarities of the value orientations of the Russian students are internally more conflicting: first of all, we are talking of an important value of love and its dissatisfaction, the important value of an interesting job and the idea that it is difficult to achieve these values. The internal conflict of the Greek students often concerns the importance and the low availability of the value of freedom. The study shows that the peculiarities of the value orientations of Russian students reflect the socio-economic changes in the society, while the values of Greek students

  1. Adaptation During a Great Economic Recession: A Cohort Study of Greek and Immigrant Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motti-Stefanidi, Frosso; Asendorpf, Jens B

    2017-07-01

    This study examined how Greek and immigrant youth adapted to school life during the economic recession in Greece. Two cohorts of adolescents (M age  = 12.6 years) were compared, one assessed before the crisis and the other during the crisis (N = 1,057 and 1,052, respectively). Cohort findings were disaggregated by immigrant status, generation, and ethnic group. Crisis-cohort youth experienced more economic problems, displayed worse conduct, higher levels of absenteeism, and lower self-efficacy than precrisis youth. The cohorts did not differ in well-being, school engagement, and academic achievement. Most crisis-cohort groups showed a pervasive increase in conduct problems compared to the precrisis cohort. However, some of these groups also showed an increase in academic achievement. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  2. The coming of the Greeks to Provence and Corsica: Y-chromosome models of archaic Greek colonization of the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novelletto Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of Greek colonization of the central and western Mediterranean during the Archaic and Classical Eras has been understudied from the perspective of population genetics. To investigate the Y chromosomal demography of Greek colonization in the western Mediterranean, Y-chromosome data consisting of 29 YSNPs and 37 YSTRs were compared from 51 subjects from Provence, 58 subjects from Smyrna and 31 subjects whose paternal ancestry derives from Asia Minor Phokaia, the ancestral embarkation port to the 6th century BCE Greek colonies of Massalia (Marseilles and Alalie (Aleria, Corsica. Results 19% of the Phokaian and 12% of the Smyrnian representatives were derived for haplogroup E-V13, characteristic of the Greek and Balkan mainland, while 4% of the Provencal, 4.6% of East Corsican and 1.6% of West Corsican samples were derived for E-V13. An admixture analysis estimated that 17% of the Y-chromosomes of Provence may be attributed to Greek colonization. Using the following putative Neolithic Anatolian lineages: J2a-DYS445 = 6, G2a-M406 and J2a1b1-M92, the data predict a 0% Neolithic contribution to Provence from Anatolia. Estimates of colonial Greek vs. indigenous Celto-Ligurian demography predict a maximum of a 10% Greek contribution, suggesting a Greek male elite-dominant input into the Iron Age Provence population. Conclusions Given the origin of viniculture in Provence is ascribed to Massalia, these results suggest that E-V13 may trace the demographic and socio-cultural impact of Greek colonization in Mediterranean Europe, a contribution that appears to be considerably larger than that of a Neolithic pioneer colonization.

  3. Skewed Sociolinguistic Awareness of a Native Non-standard Dialect: Evidence from the Cypriot Greek Writing of Greek Cypriot Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiomamitou, Ioli; Yiakoumetti, Androula

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sociolinguistic research in settings in which a regional, social, or ethnic non-standard linguistic variety is used alongside the standard variety of the same language has steadily increased. The educational implications of the concomitant use of such varieties have also received a great deal of research attention. This study deals with regional linguistic variation and its implications for education by focusing on the Greek Cypriot educational context. This context is ideal for investigating the linguistic profiles of speakers of proximal varieties as the majority of Greek Cypriots are primarily educated in just one of their varieties: the standard educational variety. The aim of our study was to understand Greek Cypriot primary school pupils' sociolinguistic awareness via examination of their written production in their home variety [Cypriot Greek (CG) dialect]. Our assumption was that, because written production is less spontaneous than speech, it better reflects pupils' conscious awareness. Pupils were advised to produce texts that reflected their everyday language with family and friends (beyond school boundaries). As expected, students' texts included an abundance of mesolectal features and the following were the ten most frequent: (1) palato-alveolar consonants, (2) future particle [ená] and conditional [ítan na] + subjunctive, (3) consonant devoicing, (4) CG-specific verb stems, (5) final [n] retention, (6) [én/ éni] instead of [íne], (7) CG-specific verb endings, (8) [én/é] instead of [ðen], (9) elision of intervocalic fricative [ɣ], and (10) CG-specific adverbs. Importantly, in addition to the expected mesolectal features that reflect contemporary CG, students included a significant and unexpected number of basilectal features and instances of hyperdialectism (that are not representative of today's linguistic reality) which rendered their texts register-inappropriate. This led us to conclude that Greek Cypriot students

  4. Skewed Sociolinguistic Awareness of a Native Non-standard Dialect: Evidence from the Cypriot Greek Writing of Greek Cypriot Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioli Ayiomamitou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, sociolinguistic research in settings in which a regional, social, or ethnic non-standard linguistic variety is used alongside the standard variety of the same language has steadily increased. The educational implications of the concomitant use of such varieties have also received a great deal of research attention. This study deals with regional linguistic variation and its implications for education by focusing on the Greek Cypriot educational context. This context is ideal for investigating the linguistic profiles of speakers of proximal varieties as the majority of Greek Cypriots are primarily educated in just one of their varieties: the standard educational variety. The aim of our study was to understand Greek Cypriot primary school pupils’ sociolinguistic awareness via examination of their written production in their home variety [Cypriot Greek (CG dialect]. Our assumption was that, because written production is less spontaneous than speech, it better reflects pupils’ conscious awareness. Pupils were advised to produce texts that reflected their everyday language with family and friends (beyond school boundaries. As expected, students’ texts included an abundance of mesolectal features and the following were the ten most frequent: (1 palato-alveolar consonants, (2 future particle [ená] and conditional [ítan na] + subjunctive, (3 consonant devoicing, (4 CG-specific verb stems, (5 final [n] retention, (6 [én/ éni] instead of [íne], (7 CG-specific verb endings, (8 [én/é] instead of [ðen], (9 elision of intervocalic fricative [ɣ], and (10 CG-specific adverbs. Importantly, in addition to the expected mesolectal features that reflect contemporary CG, students included a significant and unexpected number of basilectal features and instances of hyperdialectism (that are not representative of today’s linguistic reality which rendered their texts register-inappropriate. This led us to conclude that Greek

  5. Skewed Sociolinguistic Awareness of a Native Non-standard Dialect: Evidence from the Cypriot Greek Writing of Greek Cypriot Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiomamitou, Ioli; Yiakoumetti, Androula

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sociolinguistic research in settings in which a regional, social, or ethnic non-standard linguistic variety is used alongside the standard variety of the same language has steadily increased. The educational implications of the concomitant use of such varieties have also received a great deal of research attention. This study deals with regional linguistic variation and its implications for education by focusing on the Greek Cypriot educational context. This context is ideal for investigating the linguistic profiles of speakers of proximal varieties as the majority of Greek Cypriots are primarily educated in just one of their varieties: the standard educational variety. The aim of our study was to understand Greek Cypriot primary school pupils’ sociolinguistic awareness via examination of their written production in their home variety [Cypriot Greek (CG) dialect]. Our assumption was that, because written production is less spontaneous than speech, it better reflects pupils’ conscious awareness. Pupils were advised to produce texts that reflected their everyday language with family and friends (beyond school boundaries). As expected, students’ texts included an abundance of mesolectal features and the following were the ten most frequent: (1) palato-alveolar consonants, (2) future particle [ená] and conditional [ítan na] + subjunctive, (3) consonant devoicing, (4) CG-specific verb stems, (5) final [n] retention, (6) [én/ éni] instead of [íne], (7) CG-specific verb endings, (8) [én/é] instead of [ðen], (9) elision of intervocalic fricative [ɣ], and (10) CG-specific adverbs. Importantly, in addition to the expected mesolectal features that reflect contemporary CG, students included a significant and unexpected number of basilectal features and instances of hyperdialectism (that are not representative of today’s linguistic reality) which rendered their texts register-inappropriate. This led us to conclude that Greek Cypriot

  6. [Greek students' attitudes towards mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, D; Gouti, A; Kaloudi, E; Τourlende, N; Douzenis, A; Christodoulou, C; Lykouras, L; Livaditis, M; Samakouri, M

    2016-01-01

    Attitudes and beliefs of the population regarding the mentally ill have been universally subject of many researches. Research of different groups' opinion for mental disorders has given remarkable findings that assist in the right design of psychiatric services. Objective of this thesis is to study the attitude of students towards mental illness. In particular, it intends to study the differences derived from the age, gender, place of birth, kind of studies, year of study, duration of stay at the place of studies and the existence of mental disorders in the student's family. Data were collected from 536 students randomly selected from Universities and Technological Institutions both in Athens and Thessaloniki. In general, the participants are being divided based on the subject of their studies in undergraduates of human sciences, exact sciences, social and health sciences. The short version of the scale "Community Attitudes Toward the Mentality III" (CAMI) was used, which consists of 26 questions sorted to four subscales (domination scale, humanism scale, social exclusion scale and the scale measuring the community beliefs regarding the care of mentally ill), along with a special questionnaire in order to collect social and demographic data. Students' attitudes towards mental illness are influenced by demographic factors, the department they are studying at and the year of study. Female gender (p=0.000), personal contact with mentally ill (p=0.012), studying in Universities (p=0.031) and especially social sciences (p=0.009) are associated with positive attitudes. On the contrary, less years of studying are associated with negative attitudes whereas older students appear to score less in the Domination Scale (p=0.000). It is significant that the place of birth (p=0,335) and the duration of stay at the place of studies (r=0.735) did not show any association with the variables studied in this research. However these results cannot be compared with older researches

  7. Presence of lead in opium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaee-Afshar, Mahmoud; Khazaeli, Payam; Behnam, Behzad; Rezazadehkermani, Mohammad; Ashraf-Ganjooei, Narges

    2008-09-01

    Opium addiction is a common form of addiction in Middle East countries such as Iran. Recently several reports suggested some kinds of pathologic findings such as abdominal pain, nephropathy, and anemia in opium addict patients. Such pathologic findings suggest lead poisoning in the patients. In this study, the concentration of lead in 10 opium samples was evaluated. The mean concentration of lead in the opium samples was 1.88 ppm. This may explain some of the pathologic findings found in addict patients. The authors would suggest further investigations to evaluate the lead concentration in opium addicts' sera and also routine screening for lead poisoning in opium addict patients.

  8. Greek National Security Concerns and the European Union’s Common Foreign and Security Policy: Consensus or Divergence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Theodore A. Couloumbis et al. (New York: Pella Publishing Co., 1976). 12 In a similar manner, Constantine Stephanopoulos asserted that: “National aims... Stephanopoulos , “Issues of Greek Foreign Policy,” in The Greek Paradox- Promise vs. Prerformance, ed. Graham T. Allison and Kalypso Nikolaidis...Opportunities. Burlington, Vermont: Ashgate Publishing Ltd., 2010. Stephanopoulos , Constantine. “Issues of Greek Foreign Policy.” In The Greek Paradox

  9. Candidate gene investigation of spinal degenerative osteoarthritis in Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liva, Eleni; Panagiotou, Irene; Palikyras, Spyros; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Paschou, Peristera; Mystakidou, Kyriaki

    2017-12-01

    Few data exist concerning the natural history of degenerative osteoarthritis (OA) of the spine and its associated gene investigation. Degenerative spinal OA demonstrates an international prevalence of 15% in the general population. The aim of this Greek case-control study is to examine gene polymorphisms that have been previously shown or hypothesized to be correlated to degenerative OA. Gene polymorphisms, especially for OA, have never been previously studied in the Greek population. The study was conducted from May 2009 to December 2012. Eligible subjects who agreed to take part in the study were Greek adults from all of Greece, referred for consultation to the Palliative Care and Pain Relief Unit of Aretaieion University Hospital, in Athens, Greece. A total of 601 matched pairs (cases and controls) participated in the study, 258 patients (188 women and 70 men) with clinically and radiologically confirmed degenerative OA and 243 control subjects (138 women and 105 men). All patients presented with chronic pain at the spine (cervical, thoracic or lumbar) caused by sympomatic osteophytes or disc narrowing, whereas clinical diagnosis of OA was based on the presence of both joint symptoms and evidence of structural changes seen on plain conventional X-rays. We investigated genetic variation across candidate OA gene GDF5, CDMP1, CDMP2, Asporin, SMAD3, and chromosomal region 7q22, in a sample of 258 patients with clinically and radiologically confirmed degenerative OA, and 243 control subjects from the Greek population. All subjects (patients and controls) were subsequently matched for the epidemiologic, demographic, and clinical risk factors, to prevent selection biases. A tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach was pursued to cover variation across all targeted loci. Single marker tests as well as haplotypic tests of association were performed. There is no conflict of interest, and also, there are no study funding sources. We found significant

  10. Assessing the Students' Evaluations of Educational Quality (SEEQ) Questionnaire in Greek Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis; Linardakis, M.; Gregoriadis, A.; Oikonomidis, V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to provide a valid and reliable instrument for the evaluation of the teaching effectiveness in the Greek higher education system. Other objectives of the study were (a) the examination of the dimensionality and the higher-order structure of the Greek version of Students' Evaluation of Educational Quality (SEEQ)…

  11. The development of the Proto-Indo-European syllabic liquids in Greek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, Lucien Christiaan van

    2013-01-01

    Ancient Greek was spoken in a large number of dialectal varieties, and is attested in both literary and epigraphic sources. Although none of these sources offers direct evidence for syllabic liquids, it is known that these sounds must have been present in Proto-Greek, the common pre-stage of these

  12. Language Learning in Conflictual Contexts: A Study of Turkish Cypriot Adolescents Learning Greek in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tum, Danyal Oztas; Kunt, Naciye; Kunt, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot communities in Cyprus have been divided for the last five decades. This study investigated whether the recent introduction of Greek language studies in Turkish Cypriot secondary schools affects students' attitudes towards the language, its speakers and culture, and motivation to study the language. Findings…

  13. Differences in College Greek Members' Binge Drinking Behaviors: A Dry/Wet House Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Rice, Kathleen; Furr, Susan

    2015-01-01

    College Greek life students self-report high rates of binge drinking and experience more alcohol-related problems than students who are not members of the Greek system. But little research has been conducted to measure differences in alcohol-free housing (dry) and alcohol-allowed housing (wet). The purpose of this quantitative study was to…

  14. The "Unknown" Greek Paleoenvironment: Curriculum Proposals through an Infusion Model for Elementary School, Using Ammonite Fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragouli, Stiliani; Rokka, Aggeliki

    2017-01-01

    In this study we introduce an infusion model to "inject" ammonites and ammonite fossils in current subjects of Greek primary curriculum. Paleontology and mainly fossils attract more and more elementary students and teachers, yet in Greece this trend is solely about dinosaurs, despite the fact that the most common Greek fossils are not…

  15. Oral Reading Fluency and Prosody: A Preliminary Analysis of the Greek Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Menelaos; Dimakos, Ioannis C.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents results from an initial investigation of Greek oral reading fluency and prosody. Although currently held perspectives consider reading the product of reading decoding and reading comprehension, there is enough evidence (both Greek and foreign) to suggest that other variables may affect reading, as well. Such variables include…

  16. Greek perceptions of frontier in Magna Graecia: literature and archaeology in dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airton POLLINI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with Greek perceptions of frontier in Magna Graecia, from a historical archaeological, contextual standpoint. Considering the complex relationship between literary and archaeological evidence, the paper uses as a case study the frontier in Southern Italy, discussing the subjective frontier perceptions by Greeks and Natives in interaction.

  17. The Role of Teaching Poetry in Developing Literacy in Greek Primary School: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravani, Evagelia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to examine the ways in which the systematic teaching of poetry reading at Greek primary school enhances children's interest in reading and helps develop their oral skills by enriching their vocabulary and creative thinking. The present poetry project was implemented at a Greek public kindergarten in Rethymno,…

  18. A Computerized Method to Teach Latin and Greek Root Words: Effect on Verbal SAT Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. Thomas; Keffer, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of using a computer program over six weeks to teach high school students to use Latin and Greek root words for deciphering English terms in order to increase their scores on the verbal portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Results indicated that knowledge of Latin and Greek root words improved students'…

  19. [Scientific report in ophthalmology--the use of Greek and Latin words].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporini, Edmea Rita; Carani, José Carlos Eudes

    2010-01-01

    Scientific research in ophthalmology is a dynamic process usually delivered by means of written reports. Greek and Latin words are commonly used in scientific writing. This paper points out some issues related to the clarity, objectivity and precision of writing and offers a short glossary of terms from Greek and Latin languages which are commonly used in scientific writing.

  20. English Words from Latin and Greek Elements. Instructor's Manual for the Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, R. L.

    Designed as a teacher's guide to accompany the revised edition of the classroom text "English Words from Latin and Greek Elements," this manual contains the following material that is not in the textbook: (1) answers to all exercises in the text; (2) the Latin and Greek origin of all prefixes, suffixes, combining forms, and bases that…

  1. A Review Grammar of Modern Greek. Translation Drills for English Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katranides, Aristotle

    Intended for use with English-speaking students, this text is based on the most frequent errors of interference and overgeneralization made by these students learning Modern Greek. The material is presented in the form of translation drills from English into Greek. Each drill begins with a sample sentence given in both languages followed by nine…

  2. Negation and Polarity in the Greek, Gothic, Classical Armenian, and Old Church Slavic Gospels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared S. Klein

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the comparative syntax of negation in the Greek gospels as well as the Gothic, Classical Armenian, and Old Church Slavic versions translated from the Greek. In addition to the issue of negation per se, I will examine the employment of negative polarity items that occur in the various clause types we will investigate.

  3. Cults, Creeds and Identities in the Greek City after the Classical Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alston, R.; van Nijf, O.M.; Williamson, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    This volume investigates the complex and diverse developments in the religious cultures of Greek cities after the classical age. An international team of scholars considers the continuities of traditional Greek religious practices, and seeks to understand the impact of new influences on those

  4. The first medical ethics and deontology in Europe as derived from Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Meropi K; Pavlides, Pavlos; Fiska, Aliki

    2016-01-01

    Medical ethics and deontology are mentioned in Greek myths long before 700 B.C. We collected and present information derived from ancient Greek mythology and related to (how) ancient physicians took care of the sick or injured and how they were rewarded for their services.

  5. 76 FR 14115 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Assorted Greek and Roman...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Determinations: ``Assorted Greek and Roman Objects'' Summary: Notice is hereby given of the following... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Assorted Greek and Roman Objects'' imported from abroad for... display of the exhibit objects at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, from on or about April 1...

  6. Reading in One's Ethnic Language: A Study of Greek-Australian High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasou, James A.; Lamprianou, Iasonas

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines reading achievement when the maternal/paternal language has become a de facto second language. The performance of a cohort of Greek-Australian high school students (N = 270) on a diagnostic Greek reading test was significantly below that of pupils in second to fourth grades in Greece. The mean item difficulty for…

  7. Relationship between Eating Behavior, Breakfast Consumption, and Obesity among Finnish and Greek Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltsista, Alexandra; Laitinen, Jaana; Sovio, Ulla; Roma, Eleftheria; Jarvelin, Marjo-Ritta; Bakoula, Chryssa

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between eating-related behaviors, particularly breakfast consumption, and weight status in Finnish and Greek adolescents. Methods: A total of 6,468 16-year-old Finnish adolescents and 2,842 17- and 18-year-old Greek adolescents, based on the latest follow-up of 2 population-based cohorts, were studied.…

  8. The Emotional Readiness of Greek Cypriot Teachers for Peaceful Co-Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Kendeou, Panayiota; Michaelidou, Athina

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we: (1) offer a conceptualisation of what it means for Greek Cypriot teachers to be "reconciled" with the "other side" (i.e. Turkish Cypriots) in Cyprus; (2) examine Greek Cypriot teachers' emotional responses to the new educational objective of cultivating peaceful coexistence in schools; and (3) investigate…

  9. A View from the Portico: Lessons from the Greeks. ASHE 1986 Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Charles M.

    Views on the 1985 Association of American Colleges' (AAC) report, "Integrity in the College Curriculum," are presented based on lessons from the Greeks and specifically the period 450 to 350 B.C.E. Seven inferences are made on what an Athenian might offer in response to the AAC Report. For the Greeks, the goal of education was wisdom and…

  10. The Use of the Cypriot-Greek Dialect in the Commercials of the Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlou, Pavlos Y.

    A study investigated the use of the Cypriot Greek dialect (CG) in radio commercials of the Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) over a period of ten years. CG, the language of everyday interaction in Cypriot villages, is distinguished from the other language variety commonly used, one closer to standard modern Greek. Analysis of the radio…

  11. "Republica de Kubros": Transgression and Collusion in Greek-Cypriot Adolescents' Classroom Silly-Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Constadina

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on seemingly "silly" talk, whispered by Greek-Cypriot students during Turkish-language classes. Taking into account the history of violent conflict between the Greek-Cypriot and Turkish-Cypriot communities, Turkish-language learners' silly-talk emerges as an interactional space that refracts larger discourses and…

  12. Who Carries the National Flag?: The Politics of Cultural Identity in the Increasingly Multicultural Greek School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheou, Dimitrios; Roussakis, Yiannis; Theocharis, Dimitris

    2006-01-01

    The change in the composition of the school population as a result of the extensive influx of immigrants in Greece has brought in a recurrent controversy on the issue of allowing non-Greek citizen to carry the national flag, the Greek's most cherished national emblem, as a reward for an excellent school performance. When a state legislator, many…

  13. Historiography of the Greek Education: Creation, Development, Influences, Perspectives (1824-2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzakis, Sifis

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the presentation as well as the interpretation (in a historical framework) of the creation and development of the historiography of the Greek education from the foundation of the Modern Greek State to date was attempted. During the first decades after the liberation of Greece from the Turks, this historiography served the national…

  14. Taha Hussein and Abbas Mahmud al-Aqqad on the Greek Philosophy: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Fouly

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taha Hussein (1889-1973 and Abbas Mahmud al-Aqqad (1889-1964 are two prominent contemporary scholars in Egypt. This article delivered the comparison of both thoughts regarding to the Greek philosophy, while extensively influenced by the Greek philosophical tradition with two different responses. Thaha Husein so fascinated to the Greek philosophical traditions in which he developed appreciatively as found on his works. While al-Aqqad, he almost concerned on reviewing the value of the Greek philosophical tradition. His interaction to them feels more rigid because he used to accentuate his Arabian color and manifested his resistence when interacting with the Greek philosophical tradition. On several occasions, Al-Aqqad more often criticized them as compared to Thaha Husain. Well-known as westernized, Thaha Husain, instead of being uncritical of Greek philosophy, to him, the beginning of Greek philosophy formulation somehow indicated through their interaction with the Eastern culture. As said, East in the past became a source and reference, albeit limited to the physical aspect. While al-Aqqad, he viewed uncertainly whether Greek or East is the major source of the early emergence of philosophy as a scientific tradition.

  15. Analyzing Greek Members Alcohol Consumption by Gender and the Impact of Alcohol Education Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Rice, Kathleen A.; Furr, Susan; Jorgensen, Maribeth

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Greek community have been found to engage in riskier alcohol drinking behaviors and have higher alcohol- related negative consequences. A sample of Greek members were surveyed in Spring of 2013 (n = 372). It was found that The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) scores were significantly higher for male…

  16. Modern Greek Language: Acquisition of Morphology and Syntax by Non-Native Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Georgia; Karapetsas, Anargyros; Galantomos, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of native and non native speakers of Modern Greek language on morphology and syntax tasks. Non-native speakers of Greek whose native language was English, which is a language with strict word order and simple morphology, made more errors and answered more slowly than native speakers on morphology but not…

  17. Familiarity with Latin and Greek Anatomical Terms and Course Performance in Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampush, James D.; Petto, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Commonly used technical anatomy and physiology (A&P) terms are predominantly rooted in Latin and Greek vocabulary, so it is commonly inferred that a solid grounding in Latin and Greek roots of medical terminology will improve student learning in anatomy and related disciplines. This study examines the association of etymological knowledge of…

  18. Acoustic characteristics of modern Greek Orthodox Church music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delviniotis, Dimitrios S

    2013-09-01

    Some acoustic characteristics of the two types of vocal music of the Greek Orthodox Church Music, the Byzantine chant (BC) and ecclesiastical speech (ES), are studied in relation to the common Greek speech and the Western opera. Vocal samples were obtained, and their acoustic parameters of sound pressure level (SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), and the long-time average spectrum (LTAS) characteristics were analyzed. Twenty chanters, including two chanters-singers of opera, sang (BC) and read (ES) the same hymn of Byzantine music (BM), the two opera singers sang the same aria of opera, and common speech samples were obtained, and all audio were analyzed. The distribution of SPL values showed that the BC and ES have higher SPL by 9 and 12 dB, respectively, than common speech. The average F0 in ES tends to be lower than the common speech, and the smallest standard deviation (SD) of F0 values characterizes its monotonicity. The tone-scale intervals of BC are close enough to the currently accepted theory with SD equal to 0.24 semitones. The rate and extent of vibrato, which is rare in BC, equals 4.1 Hz and 0.6 semitones, respectively. The average LTAS slope is greatest in BC (+4.5 dB) but smaller than in opera (+5.7 dB). In both BC and ES, instead of a singer's formant appearing in an opera voice, a speaker's formant (SPF) was observed around 3300 Hz, with relative levels of +6.3 and +4.6 dB, respectively. The two vocal types of BM, BC, and ES differ both to each other and common Greek speech and opera style regarding SPL, the mean and SD of F0, the LTAS slope, and the relative level of SPF. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Bullying and Sexual Discrimination in the Greek Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysafi, Pavlina; Simou, Effie; Makris, Marinos; Malietzis, George; Makris, Gregory C

    Modern medicine is based on teamwork and communication. Bullying and discrimination can have a serious effect on these, affecting the standard of medical training and patient care. To determine the incidence of bullying and sex discrimination in the Greek health care system. An online questionnaire was designed and circulated among Greek medical professionals. We received 1349 completed questionnaires with a response rate of 48% and with 45% of them being female. Equal opportunities in specialty training were reported by 55% of the participants. Female doctors in medicine and in surgery reported no equal opportunities at an incidence of 15% and 30%, respectively (p < 0.001). Family obligations and lack of family support were considered as the main obstacles in female doctors' professional development by 92% and 59% of the participants, respectively. Both sexes appeared to have suffered from various forms of abusive behavior with characteristics that vary between them. Verbal abuse, threatening behavior, and sexual harassment were reported by 50%, 38%, and 20%, respectively, with women being 3 times more likely to be victims of sexual harassment (34% vs. 9%, p < 0.001). Finally, the availability of official support mechanisms was reported in only 15% of the cases, whereas friends and colleagues were the main support for 46.17% of the cases. This is the first study attempting to preliminary describe the extent of bullying and sexual discrimination in the Greek national health care system. Despite the limitations of this study, it is imperative that more research is performed on this issue from the appropriate national authorities. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Greek Monk Theodore as the first Primate of Canterbury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ks. Warsonofiusz (Doroszkiewicz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The theological climate of the young Church of Anglo-Saxon Christians was determined by Irish and Welsh monks maintaining the tradition of the Egyptian desert. The Angles and Saxons had a particular vision of the natural world, of the eternal world, a particular comprehension of sin and repentance. Rome in its missionary work used them to attach the British Christians the see of St Peter. Britain had no original link with the culture and tradition of the classical Church. It has been particularly established and enforced in VII and VIII, when England received a great dose of classical learning and theology due to the activity of archbishop of Canterbury Theodore and monk Hadrian. The formerly Greek monk Theodore – well learned in the Holy Scripture as well as Greek and Latin classics – was named the archbishop of Canterbury by pope Vitalian under the condition that he should notintroduce any typically Greek customs. Theodore named Hadrian the abbot of the Canterbury monastery of St Peter. There and in York young English could pursue classical studies of the Holy Scriptures, poetry, philosophy, mathematics, astronomy, etc. It resulted in significant literary development in Britain, of which venerable Bede is an example.Theodore introduced in Canterbury proto-byzantine canonical law, during two famous synods established doctrinal and ecclesiastical foundations of English Christianity based on ancient orthodox tradition of Eastern part of the Mediterranean region. At the Synod of Hatfield,with the other bishops, Theodore confirmed the Nicean Creed, fiveformer ecumenical councils and the generally accepted Church Fathers. They worked also on practical church unity, that is established: common date of Easter with other parts of Christian world, non-intervention ofbishops in other dioceses, canonical laws regulating the attitude of bishops towards monastic communities and the decrees against monophysismonks coming from Persia.

  1. Forensic investigation of suicide cases in major Greek correctional facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakelliadis, E I; Vlachodimitropoulos, D G; Goutas, N D; Panousi, P I; Logiopoulou, A-P I; Delicha, E M; Spiliopoulou, C A

    2013-11-01

    According to Greek legislation the medico-legal investigation of deaths occurring in prisons is mandatory. Furthermore, in cases of suicide or of suspected suicide the contribution of medico-legal investigation is of grave importance. The current paper addresses the medico-legal investigation of suicide cases in Greek correctional facilities and aims to describe the current situation. Our study consists of the meticulous research in the data records of major Greek correctional facilities, for the time period 1999-2010. Official permission was obtained by the Hellenic Ministry of Justice, which provided us the access to the records. Data was also collected from the Piraeus Forensic Service, from the Department of Pathological Anatomy of the University of Athens and finally from our own records. Measures were taken to respect the anonymity of the cases. Data was collected for the social, penal, medical history as well as for the medico-legal investigation. It appears that 85.7% of suicide cases were transferred to the Prisoner's Hospital (p < 0.0001), the forensic pathologist who conducted the PME did not perform scene investigation in none of the 70 suicide cases. In a total of 70 cases, histopathological examination, was requested only in 30 cases (42.9%). Hanging was the preferred method for those who committed suicide, followed by the poisoning due to psychoactive substances. Understanding the mistakes made during the forensic investigation of suicide cases inside correctional facilities is necessary, in order to prevent them from occurring again in the future, by implementing appropriate new policies and guidelines. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The carbon footprint of Greek households (1995–2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markaki, M.; Belegri-Roboli, A.; Sarafidis, U.; Mirasgedis, S.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is twofold: i) to investigate the carbon footprint of Greek households throughout the period 1995–2012, in order to identify the main socio-economic factors that affect GHG emissions, and ii) to evaluate the effectiveness of the implemented policies to tackle climate change. In this, a consumption-based emissions inventory approach is applied. The analysis is based on an environmentally-extended input-output model including direct CO 2 emissions from households, indirect CO 2 emissions from electricity consumption and indirect CO 2 emissions from energy used in the production of goods and services purchased by households, domestic or imported. Statistical analysis and appropriate regression models were developed in order to identify the main factors influencing the carbon footprint of Greek households. The results indicate that the observed trends during the period 1995–2008 can be attributed to the effect of high economic growth. This trend is partially counterbalanced by favorable weather conditions and the implementation of greenhouse mitigation policies and measures mainly in the supply side. Since 2008 the shrinking household income is the dominant driver. In addition, the effectiveness of energy conservation policies and measures in place is rather low, while the effect of imports is limited. - Highlights: • The factors influencing the carbon footprint of Greek households have been analyzed. • The analysis is based on consumption-based GHG inventories. • High economic growth resulted in carbon footprint increases during 1995–2008. • Carbon footprint reduction after 2008 is attributed to shrinking of household income. • Mitigation measures in power and manufacturing sectors reduced carbon footprint.

  3. HPV vaccine acceptability in high-risk Greek men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Lea; Tsikis, Savas; Bethimoutis, George; Nicolaidou, Electra; Paparizos, Vassilios; Antoniou, Christina; Kanelleas, Antonios; Chardalias, Leonidas; Stavropoulos, Georgios-Emmanouil; Schneider, John; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella

    2018-01-02

    HPV is associated with malignancy in men, yet there is a lack of data on HPV knowledge, vaccine acceptability, and factors affecting vaccine acceptability in Greek men. This study aims to identify determinants of knowledge and willingness to vaccinate against HPV among high-risk Greek men. Men (n = 298) between the ages of 18 and 55 were enrolled from the STI and HIV clinics at "Andreas Syggros" Hospital in Athens, Greece from July-October 2015. Participants completed a survey on demographics, economic factors, sexual history, HPV knowledge, and vaccine acceptability. The majority of participants were younger than 40 (76.6%) and unmarried (84.6%). Our sample was 31.2% MSM (men who have sex with men), and 20.1% were HIV-positive. Most participants (>90%) were aware that HPV is highly prevalent in both men and women; however, fewer identified that HPV causes cancers in both sexes (68%) and that vaccination protects men and women (67%). Amongst participants, 76.7% were willing to vaccinate themselves against HPV, 71.4% an adolescent son, and 69.3% an adolescent daughter. HIV-positive men were more likely to be willing to vaccinate themselves (OR 2.83, p = .015), a son (OR 3.3, p = .015) or a daughter (3.01, p = .020). Higher income levels were associated with increased willingness to vaccinate oneself (OR 1.32, p = .027), a son (1.33, p = .032) or daughter (1.34, p = .027). Although there is a HPV knowledge gap, HPV vaccine acceptability is high despite lack of vaccine promotion to Greek men. Future studies should include lower-risk men to adequately inform public health efforts.

  4. HISTORICAL CONCEPTIONS OF A HEALTHY CITY: THE GREEK PARADIGM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Chatzicocoli

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Today much attention is being given to the concept of a “healthy city”. However, the need for incoming paradigms is needed since this concept is still developing both as a term and as a real experience. The study of the historical experiences and examples can enrich the understanding of a healthy city’s historical background and can help in learning from the past. Especially the Greek paradigm appears of a particular importance as the idea of the creation of healthy cities seems to be central in the Hellenic (Greek culture, the first anthropocentric culture developed in Europe, which is perceived to form the base of the so called Western Civilization. The conceptions of a healthy city were supported by the Hellenic Mythology, Philosophy, Art and Science. The principles of the planning and design of healthy cities were expressed through various applications concerning the Greek cities and, especially, through the creation of specific settlements devoted to the restoration of health, such as Asklepieia. Asklepieia were centres of worship of the hero, divine physician and healing god, Asklepios and became the first health care centres in Europe. Asklepieia offered their healing environment and services for many centuries in the then Hellenic territory, from the pre-historic era and the War of Troy though out the Classical, Hellenistic and Roman times to the early-Byzantine times until the total prevalence of Christianity. In Asklepieia the restoration of health was understood as a result of positive interaction of physical, psychological, mental, spiritual, social, environmental, etc, factors.

  5. Marine alien species in Greek Seas: Additions and amendments by 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ZENETOS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An update of the inventory of alien marine species from the coastal and offshore waters of Greece is presented. Records were compiled based on the existing scientific and grey literature, including the HCMR database of Greek alien species (ELNAIS, technical reports, scientific congresses, academic dissertations, websites, and unpublished/personal observations. 47 species were added to the inventory, including 34 invertebrates, one vertebrate (fish, three plants, eight protozoa, and one cyanobacterium. With the new records, the inventory of alien marine species of Greece now includes a total of 237 species (33 macrophytes, 131 invertebrates, 42 vertebrates, two bacteria and 29 protozoans. Among these, the presence of the gastropodHypselodoris infucata, the bivalvesDendrostrea frons and Septifer forskaliand the chondrichthyan Rhizoprionodon acutus is reported here for the first time. Based on molecular analysis, the occurrence of Bulla arabica in Greek waters is confirmed, and the suggestion that previous records of Bulla ampulla in the Mediterranean should be considered as misidentification of B. arabica is further supported. The acclimitization status of earlier records was revised in the light of new data, and thus the fishEnchelycore anatina, Seriola fasciata andTylerius spinosissimus, the red algaeHypnea cornuta and Sarconema scinaioides, the scyphomedusaCassiopea andromeda, the cephalopodSepioteuthis lessoniana, the nudibranchChromodoris annulata and the bivalvesGastrochaena cymbium andPseudochama corbieri were upgraded from casual records to established populations. The increased rate of introductions of warm water species confirms previous findings, which link the rate of introduction in the eastern Mediterranean to climate change.

  6. PARTICULARITIES OF THE ORGANIZATION OF LOCAL PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN ROMANIAN AND GREEK SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCUTARIU PETRONELA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The way the public administration is organized affects the progress of the national community, in general, and of the local communities, in particular. A good management of public affairs from territorial units is not possible without the organizational design of the local administrative mechanism. From such a way, the pages of this paper are devoted to the study in mirror of the organization way of the Romanian and Greek local administrative systems, both territorially and functionally. By examining the territorial and functional administrative organisation we highlighted the peculiarities encountered and we extracted the similarities and the differences in the two local public administrations taken into consideration. As a result of the investigations conducted we found that at the basis of both local administrations are found clear regulations that expressly provide the territorial and functional organisational bases; with reference to the territorial organisation, for both administrative systems we have identified a structure with three levels of government, the difference being given by the existence of other specific territorial divisions; regarding the organs through which is realised the management of public affairs, in both administrations we find own authorities for each of the levels of government; the duration of the mandate of the Romanian local administration authorities differs from the one of the Greek administration authorities; most of administrative authorities of the two systems are elected by direct vote and only for some of them the setting occurs through indirect voting or appointment. Overall, we found that, at least regarding the criteria analyzed, between the two local public administrations there are no consistent differences, the territorial and functional organisational specificities being similar in equal measure.

  7. Uxoricide in pregnancy: ancient Greek domestic violence in evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacy, Susan; McHardy, Fiona

    2013-10-24

    Previous studies of ancient Greek examples of uxoricide in pregnancy have concluded that the theme is used to suggest tyrannical abuse of power and that the violence is a product of the patriarchal nature of ancient society. This article uses evolutionary analyses of violence during pregnancy to argue that the themes of sexual jealousy and uncertainty over paternity are as crucial as the theme of power to an understanding of these examples and that the examples can be seen as typical instances of spousal abuse as it occurs in all types of society.

  8. Determinants of bank profitability: Evidence from the Greek banking sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexiou Constantinos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects of bank-specific and macroeconomic determinants of bank profitability, using an empirical framework that incorporates the traditional Structure-Conduct- Performance (SCP hypothesis. A panel data approach has been adopted and effectively applied to six Greek banks. The evidence generated suggests that for any consistent or systematic size the profitability relationship is relatively weak. Most of the bank-specific determinants were found to significantly affect bank profitability. A more ambiguous picture emerged when the macroeconomic factors were considered.

  9. Greek or Roman historical personages in the Quixote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio López Férez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on the presence of Greek or Roman historical personages in Don Quixote, offering the passages with the pertinent commentary and notes. Following a chronological order, and indicating in brackets the number of mentions, we have: Lycurgus (1; Tulia, Servius Tulius daughter (1; Lucretia (2; Horatius Cocles (1; Caius Mucius Scevola (1; Artemisia-Mausolus (1; Alexander the Great (13; Hannibal (2; Publius Cornelius Scipio, Africanus (1; Viriatus (1; Sulla-Marius-Catillina (1; Julius Caesar (6; Portia (1; Augustus (2; Nero (2; Traianus-Hadrianus (1.

  10. The Greek Financial Crisis: Discourses of Difference or Solidarity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Bickes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The so-called Greek Financial Crisis, which has been the object of close attention in the German media since the end of 2009, has caused a public debate on who should be held responsible for the decline of crisis-hit Greece, the common currency and the Eurozone. The media’s enduring and controversial public discussion has lately been referred to as the Greek bashing. When the crisis had spread much further in 2012 and also other countries suffered from high debt, economic stagnation and unemployment, the news coverage became more moderate. This project report highlights the role of medial discourses of difference and solidarity during the crisis. Therefore, we rely on an exemplary data-set that does not only take the development of the German media’s tenor on the Greek Crisis into consideration, but also adds an international perspective in order to compare the medial treatment of different countries involved. The study methodologically focuses on the analysis of (metaphorical language and grammatical structures in the news coverage of the German daily newspaper BILD, the German magazine SPIEGEL as well as the international news magazines Economist (Great Britain and TIME (USA. Therefore, the interdisciplinary approach of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA was used in order to produce insights into public discourses in sociopolitical contexts. Deutsche Medien haben der sogenannten Griechischen Finanzkrise erhebliche Aufmerksamkeit gewidmet. Im Hinblick auf die Verantwortlichkeiten für den Niedergang Griechenlands, für die Krise des Euros und der Eurozone war die öffentliche Meinung in Deutschland gespalten. Damit einher ging eine anhaltende und kontroverse mediale Diskussion, die aufgrund des teils rüden Stils alsbald als Greek bashing bezeichnet wurde. Nachdem sich die Krise 2012 auf andere Mitgliedsstaaten ausdehnte und dort zu hoher Staatsverschuldung, ökonomischer Stagnation und Arbeitslosigkeit führte, nahmen Mediendiskurse (auch zu

  11. In the Greek isles a volcano has awakened

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-05-01

    In 1650 B.C.E. a series of massive volcanic eruptions decimated the ancient seafaring Minoan civilization. Over the next 4 millennia, the largely subaquatic Santorini caldera had a series of smaller eruptions, with five such events within the past 600 years, ending most recently in 1950. From the air the Santorini caldera appears as a small cluster within the larger collection of Greek islands in the southern Aegean Sea. Following a 60-year lull, Santorini woke up on 9 January 2011 with a swarm of low-magnitude earthquakes.

  12. Classical Greek and Roman rhetoric and the modern audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, David W

    2003-12-01

    The formal structuring of oral discourse or rhetoric was highly developed in antiquity. Both Greek and Roman authorities on the subject codified for orators an arrangement of material and a contextual format which have utility in the present day. The art of public lecturing should encompass relevance of material, structure of presentation and style of delivery in order to render the whole enjoyable and memorable. Teaching does not cause learning, but skilful rhetorical technique can imbue the student with a potent desire for further self-directed study. In this field, the ancient is auxiliary to the modern.

  13. Assessment of the lower ESR dating range in Greek speleothems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassiakos, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Pilot ESR dating studies on geologically young calcitic sinters were carried out, aiming at assessment of the lower ESR dating range in characteristic Greek speleoenvironments. Five stalactites were dated, coming from an ancient mining gallery, idle for the last 2,500 years, found on Siphnos island (Aegean). The calculated ages range between 1,7-2,0 ka. Medium to low measured external dose rates (aprox. 900 μGy/a) and very low measured radioelement concentration in samples are very usual in the Mediterranean environments. The study concludes that ESR dating of speleothems younger than two millenia is practically unattainable. Some geoarchaeological implications of the obtained ages are discussed. (author)

  14. Greek cultural influence and the revolutionary polices of Tiberius Gracchus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. OSSIER

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: En el presente trabajo se aborda la importanciaque los referentes griegos puedieron tener en la reforma agraria de Tiberio Graco, como Diófanes de Mitileno o Blosio de Cumas, por encima de la escasa influencia de los círculos romanos.ABSTRACT: This study deals with importance that the Greek referents, such as Diophanes of Mytilene or Blossius of Cumae, may have had in the agricultural reforma of Tiberius Gracchus, greater than the sligt influence of Roman circles.

  15. Transfer Effects in Spelling from Transparent Greek to Opaque English in Seven-to-Ten-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niolaki, Georgia Z.; Masterson, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated single-word spelling performance of 33 English- and 38 Greek-speaking monolingual children, and 46 English- and Greek-speaking bilingual children (age range from 6;7 to 10;1 years). The bilingual children were divided into two groups on the basis of their single-word reading and spelling performance in Greek. In line with…

  16. Going Deeper with New Testament Greek: An Intermediate Study of the Grammar and Syntax of the New Testament

    OpenAIRE

    LAVRUSHKO, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    Going Deeper with New Testament Greek is an intermediate NT Greek grammar,written by well-known NT professors Andreas J. Köstenberger (Southeastern BaptistTheological Seminary), Benjamin L. Merkle (Southeastern Baptist TheologicalSeminary), and Robert L. Plummer (The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary).The book is aimed at the needs of both intermediate Greek students and teachers.

  17. 3 CFR 8353 - Proclamation 8353 of March 24, 2009. Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Greeks. In recent history, Greece and the United States have stood together to meet the challenges of our... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8353 of March 24, 2009. Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2009 8353 Proclamation 8353...

  18. Identifying the sociodemographic determinants of subjective health complaints in a cross-sectional study of Greek adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petanidou Dimitra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experience of common health symptoms without a clear physical or psychological cause, such as headache or dizziness, is often reported in adolescence. The present study attempted to investigate associations of self-reported subjective health complaints (SHC with a number of sociodemographic factors of Greek adolescents. Methods Questionnaires were administered to a Greek nationwide random school-based sample of adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and their parents in 2003. Data from 922 adolescent-parent pairs were analyzed (response rate = 63%. Adolescents’ reported subjective health complaints were assessed for their association with a number of sociodemographic factors: age, sex, type of area of residence according to level of urbanization, immigration background, parental education and employment status, family socioeconomic status and perceived quality of financial resources (PQFR. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of the aforementioned factors with subjective health complaints as the dependent variable. Results Most sociodemographic variables, apart from area of residence and immigration background, were independently associated with subjective health complaints in the univariate analyses. The multiple linear regression analysis, however, limited the factors that could predict adolescents’ subjective health complaints to four (age, sex, Family Affluence Scale score and perceived quality of financial resources. Some considerations regarding parental employment status and immigration background are highlighted. Conclusions Our study highlights the sociodemographic components of subjective health complaints in the Greek adolescent population. The need to include adolescent-specific measures when collecting information on adolescents’ social background is underlined. Identifying vulnerable adolescent populations could lead to effective health promoting and preventive interventions.

  19. Turning lead into gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    For years the field of entrepreneurship has been blinded by the alchemical promise of turning lead into gold, of finding the ones most likely to become the next Branson, Zuckerberg or Gates. The promise has been created in the midst of political and scientific agendas where certain individuals...

  20. Finding Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Students best learn science through a combination of science inquiry and language learning. This article presents a series of chemistry lessons on the naming of compounds. The weeklong unit focuses on patterns across compound names and chemical formulas and addresses several of the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS Lead States…

  1. Revisiting Greek Propolis: Chromatographic Analysis and Antioxidant Activity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos M; Anastasiadou, Pelagia; Papadopoulos, Antonis; Machera, Kyriaki

    2017-01-01

    Propolis is a bee product that has been extensively used in alternative medicine and recently has gained interest on a global scale as an essential ingredient of healthy foods and cosmetics. Propolis is also considered to improve human health and to prevent diseases such as inflammation, heart disease, diabetes and even cancer. However, the claimed effects are anticipated to be correlated to its chemical composition. Since propolis is a natural product, its composition is consequently expected to be variable depending on the local flora alignment. In this work, we present the development of a novel HPLC-PDA-ESI/MS targeted method, used to identify and quantify 59 phenolic compounds in Greek propolis hydroalcoholic extracts. Amongst them, nine phenolic compounds are herein reported for the first time in Greek propolis. Alongside GC-MS complementary analysis was employed, unveiling eight additional newly reported compounds. The antioxidant activity study of the propolis samples verified the potential of these extracts to effectively scavenge radicals, with the extract of Imathia region exhibiting comparable antioxidant activity to that of quercetin.

  2. The Greek evil eye, African witchcraft, and Western ethnocentrism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Apostolides

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to illustrate the ethnocentrism of Western thought by projecting its own science-oriented culture onto cultures with different beliefs. A comparative study between African witchcraft and the Greek phenomenon of the evil eye will be done to investigate whether similar reasons can be given for their existence today. The article reflects on the view that has been prevalent since the Enlightenment, namely that belief in the supernatural is “primitive” and has no place in a world where most things can be explained or solved scientifically. Against this background, contemporary Western perspectives on evil are explained and compared with those of the Greek Orthodox worldview, which shows similarities with New Testament textual evidence. This correlation is demonstrated by an anthropological perspective on the phenomenon of the evil eye as seen from a social, cultural and ecological point of view. These insights are compared with the belief in witchcraft, demonic possession and exorcism within African tradition and spirituality.

  3. Greek students' knowledge and sources of information regarding sex education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matziou, V; Perdikaris, P; Petsios, K; Gymnopoulou, E; Galanis, P; Brokalaki, H

    2009-09-01

    Human sexuality is a complex part of life and is considered a multidimensional phenomenon. Therefore there is an increased need for adequate and comprehensive sex education, especially for teenagers and young adults. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the level of students' sexual knowledge, as well as to identify their sources of information regarding sexual life and reproduction. A cross-sectional study using a designed self-report questionnaire was performed. The study population consisted of 936 students who were attending 10 high schools and four medical schools in Attica. Data were collected after obtaining permission from the Pedagogic Institute of the Greek Ministry of Education. The main sources of students' sexual information about reproduction were friends (29.1%) and parents (24.0%), whereas school was reported by 14.3% of them. The preferred sources of information, according to students' perceptions, were sex education specialists (65.6%), followed by school (39.1%), parents (32.2%) and friends (27.7%). The importance of school, peer and parent support upon adolescents' sexual life was revealed by the results of the study. Students' knowledge level on sex topics is not satisfactory and therefore there is a need for sex education specialists and special courses regarding sex education in Greek schools.

  4. An Exploration of Greek Business Executives’ Intercultural Communication Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Dimitrios Karras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Managers’ ability to build global organizations and synergies is imperative, which in turn necessitates effective and appropriate intercultural communication skills. Literature to date primarily focuses on countries whose financial/corporate interdependence is of utmost importance. Not surprisingly then, the body of literature indicates that existing research addressing ICC within a Greek business context is inexistent. Consequently, this study is a preliminary attempt to start redressing this balance and hence, this proposed research aims to contribute to a poorly existing knowledge base by reporting on an enquiry undertaken to quantitatively determine middle managers’ ICC in Greece by measuring intercultural sensitivity -a determining factor of ICC. Quantitative data was obtained using the ISS from a body of fifty-five Greek middle-level managers. The results indicated that overall these managers have a high level of ICC; however no significant statistical correlations were found between the demographic variables explored and intercultural sensitivity. This paper concludes with some practical implications and recommendations for further research.

  5. A comparative study of greek and chinese alchemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdihassan, S

    1979-01-01

    According to an herbal cult of immortality in China, about 200 B.C., certain plants could make man immortal. Greek alchemy, the earliest record of which dated about 200 A.D., presents a similar version, was originally Chinese and was introduced by the Arabs who brought herbal drugs of longevity to Alexandria. The name of these drugs, Chin-I, dialectal Kim-Iya, was Arabicized as Kimiya and transliterated Chemeia by the Copts. Other terms were later influenced by Indians (Chumeia, 100 A.D.) and more directly by the Chinese (Chrusozomion, 200 A.D.). The 3 terms signify herbal elixirs of gold and the art related to them. Both early Chinese and Greek alchemies were not concerned with the making of bullion gold. In China the development of alchemy has been ruled by two theories: first, as like makes like, a perennial plant can make human life perennial: likewise, certain substances can prolong human life as they are rich in Life-force or Soul-content. From here, Blood was equated to Soul and later Redness to Soul. Jade, Cinnabar and eventually gold, more precisely Red-gold or Cinnabar-gold, a colloidal gold, became the ideal drug of immortality. Finally, alchemy can be defined as the art of making metal colloids as panaceae.

  6. Copper and zinc concentrations in serum of healthy Greek adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouremenou-Dona, Eleni; Dona, Artemis; Papoutsis, John; Spiliopoulou, Chara

    2006-01-01

    Serum copper and zinc concentrations of 506 (414 males and 92 females) apparently healthy Greek blood donors aged 18-60 years old were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The mean copper and zinc concentrations were 115.46 ± 23.56 μg/dl and 77.11 ± 17.67 μg/dl, respectively. The mean value for copper and zinc in females was higher than in males, although the difference for zinc was smaller than the one observed for copper. When the subjects were divided into various age groups there appeared to be some increase in copper concentration as a function of age, whereas zinc concentration did not change. There were no significant variations in serum copper and zinc concentrations due to place of residence, occupation and socioeconomic status. This study is the first one evaluating the serum status of copper and zinc in healthy Greeks and it has shown that they are at the highest concentration range for copper and the lowest for zinc compared to literature data on copper and zinc levels for various countries

  7. The Beginnings oj the Philology with the Greeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacija J. Fridl

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The article The Beginnings of the Philology with the Greeks is the Slovene translation of the first part of the paper Die Anfange der Philologie bei den Griechen, which was given by Herman Diels at the 50th symposium of German philologists in 1909. His study includes the beginnings of reflection on language and the development of the classical philological awareness in ancient Greece, from the first puns of the Orphics to the etymological explanations of Heraclitus and Hecataius and the linguistic observations of Herodotus. The author treats with particular attention the importance of ancient Greek philosophical schools for the development of linguistics. He further points out the difference between the linguistic teachings of Heraclitus and Parmenides, which are recorded in Plato's Cratylus, and throws light on the role of the sophist movement in the formation of classical philology in Hellenism. With the translation of Diels's study the periodical KT]pta marks the 75th anniversary of the death of the prominent author of the Fragments of the Pre-Socratics.

  8. Reforms in the Greek pharmaceutical market during the financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoros, Sotiris; Stargardt, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Following the financial crisis of 2008, Greece has been facing severe fiscal problems associated with high public debt and deficit. Given their significant contribution to public sector expenditure, part of the effort to reduce public expenditure has involved a focus on pharmaceutical markets. Our aim is to provide an overview of recent policy changes in the Greek pharmaceutical market as a response to the crisis. We also discuss other potential measures that can be implemented. The recommendations are relevant to European countries facing debt crises, but also to any other country, as improving efficiency makes funds available to be used on other interventions. In 2010 and 2011, following the debt crisis and the agreement with the IMF, EU and ECB, the Greek government introduced several policy measures aimed at cost-containment. These changes included (a) price cuts, (b) the re-introduction of a positive list, (c) changes in the profit margins of pharmacies and wholesalers, and (d) tenders for hospital drugs. As a result, public drug expenditure decreased from €5.09 billion in 2009 to €4.25 billion in 2010 and €4.10 billion in 2011. As the need to cut expenditure becomes more urgent, seeking efficiency is possibly the only option for countries that do not wish to compromise quality of healthcare and public health. However, efficiency and cost containment are not only about introducing new policies, but also about the enforcement of existing laws and fighting corruption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Revisiting Greek Propolis: Chromatographic Analysis and Antioxidant Activity Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos M Kasiotis

    Full Text Available Propolis is a bee product that has been extensively used in alternative medicine and recently has gained interest on a global scale as an essential ingredient of healthy foods and cosmetics. Propolis is also considered to improve human health and to prevent diseases such as inflammation, heart disease, diabetes and even cancer. However, the claimed effects are anticipated to be correlated to its chemical composition. Since propolis is a natural product, its composition is consequently expected to be variable depending on the local flora alignment. In this work, we present the development of a novel HPLC-PDA-ESI/MS targeted method, used to identify and quantify 59 phenolic compounds in Greek propolis hydroalcoholic extracts. Amongst them, nine phenolic compounds are herein reported for the first time in Greek propolis. Alongside GC-MS complementary analysis was employed, unveiling eight additional newly reported compounds. The antioxidant activity study of the propolis samples verified the potential of these extracts to effectively scavenge radicals, with the extract of Imathia region exhibiting comparable antioxidant activity to that of quercetin.

  10. American and Greek Children's Visual Images of Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Bonoti, Fotini; Kontopoulou, Argiro

    2016-08-01

    This study explores American and Greek primary pupils' visual images of scientists by means of two nonverbal data collection tasks to identify possible convergences and divergences. Specifically, it aims to investigate whether their images of scientists vary according to the data collection instrument used and to gender. To this end, 91 third-grade American ( N = 46) and Greek ( N = 45) pupils were examined. Data collection was conducted through a drawing task based on Chambers (1983) `Draw-A-Scientist-Test' (DAST) and a picture selection task during which the children selected between 14 pairs of illustrations those that were most probable to represent scientists. Analysis focused on stereotype indicators related with scientists' appearance and work setting. Results showed that the two groups' performance varied significantly across the tasks used to explore their stereotypic perceptions, although the overall stereotypy was not differentiated according to participants' ethnic group. Moreover, boys were found to use more stereotypic indicators than girls, while the picture selection task elicited more stereotypic responses than the drawing task. In general, data collected by the two instruments revealed convergences and divergences concerning the stereotypic indicators preferred. Similarities and differences between national groups point to the influence of a globalized popular culture on the one hand and of the different sociocultural contexts underlying science curricula and their implementation on the other. Implications for science education are discussed.

  11. Suicidal behaviour in the ancient Greek and Roman world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykouras, L; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Tsiamis, C; Ploumpidis, D

    2013-12-01

    We attempt to present and analyze suicidal behaviour in the ancient Greek and Roman world. Drawing information from ancient Greek and Latin sources (History, Philosophy, Medicine, Literature, Visual Arts) we aim to point out psychological and social aspects of suicidal behaviour in antiquity. The shocking exposition of suicides reveals the zeitgeist of each era and illustrates the prevailing concepts. Social and legal reactions appear ambivalent, as they can oscillate from acceptance and interpretation of the act to punishment. In the history of these attitudes, we can observe continuities and breaches, reserving a special place in cases of mental disease. The delayed emergence of a generally accepted term for the voluntary exit from life (the term suicidium established during the 17th century), is connected to reactions triggered by the act of suicide than to the frequency and the extent of the phenomenon. The social environment of the person, who voluntary ends his life usually dictates the behaviour and historical evidence confirms the phenomenon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thrombophilic gene polymorphisms and recurrent pregnancy loss in Greek women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidimitriou, M; Chatzidimitriou, D; Mavridou, M; Anetakis, C; Chatzopoulou, F; Lialiaris, T; Mitka, S

    2017-12-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is a multifactorial disorder. The aim of this study was the detection of various genetic polymorphisms and their correlation to RPL, in Greek women. The impact of 12 thrombophilic polymorphisms was evaluated, among 48 Greek women with a history of RPL, vs 27 healthy parous women. Multiplex PCR and in situ hybridization on nitrocellulose films were performed, to investigate 12 genetic polymorphisms previously reported as risk factors for RPL. Heterozygous FV Leiden, homozygous PAI-1 4G/4G, heterozygous MTHFR C677T, homozygous MTHFR A1298C, as much as the combined thrombophilic genotypes MTHFR 677T + ACE Ι/D, MTHFR 677T/1298C + ACE D/D, ACE I/D + b-fibrinogen -455 G/A, FV HR2 + b-fibrinogen -455 G/A showed a correlation as risk factors for RPL, whereas the rest of the investigated polymorphisms and their combinations did not render statistically significant differences between the two groups in study. The results of this study, as well as those of similar studies, concerning the detection of genetic, environmental, and physiological factors underlying RPL, will prove of critical significance in the investigation and treatment of thrombophilic predisposition, in cases of RPL. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Validation and cross-cultural adaptation of Greek version of Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Ververidis, Athanasios; Giakas, Giannis; Drosos, Georgios I

    2017-07-27

    The purpose of this study was the translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) in Greek population. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the original version of ATRS in Greek language was performed according to the methodology described by Beaton et al. Validation and test-retest reliability were evaluated in forty-six patients, treated surgically for acute Achilles tendon rupture. Validity was evaluated by correlation of total and all subscale scores of Greek version of Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI). Test-retest reliability evaluated with interclass correlation coefficient and Crombach's α coefficient was used for internal consistency. The internal consistency (α=0.96) and test-retest reliability (ICC=0.97) were excellent. There were no ceiling and floor effects during test-retest assessment. The Greek version of ATRS showed strong correlation with all subscales and overall score of MFPDI (pain subscale: R=-0.954, pGreek version of ATRS was successfully adapted in Greek population and it appears to be a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate outcomes in Greek speaking patients after Achilles tendon rupture. Level III. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Patient Dignity Inventory in Advanced Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpa, Efi; Kostopoulou, Sotiria; Tsilika, Eleni; Galanos, Antonis; Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Mystakidou, Kyriaki

    2017-09-01

    The patient dignity inventory (PDI) is an instrument to measure dignity distressing aspects at the end of life. The aims of the present study were the translation of the PDI in Greek language as well as to measure its psychometric aspects in a palliative care unit. A back-translation method was obtained at the Greek version. One hundred twenty advanced cancer patients completed the Greek version of the PDI, the Greek hospital anxiety and depression scale, the Greek schedule of attitudes toward hastened death (SAHD-Gr), and the Greek 12-item short form health survey. Confirmatory factor analysis failed to fit to the original instrument's structure and exploratory factor analysis was conducted revealing five factors ("Psychological Distress," "Body Image and Role Identity," "Self-Esteem," "Physical Distress and Dependency," and "Social Support"). The psychometric analysis of the PDI-Gr demonstrated a good concurrent validity, and the instrument discriminated well between subgroups of patients regarding age differences. Cronbach α were between 0.71 and 0.9 showing a good internal consistency. The Greek version of the PDI showed good psychometric properties in advanced cancer patients, supported the usefulness of the instrument assessing the sense of dignity distressing aspects of the terminally ill cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Representations of mental illness in the Greek Press: 2001 vs 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, M; Louki, E; Charitsi, M; Alexiou, T; Patelakis, A; Christakaki, A; Papadimitriou, G N

    2015-01-01

    The media seem to have played a prominent role in shaping the contemporary social image of people with mental illness, by perpetuating the stigma attached to it. Worldwide, a vast amount of research findings converge to the stigmatizing representation of people with mental illness by the media, with reference to the dominant stereotype of violence. The present study aims to explore the representations of mental illness in the Greek Press using a quantitative and qualitative approach. Potential changes in the media portrayal of mental illness during the last decade are also being examined: findings are compared to those of a previous research that took place in 2001, following the same methodology. The sample consisted of press articles referring to mental illness, that were indexed daily from the Greek newspapers during the period July-November 2011. The items were categorized into thematic categories and further analyzed taking in account the use of stigmatizing vocabulary, the reproduction of common myths concerning mental illness, the overall valence of each article (stigmatizing, neutral or anti-stigmatizing) towards people with mental illness, as well as the contextual implications conveyed in the use of psychiatric terms as a metaphor. The largest thematic category that emerged from the sample was that referring to the repercussions of the economic crisis to mental health, followed by the category of articles where psychiatric terms are used as a metaphor. The comparisons made between 2001 and 2011 revealed an improved representation of mental illness in terms of stigma, especially regarding schizophrenia. The public expression of stigma has decreased, with fewer stigmatizing articles and notably more neutral in valence articles. The findings of this study suggest a decline of the media propensity for emotionally charged descriptions and a shift towards objective journalism regarding mental illness. This is most likely to be attributed to the anti

  16. Adapting a receptive vocabulary test for preschool-aged Greek-speaking children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okalidou, Areti; Syrika, Asimina; Beckman, Mary E; Edwards, Jan R

    2011-01-01

    Receptive vocabulary is an important measure for language evaluations. Therefore, norm-referenced receptive vocabulary tests are widely used in several languages. However, a receptive vocabulary test has not yet been normed for Modern Greek. To adapt an American English vocabulary test, the Receptive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test-II (ROWPVT-II), for Modern Greek for use with Greek-speaking preschool children. The list of 170 English words on ROWPVT-II was adapted by (1) developing two lists (A and B) of Greek words that would match either the target English word or another concept corresponding to one of the pictured objects in the four-picture array; and (2) determining a developmental order for the chosen Greek words for preschool-aged children. For the first task, adult word frequency measures were used to select the words for the Greek wordlist. For the second task, 427 children, 225 boys and 202 girls, ranging in age from 2;0 years to 5;11 years, were recruited from urban and suburban areas of Greece. A pilot study of the two word lists was performed with the aim of comparing an equal number of list A and list B responses for each age group and deriving a new developmental list order. The relative difficulty of each Greek word item, that is, its accuracy score, was calculated by taking the average proportion of correct responses across ages for that word. Subsequently, the word accuracy scores in the two lists were compared via regression analysis, which yielded a highly significant relationship (R(2) = 0.97; p vocabulary test for Greek preschool-aged children. Further steps need to be taken when testing larger numbers of 2;0 to 5;11-year-old children on the revised word list for determination of norms. This effort will facilitate early identification and remediation of language disorders in Modern Greek-speaking children. © 2010 Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists.

  17. Dataset of milk whey proteins of two indigenous greek goat breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Katsafadou, Angeliki I; Pierros, Vasileios; Kontopodis, Evangelos; Fthenakis, George C; Arsenos, George; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis; Tsangaris, George Th

    2016-09-01

    Due to its rarity and unique biological traits, as well as its growing financial value, milk of dairy Greek small ruminants is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. For the construction of the present dataset, cutting-edge proteomics methodologies were employed, in order to investigate and characterize, for the first time, the milk whey proteome from the two indigenous Greek goat breeds, Capra prisca and Skopelos. In total 822 protein groups were identified in milk whey of the two breeds, The present data are further discussed in the research article "Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics" [1].

  18. Notes on the use of Greek word roots in genus and species names of prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Vandamme, Peter; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a survey of the ways in which Greek words and word roots have been used in the nomenclature of prokaryotes and explores the extent to which the different uses agree with the wording of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes. We here give recommendations on how to use Greek words and word roots in new genus names and specific epithets so that the resulting names are in agreement both with the rules of Greek grammar and with Principle 3 of the Code.

  19. Lead poisoning in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zook, B.C.; Carpenter, J.L.; Leeds, E.B.

    1969-01-01

    Lead poisoning was diagnosed and studied in 60 dogs. It was found that lead poisoning is a common disease of young dogs, especially in the summer and fall, and is related to their chewing and eating habits resulting in the ingestion of paint, linoleum, or other lead-containing materials. The signs were characterized by gastrointestinal dysfunction (colic, vomiting, and diarrhea) and nervous disorders (convulsions, hysteria, nervousness, behavioral changes). The blood findings, which the authors consider nearly pathognomonic, consisted of numerous stippled and immature (especially nucleated) erythrocytes in the absence of severe anemia. Protein and casts were frequently found in the urine. Radiography sometimes revealed lead-containing particles in the gastro-intestinal tract, and lead lines were occasionally detected in the metaphysis of long bones in immature dogs. Treatment with calcium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid resulted in rapid and often dramatic recoveries in nearly all instances. Removal of lead from the gastrointestinal tract and treatment to relieve pronounced central nervous disorders was sometimes necessary. 40 references, 6 figures, 7 tables

  20. Investigation of the Greek Stock Exchange volatility and the impact of foreign markets from 2007 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Sariannidis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this paper - The current paper aims to analyze the impact of the debt crisis on the FTSE / ASE 20 index volatility. The research also examines the impact of powerful foreign capital markets on the Greek Stock Exchange market, the seasonality returns (Day-of-the-Week effect and the volatility structure. Design/methodology/approach - The analysis of data is made by employing the GARCH models, and more specifically the GJR-GARCH model. Findings - The results of the GJR-GARCH model demonstrate that the debt crisis and, therefore, its consequences increase the FTSE / ASE 20 index volatility and the Greek market does not react asymmetrically to negative information. In addition, the results indicate the importance of foreign markets in shaping the first moment of the FTSE / ASE 20 index and the presence of the Reverse Day of the Week effect. Research limitations/implications - The implication of volatility measurement is vital in determining the cost for investment, security pricing markets, hedging and other trading strategies, and also for regulatory policies conducted within financial markets. Originality/value - The paper may prove helpful to regulatory authorities, investors and financial analysts to understand the structure and behavior of volatility in a small stock exchange market under crisis.