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Sample records for greater clonal growth

  1. Clonal growth and plant species abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-08-01

    Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf-height-seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area - height - seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially underlying clonal growth effects on abundance. Garden

  2. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

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    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  3. HIV genetic information and clonal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on an analysis of blood cells from five HIV-infected individuals, NCI researchers have identified more than 2,400 HIV DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sites showed that there is extensive clonal expansion (growth) of HIV infected cells.

  4. Rhizome elongation and seagrass clonal growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marbà, N.; Duarte, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    A compilation of published and original data on rhizome morphometry, horizontal and vertical elongation rates and branching patterns for 27 seagrass species developing in 192 seagrass stands allowed an examination of the variability of seagrass rhizome and clonal growth programmes across and within

  5. Distribution of clonal growth forms in wetlands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosnová, Monika; van Diggelen, R.; Klimešová, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 1 (2010), s. 33-39 ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/08/H044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : clonal growth organ * the Netherlands * wetland plant community Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.087, year: 2010

  6. Big Bang Tumor Growth and Clonal Evolution.

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    Sun, Ruping; Hu, Zheng; Curtis, Christina

    2018-05-01

    The advent and application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to tumor genomes has reinvigorated efforts to understand clonal evolution. Although tumor progression has traditionally been viewed as a gradual stepwise process, recent studies suggest that evolutionary rates in tumors can be variable with periods of punctuated mutational bursts and relative stasis. For example, Big Bang dynamics have been reported, wherein after transformation, growth occurs in the absence of stringent selection, consistent with effectively neutral evolution. Although first noted in colorectal tumors, effective neutrality may be relatively common. Additionally, punctuated evolution resulting from mutational bursts and cataclysmic genomic alterations have been described. In this review, we contrast these findings with the conventional gradualist view of clonal evolution and describe potential clinical and therapeutic implications of different evolutionary modes and tempos. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Demographic consequences of greater clonal than sexual reproduction in Dicentra canadensis.

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    Lin, Chia-Hua; Miriti, Maria N; Goodell, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Clonality is a widespread life history trait in flowering plants that may be essential for population persistence, especially in environments where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. Frequent clonal reproduction, however, could hinder sexual reproduction by spatially aggregating ramets that compete with seedlings and reduce inter-genet pollination. Nevertheless, the role of clonality in relation to variable sexual reproduction in population dynamics is often overlooked. We combined population matrix models and pollination experiments to compare the demographic contributions of clonal and sexual reproduction in three Dicentra canadensis populations, one in a well-forested landscape and two in isolated forest remnants. We constructed stage-based transition matrices from 3 years of census data to evaluate annual population growth rates, λ. We used loop analysis to evaluate the relative contribution of different reproductive pathways to λ. Despite strong temporal and spatial variation in seed set, populations generally showed stable growth rates. Although we detected some pollen limitation of seed set, manipulative pollination treatments did not affect population growth rates. Clonal reproduction contributed significantly more than sexual reproduction to population growth in the forest remnants. Only at the well-forested site did sexual reproduction contribute as much as clonal reproduction to population growth. Flowering plants were more likely to transition to a smaller size class with reduced reproductive potential in the following year than similarly sized nonflowering plants, suggesting energy trade-offs between sexual and clonal reproduction at the individual level. Seed production had negligible effects on growth and tuber production of individual plants. Our results demonstrate that clonal reproduction is vital for population persistence in a system where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. The bias toward clonality may be driven by low fitness returns

  8. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Z.; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 2 (2014), s. 377-388 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0963 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : clonal plants * frequency * plant communities of Central Europe Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.654, year: 2014

  9. Propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration influence the establishment and growth of an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hua eYou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules may affect the establishment, growth and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments or low (one fragment propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat, with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions.

  10. Growth and stem form quality of clonal Pinus taeda following fertilization in the Virginia Piedmont

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    Jeremy P. Stovall; Colleen A. Carlson; John R. Seiler; Thomas R. Fox

    2013-01-01

    Clonal forestry offers the opportunity to increase yields, enhance uniformity, and improve wood characteristics. Intensive silvicultural practices, including fertilization, will be required to capture the full growth potential of clonal plantations. However, variation in nutrient use efficiency that exists among clones could affect growth responses. Our research...

  11. Directional growth of a clonal bromeliad species in response to spatial habitat heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampaio, M.C.; Araujo, T.F.; Scarano, F.R.; Stuefer, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Habitat selection by directional growth of plants has previously been investigated but field evidence for this phenomenon is extremely scarce. In this study we demonstrate directional clonal growth in Aechmea nudicaulis, a monocarpic, perennial bromeliad native to spatially heterogeneous sandy

  12. Clonal Growth Forms in Eastern Ladakh, Western Himalayas: Classification and Habitat Preferences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; Doležal, Jiří; Dvorský, Miroslav; de Bello, Francesco; Klimeš, Leoš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, 2-3 (2011), 191-217 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Clonal growth form * Clonal space occupancy strategies * Habitat types Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.500, year: 2011

  13. Adjusting to global change through clonal growth and epigenetic variation

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    Richard S Dodd

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The earth is experiencing major changes in global and regional climates and changes are predicted to accelerate in the future. Many species will be under considerable pressure to evolve, to migrate, or be faced with extinction. Clonal plants would appear to be at a particular disadvantage due to their limited mobility and limited capacity for adaptation. However, they have outlived previous environmental shifts and clonal species have persisted for millenia. Clonal spread offers unique ecological advantages, such as resource sharing, risk sharing, and economies of scale among ramets within genotypes. We suggest that ecological attributes of clonal plants, in tandem with variation in gene regulation through epigenetic mechanisms that facilitate and optimize phenotype variation in response to environmental change may permit them to be well suited to projected conditions.

  14. Clonal growth strategy, diversity and structure: A spatiotemporal response to sedimentation in tropical Cyperus papyrus swamps.

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    Geremew, Addisie; Stiers, Iris; Sierens, Tim; Kefalew, Alemayehu; Triest, Ludwig

    2018-01-01

    Land degradation and soil erosion in the upper catchments of tropical lakes fringed by papyrus vegetation can result in a sediment load gradient from land to lakeward. Understanding the dynamics of clonal modules (ramets and genets) and growth strategies of plants on such a gradient in both space and time is critical for exploring a species adaptation and processes regulating population structure and differentiation. We assessed the spatial and temporal dynamics in clonal growth, diversity, and structure of an emergent macrophyte, Cyperus papyrus (papyrus), in response to two contrasting sedimentation regimes by combining morphological traits and genotype data using 20 microsatellite markers. A total of 636 ramets from six permanent plots (18 x 30 m) in three Ethiopian papyrus swamps, each with discrete sedimentation regimes (high vs. low) were sampled for two years. We found that ramets under the high sedimentation regime (HSR) were significantly clumped and denser than the sparse and spreading ramets under the low sedimentation regime (LSR). The HSR resulted in significantly different ramets with short culm height and girth diameter as compared to the LSR. These results indicated that C. papyrus ameliorates the effect of sedimentation by shifting clonal growth strategy from guerrilla (in LSR) to phalanx (in HSR). Clonal richness, size, dominance, and clonal subrange differed significantly between sediment regimes and studied time periods. Each swamp under HSR revealed a significantly high clonal richness (R = 0.80) as compared to the LSR (R = 0.48). Such discrepancy in clonal richness reflected the occurrence of initial and repeated seedling recruitment strategies as a response to different sedimentation regimes. Overall, our spatial and short-term temporal observations highlighted that HSR enhances clonal richness and decreases clonal subrange owing to repeated seedling recruitment and genets turnover.

  15. Competition, salinity, and clonal growth in native and introduced irises.

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    Mopper, Susan; Wiens, Karen C; Goranova, Greta A

    2016-09-01

    Iris pseudacorus spread rapidly into North America after introduction from Europe in the 1800s and now co-occurs with native I. hexagona in freshwater Louisiana wetlands. Native irises support and interact with multiple trophic levels, whereas I. pseudacorus is classified an invasive pest because it grows aggressively, reduces biodiversity, and displaces native vegetation. Salinity levels are increasing in coastal wetlands worldwide. We examined how salt-stress affects competitive interactions between these conspecifics. We established a three-way full-factorial common-garden experiment that included species (I. pseudacorus, I. hexagona), competition (no competition, intraspecific competition, and interspecific competition), and salinity (0, 4, 8 parts per thousand NaCl), with six replicates per treatment. After 18 mo, Iris pseudacorus produced much more biomass than the native species did (F1, 92 = 71.5, P Interspecific competition did not affect the introduced iris, but biomass of the native was strongly reduced (competition × species interaction: F2, 95 = 76.7, P = 0.002). Salinity significantly reduced biomass of both species (F2, 92 = 21.8, P competitive advantage over the native, regardless of environmental salinity levels. Based on patterns in clonal reproduction, the introduced iris could potentially threaten native iris populations. We are currently investigating seed production and mortality during competition and stress because both clonal and sexual reproduction must be considered when predicting long-term population dynamics. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  16. The Easterlin Illusion: Economic growth does go with greater happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut); F. Vergunst (Floris)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The 'Easterlin Paradox' holds that economic growth in nations does not buy greater happiness for the average citizen. This thesis was advanced in the 1970s on the basis of the then available data on happiness in nations. Later data have disproved most of the empirical

  17. Clonal Spread in Second Growth Stands of Coast Redwood, Sequoia sempervirens

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    Vladimir Douhovnikoff; Richard S. Dodd

    2007-01-01

    Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) is one of the rare conifers to reproduce successfully through clonal spread. The importance of this mode of reproduction in stand development is largely unknown. Understanding the importance of clonal spread and the spatial structure of clones is crucial for stand management strategies that would aim to maximize...

  18. Effect of Temperature on Growth and Sporulation of US-22, US-23, and US-24 Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans and Implications for Late Blight Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl Johnson, Anna C; Frost, Kenneth E; Rouse, Douglas I; Gevens, Amanda J

    2015-04-01

    Epidemics of late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, have been studied by plant pathologists and regarded with great concern by potato and tomato growers since the Irish potato famine in the 1840s. P. infestans populations have continued to evolve, with unique clonal lineages arising which differ in pathogen fitness and pathogenicity, potentially impacting epidemiology. In 2012 and 2013, the US-23 clonal lineage predominated late blight epidemics in most U.S. potato and tomato production regions, including Wisconsin. This lineage was unknown prior to 2009. For isolates of three recently identified clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-22, US-23, and US-24), sporulation rates were experimentally determined on potato and tomato foliage and the effect of temperature on lesion growth rate on tomato was investigated. The US-22 and US-23 isolates had greater lesion growth rates on tomato than US-24 isolates. Sporulation rates for all isolates were greater on potato than tomato, and the US-23 isolates had greater sporulation rates on both tomato and potato than the US-22 and US-24 isolates. Experimentally determined correlates of fitness were input to the LATEBLIGHT model and epidemics were simulated using archived Wisconsin weather data from four growing seasons (2009 to 2012) to investigate the effect of isolates of these new lineages on late blight epidemiology. The fast lesion growth rates of US-22 and US-23 isolates resulted in severe epidemics in all years tested, particularly in 2011. The greater sporulation rates of P. infestans on potato resulted in simulated epidemics that progressed faster than epidemics simulated for tomato; the high sporulation rates of US-23 isolates resulted in simulated epidemics more severe than simulated epidemics of isolates of the US-22 and US-24 isolates and EC-1 clonal lineages on potato and tomato. Additionally, US-23 isolates consistently caused severe simulated epidemics when lesion growth rate and sporulation

  19. Image analysis for the automated estimation of clonal growth and its application to the growth of smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavino, V C; Milo, G E; Cornwell, D G

    1982-03-01

    Image analysis was used for the automated measurement of colony frequency (f) and colony diameter (d) in cultures of smooth muscle cells, Initial studies with the inverted microscope showed that number of cells (N) in a colony varied directly with d: log N = 1.98 log d - 3.469 Image analysis generated the complement of a cumulative distribution for f as a function of d. The number of cells in each segment of the distribution function was calculated by multiplying f and the average N for the segment. These data were displayed as a cumulative distribution function. The total number of colonies (fT) and the total number of cells (NT) were used to calculate the average colony size (NA). Population doublings (PD) were then expressed as log2 NA. Image analysis confirmed previous studies in which colonies were sized and counted with an inverted microscope. Thus, image analysis is a rapid and automated technique for the measurement of clonal growth.

  20. Clonal variation in growth plasticity within a Bosmina longirostris population: the potential for resistance to toxic cyanobacteria.

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    Xiaodong Jiang

    Full Text Available Many aquatic organisms respond phenotypically, through morphological, behavioral, and physiological plasticity, to environmental changes. The small-size cladoceran Bosminalongirostris, a dominant zooplankter in eutrophic waters, displayed reduced growth rates in response to the presence of a toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystisaeruginosa, in their diets. The magnitude of growth reduction differed among 15 clones recently isolated from a single population. A significant interaction between clone and food type indicated a genetic basis for the difference in growth plasticity. The variation in phenotypic plasticity was visualized by plotting reaction norms with two diets. The resistance of each clone to dietary cyanobacteria was measured as the relative change in growth rates on the "poor" diet compared with the "good" diet. The enhanced resistance to M. aeruginosa in B. longirostris was derived from both the reduced slope of reaction norms and the increased mean growth rates with two diets. The large clonal variation within a B. longirostris population may contribute to local adaptation to toxic cyanobacteria and influence ecosystem function via clonal succession.

  1. Physiological integration affects growth form and competitive ability in clonal plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2004), s. 493-520 ISSN 0269-7653 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/02/0953 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : competitive ability * Physiological integration * clonal plants Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.215, year: 2004

  2. Clonal growth forms in Arctic plants and their habitat preferences: a study from Petuniabukta, Spitsbergen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; Doležal, Jiří; Prach, Karel; Košnar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 4 (2012), 421-442 ISSN 0138-0338 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA341; GA AV ČR IAA600050802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : clonality * plants * Arctic Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.745, year: 2012

  3. Transition in Central Asia: Growth with Increasingly Greater Inequality?

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    Max Spoor

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the economic evolution of the former Soviet states of Central Asia since their independence, especially in regard to growth and in comparison with growing inequality. The following topics are considered: first of all, the initial conditions in whichthe economic transition of these countries began; secondly, the transformations of widely varying scope (different “routes of transition” that these economies have experienced, from an almost non-reform (Turkmenistan or a gradual or partial reform (Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, to a large-scale reform (Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan; and thirdly, the economic performance of the Central Asian states, which, with the exception of Uzbekistan, has been quite poor and has generated what we could call two kinds of “duality”: one which is generated by the expansion of extracting industries (oil, gas and metals, to the detriment of other sectors fundamental to the countries’ development, and another one originating from the growingunequal distribution of income among the population. While the first of these “dualities” cannot be maintained as a long-term development strategy, the second one could culminate in social agitation and instability, even in the medium term, which could contribute to thedestabilisation of the already fragile and volatile region of Central Asia.

  4. Semisolid liver infusion tryptose supplemented with human urine allows growth and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli clonal lineages

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    Emanuella Francisco Fajardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION This work shows that 3% (v/v human urine (HU in semisolid Liver Infusion Tryptose (SSL medium favors the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli. METHODS Parasites were plated as individual or mixed strains on SSL medium and on SSL medium with 3% human urine (SSL-HU. Isolate DNA was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS SSL-HU medium improved clone isolation. PCR revealed that T. cruzi strains predominate on mixed-strain plates. PFGE confirmed that isolated parasites share the same molecular karyotype as parental cell lines. CONCLUSIONS SSL-HU medium constitutes a novel tool for obtaining T. cruzi and T. rangeli clonal lineages.

  5. Effects of simulated root herbivory and fertilizer application on growth and biomass allocation in the clonal perennialSolidago canadensis.

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    Schmid, B; Miao, S L; Bazzaz, F A

    1990-08-01

    Compensatory growth in response to simulated belowground herbivory was studied in the old-field clonal perennialSolidago canadensis. We grew rootpruned plants and plants with intact root systems in soil with or without fertilizer. For individual current shoots (aerial shoot with rhizome and roots) and for whole clones the following predictions were tested: a) root removal is compensated by increased root growth, b) fertilizer application leads to increased allocation to aboveground plant organs and increased leaf turnover, c) effects of fertilizer application are reduced in rootpruned plants. When most roots (90%) were removed current shoots quickly restored equilibrium between above-and belowground parts by compensatory belowground growth whereas the whole clone responded with reduced aboveground growth. This suggests that parts of a clone which are shared by actively growing shoots act as a buffer that can be used as source of material for compensatory growth in response to herbivory. Current shoots increased aboveground mass and whole clones reduced belowground mass in response to fertilizer application, both leading to increased allocation to aboverground parts. Also with fertilizer application both root-pruned and not root-pruned plants increased leaf and shoot turnover. Unfertilized plants, whether rootpruned or not, showed practically no aboveground growth and very little leaf and shoot turnover. Effects of root removal were as severe or more severe under conditions of high as under conditions of low nutrients, suggesting that negative effects of belowground herbivory are not ameliorated by abundant nutrients. Root removal may negate some effects of fertilizer application on the growth of current shoots and whole clones.

  6. MRSA Causing Infections in Hospitals in Greater Metropolitan New York: Major Shift in the Dominant Clonal Type between 1996 and 2014.

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    Maria Pardos de la Gandara

    Full Text Available A surveillance study in 1996 identified the USA100 clone (ST5/SCCmecII-also known as the "New York/Japan" clone-as the most prevalent MRSA causing infections in 12 New York City hospitals. Here we update the epidemiology of MRSA in seven of the same hospitals eighteen years later in 2013/14. Most of the current MRSA isolates (78 of 121 belonged to the MRSA clone USA300 (CC8/SCCmecIV but the USA100 clone-dominant in the 1996 survey-still remained the second most frequent MRSA (25 of the 121 isolates causing 32% of blood stream infections. The USA300 clone was most common in skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs and was associated with 84.5% of SSTIs compared to 5% caused by the USA100 clone. Our data indicate that by 2013/14, the USA300 clone replaced the New York/Japan clone as the most frequent cause of MRSA infections in hospitals in Metropolitan New York. In parallel with this shift in the clonal type of MRSA, there was also a striking change in the types of MRSA infections from 1996 to 2014.

  7. Populations in clonal plants

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    Jussi Tammisola

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Population phenomena in higher plants are reviewed critically, particularly in relation to clonality. An array of concepts used in the field are discussed. In contrast to animals, higher plants are modular in structure. Plant populations show hierarchy at two levels: ramets and genets. In addition, their demography is far more complicated, since even the direction of development of a ramet may change by rejuvenation. Therefore, formulae concerning animal populations often require modification for plants. Furthermore, at the zygotic stage, higher plants are generally less mobile than animals. Accordingly, their population processes tend to be more local. Most populations of plants have a genetic structure: alleles and genotypes are spatially aggregated. Due to the short-ranged foraging behaviour of pollinators, genetically non-random pollination prevails. A generalized formula for parent-offspring dispersal variance is derived. It is used to analyze the effect of clonality on genetic patchiness in populations. In self-compatible species, an increase in clonality will tend to increase the degree of patchiness, while in self-incompatible species a decrease may result. Examples of population structure studies in different species are presented. A considerable degree of genetic variation appears to be found also in the populations of species with a strong allocation of resources to clonal growth or apomictic seed production. Some consequences of clonality are considered from the point of view of genetic conservation and plant breeding.

  8. Effects of Spatial Patch Arrangement and Scale of Covarying Resources on Growth and Intraspecific Competition of a Clonal Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Jian; Shi, Xue-Ping; Meng, Xue-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Fang-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in two co-variable resources such as light and water availability is common and can affect the growth of clonal plants. Several studies have tested effects of spatial heterogeneity in the supply of a single resource on competitive interactions of plants, but none has examined those of heterogeneous distribution of two co-variable resources. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (without intraspecific competition) or nine isolated ramets (with competition) of a rhizomatous herb Iris japonica under a homogeneous environment and four heterogeneous environments differing in patch arrangement (reciprocal and parallel patchiness of light and soil water) and patch scale (large and small patches of light and water). Intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth of I. japonica, but at the whole container level there were no significant interaction effects of competition by spatial heterogeneity or significant effect of heterogeneity on competitive intensity. Irrespective of competition, the growth of I. japonica in the high and the low water patches did not differ significantly in the homogeneous treatments, but it was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the heterogeneous treatments with large patches. For the heterogeneous treatments with small patches, the growth of I. japonica was significantly larger in the high than in the low water patches in the presence of competition, but such an effect was not significant in the absence of competition. Furthermore, patch arrangement and patch scale significantly affected competitive intensity at the patch level. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in light and water supply can alter intraspecific competition at the patch level and such effects depend on patch arrangement and patch scale.

  9. Interspecific differences in growth response and tolerance to the antibiotic sulfadiazine in ten clonal wetland plants in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinfeng; Xu, Huilian; Sun, Yingbo; Huang, Lili; Zhang, Peixia; Zou, Chunping; Yu, Bo; Zhu, Genfa; Zhao, Chaoyi

    2016-02-01

    Pollution caused by residual antibiotics is a worldwide environmental issue. Antibiotic residues often occur in aquatic ecosystems, posing threats to the health of aquatic organisms. The effects of antibiotic residues on the growth of crop plants and on human health are reasonably well known. However, less is known about antibiotic effects on wetland plants. Therefore, we studied the response and tolerance of ten clonal wetland plants grown in soil spiked with sulfadiazine at 10 mg kg(-1) (an environmentally relevant concentration) and 100 mg kg(-1). At 10 mg kg(-1), ramet number was the least affected trait, while root number was the most affected among plant species. Plant shoot and total biomass were reduced in all species except in Cyperus malaccensis var. brevifolius and Panicum repens. Chlorophyll content was reduced in Alocasia macrorrhiza, Saururus chinensis, and Commelina diffusa. In general, Panicum paludosum and C. malaccensis var. brevifolius showed the least reduction of growth parameters, whereas growth of both A. macrorrhiza and S. chinensis was severely reduced. At 100 mg kg(-1), negative responses occurred in all species. Comprehensive tolerance analysis revealed that P. paludosum and C. malaccensis var. brevifolius were the species most resistant to sulfadiazine. These species are potential candidates for sulfadiazine polluted wetland restoration. A. macrorrhiza and S. chinensis were the most susceptible species and they should be protected from sulfadiazine pollution. Relative plant shoot biomass and height were the most useful indicators for evaluating plant tolerance to sulfadiazine. Plant tolerance to sulfadiazine was associated with the differences of plants in height and shoot biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Marked heterogeneity in growth characteristics of myoblast clonal cultures and myoblast mixed cultures obtained from the same individual.

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    Maier, Andrea B; Cohen, Ron; Blom, Joke; van Heemst, Diana; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as an age-related decrease in skeletal muscle mass and function while adjacent satellite cells are unable to compensate for this loss. However, myoblast cultures can be established even in the presence of sarcopenia. It is yet unknown whether satellite cells from failing muscle in older age are equally affected, as human satellite cells have been assessed using myoblast mixed cultures and not by using myoblast clonal cultures. We questioned to what extent myoblast mixed cultures reflect the in vivo characteristics of single satellite cells from adult skeletal muscle. We established a myoblast mixed culture and three myoblast clonal cultures out of the same muscle biopsy and cultured these cells for 100 days. Replicative capacity and oxidative stress resistance were compared. We found marked heterogeneity between the myoblast clonal cultures that all had a significantly lower replicative capacity when compared to the mixed culture. Replicative capacity of the clonal cultures was inversely related to the β-galactosidase activity after exposure to oxidative stress. Addition of L-carnosine enhanced the remaining replicative capacity in all cultures with a concomitant marginal decrease in β-galactosidase activity. It is concluded that myoblast mixed cultures in vitro do not reflect the marked heterogeneity between single isolated satellite cells. The consequences of the heterogeneity on muscle performance remain to be established. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Planar cell polarity signaling coordinates oriented cell division and cell rearrangement in clonally expanding growth plate cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuwei; Li, Ang; Junge, Jason; Bronner, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Both oriented cell divisions and cell rearrangements are critical for proper embryogenesis and organogenesis. However, little is known about how these two cellular events are integrated. Here we examine the linkage between these processes in chick limb cartilage. By combining retroviral-based multicolor clonal analysis with live imaging, the results show that single chondrocyte precursors can generate both single-column and multi-column clones through oriented division followed by cell rearra...

  12. Hospitals with greater diversities of physiologically complex procedures do not achieve greater surgical growth in a market with stable numbers of such procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Lubarsky, David A

    2018-05-01

    Although having a large diversity of types of procedures has a substantial operational impact on the surgical suites of hospitals, the strategic importance is unknown. In the current study, we used longitudinal data for all hospitals and patient ages in the State of Florida to evaluate whether hospitals with greater diversity of types of physiologically complex major therapeutic procedures (PCMTP) also had greater rates of surgical growth. Observational cohort study. 1479 combinations of hospitals in the State of Florida and fiscal years, 2008-2015. The types of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedures studied were PCMT, defined as: a) major therapeutic procedure; b) >7 American Society of Anesthesiologists base units; and c) performed during a hospitalization with a Diagnosis Related Group with a mean length of stay ≥4.0days. The number of procedures of each type of PCMTP commonly performed at each hospital was calculated by taking 1/Herfindahl index (i.e., sum of the squares of the proportions of all procedures of each type of PCMTP). Over the 8 successive years studied, there was no change in the number of PCMTP being performed (Kendall's τ b =-0.014±0.017 [standard error], P=0.44; N=1479 hospital×years). Busier and larger hospitals commonly performed more types of PCMTP, respectively categorized based on performed PCMTP (τ=0.606±0.017, P<0.0001) or hospital beds (τ=0.524±0.017, P<0.0001). There was no association between greater diversity of types of PCMTP commonly performed and greater annual growth in numbers of PCMTP (τ=0.002±0.019, P=0.91; N=1295 hospital×years). Conclusions were the same with multiple sensitivity analyses. Post hoc, it was recognized that hospitals performing a greater diversity of PCMTP were more similar to the aggregate of other hospitals within the same health district (τ=0.550±0.017, P<0.0001). During a period with no overall growth in PCMTP, hospitals with

  13. Norway maple displays greater seasonal growth and phenotypic plasticity to light than native sugar maple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Alain; Fontaine, Bastien; Berninger, Frank; Dubois, Karine; Lechowicz, Martin J; Messier, Christian; Posada, Juan M; Valladares, Fernando; Brisson, Jacques

    2012-11-01

    Norway maple (Acer platanoides L), which is among the most invasive tree species in forests of eastern North America, is associated with reduced regeneration of the related native species, sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh) and other native flora. To identify traits conferring an advantage to Norway maple, we grew both species through an entire growing season under simulated light regimes mimicking a closed forest understorey vs. a canopy disturbance (gap). Dynamic shade-houses providing a succession of high-intensity direct-light events between longer periods of low, diffuse light were used to simulate the light regimes. We assessed seedling height growth three times in the season, as well as stem diameter, maximum photosynthetic capacity, biomass allocation above- and below-ground, seasonal phenology and phenotypic plasticity. Given the north European provenance of Norway maple, we also investigated the possibility that its growth in North America might be increased by delayed fall senescence. We found that Norway maple had significantly greater photosynthetic capacity in both light regimes and grew larger in stem diameter than sugar maple. The differences in below- and above-ground biomass, stem diameter, height and maximum photosynthesis were especially important in the simulated gap where Norway maple continued extension growth during the late fall. In the gap regime sugar maple had a significantly higher root : shoot ratio that could confer an advantage in the deepest shade of closed understorey and under water stress or browsing pressure. Norway maple is especially invasive following canopy disturbance where the opposite (low root : shoot ratio) could confer a competitive advantage. Considering the effects of global change in extending the potential growing season, we anticipate that the invasiveness of Norway maple will increase in the future.

  14. Planar cell polarity signaling coordinates oriented cell division and cell rearrangement in clonally expanding growth plate cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwei; Li, Ang; Junge, Jason; Bronner, Marianne

    2017-10-10

    Both oriented cell divisions and cell rearrangements are critical for proper embryogenesis and organogenesis. However, little is known about how these two cellular events are integrated. Here we examine the linkage between these processes in chick limb cartilage. By combining retroviral-based multicolor clonal analysis with live imaging, the results show that single chondrocyte precursors can generate both single-column and multi-column clones through oriented division followed by cell rearrangements. Focusing on single column formation, we show that this stereotypical tissue architecture is established by a pivot-like process between sister cells. After mediolateral cell division, N-cadherin is enriched in the post-cleavage furrow; then one cell pivots around the other, resulting in stacking into a column. Perturbation analyses demonstrate that planar cell polarity signaling enables cells to pivot in the direction of limb elongation via this N-cadherin-mediated coupling. Our work provides new insights into the mechanisms generating appropriate tissue architecture of limb skeleton.

  15. Dystrophin-deficient dogs with reduced myostatin have unequal muscle growth and greater joint contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Liu, Naili; Warsing, Leigh C; Grange, Robert W; Ahn, Mihye; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J; Cotten, Steven W; Willis, Monte S; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice; Zhu, Hongtu; Palandra, Joe; Morris, Carl A; Styner, Martin A; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of muscle growth whose inhibition promotes muscle growth and regeneration. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice in which myostatin is knocked out or inhibited postnatally have a less severe phenotype with greater total mass and strength and less fibrosis and fatty replacement of muscles than mdx mice with wild-type myostatin expression. Dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) have previously been noted to have increased muscle mass and reduced fibrosis after systemic postnatal myostatin inhibition. Based partly on these results, myostatin inhibitors are in development for use in human muscular dystrophies. However, persisting concerns regarding the effects of long-term and profound myostatin inhibition will not be easily or imminently answered in clinical trials. To address these concerns, we developed a canine (GRippet) model by crossbreeding dystrophin-deficient GRMD dogs with Mstn-heterozygous (Mstn (+/-)) whippets. A total of four GRippets (dystrophic and Mstn (+/-)), three GRMD (dystrophic and Mstn wild-type) dogs, and three non-dystrophic controls from two litters were evaluated. Myostatin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein levels were downregulated in both GRMD and GRippet dogs. GRippets had more severe postural changes and larger (more restricted) maximal joint flexion angles, apparently due to further exaggeration of disproportionate effects on muscle size. Flexors such as the cranial sartorius were more hypertrophied on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the GRippets, while extensors, including the quadriceps femoris, underwent greater atrophy. Myostatin protein levels negatively correlated with relative cranial sartorius muscle cross-sectional area on MRI, supporting a role in disproportionate muscle size. Activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) expression was higher in dystrophic versus control dogs, consistent with physiologic feedback between myostatin and ActRIIB. However, there was no

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular proteins expressed by various clonal types of Staphylococcus aureus and during planktonic growth and biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atshan, Salman S; Shamsudin, Mariana N; Sekawi, Zamberi; Thian Lung, Leslie T; Barantalab, Fatemeh; Liew, Yun K; Alreshidi, Mateg Ali; Abduljaleel, Salwa A; Hamat, Rukman A

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is well known for its biofilm formation with rapid emergence of new clones circulating worldwide. The main objectives of the study were (1) to identify possible differences in protein expression among various and closely related clonal types of S. aureus, (2) to establish the differences in protein expression in terms of size of protein spots and its intensities between bacteria which are grown statically (biofilm formation) with that of under aeration and agitation, and (3) to compare the differences in protein expression as a function of time (in hours). In this study, we selected six clinical isolates comprising two similar (MRSA-527 and MRSA-524) and four different (MRSA-139, MSSA-12E, MSSA-22d, and MSSA-10E) types identified by spa typing, MLST and SCCmec typing. We performed 2D gel migration comparison. Also, two MRSA isolates (527 and 139) were selected to determine quantitative changes in the level of extracellular proteins at different biofilm growth time points of 12, 24, and 48 h. The study was done using a strategy that combines 2-DGE and LC-MS/MS analysis for absolute quantification and identification of the extracellular proteins. The 2DGE revealed that the proteomic profiles for the isolates belonging to the similar spa, MLST, and SCCmec types were still quite different. Among the extracellular proteins secreted at different time points of biofilm formation, significant changes in protein expression were observed at 48 h incubation as compared to the exponential growth at 12 h incubation. The main conclusion of the work is that the authors do observe differences among isolates, and growth conditions do influence the protein content at different time points of biofilm formation.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic quantification of plumbagin from transformed rhizoclones of Plumbago zeylanica L.: inter-clonal variation in biomass growth and plumbagin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Pranati; Sharma, Mukesh; Behera, Sailesh N; Thirunavoukkarasu, Manikkannan; Chand, Pradeep K

    2015-02-01

    An optimized protocol for induction and establishment of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy root cultures of Plumbago zeylanica L. was developed through selection of suitable explant type and the bacterial strain. The infection of internodal explants from an in vivo plant and leaves of in vitro origin with the A4 strain resulted in the emergence of hairy roots at a transformation frequency of 86.33 and 42.33 %, respectively. Independent transformed root somaclones (rhizoclones) capable of sustained growth were maintained under a low illumination in auxin-free agar-solidified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium through subcultures at periodic intervals. The presence of pRi T L-DNA rolB or rolC genes and pRi T R-DNA mas2 gene in the transformed rhizoclone genome was ascertained by PCR amplification. Concentrations and type of carbon source, auxin and media strength were optimized for root biomass growth. Five independent rhizoclones each from A4- and LBA9402-transformed root lines were studied for their plumbagin accumulation at different growth phases, using HPLC analysis. The potential for plumbagin biosynthesis was expressed in all the tested rhizoclones, although distinct inter-clonal variations were noted. It was evident that maturation of hairy roots was more important for plumbagin accumulation; slow-growing and early-maturing rhizoclones accumulated more plumbagin compared to fast-growing and late-maturing rhizoclones. A4-induced rhizoclone HRA2B5 was identified as the most superior clone with a higher plumbagin yield potential in comparison with other tested hairy root clones, in vitro-grown non-transformed roots and in vivo roots of naturally occurring P. zeylanica.

  18. Linking clonal growth patterns and ecophysiology allows the prediction of meadow-scale dynamics of seagrass beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaat, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Seagrasses are a group of 12 genera of monocotyledonous plants in four families that have successfully colonised shallow coastal seas, probably since the Cretaceous. Variations in light availability and water movement are prime environmental factors for the growth of these marine angiosperms. An

  19. Foreign Direct Investment or External Debt and Domestic Saving: Which has Greater Impact on Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horas Djulius

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The choice taken by developing countries in meeting the lack of development funds has a varying effect. This study clarifies the role of foreign direct investment (FDI compared to foreign loans and domestic savings in short- and long-term economic growth of Indonesia. Data were obtained from World Bank and Bank Indonesia and used in error correction model to explain the linkage between predictors and economic growth. We show that in the short run, the three explanatory variables significantly affect economic growth. In the long run, compared to FDI and foreign loans, domestic savings positively and significantly affect economic growth. This study emphasizes the importance of sustaining domestic savings to maintain the stability of economic fundamentals in the long term.DOI: 10.15408/etk.v17i1.7120

  20. Fiscal consequences of greater openness: from tax avoidance and tax arbitrage to revenue growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jouko Ylä-Liedenpohja

    2008-01-01

    Revenue from corporation tax and taxes on capital income, net of revenue loss from deductibility of interest, as a percentage of the GDP has tripled in Finland over the past two decades. This is argued to result from greater openness of the economy as well as from simultaneous tax reforms towards neutrality of capital income taxation by combining tax-base broadening with tax-rate reductions. They implied improved efficiency of real investments, elimination of tax avoidance in entrepreneurial ...

  1. An Invasive Clonal Plant Benefits from Clonal Integration More than a Co-Occurring Native Plant in Nutrient-Patchy and Competitive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wenhua; Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Dan; Xie, Dong; Liu, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits

  2. Radial growth and ring formation process in clonal plant Eriophorum angustifolium on postmined peatland in the Šumava Mts., Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanta, Vojtěch; Janeček, Štěpán; Doležal, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2008), s. 44-54 ISSN 0003-3847 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/03/H034; GA ČR GA526/07/0808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Clonal plant * Eriophorum angustifolium * Experiments Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.361, year: 2008

  3. Effect of rosette size, clonality and spatial distribution on the reproduction of Vriesea carinata (Bromeliaceae in the Atlantic Forest of Paraná, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Aparecido de Souza Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Plant size and clonality are important traits for explaining the reproductive effort of clonal plants. Larger plants can invest more resources into reproduction, and clonality is known to increase reproductive effort. Moreover, reproductive effort is influenced by environmental variation, and so the spatial distribution of plants may affect plant reproductive effort. We investigated the effect of plant size, clonality and spatial distribution on the reproductive effort of Vriesea carinata in the Atlantic Forest in the state of Paraná, Brazil. We marked twenty individual plants and measured their rosette size, biomass and number, as well as rosette reproductive effort (number of flowers, fruits and seeds. We also evaluated the relationship between reproductive effort and spatial distribution of plants. Reproductive effort did not correlate with size, whereas greater clonal growth contributed to a lower reproductive effort because rosettes within clones that had more rosettes set fewer flowers. We found that plants growing closer to each other exhibited similar reproductive efforts independently of vegetative traits, because reproductive traits were spatially autocorrelated. In Vriesea carinata, the main drivers of reproductive effort are clonality, which decreases flower production, and spatial factors, which result in greater similarity in reproductive efforts among more proximate plants.

  4. Safety of growth factor administration for leukapheresis in those with WBC counts greater than 60,000/µl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihong; Rizzieri, David; Drago, Susan

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization using growth factors is a common method of stem cell collection for transplantation, however, little is reported concerning safety of continued growth factor delivery in exceptional responders with very high white blood cell (WBC) counts in preparation for pheresis. We performed a retrospective study of the safety of growth factor delivery for leukapheresis in those with WBC counts greater than 60,000/µl. Allogeneic donors received 5 days of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a daily dose of 10 or 16 µg/kg. Autologous donors received G-CSF 10 µg/kg/day +/- chemotherapy until peripheral blood CD34(+) count reached 10/µl. Granulocyte donors received 300 µg dose of G-CSF the day prior to donation. Out of 3,037 leukapheresis collections from 1998 to 2005, we identified 303 collections from 204 donors or patients who had a WBC > 60,000/µl. WBC counts were ≥100,000/µl in seven of these subjects. If inadequate stem cell dose was obtained with pheresis with WBC counts this high, patients had growth factor dosing decreased 50% but still received a dose till stem cell collection was completed. Of the 204 subjects, 122 were patients and 82 were donors. These 204 donors/patients had no serious adverse events reported other than the common reports of myalgia, bone pain, and headache associated with administration of growth factors. Pain levels ranged from mild to severe and usually were managed by over the counter analgesics. Continuing ½ the dose of neupogen to complete the pheresis process appears safe in subjects with very high white blood counts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparative drug susceptibility study of five clonal strains of Trichomonas vaginalis in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hemantkumar Somabhai Chaudhari; Prati Pal Singh

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To produce comparative data on a group of Trichomonas vaginalis clonal strains with varied drug responses using identical methods and materials. Methods: Five clonal strains of Trichomonas vaginalis were isolated from reference strain using agar plate technique. The variability of growth kinetic and susceptibility of clonal strain to metronidazole, tinidazole, satranidazole and nitazoxanide were observed in 96 well microtitre plate. Results: Among these clonal strains there was a good correlation between rates of growth with the relative susceptibility of the strains to drugs in vitro. Regarding metronidazole, tinidazole and satranidazole susceptibility, different degrees of susceptibility were determined. However, no difference in nitazoxanide susceptibility was found between the clonal strain tested and a reference strain.Conclusions: This is the first description of biological variability in clonal stock of Trichomonas vaginalis. Different degrees of drug susceptibility were determined among clonal strains tested. Further studies will be necessary to ascertain the importance of this variability in clinical infection.

  6. Selective Inhibition of Tumor Growth by Clonal NK Cells Expressing an ErbB2/HER2-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeld, Kurt; Sahm, Christiane; Zhang, Congcong; Naundorf, Sonja; Brendel, Christian; Odendahl, Marcus; Nowakowska, Paulina; Bönig, Halvard; Köhl, Ulrike; Kloess, Stephan; Köhler, Sylvia; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Jauch, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; Schubert, Ralf; Kühlcke, Klaus; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans G; Rieger, Michael A; Tonn, Torsten; Grez, Manuel; Wels, Winfried S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an important effector cell type for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Similar to T cells, NK cells can be modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance antitumor activity, but experience with CAR-engineered NK cells and their clinical development is still limited. Here, we redirected continuously expanding and clinically usable established human NK-92 cells to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2) antigen. Following GMP-compliant procedures, we generated a stable clonal cell line expressing a humanized CAR based on ErbB2-specific antibody FRP5 harboring CD28 and CD3ζ signaling domains (CAR 5.28.z). These NK-92/5.28.z cells efficiently lysed ErbB2-expressing tumor cells in vitro and exhibited serial target cell killing. Specific recognition of tumor cells and antitumor activity were retained in vivo, resulting in selective enrichment of NK-92/5.28.z cells in orthotopic breast carcinoma xenografts, and reduction of pulmonary metastasis in a renal cell carcinoma model, respectively. γ-irradiation as a potential safety measure for clinical application prevented NK cell replication, while antitumor activity was preserved. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to engineer CAR-expressing NK cells as a clonal, molecularly and functionally well-defined and continuously expandable cell therapeutic agent, and suggest NK-92/5.28.z cells as a promising candidate for use in adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25373520

  7. Land Cover Mapping Analysis and Urban Growth Modelling Using Remote Sensing Techniques in Greater Cairo Region—Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Megahed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study modeled the urban growth in the Greater Cairo Region (GCR, one of the fastest growing mega cities in the world, using remote sensing data and ancillary data. Three land use land cover (LULC maps (1984, 2003 and 2014 were produced from satellite images by using Support Vector Machines (SVM. Then, land cover changes were detected by applying a high level mapping technique that combines binary maps (change/no-change and post classification comparison technique. The spatial and temporal urban growth patterns were analyzed using selected statistical metrics developed in the FRAGSTATS software. Major transitions to urban were modeled to predict the future scenarios for year 2025 using Land Change Modeler (LCM embedded in the IDRISI software. The model results, after validation, indicated that 14% of the vegetation and 4% of the desert in 2014 will be urbanized in 2025. The urban areas within a 5-km buffer around: the Great Pyramids, Islamic Cairo and Al-Baron Palace were calculated, highlighting an intense urbanization especially around the Pyramids; 28% in 2014 up to 40% in 2025. Knowing the current and estimated urbanization situation in GCR will help decision makers to adjust and develop new plans to achieve a sustainable development of urban areas and to protect the historical locations.

  8. Extensive clonal spread and extreme longevity in saw palmetto, a foundation clonal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mizuki K; Horner, Liana M; Kubota, Toshiro; Keller, Nathan A; Abrahamson, Warren G

    2011-09-01

    The lack of effective tools has hampered out ability to assess the size, growth and ages of clonal plants. With Serenoa repens (saw palmetto) as a model, we introduce a novel analytical framework that integrates DNA fingerprinting and mathematical modelling to simulate growth and estimate ages of clonal plants. We also demonstrate the application of such life-history information of clonal plants to provide insight into management plans. Serenoa is an ecologically important foundation species in many Southeastern United States ecosystems; yet, many land managers consider Serenoa a troublesome invasive plant. Accordingly, management plans have been developed to reduce or eliminate Serenoa with little understanding of its life history. Using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms, we genotyped 263 Serenoa and 134 Sabal etonia (a sympatric non-clonal palmetto) samples collected from a 20 × 20 m study plot in Florida scrub. Sabal samples were used to assign small field-unidentifiable palmettos to Serenoa or Sabal and also as a negative control for clone detection. We then mathematically modelled clonal networks to estimate genet ages. Our results suggest that Serenoa predominantly propagate via vegetative sprouts and 10,000-year-old genets may be common, while showing no evidence of clone formation by Sabal. The results of this and our previous studies suggest that: (i) Serenoa has been part of scrub associations for thousands of years, (ii) Serenoa invasion are unlikely and (ii) once Serenoa is eliminated from local communities, its restoration will be difficult. Reevaluation of the current management tools and plans is an urgent task. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Effects of aspect on clonal reproduction and biomass allocation of layering modules of Nitraria tangutorum in nebkha dunes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Li

    Full Text Available The formation of many nebkha dunes relies on the layering of clonal plants. The microenvironmental conditions of such phytogenic nebkha are heterogeneous depending on the aspect and slope. Exploring the effects of aspect on clonal reproduction and biomass allocation can be useful in understanding the ecological adaptation of species. We hypothesized that on the windward side layering propagation would be promoted, that biomass allocation to leaves and stems of ramets would increase, and that the effects of aspect would be greater in the layering with larger biomass. To test these hypotheses, we surveyed the depth of germination points of axillary buds, the rate of ramet sprouting, the density of adventitious root formation points, and the biomass of modules sprouting from layering located on the NE, SE, SW and NW, aspects of Nitraria tangutorum nebkhas. The windward side was located on the NW and SW aspects. The results indicated that conditions of the NW aspect were more conducive to clonal reproduction and had the highest rate of ramet sprouting and the highest density of adventitious formation points. For the modules sprouting from layering on the SW aspect, biomass allocation to leaves and stems was greatest with biomass allocation to adventitious roots being lowest. This result supported our hypothesis. Contrary to our hypothesis, the effects of aspect were greater in layering of smaller biomass. These results support the hypothesis that aspect does affect layering propagation capacity and biomass allocation in this species. Additionally, clonal reproduction and biomass allocation of modules sprouting from layering with smaller biomass was more affected by aspect. These results suggest that the clonal growth of N. tangutorum responses to the microenvironmental heterogeneity that results from aspect of the nebkha.

  10. Effects of aspect on clonal reproduction and biomass allocation of layering modules of Nitraria tangutorum in nebkha dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghe; Xu, Jun; Li, Huiqing; Wang, Saixiao; Yan, Xiu; Xin, Zhiming; Jiang, Zeping; Wang, Linlong; Jia, Zhiqing

    2013-01-01

    The formation of many nebkha dunes relies on the layering of clonal plants. The microenvironmental conditions of such phytogenic nebkha are heterogeneous depending on the aspect and slope. Exploring the effects of aspect on clonal reproduction and biomass allocation can be useful in understanding the ecological adaptation of species. We hypothesized that on the windward side layering propagation would be promoted, that biomass allocation to leaves and stems of ramets would increase, and that the effects of aspect would be greater in the layering with larger biomass. To test these hypotheses, we surveyed the depth of germination points of axillary buds, the rate of ramet sprouting, the density of adventitious root formation points, and the biomass of modules sprouting from layering located on the NE, SE, SW and NW, aspects of Nitraria tangutorum nebkhas. The windward side was located on the NW and SW aspects. The results indicated that conditions of the NW aspect were more conducive to clonal reproduction and had the highest rate of ramet sprouting and the highest density of adventitious formation points. For the modules sprouting from layering on the SW aspect, biomass allocation to leaves and stems was greatest with biomass allocation to adventitious roots being lowest. This result supported our hypothesis. Contrary to our hypothesis, the effects of aspect were greater in layering of smaller biomass. These results support the hypothesis that aspect does affect layering propagation capacity and biomass allocation in this species. Additionally, clonal reproduction and biomass allocation of modules sprouting from layering with smaller biomass was more affected by aspect. These results suggest that the clonal growth of N. tangutorum responses to the microenvironmental heterogeneity that results from aspect of the nebkha.

  11. Clonality evaluation in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villamizar-Rivera, Nicolás

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant proliferations are usually clonal. While most times the biological potential can be established through routine pathologic and clinical examinations, some cases are difficult to classify. Moreover, in some situations there are dominant clones whose analysis is important, such as in autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency. This paper presents in an understandable way the main techniques for the study of clonality, namely: evaluation of gene rearrangements of antigen receptor, and evaluation of human antigen receptor gene.

  12. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  13. Lycopene supplementation elevates circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and -2 concentrations in persons at greater risk of colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Voskuil, D.W.; Bonfrer, J.M.; Korse, C.M.; Doorn, J. van; Cats, A.; Depla, A.C.; Timmer, R.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Veer, L.J. van 't; Rookus, M.A.; Kampman, E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Higher circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations have been related to a greater risk of cancer. Lycopene intake is inversely associated with cancer risk, and experimental studies have shown that it may affect the IGF system, possibly through an effect on IGF-binding

  14. Lycopene supplementation elevates circulating insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 and-2 concentrations in persons at greater risk of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Voskuil, D.W.; Bonfrer, J.M.; Korse, C.M.; Doorn, J.; Cats, A.; Depla, A.C.; Timmer, R.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Leeuwen, van F.E.; van't Veer, L.J.; Rookus, M.A.; Kampman, E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Higher circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations have been related to a greater risk of cancer. Lycopene intake is inversely associated with cancer risk, and experimental studies have shown that it may affect the IGF system, possibly through an effect on IGF-binding

  15. Uncovering the Number and Clonal Dynamics of Mesp1 Progenitors during Heart Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Chabab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heart arises from distinct sources of cardiac progenitors that independently express Mesp1 during gastrulation. The precise number of Mesp1 progenitors that are specified during the early stage of gastrulation, and their clonal behavior during heart morphogenesis, is currently unknown. Here, we used clonal and mosaic tracing of Mesp1-expressing cells combined with quantitative biophysical analysis of the clonal data to define the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth during heart development. Our data indicate that the myocardial layer of the heart derive from ∼250 Mesp1-expressing cardiac progenitors born during gastrulation. Despite arising at different time points and contributing to different heart regions, the temporally distinct cardiac progenitors present very similar clonal dynamics. These results provide insights into the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth and open up avenues to decipher the clonal dynamics of progenitors in other organs and tissues.

  16. Clonal differences in log end splitting in Eucalyptus grandis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the juvenile–mature correlation of log end splitting among Eucalyptus grandis clones from two trials and how differences in splitting relate to differences in wood density, pith-to-bark gradient and growth rate. Two approximately 20-year-old Eucalyptus grandis clonal trials at Bergvliet plantation were ...

  17. Functional specialization of ramets in a clonal plant network functional specialization of ramets in a clonal plant network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikegami, M.

    2004-01-01

    Functional specialization of ramets and co-operation between interconnected ramets in heterogeneous environments are studied in this thesis. Since clonal plants can spread horizontally by vegetative growth, a genet has the potential to grow across a heterogeneous environment. Therefore, ramets can

  18. Ground cover and tree growth on calcareous minesoils: Greater influence of soil surface than nitrogen rate or seed mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kost, D.A.; Vimmerstedt, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Growth of ground cover and trees was evaluated for five growing seasons on calcareous coal minesoil surfaces (standard graded topsoil, graded and ripped topsoil, graded gray cast overburden) in southeastern Ohio. Soil surface plots were seeded in September 1987 with either a standard herbaceous seed mix [orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), timothy (Phleum pratense L.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), Ranger alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Mammoth red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), Empire birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)], or a modified mix using no alfalfa and half the rate of orchardgrass. Nitrogen (45, 90, or 135 kg ha/N) was applied as ammonium nitrate in September 1987 and April 1989. White ash (Fraxinus americana L.), silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.), northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), and eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) were planted in spring 1989 into 0.8 m-wide strips sprayed with glyphosate herbicide at 2.24 kg/ha in October 1988. Total cover and total biomass were highest in July 1989, following the last application of nitrogen fertilizer in April 1989. Total cover ranged from 44% to 56%, and total biomass ranged from 102 to 162 g/0.5 m 2 from 1990 to 1993. Total cover and total biomass were lower at the lowest nitrogen rate in 1989 only. Type of herbaceous seed mix did not affect growth of ground cover or trees. Overall tree survival was 82.0% the first year but declined to 40.6% after 5 yr. Survival varied significantly among all tree species (3.5% for pine, 22.2% for oak, 38.5% for maple, 98.1% for ash)

  19. Growth of sand whiff Citharichthys arenaceus and bay whiff Citharichthys spilopterus (pleuronectiformes: bothidae) in Puerto Rico (greater antilles) and North Carolina (USA), with comments on growth rate comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyeux, Jean-Christophe; Miller, John M.; Aliaume, Catherine; Zerbi, Alfonso

    Sagittal otoliths from two bothid flatfish species ( Citharichthys arenaceus and C. spilopterus) collected in Puerto Rico were microstructurally examined and periodic increments counted. C. arenaceus length-at-age (33 to 246 days) data were best fitted by a Gompertz growth model whose parameters were estimated to be SL ∞ = 170 mm and K = 0.0166. Adult size is reached in less than one year. The peak period of hatching occurred in late spring, and settlement took place 39 days later. Due to a smaller age range (71 to 150 days), growth of C. spilopterus was described by a linear relationship with slope = 0.693 and intercept = -15.1 days. Hatching occurred in winter and spring. These two species showed no significant difference in age at settlement. After settlement, growth of C. spilopterus (0.69 mm·d -1 at 71 to 113 days old) was significantly slower than that of C. arenaceus (1.00 mm·d -1 at 71 to 113 days) possibly due to poorer environmental (abiotic or food-related) conditions during the dry, cool season (December-April). C. spilopterus from North Carolina, hatched in the same period, settled about two weeks older than in Puerto Rico. Growth after settlement was significantly slower in North Carolina (0.44 mm·d -1 at 71 to 113 days) than in Puerto Rico. Environmental conditions (including temperature), distance between spawning areas and settlement grounds, and/or food availability, might explain the dissimilarity in growth observed between the two geographic areas. We recommend absolute field growth to be compared by using growth rates obtained by deriving the growth curve formula.

  20. Lead perturbs epidermal growth factor (EGF) modulation of intracellular calcium metabolism in clonal rat osteoblastic (ROS 17/2.8) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, G.J.; Rosen, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    EGF, a single chain polypeptide growth factor important for many cellular functions including glycolysis and protein phophorylation, is known to modulate calcium metabolism in several cell systems. It has been shown that EGF causes an increase in Ca 2+ influx and accumulation of inositol triphosphate, and probably exhibits many, if not all, of its effects via the calcium messenger system. Lead is known to interact with and perturb normal calcium signaling pathways; hence, the purpose of this work was to determine if lead perturbs EGF modulation of calcium metabolism in ROS 17/2.8 cells and if cell functions controlled by EGF were impaired. Cells were labelled with 45 Ca (1.87 mM Ca) for 20 hr in the presence of 5 μM Pb, 50 ng/ml EGF or μM Pb and 50 ng/ml EGF. Following an EGTA rinse, kinetic parameters were determined from 45 Ca efflux curves. Three kinetic compartments described the intracellular metabolism of 45 Ca. 5 μM Pb significantly altered the effect of EGF on intracellular calcium metabolism. Calcium distribution was shifted from the fast exchanging, quantitatively small calcium pools, S 1 and S 2 to the slow exchanging, quantitatively large S 2 . There was also a 50% increase in total cell calcium in cells treated with 5 μM Pb and 50 ng/ml EGF over cells treated with 50 ng/ml EGF alone. There was also a 25% decrease in the half-time for calcium exchange from S 3 to S 1 was also decreased. These data show that Pb impairs the normal modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis by EGF and may therefore perturb functions that are modulated by EGF via the calcium messenger system

  1. Massage therapy during early postnatal life promotes greater lean mass and bone growth, mineralization, and strength in juvenile and young adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Miller, S; Shaw, J; Moyer-Mileur, L

    2009-01-01

    The objects of this study were to investigate the effects of massage therapy during early life on postnatal growth, body composition, and skeletal development in juvenile and young adult rats. Massage therapy was performed for 10 minutes daily from D6 to D10 of postnatal life in rat pups (MT, n=24). Body composition, bone area, mineral content, and bone mineral density were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); bone strength and intrinsic stiffness on femur shaft were tested by three-point bending; cortical and cancellous bone histomorphometric measurements were performed at D21 and D60. Results were compared to age- and gender-matched controls (C, n=24). D21 body weight, body length, lean mass, and bone area were significantly greater in the MT cohort. Greater bone mineral content was found in male MT rats; bone strength and intrinsic stiffness were greater in D60 MT groups. At D60 MT treatment promoted bone mineralization by increasing trabecular mineral apposition rate in male and endosteal mineral surface in females, and also improved micro-architecture by greater trabeculae width in males and decreasing trabecular separation in females. In summary, massage therapy during early life elicited immediate and prolonged anabolic effects on postnatal growth, lean mass and skeletal developmental in a gender-specific manner in juvenile and young adult rats.

  2. Clonal integration facilitates spread of Paspalum paspaloides from terrestrial to cadmium-contaminated aquatic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, F-L; Xing, Y-P; Wei, G-W; Li, C-Y; Yu, F-H

    2017-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a hazardous environmental pollutant with high toxicity to plants, which has been detected in many wetlands. Clonal integration (resource translocation) between connected ramets of clonal plants can increase their tolerance to stress. We hypothesised that clonal integration facilitates spread of amphibious clonal plants from terrestrial to Cd-contaminated aquatic habitats. The spread of an amphibious grass Paspalum paspaloides was simulated by growing basal older ramets in uncontaminated soil connected (allowing integration) or not connected (preventing integration) to apical younger ramets of the same fragments in Cd-contaminated water. Cd contamination of apical ramets of P. paspaloides markedly decreased growth and photosynthetic capacity of the apical ramets without connection to the basal ramets, but did not decrease these properties with connection. Cd contamination did not affect growth of the basal ramets without connection to the apical ramets, but Cd contamination of 4 and 12 mg·l -1 significantly increased growth with connection. Consequently, clonal integration increased growth of the apical ramets, basal ramets and whole clones when the apical ramets were grown in Cd-contaminated water of 4 and 12 mg·l -1 . Cd was detected in the basal ramets with connection to the apical ramets, suggesting Cd could be translocated due to clonal integration. Clonal integration, most likely through translocation of photosynthates, can support P. paspaloides to spread from terrestrial to Cd-contaminated aquatic habitats. Amphibious clonal plants with a high ability for clonal integration are particularly useful for re-vegetation of degraded aquatic habitats caused by Cd contamination. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Greater Melbourne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, M; Burke, T; Newton, P

    1986-03-01

    With more than a quarter of its population born overseas, Melbourne, Australia, is rapidly changing from an all-white British outpost to a multicultural, multilingual community. Since the "white" Australian policy was abandoned after World War II, 3 million immigrants from 100 different countries have moved to Australia. Most of the immigrants come from New Zealand, Rhodesia, South Africa, Britain, Ireland, Greece, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Poland, and Indochina. Melbourne is Australia's 2nd largest city and houses 1 out of 5 Australians. Its 1984 population was 2,888,400. Melbourne's housing pattern consists of subdivisions; 75% of the population live in detached houses. Between 1954 and 1961 Melbourne grew at an annual rate of 3.5%; its growth rate between 1961 and 1971 still averaged 2.5%. In the 1970s the growth rate slowed to 1.4%. Metropolitan Melbourne has no central government but is divided into 56 councils and 8 regions. Both Australia's and Melbourne's fertility rates are high compared to the rest of the developed world, partly because of their younger age structure. 41% of Melbourne's population was under age 24 in 1981. Single-person households are growing faster than any other type. 71% of the housing is owner-occupied; in 1981 the median sized dwelling had 5.2 rooms. Public housing only accounts for 2.6% of all dwellings. Fewer students graduate from high school in Australia than in other developed countries, and fewer graduates pursue higher education. Melbourne's suburban sprawl promotes private car travel. In 1980 Melbourne contained more than 28,000 retail establishments and 4200 restaurants and hotels. Industry accounts for 30% of employment, and services account for another 30%. Its largest industries are motor vehicles, clothing, and footware. Although unemployment reached 10% after the 1973 energy crisis, by 1985 it was down to 6%.

  4. Transgenerational plasticity in clonal plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Latzel, Vít; Klimešová, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2010), s. 1537-1543 ISSN 0269-7653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/08/H044; GA ČR GA526/09/0963; GA ČR GPP505/10/P173 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : maternal effect * evolution * clonal plants Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.398, year: 2010

  5. Aging in a long-lived clonal tree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilara Ally

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available From bacteria to multicellular animals, most organisms exhibit declines in survivorship or reproductive performance with increasing age ("senescence". Evidence for senescence in clonal plants, however, is scant. During asexual growth, we expect that somatic mutations, which negatively impact sexual fitness, should accumulate and contribute to senescence, especially among long-lived clonal plants. We tested whether older clones of Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen from natural stands in British Columbia exhibited significantly reduced reproductive performance. Coupling molecular-based estimates of clone age with male fertility data, we observed a significant decline in the average number of viable pollen grains per catkin per ramet with increasing clone age in trembling aspen. We found that mutations reduced relative male fertility in clonal aspen populations by about 5.8 x 10(-5 to 1.6 x 10(-3 per year, leading to an 8% reduction in the number of viable pollen grains, on average, among the clones studied. The probability that an aspen lineage ultimately goes extinct rises as its male sexual fitness declines, suggesting that even long-lived clonal organisms are vulnerable to senescence.

  6. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-01-01

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolut...

  7. Clonal sets of a binary relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedam, Lemnaouar; Pérez-Fernández, Raúl; Bouremel, Hassane; De Baets, Bernard

    2018-05-01

    In a recent paper, we have introduced the notion of clone relation of a given binary relation. Intuitively, two elements are said to be "clones" if they are related in the same way w.r.t. every other element. In this paper, we generalize this notion from pairs of elements to sets of elements of any cardinality, resulting in the introduction of clonal sets. We investigate the most important properties of clonal sets, paying particular attention to the introduction of the clonal closure operator, to the analysis of the (lattice) structure of the set of clonal sets and to a distance metric expressing how close two elements are to being clones.

  8. A computational clonal analysis of the developing mouse limb bud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Marcon

    Full Text Available A comprehensive spatio-temporal description of the tissue movements underlying organogenesis would be an extremely useful resource to developmental biology. Clonal analysis and fate mappings are popular experiments to study tissue movement during morphogenesis. Such experiments allow cell populations to be labeled at an early stage of development and to follow their spatial evolution over time. However, disentangling the cumulative effects of the multiple events responsible for the expansion of the labeled cell population is not always straightforward. To overcome this problem, we develop a novel computational method that combines accurate quantification of 2D limb bud morphologies and growth modeling to analyze mouse clonal data of early limb development. Firstly, we explore various tissue movements that match experimental limb bud shape changes. Secondly, by comparing computational clones with newly generated mouse clonal data we are able to choose and characterize the tissue movement map that better matches experimental data. Our computational analysis produces for the first time a two dimensional model of limb growth based on experimental data that can be used to better characterize limb tissue movement in space and time. The model shows that the distribution and shapes of clones can be described as a combination of anisotropic growth with isotropic cell mixing, without the need for lineage compartmentalization along the AP and PD axis. Lastly, we show that this comprehensive description can be used to reassess spatio-temporal gene regulations taking tissue movement into account and to investigate PD patterning hypothesis.

  9. Re-examining the Role of Transport Infrastructure in Trade, Regional Growth and Governance: Comparing the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS and Central Eastern Europe (CEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bafoil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to question the hypothesis of the role of transport infrastructures in regional economic growth by comparing Central Eastern Europe (supported by the EU structural and cohesion funds and the Greater Mekong Subregion (mainly supported by the “economic corridors” of the ADB. Three main components of trade efficiency are scrutinized and compared: (1 the historical development of trade agreements, (2 the supra-national (regional capacity of trade regulation, and (3 the micro level of governance between the different actors involved in trade. The comparison between CEE and the GMS is all the more warranted because of two paradoxes that need to be explained: The first one results from the existing link between transport and growth in the case of the GMS, and the lack of a link in the case of CEE. The second paradox insists on the fact that despite their very different institutional frameworks, both subregions continue to face similar challenges concerning the implementation of trade agreements and the exchange of facilities at the local level – pointing towards the issue of governance.

  10. Clonal multiplication of guava through softwood cuttings under mist conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kareem, A.; Jaskkani, M.J.; Fatima, B.; Sadia, B.

    2012-01-01

    Guava (psidium guajava l.) is a luscious and important tropical fruit crop. the objective of the study was to develop vegetative propagation system to avoid clonal degradation in guava fruit plants. softwood cuttings from five year old gola accession were prepared from the shoot tops of current season growth, measuring 12 cm in length and carrying 2 to 4 nodes. iba and naa (0, 2000, 4000, 6000, 8000 ppm) were selected to treat cuttings for root induction. cuttings were planted under mist conditions by maintaining temperature at 25 degree c and 85% relative humidity for 25 days. maximum survival percentage (92.17%) of plants at transplanting was noted with 4000 ppm concentration followed by 2000 ppm (85.50%). In general iba 4000 ppm concentration performed better as compared to naa for all parameters studied. This study revealed the potential of clonal propagation of guava through softwood cuttings treated with auxins. (author)

  11. Plant Clonal Integration Mediates the Horizontal Redistribution of Soil Resources, Benefiting Neighboring Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Liu, Zhi-Lan; Gao, Shu-Qin; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Feng-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor) microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient) microsites and subsequently used by neighbor plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbors. The isotopes [(15)N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighboring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighboring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighboring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes.

  12. Plant clonal integration mediates the horizontal redistribution of soil resources, benefiting neighbouring plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehua eYe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient microsites and subsequently used by neighbour plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbours. The isotopes [15N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighbouring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighbouring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighbouring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes.

  13. The relative importance of intrinsic and extrinsic drivers to population growth vary among local populations of Greater Sage-Grouse: An integrated population modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Prochazka, Brian G.; Ricca, Mark A.; Halstead, Brian J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Blomberg, Erik J.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Wiechman, Lief; Tebbenkamp, Joel; Gardner, Scott C.; Reese, Kerry P.

    2018-01-01

    Consideration of ecological scale is fundamental to understanding and managing avian population growth and decline. Empirically driven models for population dynamics and demographic processes across multiple spatial scales can be powerful tools to help guide conservation actions. Integrated population models (IPMs) provide a framework for better parameter estimation by unifying multiple sources of data (e.g., count and demographic data). Hierarchical structure within such models that include random effects allow for varying degrees of data sharing across different spatiotemporal scales. We developed an IPM to investigate Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) on the border of California and Nevada, known as the Bi-State Distinct Population Segment. Our analysis integrated 13 years of lek count data (n > 2,000) and intensive telemetry (VHF and GPS; n > 350 individuals) data across 6 subpopulations. Specifically, we identified the most parsimonious models among varying random effects and density-dependent terms for each population vital rate (e.g., nest survival). Using a joint likelihood process, we integrated the lek count data with the demographic models to estimate apparent abundance and refine vital rate parameter estimates. To investigate effects of climatic conditions, we extended the model to fit a precipitation covariate for instantaneous rate of change (r). At a metapopulation extent (i.e. Bi-State), annual population rate of change λ (er) did not favor an overall increasing or decreasing trend through the time series. However, annual changes in λ were driven by changes in precipitation (one-year lag effect). At subpopulation extents, we identified substantial variation in λ and demographic rates. One subpopulation clearly decoupled from the trend at the metapopulation extent and exhibited relatively high risk of extinction as a result of low egg fertility. These findings can inform localized, targeted management actions for specific areas

  14. Clonal proliferation of multipotent stem/progenitor cells in the neonatal and adult salivary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Teruki; Takao, Tukasa; Fujita, Kiyohide; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Salivary gland stem/progenitor cells are thought to be present in intercalated ductal cells, but the fact is unclear. In this study, we sought to clarify if stem/progenitor cells are present in submandibular glands using colony assay, which is one of the stem cell assay methods. Using a low-density culture of submandibular gland cells of neonatal rats, we developed a novel culture system that promotes single cell colony formation. Average doubling time for the colony-forming cells was 24.7 (SD = ±7.02) h, indicating high proliferative potency. When epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) were added to the medium, the number of clonal colonies increased greater than those cultured without growth factors (13.2 ± 4.18 vs. 4.5 ± 1.73). The RT-PCR and immunostaining demonstrated expressing acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cell lineage markers. This study demonstrated the presence of the salivary gland stem/progenitor cells that are highly proliferative and multipotent in salivary glands

  15. Clonal evolution following chemotherapy-induced stem cell depletion in cats heterozygous for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abkowitz, J.L.; Ott, R.M.; Holly, R.D.; Adamson, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The number of hematopoietic stem cells necessary to support normal hematopoiesis is not known but may be small. If so, the depletion or damage of such cells could result in apparent clonal dominance. To test this hypothesis, dimethylbusulfan [2 to 4 mg/kg intravenously (IV) x 3] was given to cats heterozygous for the X-linked enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD). These cats were the daughters of domestic X Geoffroy parents. After the initial drug-induced cytopenias (2 to 4 weeks), peripheral blood counts and the numbers of marrow progenitors detected in culture remained normal, although the percentages of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) in DNA synthesis increased, as determined by the tritiated thymidine suicide technique. In three of six cats treated, a dominance of Geoffroy-type G-6-PD emerged among the progenitor cells, granulocytes, and RBCs. These skewed ratios of domestic to Geoffroy-type G-6-PD have persisted greater than 3 years. No changes in cell cycle kinetics or G-6-PD phenotypes were noted in similar studies in six control cats. These data suggest that clonal evolution may reflect the depletion or damage of normal stem cells and not only the preferential growth and dominance of neoplastic cells

  16. Latest Rate, Extent, and Temporal Evolution of Growth Faulting over Greater Houston Region Revealed by Multi- Band InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, F.; Lu, Z.; Kim, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Growth faults are common and continue to evolve throughout the unconsolidated sediments of Greater Houston (GH) region in Texas. Presence of faults can induce localized surface displacements, aggravate localized subsidence, and discontinue the integrity of ground water flow. Property damages due to fault creep have become more evident during the past few years over the GH area, portraying the necessity of further study of these faults. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been proven to be effective in mapping creep along and/or across faults. However, extracting a short wavelength, as well as small amplitude of the creep signal (about 10-20 mm/year) from long time span interferograms is extremely difficult, especially in agricultural or vegetated areas. This paper aims to map and monitor the latest rate, extent, and temporal evolution of faulting at a highest spatial density over GH region using an improved Multi-temporal InSAR (MTI) technique. The method, with maximized usable signal and correlation, has the ability to identify and monitor the active faults to provide an accurate and elaborate image of the faults. In this study, two neighboring ALOS tracks and Sentinel-1A datasets are used. Many zones of steep phase gradients and/or discontinuities have been recognized from the long term velocity maps by both ALOS (2007-2011) and Sentinei-1A (2015-2017) imagery. Not only those previously known faults position but also the new fault traces that have not been mapped by other techniques are imaged by our MTI technique. Fault damage and visible cracking of ground were evident at most locations through our field survey. The discovery of new fault activation, or faults moved from earlier locations is a part of the Big Barn Fault and Conroe fault system, trending from southwest to northeast between Hockley and Conroe. The location of area of subsidence over GH is also shrinking and migrating toward the northeast (Montgomery County) after 2000. The

  17. Clonal splitters and integrators in harsh environments of the Trans-Himalaya

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Leoš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2008), s. 351-367 ISSN 0269-7653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/1219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Ladakh * altitude * clonal growth Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.448, year: 2008

  18. Production and carbon allocation in a clonal Eucalyptus plantation with water and nutrient manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Luiz Stape; Dan Binkley; Michael G. Ryan

    2008-01-01

    We examined resource limitations on growth and carbon allocation in a fast-growing, clonal plantation of Eucalyptus grandis urophylla in Brazil by characterizing responses to annual rainfall, and response to irrigation and fertililization for 2 years. Productivity measures included gross primary production (GPP), total belowground carbon allocation (...

  19. Searching for the relevance of clonal and bud bank traits across floras and communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; de Bello, Francesco; Herben, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, 2-3 (2011), 109-115 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0963; GA ČR GA526/07/0808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : clonal growth * bud bank * database Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.500, year: 2011

  20. Analysis, Assessment and Modeling of The Urban Growth in Greater Muscat, Sultanate of Oman, Using Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Awadhi, T.

    2008-01-01

    Muscat Governorate is the main governorate in the Sultanate of Oman and at the same time, it is the capital of the country. The urban of Muscat expanded on the area rapidly. So, the process of the growth, the controlling factors and the side problems which become apparent need to be highlighted. In order to determine the urban growth between 1960 and 2003, multi data sources and techniques have been used under a GIS environment. This research aims to measure and to model the urban expansion of Muscat Governorate using the combined technologies of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS). Based on the detailed datasets and knowledge of historical land use maps attempts were made to simulate future growth patterns of the city. The outcome of this exercise was the design of six urban growth maps covering the years 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2003. The results show that the total urban expansion reached more than 650% between 1960 and 2003, with an annual growth rate of approximately 20%. A combination of human and physical factors controlled this rapid growth. The paper discusses also the current urban problems resulting from this rapid growth as well as its future spatial trends

  1. More features, greater connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Changes in our political infrastructure, the continuing frailties of our economy, and a stark growth in population, have greatly impacted upon the perceived stability of the NHS. Healthcare teams have had to adapt to these changes, and so too have the technologies upon which they rely to deliver first-class patient care. Here Sarah Hunt, marketing co-ordinator at Aid Call, assesses how the changing healthcare environment has affected one of its fundamental technologies - the nurse call system, argues the case for wireless such systems in terms of what the company claims is greater adaptability to changing needs, and considers the ever-wider range of features and functions available from today's nurse call equipment, particularly via connectivity with both mobile devices, and ancillaries ranging from enuresis sensors to staff attack alert 'badges'.

  2. Clonal proliferation of cultured nonmalignant and malignant human breast epithelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.S.; Lan, S.; Ceriani, R.; Hackett, A.J.; Stampfer, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    We have developed a method for clonal growth of human mammary epithelial cells of both nonmalignant and malignant origin. Plating efficiencies of 1 to 50% were obtained by seeding second-passage mammary epithelial cells on fibroblast feeder layers in an enriched medium composed of various hormones and growth factors, as well as conditioned media from three specific human cell lines. Single mammary epithelial cells seeded sparsely onto the fibroblasts underwent at least eight population doublings to form large, readily visible colonies. Optimal colony formation required both feeder cells and the enriched medium. Epithelial colonies containing at least 16 cells were visible 5 days postseeding, and these colonies continued to grow progressively. Plating efficiency and colony size were similar on ultraviolet-irradiated or nonirradiated fibroblasts. The number of colonies formed was proportional to the number of epithelial cells plated. The colonies were identified as epithelial by the presence of human mammary epithelial antigens

  3. Quality improvement in Vignoles through clonal selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to select an improved, loose-clustered clone of Vignoles that will contribute to an integrated approach to disease control. Clonal selection has historically proven useful in reducing cluster compactness through a variety of mechanisms, including decreased berry size, lengthening of the ...

  4. Clonality analysis of lymphoid proliferations using the BIOMED-2 clonality assays: a single institution experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokovic, Ira; Novakovic, Barbara Jezersek; Cerkovnik, Petra; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonality determination in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders can improve the final diagnosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the applicative value of standardized BIOMED-2 gene clonality assay protocols for the analysis of clonality of lymphocytes in a group of different lymphoid proliferations. Materials and methods. With this purpose, 121 specimens from 91 patients with suspected lymphoproliferations submitted for routine diagnostics from January to December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. According to the final diagnosis, our series comprised 32 cases of B-cell lymphomas, 38 cases of non-Hodgkin’s T-cell lymphomas and 51 cases of reactive lymphoid proliferations. Clonality testing was performed using the BIOMED-2 clonality assays. Results The determined sensitivity of the TCR assay was 91.9%, while the sensitivity of the IGH assay was 74.2%. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 73.3% in the group of lymphomas and 87.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the TCR assay was 62.5% in the group of lymphomas and 54.3% in the group of reactive lesions. Conclusions In the present study, we confirmed the utility of standardized BIOMED-2 clonality assays for the detection of clonality in a routine diagnostical setting of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. Reactions for the detection of the complete IGH rearrangements and reactions for the detection of the TCR rearrangements are a good choice for clonality testing of a wide range of lymphoid proliferations and specimen types while the reactions for the detection of incomplete IGH rearrangements have not shown any additional diagnostic value. PMID:24991205

  5. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-07-21

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1 Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  7. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Laskey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings.

  8. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of γ-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after γ-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRβ locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4 + CD8 + double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as γH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  9. Noise-Driven Phenotypic Heterogeneity with Finite Correlation Time in Clonal Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UnJin Lee

    Full Text Available There has been increasing awareness in the wider biological community of the role of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity in playing key roles in phenomena such as cellular bet-hedging and decision making, as in the case of the phage-λ lysis/lysogeny and B. Subtilis competence/vegetative pathways. Here, we report on the effect of stochasticity in growth rate, cellular memory/intermittency, and its relation to phenotypic heterogeneity. We first present a linear stochastic differential model with finite auto-correlation time, where a randomly fluctuating growth rate with a negative average is shown to result in exponential growth for sufficiently large fluctuations in growth rate. We then present a non-linear stochastic self-regulation model where the loss of coherent self-regulation and an increase in noise can induce a shift from bounded to unbounded growth. An important consequence of these models is that while the average change in phenotype may not differ for various parameter sets, the variance of the resulting distributions may considerably change. This demonstrates the necessity of understanding the influence of variance and heterogeneity within seemingly identical clonal populations, while providing a mechanism for varying functional consequences of such heterogeneity. Our results highlight the importance of a paradigm shift from a deterministic to a probabilistic view of clonality in understanding selection as an optimization problem on noise-driven processes, resulting in a wide range of biological implications, from robustness to environmental stress to the development of drug resistance.

  10. Drug hypersensitivity in clonal mast cell disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonadonna, P; Pagani, M; Aberer, W

    2015-01-01

    and severity of immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Mastocytosis in adults is associated with a history of anaphylaxis in 22-49%. Fatal anaphylaxis has been described particularly following hymenoptera stings, but also occasionally after the intake of drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs......, opioids and drugs in the perioperative setting. However, data on the frequency of drug hypersensitivity in mastocytosis and vice versa are scarce and evidence for an association appears to be limited. Nevertheless, clonal MC disorders should be ruled out in cases of severe anaphylaxis: basal serum...... tryptase determination, physical examination for cutaneous mastocytosis lesions, and clinical characteristics of anaphylactic reaction might be useful for differential diagnosis. In this position paper, the ENDA group performed a literature search on immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions in clonal MC...

  11. Metabolic heterogeneity in clonal microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takhaveev, Vakil; Heinemann, Matthias

    2018-02-21

    In the past decades, numerous instances of phenotypic diversity were observed in clonal microbial populations, particularly, on the gene expression level. Much less is, however, known about phenotypic differences that occur on the level of metabolism. This is likely explained by the fact that experimental tools probing metabolism of single cells are still at an early stage of development. Here, we review recent exciting discoveries that point out different causes for metabolic heterogeneity within clonal microbial populations. These causes range from ecological factors and cell-inherent dynamics in constant environments to molecular noise in gene expression that propagates into metabolism. Furthermore, we provide an overview of current methods to quantify the levels of metabolites and biomass components in single cells. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Clonal theory of radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    In some cases, usually involving high-LET radiations, the dose response at low doses follows a power function of dose with exponent less than one over a wide dose range. This type of response is of great interest since (a) it implies greater effect per unit dose at progressively smaller doses, and (b) it is not predicted by most models and theories of radiobiology. A theoretical framework is presented for responses having the above characteristics over a dose range extending over a factor of 1000. The model postulates precursor cells which occur in clones. Different numbers of precursor cells per clone are assumed. Suitable transformation of a single cell in a clone completes initiation of that clone and raises the probability of tumor formation. At low doses, clones with large numbers of cells at risk have relatively high probability of response. However, depletion of the number of untransformed large clones with increasing dose leaves primarily untransformed smaller clones with smaller probability of response per unit dose. The analytical results demonstrate that power functions with exponent less than one can result even for doses so small that the mean number of charged particle traversals per cell is much less than one. The results also demonstrate that response functions may change from nearly approx. D/sup 0.4/ to nearly linear as linear energy transfer (LET) of the charged particle secondaries decreases

  13. The Greater Impact of Mergers on the Growth of Massive Galaxies: Implications for Mass Assembly and Evolution since z sime 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Kevin; Fukugita, Masataka; Ellis, Richard S.; Targett, Thomas A.; Belli, Sirio; Kodama, Tadayuki

    2009-06-01

    Using deep infrared observations conducted with the MOIRCS imager on the Subaru Telescope in the northern GOODS field combined with public surveys in GOODS-S, we investigate the dependence on stellar mass, M *, and galaxy type of the close pair fraction (5 h -1 kpc implied merger rate. In terms of combined depth and survey area, our publicly available mass-limited sample represents a significant improvement over earlier infrared surveys used for this purpose. In common with some recent studies, we find that the fraction of paired systems that could result in major mergers is low (~4%) and does not increase significantly with redshift to z ≈ 1.2, with vprop(1 + z)1.6±1.6. Our key finding is that massive galaxies with M *>1011 M sun are more likely to host merging companions than less massive systems (M * ~ 1010 M sun). We find evidence for a higher pair fraction for red, spheroidal hosts compared to blue, late-type systems, in line with expectations based on clustering at small scales. The so-called "dry" mergers between early-type galaxies devoid of star formation (SF) represent nearly 50% of close pairs with M *>3 × 1010 M sun at z ~ 0.5, but less than 30% at z ~ 1. This result can be explained by the increasing abundance of red, early-type galaxies at these masses. We compare the volumetric merger rate of galaxies with different masses to mass-dependent trends in galaxy evolution. Our results reaffirm the conclusion of Bundy et al. that major mergers do not fully account for the formation of spheroidal galaxies since z ~ 1. In terms of mass assembly, major mergers contribute little to galaxy growth below M * ~ 3 × 1010 M sun but play a more significant role among galaxies with M * gsim 1011 M sun ~ 30% of which have undergone mostly dry mergers over the observed redshift range. Overall, the relatively rapid and recent coalescence of high-mass galaxies mirrors the expected hierarchical growth of halos and is consistent with recent model predictions, even if

  14. Spatial heterogeneity in light supply affects intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity in light supply is common in nature. Many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous light supply on growth, morphology, physiology and biomass allocation of clonal plants, but few have tested those effects on intraspecific competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we grew one (no competition or nine ramets (with intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous clonal plant, Duchesnea indica, in three homogeneous light conditions (high, medium and low light intensity and two heterogeneous ones differing in patch size (large and small patch treatments. The total light in the two heterogeneous treatments was the same as that in the homogeneous medium light treatment. Both decreasing light intensity and intraspecific competition significantly decreased the growth (biomass, number of ramets and total stolon length of D. indica. As compared with the homogeneous medium light treatment, the large patch treatment significantly increased the growth of D. indica without intraspecific competition. However, the growth of D. indica with competition did not differ among the homogeneous medium light, the large and the small patch treatments. Consequently, light heterogeneity significantly increased intraspecific competition intensity, as measured by the decreased log response ratio. These results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in light supply can alter intraspecific interactions of clonal plants.

  15. Recent advances in understanding clonal haematopoiesis in aplastic anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Natasha; Olson, Timothy S; Babushok, Daria V

    2017-05-01

    Acquired aplastic anaemia (AA) is an immune-mediated bone marrow failure disorder inextricably linked to clonal haematopoiesis. The majority of AA patients have somatic mutations and/or structural chromosomal abnormalities detected as early as at diagnosis. In contrast to other conditions linked to clonal haematopoiesis, the clonal signature of AA reflects its immune pathophysiology. The most common alterations are clonal expansions of cells lacking glycophosphotidylinositol-anchored proteins, loss of human leucocyte antigen alleles, and mutations in BCOR/BCORL1, ASXL1 and DNMT3A. Here, we present the current knowledge of clonal haematopoiesis in AA as it relates to aging, inherited bone marrow failure, and the grey-zone overlap of AA and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We conclude by discussing the significance of clonal haematopoiesis both for improved diagnosis of AA, as well as for a more precise, personalized approach to prognostication of outcomes and therapy choices. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Clonal integration supports the expansion from terrestrial to aquatic environments of the amphibious stoloniferous herb Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N; Yu, F-H; Li, P-X; He, W-M; Liu, J; Yu, G-L; Song, Y-B; Dong, M

    2009-05-01

    Effects of clonal integration on land plants have been extensively studied, but little is known about the role in amphibious plants that expand from terrestrial to aquatic conditions. We simulated expansion from terrestrial to aquatic habitats in the amphibious stoloniferous alien invasive alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) by growing basal ramets of clonal fragments in soils connected (allowing integration) or disconnected (preventing integration) to the apical ramets of the same fragments submerged in water to a depth of 0, 5, 10 or 15 cm. Clonal integration significantly increased growth and clonal reproduction of the apical ramets, but decreased both of these characteristics in basal ramets. Consequently, integration did not affect the performance of whole clonal fragments. We propose that alligator weed possesses a double-edged mechanism during population expansion: apical ramets in aquatic habitats can increase growth through connected basal parts in terrestrial habitats; however, once stolon connections with apical ramets are lost by external disturbance, the basal ramets in terrestrial habitats increase stolon and ramet production for rapid spreading. This may contribute greatly to the invasiveness of alligator weed and also make it very adaptable to habitats with heavy disturbance and/or highly heterogeneous resource supply.

  17. Effects of Cu Pollution on the Expansion of an Amphibious Clonal Herb in Aquatic-Terrestrial Ecotones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xu

    Full Text Available Physiological integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants in aquatic and terrestrial heterogeneous habitats and associated ecotones. Similar to nutrients, pollutants may be transported among connected ramets via physiological integration. Few studies have examined the expansion of amphibious clonal plants from terrestrial to aquatic environments, particularly when the local water supply is polluted with heavy metals. A greenhouse experiment was conducted using the amphibious plant Alternanthera philoxeroides to determine whether Cu can spread among clonal plants and examine the corresponding effects of this pollution on the expansion of clonal plants in aquatic-terrestrial ecotones. Ramets from the same clonal fragments were rooted in unpolluted soil and polluted water at five different levels. The responses of the ramets in terrestrial and aquatic habitats were quantified via traits associated with growth, morphology and Cu accumulation. The results indicated that ramets in soil and water significantly differed in nearly all of these traits. The expansion of populations from terrestrial to polluted aquatic habitats was facilitated by stem elongation rather than new ramet production. The accumulated Cu in polluted ramets can be horizontally transported to other ramets in soil via connected stolons. In terms of clonal growth patterns, variations in Cu pollution intensity were negatively correlated with variations in the morphological and growth traits of ramets in polluted aquatic habitats and unpolluted soil. We concluded that Cu ions are distributed among the clones and accumulated in different ramet tissues in heterogeneous habitats. Therefore, we suggest that Cu pollution of aquatic-terrestrial ecotones, especially at high levels, can affect the growth and expansion of the whole clones because Cu ions are shared between integrated ramets.

  18. Effects of Cu Pollution on the Expansion of an Amphibious Clonal Herb in Aquatic-Terrestrial Ecotones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Zhou, Zhen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Physiological integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants in aquatic and terrestrial heterogeneous habitats and associated ecotones. Similar to nutrients, pollutants may be transported among connected ramets via physiological integration. Few studies have examined the expansion of amphibious clonal plants from terrestrial to aquatic environments, particularly when the local water supply is polluted with heavy metals. A greenhouse experiment was conducted using the amphibious plant Alternanthera philoxeroides to determine whether Cu can spread among clonal plants and examine the corresponding effects of this pollution on the expansion of clonal plants in aquatic-terrestrial ecotones. Ramets from the same clonal fragments were rooted in unpolluted soil and polluted water at five different levels. The responses of the ramets in terrestrial and aquatic habitats were quantified via traits associated with growth, morphology and Cu accumulation. The results indicated that ramets in soil and water significantly differed in nearly all of these traits. The expansion of populations from terrestrial to polluted aquatic habitats was facilitated by stem elongation rather than new ramet production. The accumulated Cu in polluted ramets can be horizontally transported to other ramets in soil via connected stolons. In terms of clonal growth patterns, variations in Cu pollution intensity were negatively correlated with variations in the morphological and growth traits of ramets in polluted aquatic habitats and unpolluted soil. We concluded that Cu ions are distributed among the clones and accumulated in different ramet tissues in heterogeneous habitats. Therefore, we suggest that Cu pollution of aquatic-terrestrial ecotones, especially at high levels, can affect the growth and expansion of the whole clones because Cu ions are shared between integrated ramets.

  19. Endothelial progenitor cells display clonal restriction in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, Marc; Özçelik, Tayfun; Bağişlar, Sevgi; Vakil, Varsha; Smith, Eric LP; Dai, Kezhi; Akyerli, Cemaliye B; Batuman, Olcay A

    2006-01-01

    In multiple myeloma (MM), increased neoangiogenesis contributes to tumor growth and disease progression. Increased levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to neoangiogenesis in MM, and, importantly, covary with disease activity and response to treatment. In order to understand the mechanisms responsible for increased EPC levels and neoangiogenic function in MM, we investigated whether these cells were clonal by determining X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) patterns in female patients by a human androgen receptor assay (HUMARA). In addition, EPCs and bone marrow cells were studied for the presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) gene rearrangement, which indicates clonality in B cells; thus, its presence in EPCs would indicate a close genetic link between tumor cells in MM and endothelial cells that provide tumor neovascularization. A total of twenty-three consecutive patients who had not received chemotherapy were studied. Screening in 18 patients found that 11 displayed allelic AR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and these patients were further studied for XCI patterns in EPCs and hair root cells by HUMARA. In 2 patients whose EPCs were clonal by HUMARA, and in an additional 5 new patients, EPCs were studied for IGH gene rearrangement using PCR with family-specific primers for IGH variable genes (V H ). In 11 patients, analysis of EPCs by HUMARA revealed significant skewing (≥ 77% expression of a single allele) in 64% (n = 7). In 4 of these patients, XCI skewing was extreme (≥ 90% expression of a single allele). In contrast, XCI in hair root cells was random. Furthermore, PCR amplification with V H primers resulted in amplification of the same product in EPCs and bone marrow cells in 71% (n = 5) of 7 patients, while no IGH rearrangement was found in EPCs from healthy controls. In addition, in patients with XCI skewing in EPCs, advanced age was associated with poorer clinical status, unlike patients whose EPCs had random XCI

  20. Transgenerational plasticity as an important mechanism affecting response of clonal species to changing climate

    OpenAIRE

    M?nzbergov?, Zuzana; Hadincov?, V?roslava

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In spite of the increasing number of studies on the importance of transgenerational plasticity for species response to novel environments, its effects on species ability to respond to climate change are still largely unexplored. We study the importance of transgenerational plasticity for response of a clonal species Festuca rubra. Individuals from four natural populations representing two levels of temperature and two levels of precipitation were cultivated in four growth chambers th...

  1. The evolutionary ecology of clonally propagated domesticated plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKey, Doyle; Elias, Marianne; Pujol, Benoît; Duputié, Anne

    2010-04-01

    While seed-propagated crops have contributed many evolutionary insights, evolutionary biologists have often neglected clonally propagated crops. We argue that widespread notions about their evolution under domestication are oversimplified, and that they offer rich material for evolutionary studies. The diversity of their wild ancestors, the diverse ecologies of the crop populations themselves, and the intricate mix of selection pressures, acting not only on the parts harvested but also on the parts used by humans to make clonal propagules, result in complex and diverse evolutionary trajectories under domestication. We examine why farmers propagate some plants clonally, and discuss the evolutionary dynamics of sexual reproduction in clonal crops. We explore how their mixed clonal/sexual reproductive systems function, based on the sole example studied in detail, cassava (Manihot esculenta). Biotechnology is now expanding the number of clonal crops, continuing the 10 000-yr-old trend to increase crop yields by propagating elite genotypes. In an era of rapid global change, it is more important than ever to understand how the adaptive potential of clonal crops can be maintained. A key component of strategies for preserving this adaptive potential is the maintenance of mixed clonal/sexual systems, which can be achieved by encouraging and valuing farmer knowledge about the sexual reproductive biology of their clonal crops.

  2. Morphological response to competition for light in the clonal Trifolium repens (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittebiere, Anne-Kristel; Renaud, Nolwenn; Clément, Bernard; Mony, Cendrine

    2012-04-01

    Plant communities in temperate zones are dominated by clonal plants that can plastically modify their growth characteristics in response to competition. Given that plants compete with one another, and the implications this has for species coexistence, we conducted a study to assess how clonal species morphologically respond to competition for light depending on its intensity and heterogeneity, which are determined by the competitor species. We assessed the morphological response to competition for light of the clonal species Trifolium repens L. by measuring its growth performance, and vertical and horizontal growth traits. We used five competitive environments, i.e., one without competitor and four differing by their competitor species creating different conditions of competition intensity and heterogeneity. The morphological response of Trifolium repens to competition for light depended on the competitor identity. Competition intensity and heterogeneity, determined by competitor identity, had an interactive effect on most traits. The increase in petiole elongation and specific leaf area due to increased competition intensity was observed only at low to intermediate competition heterogeneity. Competition heterogeneity promoted the elongation of clone connections allowing space exploration. Our results demonstrated that the intensity and heterogeneity of competition, which depended on competitor identity, are of primary importance in determining the plastic response of Trifolium repens. This emphasizes that it is important to consider the fine-scale spatial distribution of individuals when studying their interactions within plant communities.

  3. Effect of clonal integration on nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere of rhizomatous clonal plant, Phyllostachys bissetii, under heterogeneous light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Jing-Song; Xue, Ge; Peng, Yuanying; Song, Hui-Xing

    2018-07-01

    Clonal integration plays an important role in clonal plant adapting to heterogeneous habitats. It was postulated that clonal integration could exhibit positive effects on nitrogen cycling in the rhizosphere of clonal plant subjected to heterogeneous light conditions. An in-situ experiment was conducted using clonal fragments of Phyllostachys bissetii with two successive ramets. Shading treatments were applied to offspring or mother ramets, respectively, whereas counterparts were treated to full sunlight. Rhizomes between two successive ramets were either severed or connected. Extracellular enzyme activities and nitrogen turnover were measured, as well as soil properties. Abundance of functional genes (archaeal or bacterial amoA, nifH) in the rhizosphere of shaded, offspring or mother ramets were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Carbon or nitrogen availabilities were significantly influenced by clonal integration in the rhizosphere of shaded ramets. Clonal integration significantly increased extracellular enzyme activities and abundance of functional genes in the rhizosphere of shaded ramets. When rhizomes were connected, higher nitrogen turnover (nitrogen mineralization or nitrification rates) was exhibited in the rhizosphere of shaded offspring ramets. However, nitrogen turnover was significantly decreased by clonal integration in the rhizosphere of shaded mother ramets. Path analysis indicated that nitrogen turnover in the rhizosphere of shaded, offspring or mother ramets were primarily driven by the response of soil microorganisms to dissolved organic carbon or nitrogen. This unique in-situ experiment provided insights into the mechanism of nutrient recycling mediated by clonal integration. It was suggested that effects of clonal integration on the rhizosphere microbial processes were dependent on direction of photosynthates transport in clonal plant subjected to heterogeneous light conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. On the ecological genetics of the clonal perennial Agrostis stolonifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, Christoffel

    1987-01-01

    There have to date been few studies specifically addressed to the evolution of clonal organisms. The present study attempts to fill this gap and aims to analyse the distribution pattern of a clonal plant species, using the wide-spread grass Agrostis stolonifera L.(Creeping Bent) as a model species.

  5. Introduction to special issue on the ecology of clonal plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gross, K. L.; Herben, T.; Klimešová, Jitka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3-4 (2017), s. 265-267 ISSN 1211-9520 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Introduction to special issue * clonal plants * clonal meeting Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 1.017, year: 2016

  6. Stomatal characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis clonal hybrids in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the stomatal response occurring during water stress and subsequent recovery of three Eucalyptus grandis clonal hybrids. The aim was to investigate the degree to which stomatal conductance (gs) and stomatal density differ between the clonal hybrids across seasons and in response to water stress.

  7. Insights in Anaphylaxis and Clonal Mast Cell Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David González-de-Olano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of anaphylaxis among patients with clonal mast cell disorders (MCD is clearly higher comparing to the general population. Due to a lower frequency of symptoms outside of acute episodes, clonal MCD in the absence of skin lesions might sometimes be difficult to identify which may lead to underdiagnosis, and anaphylaxis is commonly the presenting symptom in these patients. Although the release of mast cell (MC mediators upon MC activation might present with a wide variety of symptoms, particular clinical features typically characterize MC mediator release episodes in patients with clonal MCD without skin involvement. Final diagnosis requires a bone marrow study, and it is recommended that this should be done in reference centers. In this article, we address the main triggers for anaphylaxis, risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of patients with MC activation syndromes (MCASs, with special emphasis on clonal MCAS [systemic mastocytosis and mono(clonal MC activations syndromes].

  8. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissy, A. Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J. H.; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K.; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L.; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L.; Lee, John J. Y.; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C.; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K. A.; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y.; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D.; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C.; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E.; Fults, Daniel W.; Walter, Andrew W.; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V. Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H.; Garvin, James H.; Stearns, Duncan S.; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E.; Tirapelli, Daniela P. C.; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R.; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Clifford, Steven C.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Cooper, Michael K.; Packer, Roger J.; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weiss, William A.; Collier, Lara S.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Largaespada, David A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon–driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with ‘humanized’ in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  9. Clonal growth and sexual reproduction: tradeoffs and environmental constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Šerá, Božena; Klimešová, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 4 (2015), s. 469-475 ISSN 0030-1299 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G; GA ČR GAP505/12/1296; GA ČR GA13-17118S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : phylogenetics analysis * anginosperms * evolution Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (UEK-B) Impact factor: 3.586, year: 2015

  10. Distribution of clonal growth traits among wetland habitats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosnová, Monika; van Diggelen, R.; Macek, Petr; Klimešová, Jitka

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 2 (2011), 88-93 ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/08/H044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : functional traits * The Netherlands * wetland habitats Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.516, year: 2011

  11. Effects of Clonal Reproduction on Evolutionary Lag and Evolutionary Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orive, Maria E; Barfield, Michael; Fernandez, Carlos; Holt, Robert D

    2017-10-01

    Evolutionary lag-the difference between mean and optimal phenotype in the current environment-is of keen interest in light of rapid environmental change. Many ecologically important organisms have life histories that include stage structure and both sexual and clonal reproduction, yet how stage structure and clonality interplay to govern a population's rate of evolution and evolutionary lag is unknown. Effects of clonal reproduction on mean phenotype partition into two portions: one that is phenotype dependent, and another that is genotype dependent. This partitioning is governed by the association between the nonadditive genetic plus random environmental component of phenotype of clonal offspring and their parents. While clonality slows phenotypic evolution toward an optimum, it can dramatically increase population survival after a sudden step change in optimal phenotype. Increased adult survival slows phenotypic evolution but facilitates population survival after a step change; this positive effect can, however, be lost given survival-fecundity trade-offs. Simulations indicate that the benefits of increased clonality under environmental change greatly depend on the nature of that change: increasing population persistence under a step change while decreasing population persistence under a continuous linear change requiring de novo variation. The impact of clonality on the probability of persistence for species in a changing world is thus inexorably linked to the temporal texture of the change they experience.

  12. Greater autonomy at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.L.D.

    2004-01-01

    In the past 10 years, workers in the Netherlands increasingly report more decision-making power in their work. This is important for an economy in recession and where workers face greater work demands. It makes work more interesting, creates a healthier work environment, and provides opportunities

  13. ClonEvol: clonal ordering and visualization in cancer sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H X; White, B S; Foltz, S M; Miller, C A; Luo, J; Fields, R C; Maher, C A

    2017-12-01

    Reconstruction of clonal evolution is critical for understanding tumor progression and implementing personalized therapies. This is often done by clustering somatic variants based on their cellular prevalence estimated via bulk tumor sequencing of multiple samples. The clusters, consisting of the clonal marker variants, are then ordered based on their estimated cellular prevalence to reconstruct clonal evolution trees, a process referred to as 'clonal ordering'. However, cellular prevalence estimate is confounded by statistical variability and errors in sequencing/data analysis, and therefore inhibits accurate reconstruction of the clonal evolution. This problem is further complicated by intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, the field lacks a comprehensive visualization tool to facilitate the interpretation of complex clonal relationships. To address these challenges we developed ClonEvol, a unified software tool for clonal ordering, visualization, and interpretation. ClonEvol uses a bootstrap resampling technique to estimate the cellular fraction of the clones and probabilistically models the clonal ordering constraints to account for statistical variability. The bootstrapping allows identification of the sample founding- and sub-clones, thus enabling interpretation of clonal seeding. ClonEvol automates the generation of multiple widely used visualizations for reconstructing and interpreting clonal evolution. ClonEvol outperformed three of the state of the art tools (LICHeE, Canopy and PhyloWGS) for clonal evolution inference, showing more robust error tolerance and producing more accurate trees in a simulation. Building upon multiple recent publications that utilized ClonEvol to study metastasis and drug resistance in solid cancers, here we show that ClonEvol rediscovered relapsed subclones in two published acute myeloid leukemia patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that through noninvasive monitoring ClonEvol recapitulated the emerging subclones

  14. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: clonality and diversity within and between foci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig W Duffy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are unusual among pathogenic protozoa in that they can undergo their complete morphological life cycle in the tsetse fly vector with mating as a non-obligatory part of this development. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which infects humans and livestock in East and Southern Africa, has classically been described as a host-range variant of the non-human infective Trypanosoma brucei that occurs as stable clonal lineages. We have examined T. b. rhodesiense populations from East (Uganda and Southern (Malawi Africa using a panel of microsatellite markers, incorporating both spatial and temporal analyses. Our data demonstrate that Ugandan T. b. rhodesiense existed as clonal populations, with a small number of highly related genotypes and substantial linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci. However, these populations were not stable as the dominant genotypes changed and the genetic diversity also reduced over time. Thus these populations do not conform to one of the criteria for strict clonality, namely stability of predominant genotypes over time, and our results show that, in a period in the mid 1990s, the previously predominant genotypes were not detected but were replaced by a novel clonal population with limited genetic relationship to the original population present between 1970 and 1990. In contrast, the Malawi T. b. rhodesiense population demonstrated significantly greater diversity and evidence for frequent genetic exchange. Therefore, the population genetics of T. b. rhodesiense is more complex than previously described. This has important implications for the spread of the single copy T. b. rhodesiense gene that allows human infectivity, and therefore the epidemiology of the human disease, as well as suggesting that these parasites represent an important organism to study the influence of optional recombination upon population genetic dynamics.

  15. Genetic diversity in three invasive clonal aquatic species in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorrell Brian K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elodea canadensis, Egeria densa and Lagarosiphon major are dioecious clonal species which are invasive in New Zealand and other regions. Unlike many other invasive species, the genetic variation in New Zealand is very limited. Clonal reproduction is often considered an evolutionary dead end, even though a certain amount of genetic divergence may arise due to somatic mutations. The successful growth and establishment of invasive clonal species may be explained not by adaptability but by pre-existing ecological traits that prove advantageous in the new environment. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure in the North Island of New Zealand using AFLPs and related the findings to the number of introductions and the evolution that has occurred in the introduced area. Results Low levels of genetic diversity were found in all three species and appeared to be due to highly homogeneous founding gene pools. Elodea canadensis was introduced in 1868, and its populations showed more genetic structure than those of the more recently introduced of E. densa (1946 and L. major (1950. Elodea canadensis and L. major, however, had similar phylogeographic patterns, in spite of the difference in time since introduction. Conclusions The presence of a certain level of geographically correlated genetic structure in the absence of sexual reproduction, and in spite of random human dispersal of vegetative propagules, can be reasonably attributed to post-dispersal somatic mutations. Direct evidence of such evolutionary events is, however, still insufficient.

  16. Ribosomal DNA sequence analysis of different geographically distributed Aloe Vera plants: Comparison with clonally regenerated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, A.; Sato, Y.; Miwa, Y.; Kabbash, A.; Moustafa, S.; Shimomura, K.; El-Bassuony, A.

    2006-01-01

    A comparison of the sequences in an internally transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 region of rDNA between clonally regenerated A.vera and same species in Japan, USA and Egypt revealed the presence of two types of nucleotide sequences, 252 and 254 bps. Based on the findings in the ITS 1 region, A.vera having 252 and 254 bps clearly showed a stable sequence similarity, suggesting high conversation of the base peak sequence in the ITS 1 region. However, frequent base substitutions in the 252 bps samples leaves that came from callus tissue and micropropagated plants were observed around the regions of nucleotide positions 66, 99 and 199-201. The minor deviation in clonally regenerated A.vera may be due to the stage of regeneration and cell specification in cases of the callus tissue. In the present study, the base peak sequence of the Its 1 region of rDNA was adopted as a molecular marker for differentiating A.vera plants from geographically distributed and clonally regenerated A.vera plants and it was suggested that the base peak substitutions in the ITS 1 region may arise from the different nutritional and environmental factors in cultivation and plant growth stages. (author)

  17. Genetic diversity in three invasive clonal aquatic species in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Elodea canadensis, Egeria densa and Lagarosiphon major are dioecious clonal species which are invasive in New Zealand and other regions. Unlike many other invasive species, the genetic variation in New Zealand is very limited. Clonal reproduction is often considered an evolutionary dead end, even though a certain amount of genetic divergence may arise due to somatic mutations. The successful growth and establishment of invasive clonal species may be explained not by adaptability but by pre-existing ecological traits that prove advantageous in the new environment. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure in the North Island of New Zealand using AFLPs and related the findings to the number of introductions and the evolution that has occurred in the introduced area. Results Low levels of genetic diversity were found in all three species and appeared to be due to highly homogeneous founding gene pools. Elodea canadensis was introduced in 1868, and its populations showed more genetic structure than those of the more recently introduced of E. densa (1946) and L. major (1950). Elodea canadensis and L. major, however, had similar phylogeographic patterns, in spite of the difference in time since introduction. Conclusions The presence of a certain level of geographically correlated genetic structure in the absence of sexual reproduction, and in spite of random human dispersal of vegetative propagules, can be reasonably attributed to post-dispersal somatic mutations. Direct evidence of such evolutionary events is, however, still insufficient. PMID:20565861

  18. Gamma irradiation effect on the formation of Clonal variation from catharantus roseus plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syukur, Sumaryati

    2000-01-01

    Clonal variation have been found in Catharantus roseus plant after gamma irradiation. Several doses have been used to produce clonal variation. The most effective doses used to perform better clonal variation was 20 krad. About 103 seeds irradiated for every radiation treatment, but only several clones were grown better than wild type. We have success to get (M) seeds the expected mutant. The seeds from selected mutant are bigger when compare to the wild type and growth better on medium containing 5-methyl Tryptophan (5-MT). The chlorophyll content is higher (almost twice) as compared to the wild type. Fulther experiment continue to do in vitro culture in order to develop embryonic callus from leaf tip and leaf base. Several manipulation of auxin and cytokini have been used to differentiate the callus formation. Modified MS medium with kinetin and cytokinin (10:1) can induce globular embryo like structure. Dragendrof alkaloid reagent were used to determine high alkaloid clones from the expected mutant. TLC analysis from callus mutant shows 3 clear bands with subsequence Rf about 0.22, 0.58 while control shows two smearing bands at 0.21 and 0.52

  19. Lack of co-ordinate expression of the alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) procollagen genes in fibroblast clonal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Y; Crane, S; Zhou, L; Ochoa, S M; Falanga, V

    2000-12-01

    Several extracellular matrix genes, most notably alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) procollagen, are reported to be co-ordinately expressed in cultures of dermal fibroblasts. However, it remains unclear whether the expression of these genes is truly co-ordinate or whether it may be the result of averaging the phenotypic expression of different fibroblast subpopulations present within each culture. Objectives To determine by Northern analysis the correlation between alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) procollagen mRNA levels in clonal populations of human dermal fibroblasts. As previously described, clonal cultures were derived from parent strains of human dermal fibroblasts by a microscopically controlled dilution technique and by stimulation of single cells with low oxygen tension in the early phases of clonal growth. In agreement with previous reports, we found that baseline steady-state levels of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA were co-ordinately regulated with the alpha1(III) procollagen mRNA in 26 parent strains (r = 0. 9003; P ordinate regulation observed in non-clonal cultures, suggesting that these two genes operate under different sets of regulatory controls. This clonal heterogeneity may provide additional flexibility to the process of tissue repair and fibroblast clonal expansion.

  20. NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution in Barrett's esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumen L Kostadinov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5-8 time points over 6.4-19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1-8.6 off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3-1.5 on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs.

  1. PCR-based clonality assessment in patients with lymphocytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    study was to assess the clinical benefits of clonality testing with previously evaluated .... with the samples, negative controls containing no DNA were ..... 2003 Standardization and quality con- ... In Molecular cloning, a laboratory manual (ed.

  2. Greater-confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Schubert, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Greater-confinement disposal (GCD) is a general term for low-level waste (LLW) disposal technologies that employ natural and/or engineered barriers and provide a degree of confinement greater than that of shallow-land burial (SLB) but possibly less than that of a geologic repository. Thus GCD is associated with lower risk/hazard ratios than SLB. Although any number of disposal technologies might satisfy the definition of GCD, eight have been selected for consideration in this discussion. These technologies include: (1) earth-covered tumuli, (2) concrete structures, both above and below grade, (3) deep trenches, (4) augered shafts, (5) rock cavities, (6) abandoned mines, (7) high-integrity containers, and (8) hydrofracture. Each of these technologies employ several operations that are mature,however, some are at more advanced stages of development and demonstration than others. Each is defined and further described by information on design, advantages and disadvantages, special equipment requirements, and characteristic operations such as construction, waste emplacement, and closure

  3. How clonal is clonal? Genome plasticity across multicellular segments of a "Candidatus Marithrix sp." filament from sulfidic, briny seafloor sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Salman-Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Candidatus Marithrix is a recently described lineage within the group of large sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoaceae, Gammaproteobacteria. This group of bacteria comprises vacuolated, attached-living filaments that inhabit the sediment surface around vent and seep sites in the marine environment. A single filament is ca. 100 µm in diameter, several millimeters long, and consists of hundreds of clonal cells, which are considered highly polyploid. Based on these characteristics, Candidatus Marithrix was used as a model organism for the assessment of genomic plasticity along segments of a single filament using next generation sequencing to possibly identify hotspots of microevolution. Using six consecutive segments of a single filament sampled from a mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico, we recovered ca. 90% of the Candidatus Marithrix genome in each segment. There was a high level of genome conservation along the filament with average nucleotide identities between 99.98-100%. Different approaches to assemble all reads into a complete consensus genome could not fill the gaps. Each of the six segment datasets encoded merely a few hundred unique nucleotides and 5 or less unique genes - the residual content was redundant in all datasets. Besides the overall high genomic identity, we identified a similar number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the clonal segments, which are comparable to numbers reported for other clonal organisms. An increase of SNPs with greater distance of filament segments was not observed. The polyploidy of the cells was apparent when analyzing the heterogeneity of reads within a segment. Here, a strong increase in single nucleotide variants, or 'intrasegmental sequence heterogeneity' (ISH events, was observed. These sites may represent hotspots for genome plasticity, and possibly microevolution, since two thirds of these variants were not co-localized across the genome copies of the multicellular filament.

  4. Greater oil investment opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Ismael Enrique

    1997-01-01

    Geologically speaking, Colombia is a very attractive country for the world oil community. According to this philosophy new and important steps are being taken to reinforce the oil sector: Expansion of the exploratory frontier by including a larger number of sedimentary areas, and the adoption of innovative contracting instruments. Colombia has to offer, Greater economic incentives for the exploration of new areas to expand the exploratory frontier, stimulation of exploration in areas with prospectivity for small fields. Companies may offer Ecopetrol a participation in production over and above royalties, without it's participating in the investments and costs of these fields, more favorable conditions for natural gas seeking projects, in comparison with those governing the terms for oil

  5. A high density of tertiary lymphoid structure B cells in lung tumors is associated with increased CD4+ T cell receptor repertoire clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Germain, Claire; Liu, Zheng; Sebastian, Yinong; Devi, Priyanka; Knockaert, Samantha; Brohawn, Philip; Lehmann, Kim; Damotte, Diane; Validire, Pierre; Yao, Yihong; Valge-Archer, Viia; Hammond, Scott A; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Higgs, Brandon W

    2015-12-01

    T and B cell receptor (TCR and BCR, respectively) Vβ or immunoglobulin heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 sequencing allows monitoring of repertoire changes through recognition, clonal expansion, affinity maturation, and T or B cell activation in response to antigen. TCR and BCR repertoire analysis can advance understanding of antitumor immune responses in the tumor microenvironment. TCR and BCR repertoires of sorted CD4 + , CD8 + or CD19 + cells in tumor, non-tumoral distant tissue (NT), and peripheral compartments (blood/draining lymph node [P]) from 47 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (age median = 68 y) were sequenced. The clonotype spectra were assessed among different tissues and correlated with clinical and immunological parameters. In all tissues, CD4 + and CD8 + TCR repertoires had greater clonality relative to CD19 + BCR. CD4 + T cells exhibited greater clonality in NT compared to tumor ( p = 0.002) and P ( p 68). Younger patients exhibited greater CD4 + T cell diversity in P compared to older patients ( p = 0.05), and greater CD4 + T cell clonality in tumor relative to P ( p cell clonality in tumor and P, respectively (both p = 0.05), correlated with high density of tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structure (TLS) B cells, a biomarker of higher overall survival in NSCLC. Results indicate distinct adaptive immune responses in NSCLC, where peripheral T cell diversity is modulated by age, and tumor T cell clonal expansion is favored by the presence of TLSs in the tumor microenvironment.

  6. Modeling of genetic gain for single traits from marker-assisted seedling selection in clonally propagated crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Sushan; Hardner, Craig; Carter, Patrick A; Evans, Kate; Main, Dorrie; Peace, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Seedling selection identifies superior seedlings as candidate cultivars based on predicted genetic potential for traits of interest. Traditionally, genetic potential is determined by phenotypic evaluation. With the availability of DNA tests for some agronomically important traits, breeders have the opportunity to include DNA information in their seedling selection operations—known as marker-assisted seedling selection. A major challenge in deploying marker-assisted seedling selection in clonally propagated crops is a lack of knowledge in genetic gain achievable from alternative strategies. Existing models based on additive effects considering seed-propagated crops are not directly relevant for seedling selection of clonally propagated crops, as clonal propagation captures all genetic effects, not just additive. This study modeled genetic gain from traditional and various marker-based seedling selection strategies on a single trait basis through analytical derivation and stochastic simulation, based on a generalized seedling selection scheme of clonally propagated crops. Various trait-test scenarios with a range of broad-sense heritability and proportion of genotypic variance explained by DNA markers were simulated for two populations with different segregation patterns. Both derived and simulated results indicated that marker-based strategies tended to achieve higher genetic gain than phenotypic seedling selection for a trait where the proportion of genotypic variance explained by marker information was greater than the broad-sense heritability. Results from this study provides guidance in optimizing genetic gain from seedling selection for single traits where DNA tests providing marker information are available. PMID:27148453

  7. Clonal dominance between subpopulations of mixed small cell lung cancer xenografts implanted ectopically in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1995-01-01

    Clonal evolution of neoplastic cells during solid tumour growth leads to the emergence of new tumour cell subpopulations with diverging phenotypic characteristics which may alter the behaviour of a malignant disease. Cellular interaction was studied in mixed xenografts in nude mice and during...... clone 54B was found to dominate the parent 54A clone when grown as mixed subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice, whereas no dominance was exerted during in vitro growth. The in vivo dominance could not be explained by differences in growth kinetics between the two tumour cell lines, and the interaction...... was not dependent on 54B being in excess in mixed tumours. The dominance was dependent on close in vivo contact as no remote effect on the growth of 54A was found when the dominating 54B cells were growing in the opposite flank of tumour-bearing mice. Irradiation inactivated 54B cells were unable to exert...

  8. Facilitation by a Spiny Shrub on a Rhizomatous Clonal Herbaceous in Thicketization-Grassland in Northern China: Increased Soil Resources or Shelter from Herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saixiyala

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of fertility islands by shrubs increases soil resources heterogeneity in thicketization-grasslands. Clonal plants, especially rhizomatous or stoloniferous clonal plants, can form large clonal networks and use heterogeneously distributed resources effectively. In addition, shrubs, especially spiny shrubs, may also provide herbaceous plants with protection from herbivores, acting as ‘shelters’. The interaction between pre-dominated clonal herbaceous plants and encroaching shrubs remains unclear in thicketization-grassland under grazing pressure. We hypothesized that clonal herbaceous plants can be facilitated by encroached shrubs as a ‘shelter from herbivores’ and/or as an ‘increased soil resources’ under grazing pressure. To test this hypothesis, a total of 60 quadrats were chosen in a thicket-grassland in northern China that was previously dominated by Leymus chinensis and was encroached upon by the spiny leguminous plant Caragana intermedia. The soil and plant traits beneath and outside the shrub canopies were sampled, investigated and contrasted with an enclosure. The soil organic matter, soil total nitrogen and soil water content were significantly higher in the soil beneath the shrub canopies than in the soil outside the canopies. L. chinensis beneath the shrub canopies had significantly higher plant height, single shoot biomass, leaf length and width than outside the shrub canopies. There were no significantly differences between plant growth in enclosure and outside the shrub canopies. These results suggested that under grazing pressure in a grassland undergoing thicketization, the growth of the rhizomatous clonal herbaceous plant L. chinensis was facilitated by the spiny shrub C. intermedia as a ‘shelter from herbivores’ more than through ‘increased soil resources’. We propose that future studies should focus on the community- and ecosystem-level impacts of plant clonality.

  9. Implications of extreme life span in clonal organisms: millenary clones in meadows of the threatened seagrass Posidonia oceanica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Arnaud-Haond

    Full Text Available The maximum size and age that clonal organisms can reach remains poorly known, although we do know that the largest natural clones can extend over hundreds or thousands of metres and potentially live for centuries. We made a review of findings to date, which reveal that the maximum clone age and size estimates reported in the literature are typically limited by the scale of sampling, and may grossly underestimate the maximum age and size of clonal organisms. A case study presented here shows the occurrence of clones of slow-growing marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica at spatial scales ranging from metres to hundreds of kilometres, using microsatellites on 1544 sampling units from a total of 40 locations across the Mediterranean Sea. This analysis revealed the presence, with a prevalence of 3.5 to 8.9%, of very large clones spreading over one to several (up to 15 kilometres at the different locations. Using estimates from field studies and models of the clonal growth of P. oceanica, we estimated these large clones to be hundreds to thousands of years old, suggesting the evolution of general purpose genotypes with large phenotypic plasticity in this species. These results, obtained combining genetics, demography and model-based calculations, question present knowledge and understanding of the spreading capacity and life span of plant clones. These findings call for further research on these life history traits associated with clonality, considering their possible ecological and evolutionary implications.

  10. Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Jones; George A. Schier

    1985-01-01

    This chapter considers aspen growth as a process, and discusses some characteristics of the growth and development of trees and stands. For the most part, factors affecting growth are discussed elsewhere, particularly in the GENETICS AND VARIATION chapter and in chapters in PART 11. ECOLOGY. Aspen growth as it relates to wood production is examined in the WOOD RESOURCE...

  11. CLO-PLA: a database of clonal and bud-bank traits of the Central European flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimešová, Jitka; Danihelka, Jiří; Chrtek, Jindřich; de Bello, Francesco; Herben, Tomáš

    2017-04-01

    This dataset presents comprehensive and easy-to-use information on 29 functional traits of clonal growth, bud banks, and lifespan of members of the Central European flora. The source data were compiled from a number of published sources (see the reference file) and the authors' own observations or studies. In total, 2,909 species are included (2,745 herbs and 164 woody species), out of which 1,532 (i.e., 52.7% of total) are classified as possessing clonal growth organs (1,480, i.e., 53.9%, if woody plants are excluded). This provides a unique, and largely unexplored, set of traits of clonal growth that can be used in studies on comparative plant ecology, plant evolution, community assembly, and ecosystem functioning across the large flora of Central Europe. It can be directly imported into a number of programs and packages that perform trait-based and phylogenetic analyses aimed to answer a variety of open and pressing ecological questions. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. Clonal selection versus clonal cooperation: the integrated perception of immune objects [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Nataf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Analogies between the immune and nervous systems were first envisioned by the immunologist Niels Jerne who introduced the concepts of antigen "recognition" and immune "memory". However, since then, it appears that only the cognitive immunology paradigm proposed by Irun Cohen, attempted to further theorize the immune system functions through the prism of neurosciences. The present paper is aimed at revisiting this analogy-based reasoning. In particular, a parallel is drawn between the brain pathways of visual perception and the processes allowing the global perception of an "immune object". Thus, in the visual system, distinct features of a visual object (shape, color, motion are perceived separately by distinct neuronal populations during a primary perception task. The output signals generated during this first step instruct then an integrated perception task performed by other neuronal networks. Such a higher order perception step is by essence a cooperative task that is mandatory for the global perception of visual objects. Based on a re-interpretation of recent experimental data, it is suggested that similar general principles drive the integrated perception of immune objects in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs. In this scheme, the four main categories of signals characterizing an immune object (antigenic, contextual, temporal and localization signals are first perceived separately by distinct networks of immunocompetent cells.  Then, in a multitude of SLO niches, the output signals generated during this primary perception step are integrated by TH-cells at the single cell level. This process eventually generates a multitude of T-cell and B-cell clones that perform, at the scale of SLOs, an integrated perception of immune objects. Overall, this new framework proposes that integrated immune perception and, consequently, integrated immune responses, rely essentially on clonal cooperation rather than clonal selection.

  13. Effects of clonal fragmentation on intraspecific competition of a stoloniferous floating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Xu, Y-S; Dong, B-C; Xue, W; Yu, F-H

    2014-11-01

    Disturbance is common and can fragment clones of plants. Clonal fragmentation may affect the density and growth of ramets so that it could alter intraspecific competition. To test this hypothesis, we grew one (low density), five (medium density) or nine (high density) parent ramets of the floating invasive plant Pistia stratiotes in buckets, and newly produced offspring ramets were either severed (with fragmentation) or remained connected to parent ramets (no fragmentation). Increasing density reduced biomass of the whole clone (i.e. parent ramet plus its offspring ramets), showing intense intraspecific competition. Fragmentation decreased biomass of offspring ramets, but increased biomass of parent ramets and the whole clone, suggesting significant resource translocation from parent to offspring ramets when clones were not fragmented. There was no interaction effect of density x fragmentation on biomass of the whole clone, and fragmentation did not affect competition intensity index. We conclude that clonal fragmentation does not alter intraspecific competition between clones of P. stratiotes, but increases biomass production of the whole clone. Thus, fragmentation may contribute to its interspecific competitive ability and invasiveness, and intentional fragmentation should not be recommended as a measure to stop the rapid growth of this invasive species. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Clonal analysis of stem cells in differentiation and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Bartomeu; Jones, Philip H

    2016-12-01

    Tracking the fate of individual cells and their progeny by clonal analysis has redefined the concept of stem cells and their role in health and disease. The maintenance of cell turnover in adult tissues is achieved by the collective action of populations of stem cells with an equal likelihood of self-renewal or differentiation. Following injury stem cells exhibit striking plasticity, switching from homeostatic behavior in order to repair damaged tissues. The effects of disease states on stem cells are also being uncovered, with new insights into how somatic mutations trigger clonal expansion in early neoplasia. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and clonal characterisation of a progenitor cell sub-population in normal human articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Articular cartilage displays a poor repair capacity. The aim of cell-based therapies for cartilage defects is to repair damaged joint surfaces with a functional replacement tissue. Currently, chondrocytes removed from a healthy region of the cartilage are used but they are unable to retain their phenotype in expanded culture. The resulting repair tissue is fibrocartilaginous rather than hyaline, potentially compromising long-term repair. Mesenchymal stem cells, particularly bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC, are of interest for cartilage repair due to their inherent replicative potential. However, chondrocyte differentiated BMSCs display an endochondral phenotype, that is, can terminally differentiate and form a calcified matrix, leading to failure in long-term defect repair. Here, we investigate the isolation and characterisation of a human cartilage progenitor population that is resident within permanent adult articular cartilage. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Human articular cartilage samples were digested and clonal populations isolated using a differential adhesion assay to fibronectin. Clonal cell lines were expanded in growth media to high population doublings and karyotype analysis performed. We present data to show that this cell population demonstrates a restricted differential potential during chondrogenic induction in a 3D pellet culture system. Furthermore, evidence of high telomerase activity and maintenance of telomere length, characteristic of a mesenchymal stem cell population, were observed in this clonal cell population. Lastly, as proof of principle, we carried out a pilot repair study in a goat in vivo model demonstrating the ability of goat cartilage progenitors to form a cartilage-like repair tissue in a chondral defect. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we propose that we have identified and characterised a novel cartilage progenitor population resident in human articular cartilage which will greatly benefit future cell

  16. Effect of environmental stress on clonal structure of Eucypris virens (Crustacea, Ostracoda)

    OpenAIRE

    Martins M. J. F.; Vandekerkhove J.; Adolfsson S.; Rossetti G.; Namiotko T.; Jokela J.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental stress imposes strong natural selection on clonal populations, promoting evolutionary change in clonal structure. Environmental stress may also lead to reduction in population size, which together with clonal selection may reduce genotypic diversity of the local populations. We examined how clonal structure in wild-collected samples of two parthenogenetic populations of the freshwater ostracod Eucypris virens responded to hypersalinity and starvation, and the combination of the ...

  17. THE EXTENT OF CLONAL STRUCTURE IN DIFFERENT LYMPHOID ORGANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HERMANS, MHA; WUBBENA, A; KROESE, FGM; HUNT, SV; COWAN, R; OPSTELTEN, D

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the clonal organization of lymphoid organs, we studied the distribution in situ of donor-derived cells in near-physiological chimeras. We introduced RT7b fetal liver cells into nonirradiated congenic RT7a neonatal rats. The chimerism 6-20 wk after injection ranged from 0.3 to

  18. Productivity gains by fertilisation in Eucalyptus urophylla clonal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Productivity gains by fertilisation in Eucalyptus urophylla clonal plantations across gradients in site and stand conditions. ... The control plot may typically be a permanent plot of an inventory network, providing representative information for a company's decisionmaking. The paired twin-plot receives intensive management ...

  19. Negative plant soil feedback explaining ring formation in clonal plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carteni, F.; Marasco, A.; Bonanomi, G.; Mazzoleni, S.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Giannino, F.

    2012-01-01

    Ring shaped patches of clonal plants have been reported in different environments, but the mechanisms underlying such pattern formation are still poorly explained. Water depletion in the inner tussocks zone has been proposed as a possible cause, although ring patterns have been also observed in

  20. Molecular marker analysis to differentiate a clonal selection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lalit Kumar

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Microsatellite and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to differentiate. Manjari Naveen, a clonal selection of Centennial Seedless variety of grape. Twenty one (21) microsatellite primers could not detect variation between parent variety and its clone. AFLP analysis.

  1. Assessment of various strategies for the preservation of clonal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clonal conformity of ramets resulting from the re-cloning of somaplants depended, on one hand, on the floral status of the mother plant at the time of sampling and, on the other hand, on its origin. Re-cloning of abnormal regenerants led, in all cases, to 100 % abnormal offspring. The age of the ramet used as mother palm at ...

  2. The potential of aspen clonal forestry in Alberta: breeding regions and estimates of genetic gain from selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Gylander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aspen naturally grows in large, single-species, even-aged stands that regenerate clonally after fire disturbance. This offers an opportunity for an intensive clonal forestry system that closely emulates the natural life history of the species. In this paper, we assess the potential of genetic tree improvement and clonal deployment to enhance the productivity of aspen forests in Alberta. We further investigate geographic patterns of genetic variation in aspen and infer forest management strategies under uncertain future climates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic variation among 242 clones from Alberta was evaluated in 13 common garden trials after 5-8 growing seasons in the field. Broad-sense heritabilities for height and diameter at breast height (DBH ranged from 0.36 to 0.64, allowing 5-15% genetic gains in height and 9-34% genetic gains in DBH. Geographic partitioning of genetic variance revealed predominant latitudinal genetic differentiation. We further observed that northward movement of clones almost always resulted in increased growth relative to local planting material, while southward movement had a strong opposite effect. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Aspen forests are an important natural resource in western Canada that is used for pulp and oriented strandboard production, accounting for ~40% of the total forest harvest. Moderate to high broad-sense heritabilities in growth traits suggest good potential for a genetic tree improvement program with aspen. Significant productivity gains appear possible through clonal selection from existing trials. We propose two breeding regions for Alberta, and suggest that well-tested southern clones may be used in the northern breeding region, accounting for a general warming trend observed over the last several decades in Alberta.

  3. The Potential of Aspen Clonal Forestry in Alberta: Breeding Regions and Estimates of Genetic Gain from Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gylander, Tim; Hamann, Andreas; Brouard, Jean S.; Thomas, Barb R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspen naturally grows in large, single-species, even-aged stands that regenerate clonally after fire disturbance. This offers an opportunity for an intensive clonal forestry system that closely emulates the natural life history of the species. In this paper, we assess the potential of genetic tree improvement and clonal deployment to enhance the productivity of aspen forests in Alberta. We further investigate geographic patterns of genetic variation in aspen and infer forest management strategies under uncertain future climates. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetic variation among 242 clones from Alberta was evaluated in 13 common garden trials after 5–8 growing seasons in the field. Broad-sense heritabilities for height and diameter at breast height (DBH) ranged from 0.36 to 0.64, allowing 5–15% genetic gains in height and 9–34% genetic gains in DBH. Geographic partitioning of genetic variance revealed predominant latitudinal genetic differentiation. We further observed that northward movement of clones almost always resulted in increased growth relative to local planting material, while southward movement had a strong opposite effect. Conclusion/Significance Aspen forests are an important natural resource in western Canada that is used for pulp and oriented strandboard production, accounting for ∼40% of the total forest harvest. Moderate to high broad-sense heritabilities in growth traits suggest good potential for a genetic tree improvement program with aspen. Significant productivity gains appear possible through clonal selection from existing trials. We propose two breeding regions for Alberta, and suggest that well-tested southern clones may be used in the northern breeding region, accounting for a general warming trend observed over the last several decades in Alberta. PMID:22957006

  4. Clonal deletion: A mechanism of tolerance in mixed bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.C.; Webster, M.; Fox, I.J.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of antigen-specific immunologic unresponsiveness which results from lethal irradiation and mixed (syngeneic-allogeneic) bone marrow cell (BMC) reconstitution is unknown. To determine whether clonal deletion is the mechanism of tolerance in this model, monoclonal antibody (Mab) RR-4-4, specific for a T-cell receptor (V beta 6) reactive against the minor alloantigen MLsa, was employed. Six-week-old B10 mice (H-2b, Mlsb, Thyl.2) were tolerized to AKR antigens (H-2k, Mlsa, Thyl.1) by whole body irradiation (950 R) and iv infusion of T-cell-depleted (TCD) B10 BMC + non-TCD AKR BMC. Chimerism and antigen-specific tolerance were documented by flow microfluorometry (FMF), skin grafting, mixed lymphocyte reaction, and cell-mediated lympholysis. When tolerant B10 mice (n = 15) had accepted AKR skin grafts for greater than 100 days, these animals were studied for the presence of host V beta 6+ T cells using Mab RR-4-4. FMF revealed that 0-5% of host (B10) lymph node and spleen cells from chimeras were V beta 6+ while 15-20% of lymph node and spleen cells from control B10 mice expressed V beta 6. These data demonstrate that clonal deletion occurs in the lethal irradiation-mixed reconstitution model as evidenced by the near total elimination of Mlsa-reactive V beta 6+ T cells and suggest that it maybe a mechanism responsible for tolerance in adult mice

  5. EuroClonality/BIOMED-2 guidelines for interpretation and reporting of Ig/TCR clonality testing in suspected lymphoproliferations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, A. W.; Groenen, P. J. T. A.; Brüggemann, M.; Beldjord, K.; Bellan, C.; Bonello, L.; Boone, E.; Carter, G. I.; Catherwood, M.; Davi, F.; Delfau-Larue, M.-H.; Diss, T.; Evans, P. A. S.; Gameiro, P.; Garcia Sanz, R.; Gonzalez, D.; Grand, D.; Håkansson, A.; Hummel, M.; Liu, H.; Lombardia, L.; Macintyre, E. A.; Milner, B. J.; Montes-Moreno, S.; Schuuring, E.; Spaargaren, M.; Hodges, E.; van Dongen, J. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    PCR-based immunoglobulin (Ig)/T-cell receptor (TCR) clonality testing in suspected lymphoproliferations has largely been standardized and has consequently become technically feasible in a routine diagnostic setting. Standardization of the pre-analytical and post-analytical phases is now essential to

  6. How old are you? Genet age estimates in a clonal animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin-Durante, M K; Miller, M W; Precht, W F; Baums, I B

    2016-11-01

    Foundation species such as redwoods, seagrasses and corals are often long-lived and clonal. Genets may consist of hundreds of members (ramets) and originated hundreds to thousands of years ago. As climate change and other stressors exert selection pressure on species, the demography of populations changes. Yet, because size does not indicate age in clonal organisms, demographic models are missing data necessary to predict the resilience of many foundation species. Here, we correlate somatic mutations with genet age of corals and provide the first, preliminary estimates of genet age in a colonial animal. We observed somatic mutations at five microsatellite loci in rangewide samples of the endangered coral, Acropora palmata (n = 3352). Colonies harboured 342 unique mutations in 147 genets. Genet age ranged from 30 to 838 years assuming a mutation rate of 1.195 -04 per locus per year based on colony growth rates and 236 to 6500 years assuming a mutation rate of 1.542 -05 per locus per year based on sea level changes to habitat availability. Long-lived A. palmata genets imply a large capacity to tolerate past environmental change, and yet recent mass mortality events in A. palmata suggest that capacity is now being frequently exceeded. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Transgenerational plasticity as an important mechanism affecting response of clonal species to changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzbergová, Zuzana; Hadincová, Věroslava

    2017-07-01

    In spite of the increasing number of studies on the importance of transgenerational plasticity for species response to novel environments, its effects on species ability to respond to climate change are still largely unexplored. We study the importance of transgenerational plasticity for response of a clonal species Festuca rubra . Individuals from four natural populations representing two levels of temperature and two levels of precipitation were cultivated in four growth chambers that simulate the temperature and precipitation of origin of the populations (maternal phase). Each population was represented in each growth chamber. After 6 months, single young ramets of these plants were reshuffled among the growth chambers and let to grow for additional 2 months (offspring phase). The results show that transgenerational effects (i.e., maternal phase conditions) significantly modify species response to novel climates, and the direction and intensity of the response depend on the climate of origin of the plants. For traits related to recourse acquisition, the conditions of maternal phase, either alone or in interaction mainly with climate of origin, had stronger effect than the conditions of cultivation. Overall, the maternal climate interacted more intensively with the climate of origin than with the offspring climate. The direction of the effect of the maternal climate was of different directions and intensities depending on plant origin and trait studied. The data demonstrated strong significant effects of conditions during maternal phase on species response to novel climates. These transgenerational affects were, however, not adaptive. Still, transgenerational plasticity may be an important driver of species response to novel conditions across clonal generations. These effects thus need to be carefully considered in future studies exploring species response to novel climates. This will also have strong effects on species performance under increasingly variable

  8. Physiological Integration Affects Expansion of an Amphibious Clonal Plant from Terrestrial to Cu-Polluted Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Zhou, Zhen-Feng

    2017-03-01

    The effects of physiological integration on clonal plants growing in aquatic and terrestrial habitats have been extensively studied, but little is known about the role in the extension of amphibious clonal plants in the heterogeneous aquatic-terrestrial ecotones, especially when the water environments are polluted by heavy metals. Ramets of the amphibious clonal herb Alternanthera philoxeroides were rooted in unpolluted soil and polluted water at three concentrations of Cu. The extension of populations from unpolluted terrestrial to polluted aqueous environments mainly relied on stem elongation rather than production of new ramets. The absorbed Cu in the ramets growing in polluted water could be spread horizontally to other ramets in unpolluted soil via physiological integration and redistributed in different organs. The performances of ramets in both terrestrial and aquatic habitats were negatively correlated with Cu intensities in different organs of plants. It is concluded that physiological integration might lessen the fitness of connected ramets in heterogeneously polluted environments. The mechanical strength of the stems decreased with increasing Cu levels, especially in polluted water. We suggest that, except for direct toxicity to growth and expansion, heavy metal pollution might also increase the mechanical risk in breaking failure of plants.

  9. Clonal forestry, heterosis and advanced-generation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    This report discusses the clonal planting stock offers many advantages to the forest products industry. Advanced-generation breeding strategies should be designed to maximize within-family variance and at the same time allow the capture of heterosis. Certainly there may be a conflict in the choice of breeding strategy based on the trait of interest. It may be that the majority of the traits express heterosis due to overdominance. Alternatively, disease resistance is expressed as the lack of a specific metabolite or infection court then the homozygous recessive genotype may be the most desirable. Nonetheless, as the forest products industry begins to utilize the economic advantages of clonal forestry, breeding strategies will have to be optimized for these commercial plant materials. Here, molecular markers can be used to characterize the nature of heterosis and therefore define the appropriate breeding strategy.

  10. Dynamics of Tumor Heterogeneity Derived from Clonal Karyotypic Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Laughney

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerical chromosomal instability is a ubiquitous feature of human neoplasms. Due to experimental limitations, fundamental characteristics of karyotypic changes in cancer are poorly understood. Using an experimentally inspired stochastic model, based on the potency and chromosomal distribution of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, we show that cancer cells have evolved to exist within a narrow range of chromosome missegregation rates that optimizes phenotypic heterogeneity and clonal survival. Departure from this range reduces clonal fitness and limits subclonal diversity. Mapping of the aneuploid fitness landscape reveals a highly favorable, commonly observed, near-triploid state onto which evolving diploid- and tetraploid-derived populations spontaneously converge, albeit at a much lower fitness cost for the latter. Finally, by analyzing 1,368 chromosomal translocation events in five human cancers, we find that karyotypic evolution also shapes chromosomal translocation patterns by selecting for more oncogenic derivative chromosomes. Thus, chromosomal instability can generate the heterogeneity required for Darwinian tumor evolution.

  11. Clonal and bud bank traits: patterns across temperate plant communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; Herben, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2015), s. 243-253 ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G; GA ČR GA13-17118S; GA ČR GAP505/12/1007 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : clonal and bud bank traits * vegetation * central Europe Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.151, year: 2015

  12. Nutrient leaching under zero tension in a subtropical clonal eucalypt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known about the effects of residue burning or retention on nutrient leaching during the inter-rotation of clonal Eucalyptus grown on the sandy soils of subtropical Zululand, South Africa. A study compared zero-tension nutrient leaching through the top metre of soil at depths of 0.15, 0.5 and 1.0 m in an undisturbed crop ...

  13. Clonal status and clinicopathological observation of cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Miao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA of the uterine cervix is defined as an extremely well differentiated variant of cervical adenocarcinoma, with well-formed glands that resemble benign glands but show distinct nuclear anaplasia or evidence of stromal invasion. Thus, MDA is difficult to differentiate from other cervical hyperplastic lesions. Monoclonality is a major characteristic of most tumors, whereas normal tissue and reactive hyperplasia are polyclonal. Methods The clinicopathological features and clonality of MDA were investigated using laser microdissection and a clonality assay based on the polymorphism of androgen receptor (AR and X-chromosomal inactivation mosaicism in female somatic tissues. Results The results demonstrated that the glands were positive for CEA, Ki-67, and p53 and negative for estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV DNA. The index of proliferation for Ki-67 was more than 50%. However, the stromal cells were positive for ER, PR, vimentin, and SM-actin. The clonal assay showed that MDA was monoclonal. Thus, our findings indicate that MDA is a true neoplasm but is not associated with high-risk HPV. Conclusions Diagnosis of MDA depends mainly on its clinical manifestations, the pathological feature that MDA glands are located deeper than the lower level of normal endocervical glands, and immunostaining.

  14. Multiplexing clonality: combining RGB marking and genetic barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornils, Kerstin; Thielecke, Lars; Hüser, Svenja; Forgber, Michael; Thomaschewski, Michael; Kleist, Nadja; Hussein, Kais; Riecken, Kristoffer; Volz, Tassilo; Gerdes, Sebastian; Glauche, Ingmar; Dahl, Andreas; Dandri, Maura; Roeder, Ingo; Fehse, Boris

    2014-01-01

    RGB marking and DNA barcoding are two cutting-edge technologies in the field of clonal cell marking. To combine the virtues of both approaches, we equipped LeGO vectors encoding red, green or blue fluorescent proteins with complex DNA barcodes carrying color-specific signatures. For these vectors, we generated highly complex plasmid libraries that were used for the production of barcoded lentiviral vector particles. In proof-of-principle experiments, we used barcoded vectors for RGB marking of cell lines and primary murine hepatocytes. We applied single-cell polymerase chain reaction to decipher barcode signatures of individual RGB-marked cells expressing defined color hues. This enabled us to prove clonal identity of cells with one and the same RGB color. Also, we made use of barcoded vectors to investigate clonal development of leukemia induced by ectopic oncogene expression in murine hematopoietic cells. In conclusion, by combining RGB marking and DNA barcoding, we have established a novel technique for the unambiguous genetic marking of individual cells in the context of normal regeneration as well as malignant outgrowth. Moreover, the introduction of color-specific signatures in barcodes will facilitate studies on the impact of different variables (e.g. vector type, transgenes, culture conditions) in the context of competitive repopulation studies. PMID:24476916

  15. Likelihood-Based Inference of B Cell Clonal Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan K Ralph

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The human immune system depends on a highly diverse collection of antibody-making B cells. B cell receptor sequence diversity is generated by a random recombination process called "rearrangement" forming progenitor B cells, then a Darwinian process of lineage diversification and selection called "affinity maturation." The resulting receptors can be sequenced in high throughput for research and diagnostics. Such a collection of sequences contains a mixture of various lineages, each of which may be quite numerous, or may consist of only a single member. As a step to understanding the process and result of this diversification, one may wish to reconstruct lineage membership, i.e. to cluster sampled sequences according to which came from the same rearrangement events. We call this clustering problem "clonal family inference." In this paper we describe and validate a likelihood-based framework for clonal family inference based on a multi-hidden Markov Model (multi-HMM framework for B cell receptor sequences. We describe an agglomerative algorithm to find a maximum likelihood clustering, two approximate algorithms with various trade-offs of speed versus accuracy, and a third, fast algorithm for finding specific lineages. We show that under simulation these algorithms greatly improve upon existing clonal family inference methods, and that they also give significantly different clusters than previous methods when applied to two real data sets.

  16. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: Are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions: The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between......Background and Aims: The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important....... Methods: Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity...

  17. Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 cells to synthetic gastric fluid is greater following growth on ready-to-eat deli turkey meat than in brain heart infusion broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Luke D; Faith, Nancy G; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2007-11-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) deli meats have been categorized as high-risk foods for contraction of foodborne listeriosis. Several recent listeriosis outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of RTE deli turkey meat. In this study, we examined whether the growth of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 on commercially prepared RTE deli turkey meat causes listerial cells to become more resistant to inactivation by synthetic gastric fluid (SGF). Listerial cells grown on turkey meat to late logarithmic-early stationary phase were significantly more resistant to SGF at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.5 than listerial cells grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth. The pH was lower in the fluid in packages of turkey meat than in BHI broth (6.5 versus 7.5). However, listerial cells grown in BHI broth adjusted to a lower pH (6.0) did not exhibit enhanced resistance to SGF. The lesser resistance to SGF of listerial cells grown in BHI broth may be due, in part, to the presence of glucose (0.2%). This study indicates the environment presented by the growth of L. monocytogenes on deli turkey meat affects its ability to survive conditions it encounters in the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Somatic Mutations and Clonal Hematopoiesis in Aplastic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Hosokawa, Kohei; Makishima, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Townsley, Danielle; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sato, Yusuke; Liu, Delong; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Wu, Colin O; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Clemente, Michael J; Kataoka, Keisuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Okuno, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Nagata, Yasunobu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Kon, Ayana; Sanada, Masashi; Scheinberg, Phillip; Miyano, Satoru; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Nakao, Shinji; Young, Neal S; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-07-02

    In patients with acquired aplastic anemia, destruction of hematopoietic cells by the immune system leads to pancytopenia. Patients have a response to immunosuppressive therapy, but myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia develop in about 15% of the patients, usually many months to years after the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. We performed next-generation sequencing and array-based karyotyping using 668 blood samples obtained from 439 patients with aplastic anemia. We analyzed serial samples obtained from 82 patients. Somatic mutations in myeloid cancer candidate genes were present in one third of the patients, in a limited number of genes and at low initial variant allele frequency. Clonal hematopoiesis was detected in 47% of the patients, most frequently as acquired mutations. The prevalence of the mutations increased with age, and mutations had an age-related signature. DNMT3A-mutated and ASXL1-mutated clones tended to increase in size over time; the size of BCOR- and BCORL1-mutated and PIGA-mutated clones decreased or remained stable. Mutations in PIGA and BCOR and BCORL1 correlated with a better response to immunosuppressive therapy and longer and a higher rate of overall and progression-free survival; mutations in a subgroup of genes that included DNMT3A and ASXL1 were associated with worse outcomes. However, clonal dynamics were highly variable and might not necessarily have predicted the response to therapy and long-term survival among individual patients. Clonal hematopoiesis was prevalent in aplastic anemia. Some mutations were related to clinical outcomes. A highly biased set of mutations is evidence of Darwinian selection in the failed bone marrow environment. The pattern of somatic clones in individual patients over time was variable and frequently unpredictable. (Funded by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and others.).

  19. Clonal architectures and driver mutations in metastatic melanomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ding

    Full Text Available To reveal the clonal architecture of melanoma and associated driver mutations, whole genome sequencing (WGS and targeted extension sequencing were used to characterize 124 melanoma cases. Significantly mutated gene analysis using 13 WGS cases and 15 additional paired extension cases identified known melanoma genes such as BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A, as well as a novel gene EPHA3, previously implicated in other cancer types. Extension studies using tumors from another 96 patients discovered a large number of truncation mutations in tumor suppressors (TP53 and RB1, protein phosphatases (e.g., PTEN, PTPRB, PTPRD, and PTPRT, as well as chromatin remodeling genes (e.g., ASXL3, MLL2, and ARID2. Deep sequencing of mutations revealed subclones in the majority of metastatic tumors from 13 WGS cases. Validated mutations from 12 out of 13 WGS patients exhibited a predominant UV signature characterized by a high frequency of C->T transitions occurring at the 3' base of dipyrimidine sequences while one patient (MEL9 with a hypermutator phenotype lacked this signature. Strikingly, a subclonal mutation signature analysis revealed that the founding clone in MEL9 exhibited UV signature but the secondary clone did not, suggesting different mutational mechanisms for two clonal populations from the same tumor. Further analysis of four metastases from different geographic locations in 2 melanoma cases revealed phylogenetic relationships and highlighted the genetic alterations responsible for differential drug resistance among metastatic tumors. Our study suggests that clonal evaluation is crucial for understanding tumor etiology and drug resistance in melanoma.

  20. Clonal origins of ETV6-RUNX1+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpar, D.; Wren, D.; Ermini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Studies on twins with concordant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have revealed that ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion is a common, prenatal genetic event with other driver aberrations occurring subclonally and probably postnatally. The fetal cell type that is transformed by ETV6-RUNX1 is not identified...... by such studies or by the analysis of early B-cell lineage phenotype of derived progeny. Ongoing, clonal immunoglobulin (IG) and cross-lineage T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements are features of B-cell precursor leukemia and commence at the pro-B-cell stage of normal B-cell lineage development. We reasoned...

  1. Age-related cancer mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Welch, John S.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. We analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals within The Cancer Genome Atlas, and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia/lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5–6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant, initiating events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion. PMID:25326804

  2. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  3. Clonal variation in proliferation rate of cultures of GPK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, P A; Hola, M

    1981-09-01

    Pedigrees of twenty-six clones of a line of keratocytes derived from guinea-pig ear epidermis (GPK cells) were analysed from time-lapse film. The mean interdivision time (IDT) for the culture was 1143 +/- 215 (SD) min. The mean generation rates (mean reciprocal interdivision times) of clones varied over a range of 3.93--10.2 x 10(-4)/min and the standard deviation of the clonal mean generation rates was 16.8% of the average value. Transient intraclonal variations in IDT due to mitoses in a plane perpendicular to the substratum were observed. The data were also analysed on the basis of cell location in sixteen equal zones (quadrats) of the filmed area. The mean generation rate of quadrats was 8.73 x 10(-4)/min (SD = 4.9%). The spatial distribution showed some clustering of cells. The mean local density of the clones (2.25 +/- 0.62 cells/10(-4) cm2) was significantly higher than the quadrat density (1.76 +/- 0.8 cells/10(-4) cm2). There was no significant correlation between clonal density and mean generation rates, whereas for quadrats a significant negative correlation was found (P = 2.7%). The results support the proposition that cell lineage is the major determinant of the proliferation rate of subconfluent cultures.

  4. Clonal expansion of renal cell carcinoma-infiltrating T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittig, Simone; Køllgaard, Tania; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    T lymphocytes can mediate the destruction of cancer cells by virtue of their ability to recognize tumor-derived antigenic peptides that are presented on the cell surface in complex with HLA molecules and expand. Thus, the presence of clonally expanded T cells within neoplastic lesions is an indic......T lymphocytes can mediate the destruction of cancer cells by virtue of their ability to recognize tumor-derived antigenic peptides that are presented on the cell surface in complex with HLA molecules and expand. Thus, the presence of clonally expanded T cells within neoplastic lesions...... is an indication of ongoing HLA-restricted T cell-mediated immune responses. Multiple tumors, including renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), are often infiltrated by significant amounts of T cells, the so-called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In the present study, we analyzed RCC lesions (n = 13) for the presence...... of expanded T-cell clonotypes using T-cell receptor clonotype mapping. Surprisingly, we found that RCCs comprise relatively low numbers of distinct expanded T-cell clonotypes as compared with melanoma lesions. The numbers of different T-cell clonotypes detected among RCC-infiltrating lymphocytes were...

  5. Virulence, sporulation, and elicitin production in three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora ramorum populations are clonal and consist of three lineages. Recent studies have shown that the clonal lineages may have varying degrees of aggressiveness on some host species, such as Quercus rubra. In this study, we examined virulence, sporulation and elicitin production of five P. ...

  6. Clonal relation in a case of CLL, ALCL, and Hodgkin composite lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anke; Maggio, Ewerton; Rust, R; Kooistra, K; Diepstra, A; Poppema, S

    2002-01-01

    Large cell lymphomas and Hodgkin disease may develop during the course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In some cases the transformed cells are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive and not clonally related to the CLL cells. In other cases the transformed cells have the same clonal rearrangements

  7. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J S; Rosenthal, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8(+)tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4...

  8. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytica...

  9. T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Wheeler, Amanda J; Chan, Natalie H; Hanft, Violet R; Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-11-28

    Tumor-infiltrating T cells play an important role in many cancers, and can improve prognosis and yield therapeutic targets. We characterized T cells infiltrating both breast cancer tumors and the surrounding normal breast tissue to identify T cells specific to each, as well as their abundance in peripheral blood. Using immune profiling of the T cell beta-chain repertoire in 16 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we show that the clonal structure of the tumor is significantly different from adjacent breast tissue, with the tumor containing ∼2.5-fold greater density of T cells and higher clonality compared with normal breast. The clonal structure of T cells in blood and normal breast is more similar than between blood and tumor, and could be used to distinguish tumor from normal breast tissue in 14 of 16 patients. Many T cell sequences overlap between tissue and blood from the same patient, including ∼50% of T cells between tumor and normal breast. Both tumor and normal breast contain high-abundance "enriched" sequences that are absent or of low abundance in the other tissue. Many of these T cells are either not detected or detected with very low frequency in the blood, suggesting the existence of separate compartments of T cells in both tumor and normal breast. Enriched T cell sequences are typically unique to each patient, but a subset is shared between many different patients. We show that many of these are commonly generated sequences, and thus unlikely to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  10. Analysis of allelic expression patterns in clonal somatic cells by single-cell RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinius, Björn; Mold, Jeff E; Ramsköld, Daniel; Deng, Qiaolin; Johnsson, Per; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Frisén, Jonas; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-11-01

    Cellular heterogeneity can emerge from the expression of only one parental allele. However, it has remained controversial whether, or to what degree, random monoallelic expression of autosomal genes (aRME) is mitotically inherited (clonal) or stochastic (dynamic) in somatic cells, particularly in vivo. Here we used allele-sensitive single-cell RNA-seq on clonal primary mouse fibroblasts and freshly isolated human CD8 + T cells to dissect clonal and dynamic monoallelic expression patterns. Dynamic aRME affected a considerable portion of the cells' transcriptomes, with levels dependent on the cells' transcriptional activity. Notably, clonal aRME was detected, but it was surprisingly scarce (aRME occurs transiently within individual cells, and patterns of aRME are thus primarily scattered throughout somatic cell populations rather than, as previously hypothesized, confined to patches of clonally related cells.

  11. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  12. Strategies for Talent Management: Greater Philadelphia Companies in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Human capital is one of the critical issues that impacts the Greater Philadelphia region's ability to grow and prosper. The CEO Council for Growth (CEO Council) is committed to ensuring a steady and talented supply of quality workers for this region. "Strategies for Talent Management: Greater Philadelphia Companies in Action" provides…

  13. Long-Term Overgrazing-Induced Memory Decreases Photosynthesis of Clonal Offspring in a Perennial Grassland Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weibo; Hu, Ningning; Hou, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jize; Guo, Huiqin; Liu, Zhiying; Kong, Lingqi; Wu, Zinian; Wang, Hui; Li, Xiliang

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of transgenerational plasticity have demonstrated that long-term overgrazing experienced by Leymus chinensis , an ecologically dominant, rhizomatous grass species in eastern Eurasian temperate grassland, significantly affects its clonal growth in subsequent generations. However, there is a dearth of information on the reasons underlying this overgrazing-induced memory effect in plant morphological plasticity. We characterized the relationship between a dwarf phenotype and photosynthesis function decline of L. chinensis from the perspective of leaf photosynthesis by using both field measurement and rhizome buds culture cultivated in a greenhouse. Leaf photosynthetic functions (net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular carbon dioxide concentration, and transpiration rate) were significantly decreased in smaller L. chinensis individuals that were induced to have a dwarf phenotype by being heavily grazed in the field. This decreased photosynthetic function was maintained a generation after greenhouse tests in which grazing was excluded. Both the response of L. chinensis morphological traits and photosynthetic functions in greenhouse were deceased relative to those in the field experiment. Further, there were significant decreases in leaf chlorophyll content and Rubisco enzyme activities of leaves between bud-cultured dwarf and non-dwarf L. chinensis in the greenhouse. Moreover, gene expression patterns showed that the bud-cultured dwarf L. chinensis significantly down-regulated (by 1.86- to 5.33-fold) a series of key genes that regulate photosynthetic efficiency, stomata opening, and chloroplast development compared with the non-dwarf L. chinensis . This is among the first studies revealing a linkage between long-term overgrazing affecting the transgenerational morphological plasticity of clonal plants and physiologically adaptive photosynthesis function. Overall, clonal transgenerational effects in L. chinensis phenotypic traits

  14. Expression of lumican in hidroacanthoma simplex and clonal-type seborrheic keratosis as a potent differential diagnostic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ryoko; Ansai, Shin-Ichi; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Matsuda, Yoko; Naito, Zenya; Kawana, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    Lumican, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, regulates the assembly and diameter of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix of various tissues. The lumican expression correlates with pathological conditions and the growth and metastasis of various malignancies. In cutaneous neoplasms, the lumican expression is lower in advanced-stage malignant melanomas that invade the dermis than in early-stage melanomas. Furthermore, we have recently reported that the expression pattern of lumican is different from that of actinic keratosis and the Bowen disease. Lumican is positive in the poroid cells of intraepidermal sweat ducts; therefore, we examined the expression patterns of lumican in acanthotic-type seborrheic keratosis and Pinkus-type poroma followed by clonal-type seborrheic keratosis and hidroacanthoma simplex. The neoplastic cells of acanthotic-type seborrheic keratosis exhibited positive immunostaining in only 1 of 31 cases (3.23%), whereas the poroid cells of Pinkus-type poroma exhibited positive immunoreactivity in 26 of 28 patients (92.8%). In the hidroacanthoma simplex cases, lumican was expressed in poroid cells forming intraepidermal nests in 22 of 28 patients (78.6%), whereas the neoplastic cells in most cases of clonal-type seborrheic keratosis were negative for lumican. In some seborrheic keratosis cases that were positive for lumican in neoplastic cells, lumican was observed in squamoid cells but not in basaloid cells. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the immunoreactivity of lumican in seborrheic keratosis and in basaloid cells. These findings suggest that lumican is a potent differential diagnostic marker that distinguishes hidroacanthoma simplex from clonal-type seborrheic keratosis.

  15. Long-Term Overgrazing-Induced Memory Decreases Photosynthesis of Clonal Offspring in a Perennial Grassland Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Hou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of transgenerational plasticity have demonstrated that long-term overgrazing experienced by Leymus chinensis, an ecologically dominant, rhizomatous grass species in eastern Eurasian temperate grassland, significantly affects its clonal growth in subsequent generations. However, there is a dearth of information on the reasons underlying this overgrazing-induced memory effect in plant morphological plasticity. We characterized the relationship between a dwarf phenotype and photosynthesis function decline of L. chinensis from the perspective of leaf photosynthesis by using both field measurement and rhizome buds culture cultivated in a greenhouse. Leaf photosynthetic functions (net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular carbon dioxide concentration, and transpiration rate were significantly decreased in smaller L. chinensis individuals that were induced to have a dwarf phenotype by being heavily grazed in the field. This decreased photosynthetic function was maintained a generation after greenhouse tests in which grazing was excluded. Both the response of L. chinensis morphological traits and photosynthetic functions in greenhouse were deceased relative to those in the field experiment. Further, there were significant decreases in leaf chlorophyll content and Rubisco enzyme activities of leaves between bud-cultured dwarf and non-dwarf L. chinensis in the greenhouse. Moreover, gene expression patterns showed that the bud-cultured dwarf L. chinensis significantly down-regulated (by 1.86- to 5.33-fold a series of key genes that regulate photosynthetic efficiency, stomata opening, and chloroplast development compared with the non-dwarf L. chinensis. This is among the first studies revealing a linkage between long-term overgrazing affecting the transgenerational morphological plasticity of clonal plants and physiologically adaptive photosynthesis function. Overall, clonal transgenerational effects in L. chinensis

  16. [Autoerotic fatalities in Greater Dusseldorf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Benno; Hellen, Florence; Borchard, Nora; Huckenbeck, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Autoerotic fatalities in the Greater Dusseldorf area correspond to the relevant medicolegal literature. Our results included exclusively young to middle-aged, usually single men who were found dead in their city apartments. Clothing and devices used showed a great variety. Women's or fetish clothing and complex shackling or hanging devices were disproportionately frequent. In most cases, death occurred due to hanging or ligature strangulation. There was no increased incidence of underlying psychiatric disorders. In most of the deceased no or at least no remarkable alcohol intoxication was found. Occasionally, it may be difficult to reliably differentiate autoerotic accidents, accidents occurring in connection with practices of bondage & discipline, dominance & submission (BDSM) from natural death, suicide or homicide.

  17. Planning for greater confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Meshkov, N.K.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    A report that provides guidance for planning for greater-confinement disposal (GCD) of low-level radioactive waste is being prepared. The report addresses procedures for selecting a GCD technology and provides information for implementing these procedures. The focus is on GCD; planning aspects common to GCD and shallow-land burial are covered by reference. Planning procedure topics covered include regulatory requirements, waste characterization, benefit-cost-risk assessment and pathway analysis methodologies, determination of need, waste-acceptance criteria, performance objectives, and comparative assessment of attributes that support these objectives. The major technologies covered include augered shafts, deep trenches, engineered structures, hydrofracture, improved waste forms, and high-integrity containers. Descriptive information is provided, and attributes that are relevant for risk assessment and operational requirements are given. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Aging, Clonality and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and increased production of reactive oxygen species have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as clonal selection of HSCs upon aging provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. PMID:27380967

  19. Atherosclerosis and clonal hematopoyesis: A new risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páramo Fernández, José A

    Recent research has revealed that clonal hematopoyesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) characterized by the acquisition of somatic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells, is not only a common age-related disorder and a premalignant condition, but it is also associated with the development of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Mutations in DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1 were each individually associated with coronary heart disease, stroke and coronary calcification. Therefore, CHIP emerges as a new risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular pathologies and its detection may be relevant as a new therapeutic target in order to modify the natural course of the disease. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparing nonparametric Bayesian tree priors for clonal reconstruction of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshwar, Amit G; Vembu, Shankar; Morris, Quaid

    2015-01-01

    Statistical machine learning methods, especially nonparametric Bayesian methods, have become increasingly popular to infer clonal population structure of tumors. Here we describe the treeCRP, an extension of the Chinese restaurant process (CRP), a popular construction used in nonparametric mixture models, to infer the phylogeny and genotype of major subclonal lineages represented in the population of cancer cells. We also propose new split-merge updates tailored to the subclonal reconstruction problem that improve the mixing time of Markov chains. In comparisons with the tree-structured stick breaking prior used in PhyloSub, we demonstrate superior mixing and running time using the treeCRP with our new split-merge procedures. We also show that given the same number of samples, TSSB and treeCRP have similar ability to recover the subclonal structure of a tumor…

  1. Transcriptomic variation in a coral reveals pathways of clonal organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    K Bay, Line; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    A microarray study was undertaken to examine the potential for clonal gene expression variation in a branching reef building coral, Acropora millepora. The role of small-scale gradients in light and water flow was examined by comparing gene expression levels between branch elevation (tip and base......) and position (centre and edge) of replicate coral colonies (n=3). Analyses of variance revealed that almost 60% of variation in gene expression was present between colonies and 34 genes were considered differentially expressed between colonies (minimum P=6.5 x 10(-4)). These genes are associated with energy...... of corymbose-like branching coral colonies such as A. millepora. Four genes were differentially expressed between the tip and base of branches (P=3.239 x 10(-4)) and were associated with lysosome lipase activity and fluorescence, suggesting that branch tips may encounter higher pathogen loads or levels...

  2. Genotypic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin Gene (hla and Its Association with Clonal Background: Implications for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xiao

    Full Text Available The α-hemolysin, encoded by the hla gene, is a major virulence factor in S. aureus infections. Changes in key amino acid residues of α-hemolysin can result in reduction, or even loss, of toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of the hla gene sequence and the relationship of hla variants to the clonal background of S. aureus isolates. A total of 47 clinical isolates from China were used in this study, supplemented with in silico analysis of 318 well-characterized whole genome sequences from globally distributed isolates. A total of 28 hla genotypes were found, including three unique to isolates from China, 20 found only in the global genomes and five found in both. The hla genotype generally correlated with the clonal background, particularly the multilocus sequence type, but was not related to geographic origin, host source or methicillin-resistance phenotype. In addition, the hla gene showed greater diversity than the seven loci utilized in the MLST scheme for S. aureus. Our investigation has provided genetic data which may be useful for future studies of toxicity, immunogenicity and vaccine development.

  3. Use of X-Chromosome Inactivation Pattern to Analyze the Clonality of 14 Female Cases of Kaposi Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding; XiuJuan, Wu; Yan, Zhang; JunQin, Liang; Fang, Xiang; Shirong, Yu; Xiaojing, Kang; Yanyan, Feng; Weidong, Wu; Dong, Luo; Qingli, Lu; DeZhi, Zhang; XiongMing, Pu

    2015-06-16

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) has features of both neoplastic growth and hyperplastic proliferation. It is the most common tumor seen in patients with HIV infection. Whether KS is a real tumor or a benign hyperplastic disease is not known. Tissues from KS and cutaneous hemangioma lesion DNA were extracted, and then digested with methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease HpaII. Human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) was amplified with PCR method and the product was separated on 10% denaturing polyacrylamide gels and stained with ethylene dibromide (EB) to show the polymorphism of HUMARA. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) was amplified and the product was digested by BStXI, agarose gel and EB stained to show the polymorphism of PGK. Finally, we analyzed the clonality of KS. In the 14 patients with KS, heterozygosity of the HUMARA gene was observed in 12 (85.7%) cases. Loss of heterozygosity of HUMARA gene on X-chromosome (without HpaII digestion there were 2 bands, after HpaII digestion there were just 1 of the bands), representing monoclonal origin, was present in 11 cases of Kaposi sarcoma. Heterozygosity of the PGK gene was observed in 5 (35.7%) cases, which all represent monoclonal origin. There was no significant difference according to country, stage, or HIV and HHV-8 (P>0.05). The current findings suggest that Kaposi sarcoma is a clonal neoplasm, not a reactive proliferation.

  4. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Khankhet

    Full Text Available Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition--dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America.

  5. Risk spreading, habitat selection and division of biomass in a submerged clonal plant: Responses to heterogeneous copper pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xue; Wang, Haowen; Wang, Qingfeng; Rudstam, Lars G.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity of contaminant-stress can be an important environmental factor for clonal plants. We focused on Cu transport among the clones, the foraging or fugitive behavior and biomass allocation of submerged plant, Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara, exposed to heterogeneous sediments. This study was carried out in aquatic mesocosms between March and September 2010. Cu accumulated in contaminated ramets was exported horizontally via stolons to other ramets in uncontaminated patches, and then transported both acropetally to leaves and basipetally to belowground structures. There was no indication that V. natans adopted morphological plasticity in response to heterogeneous contaminated habitat. In contrast to predictions, more biomass was allocated to belowground tissues in contaminated patches. We concluded that risk of Cu stress spread among submerged clones, and V. natans did not actively select habitat in contaminated patchy environment. Furthermore, V. natans adopted compensatory investments instead of division of labor to acquire nutrient and survive. -- Highlights: ► Response of submerged clonal plant in heterogeneous Cu soil was studied. ► Cu can spread among V. natans clones in contaminated patches. ► Ramets of V. natans grow randomly instead of habitat selection actively. ► Individual growth in patchy pollution was relative independent rather than DoL. -- Cu can spread among V. natans clones and the clones grow randomly and relative independent in heterogeneous Cu-contaminated sediment

  6. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankhet, Jordan; Vanderwolf, Karen J; McAlpine, Donald F; McBurney, Scott; Overy, David P; Slavic, Durda; Xu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition--dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America.

  7. Clonal diversity and estimation of relative clone age: application to agrobiodiversity of yam (Dioscorea rotundata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarcelli, Nora; Couderc, Marie; Baco, Mohamed N; Egah, Janvier; Vigouroux, Yves

    2013-11-13

    Clonal propagation is a particular reproductive system found in both the plant and animal kingdoms, from human parasites to clonally propagated crops. Clonal diversity provides information about plant and animal evolutionary history, i.e. how clones spread, or the age of a particular clone. In plants, this could provide valuable information about agrobiodiversity dynamics and more broadly about the evolutionary history of a particular crop. We studied the evolutionary history of yam, Dioscorea rotundata. In Africa, Yam is cultivated by tuber clonal propagation. We used 12 microsatellite markers to identify intra-clonal diversity in yam varieties. We then used this diversity to assess the relative ages of clones. Using simulations, we assessed how Approximate Bayesian Computation could use clonal diversity to estimate the age of a clone depending on the size of the sample, the number of independent samples and the number of markers. We then applied this approach to our particular dataset and showed that the relative ages of varieties could be estimated, and that each variety could be ranked by age. We give a first estimation of clone age in an approximate Bayesian framework. However the precise estimation of clone age depends on the precision of the mutation rate. We provide useful information on agrobiodiversity dynamics and suggest recurrent creation of varietal diversity in a clonally propagated crop.

  8. Prediction for the occurrence of clonal chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M.; Kadama, Y.; Ohtaki, K.; Itoh, M.; Awa, A.; Cologne, J.; Nakamura, N.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Identical chromosome aberrations among multiple blood lymphocytes in a blood sample (clonal aberrations) are encountered occasionally during cytogenetic examination of radiation-exposed people. Clonal aberrations are found primarily among high-dose exposed people but no systematic surveys were ever conducted. Therefore, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we conducted a large-scale screening for detecting clonal aberrations using FISH followed by Q-banding. Examinations of 500 cells from each of 513 A-bomb survivors led us to detect 96 clones. The clonal cell fraction (Cf) varied from 0.6% to 20% among the 500 cells. As the number of clonal event was inversely proportional to Cf, we hypothesized that the progenitor cells vary extensively in the number of offspring that they can produce and relative number of progenitor cells decreases as the increase of treatment, while other genes such as DNA repair proteinsnumber of progenitor cells capable to form clones (Cf >=0.6%) to be 2 (1 to 3) in non-exposed individuals. The number increased to up to 7 among the high-dose exposed survivors. Further, our preliminary results for the origins of 10 clones indicated that both hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mature T cells contributed to the clone formation roughly equally. Thus, the estimated number of 2 in non-exposed individuals is shared as one HSC and one mature T cells. The model could neatly explain the frequency of clones in two reports. Our model predicts that clonal aberrations are rarely found but clonal expansion of T lymphocytes occurs commonly. In fact, clonal expansions of non-aberrant cells are reported using TCR gene rearrangement patterns as a marker. We now understand the rough structure of lymphocyte pool in humans and can predict the probability of detecting a clone if the individual frequency of non-clonal translocations and the number of cells scored are given

  9. Waste management in Greater Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrusca, K. [Greater Vancouver Regional District, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Richter, R. [Montenay Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Veolia Environmental Services, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    An outline of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) waste-to-energy program was presented. The GVRD has an annual budget for solid waste management of $90 million. Energy recovery revenues from solid waste currently exceed $10 million. Over 1,660,00 tonnes of GVRD waste is recycled, and another 280,000 tonnes is converted from waste to energy. The GVRD waste-to-energy facility combines state-of-the-art combustion and air pollution control, and has processed over 5 million tonnes of municipal solid waste since it opened in 1988. Its central location minimizes haul distance, and it was originally sited to utilize steam through sales to a recycle paper mill. The facility has won several awards, including the Solid Waste Association of North America award for best facility in 1990. The facility focuses on continual improvement, and has installed a carbon injection system; an ammonia injection system; a flyash stabilization system; and heat capacity upgrades in addition to conducting continuous waste composition studies. Continuous air emissions monitoring is also conducted at the plant, which produces a very small percentage of the total air emissions in metropolitan Vancouver. The GVRD is now seeking options for the management of a further 500,000 tonnes per year of solid waste, and has received 23 submissions from a range of waste energy technologies which are now being evaluated. It was concluded that waste-to-energy plants can be located in densely populated metropolitan areas and provide a local disposal solution as well as a source of renewable energy. Other GVRD waste reduction policies were also reviewed. refs., tabs., figs.

  10. Diverse cellular architecture of atherosclerotic plaque derives from clonal expansion of a few medial SMCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kevin; Lund, Marie Bek; Shim, Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Fibrous cap smooth muscle cells (SMCs) protect atherosclerotic lesions from rupturing and causing thrombosis, while other plaque SMCs may have detrimental roles in plaque development. To gain insight into recruitment of different plaque SMCs, we mapped their clonal architecture in aggregation...... in the cap and heterogeneous ACTA2– SMCs in the plaque interior, including chondrocyte-like cells and cells with intracellular lipid and crystalline material. Fibrous cap SMCs were invariably arranged in endothelium-aligned clonal sheets, confirming results in the aggregation chimeras. Analysis of the clonal...

  11. Clonal Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus post breeding endometritis in thoroughbred broodmares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Söderlind, Maja; Rydemann Rudefalk, Sofia

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is one of the most commonly isolated pathogens from the uterus of mares with infectious endometritis. Its ability to cause chronic latent infection by residing deep within the endometrial tissue has previously been described. The aim of the study was to inv......Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is one of the most commonly isolated pathogens from the uterus of mares with infectious endometritis. Its ability to cause chronic latent infection by residing deep within the endometrial tissue has previously been described. The aim of the study...... was to investigate whether clonal or genetically distinct S. zooepidemicus strains isolated from mares with endometritis were associated with mare risk factors and the outcome of natural cover. Uterine swabs were obtained from mares with intrauterine fluid after natural cover (n=31) at thoroughbred stud farms...... in Australia. Fifty two percent of the mares (n=16) were diagnosed with infectious endometritis, and S.zooepidemicus was isolated in 81% (n=13) of these mares. Up to four S. zooepidemicus isolates were selected from each mare with growth of S. zooepidemicus and isolates from an additional five mares were...

  12. Competition between meiotic and apomictic pathways during ovule and seed development results in clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojsgaard, Diego H; Martínez, Eric J; Quarin, Camilo L

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic and apomictic reproductive pathways develop simultaneously in facultative aposporous species, and compete to form a seed as a final goal. This developmental competition was evaluated in tetraploid genotypes of Paspalum malacophyllum in order to understand the low level of sexuality in facultative apomictic populations. Cyto-embryology on ovules, flow cytometry on seeds and progeny tests by DNA fingerprinting were used to measure the relative incidence of each meiotic or apomictic pathway along four different stages of the plant's life cycle, namely the beginning and end of gametogenesis, seed formation and adult offspring. A high variation in the frequencies of sexual and apomictic pathways occurred at the first two stages. A trend of radical decline in realized sexuality was then observed. Sexual and apomictic seeds were produced, but the efficiency of the sexual pathway dropped drastically, and exclusively clonal offspring remained. Both reproductive pathways are unstable at the beginning of development, and only the apomictic one remains functional. Key factors reducing sexuality are the faster growth and parthenogenetic development in the aposporous pathway, and an (epi)genetically negative background related to the extensive gene de-regulation pattern responsible for apomixis. The effects of inbreeding depression during post-fertilization development may further decrease the frequency of effective sexuality. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Making sense of snapshot data: ergodic principle for clonal cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philipp

    2017-11-01

    Population growth is often ignored when quantifying gene expression levels across clonal cell populations. We develop a framework for obtaining the molecule number distributions in an exponentially growing cell population taking into account its age structure. In the presence of generation time variability, the average acquired across a population snapshot does not obey the average of a dividing cell over time, apparently contradicting ergodicity between single cells and the population. Instead, we show that the variation observed across snapshots with known cell age is captured by cell histories, a single-cell measure obtained from tracking an arbitrary cell of the population back to the ancestor from which it originated. The correspondence between cells of known age in a population with their histories represents an ergodic principle that provides a new interpretation of population snapshot data. We illustrate the principle using analytical solutions of stochastic gene expression models in cell populations with arbitrary generation time distributions. We further elucidate that the principle breaks down for biochemical reactions that are under selection, such as the expression of genes conveying antibiotic resistance, which gives rise to an experimental criterion with which to probe selection on gene expression fluctuations. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Myeloma Cell Dynamics in Response to Treatment Supports a Model of Hierarchical Differentiation and Clonal Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Zhao, Rui; van de Velde, Helgi; Tross, Jennifer G; Mitsiades, Constantine; Viselli, Suzanne; Neuwirth, Rachel; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Anderson, Kenneth; Ghobrial, Irene M; San Miguel, Jesús F; Richardson, Paul G; Tomasson, Michael H; Michor, Franziska

    2016-08-15

    Since the pioneering work of Salmon and Durie, quantitative measures of tumor burden in multiple myeloma have been used to make clinical predictions and model tumor growth. However, such quantitative analyses have not yet been performed on large datasets from trials using modern chemotherapy regimens. We analyzed a large set of tumor response data from three randomized controlled trials of bortezomib-based chemotherapy regimens (total sample size n = 1,469 patients) to establish and validate a novel mathematical model of multiple myeloma cell dynamics. Treatment dynamics in newly diagnosed patients were most consistent with a model postulating two tumor cell subpopulations, "progenitor cells" and "differentiated cells." Differential treatment responses were observed with significant tumoricidal effects on differentiated cells and less clear effects on progenitor cells. We validated this model using a second trial of newly diagnosed patients and a third trial of refractory patients. When applying our model to data of relapsed patients, we found that a hybrid model incorporating both a differentiation hierarchy and clonal evolution best explains the response patterns. The clinical data, together with mathematical modeling, suggest that bortezomib-based therapy exerts a selection pressure on myeloma cells that can shape the disease phenotype, thereby generating further inter-patient variability. This model may be a useful tool for improving our understanding of disease biology and the response to chemotherapy regimens. Clin Cancer Res; 22(16); 4206-14. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. An efficient and reproducible method for in vitro clonal multiplication of Rauvolfia tetraphylla L. and evaluation of genetic stability using DNA-based markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohammad; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Ahmad, Naseem; Anis, Mohammad; Hegazy, Ahmad K

    2012-12-01

    An efficient protocol is described for the rapid in vitro clonal propagation of an endangered medicinal plant, Rauvolfia tetraphylla L., through high frequency shoot induction from nodal explants collected from young shoots of a field grown plant. Effects of growth regulators [6-benzyladenine (BA), kinetin (Kin) 2iP, or α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA)], carbohydrates, different medium [Murashige and Skoog (MS), Woody Plant Medium (WPM), Gamborg medium (B5), Linsmier and Skoog medium (LS)], and various pH levels on in vitro morphogenesis were investigated. The highest frequency of shoot regeneration (90 %) and maximum number of shoot (35.4 ± 2.3) per explant were observed on WPM medium supplemented with 7.5 μM BA, 2.5 μM NAA, and 30 g/l sucrose at pH 5.8. Well-developed shoots, 4-5 cm in length, were successfully rooted ex vitro at 90 % by a 30-min pulse treatment with 150 μM IBA prior to their transfer in planting substrates. The survival rate of transplantation reached 90 % when transferred to field condition. Genetic stability of micropropagated plantlets was assessed and compared with mother plant using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and Inter Simple Sequence Repeats markers. No variation was observed in DNA fingerprinting patterns among the micropropagated plants, which were similar to that of the donor plant illustrating their genetic uniformity and clonal fidelity. This confirms that clonal propagation of this plant using axillary shoot buds can be used for commercial exploitation of the selected genotype where a high degree of fidelity is an essential prerequisite. The work contributed to a better in vitro regeneration and clonal mass multiplication of R. tetraphylla and to develop a strategy for the germplasm conservation of this endangered medicinal plant.

  16. Screening of clonal chromosome aberrations present in A-bomb survivors by FISH method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Mimako; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Ito, Masahiro; Otaki, Kazuo; Nakamura, Nori

    1997-01-01

    Significance of FISH method for detection of clonal chromosome aberration was reviewed. A clonal chromosome aberration is derived from one abnormal cell clone and gives the influence on the frequency of the aberration. As well, the size and frequency of the aberration give an important information concerning lymphocyte kinetics. FISH method is meaningful for detection of the clonal aberration. Fifteen kinds of clonal aberrations were detected in A-bomb survivors, of which 10 were specifically detected by the method, indicating that its detection rate was 2-3 time as high as the ordinary method. The results were those on the DNA probe on no.1, no.2 and no.3 chromosomes, which consisting of about 23% of the genome. (K.H.)

  17. Implementation of Microfluidic Chip Electrophoresis for the Detection of B-cell Clonality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazan M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A clonal population of B-cells is defined as those cells arising from the mitotic division of a single somatic cell with the same rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes. This gives rise to DNA markers for each individual lymphoid cell and its progenies and enables us to study clonality in different B-cell malignancies using multiplex polymerase chain reaction - PCR. The BIOMED-2 protocol has been implemented for clonality detection in lymphoproliferative diseases and exploits multiplex PCR reaction, subsequently analyzed by heteroduplex analysis (HDA using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. With the advent of miniaturization and automation of molecular biology methods, lab-on-chip technologies were developed and replace partially the conventional approaches. We tested device for microfluidic chip, which is used for B-cells clonality analysis, using a PCR reaction for three subregions called frameworks (FR of the immunoglobulin heavy locus (IGH gene.

  18. Clonal diversity analysis using SNP microarray: a new prognostic tool for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linsheng; Znoyko, Iya; Costa, Luciano J; Conlin, Laura K; Daber, Robert D; Self, Sally E; Wolff, Daynna J

    2011-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. The methods currently used for monitoring CLL and determining conditions for treatment are limited in their ability to predict disease progression, patient survival, and response to therapy. Although clonal diversity and the acquisition of new chromosomal abnormalities during the disease course (clonal evolution) have been associated with disease progression, their prognostic potential has been underappreciated because cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies have a restricted ability to detect genomic abnormalities and clonal evolution. We hypothesized that whole genome analysis using high resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays would be useful to detect diversity and infer clonal evolution to offer prognostic information. In this study, we used the Infinium Omni1 BeadChip (Illumina, San Diego, CA) array for the analysis of genetic variation and percent mosaicism in 25 non-selected CLL patients to explore the prognostic value of the assessment of clonal diversity in patients with CLL. We calculated the percentage of mosaicism for each abnormality by applying a mathematical algorithm to the genotype frequency data and by manual determination using the Simulated DNA Copy Number (SiDCoN) tool, which was developed from a computer model of mosaicism. At least one genetic abnormality was identified in each case, and the SNP data was 98% concordant with FISH results. Clonal diversity, defined as the presence of two or more genetic abnormalities with differing percentages of mosaicism, was observed in 12 patients (48%), and the diversity correlated with the disease stage. Clonal diversity was present in most cases of advanced disease (Rai stages III and IV) or those with previous treatment, whereas 9 of 13 patients without detected clonal diversity were asymptomatic or clinically stable. In conclusion, SNP microarray studies with simultaneous evaluation

  19. Clonal diversity and fine-scale genetic structure in a high andean treeline population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peng, Y.; Macek, P.; Macková, Jana; Romoleroux, K.; Hensen, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 1 (2015), s. 59-65 ISSN 0006-3606 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA601110702; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010009 Program:IA Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : AFLP * clonal diversity * clonal propagation * fine-scale genetic structure * Polylepis reticulata * treeline Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.944, year: 2015

  20. Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    19 NIH Exploiting drivers of androgen receptor signaling negative prostate cancer for precision medicine Goal(s): Identify novel potential drivers...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0466 TITLE: Clonal evaluation of prostate cancer by ERG/SPINK1 status to improve prognosis prediction PRINCIPAL...Sept 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Clonal Evaluation of Prostate Cancer by ERG/SPINK1 Status to Improve Prognosis Prediction 5b

  1. Mutational Profiling Can Establish Clonal or Independent Origin in Synchronous Bilateral Breast and Other Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Bao

    Full Text Available Synchronous tumors can be independent primary tumors or a primary-metastatic (clonal pair, which may have clinical implications. Mutational profiling of tumor DNA is increasingly common in the clinic. We investigated whether mutational profiling can distinguish independent from clonal tumors in breast and other cancers, using a carefully defined test based on the Clonal Likelihood Score (CLS = 100 x # shared high confidence (HC mutations/ # total HC mutations.Statistical properties of a formal test using the CLS were investigated. A high CLS is evidence in favor of clonality; the test is implemented as a one-sided binomial test of proportions. Test parameters were empirically determined using 16,422 independent breast tumor pairs and 15 primary-metastatic tumor pairs from 10 cancer types using The Cancer Genome Atlas.We validated performance of the test with its established parameters, using five published data sets comprising 15,758 known independent tumor pairs (maximum CLS = 4.1%, minimum p-value = 0.48 and 283 known tumor clonal pairs (minimum CLS 13%, maximum p-value 0.99, supporting independence. A plausible molecular mechanism for the shift from hormone receptor positive to triple negative was identified in the clonal pair.We have developed the statistical properties of a carefully defined Clonal Likelihood Score test from mutational profiling of tumor DNA. Under identified conditions, the test appears to reliably distinguish between synchronous tumors of clonal and of independent origin in several cancer types. This approach may have scientific and clinical utility.

  2. Efeitos do alagamento do substrato no crescimento e na composição química de genótipos clonais de Theobroma cacao L. Effects of substrate flooding on growth and chemical composition of Theobroma cacao L. clonal genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Carmo Rehem

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O alagamento do solo pode promover alterações no metabolismo celular e causar desvios nas condições ótimas de crescimento das plantas, gerando uma condição de estresse. Objetivou-se no presente trabalho avaliar os efeitos do alagamento no crescimento e na nutrição mineral de seis clones de T. cacao (CP-49, CCN-10, CP-06, CEPEC-2007, CEPEC-2008 e PS-1319, para elucidar possíveis mecanismos de tolerância ao alagamento. Mudas clonais de T. cacao, com 6 meses de idade, foram submetidas ao alagamento, juntamente com o tratamento-controle (não alagado, por 30 dias. Observou-se, no final desse período, que o alagamento promoveu diminuição nas taxas de crescimento relativo radicular (exceto para CP-06 e de área foliar, acúmulo de matéria seca e incremento nas taxas de crescimento relativo caulinar (exceto para os clones CP-06 e CEPEC-2008 e assimilatória líquida (exceto para o clone alagado PS-1319 e de massa foliar específica para os clones CP-49, CCN-10 e CP-06. Os clones que sobreviveram aos 30 dias de alagamento apresentaram baixos valores de razão de área foliar. De modo geral, o alagamento do substrato acarretou deficiência na absorção de macro e micronutrientes minerais, exceto de Fe. Dentre os clones avaliados, o CP-49 foi tolerante e o CEPEC-2008 não tolerante ao alagamento. Os demais clones ficaram numa posição intermediária. Logo, o clone CP-49 tem grande potencial para ser cultivado em condições de alagamento.Soil flooding can induce changes in cell metabolism and cause deviations in optimum conditions for plant growth, creating a stress condition. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of flooding on growth and mineral nutrition of six T. cacao clones (CP-49, CCN-10, CP-06, CEPEC-2007, CEPEC-2008 and PS-1319, aiming to clarify the possible mechanisms of soil flooding tolerance. Plants of T. cacao with 6 months of age were subject to soil flooding, along with the control treatment (not flooded

  3. Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Zhou, Weiyin; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Hutchinson, Amy; Deng, Xiang; Liu, Chenwei; Horner, Marie-Josephe; Cullen, Michael; Epstein, Caroline G; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael C; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Sampson, Joshua; Chung, Charles C; Kovaks, Joseph; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Teras, Lauren T; Gaudet, Mia M; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Hu, Nan; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Liao, Linda; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Koh, Woon-Puay; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Fan, Jin-Hu; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Zanetti, Krista A; Ziegler, Regina G; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Malats, Nuria; Marenne, Gaelle; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Landi, Maria Teresa; Goldin, Lynn; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Rotunno, Melissa; Rajaraman, Preetha; Andersson, Ulrika; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreon, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henriksson, Roger; Inskip, Peter D; Johansen, Christoffer; Landgren, Annelie; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Melin, Beatrice S; Peters, Ulrike; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Silverman, Debra T; Kogevinas, Manolis; Gonzalez, Juan R; Villa, Olaya; Li, Donghui; Duell, Eric J; Risch, Harvey A; Olson, Sara H; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M; Jiao, Li; Hassan, Manal; Wheeler, William; Arslan, Alan A; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron D; Holly, Elizabeth A; Klein, Alison P; LaCroix, Andrea; Mandelson, Margaret T; Petersen, Gloria; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Canzian, Federico; Chang, Kenneth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Jenab, Mazda; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; McWilliams, Robert R; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Rabe, Kari G; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Elena, Joanne W; Yu, Herbert; Amundadottir, Laufey; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stram, Daniel; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; García, Ana Patiño; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Barkauskas, Donald A; Gorlick, Richard G; Purdue, Mark; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E; Schwartz, Kendra L; Davis, Faith G; Hsing, Ann W; Berndt, Sonja I; Black, Amanda; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B; Graubard, Barry I; Kratz, Christian P; Greene, Mark H; Erickson, Ralph L; Hunter, David J; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Real, Francisco X; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret; Rothman, Nathaniel; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Chanock, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls drawn from 13 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones from DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of size >2 Mb were observed in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%) with abnormal cell proportions between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, the frequency increased with age; 0.23% under 50 and 1.91% between 75 and 79 (p=4.8×10−8). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid-tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals, OR=1.25, p=0.016), with a stronger association for cases who had DNA collected prior to diagnosis or treatment (OR=1.45, p=0.0005). Detectable clonal mosaicism was common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least one year prior to diagnosis of leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR=35.4, p=3.8×10−11). These findings underscore the importance of the role and time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and other late-onset diseases. PMID:22561519

  4. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. → The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. → The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. → P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. → Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC -/- cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC -/- clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  5. Clonal dominance among T-lymphocyte infiltrates in arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenkovic, I.; Stegagno, M.; Wright, K.A.; Krane, S.M.; Amento, E.P.; Colvin, R.B.; Duquesnoy, R.J.; Kurnick, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    Synovial membranes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as other types of chronic destructive inflammatory arthritis contain infiltrates of activated T lymphocytes that probably contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. In an effort to elucidate the nature of these infiltrates, interleukin 2 (IL-2)-responsive T lymphocytes were grown out of synovial fragments from 14 patients undergoing surgery for advanced destructive inflammatory joint disease. Eleven of the samples examined were from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis, while three others were obtained from individuals with clinical osteoarthritis. Southern blot analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain genes in 13 of 14 cultures showed distinct rearrangements, indicating that each culture was characterized by the predominance of a limited number of clones. T-cell populations from peripheral blood stimulated with a variety of activators and expanded with IL-2 did not demonstrate evidence of similar clonality in long-term culture. These results suggest that a limited number of activated T-cell clones predominate at the site of tissue injury in rheumatoid synovial membranes as well as in other types of destructive inflammatory joint disease. Further characterization of these T-cell clones may aid our understanding of the pathogenesis of these rheumatic disorders

  6. Clonal dominance and transplantation dynamics in hematopoietic stem cell compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ashcroft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells in mammals are known to reside mostly in the bone marrow, but also transitively passage in small numbers in the blood. Experimental findings have suggested that they exist in a dynamic equilibrium, continuously migrating between these two compartments. Here we construct an individual-based mathematical model of this process, which is parametrised using existing empirical findings from mice. This approach allows us to quantify the amount of migration between the bone marrow niches and the peripheral blood. We use this model to investigate clonal hematopoiesis, which is a significant risk factor for hematologic cancers. We also analyse the engraftment of donor stem cells into non-conditioned and conditioned hosts, quantifying the impact of different treatment scenarios. The simplicity of the model permits a thorough mathematical analysis, providing deeper insights into the dynamics of both the model and of the real-world system. We predict the time taken for mutant clones to expand within a host, as well as chimerism levels that can be expected following transplantation therapy, and the probability that a preconditioned host is reconstituted by donor cells.

  7. The Latent Reservoir for HIV-1: How Immunologic Memory and Clonal Expansion Contribute to HIV-1 Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Alexandra J.; Kwon, Kyungyoon J.; Farber, Donna L.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 infection reduces plasma virus levels to below the limit of detection of clinical assays. However, even with prolonged suppression of viral replication with ART, viremia rebounds rapidly after treatment interruption. Thus ART is not curative. The principal barrier to cure is a remarkably stable reservoir of latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Here we consider explanations for the remarkable stability of the latent reservoir. Stability does not appear to reflect replenishment from new infection events but rather normal physiologic processes that provide for immunologic memory. Of particular importance are proliferative processes that drive clonal expansion of infected cells. Recent evidence suggests that in some infected cells, proliferation is a consequence of proviral integration into host genes associated with cell growth. Efforts to cure HIV-1 infection by targeting the latent reservoir may need to consider the potential of latently infected cells to proliferate. PMID:27382129

  8. High-throughput monitoring of integration site clonality in preclinical and clinical gene therapy studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A Giordano

    Full Text Available Gene transfer to hematopoietic stem cells with integrating vectors not only allows sustained correction of monogenic diseases but also tracking of individual clones in vivo. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR has been shown to be an accurate method to quantify individual stem cell clones, yet due to frequently limited amounts of target material (especially in clinical studies, it is not useful for large-scale analyses. To explore whether vector integration site (IS recovery techniques may be suitable to describe clonal contributions if combined with next-generation sequencing techniques, we designed artificial ISs of different sizes which were mixed to simulate defined clonal situations in clinical settings. We subjected all mixes to either linear amplification–mediated PCR (LAM-PCR or nonrestrictive LAM-PCR (nrLAM-PCR, both combined with 454 sequencing. We showed that nrLAM-PCR/454-detected clonality allows estimating qPCR-detected clonality in vitro. We then followed the kinetics of two clones detected in a patient enrolled in a clinical gene therapy trial using both, nrLAM-PCR/454 and qPCR and also saw nrLAM-PCR/454 to correlate to qPCR-measured clonal contributions. The method presented here displays a feasible high-throughput strategy to monitor clonality in clinical gene therapy trials is at hand.

  9. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing for Identification of Globally Distributed Clonal Groups and Differentiation of Outbreak Strains of Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Hammack, Thomas S.; Allard, Marc W.; Strain, Errol A.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many listeriosis outbreaks are caused by a few globally distributed clonal groups, designated clonal complexes or epidemic clones, of Listeria monocytogenes, several of which have been defined by classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting 6 to 8 housekeeping or virulence genes. We have developed and evaluated core genome MLST (cgMLST) schemes and applied them to isolates from multiple clonal groups, including those associated with 39 listeriosis outbreaks. The cgMLST...

  10. Deep Sequencing of T-cell Receptor DNA as a Biomarker of Clonally Expanded TILs in Breast Cancer after Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, David B; Yuan, Jianda; Redmond, David; Wen, Y Hanna; Durack, Jeremy C; Emerson, Ryan; Solomon, Stephen; Dong, Zhiwan; Wong, Phillip; Comstock, Christopher; Diab, Adi; Sung, Janice; Maybody, Majid; Morris, Elizabeth; Brogi, Edi; Morrow, Monica; Sacchini, Virgilio; Elemento, Olivier; Robins, Harlan; Patil, Sujata; Allison, James P; Wolchok, Jedd D; Hudis, Clifford; Norton, Larry; McArthur, Heather L

    2016-10-01

    In early-stage breast cancer, the degree of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) predicts response to chemotherapy and overall survival. Combination immunotherapy with immune checkpoint antibody plus tumor cryoablation can induce lymphocytic infiltrates and improve survival in mice. We used T-cell receptor (TCR) DNA sequencing to evaluate both the effect of cryoimmunotherapy in humans and the feasibility of TCR sequencing in early-stage breast cancer. In a pilot clinical trial, 18 women with early-stage breast cancer were treated preoperatively with cryoablation, single-dose anti-CTLA-4 (ipilimumab), or cryoablation + ipilimumab. TCRs within serially collected peripheral blood and tumor tissue were sequenced. In baseline tumor tissues, T-cell density as measured by TCR sequencing correlated with TIL scores obtained by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. However, tumors with little or no lymphocytes by H&E contained up to 3.6 × 10 6 TCR DNA sequences, highlighting the sensitivity of the ImmunoSEQ platform. In this dataset, ipilimumab increased intratumoral T-cell density over time, whereas cryoablation ± ipilimumab diversified and remodeled the intratumoral T-cell clonal repertoire. Compared with monotherapy, cryoablation plus ipilimumab was associated with numerically greater numbers of peripheral blood and intratumoral T-cell clones expanding robustly following therapy. In conclusion, TCR sequencing correlates with H&E lymphocyte scoring and provides additional information on clonal diversity. These findings support further study of the use of TCR sequencing as a biomarker for T-cell responses to therapy and for the study of cryoimmunotherapy in early-stage breast cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(10); 835-44. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. [Lymphocytic Clonal Expansion in Adult Patients with Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Feng-Luan; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Qian; Feng, Jia; Zhang, Wen-Li; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hai-Chan; Wen, Juan-Juan; Meng, Qing-Xiang

    2017-12-01

    To explore the lymphocytic clonal expansion in adult patients with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative diseases (EBV+LPD), and to investigate the experimental methods for EBV+LPD cells so as to provide a more objective measure for the diagnosis, classification and prognosis in the early stage of this disease. Peripheral blood samples from 5 patients with EBV+LPD, 4 patients with adult infectious mononucleosis(IM) as negative control and 3 patients with acute NK-cell leukemia(ANKL) as positive control were collected. Prior to immunochemotherapy, viral loads and clonality were analysed by flow cytometry (FCM), T cell receptor gene rearrangement (TCR) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and diversity of EB virus terminal repeat (EBV-TR) was detected by Southern blot. FCM showed only 1 case with clonal TCRVβ in 5 patients with EBV+LPD, TCR clonal expansion could be detected both in patients with IM(4 of 4) and 4 patients with EBV+LPD(4 of 5), Out of patients with EBV+LPD, 1 patient displayed a monoclonal band and 2 patients showed oligoclonal bands when detecting EBV-TR by southen blot. Detecting the diversity of EBV-TR by Southern blot may be the most objective way to reflex clonal transformation of EBV+LPD, which is of great benefit to the diagnosis, classification and prognosis in the early stage of this disease.

  12. Emergence of clonal hematopoiesis in the majority of patients with acquired aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Perdigones, Nieves; Perin, Juan C; Olson, Timothy S; Ye, Wenda; Roth, Jacquelyn J; Lind, Curt; Cattier, Carine; Li, Yimei; Hartung, Helge; Paessler, Michele E; Frank, Dale M; Xie, Hongbo M; Cross, Shanna; Cockroft, Joshua D; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Monos, Dimitrios; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2015-04-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a nonmalignant disease caused by autoimmune destruction of early hematopoietic cells. Clonal hematopoiesis is a late complication, seen in 20-25% of older patients. We hypothesized that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is a more general phenomenon, which can arise early in disease, even in younger patients. To evaluate clonal hematopoiesis in aAA, we used comparative whole exome sequencing of paired bone marrow and skin samples in 22 patients. We found somatic mutations in 16 patients (72.7%) with a median disease duration of 1 year; of these, 12 (66.7%) were patients with pediatric-onset aAA. Fifty-eight mutations in 51 unique genes were found primarily in pathways of immunity and transcriptional regulation. Most frequently mutated was PIGA, with seven mutations. Only two mutations were in genes recurrently mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome. Two patients had oligoclonal loss of the HLA alleles, linking immune escape to clone emergence. Two patients had activating mutations in key signaling pathways (STAT5B (p.N642H) and CAMK2G (p.T306M)). Our results suggest that clonal hematopoiesis in aAA is common, with two mechanisms emerging-immune escape and increased proliferation. Our findings expand conceptual understanding of this nonneoplastic blood disorder. Future prospective studies of clonal hematopoiesis in aAA will be critical for understanding outcomes and for designing personalized treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Linezolid-resistant enterococci in Polish hospitals: species, clonality and determinants of linezolid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawryszewska, I; Żabicka, D; Hryniewicz, W; Sadowy, E

    2017-07-01

    The significant increase of the linezolid-resistant enterococci (LRE) has been observed in Polish hospitals since 2012 and our study aimed at elucidating the possible reasons for this phenomenon. Polish LRE isolates were analysed by multilocus-sequence typing (MLST) and multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to establish clonal relatedness and mechanism of linezolid resistance, respectively. Fifty analysed LRE (2008-2015) included mostly Enterococcus faecium (82%) and Enterococcus faecalis (16%). Enterococcus faecium belonged to the hospital-adapted lineages 17/18 and 78, while E. faecalis isolates represented ST6, a hospital-associated type, and ST116, found in both humans and food-production animals. The G2576T 23S rRNA mutation was the most frequent (94%) mechanism of linezolid/tedizolid resistance of LRE. None of the isolates carried the plasmid-associated gene of Cfr methyltransferase, whereas optrA, encoding the ABC-type drug transporter, was identified in two E. faecalis isolates. In these isolates, optrA was located on a plasmid, transferable to both E. faecium and E. faecalis, whose partial (36.3 kb) sequence was 100% identical to the pE394 plasmid, identified previously in China in both clinical and farm animal isolates. The optrA-E. faecium transconjugant displayed a significant growth deficiency, in contrast to the optrA-E. faecalis. Our study indicates the role of mutation acquisition by hospital-adapted clones of enterococci as a major driver of increasing resistance to linezolid and tedizolid. Transferability and apparent lack of a biological cost of resistance suggest that E. faecalis may be a natural reservoir of optrA, an emerging mechanism of oxazolidinone resistance.

  14. CLONAL MICROPROPAGATION OF POTATO VARIETIES BY WESTERN SIBERIA SELECTION– THE NEW FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Miakisheva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is sanctified urgent need to use methods of modern biotechnology in primary seed farming of potatoes in the territory of the Russian Federation. Lack of required amount of good quality planting material is a major factor limiting stable high yield. The crop of potatoes, annually produced in Russia, significantly below global, and does not meet genetic capabilities of the species. Many viral infections tend to accumulate in the tubers, reducing their quality and keeping quality during storage. For the first time peculiarities of clonal micropropagation and in vitro culture of early-maturing potato varieties Lubava Russian breeding (agricultural research Institute of the city of Kemerovo, the Kemerovo region of the Russian Federation. At the stage of introduction to the culture of the parameters, providing pure cultures using lizoformin as sterilizing compounds. At the stage of actually breeding to obtain plants-regenerants of a certain morphological structure was studied the influence of certain components of the nutrient medium. The influence of agar, sucrose and vitamins such morphological indicators of development of regenerated plants as number of internodes and plant height. In the rooting stage the effect of different of growth regulators auxin nature: α-naphthyloxy acid, β-indoleacetic acid and β-indolebutyric acid, in concentrations of 0.1-5 μm. Selected concentrations of these compounds, the introduction of which in the nutrient medium provided the maximum indices of rhisogenesis: the number and length of roots. At the stage of adaptation to non-sterile growing conditions ex vitro the efficiency of the hydroponic plants, filled with a liquid nutrient solution. A successful stage adaptation has characterizability 100% survival rate of plants and increase the morphological characteristics of regenerants.

  15. Clonal propagation and cryogenic storage of the medicinal plant Stevia rebaudiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatnawi, M. A.; Shibli, R. A.; Abu-Romman, S. M.; Al-Mazra awi, M. S.; Al Ajlouni, Z. I.; Shatanawi, W. A.; Odeh, W. H.

    2011-07-01

    Successful clonal propagation of Stevia rebaudiana was achieved using micro shoots as a primary step for in vitro conservation. Maximum proliferation was obtained on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 1.5 mg L{sup -}1 benzyl amino purine and 0.2 mg L{sup -}1 indole-3-butyric-acid (IBA). Auxin increased rooting percentage of shoots at concentration of 0.4 mg L{sup -}1 IBA, indole-3-acetic-acid or naphthalene acetic acid and no rooting occurred without plant growth regulator. A survival of 90% was achieved when rooted explants were acclimatized in vivo in 1 soil: 1 perlite: 1 peat. In vitro S. rebaudiana shoots were successfully stored for up to 32 weeks on MS medium supplemented with an appropriate concentration of sucrose, sorbitol or mannitol, at 24 {+-} 2 degree centigrade. After 32 weeks, 93.6% of the shoots were able to survive. Moreover, 89.3% of them were able to regrow when stored under light conditions. Cryo preservation by vitrification was successfully achieved (65.6% regrowth) when shoot tips were pre cultured on a medium supplemented with 0.4 M sorbitol for 2 d, followed by loading shoot tips with 80% concentrated plant vitrification solution 2 (PVS2) for 20 min; then dehydrated with 100% PVS2 for 60 min at 0 degree centigrade prior to storage in liquid nitrogen. This procedure is easy to handle and produced a high levels of shoot formation. This protocol could be useful for long term storage of S. rebaudiana germplasm. (Author) 30 refs.

  16. Clonal characterization of rat muscle satellite cells: proliferation, metabolism and differentiation define an intrinsic heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Rossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells (SCs represent a distinct lineage of myogenic progenitors responsible for the postnatal growth, repair and maintenance of skeletal muscle. Distinguished on the basis of their unique position in mature skeletal muscle, SCs were considered unipotent stem cells with the ability of generating a unique specialized phenotype. Subsequently, it was demonstrated in mice that opposite differentiation towards osteogenic and adipogenic pathways was also possible. Even though the pool of SCs is accepted as the major, and possibly the only, source of myonuclei in postnatal muscle, it is likely that SCs are not all multipotent stem cells and evidences for diversities within the myogenic compartment have been described both in vitro and in vivo. Here, by isolating single fibers from rat flexor digitorum brevis (FDB muscle we were able to identify and clonally characterize two main subpopulations of SCs: the low proliferative clones (LPC present in major proportion (approximately 75% and the high proliferative clones (HPC, present instead in minor amount (approximately 25%. LPC spontaneously generate myotubes whilst HPC differentiate into adipocytes even though they may skip the adipogenic program if co-cultured with LPC. LPC and HPC differ also for mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m, ATP balance and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS generation underlying diversities in metabolism that precede differentiation. Notably, SCs heterogeneity is retained in vivo. SCs may therefore be comprised of two distinct, though not irreversibly committed, populations of cells distinguishable for prominent differences in basal biological features such as proliferation, metabolism and differentiation. By these means, novel insights on SCs heterogeneity are provided and evidences for biological readouts potentially relevant for diagnostic purposes described.

  17. Effects of soil nutrient heterogeneity on intraspecific competition in the invasive, clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Alpert, Peter; Li, Hong-Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Lei, Guang-Chun; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-03-01

    Fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in soil nutrient availability can increase the growth of individual plants, the productivity of plant communities and interspecific competition. If this is due to the ability of plants to concentrate their roots where nutrient levels are high, then nutrient heterogeneity should have little effect on intraspecific competition, especially when there are no genotypic differences between individuals in root plasticity. We tested this hypothesis in a widespread, clonal species in which individual plants are known to respond to nutrient heterogeneity. Plants derived from a single clone of Alternanthera philoxeroides were grown in the greenhouse at low or high density (four or 16 plants per 27·5 × 27·5-cm container) with homogeneous or heterogeneous availability of soil nutrients, keeping total nutrient availability per container constant. After 9 weeks, measurements of size, dry mass and morphology were taken. Plants grew more in the heterogeneous than in the homogeneous treatment, showing that heterogeneity promoted performance; they grew less in the high- than in the low-density treatment, showing that plants competed. There was no interactive effect of nutrient heterogeneity and plant density, supporting the hypothesis that heterogeneity does not affect intraspecific competition in the absence of genotypic differences in plasticity. Treatments did not affect morphological characteristics such as specific leaf area or root/shoot ratio. Results indicate that fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in the availability of soil nutrients does not increase competition when plants are genetically identical, consistent with the suggestion that effects of heterogeneity on competition depend upon differences in plasticity between individuals. Heterogeneity is only likely to increase the spread of monoclonal, invasive populations such as that of A. philoxeroides in China.

  18. Genomic Structural Variations Affecting Virulence During Clonal Expansion of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Biovar 3 in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firrao, Giuseppe; Torelli, Emanuela; Polano, Cesare; Ferrante, Patrizia; Ferrini, Francesca; Martini, Marta; Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco; Ermacora, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) biovar 3 caused pandemic bacterial canker of Actinidia chinensis and Actinidia deliciosa since 2008. In Europe, the disease spread rapidly in the kiwifruit cultivation areas from a single introduction. In this study, we investigated the genomic diversity of Psa biovar 3 strains during the primary clonal expansion in Europe using single molecule real-time (SMRT), Illumina and Sanger sequencing technologies. We recorded evidences of frequent mobilization and loss of transposon Tn6212, large chromosome inversions, and ectopic integration of IS sequences (remarkably ISPsy31, ISPsy36, and ISPsy37). While no phenotype change associated with Tn6212 mobilization could be detected, strains CRAFRU 12.29 and CRAFRU 12.50 did not elicit the hypersensitivity response (HR) on tobacco and eggplant leaves and were limited in their growth in kiwifruit leaves due to insertion of ISPsy31 and ISPsy36 in the hrpS and hrpR genes, respectively, interrupting the hrp cluster. Both strains had been isolated from symptomatic plants, suggesting coexistence of variant strains with reduced virulence together with virulent strains in mixed populations. The structural differences caused by rearrangements of self-genetic elements within European and New Zealand strains were comparable in number and type to those occurring among the European strains, in contrast with the significant difference in terms of nucleotide polymorphisms. We hypothesize a relaxation, during clonal expansion, of the selection limiting the accumulation of deleterious mutations associated with genome structural variation due to transposition of mobile elements. This consideration may be relevant when evaluating strategies to be adopted for epidemics management.

  19. Variation of functional clonal traits along elevation in two fern species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.B.; Chen, L.Y.; Xiong, W.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypical plasticity is generally considered among adaptive strategies by which plants can cope with environmental variation in space and time. Although much is known about plasticity in seed plants in terms of functional clonal traits while little is known about ferns. Variation of functional clonal traits of two ferns Dicranopteris dichotoma and Diplopterygium glaucum among plots differing in elevation in a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China was investigated. Along with elevation increasing the two fern species showed similar variation pattern of functional clonal traits: stable spacer length, increasing specific spacer length and decreasing spacer weight per ramet and specific spacer weight. The two ferns species had similar variation pattern of ramet performance traits but different variation pattern of ramet population properties. These results suggest an evolutionary trade-off between functions of foraging for and storing of resources in the two ferns, with a functional preference for the foraging in response to environmental change. (author)

  20. Usefullness of IGH/TCR PCR studies in lymphoproliferative disorders with inconclusive clonality by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; Juncà, Jordi; Rodríguez, Inés; Marcé, Silvia; Cabezón, Marta; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-07-25

    In up to 5-15% of studies of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) flow cytometry (FCM) or immunomorphologic methods cannot discriminate malignant from reactive processes. The aim of this work was to determine the usefulness of PCR for solving these diagnostic uncertainties. We analyzed IGH and TCRγ genes by PCR in 106 samples with inconclusive FCM results. A clonal result was registered in 36/106 studies, with a LPD being confirmed in 27 (75%) of these cases. Specifically, 9/9 IGH clonal and 16/25 TCRγ clonal results were finally diagnosed with LPD. Additionally, 2 clonal TCRγ samples with suspicion of undefined LPD were finally diagnosed with T LPD. Although polyclonal results were obtained in 47 of the cases studied (38 IGH and 9 TCRγ), hematologic neoplasms were diagnosed in 4/38 IGH polyclonal and in 1/9 TCRγ polyclonal studies. There were also 14 PCR polyclonal results (4 IGH, 10 TCRγ), albeit non-conclusive. Of these, 2/4 were eventually diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma and 3/10 with T-cell LPD. In 8 IGH samples the results of PCR techniques were non-informative but in 3/8 cases a B lymphoma was finally confirmed. We concluded that PCR is a useful technique to identify LPD when FCM is inconclusive. A PCR clonal B result is indicative of malignancy but IGH polyclonal and non-conclusive results do not exclude lymphoid neoplasms. Interpretation of T-cell clonality should be based on all the available clinical and analytical data. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society. Copyright © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  1. Clonal relatedness between lobular carcinoma in situ and synchronous malignant lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) has been accepted as a marker of risk for the development of invasive breast cancer, yet modern models of breast carcinogenesis include LCIS as a precursor of low-grade carcinomas. We provide evidence favoring a clonal origin for LCIS and synchronous estrogen receptor-positive malignant lesions of the ductal and lobular phenotype. Methods Patients with prior LCIS undergoing mastectomy were identified preoperatively from 2003 to 2008. Specimens were widely sampled, and frozen blocks were screened for LCIS and co-existing malignant lesions, and were subject to microdissection. Samples from 65 patients were hybridized to the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array platform. Cases with both an LCIS sample and an associated ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive tumor sample were evaluated for patterns of somatic copy number changes to assess evidence of clonal relatedness. Results LCIS was identified in 44 of the cases, and among these a DCIS and/or invasive lesion was also identified in 21 cases. A total of 17 tumor pairs had adequate DNA/array data for analysis, including nine pairs of LCIS/invasive lobular cancer, four pairs of LCIS/DCIS, and four pairs of LCIS/invasive ductal cancer. Overall, seven pairs (41%) were judged to be clonally related; in five (29%) evidence suggested clonality but was equivocal, and five (29%) were considered independent. Clonal pairs were observed with all matched lesion types and low and high histological grades. We also show anecdotal evidence of clonality between a patient-matched triplet of LCIS, DCIS, and invasive ductal cancer. Conclusion Our results support the role of LCIS as a precursor in the development of both high-grade and low-grade ductal and lobular cancers. PMID:22776144

  2. PPARγ ligand production is tightly linked to clonal expansion during initiation of adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenborg, Philip; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Feddersen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    of differentiation. Concomitant with agonist production, murine fibroblasts undergo two rounds of mitosis referred to as mitotic clonal expansion. Here we show that mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in either of two cell cycle inhibitors, the transcription factor p53 or its target gene encoding the cyclin...... cycle inhibitory compounds decreased PPAR ligand production in differentiating 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, these inhibitors abolished the release of arachidonic acid induced by the hormonal cocktail initiating adipogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that murine fibroblasts require clonal...... expansion for PPAR ligand production at the onset of adipocyte differentiation....

  3. Diverse cellular architecture of atherosclerotic plaque derives from clonal expansion of a few medial SMCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kevin; Lund, Marie Bek; Shim, Jeong

    2017-01-01

    chimeras of eGFP+Apoe-/- and Apoe-/- mouse embryos and in mice with a mosaic expression of fluorescent proteins in medial SMCs that were rendered atherosclerotic by PCSK9-induced hypercholesterolemia. Fibrous caps in aggregation chimeras were found constructed from large, endothelial-aligned layers...... in the cap and heterogeneous ACTA2- SMCs in the plaque interior, including chondrocyte-like cells and cells with intracellular lipid and crystalline material. Fibrous cap SMCs were invariably arranged in endothelium-aligned clonal sheets, confirming results in the aggregation chimeras. Analysis of the clonal...

  4. Stress-induced memory alters growth of clonal offspring of white clover (Trifolium repens)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González, Alejandra Pilar Rendina; Chrtek, Jindřich; Dobrev, Petre; Dumalasová, Veronika; Fehrer, Judith; Mráz, Patrik; Latzel, Vít

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 9 (2016), s. 1567-1574 ISSN 0002-9122 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06802S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : asexual reproduction * DNA methylation * epigenetic variation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 3.050, year: 2016

  5. The Contrasting Roles of Growth Traits and Architectural Traits in Diversity Maintenance in Clonal Plant Communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wildová, Radka; Goldberg, D. E.; Herben, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 180, č. 6 (2012), s. 693-706 ISSN 0003-0147 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/1471 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : individual based model * coexistence * cempetitive exclusion * plant architecture * spatial traits Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.552, year: 2012

  6. Accounting for clonality in comparative plant demography – growth or reproduction?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janovský, Zdeněk; Herben, Tomáš; Klimešová, Jitka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3-4 (2017), s. 433-442 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-19245S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Population matrices * Clo-Pla * Compadre Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 1.017, year: 2016

  7. Regulating the regulators: responses of four plant growth regulators during clonal propagation of Lachenalia montana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aremu, A.O.; Plačková, Lenka; Masondo, N.A.; Amoo, S.O.; Moyo, M.; Novák, Ondřej; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2017), s. 305-315 ISSN 0167-6903 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21306; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA14-34792S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : adventitious bud formation * zeatin-type cytokinins * in-vitro * cv ronina * endogenous cytokinin * biological -activity * bulb production * south-africa * biotechnology * organogenesis * Asparagaceae * Floriculture * Phytohormones * Physiological disorders * meta-Topolin * Ornamentals Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2016

  8. Clonal variation in growth, flowering and cone production in a seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... production in a seed orchard of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in ... one of the important seed sources for forest plantations. And also, these seed ...... Ph.D. Thesis, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Umea ,. Sweden.

  9. Clonal growth and fine-scale genetic structure in tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus: Fagaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard S. Dodd; Wasima Mayer; Alejandro Nettel; Zara Afzal-Rafii

    2013-01-01

    The combination of sprouting and reproduction by seed can have important consequences on fine-scale spatial distribution of genetic structure (SGS). SGS is an important consideration for species’ restoration because it determines the minimum distance among seed trees to maximize genetic diversity while not prejudicing locally adapted genotypes. Local environmental...

  10. A comparison of 454 sequencing and clonal sequencing for the characterization of hepatitis C virus NS3 variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Cynthia K. Y.; Welkers, Matthijs R. A.; Thomas, Xiomara V.; Sullivan, James C.; Kieffer, Tara L.; Reesink, Henk W.; Rebers, Sjoerd P. H.; de Jong, Menno D.; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We compared 454 amplicon sequencing with clonal sequencing for the characterization of intra-host hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 variants. Clonal and 454 sequences were obtained from 12 patients enrolled in a clinical phase I study for telaprevir, an NS3-4a protease inhibitor. Thirty-nine datasets were

  11. Clinical significance of T-cell clonality in mycosis fungoides and other cutaneous T-cell lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muche, Joachim Marcus

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to obtain more insight into T-cell clonality in blood of mycosis fungoides (MF) patients. Investigation of the frequency of blood T-cell clonality clearly indicated early dissemination of neoplastic T-cells into skin and blood as a sign of physiological recirculation.

  12. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow, Michael; Nazarian, Levon N

    2014-05-01

    Lateral hip pain, or greater trochanteric pain syndrome, is a commonly seen condition; in this article, the relevant anatomy, epidemiology, and evaluation strategies of greater trochanteric pain syndrome are reviewed. Specific attention is focused on imaging of this syndrome and treatment techniques, including ultrasound-guided interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaccine Preventability of Meningococcal Clone, Greater Aachen Region, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, Johannes; Schouls, Leo M.; van de Pol, Ingrid; Keijzers, Wendy C.; Martin, Diana R.; Glennie, Anne; Oster, Philipp; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich; van der Ende, Arie

    2010-01-01

    Emergence of serogroup B meningococci of clonal complex sequence type (ST) 41/44 can cause high levels of disease, as exemplified by a recent epidemic in New Zealand. Multiplication of annual incidence rates (3.1 cases/100,000 population) of meningococcal disease in a defined German region, the city

  14. In vitro clonal propagation of the neem tree ( Azadirachta indica A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro clonal propagation of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) M Shahin-uz-zaman, M Ashrafuzzaman, MS Haque, LN Luna. Abstract. A study was conducted with root and shoot tip explants of neem to develop an efficient protocol of regeneration. Shoot tips and root tips from 10 - 20 days old seedlings of neem ...

  15. [Chronologic analysis of clonal evolution in acquired aplastic anemia and sMDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizato, Tetsuichi

    2016-04-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a prototype of idiopathic bone marrow failure, which is caused by immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic progenitors but is also characterized by frequent evolution to clonal myeloid disorders, such as myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukemia. However, the chronological behavior of the clonality and its link to myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia has not been fully explored. To define the clonality and its chronological behavior in AA, we performed targeted sequencing (N=439) in cases with AA. Somatic mutations were detected in 1/3 of our cases. Mutations were most frequently found in DNMT3A, followed by BCOR, PIGA and ASXL1. The prevalence of mutations increased with age. The clone sizes in DNMT3A and ASXL1 were prone to increase, whereas those of BCOR and PIGA were more likely to decrease or remain stable. Mutations in PIGA, BCOR and BCORL1 correlated with a better response to immunosuppressive therapy and more favorable survival. On the other hand, other mutations were associated with worse outcomes. The chronological dynamics of clonality showed marked variability and were not necessarily associated with prognosis.

  16. Epigenetic memory as a basis for intelligent behavior in clonal plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Latzel, Vít; González, Alejandra Pilar Rendina; Rosenthal, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, AUG 31 (2016), s. 1-7, č. článku 1354. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06802S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : epigenetic variability * memory * clonal plant s Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  17. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  18. Clonal genotype of Geomyces destructans among bats with White Nose Syndrome, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Sunanda S; Li, Xiaojiang; Rudd, Robert J; Okoniewski, Joseph C; Xu, Jianping; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2011-07-01

    The dispersal mechanism of Geomyces destructans, which causes geomycosis (white nose syndrome) in hibernating bats, remains unknown. Multiple gene genealogic analyses were conducted on 16 fungal isolates from diverse sites in New York State during 2008-2010. The results are consistent with the clonal dispersal of a single G. destructans genotype.

  19. Clonal Genotype of Geomyces destructans among Bats with White Nose Syndrome, New York, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, Sunanda S.; Li, Xiaojiang; Rudd, Robert J.; Okoniewski, Joseph C.; Xu, Jianping; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2011-01-01

    The dispersal mechanism of Geomyces destructans, which causes geomycosis (white nose syndrome) in hibernating bats, remains unknown. Multiple gene genealogic analyses were conducted on 16 fungal isolates from diverse sites in New York State during 2008–2010. The results are consistent with the clonal dispersal of a single G. destructans genotype.

  20. Fatal septicemia linked to transmission of MRSA clonal complex 398 in hospital and nursing home, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Kemp, Michael; Holm, Anette

    2016-01-01

    We describe 2 fatal cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 septicemia in persons who had no contact with livestock. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolated MRSA strains strongly suggest that both were of animal origin and that the patients had been infected...

  1. Diverse cellular architecture of atherosclerotic plaque derives from clonal expansion of a few medial SMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Kevin; Lund, Marie Bek; Shim, Jeong; Gunnersen, Stine; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Kjolby, Mads; Carramolino, Laura; Bentzon, Jacob Fog

    2017-10-05

    Fibrous cap smooth muscle cells (SMCs) protect atherosclerotic lesions from rupturing and causing thrombosis, while other plaque SMCs may have detrimental roles in plaque development. To gain insight into recruitment of different plaque SMCs, we mapped their clonal architecture in aggregation chimeras of eGFP+Apoe-/- and Apoe-/- mouse embryos and in mice with a mosaic expression of fluorescent proteins in medial SMCs that were rendered atherosclerotic by PCSK9-induced hypercholesterolemia. Fibrous caps in aggregation chimeras were found constructed from large, endothelial-aligned layers of either eGFP+ or nonfluorescent SMCs, indicating substantial clonal expansion of a few cells. Similarly, plaques in mice with SMC-restricted Confetti expression showed oligoclonal SMC populations with little intermixing between the progeny of different medial SMCs. Phenotypes comprised both ACTA2+ SMCs in the cap and heterogeneous ACTA2- SMCs in the plaque interior, including chondrocyte-like cells and cells with intracellular lipid and crystalline material. Fibrous cap SMCs were invariably arranged in endothelium-aligned clonal sheets, confirming results in the aggregation chimeras. Analysis of the clonal structure showed that a low number of local medial SMCs partake in atherosclerosis and that single medial SMCs can produce several different SMC phenotypes in plaque. The combined results show that few medial SMCs proliferate to form the entire phenotypically heterogeneous plaque SMC population in murine atherosclerosis.

  2. CLO-PLA: the database of clonal and bud bank traits of Central European flora

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; de Bello, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2009), s. 511-516 ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0723 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : bud bank * clonal traits * database Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2009

  3. Analysis of the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruzynski, Anna; Glimm, Hanno; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof von

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy-based clinical phase I/II studies using integrating retroviral vectors could successfully treat different monogenetic inherited diseases. However, with increased efficiency of this therapy, severe side effects occurred in various gene therapy trials. In all cases, integration of the vector close to or within a proto-oncogene contributed substantially to the development of the malignancies. Thus, the in-depth analysis of integration site patterns is of high importance to uncover potential clonal outgrowth and to assess the safety of gene transfer vectors and gene therapy protocols. The standard and nonrestrictive linear amplification-mediated PCR (nrLAM-PCR) in combination with high-throughput sequencing exhibits technologies that allow to comprehensively analyze the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells and to assess the safety of the used vector system at an early stage on the molecular level. It enables clarifying the biological consequences of the vector system on the fate of the transduced cell. Furthermore, the downstream performance of real-time PCR allows a quantitative estimation of the clonality of individual cells and their clonal progeny. Here, we present a guideline that should allow researchers to perform comprehensive integration site analysis in preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Integration Site and Clonal Expansion in Human Chronic Retroviral Infection and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Heather A.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been successfully used therapeutically to restore expression of genes in a range of single-gene diseases, including several primary immunodeficiency disorders. Although clinical trials have shown remarkable results, there have also been a number of severe adverse events involving malignant outgrowth of a transformed clonal population. This clonal expansion is influenced by the integration site profile of the viral integrase, the transgene expressed, and the effect of the viral promoters on the neighbouring host genome. Infection with the pathogenic human retrovirus HTLV-1 also causes clonal expansion of cells containing an integrated HTLV-1 provirus. Although the majority of HTLV-1-infected people remain asymptomatic, up to 5% develop an aggressive T cell malignancy. In this review we discuss recent findings on the role of the genomic integration site in determining the clonality and the potential for malignant transformation of cells carrying integrated HTLV-1 or gene therapy vectors, and how these results have contributed to the understanding of HTLV-1 pathogenesis and to improvements in gene therapy vector safety. PMID:25365582

  5. Analyzing clonal fidelity of micropropagated Psidium guajava L. plants using simple sequence repeat markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micropropagation of Psidium guajava L. (guava) is a viable alternative to currently adopted techniques for large-scale plant propagation of commercial cultivars. Assessment of clonal fidelity in micropropagated plants is the first step towards ensuring genetic uniformity in mass production of planti...

  6. Age and distribution of an evergreen clonal shrub in the Coweeta basin: Rhododendron maximum L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Elliott; James M. Vose

    2012-01-01

    Rhododendron maximum L. is an evergreen, clonal shrub that forms a dominant sub-canopy layer and is a key species in southern Appalachian forests. We investigated the age and distribution of R. maximum across the Coweeta Basin, a 1626 ha watershed in western North Carolina. We selected 16 perennial, second-order streams and used a Global Positioning System to establish...

  7. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana; Blume, Carolin; Sellner, Leopold; Jauch, Anna; Sill, Martin; Kater, Arnon P.; te Raa, G. Doreen; Geisler, Christian; van Oers, Marinus; Dietrich, Sascha; Dreger, Peter; Ho, Anthony D.; Paruzynski, Anna; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Glimm, Hanno; Zenz, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were

  8. Clonal vs leaf-height-seed (LHS) traits: which are filtered more strongly across habitats?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    E.-Vojtkó, A.; Freitag, M.; Bricca, A.; Martello, F.; Compañ, J. M.; Küttim, M.; Kun, R.; de Bello, Francesco; Klimešová, Jitka; Götzenberger, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, 3-4 (2017), s. 269-281 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-15012S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : environmental filtering * functional diversity * clonal traits Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 1.017, year: 2016

  9. Reverse Transcriptase Mechanism of Somatic Hypermutation: 60 Years of Clonal Selection Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Steele

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for the reverse transcriptase mechanism of somatic hypermutation is substantial and multifactorial. In this 60th anniversary year of the publication of Sir MacFarlane Burnet’s Clonal Selection Theory, the evidence is briefly reviewed and updated.

  10. Rapid clonal analysis of recurrent tuberculosis by direct MIRU-VNTR typing on stored isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Viedma Darío

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of molecular tools to the analysis of tuberculosis has revealed examples of clonal complexity, such as exogenous reinfection, coinfection, microevolution or compartmentalization. The detection of clonal heterogeneity by standard genotyping approaches is laborious and often requires expertise. This restricts the rapid availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB genotypes for clinical or therapeutic decision-making. A new PCR-based technique, MIRU-VNTR, has made it possible to genotype MTB in a time frame close to real-time fingerprinting. Our purpose was to evaluate the capacity of this technique to provide clinicians with a rapid discrimination between reactivation and exogenous reinfection and whether MIRU-VNTR makes it possible to obtain data directly from stored MTB isolates from recurrent episodes. Results We detected differences, between the MIRUtypes of recurrent isolates in 38.5% (5/13 of the cases studied. These included cases of i exogenous reinfection, often with more resistant strains, ii likely examples of microevolution, leading to the appearance of new clonal variants and iii a combination of microevolution, coinfection and competition. Conclusion MIRU-VNTR rapidly obtained clinically useful genotyping data in a challenging situation, directly from stored MTB isolates without subculturing them or purifying their DNA. Our results also mean that MIRU-VNTR could be applied for easy, rapid and affordable massive screening of collections of stored MTB isolates, which could establish the real dimension of clonal heterogeneity in MTB infection.

  11. Clonality and Micro-Diversity of a Nationwide Spreading Genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takayuki; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Tamaru, Aki; Seto, Junji; Ahiko, Tadayuki; Yamamoto, Kaori; Hase, Atushi; Maeda, Shinji; Yamamoto, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission routes can be estimated from genotypic analysis of clinical isolates from patients. In Japan, still a middle-incidence country of TB, a unique genotype strain designated as ‘M-strain’ has been isolated nationwide recently. To ascertain the history of the wide spread of the strain, 10 clinical isolates from different areas were subjected to genome-wide analysis based on deep sequencers. Results show that all isolates possessed common mutations to those of referential strains. The greatest number of accumulated single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from the oldest coalescence was 13 nucleotides, indicating high clonality of these isolates. When an SNV common to the isolates was used as a surrogate marker of the clone, authentic clonal isolates with variation in a reliable subset of variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) genotyping method can be selected successfully from clinical isolates populations of M. tuberculosis. When the authentic clones can also be assigned to sub-clonal groups by SNVs derived from the genomic comparison, they are classifiable into three sub-clonal groups with a bias of geographical origins. Feedback from genomic analysis of clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis to genotypic markers will be an efficient strategy for the big data in various settings for public health actions against TB. PMID:25734518

  12. Clonal diversity of Staphylococcus aureus originating from the small ruminants goats and sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Concepción Porrero, M.; Hasman, Henrik; Vela, Ana I.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in humans and many animal species. The prevalence of different clonal types in animal species remains largely unknown. We analyzed 267 S. aureus from intramammary infections in goats (47) and sheep (220) by spa typing, multi-locus sequence typing (ML...

  13. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were...

  14. Implications of self/non-self discrimination for spatial patterning of clonal plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Novoplansky, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2008), s. 337-350 ISSN 0269-7653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0098 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : clonal plants * clustering * competition * facilitation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.448, year: 2008

  15. Clonal diversity and genetic differentiation of Maianthemum bifolium among forest fragments of different age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, P.F.P.; Grashof-Bokdam, C.J.; Sluis, van der T.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Maianthemum bifolium Schmidt (May Lily) is a woodland species with low colonisation ability and high demands for seedling establishment conditions. To study the colonisation process, we analysed the clonal organisation and population structure of Maianthemum bifolium populations in a number of

  16. OCCURRENCE OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI CLONAL GROUP A IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolates of Escherichia coli belonging to clonal group A (CGA), a recently described disseminated cause of drug-resistant urinary tract infections in humans, were present in four of seven sewage effluents collected from geographically dispersed areas of the United States. ...

  17. Reproduction by seed and clonality in plants: correlated syndromes or independent strategies?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Tackenberg, O.; Klimešová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 6 (2016), s. 1696-1706 ISSN 0022-0477 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-19245S; GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : bud bank traits * clonal traits * CLOPLA database * dispersal * phylogenetic regressions Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.813, year: 2016

  18. Prevalence, serotype, virulence characteristics, clonality and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from swine feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Swine are the only known animal reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), a human pathogen. Since YE is a fecal organism of swine, the primary goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, serotype, virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated characteristics, clonality, and antibiotic su...

  19. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  20. Clonality, virulence and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from Mirzapur, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattaway, Marie Anne; Day, Michaela; Mtwale, Julia; White, Emma; Rogers, James; Day, Martin; Powell, David; Ahmad, Marwa; Harris, Ross; Talukder, Kaisar Ali; Wain, John; Jenkins, Claire; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the virulence and antimicrobial resistance in association with common clonal complexes (CCs) of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) isolated from Bangladesh. The aim was to determine whether specific CCs were more likely to be associated with putative virulence genes and/or antimicrobial resistance. The presence of 15 virulence genes (by PCR) and susceptibility to 18 antibiotics were determined for 151 EAEC isolated from cases and controls during an intestinal infectious disease study carried out between 2007-2011 in the rural setting of Mirzapur, Bangladesh (Kotloff KL, Blackwelder WC, Nasrin D, Nataro JP, Farag TH et al.Clin Infect Dis 2012;55:S232-S245). These data were then analysed in the context of previously determined serotypes and clonal complexes defined by multi-locus sequence typing. Overall there was no association between the presence of virulence or antimicrobial resistance genes in isolates of EAEC from cases versus controls. However, when stratified by clonal complex (CC) one CC associated with cases harboured more virulence factors (CC40) and one CC harboured more resistance genes (CC38) than the average. There was no direct link between the virulence gene content and antibiotic resistance. Strains within a single CC had variable virulence and resistance gene content indicating independent and multiple gene acquisitions over time. In Bangladesh, there are multiple clonal complexes of EAEC harbouring a variety of virulence and resistance genes. The emergence of two of the most successful clones appeared to be linked to either increased virulence (CC40) or antimicrobial resistance (CC38), but increased resistance and virulence were not found in the same clonal complexes.

  1. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) for the assessment of clonality in feline B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Manfred; Scheffold, Svenja; Hecht, Werner; Reinacher, Manfred

    2018-06-01

    Analysis of clonality is gaining importance in diagnosing lymphomas in veterinary medicine. Usually, PCR for the analysis of antigen receptor rearrangement (PARR) is followed by electrophoretic separation of the PCR products. Aim of this study was to test the feasibility of HRM for the assessment of clonality in B-cell lymphomas of cats. High resolution melting analysis differentiates PCR products by their different melting point using the decrease in fluorescence of an intercalating dye during melting of the PCR product. Additionally, the method is easy to use with no post-PCR manipulation of the samples. Forty-seven feline B-cell lymphomas and 31 reactive lymphatic proliferations of cats were investigated by PARR followed either by capillary electrophoresis or an HRM assay. To objectify the interpretation of the HRM results a recently published mathematical approach was applied to the melting curve. To overcome discrepancies between the visual interpretation and the mathematical approach, the latter was modified to include testing of reproducibility and recognition of pseudoclonality. In 11 of 47 lymphoma cases clonal populations were detectable by HRM assay compared to 14 of 47 lymphomas in which clonal populations were detected by capillary electrophoresis assay. Neither of the methods showed a clonal pattern in any of the reactive samples. However, the HRM assay showed a unique pattern in cases of follicular lymphatic hyperplasia that had no corresponding pattern in capillary electrophoresis. The capillary electrophoresis assay could identify 3 lymphomas that were not detected by the HRM assay and is therefore regarded superior to the HRM assay. The comparison however, was hampered by the overall bad performance of the PARR, that might be the consequence of insufficient primer binding due to somatic hypermutation of the binding sites during antigen stimulated proliferation of the B lymphocytes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Tchesnokova

    Full Text Available Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs, which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients' urine within 25-35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care.

  3. Bacterial clonal diagnostics as a tool for evidence-based empiric antibiotic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; Avagyan, Hovhannes; Rechkina, Elena; Chan, Diana; Muradova, Mariya; Haile, Helen Ghirmai; Radey, Matthew; Weissman, Scott; Riddell, Kim; Scholes, Delia; Johnson, James R; Sokurenko, Evgeni V

    2017-01-01

    Despite the known clonal distribution of antibiotic resistance in many bacteria, empiric (pre-culture) antibiotic selection still relies heavily on species-level cumulative antibiograms, resulting in overuse of broad-spectrum agents and excessive antibiotic/pathogen mismatch. Urinary tract infections (UTIs), which account for a large share of antibiotic use, are caused predominantly by Escherichia coli, a highly clonal pathogen. In an observational clinical cohort study of urgent care patients with suspected UTI, we assessed the potential for E. coli clonal-level antibiograms to improve empiric antibiotic selection. A novel PCR-based clonotyping assay was applied to fresh urine samples to rapidly detect E. coli and the urine strain's clonotype. Based on a database of clonotype-specific antibiograms, the acceptability of various antibiotics for empiric therapy was inferred using a 20%, 10%, and 30% allowed resistance threshold. The test's performance characteristics and possible effects on prescribing were assessed. The rapid test identified E. coli clonotypes directly in patients' urine within 25-35 minutes, with high specificity and sensitivity compared to culture. Antibiotic selection based on a clonotype-specific antibiogram could reduce the relative likelihood of antibiotic/pathogen mismatch by ≥ 60%. Compared to observed prescribing patterns, clonal diagnostics-guided antibiotic selection could safely double the use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and minimize fluoroquinolone use. In summary, a rapid clonotyping test showed promise for improving empiric antibiotic prescribing for E. coli UTI, including reversing preferential use of fluoroquinolones over trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The clonal diagnostics approach merges epidemiologic surveillance, antimicrobial stewardship, and molecular diagnostics to bring evidence-based medicine directly to the point of care.

  4. Comparative host specificity of human- and pig- associated Staphylococcus aureus clonal lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshnee Moodley

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion is a crucial step in colonization of the skin. In this study, we investigated the differential adherence to human and pig corneocytes of six Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to three human-associated [ST8 (CC8, ST22 (CC22 and ST36(CC30] and two pig-associated [ST398 (CC398 and ST433(CC30] clonal lineages, and their colonization potential in the pig host was assessed by in vivo competition experiments. Corneocytes were collected from 11 humans and 21 pigs using D-squame® adhesive discs, and bacterial adherence to corneocytes was quantified by a standardized light microscopy assay. A previously described porcine colonization model was used to assess the potential of the six strains to colonize the pig host. Three pregnant, S. aureus-free sows were inoculated intravaginally shortly before farrowing with different strain mixes [mix 1 human and porcine ST398; mix 2 human ST36 and porcine ST433; and mix 3 human ST8, ST22, ST36 and porcine ST398] and the ability of individual strains to colonize the nasal cavity of newborn piglets was evaluated for 28 days after birth by strain-specific antibiotic selective culture. In the corneocyte assay, the pig-associated ST433 strain and the human-associated ST22 and ST36 strains showed significantly greater adhesion to porcine and human corneocytes, respectively (p<0.0001. In contrast, ST8 and ST398 did not display preferential host binding patterns. In the in vivo competition experiment, ST8 was a better colonizer compared to ST22, ST36, and ST433 prevailed over ST36 in colonizing the newborn piglets. These results are partly in agreement with previous genetic and epidemiological studies indicating the host specificity of ST22, ST36 and ST433 and the broad-host range of ST398. However, our in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed an unexpected ability of ST8 to adhere to porcine corneocytes and persist in the nasal cavity of pigs.

  5. Clonal nature of spontaneously immortalized 3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittling, S R

    1996-11-25

    Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), when plated at appropriate densities, proliferate vigorously for several passages, and then the growth rate of the culture slows considerably. If the cells are plated at a high enough density and continuously passed, the cultures will eventually overcome this "crisis" period and resume rapid growth. Here, we have addressed the question of what the changes are that cells undergo in overcoming the growth restraints of crisis. Primary MEF cells were infected with a retrovirus which confers G418 resistance and selected in G418. The resultant pre-crisis population comprised cells which each contained a retrovirus integrated at a unique genomic location. These cells were then passed according to the 3T3 protocol until immortal, rapidly growing cells emerged. The integration pattern of the retrovirus in the immortal population was examined. In two independent experiments, the immortal population of cells grown in the presence of G418 comprised two independent clones of cells, with additional clones undetectable at the level of detection of the assays used. The integration pattern was also examined in parallel infected cultures grown in the absence of selection. In one experiment the unselected immortal population contained the same labeled clone that appeared in the sister infected culture, indicating that an immortal precursor was present in the precrisis population. These results are consistent with the idea that a mutation is responsible for the immortal phenotype.

  6. Growth and yield models for Eucalyptus grandis grown in Swaziland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to develop a stand-level growth and yield model for short-rotationEucalyptus grandis grown for pulp wood production at Piggs Peak in Swaziland. The data were derived from a Nelder 1a spacing trial established with E. grandis clonal cuttings in 1998 and terminated in 2005. Planting density ...

  7. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing for Identification of Globally Distributed Clonal Groups and Differentiation of Outbreak Strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Hammack, Thomas S; Allard, Marc W; Strain, Errol A; Brown, Eric W

    2016-10-15

    Many listeriosis outbreaks are caused by a few globally distributed clonal groups, designated clonal complexes or epidemic clones, of Listeria monocytogenes, several of which have been defined by classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting 6 to 8 housekeeping or virulence genes. We have developed and evaluated core genome MLST (cgMLST) schemes and applied them to isolates from multiple clonal groups, including those associated with 39 listeriosis outbreaks. The cgMLST clusters were congruent with MLST-defined clonal groups, which had various degrees of diversity at the whole-genome level. Notably, cgMLST could distinguish among outbreak strains and epidemiologically unrelated strains of the same clonal group, which could not be achieved using classic MLST schemes. The precise selection of cgMLST gene targets may not be critical for the general identification of clonal groups and outbreak strains. cgMLST analyses further identified outbreak strains, including those associated with recent outbreaks linked to contaminated French-style cheese, Hispanic-style cheese, stone fruit, caramel apple, ice cream, and packaged leafy green salad, as belonging to major clonal groups. We further developed lineage-specific cgMLST schemes, which can include accessory genes when core genomes do not possess sufficient diversity, and this provided additional resolution over species-specific cgMLST. Analyses of isolates from different common-source listeriosis outbreaks revealed various degrees of diversity, indicating that the numbers of allelic differences should always be combined with cgMLST clustering and epidemiological evidence to define a listeriosis outbreak. Classic multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes targeting internal fragments of 6 to 8 genes that define clonal complexes or epidemic clones have been widely employed to study L. monocytogenes biodiversity and its relation to pathogenicity potential and epidemiology. We demonstrated that core genome MLST

  8. Growth and wood properties of genetically improved loblolly pine: propagation type comparison and genetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finto Antony; Laurence Schimleck; Lewis Jordan; Benjamin Hornsby; Joseph Dahlen; Richard Daniels; Alexander Clark; Luis Apiolaza; Dudley Huber

    2013-01-01

    The use of clonal varieties in forestry offers great potential to improve growth traits (quantity) and wood properties (quality) of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Loblolly pine trees established via somatic embryogenesis (clones), full-sib zygotic crosses, and half-sib zygotic open-pollinated families were sampled to identify variation in growth and wood properties...

  9. Simultaneous bilateral isolated greater trochanter fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruti Kambali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old woman sustained simultaneous isolated bilateral greater trochanteric fracture, following a road traffic accident. The patient presented to us 1 month after the injury. She presented with complaints of pain in the left hip and inability to walk. Roentgenograms revealed displaced comminuted bilateral greater trochanter fractures. The fracture of the left greater trochanter was reduced and fixed internally using the tension band wiring technique. The greater trochanter fracture on the right side was asymptomatic and was managed conservatively. The patient regained full range of motion and use of her hips after a postoperative follow-up of 6 months. Isolated fractures of the greater trochanter are unusual injuries. Because of their relative rarity and the unsettled controversy regarding their etiology and pathogenesis, several methods of treatment have been advocated. Furthermore, the reports of this particular type of injury are not plentiful and the average textbook coverage afforded to this entity is limited. In our study we discuss the mechanism of injury and the various treatment options available.

  10. CONTRIBUTIONS OF SEXUAL AND ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION TO POPULATION STRUCTURE IN THE CLONAL SOFT CORAL, ALCYONIUM RUDYI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Catherine S

    1997-02-01

    Numerous studies of population structure in sessile clonal marine invertebrates have demonstrated low genotypic diversity and nonequilibrium genotype frequencies within local populations that are monopolized by relatively few, highly replicated genets. All of the species studied to date produce planktonic sexual propagules capable of dispersing long distances; despite local genotypic disequilibria, populations are often panmictic over large geographic areas. The population structure paradigm these species represent may not be typical of the majority of clonal invertebrate groups, however, which are believed to produce highly philopatric sexual propagules. I used allozyme variation to examine the population structure of the temperate soft coral, Alcyonium rudyi, a typical clonal species whose sexually produced larvae and asexually produced ramets both have very low dispersal capabilities. Like other clonal plants and invertebrates, the local population dynamics of A. rudyi are dominated by asexual reproduction, and recruitment of new sexually produced genets occurs infrequently. As expected from its philopatric larval stage, estimates of genetic differentiation among populations of A. rudyi were highly significant at all spatial scales examined (mean θ = 0.300 among 20 populations spanning a 1100-km range), suggesting that genetic exchange seldom occurs among populations separated by as little as a few hundred meters. Mapping of multilocus allozyme genotypes within a dense aggregation of A. rudyi ramets confirmed that dispersal of asexual propagules is also very limited: members of the same genet usually remain within invertebrates, populations of A. rudyi do not appear to be dominated by a few widespread genets: estimates of genotypic diversity (G o ) within 20 geographically distinct populations did not differ from expectations for outcrossing, sexual populations. Despite theoretical suggestions that philopatric dispersal combined with typically small effective

  11. Adipose cell differentiation: evidence for a two-step process in the polyamine-dependent Ob1754 clonal line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, E Z; Dani, C; Doglio, A; Etienne, J; Grimaldi, P; Ailhaud, G

    1986-01-01

    A subclone of preadipocyte Ob17 cells has been isolated (Ob1754 clonal line). Confluent Ob1754 cells treated with an inhibitor of spermidine and spermine synthesis, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), were totally dependent upon putrescine addition for the expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase which behaved as a late marker of adipose conversion. Under these conditions, the early expression of lipoprotein lipase during growth arrest remained unchanged. Studies at the mRNA level showed that the expression of unidentified pOb24 and pGH3 mRNAs, which was parallel to that of lipoprotein lipase, is independent of polyamine addition whereas the late emergence of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA was putrescine-dependent and co-ordinated with the expression of pAL422 mRNA encoding for a myelin-P2 homologue [Bernlohr, Angus, Lane, Bolanowski & Kelly (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 81, 5468-5472]. The appearance of lipoprotein lipase preceded DNA synthesis and post-confluent mitoses which were both putrescine-dependent and which took place before the appearance of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus the adipose conversion of Ob1754 cells involves the expression of at least two separate sets of markers which are differently regulated. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 6. PMID:3800927

  12. Clonal in vitro propagation of peat mosses (Sphagnum L.) as novel green resources for basic and applied research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beike, Anna K; Spagnuolo, Valeria; Lüth, Volker; Steinhart, Feray; Ramos-Gómez, Julia; Krebs, Matthias; Adamo, Paola; Rey-Asensio, Ana Isabel; Angel Fernández, J; Giordano, Simonetta; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    As builders and major components of peatlands, Sphagnopsida (peat mosses) are very important organisms for ecosystems and world's climate. Nowadays many Sphagnum species as well as their habitats are largely protected, while their scientific and economic relevance remains considerable. Advanced methods of in vitro cultivation provide the potential to work in a sustainable way with peat mosses and address aspects of basic research as well as biotechnological and economical topics like biomonitoring or the production of renewable substrates for horticulture ( Sphagnum farming). Here, we describe the establishment of axenic in vitro cultures of the five peat moss species Sphagnum fimbriatum Wils. and Hook., Sphagnum magellanicum Brid., Sphagnum palustre L., Sphagnum rubellum Wils. and Sphagnum subnitens Russ. and Warnst. with specific focus on large-scale cultivation of S. palustre in bioreactors. Axenic, clonal cultures were established to produce high quantities of biomass under standardized laboratory conditions. For advanced production of S. palustre we tested different cultivation techniques, growth media and inocula, and analyzed the effects of tissue disruption. While cultivation on solid medium is suitable for long term storage, submerse cultivation in liquid medium yielded highest amounts of biomass. By addition of sucrose and ammonium nitrate we were able to increase the biomass by around 10- to 30-fold within 4 weeks. The morphology of in vitro-cultivated gametophores showed similar phenotypic characteristics compared to material from the field. Thus the tested culture techniques are suitable to produce S. palustre material for basic and applied research.

  13. Clonal variation of DNA repair in a human glioma cell line This study was supported by the Cancer Research Campaign and the Bob Champion Cancer Trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Simon; McMillan, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    Clonal heterogeneity in response to ionizing radiation was found for a human glioma cell line, IN859. The authors have investigated the most sensitive clone, the most resistant clone and the parent line for differences in DNA repair fidelity using the method of plasmid reconstitution. Significant differences in repair fidelity were found between the two clones, and between the sensitive clone and the parent line. The resistant clone and the parent lines showed the greater repair fidelity. A comparison of two different restriction enzymes, which cleave the plasmid with blunt or cohesive-ended double-strand breaks, did not reveal differences in repair fidelity. Equal numbers of plasmids were integrated in each cell line, but the sensitive clone showed a higher frequency of misrepair of cleaved plasmid. Misrepair was characterized by partial or complete loss of sequence at the site of plasmid cleavage. It is concluded that the radiosensitive clone exhibits increased misrepair. (author). 15 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Greater trochanteric fracture with occult intertrochanteric extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Michael; O'Brien, Seth D; Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Alderete, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Proximal femoral fractures are frequently encountered in the emergency department (ED). Prompt diagnosis is paramount as delay will exacerbate the already poor outcomes associated with these injuries. In cases where radiography is negative but clinical suspicion remains high, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the study of choice as it has the capability to depict fractures which are occult on other imaging modalities. Awareness of a particular subset of proximal femoral fractures, namely greater trochanteric fractures, is vital for both radiologists and clinicians since it has been well documented that they invariably have an intertrochanteric component which may require surgical management. The detection of intertrochanteric or cervical extension of greater trochanteric fractures has been described utilizing MRI but is underestimated with both computed tomography (CT) and bone scan. Therefore, if MRI is unavailable or contraindicated, the diagnosis of an isolated greater trochanteric fracture should be met with caution. The importance of avoiding this potential pitfall is demonstrated in the following case of an elderly woman with hip pain and CT demonstrating an isolated greater trochanteric fracture who subsequently returned to the ED with a displaced intertrochanteric fracture.

  15. Butterfly valves: greater use in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, M.

    1975-01-01

    Improvements in butterfly valves, particularly in the areas of automatic control and leak tightness are described. The use of butterfly valves in nuclear power plants is discussed. These uses include service in component cooling, containment cooling, and containment isolation. The outlook for further improvements and greater uses is examined. (U.S.)

  16. Greater Somalia, the never-ending dream?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoppi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an historical analysis of the concept of Greater Somalia, the nationalist project that advocates the political union of all Somali-speaking people, including those inhabiting areas in current Djibouti, Ethiopia and Kenya. The Somali territorial unification project of “lost...

  17. Prevalence and clonal analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis in primary endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Silva, Marlei G

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in 62 teeth with primary endodontic infections by using a species-specific 16S rRNA gene-based nested polymerase chain reaction assay. P. gingivalis isolates recovered from 2 infected root canals were also analyzed for clonal diversity by using arbitrarily primed PCR. Overall, P. gingivalis was found in 48% of the samples. This species was specifically detected in 36% of canals of teeth with chronic apical periodontitis, in 46% of the cases of acute apical periodontitis, and in 67% of acute apical abscesses. P. gingivalis was significantly more frequent in abscess aspirates than in canals of teeth with chronic apical periodontitis (P abscesses, and demonstrated that different clonal types of this species can colonize the root canal in the same individual.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema......, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens...

  19. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya V Bolkhovskaya

    Full Text Available Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  20. Assessing T cell clonal size distribution: a non-parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkhovskaya, Olesya V; Zorin, Daniil Yu; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Clonal structure of the human peripheral T-cell repertoire is shaped by a number of homeostatic mechanisms, including antigen presentation, cytokine and cell regulation. Its accurate tuning leads to a remarkable ability to combat pathogens in all their variety, while systemic failures may lead to severe consequences like autoimmune diseases. Here we develop and make use of a non-parametric statistical approach to assess T cell clonal size distributions from recent next generation sequencing data. For 41 healthy individuals and a patient with ankylosing spondylitis, who undergone treatment, we invariably find power law scaling over several decades and for the first time calculate quantitatively meaningful values of decay exponent. It has proved to be much the same among healthy donors, significantly different for an autoimmune patient before the therapy, and converging towards a typical value afterwards. We discuss implications of the findings for theoretical understanding and mathematical modeling of adaptive immunity.

  1. Clonality, virulence and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from Mirzapur, Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattaway, Marie Anne; Day, Michaela; Mtwale, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigates the virulence and antimicrobial resistance in association with common clonal complexes (CCs) of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) isolated from Bangladesh. The aim was to determine whether specific CCs were more likely to be associated with putative...... virulence genes and/or antimicrobial resistance.Methodology. The presence of 15 virulence genes (by PCR) and susceptibility to 18 antibiotics were determined for 151 EAEC isolated from cases and controls during an intestinal infectious disease study carried out between 2007-2011 in the rural setting...... between the presence of virulence or antimicrobial resistance genes in isolates of EAEC from cases versus controls. However, when stratified by clonal complex (CC) one CC associated with cases harboured more virulence factors (CC40) and one CC harboured more resistance genes (CC38) than the average...

  2. Fusion of remote sensing images based on pyramid decomposition with Baldwinian Clonal Selection Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haiyan; Xing, Bei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yanyan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we put forward a novel fusion method for remote sensing images based on the contrast pyramid (CP) using the Baldwinian Clonal Selection Algorithm (BCSA), referred to as CPBCSA. Compared with classical methods based on the transform domain, the method proposed in this paper adopts an improved heuristic evolutionary algorithm, wherein the clonal selection algorithm includes Baldwinian learning. In the process of image fusion, BCSA automatically adjusts the fusion coefficients of different sub-bands decomposed by CP according to the value of the fitness function. BCSA also adaptively controls the optimal search direction of the coefficients and accelerates the convergence rate of the algorithm. Finally, the fusion images are obtained via weighted integration of the optimal fusion coefficients and CP reconstruction. Our experiments show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods in terms of both visual effect and objective evaluation criteria, and the fused images are more suitable for human visual or machine perception.

  3. Establishment of dna fingerprinting in clonal tea improved cultivars from yunnan of china using issr markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, B.Y.; Zhao, C.M.; Sun, X.M.; Jiang, H.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, DNA fingerprints were constructed by using ISSR markers for 20 clonal improved varieties developed by two breeding institutes in Yunnan province. Seven core ISSR primers were selected from 15 primers. A total of 110 bands were generated by PAGE with seven core primers, 93 of which were polymorphic bands, the percentage of polymorphic band (PPB) was 84.54%, and the mean value of polymorphism information content (PIC) reached 0.417; the genetic similarity coefficient of the cultivars was 0.574-0.854. The two primers, UBC835 and ISSR2, had high PIC values, and could be used to distinguish all cultivars, presenting the most efficient single primers. Among the all of primer combinations from the seven core primers, the three combinations, UBC835/UBC811, UBC835/ISSR2, and UBC835/ISSR3 showed lower similar coefficients, and more efficient in identifying the 20 improved varieties than the other primer combinations. Then these three primer combinations were further scored in 15 traditional cultivars. The results showed that UBC835/ISSR2 was the optimal primer combination, which could be used to distinguish each material among the 20 clonal improved varieties and 15 traditional cultivals. Finally, the DNA fingerprints of the 20 clonal improved varieties were constructed based on country and region code, breeding institute, core primer name and ISSR marker data. The established fingerprints could provide reliable scientific base for the protection of intellectual property right for these clonal improved varieties, and the important molecular information contained in these fingerprints would be useful for the authenticity identification and genetic relationship analysis of tea varieties. (author)

  4. MIRU-VNTR allelic variability depends on Mycobacterium bovis clonal group identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Amandine; Michelet, Lorraine; De Cruz, Krystel; Cochard, Thierry; Branger, Maxime; Karoui, Claudine; Henault, Sylvie; Biet, Franck; Boschiroli, María Laura

    2016-11-01

    The description of the population of M. bovis strains circulating in France from 1978 to 2013 has highlighted the discriminating power of the MLVA among predominant spoligotype groups. In the present study we aimed to characterize clonal groups via MLVA and to better understand the strain's population structure. MLVA was performed with eight MIRU-VNTR loci, most of them defined by the Venomyc European consortium. The discriminatory index of each MLVA loci was calculated for SB0120, SB0134, SB0121 and the "F4-family", the main spoligotype groups in France. Differences in global DI per spoligotype, but also by locus within each spoligotype, were observed, which strongly suggest the clonal complex nature of these major groups. These MLVA results were compared to those of other European countries where strain collections had been characterized (Spain, Portugal, Italy, Northern Ireland and Belgium). Overall, QUB 3232 and ETR D are respectively the most and the least discriminative loci, regardless of the strains geographical origin. However, marked DI differences are observed in the rest of the MIRU-VNTR loci, again highlighting that strain genetic variability in a country depends on the dominant existing clonal complexes. A web application for M. bovis, including spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing data, was developed to allow inter-laboratory comparison of field isolates. In conclusion, combination of typing methods is required for M. bovis optimum discrimination and differentiation of groups of strains. Thus, the loci employed for MLVA in a country should be those which are the most discriminative for the clonal complexes which characterize their M. bovis population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of clonal reproduction on genetic structure in Pentaclethra macroloba (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae)

    OpenAIRE

    Gaddis, Keith D.; Zukin, Helen L.; Dieterich, Inca A.; Braker, Elizabeth; Sork, Victoria L.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of monodominant forests on well-drained soils in tropical regions has been widely reported. Such forests most likely result from a combination of both ecological and evolutionary factors. Under conditions of high seed and seedling mortality, vegetative reproduction could create a reproductive advantage leading to forest dominance, and profoundly affect the distribution of genetic variation in a clonal species. We investigated these effects in a low diversity forest site in North...

  6. Against the odds: complete outcrossing in a monoecious clonal seagrass Posidonia australis (Posidoniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Gecan, Ilena; Krauss, Siegfried L; Kendrick, Gary A

    2014-06-01

    Seagrasses are marine, flowering plants with a hydrophilous pollination strategy. In these plants, successful mating requires dispersal of filamentous pollen grains through the water column to receptive stigmas. Approximately 40 % of seagrass species are monoecious, and therefore little pollen movement is required if inbreeding is tolerated. Outcrossing in these species is further impacted by clonality, which is variable, but can be extensive in large, dense meadows. Despite this, little is known about the interaction between clonal structure, genetic diversity and mating systems in hydrophilous taxa. Polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers were used to characterize genetic diversity, clonal structure, mating system and realized pollen dispersal in two meadows of the temperate, monoecious seagrass, Posidonia australis, in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia. Within the two sampled meadows, genetic diversity was moderate among the maternal shoots (R = 0·45 and 0·64) and extremely high in the embryos (R = 0·93-0·97). Both meadows exhibited a highly clumping (or phalanx) structure among clones, with spatial autocorrelation analysis showing significant genetic structure among shoots and embryos up to 10-15 m. Outcrossing rates were not significantly different from one. Pollen dispersal distances inferred from paternity assignment averaged 30·8 and 26·8 m, which was larger than the mean clone size (12·8 and 13·8 m). These results suggest highly effective movement of pollen in the water column. Despite strong clonal structure and moderate genetic diversity within meadows, hydrophilous pollination is an effective vector for completely outcrossed offspring. The different localized water conditions at each site (highly exposed conditions vs. weak directional flow) appear to have little influence on the success and pattern of successful pollination in the two meadows. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All

  7. Clonal differences in generation times of GPK epithelial cells in monolayer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, P A; Hola, M

    1980-01-01

    Pedigrees of cells in eight clones of guinea pig keratocyte (GPK) cells in monolayer culture were analyzed from a time-lapse film. The generation times and the position in the field of observation were recorded up to the sixth generation when the cultures were still subconfluent. Statistical analysis of the results indicates that the position in the culture has less significance than the clonal origin of the cell in determining the interval between successive mitoses.

  8. Clonal structure and variable fertilization success in Florida Keys broadcast-spawning corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. W.; Baums, I. B.; Pausch, R. E.; Bright, A. J.; Cameron, C. M.; Williams, D. E.; Moffitt, Z. J.; Woodley, C. M.

    2018-03-01

    Keystone reef-building corals in the Caribbean are predominantly self-incompatible broadcast spawners and a majority are threatened due to both acute adult mortality and poor recruitment. As population densities decline, concerns about fertilization limitation and effective population size in these species increase and would be further exacerbated by either high clonality or gametic incompatibility of parental genotypes. This study begins to address these concerns for two Caribbean broadcasting species by characterizing clonal structure and quantifying experimental pairwise fertilization success. Orbicella faveolata showed surprisingly high and contrasting levels of clonality between two sampled sites; Acropora palmata was previously known to be highly clonal. Individual pairwise crosses of synchronously spawning genotypes of each species were conducted by combining aliquots of gamete bundles immediately after spawning, and showed high and significant variability in fertilization success. Over half of the individual crosses of O. faveolata and about one-third of A. palmata crosses yielded ≤ 40% fertilization. Total sperm concentration was quantified in only a subset of O. faveolata crosses (range of 1-6 × 107 mL-1), but showed no correlation with fertilization success. We interpret that both parental incompatibility and individual genotypes with low-quality gametes are likely to have contributed to the variable fertilization observed with important implications for conservation. Differential fertilization success implies effective population size may be considerably smaller than hoped and population enhancement efforts need to incorporate many more parental genotypes at the patch scale to ensure successful larval production than indicated by estimates based simply on preserving levels of standing genetic diversity.

  9. The Hayflick Limit May Determine the Effective Clonal Diversity of Naive T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndifon, Wilfred; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2016-06-15

    Having a large number of sufficiently abundant T cell clones is important for adequate protection against diseases. However, as shown in this paper and elsewhere, between young adulthood and >70 y of age the effective clonal diversity of naive CD4/CD8 T cells found in human blood declines by a factor of >10. (Effective clonal diversity accounts for both the number and the abundance of T cell clones.) The causes of this observation are incompletely understood. A previous study proposed that it might result from the emergence of certain rare, replication-enhancing mutations in T cells. In this paper, we propose an even simpler explanation: that it results from the loss of T cells that have attained replicative senescence (i.e., the Hayflick limit). Stochastic numerical simulations of naive T cell population dynamics, based on experimental parameters, show that the rate of homeostatic T cell proliferation increases after the age of ∼60 y because naive T cells collectively approach replicative senescence. This leads to a sharp decline of effective clonal diversity after ∼70 y, in agreement with empirical data. A mathematical analysis predicts that, without an increase in the naive T cell proliferation rate, this decline will occur >50 yr later than empirically observed. These results are consistent with a model in which exhaustion of the proliferative capacity of naive T cells causes a sharp decline of their effective clonal diversity and imply that therapeutic potentiation of thymopoiesis might either prevent or reverse this outcome. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Prevalence of clonal complexes and virulence genes among commensal and invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunlög Rasmussen

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus encodes a remarkable number of virulence factors which may contribute to its pathogenicity and ability to cause invasive disease. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the association between S. aureus invasiveness and bacterial genotype, in terms of the presence of virulence genes and affiliation to clonal complexes. Also, the significance of different virulence genes, mainly adhesins, for the development of infective endocarditis was investigated. DNA microarray technology was used to analyze 134 S. aureus isolates, all methicillin-susceptible, derived from three groups of clinically well-characterized patients: nasal carriers (n=46, bacteremia (n=55, and bacteremia with infective endocarditis (n=33. Invasive isolates were dominant in four of the major clonal complexes: 5, 8, 15, and 25. Of the 170 virulence genes examined, those encoding accessory gene regulator group II (agr II, capsule polysaccharide serotype 5 (cap5, and adhesins such as S. aureus surface protein G (sasG and fibronectin-binding protein B (fnbB were found to be associated with invasive disease. The same was shown for the leukocidin genes lukD/lukE, as well as the genes encoding serine protease A and B (splA/splB, staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn and the staphylococcal exotoxin-like protein (setC or selX. In addition, there was a trend of higher prevalence of certain genes or gene clusters (sasG, agr II, cap5 among isolates causing infective endocarditis compared to other invasive isolates. In most cases, the presence of virulence genes was linked to clonal complex affiliation. In conclusion, certain S. aureus clonal lineages harboring specific sets of virulence genes seem to be more successful in causing invasive disease.

  11. A novel genetic tool for clonal analysis of fourth chromosome mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa-Neves, Rui; Schinaman, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    The fourth chromosome of Drosophila remains one of the most intractable regions of the fly genome to genetic analysis. The main difficulty posed to the genetic analyses of mutations on this chromosome arises from the fact that it does not undergo meiotic recombination, which makes recombination mapping impossible, and also prevents clonal analysis of mutations, a technique which relies on recombination to introduce the prerequisite recessive markers and FLP-recombinase recognition targets (FR...

  12. An efficient identification strategy of clonal tea cultivars using long-core motif SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rang Jian; Gao, Xiang Feng; Kong, Xiang Rui; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), especially those with long-core motifs (tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide) represent an excellent tool for DNA fingerprinting. SSRs with long-core motifs are preferred since neighbor alleles are more easily separated and identified from each other, which render the interpretation of electropherograms and the true alleles more reliable. In the present work, with the purpose of characterizing a set of core SSR markers with long-core motifs for well fingerprinting clonal cultivars of tea (Camellia sinensis), we analyzed 66 elite clonal tea cultivars in China with 33 initially-chosen long-core motif SSR markers covering all the 15 linkage groups of tea plant genome. A set of 6 SSR markers were conclusively selected as core SSR markers after further selection. The polymorphic information content (PIC) of the core SSR markers was >0.5, with ≤5 alleles in each marker containing 10 or fewer genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the core SSR markers were not strongly correlated with the trait 'cultivar processing-property'. The combined probability of identity (PID) between two random cultivars for the whole set of 6 SSR markers was estimated to be 2.22 × 10(-5), which was quite low, confirmed the usefulness of the proposed SSR markers for fingerprinting analyses in Camellia sinensis. Moreover, for the sake of quickly discriminating the clonal tea cultivars, a cultivar identification diagram (CID) was subsequently established using these core markers, which fully reflected the identification process and provided the immediate information about which SSR markers were needed to identify a cultivar chosen among the tested ones. The results suggested that long-core motif SSR markers used in the investigation contributed to the accurate and efficient identification of the clonal tea cultivars and enabled the protection of intellectual property.

  13. Genetic diversity of a clonal angiosperm near its range limit: The case of Cymodocea nodosa at the Canary Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto, Filipe; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Duarte, Carlos M.; Serrao, Ester Álvares

    2006-01-01

    The seagrass Cymodocea nodosa forms a unique community in the Canary Islands, where it is classified as an endangered species. Biogeographic theory predicts that clonal species on islands near their distributional limits might show lower proportions of sexual (versus clonal) reproduction, lower genetic diversity, and higher differentiation. We addressed these hypotheses by comparing the genetic structure of C. nodosa from 10 meadows in the 4 main Canary Islands with 2 Iberian sites (Atlantic ...

  14. Age-related mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion and malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D; Johnson, Kimberly J; Wendl, Michael C; McMichael, Joshua F; Schmidt, Heather K; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Welch, John S; Link, Daniel C; Walter, Matthew J; Mardis, Elaine R; Dipersio, John F; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J; Ding, Li

    2014-12-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) provides a unique resource for comprehensive discovery of mutations and genes in blood that may contribute to the clonal expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Here, we analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals from TCGA and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia and/or lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5-6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion.

  15. Loss of heterozygosity drives clonal diversity of Phytophthora capsici in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hu

    Full Text Available Phytophthora capsici causes significant loss to pepper (Capsicum annum in China and our goal was to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers for P. capsici and characterize genetic diversity nationwide. Eighteen isolates of P. capsici from locations worldwide were re-sequenced and candidate nuclear and mitochondrial SNPs identified. From 2006 to 2012, 276 isolates of P. capsici were recovered from 136 locations in 27 provinces and genotyped using 45 nuclear and 2 mitochondrial SNPs. There were two main mitochondrial haplotypes and 95 multi-locus genotypes (MLGs identified. Genetic diversity was geographically structured with a high level of genotypic diversity in the north and on Hainan Island in the south, suggesting outcrossing contributes to diversity in these areas. The remaining areas of China are dominated by four clonal lineages that share mitochondrial haplotypes, are almost exclusively the A1 or A2 mating type and appear to exhibit extensive diversity based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH. Analysis of SNPs directly from infected peppers confirmed LOH in field populations. One clonal lineage is dominant throughout much of the country. The overall implications for long-lived genetically diverse clonal lineages amidst a widely dispersed sexual population are discussed.

  16. Different rates of defense evolution and niche preferences in clonal and nonclonal milkweeds (Asclepias spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissier, Loïc; Litsios, Glenn; Fishbein, Mark; Salamin, Nicolas; Agrawal, Anurag A; Rasmann, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Given the dual role of many plant traits to tolerate both herbivore attack and abiotic stress, the climatic niche of a species should be integrated into the study of plant defense strategies. Here we investigate the impact of plant reproductive strategy and components of species' climatic niche on the rate of chemical defense evolution in the milkweeds using a common garden experiment of 49 species. We found that across Asclepias species, clonal reproduction repeatedly evolved in lower temperature conditions, in species generally producing low concentrations of a toxic defense (cardenolides). Additionally, we found that rates of cardenolide evolution were lower for clonal than for nonclonal species. We thus conclude that because the clonal strategy is based on survival, long generation times, and is associated with tolerance of herbivory, it may be an alternative to toxicity in colder ecosystems. Taken together, these results indicate that the rate of chemical defense evolution is influenced by the intersection of life-history strategy and climatic niches into which plants radiate. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Clonal multiplication of Cymbidiums through tissue culture of the shoot meristem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimber, Donald E.

    1963-09-01

    The propagation of clonal varieties of some orchids is at times exasperatingly slow and occasionally an almost futile effort. Clonal multiplication is generally confined to dlvidlng mature plants and to starting plants from pseudobulbs. There is, of course, the specialized technique for obtaining Phalaenopsis plantlets from the aseptic culture of inflorescence nodes, but this is basically the same thing as propagating plants from pseudobulbs. In certain cases it is highly desirable to rapidly multiply certain clones of orchids. Awarded varieties could thereby be dispersed with great rapidity where now it may take decades for some clones to became fairly common. Commercial flower production would be very much enhanced if certain desirable clones could be multiplied ad infinitum within a short time. Orchid flower production could then be placed more on a par with many of the other cut flowers and the clonal peculiarities of some fo the current hybrids could be pampered instead of ignored. This paper describes a tissue culture method for the rapid propagation of Cymbidium clones.

  18. Clonal expansion under the microscope: studying lymphocyte activation and differentiation using live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonsky, Michal; Chain, Benjamin; Friedman, Nir

    2016-03-01

    Clonal expansion of lymphocytes is a hallmark of vertebrate adaptive immunity. A small number of precursor cells that recognize a specific antigen proliferate into expanded clones, differentiate and acquire various effector and memory phenotypes, which promote effective immune responses. Recent studies establish a large degree of heterogeneity in the level of expansion and in cell state between and within expanding clones. Studying these processes in vivo, while providing insightful information on the level of heterogeneity, is challenging due to the complex microenvironment and the inability to continuously track individual cells over extended periods of time. Live cell imaging of ex vivo cultures within micro fabricated arrays provides an attractive methodology for studying clonal expansion. These experiments facilitate continuous acquisition of a large number of parameters on cell number, proliferation, death and differentiation state, with single-cell resolution on thousands of expanding clones that grow within controlled environments. Such data can reveal stochastic and instructive mechanisms that contribute to observed heterogeneity and elucidate the sequential order of differentiation events. Intercellular interactions can also be studied within these arrays by following responses of a controlled number of interacting cells, all trapped within the same microwell. Here we describe implementations of live-cell imaging within microwell arrays for studies of lymphocyte clonal expansion, portray insights already gained from these experiments and outline directions for future research. These tools, together with in vivo experiments tracking single-cell responses, will expand our understanding of adaptive immunity and the ways by which it can be manipulated.

  19. A Clonal Lineage of Fusarium oxysporum Circulates in the Tap Water of Different French Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Sautour, Marc; Gautheron, Nadine; Laurent, Julie; Aho, Serge; Bonnin, Alain; Sixt, Nathalie; Hartemann, Philippe; Dalle, Frédéric; Steinberg, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is typically a soilborne fungus but can also be found in aquatic environments. In hospitals, water distribution systems may be reservoirs for the fungi responsible for nosocomial infections. F. oxysporum was previously detected in the water distribution systems of five French hospitals. Sixty-eight isolates from water representative of all hospital units that were previously sampled and characterized by translation elongation factor 1α sequence typing were subjected to microsatellite analysis and full-length ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) sequence typing. All but three isolates shared common microsatellite loci and a common two-locus sequence type (ST). This ST has an international geographical distribution in both the water networks of hospitals and among clinical isolates. The ST dominant in water was not detected among 300 isolates of F. oxysporum that originated from surrounding soils. Further characterization of 15 isolates by vegetative compatibility testing allowed us to conclude that a clonal lineage of F. oxysporum circulates in the tap water of the different hospitals. We demonstrated that a clonal lineage of Fusarium oxysporum inhabits the water distribution systems of several French hospitals. This clonal lineage, which appears to be particularly adapted to water networks, represents a potential risk for human infection and raises questions about its worldwide distribution. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Clonal stability of latex yield in eleven clones of Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.O. Omokhafe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleven Hevea brasiliensis clones were evaluated for clonal stability of latex yield. A randomized complete block design was used with four replicates, two locations, seven years and three periods per year. Stability analysis was based on clone x year and clone x year x location interactions. Five stability parameters viz environmental variance, shukla's stability variance, regression of clonal latex yield on environmental index, variance due to regression and variance due to deviation from regression were applied. There was significant clone x environment effect at the two levels of interaction. Among the eleven clones, C 162 was outstanding for clonal stability and it can serve as donor parent for stability alleles. Three clones (C 76, C 150 and C 154 were also stable. The four stable clones (C 76, C 150, C 154 and C 162 are suitable for broad-spectrum recommendation for latex yield. Five clones (C 83, C 143, C 163, C 202 and RRIM 600 will require environment-specific recommendation because of their unstable phenotype. The stability feature of two clones (C 145 and C 159 was not clear and this will be investigated in subsequent studies.

  1. Secondary immunization generates clonally related antigen-specific plasma cells and memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Daniela; Giesecke, Claudia; Mei, Henrik E; Reiter, Karin; Daridon, Capucine; Lipsky, Peter E; Dörner, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Rechallenge with T cell-dependent Ags induces memory B cells to re-enter germinal centers (GCs) and undergo further expansion and differentiation into plasma cells (PCs) and secondary memory B cells. It is currently not known whether the expanded population of memory B cells and PCs generated in secondary GCs are clonally related, nor has the extent of proliferation and somatic hypermutation of their precursors been delineated. In this study, after secondary tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization, TT-specific PCs increased 17- to 80-fold on days 6-7, whereas TT-specific memory B cells peaked (delayed) on day 14 with a 2- to 22-fold increase. Molecular analyses of V(H)DJ(H) rearrangements of individual cells revealed no major differences of gene usage and CDR3 length between TT-specific PCs and memory B cells, and both contained extensive evidence of somatic hypermutation with a pattern consistent with GC reactions. This analysis identified clonally related TT-specific memory B cells and PCs. Within clusters of clonally related cells, sequences shared a number of mutations but also could contain additional base pair changes. The data indicate that although following secondary immunization PCs can derive from memory B cells without further somatic hypermutation, in some circumstances, likely within GC reactions, asymmetric mutation can occur. These results suggest that after the fate decision to differentiate into secondary memory B cells or PCs, some committed precursors continue to proliferate and mutate their V(H) genes.

  2. Somatically Acquired LINE-1 Insertions in Normal Esophagus Undergo Clonal Expansion in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet-O'Hare, Tara T; Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Anders, Robert A; Burns, Kathleen H; Kazazian, Haig H

    2016-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (SCC) is the most common form of esophageal cancer in the world and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage when successful treatment is challenging. Understanding the mutational profile of this cancer may identify new treatment strategies. Because somatic retrotransposition has been shown in tumors of the gastrointestinal system, we focused on LINE-1 (L1) mobilization as a source of genetic instability in this cancer. We hypothesized that retrotransposition is ongoing in SCC patients. The expression of L1 encoded proteins is necessary for retrotransposition to occur; therefore, we evaluated the expression of L1 open reading frame 1 protein (ORF1p). Using immunohistochemistry, we detected ORF1p expression in all four SCC cases evaluated. Using L1-seq, we identified and validated 74 somatic insertions in eight tumors of the nine evaluated. Of these, 12 insertions appeared to be somatic, not genetically inherited, and sub-clonal (i.e., present in less than one copy per genome equivalent) in the adjacent normal esophagus (NE), while clonal in the tumor. Our results indicate that L1 retrotransposition is active in SCC of the esophagus and that insertion events are present in histologically NE that expands clonally in the subsequent tumor. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. Clonal variation in gas exchange and freezing tolerance development of interior spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss x P. engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.) during autumn acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Shihe; Grossnickle, S.C. [British Columbia Research Corp., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Forest Biotechnology Centre

    1999-08-01

    Variation in physiological response during autumn acclimation was investigated in somatic seedlings of 10 interior spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss x P. engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.) clones from five full-sib families. Experiments were conducted on 2-yr-old seedlings through simulation in a growth chamber. Throughout the experimental period, gas-exchange parameters (net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance to water vapour and instantaneous water-use efficiency) were measured weekly and freezing tolerance was determined five times. Results showed that as seedlings acclimated to decreasing air temperature and photoperiod, stomatal conductance decreased linearly, photosynthesis was unchanged until air temperature and photoperiod were below 10 deg C and 11 h, respectively, water-use efficiency nearly doubled and freezing tolerance increased in a curvilinear fashion. There was significant between- and within-family clonal variation in all of these physiological parameters. 47 refs, 7 figs

  4. Antimicrobial efficacy of preoperative skin antisepsis and clonal relationship to postantiseptic skin-and-wound flora in patients undergoing clean orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeschlein, G; Napp, M; Layer, F; von Podewils, S; Haase, H; Spitzmueller, R; Assadian, O; Kasch, R; Werner, G; Jünger, M; Hinz, P; Ekkernkamp, A

    2015-11-01

    Nosocomial surgical site infections (SSI) are still important complications in surgery. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible role of skin flora surviving preoperative antisepsis as a possible cause of SSI. We conducted a two-phase prospective clinical trial in patients undergoing clean orthopedic surgery at a university trauma center in northern Germany. Quantitative swab samples were taken from pre- and postantiseptic skin and, additionally, from the wound base, wound margin, and the suture of 137 patients. Seventy-four patients during phase I and 63 during phase II were investigated. Microbial growth, species spectrum, and antibiotic susceptibility were analyzed. In phase two, the clonal relationship of strains was additionally analyzed. 18.0 % of the swab samples were positive for bacterial growth in the wound base, 24.5 % in the margin, and 27.3 % in the suture. Only 65.5 % of patients showed a 100 % reduction of the skin flora after antisepsis. The microbial spectrum in all postantiseptic samples was dominated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Clonally related staphylococci were detected in ten patients [nine CoNS, one methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA)]. Six of ten patients were suspected of having transmitted identical clones from skin flora into the wound. Ethanol-based antisepsis results in unexpected high levels of skin flora, which can be transmitted into the wound during surgery causing yet unexplained SSI. Keeping with the concept of zero tolerance, further studies are needed in order to understand the origin of this flora to allow further reduction of SSI.

  5. Utilization of wind energy in greater Hanover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahling, U.

    1993-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Eighties, the association of communities of Greater Hanover has dealt intensively with energy and ecopolitical questions in the scope of regional planning. Renewable energy sources play a dominant role in this context. This brochure is the third contribution to the subject ''Energy policy and environmental protection''. Experts as well as possibly interested parties are addressed especially. For all 8 contributions contained, separate entries have been recorded in this database. (BWI) [de

  6. Small cities face greater impact from automation

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Morgan R.; Sun, Lijun; Cebrian, Manuel; Youn, Hyejin; Rahwan, Iyad

    2017-01-01

    The city has proven to be the most successful form of human agglomeration and provides wide employment opportunities for its dwellers. As advances in robotics and artificial intelligence revive concerns about the impact of automation on jobs, a question looms: How will automation affect employment in cities? Here, we provide a comparative picture of the impact of automation across U.S. urban areas. Small cities will undertake greater adjustments, such as worker displacement and job content su...

  7. The Greater Sekhukhune-CAPABILITY outreach project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Nerine; Lampret, Julie; Lane, Tony; Christianson, Arnold

    2013-07-01

    The Greater Sekhukhune-CAPABILITY Outreach Project was undertaken in a rural district in Limpopo, South Africa, as part of the European Union-funded CAPABILITY programme to investigate approaches for capacity building for the translation of genetic knowledge into care and prevention of congenital disorders. Based on previous experience of a clinical genetic outreach programme in Limpopo, it aimed to initiate a district clinical genetic service in Greater Sekhukhune to gain knowledge and experience to assist in the implementation and development of medical genetic services in South Africa. Implementing the service in Greater Sekhukhune was impeded by a developing staff shortage in the province and pressure on the health service from the existing HIV/AIDS and TB epidemics. This situation underscores the need for health needs assessment for developing services for the care and prevention of congenital disorders in middle- and low-income countries. However, these impediments stimulated the pioneering of innovate ways to offer medical genetic services in these circumstances, including tele-teaching of nurses and doctors, using cellular phones to enhance clinical care and adapting and assessing the clinical utility of a laboratory test, QF-PCR, for use in the local circumstances.

  8. Operational technology for greater confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, P.T.; Vollmer, A.T.; Hunter, P.H.

    1984-12-01

    Procedures and methods for the design and operation of a greater confinement disposal facility using large-diameter boreholes are discussed. It is assumed that the facility would be located at an operating low-level waste disposal site and that only a small portion of the wastes received at the site would require greater confinement disposal. The document is organized into sections addressing: facility planning process; facility construction; waste loading and handling; radiological safety planning; operations procedures; and engineering cost studies. While primarily written for low-level waste management site operators and managers, a detailed economic assessment section is included that should assist planners in performing cost analyses. Economic assessments for both commercial and US government greater confinement disposal facilities are included. The estimated disposal costs range from $27 to $104 per cubic foot for a commercial facility and from $17 to $60 per cubic foot for a government facility. These costs are based on average site preparation, construction, and waste loading costs for both contact- and remote-handled wastes. 14 figures, 22 tables

  9. Effect of clonal reproduction on genetic structure in Pentaclethra macroloba (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Keith D; Zukin, Helen L; Dieterich, Inca A; Braker, Elizabeth; Sork, Victoria L

    2014-06-01

    The existence of monodominant forests on well-drained soils in tropical regions has been widely reported. Such forests most likely result from a combination of both ecological and evolutionary factors. Under conditions of high seed and seedling mortality, vegetative reproduction could create a reproductive advantage leading to forest dominance, and profoundly affect the distribution of genetic variation in a clonal species. We investigated these effects in a low diversity forest site in Northeastern Costa Rica dominated by the species Pentaclethra macroloba, which sprouts from the root mass of fallen trees and from snapped trunks. We examined the population structure of juvenile P. macroloba growing in different soil types and across an elevational gradient. Using seven molecular markers, we genotyped 173 juvenile P. macroloba from 18 plots (six plots in seasonally inundated swamps, and 12 plots in upland non-swamp) spanning 50-300m in elevation at La Selva Biological Station and the adjacent Reserva Ecológica Bijagual in Northeastern Costa Rica. We answered two specific questions: (1) How extensive is clonal reproduction? and (2) what is the distribution of genetic diversity and structure? We found that clonal reproduction occurred exclusively within inundated swamp areas. However, there was no significant difference between genetic diversity measures in swamp and non-swamp plots, which were both generally low when compared with other tropical forest species. Genetic structure was significant across all plots (F(ST) = -0.109). However, genetic structure among swamp plots (F(ST) = 0.128) was higher than among non-swamp upland plots (F(ST) = 0.093). Additionally, spatial autocorrelation among individuals within non-swamp upland plots was significant from the 25 to 100m spatial scale, but not within swamp plots. The degree of overall genetic structure we found in P. macroloba is high for a tropical forest tree. The incidence of clonal reproduction is a contributing

  10. Effect of clonal reproduction on genetic structure in Pentaclethra macroloba (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D. Gaddis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The existence of monodominant forests on well-drained soils in tropical regions has been widely reported. Such forests most likely result from a combination of both ecological and evolutionary factors. Under conditions of high seed and seedling mortality, vegetative reproduction could create a reproductive advantage leading to forest dominance, and profoundly affect the distribution of genetic variation in a clonal species. We investigated these effects in a low diversity forest site in Northeastern Costa Rica dominated by the species Pentaclethra macroloba, which sprouts from the root mass of fallen trees and from snapped trunks. We examined the population structure of juvenile P. macroloba growing in different soil types and across an elevational gradient. Using seven molecular markers, we genotyped 173 juvenile P. macroloba from 18 plots (six plots in seasonally inundated swamps, and 12 plots in upland non-swamp spanning 50-300m in elevation at La Selva Biological Station and the adjacent Reserva Ecológica Bijagual in Northeastern Costa Rica. We answered two specific questions: (1 How extensive is clonal reproduction? and (2 what is the distribution of genetic diversity and structure?. We found that clonal reproduction occurred exclusively within inundated swamp areas. However, there was no significant difference between genetic diversity measures in swamp and non-swamp plots, which were both generally low when compared with other tropical forest species. Genetic structure was significant across all plots (F ST=0.109. However, genetic structure among swamp plots (F ST=0.128 was higher than among non-swamp upland plots (F ST=0.093. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation among individuals within non-swamp upland plots was significant from the 25 to 100m spatial scale, but not within swamp plots. The degree of overall genetic structure we found in P. macroloba is high for a tropical forest tree. The incidence of clonal reproduction is a

  11. Clonal expansion of CD4+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in IgG4-related disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, Hamid; Mahajan, Vinay S.; Maehara, Takashi; Deshpande, Vikram; Della-Torre, Emanuel; Wallace, Zachary S.; Kulikova, Maria; Drijvers, Jefte M.; Daccache, Joe; Carruthers, Mollie N.; Castellino, Flavia; Stone, James R.; Stone, John H.; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    Background IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic condition of unknown etiology, characterized by highly fibrotic lesions with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates. CD4+ T cells constitute the major inflammatory cell population in IgG4-RD lesions. Objective We used an unbiased approach to characterize CD4+ T cell subsets in IgG4-RD subjects based on their clonal expansion and their ability to infiltrate affected tissue sites. Methods We used flow cytometry to identify CD4+ effector/memory T cells (TEM) in a cohort of 101 IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) patients. These expanded cells were characterized by gene expression analysis and flow cytometry. Next-generation sequencing of the T cell receptor β chain gene was performed on CD4+SLAMF7+ CTLs and CD4+GATA3+ TH2 cells in a subset of patients to identify their clonality. Tissue infiltration by specific T cells was examined using quantitative multi-color imaging. Results CD4+ effector/memory T cells with a cytolytic phenotype were expanded in IgG4-RD patients. Next-generation sequencing revealed prominent clonal expansions of these CD4+CTLs but not CD4+GATA3+ memory TH2 cells in subjects with IgG4-RD. The dominant T cells infiltrating a range of inflamed IgG4-RD tissue sites were clonally-expanded CD4+CTLs that expressed SLAMF7, granzyme A, IL-1β, and TGF-β1. Clinical remission induced by rituximab-mediated B cell depletion was associated with a reduction in disease-associated CD4+ CTLs Conclusions IgG4-RD is prominently linked to clonally-expanded, IL-1β, and TGF- β1 secreting, CD4+ CTLs in peripheral blood as well as in inflammatory tissue lesions. These active, terminally-differentiated, cytokine-secreting effector CD4+ T cells are now linked to a human disease characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26971690

  12. Land use scenarios for greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian; Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2012-01-01

    Urban planning and development in Denmark can be characterised by a relatively strong planning framework. Land use scenarios based on empirically derived dynamics of urban growth are practically never applied. However, modelling approaches do offer a methodology to explore the pressures in an urban...... region, as well as an approach to understand urban development patterns outside the ‘spatial masterplan’. In this context we will present the results of a modelling exercise addressing future land use change in the metropolitan area of Copenhagen, Denmark, and the impact of the current regional planning...... short period of time. The set-up and the results were discussed with a few experts from the Danish Ministry of the Environment and its value as discussion input recognized. The approach offers a lot of possibilities to discuss urban growth and spatial planning policies, even in a country with a strong...

  13. Land use scenarios for greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian; Jørgensen, Gertrud; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    2011-01-01

    development plans. Land use scenarios based on empirically derived dynamics of urban growth are practically never applied. This may be explained by the in-consistency between the logic of spatial master planning - and the organic or driver-dependent character of urban growth assumed by land use modelling...... approaches. However, modelling approaches do offer a methodology to explore the pressures in an urban region, as well as an approach to understand urban development patterns outside the ‘spatial masterplan’. In this context we will present the results of a modelling exercise addressing future land use change......Urban planning and development in Denmark can be characterised by a relatively strong planning framework. Projections of the future demand for urban development as well as decisions on how and where to accommodate this demand is part of the planning process and reflected in strategic- and local...

  14. Strategic growth options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulatilaka, N.; Perotti, E.C.

    1998-01-01

    We provide a strategic rationale for growth options under uncertainty and imperfect corn-petition. In a market with strategic competition, investment confers a greater capability to take advantage of future growth opportunities. This strategic advantage leads to the capture of a greater share of the

  15. Greater happiness for a greater number: Is that possible in Austria?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWhat is the final goal of public policy? Jeremy Bentham (1789) would say: greater happiness for a greater number. He thought of happiness as subjective enjoyment of life; in his words as “the sum of pleasures and pains”. In his time the happiness of the great number could not be measured

  16. Greater happiness for a greater number: Is that possible? If so how? (Arabic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut); E. Samuel (Emad)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWhat is the final goal of public policy? Jeremy Bentham (1789) would say: greater happiness for a greater number. He thought of happiness as subjective enjoyment of life; in his words as “the sum of pleasures and pains”. In his time, the happiness of the great number could not be

  17. Greater happiness for a greater number: Is that possible in Germany?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWhat is the final goal of public policy? Jeremy Bentham (1789) would say: greater happiness for a greater number. He thought of happiness as subjective enjoyment of life; in his words as “the sum of pleasures and pains”. In his time the Happiness of the great number could not be measured

  18. Search for greater stability in nuclear regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asselstine, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The need for greater stability in nuclear regulation is discussed. Two possible approaches for dealing with the problems of new and rapidly changing regulatory requirements are discussed. The first approach relies on the more traditional licensing reform initiatives that have been considered off and on for the past decade. The second approach considers a new regulator philosophy aimed at the root causes of the proliferation of new safety requirements that have been imposed in recent years. For the past few years, the concepts of deregulation and regulatory reform have been in fashion in Washington, and the commercial nuclear power program has not remained unaffected. Many look to these concepts to provide greater stability in the regulatory program. The NRC, the nuclear industry and the administration have all been avidly pursuing regulatory reform initiatives, which take the form of both legislative and administrative proposals. Many of these proposals look to the future, and, if adopted, would have little impact on currently operating nuclear power plants or plants now under construction

  19. Greater Sudbury fuel efficient driving handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    Reducing the amount of fuel that people use for personal driving saves money, improves local air quality, and reduces personal contributions to climate change. This handbook was developed to be used as a tool for a fuel efficient driving pilot program in Greater Sudbury in 2009-2010. Specifically, the purpose of the handbook was to provide greater Sudbury drivers with information on how to drive and maintain their personal vehicles in order to maximize fuel efficiency. The handbook also provides tips for purchasing fuel efficient vehicles. It outlines the benefits of fuel maximization, with particular reference to reducing contributions to climate change; reducing emissions of air pollutants; safe driving; and money savings. Some tips for efficient driving are to avoid aggressive driving; use cruise control; plan trips; and remove excess weight. Tips for efficient winter driving are to avoid idling to warm up the engine; use a block heater; remove snow and ice; use snow tires; and check tire pressure. The importance of car maintenance and tire pressure was emphasized. The handbook also explains how fuel consumption ratings are developed by vehicle manufacturers. refs., figs.

  20. Women at greater risk of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahathir, M

    1997-04-01

    Although many people believe that mainly men get infected with HIV/AIDS, women are actually getting infected at a faster rate than men, especially in developing countries, and suffer more from the adverse impact of AIDS. As of mid-1996, the Joint UN Program on AIDS estimated that more than 10 million of the 25 million adults infected with HIV since the beginning of the epidemic are women. The proportion of HIV-positive women is growing, with almost half of the 7500 new infections daily occurring among women. 90% of HIV-positive women live in a developing country. In Asia-Pacific, 1.4 million women have been infected with HIV out of an estimated total 3.08 million adults from the late 1970s until late 1994. Biologically, women are more vulnerable than men to infection because of the greater mucus area exposed to HIV during penile penetration. Women under age 17 years are at even greater risk because they have an underdeveloped cervix and low vaginal mucus production. Concurrent sexually transmitted diseases increase the risk of HIV transmission. Women's risk is also related to their exposure to gender inequalities in society. The social and economic pressures of poverty exacerbate women's risk. Prevention programs are discussed.

  1. Small cities face greater impact from automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Morgan R; Sun, Lijun; Cebrian, Manuel; Youn, Hyejin; Rahwan, Iyad

    2018-02-01

    The city has proved to be the most successful form of human agglomeration and provides wide employment opportunities for its dwellers. As advances in robotics and artificial intelligence revive concerns about the impact of automation on jobs, a question looms: how will automation affect employment in cities? Here, we provide a comparative picture of the impact of automation across US urban areas. Small cities will undertake greater adjustments, such as worker displacement and job content substitutions. We demonstrate that large cities exhibit increased occupational and skill specialization due to increased abundance of managerial and technical professions. These occupations are not easily automatable, and, thus, reduce the potential impact of automation in large cities. Our results pass several robustness checks including potential errors in the estimation of occupational automation and subsampling of occupations. Our study provides the first empirical law connecting two societal forces: urban agglomeration and automation's impact on employment. © 2018 The Authors.

  2. Small cities face greater impact from automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijun; Cebrian, Manuel; Rahwan, Iyad

    2018-01-01

    The city has proved to be the most successful form of human agglomeration and provides wide employment opportunities for its dwellers. As advances in robotics and artificial intelligence revive concerns about the impact of automation on jobs, a question looms: how will automation affect employment in cities? Here, we provide a comparative picture of the impact of automation across US urban areas. Small cities will undertake greater adjustments, such as worker displacement and job content substitutions. We demonstrate that large cities exhibit increased occupational and skill specialization due to increased abundance of managerial and technical professions. These occupations are not easily automatable, and, thus, reduce the potential impact of automation in large cities. Our results pass several robustness checks including potential errors in the estimation of occupational automation and subsampling of occupations. Our study provides the first empirical law connecting two societal forces: urban agglomeration and automation's impact on employment. PMID:29436514

  3. Planning for greater-confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Meshkov, N.K.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Yu, C.

    1984-01-01

    This contribution is a progress report for preparation of a document that will summarize procedures and technical information needed to plan for and implement greater-confinement disposal (GCD) of low-level radioactive waste. Selection of a site and a facility design (Phase I), and construction, operation, and extended care (Phase II) will be covered in the document. This progress report is limited to Phase I. Phase I includes determination of the need for GCD, design alternatives, and selection of a site and facility design. Alternative designs considered are augered shafts, deep trenches, engineered structures, high-integrity containers, hydrofracture, and improved waste form. Design considerations and specifications, performance elements, cost elements, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of the different designs are covered. Procedures are discussed for establishing overall performance objectives and waste-acceptance criteria, and for comparative assessment of the performance and cost of the different alternatives. 16 references

  4. Greater confinement disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Merry-Libby, P.A.; Meshkov, N.K.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) includes a broad spectrum of different radionuclide concentrations, half-lives, and hazards. Standard shallow-land burial practice can provide adequate protection of public health and safety for most LLW. A small volume fraction (approx. 1%) containing most of the activity inventory (approx. 90%) requires specific measures known as greater-confinement disposal (GCD). Different site characteristics and different waste characteristics - such as high radionuclide concentrations, long radionuclide half-lives, high radionuclide mobility, and physical or chemical characteristics that present exceptional hazards - lead to different GCD facility design requirements. Facility design alternatives considered for GCD include the augered shaft, deep trench, engineered structure, hydrofracture, improved waste form, and high-integrity container. Selection of an appropriate design must also consider the interplay between basic risk limits for protection of public health and safety, performance characteristics and objectives, costs, waste-acceptance criteria, waste characteristics, and site characteristics

  5. Planning for greater-confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Meshkov, N.K.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Yu, C.

    1984-01-01

    This contribution is a progress report for preparation of a document that will summarize procedures and technical information needed to plan for and implement greater-confinement disposal (GCD) of low-level radioactive waste. Selection of a site and a facility design (Phase I), and construction, operation, and extended care (Phase II) will be covered in the document. This progress report is limited to Phase I. Phase I includes determination of the need for GCD, design alternatives, and selection of a site and facility design. Alternative designs considered are augered shafts, deep trenches, engineered structures, high-integrity containers, hydrofracture, and improved waste form. Design considerations and specifications, performance elements, cost elements, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of the different designs are covered. Procedures are discussed for establishing overall performance objecties and waste-acceptance criteria, and for comparative assessment of the performance and cost of the different alternatives. 16 refs

  6. Identification of genuine primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma via clinicopathologic observation and clonality assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li; Wei, Long-Xiao; Huang, Gao-Sheng; Zhang, Wen-Dong; Wang, Lu; Zhu, Shao-Jun; Han, Xiu-Juan; Yao, Li; Lan, Miao; Li, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-19

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is an uncommon lymphoma associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). It most commonly involves the nasal cavity and upper respiratory tract. Primary pulmonary NK/T cell lymphoma is extremely rare. If a patient with a NK or T-cell tumor has an unusual reaction to treatment or an unusual prognosis, it is wise to differentiate NK from T-cell tumors. The clinicopathologic characteristics, immunophenotype, EBV in situ hybridization, and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement of primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma from a 73-year-old Chinese woman were investigated and the clonal status was determined using female X-chromosomal inactivation mosaicism and polymorphisms at the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene. The lesion showed the typical histopathologic characteristics and immunohistochemical features of NK/T cell lymphoma. However, the sample was negative for TCR gene rearrangement. A clonality assay demonstrated that the lesion was monoclonal. It is concluded that this is the first recorded case of genuine primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma. The purpose of the present work is to recommend that pathologists carefully investigate the whole lesion to reduce the likelihood that primary pulmonary NK cell lymphoma will be misdiagnosed as an infectious lesion. In addition, TCR gene rearrangement and clonal analysis, which is based on female X-chromosomal inactivation mosaicism and polymorphisms at PGK and androgen receptor (AR) loci, were found to play important roles in differentiating NK cell lymphoma from T cell lymphoma. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5205300349457729.

  7. Epidemiological tracking and population assignment of the non-clonal bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Julia; Price, Erin P; Hornstra, Heidie; Busch, Joseph D; Mayo, Mark; Godoy, Daniel; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Baker, Anthony; Foster, Jeffrey T; Wagner, David M; Tuanyok, Apichai; Warner, Jeffrey; Spratt, Brian G; Peacock, Sharon J; Currie, Bart J; Keim, Paul; Pearson, Talima

    2011-12-01

    Rapid assignment of bacterial pathogens into predefined populations is an important first step for epidemiological tracking. For clonal species, a single allele can theoretically define a population. For non-clonal species such as Burkholderia pseudomallei, however, shared allelic states between distantly related isolates make it more difficult to identify population defining characteristics. Two distinct B. pseudomallei populations have been previously identified using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). These populations correlate with the major foci of endemicity (Australia and Southeast Asia). Here, we use multiple Bayesian approaches to evaluate the compositional robustness of these populations, and provide assignment results for MLST sequence types (STs). Our goal was to provide a reference for assigning STs to an established population without the need for further computational analyses. We also provide allele frequency results for each population to enable estimation of population assignment even when novel STs are discovered. The ability for humans and potentially contaminated goods to move rapidly across the globe complicates the task of identifying the source of an infection or outbreak. Population genetic dynamics of B. pseudomallei are particularly complicated relative to other bacterial pathogens, but the work here provides the ability for broad scale population assignment. As there is currently no independent empirical measure of successful population assignment, we provide comprehensive analytical details of our comparisons to enable the reader to evaluate the robustness of population designations and assignments as they pertain to individual research questions. Finer scale subdivision and verification of current population compositions will likely be possible with genotyping data that more comprehensively samples the genome. The approach used here may be valuable for other non-clonal pathogens that lack simple group-defining genetic characteristics

  8. Epidemiological tracking and population assignment of the non-clonal bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Dale

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid assignment of bacterial pathogens into predefined populations is an important first step for epidemiological tracking. For clonal species, a single allele can theoretically define a population. For non-clonal species such as Burkholderia pseudomallei, however, shared allelic states between distantly related isolates make it more difficult to identify population defining characteristics. Two distinct B. pseudomallei populations have been previously identified using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. These populations correlate with the major foci of endemicity (Australia and Southeast Asia. Here, we use multiple Bayesian approaches to evaluate the compositional robustness of these populations, and provide assignment results for MLST sequence types (STs. Our goal was to provide a reference for assigning STs to an established population without the need for further computational analyses. We also provide allele frequency results for each population to enable estimation of population assignment even when novel STs are discovered. The ability for humans and potentially contaminated goods to move rapidly across the globe complicates the task of identifying the source of an infection or outbreak. Population genetic dynamics of B. pseudomallei are particularly complicated relative to other bacterial pathogens, but the work here provides the ability for broad scale population assignment. As there is currently no independent empirical measure of successful population assignment, we provide comprehensive analytical details of our comparisons to enable the reader to evaluate the robustness of population designations and assignments as they pertain to individual research questions. Finer scale subdivision and verification of current population compositions will likely be possible with genotyping data that more comprehensively samples the genome. The approach used here may be valuable for other non-clonal pathogens that lack simple group-defining genetic

  9. Clonal mutations in primary human glial tumors: evidence in support of the mutator hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Chitra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A verifiable consequence of the mutator hypothesis is that even low grade neoplasms would accumulate a large number of mutations that do not influence the tumor phenotype (clonal mutations. In this study, we have attempted to quantify the number of clonal mutations in primary human gliomas of astrocytic cell origin. These alterations were identified in tumor tissue, microscopically confirmed to have over 70% neoplastic cells. Methods Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed using a set of fifteen 10-mer primers of arbitrary but definite sequences in 17 WHO grade II astrocytomas (low grade diffuse astrocytoma or DA and 16 WHO grade IV astrocytomas (Glioblastoma Multiforme or GBM. The RAPD profile of the tumor tissue was compared with that of the leucocyte DNA of the same patient and alteration(s scored. A quantitative estimate of the overall genomic changes in these tumors was obtained by 2 different modes of calculation. Results The overall change in the tumors was estimated to be 4.24% in DA and 2.29% in GBM by one method and 11.96% and 6.03% in DA and GBM respectively by the other. The difference between high and lower grade tumors was statistically significant by both methods. Conclusion This study demonstrates the presence of extensive clonal mutations in gliomas, more in lower grade. This is consistent with our earlier work demonstrating that technique like RAPD analysis, unbiased for locus, is able to demonstrate more intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in lower grade gliomas compared to higher grade. The results support the mutator hypothesis proposed by Loeb.

  10. Clonal mutations in primary human glial tumors: evidence in support of the mutator hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Anjan; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Chosdol, Kunzang; Sarkar, Chitra; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sinha, Subrata

    2007-01-01

    A verifiable consequence of the mutator hypothesis is that even low grade neoplasms would accumulate a large number of mutations that do not influence the tumor phenotype (clonal mutations). In this study, we have attempted to quantify the number of clonal mutations in primary human gliomas of astrocytic cell origin. These alterations were identified in tumor tissue, microscopically confirmed to have over 70% neoplastic cells. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed using a set of fifteen 10-mer primers of arbitrary but definite sequences in 17 WHO grade II astrocytomas (low grade diffuse astrocytoma or DA) and 16 WHO grade IV astrocytomas (Glioblastoma Multiforme or GBM). The RAPD profile of the tumor tissue was compared with that of the leucocyte DNA of the same patient and alteration(s) scored. A quantitative estimate of the overall genomic changes in these tumors was obtained by 2 different modes of calculation. The overall change in the tumors was estimated to be 4.24% in DA and 2.29% in GBM by one method and 11.96% and 6.03% in DA and GBM respectively by the other. The difference between high and lower grade tumors was statistically significant by both methods. This study demonstrates the presence of extensive clonal mutations in gliomas, more in lower grade. This is consistent with our earlier work demonstrating that technique like RAPD analysis, unbiased for locus, is able to demonstrate more intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in lower grade gliomas compared to higher grade. The results support the mutator hypothesis proposed by Loeb

  11. Confirmation of the reported association of clonal chromosomal mosaicism with an increased risk of incident hematologic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula M Schick

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities provide clinical utility in the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic malignancies, and may be predictive of malignant transformation in individuals without apparent clinical presentation of a hematologic cancer. In an effort to confirm previous reports of an association between clonal mosaicism and incident hematologic cancer, we applied the anomDetectBAF algorithm to call chromosomal anomalies in genotype data from previously conducted Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS. The genotypes were initially collected from DNA derived from peripheral blood of 12,176 participants in the Group Health electronic Medical Records and Genomics study (eMERGE and the Women's Health Initiative (WHI. We detected clonal mosaicism in 169 individuals (1.4% and large clonal mosaic events (>2 mb in 117 (1.0% individuals. Though only 9.5% of clonal mosaic carriers had an incident diagnosis of hematologic cancer (multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, lymphoma, or leukemia, the carriers had a 5.5-fold increased risk (95% CI: 3.3-9.3; p-value = 7.5×10(-11 of developing these cancers subsequently. Carriers of large mosaic anomalies showed particularly pronounced risk of subsequent leukemia (HR = 19.2, 95% CI: 8.9-41.6; p-value = 7.3×10(-14. Thus we independently confirm the association between detectable clonal mosaicism and hematologic cancer found previously in two recent publications.

  12. Clonal relationship among Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated in Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrascia, Maria; Pugliese, Nicola; Maimone, Francesco; Mohamud, Kadigia A; Grimont, Patrick A D; Materu, Sadiki F; Pazzani, Carlo

    2009-03-01

    One hundred and three Vibrio cholerae O1 strains, selected to represent the cholera outbreaks which occurred in Somalia in 1998-1999, were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns, ribotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility. All strains showed a unique amplified DNA pattern and 2 closely related ribotypes (B5a and B8a), among which B5a was the more frequently identified. Ninety-one strains were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim, conferred, except for spectinomycin, by a conjugative plasmid IncC. These findings indicated that the group of strains active in Somalia in the late 1990s had a clonal origin.

  13. Clonal propagation of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni by stem-tip culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Y; Nakamura, S; Fukui, H; Tabata, M

    1984-10-01

    Clonal propagation of Stevia rebaudiana has been established by culturing stem-tips with a few leaf primordia on an agar medium supplemented with a high concentration (10 mg/l) of kinetin. Anatomical examination has suggested that these multiple shoots originate from a number of adventitious buds formed on the margin of the leaf. Innumerable shoots can be obtained by repeating the cycle of multiple-shoot formation from a single stem-tip of Stevia. These shoots produce roots when transferred to a medium containing NAA (0.1 mg/l) without kinetin. The regenerated plantlets can be transplanted to soil.

  14. Demographic variability and heterogeneity among individuals within and among clonal bacteria strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouvet, Lionel; Rodriguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Steiner, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    to accurately decompose the drivers of heterogeneity among individuals as genetically fixed or selectively neutral. Rather than working on wild populations we present here data from a simple bacterial system in the lab, Escherichia coli. Our system, based on cutting-edge microfluidic techniques, provides high...... control over the genotype and the environment. It therefore allows to unambiguously decompose and quantify fixed genetic variability and dynamic stochastic variability among individuals. We show that within clonal individual variability (dynamic heterogeneity) in lifespan and lifetime reproduction...

  15. Clonal outbreaks of [ Pasteurella] pneumotropica biovar Heyl in two mouse colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikary, Sadhana; Bisgaard, Magne; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document the pathogenic role of biovar Heyl of [Pasteurella] pneumotropica in mouse colonies. Fifty-three isolates associated with mastitis and orbital, cutaneous and vaginal abscesses as well as isolates from the nose and vagina of healthy mice were investigated...... strains with the same rpoB sequence type, as shown by the PFGE profiles. The investigation documented that members of biovar Heyl of [P.] pneumotropica caused disease outbreaks in mouse colonies since the clonality indicated a primary role of [P.] pneumotropica biovar Heyl in the infections observed....

  16. Probable clonal origin of acute myeloblastic leukemia following radiation and chemotherapy of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggans, R.G.; Jacobson, R.J.; Fialkow, P.J.; Woolley, P.V. III; Macdonald, J.S.; Schein, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    A 64-yr-old female developed acute myeloblastic leukemia following radiation and drug therapy for colon carcinoma. The patient was heterozygous for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G-6-PD) and displayed types A and B isoenzymes in nonhematopoietic tissue. In contrast, only type B G-6-PD was observed in peripheral blood white cells. In addition, a karyotypic abnormality was found in peripheral blood and marrow cells but not in skin fibroblasts. The data are consistent with a clonal origin of this leukemia

  17. Urban acid deposition in Greater Manchester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.S.; Longhurst, J.W.S.; Gee, D.R.; Hare, S.E. (Manchester Polytechnic, Manchester (UK). Acid Rain Information Centre)

    1989-08-01

    Data are presented from a monitoring network of 18 bulk precipitation collectors and one wet-only collector in the urban area of Greater Manchester, in the north west of England. Weekly samples were analysed for all the major ions in precipitation along with gaseous nitrogen dioxide concentrations from diffusion tubes. Statistical analysis of the data shows significant spatial variation of non marine sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, acidity and calcium concentrations, and nitrogen dioxide concentrations. Calcium is thought to be responsible for the buffering of acidity and is of local origin. Wet deposition is the likely removal process for calcium in the atmosphere and probably by below cloud scavenging. Nitrate and ammonium concentrations and depositions show close spatial, temporal and statistical association. Examination of high simultaneous episodes of nitrate and ammonium deposition shows that these depositions cannot be explained in terms of trajectories and it is suggested that UK emissions of ammonia may be important. Statistical analysis of the relationships between nitrate and ammonium depositions, concentrations and precipitation amount suggest that ammonia from mesoscale sources reacts reversibly with nitric acid aerosol and is removed by below cloud scavenging. High episodes of the deposition of non marine sulphate are difficult to explain by trajectory analysis alone, perhaps suggesting local sources. In a comparison between wet deposition and bulk deposition, it was shown that only 15.2% of the non marine sulphur was dry deposited to the bulk precipitation collector. 63 refs., 86 figs., 31 tabs.

  18. Clonal Propagation of Khaya senegalensis: The Effects of Stem Length, Leaf Area, Auxins, Smoke Solution, and Stockplant Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Ky-Dembele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Khaya senegalensis is a multipurpose African timber species. The development of clonal propagation could improve plantation establishment, which is currently impeded by mahogany shoot borer. To examine its potential for clonal propagation, the effects of cutting length, leaf area, stockplant maturation, auxin, and smoke solution treatments were investigated. Leafy cuttings rooted well (up to 80% compared to leafless cuttings (0%. Cuttings taken from seedlings rooted well (at least 95%, but cuttings obtained from older trees rooted poorly (5% maximum. The rooting ability of cuttings collected from older trees was improved (16% maximum by pollarding. Auxin application enhanced root length and the number of roots while smoke solution did not improve cuttings' rooting ability. These results indicate that juvenile K. senegalensis is amenable to clonal propagation, but further work is required to improve the rooting of cuttings from mature trees.

  19. Aberrant clones: Birth order generates life history diversity in Greater Duckweed, Spirodela polyrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejbel, Hebah S; Simons, Andrew M

    2018-02-01

    Environmental unpredictability is known to result in the evolution of bet-hedging traits. Variable dormancy enhances survival through harsh conditions, and is widely cited as a diversification bet-hedging trait. The floating aquatic plant, Spirodela polyrhiza (Greater Duckweed), provides an opportunity to study diversification because although partially reliable seasonal cues exist, its growing season is subject to an unpredictable and literally "hard" termination when the surface water freezes, and overwinter survival depends on a switch from production of normal daughter fronds to production of dense, sinking "turions" prior to freeze-over. The problem for S. polyrhiza is that diversified dormancy behavior must be generated among clonally produced, genetically identical offspring. Variation in phenology has been observed in the field, but its sources are unknown. Here, we investigate sources of phenological variation in turion production , and test the hypothesis that diversification in turion phenology is generated within genetic lineages through effects of parental birth order. As expected, phenotypic plasticity to temperature is expressed along a thermal gradient; more interestingly, parental birth order was found to have a significant and strong effect on turion phenology: Turions are produced earlier by late birth-order parents. These results hold regardless of whether turion phenology is measured as first turion birth order, time to first turion, or turion frequency. This study addresses a question of current interest on potential mechanisms generating diversification, and suggests that consistent phenotypic differences across birth orders generate life history variation.

  20. Comparison of Stevia plants grown from seeds, cuttings and stem-tip cultures for growth and sweet diterpene glucosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Y; Nakamura, S; Fukui, H; Tabata, M

    1984-10-01

    The growth and sweet diterpene glucosides of Stevia plants propagated by stem-tip cultures were compared with those of the control plants propagated by seeds. There was no significant difference between the two groups both in growth and in chemical composition. As for the contents of sweet diterpene glucosides, however, the clonal plants showed significantly smaller variations than the sexually propagated plants; they were almost as homogeneous as the plants propagated by cuttings. These results suggest that the clonal propagation by stem-tip culture is an effective method of obtaining a population of uniform plants for the production of sweet diterpene glucosides.

  1. Economic and geographic factors affecting the development of Greater Baku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vusat AFANDIYEV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, the responsible factors for the ongoing development of urbanization are the high speed of population growth, and the mass migration of humans to cities and large urban areas. In most countries, this process resulted in the emergence of ‘pseudo-urbanization’ which is difficult to be regulated. The purpose of the carried researches to determine the development priorities in the territory of Greater Baku – the capital city of the Republic of Azerbaijan; to define the problems that take place in this connection; and to develop ways of elimination of these problems. The reason of taking Baku as a research area is connected with some of the factors. Firstly, studies on Baku have been conducted based on the Soviet geographical and urban planning school and their methods for a long period. In this regard, it is necessary to carry out research in this field based on the principles adopted in most countries. Secondly, since 1992, the intensive accumulation of population in the territory of the capital city and the surrounding areas is being observed because of socio-economic problems. As a result, the process of pseudo-urbanization intensified, entailing a densely-populated area. Thirdly, low-rise buildings still continue to exist in the large areas within the territory of Baku, and they are not associated with the functional structure of the city. This situation creates many challenges, particularly in terms of density growth and effective use of the city’s territory. Finally, numerous new buildings have been constructed in the residential areas of Baku in recent years, and this may entailserious problems in water supply, energy provision, and utilities. The study is carried out referring to previous works of researchers, statistic data, and the results of the population census conducted in 1959-2009.The practical significance of the scientific work is that positive and negative factors affecting the further development of Greater Baku

  2. Genet-specific DNA methylation probabilities detected in a spatial epigenetic analysis of a clonal plant population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwako S Araki

    Full Text Available In sessile organisms such as plants, spatial genetic structures of populations show long-lasting patterns. These structures have been analyzed across diverse taxa to understand the processes that determine the genetic makeup of organismal populations. For many sessile organisms that mainly propagate via clonal spread, epigenetic status can vary between clonal individuals in the absence of genetic changes. However, fewer previous studies have explored the epigenetic properties in comparison to the genetic properties of natural plant populations. Here, we report the simultaneous evaluation of the spatial structure of genetic and epigenetic variation in a natural population of the clonal plant Cardamine leucantha. We applied a hierarchical Bayesian model to evaluate the effects of membership of a genet (a group of individuals clonally derived from a single seed and vegetation cover on the epigenetic variation between ramets (clonal plants that are physiologically independent individuals. We sampled 332 ramets in a 20 m × 20 m study plot that contained 137 genets (identified using eight SSR markers. We detected epigenetic variation in DNA methylation at 24 methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MS-AFLP loci. There were significant genet effects at all 24 MS-AFLP loci in the distribution of subepiloci. Vegetation cover had no statistically significant effect on variation in the majority of MS-AFLP loci. The spatial aggregation of epigenetic variation is therefore largely explained by the aggregation of ramets that belong to the same genets. By applying hierarchical Bayesian analyses, we successfully identified a number of genet-specific changes in epigenetic status within a natural plant population in a complex context, where genotypes and environmental factors are unevenly distributed. This finding suggests that it requires further studies on the spatial epigenetic structure of natural populations of diverse organisms

  3. Genet-specific DNA methylation probabilities detected in a spatial epigenetic analysis of a clonal plant population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiwako S; Kubo, Takuya; Kudoh, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In sessile organisms such as plants, spatial genetic structures of populations show long-lasting patterns. These structures have been analyzed across diverse taxa to understand the processes that determine the genetic makeup of organismal populations. For many sessile organisms that mainly propagate via clonal spread, epigenetic status can vary between clonal individuals in the absence of genetic changes. However, fewer previous studies have explored the epigenetic properties in comparison to the genetic properties of natural plant populations. Here, we report the simultaneous evaluation of the spatial structure of genetic and epigenetic variation in a natural population of the clonal plant Cardamine leucantha. We applied a hierarchical Bayesian model to evaluate the effects of membership of a genet (a group of individuals clonally derived from a single seed) and vegetation cover on the epigenetic variation between ramets (clonal plants that are physiologically independent individuals). We sampled 332 ramets in a 20 m × 20 m study plot that contained 137 genets (identified using eight SSR markers). We detected epigenetic variation in DNA methylation at 24 methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MS-AFLP) loci. There were significant genet effects at all 24 MS-AFLP loci in the distribution of subepiloci. Vegetation cover had no statistically significant effect on variation in the majority of MS-AFLP loci. The spatial aggregation of epigenetic variation is therefore largely explained by the aggregation of ramets that belong to the same genets. By applying hierarchical Bayesian analyses, we successfully identified a number of genet-specific changes in epigenetic status within a natural plant population in a complex context, where genotypes and environmental factors are unevenly distributed. This finding suggests that it requires further studies on the spatial epigenetic structure of natural populations of diverse organisms, particularly for

  4. Unexpected heterogeneity derived from Cas9 ribonucleoprotein-introduced clonal cells at the HPRT1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Mochida, Keiji; Nakade, Shota; Ezure, Toru; Minagawa, Sachi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Single-cell cloning is an essential technique for establishing genome-edited cell clones mediated by programmable nucleases such as CRISPR-Cas9. However, residual genome-editing activity after single-cell cloning may cause heterogeneity in the clonal cells. Previous studies showed efficient mutagenesis and rapid degradation of CRISPR-Cas9 components in cultured cells by introducing Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). In this study, we investigated how the timing for single-cell cloning of Cas9 RNP-transfected cells affected the heterogeneity of the resultant clones. We carried out transfection of Cas9 RNPs targeting several loci in the HPRT1 gene in HCT116 cells, followed by single-cell cloning at 24, 48, 72 hr and 1 week post-transfection. After approximately 3 weeks of incubation, the clonal cells were collected and genotyped by high-resolution microchip electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing. Unexpectedly, long-term incubation before single-cell cloning resulted in highly heterogeneous clones. We used a lipofection method for transfection, and the media containing transfectable RNPs were not removed before single-cell cloning. Therefore, the active Cas9 RNPs were considered to be continuously incorporated into cells during the precloning incubation. Our findings provide a warning that lipofection of Cas9 RNPs may cause continuous introduction of gene mutations depending on the experimental procedures. © 2018 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Wind power forecast using wavelet neural network trained by improved Clonal selection algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitsaz, Hamed; Amjady, Nima; Zareipour, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Presenting a Morlet wavelet neural network for wind power forecasting. • Proposing improved Clonal selection algorithm for training the model. • Applying Maximum Correntropy Criterion to evaluate the training performance. • Extensive testing of the proposed wind power forecast method on real-world data. - Abstract: With the integration of wind farms into electric power grids, an accurate wind power prediction is becoming increasingly important for the operation of these power plants. In this paper, a new forecasting engine for wind power prediction is proposed. The proposed engine has the structure of Wavelet Neural Network (WNN) with the activation functions of the hidden neurons constructed based on multi-dimensional Morlet wavelets. This forecast engine is trained by a new improved Clonal selection algorithm, which optimizes the free parameters of the WNN for wind power prediction. Furthermore, Maximum Correntropy Criterion (MCC) has been utilized instead of Mean Squared Error as the error measure in training phase of the forecasting model. The proposed wind power forecaster is tested with real-world hourly data of system level wind power generation in Alberta, Canada. In order to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method, it is compared with several other wind power forecast techniques. The obtained results confirm the validity of the developed approach

  6. Limpeza clonal de mudas de videira infectadas por Xanthomonas campestris pv. viticola

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    Adriano Márcio Freire Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O cancro bacteriano da videira é causado por Xanthomonas campestris pv. viticola (Xcv. Visando à limpeza clonal de mudas de 'Red Globe', foram estudados: tamanho ideal de ápices e gemas axilares para cultivo em meio de Galzy modificado (MGM; efeito da termoterapia (38ºC/30 dias; e ação de antibióticos na eliminação de Xcv em videiras infectadas. Os percentuais de contaminação por Xcv e de regeneração foram analisados, e as plantas obtidas foram indexadas em meio ágar nutritivo-dextrose-extrato de levedura-ampicilina (NYDAM, seguindo-se teste de patogenicidade. O cultivo de explantes com 3 mm possibilitou a obtenção de plantas livres da bactéria, com regeneração 14,3 vezes maior que explantes com 1 mm. A termoterapia de mudas infectadas, associada ao cultivo in vitro, não eliminou o patógeno. O cultivo de explantes com 10 mm, durante 40 dias em MGM + cefotaxima (300 mg L-1, proporcionou limpeza clonal das mudas. A indexação de plantas de videira regeneradas in vitro, quanto à infecção por Xcv utilizando NYDAM, seguida de teste de patogenicidade, é uma alternativa econômica e eficiente para produção de mudas de alta qualidade fitossanitária.

  7. Brake fault diagnosis using Clonal Selection Classification Algorithm (CSCA – A statistical learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jegadeeshwaran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In automobile, brake system is an essential part responsible for control of the vehicle. Any failure in the brake system impacts the vehicle's motion. It will generate frequent catastrophic effects on the vehicle cum passenger's safety. Thus the brake system plays a vital role in an automobile and hence condition monitoring of the brake system is essential. Vibration based condition monitoring using machine learning techniques are gaining momentum. This study is one such attempt to perform the condition monitoring of a hydraulic brake system through vibration analysis. In this research, the performance of a Clonal Selection Classification Algorithm (CSCA for brake fault diagnosis has been reported. A hydraulic brake system test rig was fabricated. Under good and faulty conditions of a brake system, the vibration signals were acquired using a piezoelectric transducer. The statistical parameters were extracted from the vibration signal. The best feature set was identified for classification using attribute evaluator. The selected features were then classified using CSCA. The classification accuracy of such artificial intelligence technique has been compared with other machine learning approaches and discussed. The Clonal Selection Classification Algorithm performs better and gives the maximum classification accuracy (96% for the fault diagnosis of a hydraulic brake system.

  8. Genetic surveillance detects both clonal and epidemic transmission of malaria following enhanced intervention in Senegal.

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    Rachel Daniels

    Full Text Available Using parasite genotyping tools, we screened patients with mild uncomplicated malaria seeking treatment at a clinic in Thiès, Senegal, from 2006 to 2011. We identified a growing frequency of infections caused by genetically identical parasite strains, coincident with increased deployment of malaria control interventions and decreased malaria deaths. Parasite genotypes in some cases persisted clonally across dry seasons. The increase in frequency of genetically identical parasite strains corresponded with decrease in the probability of multiple infections. Further, these observations support evidence of both clonal and epidemic population structures. These data provide the first evidence of a temporal correlation between the appearance of identical parasite types and increased malaria control efforts in Africa, which here included distribution of insecticide treated nets (ITNs, use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs for malaria detection, and deployment of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. Our results imply that genetic surveillance can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of disease control strategies and assist a rational global malaria eradication campaign.

  9. Using BOX-PCR to exclude a clonal outbreak of melioidosis

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    Ward Linda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although melioidosis in endemic regions is usually caused by a diverse range of Burkholderia pseudomallei strains, clonal outbreaks from contaminated potable water have been described. Furthermore B. pseudomallei is classified as a CDC Group B bioterrorism agent. Ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST have been used to identify genetically related B. pseudomallei isolates, but they are time consuming and technically challenging for many laboratories. Methods We have adapted repetitive sequence typing using a BOX A1R primer for typing B. pseudomallei and compared BOX-PCR fingerprinting results on a wide range of well-characterized B. pseudomallei isolates with MLST and PFGE performed on the same isolates. Results BOX-PCR typing compared favourably with MLST and PFGE performed on the same isolates, both discriminating between the majority of multilocus sequence types and showing relatedness between epidemiologically linked isolates from various outbreak clusters. Conclusion Our results suggest that BOX-PCR can be used to exclude a clonal outbreak of melioidosis within 10 hours of receiving the bacterial strains.

  10. Clonal heterogeneity and chromosomal instability at disease presentation in high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Anna; Chalandon, Yves; Marazzi, Alfio; Jotterand, Martine

    2010-12-01

    Although aneuploidy has many possible causes, it often results from underlying chromosomal instability (CIN) leading to an unstable karyotype with cell-to-cell variation and multiple subclones. To test for the presence of CIN in high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (HeH ALL) at diagnosis, we investigated 20 patients (10 HeH ALL and 10 non-HeH ALL), using automated four-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) with centromeric probes for chromosomes 4, 6, 10, and 17. In HeH ALL, the proportion of abnormal cells ranged from 36.3% to 92.4%, and a variety of aneuploid populations were identified. Compared with conventional cytogenetics, I-FISH revealed numerous additional clones, some of them very small. To investigate the nature and origin of this clonal heterogeneity, we determined average numerical CIN values for all four chromosomes together and for each chromosome and patient group. The CIN values in HeH ALL were relatively high (range, 22.2-44.7%), compared with those in non-HeH ALL (3.2-6.4%), thus accounting for the presence of numerical CIN in HeH ALL at diagnosis. We conclude that numerical CIN may be at the origin of the high level of clonal heterogeneity revealed by I-FISH in HeH ALL at presentation, which would corroborate the potential role of CIN in tumor pathogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clonal selection in xenografted TAM recapitulates the evolutionary process of myeloid leukemia in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ken-ichiro; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Terui, Kiminori; Yoshida, Kenichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Toki, Tsutomu; Wang, RuNan; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Miyano, Satoru; Kato, Itaru; Morishima, Tatsuya; Fujino, Hisanori; Umeda, Katsutsugu; Hiramatsu, Hidefumi; Adachi, Souichi; Ito, Etsuro; Ogawa, Seishi; Ito, Mamoru; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Heike, Toshio

    2013-05-23

    Transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM) is a clonal preleukemic disorder that progresses to myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) through the accumulation of genetic alterations. To investigate the mechanism of leukemogenesis in this disorder, a xenograft model of TAM was established using NOD/Shi-scid, interleukin (IL)-2Rγ(null) mice. Serial engraftment after transplantation of cells from a TAM patient who developed ML-DS a year later demonstrated their self-renewal capacity. A GATA1 mutation and no copy number alterations (CNAs) were detected in the primary patient sample by conventional genomic sequencing and CNA profiling. However, in serial transplantations, engrafted TAM-derived cells showed the emergence of divergent subclones with another GATA1 mutation and various CNAs, including a 16q deletion and 1q gain, which are clinically associated with ML-DS. Detailed genomic analysis identified minor subclones with a 16q deletion or this distinct GATA1 mutation in the primary patient sample. These results suggest that genetically heterogeneous subclones with varying leukemia-initiating potential already exist in the neonatal TAM phase, and ML-DS may develop from a pool of such minor clones through clonal selection. Our xenograft model of TAM may provide unique insight into the evolutionary process of leukemia.

  12. BRAF inhibition is associated with increased clonality in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Zachary A; Frederick, Dennie T; Juneja, Vikram R; Sullivan, Ryan J; Lawrence, Donald P; Piris, Adriano; Sharpe, Arlene H; Fisher, David E; Flaherty, Keith T; Wargo, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    There have been significant advances with regard to BRAF-targeted therapies against metastatic melanoma. However, the majority of patients receiving BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) manifest disease progression within a year. We have recently shown that melanoma patients treated with BRAFi exhibit an increase in melanoma-associated antigens and in CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in response to therapy. To characterize such a T-cell infiltrate, we analyzed the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) of rearranged T-cell receptor (TCR) β chain-coding genes in tumor biopsies obtained before the initiation of BRAFi and 10–14 d later. We observed an increase in the clonality of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in 7 of 8 patients receiving BRAFi, with a statistically significant 21% aggregate increase in clonality. Over 80% of individual T-cell clones detected after initiation of BRAFi treatment were new clones. Interestingly, the comparison of tumor infiltrates with clinical responses revealed that patients who had a high proportion of pre-existing dominant clones after the administration of BRAFi responded better to therapy than patients who had a low proportion of such pre-existing dominant clones following BRAFi. These data suggest that although the inhibition of BRAF in melanoma patients results in tumor infiltration by new lymphocytes, the response to treatment appears to be related to the presence of a pre-existing population of tumor-infiltrating T-cell clones. PMID:24251082

  13. Cryptosporidium,Giardia, Cryptococcus, Pneumocystis genetic variability: cryptic biological species or clonal near-clades?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Tibayrenc

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An abundant literature dealing with the population genetics and taxonomy of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Pneumocystis spp., and Cryptococcus spp., pathogens of high medical and veterinary relevance, has been produced in recent years. We have analyzed these data in the light of new population genetic concepts dealing with predominant clonal evolution (PCE recently proposed by us. In spite of the considerable phylogenetic diversity that exists among these pathogens, we have found striking similarities among them. The two main PCE features described by us, namely highly significant linkage disequilibrium and near-clading (stable phylogenetic clustering clouded by occasional recombination, are clearly observed in Cryptococcus and Giardia, and more limited indication of them is also present in Cryptosporidium and Pneumocystis. Moreover, in several cases, these features still obtain when the near-clades that subdivide the species are analyzed separately ("Russian doll pattern". Lastly, several sets of data undermine the notion that certain microbes form clonal lineages simply owing to a lack of opportunity to outcross due to low transmission rates leading to lack of multiclonal infections ("starving sex hypothesis". We propose that the divergent taxonomic and population genetic inferences advanced by various authors about these pathogens may not correspond to true evolutionary differences and could be, rather, the reflection of idiosyncratic practices among compartmentalized scientific communities. The PCE model provides an opportunity to revise the taxonomy and applied research dealing with these pathogens and others, such as viruses, bacteria, parasitic protozoa, and fungi.

  14. Clonality and distribution of clinical Ureaplasma isolates recovered from male patients and infertile couples in China.

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    Zhi Ruan

    Full Text Available Ureaplasma spp. have gained increasing recognition as pathogens in both adult and neonatal patients with multiple clinical presentations. However, the clonality of this organism in the male population and infertile couples in China is largely unknown. In this study, 96 (53 U. parvum and 43 U. urealyticum of 103 Ureaplasma spp. strains recovered from genital specimens from male patients and 15 pairs of infertile couples were analyzed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST/expanded multilocus sequence typing (eMLST schemes. A total of 39 sequence types (STs and 53 expanded sequence types (eSTs were identified, with three predominant STs (ST1, ST9 and ST22 and eSTs (eST16, eST41 and eST82. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clusters that were highly congruent with the taxonomic differences between the two Ureaplasma species. We found significant differences in the distributions of both clusters and sub-groups between the male and female patients (P 0.80. However, this concordance was observed only for the detection of U. urealyticum within the infertile couples. In conclusion, the distributions of the clusters and sub-groups significantly differed between the male and female patients. U. urealyticum is more likely to transmit between infertile couples and be associated with clinical manifestations by the specific epidemic clonal lineages.

  15. Unforeseen clonal evolution of tumor cell population in recurrent and metastatic dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

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    Ensel Oh

    Full Text Available Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP is a very rare soft tissue sarcoma, generally of low-grade malignancy. DFSP is locally aggressive with a high recurrence rate, but metastasis occurs rarely. To investigate the mechanism of metastasis in DFSP, we analyzed the whole exome sequencing data of serial tumor samples obtained from a patient who had a 10-year history of recurrent and metastatic DFSP. Tracking various genomic alterations, namely somatic mutations, copy number variations, and chromosomal rearrangements, we observed a dramatic change in tumor cell population during the occurrence of metastasis in this DFSP case. The new subclone that emerged in metastatic DFSP harbored a completely different set of somatic mutations and new focal amplifications, which had not been observed in the primary clone before metastasis. The COL1A1-PDGFB fusion, characteristic of DFSP, was found in all of the serial samples. Moreover, the break position on the fusion gene was identical in all samples. Based on these observations, we suggest a clonal evolution model to explain the mechanism underlying metastasis in DFSP and identified several candidate target genes responsible for metastatic DFSP by utilizing The Cancer Genome Atlas database. This is the first study to observe clonal evolution in metastatic DFSP and provide insight for a possible therapeutic strategy for imatinib-resistant or metastatic DFSP.

  16. Assignment of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates to clonal complexes using a small set of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsa, Erin; Fricke, Thomas; Stephens, Alex J; Ko, Danny; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2008-08-19

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus (GBS)) is an important human pathogen, particularly of newborns. Emerging evidence for a relationship between genotype and virulence has accentuated the need for efficient and well-defined typing methods. The objective of this study was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based method for assigning GBS isolates to multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-defined clonal complexes. It was found that a SNP set derived from the MLST database on the basis of maximization of Simpsons Index of Diversity provided poor resolution and did not define groups concordant with the population structure as defined by eBURST analysis of the MLST database. This was interpreted as being a consequence of low diversity and high frequency horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, a different approach to SNP identification was developed. This entailed use of the "Not-N" bioinformatic algorithm that identifies SNPs diagnostic for groups of known sequence variants, together with an empirical process of SNP testing. This yielded a four member SNP set that divides GBS into 10 groups that are concordant with the population structure. A fifth SNP was identified that increased the sensitivity for the clinically significant clonal complex 17 to 100%. Kinetic PCR methods for the interrogation of these SNPs were developed, and used to genotype 116 well characterized isolates. A five SNP method for dividing GBS into biologically valid groups has been developed. These SNPs are ideal for high throughput surveillance activities, and combining with more rapidly evolving loci when additional resolution is required.

  17. Genotypic diversity and clonal structure of Erigeron annuus (Asteraceae in Lithuania

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    Tunaitienė, Virginija

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the clonal structure and genetic diversity of alien herbaceous plant species Erigeron annuus. The global warming and changes in agriculture practice in the past few decades were favourable for the expansion of this species in Lithuania. We used RAPD and ISSR assays to assess genetic variation within and among 29 populations of E. annuus. A total of 278 molecular markers were revealed. Our study detected reduced level of genetic diversity of invasive populations of E. annuus. Significant differences in DNA polymorphism among populations of E. annuus were also found. Some populations of this species are composed of genetically identical plants, while others were polymorphic. Clonal diversity of study populations ranged from 0.083 to 0.4 for both DNA marker systems. The Simpsons diversity index values ranged from 0.0 to 0.636. The average number of genotypes per population established using both assays was about 1.7. Out of 328 E. annuus individuals only 16 showed unique RAPD and 14 unique ISSR banding patterns. The remaining plants were clones of different size. The most common genotype of E. annuus identified in our study was represented by predominate in nine populations.

  18. Clonal origins of cells in the pigmented retina of the zebrafish eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streisinger, G.; Coale, F.; Taggart, C.; Walker, C.; Grunwald, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Mosaic analysis has been used to study the clonal basis of the development of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio. Zebrafish embryos heterozygous for a recessive mutation at the gol-1 locus were exposed to gamma-irradiation at various developmental stages to create mosaic individuals consisting of wild-type pigmented cells and a clone of pigmentless (golden) cells in the eye. The contribution of individual embryonic cells to the pigmented retina was measured and the total number of cells in the embryo that contributed descendants to this tissue was determined. Until the 32-cell stage, almost every blastomere has some descendants that participate in the formation of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish. During subsequent cell divisions, up to the several thousand-cell stage, the number of ancestral cells is constant: approximately 40 cells are present that will give rise to progeny in the pigmented retina. Analysis of the size of clones in the pigmented retina indicates that the cells of this tissue do not arise through a rigid series of cell divisions originating in the early embryo. The findings that each cleavage stage cell contributes to the pigmented retina and yet the contribution of such cells is highly variable are consistent with the interpretation that clonal descendants of different blastomeres normally intermix extensively prior to formation of the pigmented retina

  19. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction on FTA cards vs. flow cytometry for B-lymphocyte clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dictor, Michael; Skogvall, Ingela; Warenholt, Janina; Rambech, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Two-colour flow cytometry was compared with multiplex PCR with capillary electrophoresis for clonality determination in specific categories of B-cell lymphoma. FTA cards were evaluated for preserving DNA from node imprints and expediting molecular analysis. A single-tube multiplex PCR targeted IGH and lymphoma-specific translocations in DNA extracted from 180 frozen lymphoid tissues and DNA bound to FTA cards from 192 fresh tissues and 137 aspirates. PCR results were compared with flow cytometry in the extracted and aspirated samples. Overall, single-tube multiplex PCR sensitivity was equivalent in the sample groups (intergroup range 79%-91%). False negatives were associated with tumour origin in the follicle centre. Multiplex PCR and flow cytometry were equally sensitive and together detected 98% of B-cell lymphomas. Additional two-tube targeting of IGK suggested an overall molecular sensitivity >90%. False positive (pseudoclonal) single-tube multiplex PCR was associated with necrosis and sparse lymphocytes. Multiplex PCR using template DNA bound to an FTA card effectively detects B-lymphocyte clonality, obviates DNA extraction and refrigeration, and can be used without diminished sensitivity in fine needle aspirates or node imprints as a replacement for or complement to flow cytometry at any point in the diagnostic work-up.

  20. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa.

  1. Molecular analysis of immunoglobulin genes reveals frequent clonal relatedness in double monoclonal gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschumper, R C; Dispenzieri, A; Abraham, R S; Henderson, K J; Jelinek, D F

    2013-04-19

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MGs) are hematological diseases characterized by high levels of a monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) or M-protein. Within this group are patients with more than one M-protein, referred to as double MGs (DMGs). The M-proteins in DMG patients may have different heavy chain (HC) isotypes that are associated with different light chains (LCs), or different HCs that are LC matched. In this study, we examined the clonal relatedness of the M-proteins in the latter type in a cohort of 14 DMG patients. By using PCR, we identified 7/14 DMG patients that expressed two Ig HC isotypes with identical Ig HC variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), joining (IGHJ), and complementarity determining region (HCDR3) sequences. Two additional DMG patients had two Ig transcripts using the same IGHV, IGHD and IGHJ genes but with slight differences in variable region or HCDR3 mutations. LC analysis confirmed that a single LC was expressed in 3/7 DMG patients with identical HC transcripts and in the two DMGs with highly similar transcripts. The PCR findings were confirmed by immunofluorescence for HC and LC expression. Clonally related HC-dissimilar/LC-matched DMGs may occur often and defines a new subtype of MG that may serve as a tool for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  2. Molecular analysis of immunoglobulin genes reveals frequent clonal relatedness in double monoclonal gammopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschumper, R C; Dispenzieri, A; Abraham, R S; Henderson, K J; Jelinek, D F

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MGs) are hematological diseases characterized by high levels of a monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) or M-protein. Within this group are patients with more than one M-protein, referred to as double MGs (DMGs). The M-proteins in DMG patients may have different heavy chain (HC) isotypes that are associated with different light chains (LCs), or different HCs that are LC matched. In this study, we examined the clonal relatedness of the M-proteins in the latter type in a cohort of 14 DMG patients. By using PCR, we identified 7/14 DMG patients that expressed two Ig HC isotypes with identical Ig HC variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), joining (IGHJ), and complementarity determining region (HCDR3) sequences. Two additional DMG patients had two Ig transcripts using the same IGHV, IGHD and IGHJ genes but with slight differences in variable region or HCDR3 mutations. LC analysis confirmed that a single LC was expressed in 3/7 DMG patients with identical HC transcripts and in the two DMGs with highly similar transcripts. The PCR findings were confirmed by immunofluorescence for HC and LC expression. Clonally related HC-dissimilar/LC-matched DMGs may occur often and defines a new subtype of MG that may serve as a tool for studies of disease pathogenesis

  3. Clonality and distribution of clinical Ureaplasma isolates recovered from male patients and infertile couples in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhi; Yang, Ting; Shi, Xinyan; Kong, Yingying; Xie, Xinyou; Zhang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Ureaplasma spp. have gained increasing recognition as pathogens in both adult and neonatal patients with multiple clinical presentations. However, the clonality of this organism in the male population and infertile couples in China is largely unknown. In this study, 96 (53 U. parvum and 43 U. urealyticum) of 103 Ureaplasma spp. strains recovered from genital specimens from male patients and 15 pairs of infertile couples were analyzed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST)/expanded multilocus sequence typing (eMLST) schemes. A total of 39 sequence types (STs) and 53 expanded sequence types (eSTs) were identified, with three predominant STs (ST1, ST9 and ST22) and eSTs (eST16, eST41 and eST82). Moreover, phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clusters that were highly congruent with the taxonomic differences between the two Ureaplasma species. We found significant differences in the distributions of both clusters and sub-groups between the male and female patients (P Ureaplasma spp. The present study also attained excellent agreement of the identification of both Ureaplasma species between paired urine and semen specimens from the male partners (k > 0.80). However, this concordance was observed only for the detection of U. urealyticum within the infertile couples. In conclusion, the distributions of the clusters and sub-groups significantly differed between the male and female patients. U. urealyticum is more likely to transmit between infertile couples and be associated with clinical manifestations by the specific epidemic clonal lineages.

  4. Limpeza clonal de mudas de videira infectadas por Xanthomonas campestris pv. viticola Clonal cleaning of grapevine plants infected by Xanthomonas campestris pv. viticola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Márcio Freire Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O cancro bacteriano da videira é causado por Xanthomonas campestris pv. viticola (Xcv. Visando à limpeza clonal de mudas de 'Red Globe', foram estudados: tamanho ideal de ápices e gemas axilares para cultivo em meio de Galzy modificado (MGM; efeito da termoterapia (38ºC/30 dias; e ação de antibióticos na eliminação de Xcv em videiras infectadas. Os percentuais de contaminação por Xcv e de regeneração foram analisados, e as plantas obtidas foram indexadas em meio ágar nutritivo-dextrose-extrato de levedura-ampicilina (NYDAM, seguindo-se teste de patogenicidade. O cultivo de explantes com 3 mm possibilitou a obtenção de plantas livres da bactéria, com regeneração 14,3 vezes maior que explantes com 1 mm. A termoterapia de mudas infectadas, associada ao cultivo in vitro, não eliminou o patógeno. O cultivo de explantes com 10 mm, durante 40 dias em MGM + cefotaxima (300 mg L-1, proporcionou limpeza clonal das mudas. A indexação de plantas de videira regeneradas in vitro, quanto à infecção por Xcv utilizando NYDAM, seguida de teste de patogenicidade, é uma alternativa econômica e eficiente para produção de mudas de alta qualidade fitossanitária.Bacterial canker is caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. viticola (Xcv. In order to eliminate Xcv from 'Red Globe' plants it was studied: optimal size of meristem tips and axillary buds for cultivation in modified Galzy's medium (MGM; effects of thermotherapy (38ºC/30 days; and action of antibiotics in the elimination of Xcv in infected grapevines. The percentages of contamination by Xcv and regeneration were analyzed and plants obtained were indexed using the semi-selective culture medium nutrient agar-dextrose-yeast extract-ampicilin (NYDAM followed by a pathogenicity test. The cultivation of 3 mm explants permitted to obtain plants free of bacteria with regeneration 14.3 times higher than 1 mm explants. The thermotherapy of infected plants associated to the in vitro culture

  5. De groei van jonge Hevea-oculaties = The growth of young Hevea buddings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostendorf, F.W.

    1933-01-01

    Results were presented of studies on the initial growth of Hevea buddings, at the Proefstation West-Java, Buitenzorg (now Bogor). The time elapsing between cutting off the stock above the union and sprouting of the implanted bud was a clonal character; so also was the angle between the young sprout

  6. Effect of temperature on the growth rate of Griffithsia tenuis c. agardh (Rhodophyta: ceramiales)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, W.W.; Casterlin, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Clonal cultures of Griffithsia tenuis were grown for 18 days (Erdschreiber solution, LD 12 : 12, 2200 lux) at 13, 18, 22 and 25/sup 0/C. The optimum temperature for growth (increase in number of cells) under these conditions was 22/sup 0/C.

  7. Powerful strategy for polymerase chain reaction-based clonality assessment in T-cell malignancies Report of the BIOMED-2 Concerted Action BHM4 CT98-3936

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüggemann, M.; White, H.; Gaulard, P.; Garcia-Sanz, R.; Gameiro, P.; Oeschger, S.; Jasani, B.; Ott, M.; Delsol, G.; Orfao, A.; Tiemann, M.; Herbst, H.; Langerak, A. W.; Spaargaren, M.; Moreau, E.; Groenen, P. J. T. A.; Sambade, C.; Foroni, L.; Carter, G. I.; Hummel, M.; Bastard, C.; Davi, F.; Delfau-Larue, M.-H.; Kneba, M.; van Dongen, J. J. M.; Beldjord, K.; Molina, T. J.

    2007-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assessment of clonal T-cell receptor (TCR) and immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements is an important diagnostic tool in mature T-cell neoplasms. However, lack of standardized primers and PCR protocols has hampered comparability of data in previous clonality studies.

  8. Altered growth pattern, not altered growth per se, is the hallmark of early lesions preceding cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doratiotto, S; Marongiu, F; Faedda, S; Pani, P; Laconi, E

    2009-01-01

    Many human solid cancers arise from focal proliferative lesions that long precede the overt clinical appearance of the disease. The available evidence supports the notion that cancer precursor lesions are clonal in origin, and this notion forms the basis for most of the current theories on the pathogenesis of neoplastic disease. In contrast, far less attention has been devoted to the analysis of the phenotypic property that serves to define these focal lesions, i.e. their altered growth pattern. In fact, the latter is often considered a mere morphological by-product of clonal growth, with no specific relevance in the process. In the following study, evidence will be presented to support the concept that focal growth pattern is an inherent property of altered cells, independent of clonal growth; furthermore, it will be discussed how such a property, far from being merely descriptive, might indeed play a fundamental role in the sequence of events leading to the development of cancer. Within this paradigm, the earliest steps of neoplasia should be considered and analysed as defects in the mechanisms of tissue pattern formation.

  9. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  10. Genomic analyses of dominant U.S. clonal lineages of Phytophthora infestans reveals a shared common ancestry for clonal lineages US11 and US18 and a lack of recently shared ancestry among all other U.S. lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    The populations of the potato and tomato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, in the US are well known for emerging repeatedly as novel clonal lineages. These successions of dominant clones have historically been named US1-US24, in order of appearance, since their first characterization usi...

  11. Leukemia-related clonal chromosome aberrations observed in A-bomb survivors. Deletion in chromosome 5 and inversion in chromosome 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were analyzed by G differentiation staining method on about 5,400 peripheral lymphocytes of 168 A-bomb survivors, of whom 143 had been exposed to mean DS86 dose of 2.05 Gy (exposed group) and of 25, 0 Gy (control) and results concerning clonal growth of abnormal cells were described in this paper. G band analysis of the aberrations in T-lymphocytes revealed that frequency of translocation in the exposed group increased to 17 times of the control and deletion, 5 times. Deletion in chromosome 5 where tumor-suppressor gene was present, [del(5q-)], was found in about 30% of total deletions. Since patients of myelodysplasia syndrome and acute myelogenic leukemia had the deletion in more than 50%, growth of cells possessing it was suggestive of the progression of pre-leukemic step. Frequency of inversion in chromosome 14, inv(14)(q11q32), was as high as 80% of total 118 inversions of T-ALL (T-acute lymphocyte leukemia) and T-CLL (T-chronic LL) types in the exposed group. Therefore, the inversion also can be a pre-leukemic step. However, it was suggested that these aberrations were not sufficient for crisis of the disease, which required other factors.(K.H.)

  12. Market Acceptance of Smart Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report finds that smart growth developments enjoy market acceptance because of stability in prices over time. Housing resales in smart growth developments often have greater appreciation than their conventional suburban counterparts.

  13. Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated from Lebanese Patients: Phenotypes and Genotypes of Resistance, Clonality, and Determinants of Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Elias; Hajjar, Micheline; Suarez, Monica; Daoud, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen that usually affects critically ill patients. High mortality rates have been associated with MDR A. baumannii infections. Carbapenem resistance among these isolates is increasing worldwide and is associated with certain International Clones (ICs) and oxacillinases (OXAs). Moreover, this organism possesses a wide range of virulence factors, whose expression is not yet fully understood. In this study, clinical A. baumannii isolates are characterized in terms of antibiotic resistance, mechanisms of carbapenem resistance, clonality, and virulence. Materials and Methods: A. baumannii clinical isolates ( n = 90) where obtained from a tertiary care center in Beirut, Lebanon. API 20NE strips in addition to the amplification of bla OXA-51-like were used for identification. Antibiotic susceptibility testing by disk diffusion was then performed in addition to PCRs for the detection of the most commonly disseminated carbapenemases. Clonality was determined by tri-locus PCR typing and doubling times were determined for isolates with varying susceptibility profiles. Biofilm formation, hemolysis, siderophore production, proteolytic activity, and surface motility was then determined for all the isolates. Statistical analysis was then performed for the determination of associations. Results and Discussion: 81 (90%) of the isolates were resistant to carbapenems. These high rates are similar to other multi-center studies in the country suggesting the need of intervention on a national level. 74 (91.3%) of the carbapenem resistant isolates harbored bla OXA-23-like including two that also harbored bla OXA-24-like . 88.9% of the A. baumannii isolates pertained to ICII and three other international clones were detected, showing the wide dissemination of clones into geographically distinct locations. Virulence profiles were highly diverse and no specific pattern was observed. Nevertheless, an association between motility

  14. Selection and Clonal Propagation of High Artemisinin Genotypes of Artemisia annua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzstein, Hazel Y.; Porter, Justin A.; Janick, Jules; Ferreira, Jorge F. S.; Mutui, Theophilus M.

    2018-01-01

    Artemisinin, produced in the glandular trichomes of Artemisia annua L. is a vital antimalarial drug effective against Plasmodium falciparum resistant to quinine-derived medicines. Although work has progressed on the semi-synthetic production of artemisinin, field production of A. annua remains the principal commercial source of the compound. Crop production of artemisia must be increased to meet the growing worldwide demand for artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) to treat malaria. Grower artemisinin yields rely on plants generated from seeds from open-pollinated parents. Although selection has considerably increased plant artemisinin concentration in the past 15 years, seed-generated plants have highly variable artemisinin content that lowers artemisinin yield per hectare. Breeding efforts to produce improved F1 hybrids have been hampered by the inability to produce inbred lines due to self-incompatibility. An approach combining conventional hybridization and selection with clonal propagation of superior genotypes is proposed as a means to enhance crop yield and artemisinin production. Typical seed-propagated artemisia plants produce less than 1% (dry weight) artemisinin with yields below 25 kg/ha. Genotypes were identified producing high artemisinin levels of over 2% and possessing improved agronomic characteristics such as high leaf area and shoot biomass production. Field studies of clonally-propagated high-artemisinin plants verified enhanced plant uniformity and an estimated gross primary productivity of up to 70 kg/ha artemisinin, with a crop density of one plant m-2. Tissue culture and cutting protocols for the mass clonal propagation of A. annua were developed for shoot regeneration, rooting, acclimatization, and field cultivation. Proof of concept studies showed that both tissue culture-regenerated plants and rooted cutting performed better than plants derived from seed in terms of uniformity, yield, and consistently high artemisinin content. Use of

  15. Testing for disconnection and distance effects on physiological self-recognition within clonal fragments of Potentilla reptans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Bin; Vermeulen, Peter; During, Heinjo; Anten, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that belowground self-recognition in clonal plants can be disrupted between sister ramets by the loss of connections or long distances within a genet. However, these results may be confounded by severing connections between ramets in the setups. Using Potentilla reptans, we

  16. Clonal mobility and its implications for spatio-temporal patterns of plant communities: what do we need to know next?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zobel, M.; Moora, M.; Herben, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 5 (2010), s. 802-806 ISSN 0030-1299 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : clonal mobility * spatio-temporal patterns * plant communities Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2010

  17. Genetic variation within clonal lineages of Phytophthora infestans revealed through genotyping-by-sequencing, and implications for late blight epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was performed on 257 Phytophthora infestans isolates belonging to four clonal lineages to study within-lineage diversity. The four lineages used in the study included US-8 (n=28), US-11 (n=27), US-23 (n=166), and US-24 (n=36), with isolates originating from 23 of the U...

  18. Genomic Analysis of the Emergence and Rapid Global Dissemination of the Clonal Group 258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Pandemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene R Bowers

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the KPC carbapenemase have rapidly spread throughout the world, causing severe healthcare-associated infections with limited antimicrobial treatment options. Dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is largely attributed to expansion of a single dominant strain, ST258. In this study, we explore phylogenetic relationships and evolution within ST258 and its clonal group, CG258, using whole genome sequence analysis of 167 isolates from 20 countries collected over 17 years. Our results show a common ST258 ancestor emerged from its diverse parental clonal group around 1995 and likely acquired blaKPC prior to dissemination. Over the past two decades, ST258 has remained highly clonal despite diversity in accessory elements and divergence in the capsule polysaccharide synthesis locus. Apart from the large recombination event that gave rise to ST258, few mutations set it apart from its clonal group. However, one mutation occurs in a global transcription regulator. Characterization of outer membrane protein sequences revealed a profile in ST258 that includes a truncated OmpK35 and modified OmpK37. Our work illuminates potential genomic contributors to the pathogenic success of ST258, helps us better understand the global dissemination of this strain, and identifies genetic markers unique to ST258.

  19. Critical analysis of the stringent complete response in multiple myeloma: contribution of sFLC and bone marrow clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, Joaquín; Paiva, Bruno; López-Anglada, Lucía; Mateos, María-Victoria; Cedena, Teresa; Vidríales, María-Belén; Sáez-Gómez, María Auxiliadora; Contreras, Teresa; Oriol, Albert; Rapado, Inmaculada; Teruel, Ana-Isabel; Cordón, Lourdes; Blanchard, María Jesús; Bengoechea, Enrique; Palomera, Luis; de Arriba, Felipe; Cueto-Felgueroso, Cecilia; Orfao, Alberto; Bladé, Joan; San Miguel, Jesús F; Lahuerta, Juan José

    2015-08-13

    Stringent complete response (sCR) criteria are used in multiple myeloma as a deeper response category compared with CR, but prospective validation is lacking, it is not always clear how evaluation of clonality is performed, and is it not known what the relative clinical influence is of the serum free light chain ratio (sFLCr) and bone marrow (BM) clonality to define more sCR. To clarify this controversy, we focused on 94 patients that reached CR, of which 69 (73%) also fulfilled the sCR criteria. Patients with sCR displayed slightly longer time to progression (median, 62 vs 53 months, respectively; P = .31). On analyzing this contribution to the prognosis of sFLCr or clonality, it was found that the sFLCr does not identify patients in CR at distinct risk; by contrast, low-sensitive multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) immunophenotyping (2 colors), which is equivalent to immunohistochemistry, identifies a small number of patients (5 cases) with high residual tumor burden and dismal outcome; nevertheless, using traditional 4-color MFC, persistent clonal BM disease was detectable in 36% of patients, who, compared with minimal residual disease-negative cases, had a significantly inferior outcome. These results show that the current definition of sCR should be revised. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. CLO-PLA: a database of clonal and bud-bank traits of the Central European flora

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; Danihelka, J.; Chrtek, Jindřich; de Bello, Francesco; Herben, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 4 (2017), s. 1179 ISSN 0012-9658 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Clonal traits * Central Europe * CLO-PLA database * bud-bank traits Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.809, year: 2016

  1. In vivo clonal analysis reveals lineage-restricted progenitor characteristics in mammalian kidney development, maintenance, and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkevich, Y.; Montoro, D.T.; Contreras-Trujillo, H.; Harari-Steinberg, O.; Newman, A.M.; Tsai, J.M.; Lim, X.; van Amerongen, R.; Bowman, A.; Januszyk, M.; Pleniceanu, O.; Nusse, R.; Longaker, M.T.; Weissman, I.L.; Dekel, B.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude by which the mammalian kidney generates and maintains its proximal tubules, distal tubules, and collecting ducts remain controversial. Here, we use long-term in vivo genetic lineage tracing and clonal analysis of individual cells from kidneys undergoing development,

  2. Vegetative regeneration of invasive Ludwigia cytotypes from clonal bud banks across resource gradients: colonizing diploid outperforms polyploid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding functional traits that underlie the colonization of invasive plants is key to developing sustainable management strategies to curtail invasions at the establishment phase. Although common, recruitment of clonal plant species from bud banks is often overlooked but may be a key transiti...

  3. Novel types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements identified in clonal complex 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, S.; Skov, R.L.; Han, X.; Larsen, A.R.; Larsen, J.; Sorum, M.; Wulf, M.; Voss, A.; Hiramatsu, K.; Ito, T.

    2011-01-01

    The structures of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements carried by 31 clonal complex 398 (CC398) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from the participants at a conference were analyzed. The SCCmecs were classified into novel types, namely, IX, X,

  4. Illegitimate V(D)J recombination-mediated deletions in Notch1 and Bcl11b are not sufficient for extensive clonal expansion and show minimal age or sex bias in frequency or junctional processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, Devin P., E-mail: devin.champagne@uvm.edu; Shockett, Penny E., E-mail: pshockett@selu.edu

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Examines illegitimate V(D)J deletion junctions in Notch1 and Bcl11b. • Suggests little influence of deletions alone on clonal outgrowth in wild-type mice. • No age or sex biases in frequency, clonality, or junctional processing observed. • Contrasts with previous results at TCRβ and HPRT1 loci. • Deletions in Bcl11b may be tolerated more easily than those in Notch1. - Abstract: Illegitimate V(D)J recombination at oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is implicated in formation of several T cell malignancies. Notch1 and Bcl11b, genes involved in developing T cell specification, selection, proliferation, and survival, were previously shown to contain hotspots for deletional illegitimate V(D)J recombination associated with radiation-induced thymic lymphoma. Interestingly, these deletions were also observed in wild-type animals. In this study, we conducted frequency, clonality, and junctional processing analyses of Notch1 and Bcl11b deletions during mouse development and compared results to published analyses of authentic V(D)J rearrangements at the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) locus and illegitimate V(D)J deletions observed at the human, nonimmune HPRT1 locus not involved in T cell malignancies. We detect deletions in Notch1 and Bcl11b in thymic and splenic T cell populations, consistent with cells bearing deletions in the circulating lymphocyte pool. Deletions in thymus can occur in utero, increase in frequency between fetal and postnatal stages, are detected at all ages examined between fetal and 7 months, exhibit only limited clonality (contrasting with previous results in radiation-sensitive mouse strains), and consistent with previous reports are more frequent in Bcl11b, partially explained by relatively high Recombination Signal Information Content (RIC) scores. Deletion junctions in Bcl11b exhibit greater germline nucleotide loss, while in Notch1 palindromic (P) nucleotides are more abundant, although average P nucleotide length is

  5. Variable effects of dexamethasone on protein synthesis in clonal rat osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, B.O.; Kream, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    We examined the effects of dexamethasone on protein synthesis in clonal rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma (ROS) cell lines by measuring the incorporation of [ 3 H]proline into collagenase-digestible and noncollagen protein in the cell layer and medium of the cultures. In ROS 17/2 and subclone C12 of ROS 17/2.8, dexamethasone decreased collagen synthesis with no change in DNA content of the cultures. In ROS 17/2.8 and its subclone G2, dexamethasone stimulated collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis, with a concomitant decrease in the DNA content of the cells. These data indicate that ROS cell lines are phenotypically heterogeneous and suggest that in normal bone there may be distinct subpopulations of osteoblasts with varying phenotypic traits with respect to the regulation of protein synthesis

  6. Genetic structure of farmer-managed varieties in clonally-propagated crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarcelli, N; Tostain, S; Vigouroux, Y; Luong, V; Baco, M N; Agbangla, C; Daïnou, O; Pham, J L

    2011-08-01

    The relative role of sexual reproduction and mutation in shaping the diversity of clonally propagated crops is largely unknown. We analyzed the genetic diversity of yam-a vegetatively-propagated crop-to gain insight into how these two factors shape its diversity in relation with farmers' classifications. Using 15 microsatellite loci, we analyzed 485 samples of 10 different yam varieties. We identified 33 different genotypes organized in lineages supported by high bootstrap values. We computed the probability that these genotypes appeared by sexual reproduction or mutation within and between each lineage. This allowed us to interpret each lineage as a product of sexual reproduction that has evolved by mutation. Moreover, we clearly noted a similarity between the genetic structure and farmers' classifications. Each variety could thus be interpreted as being the product of sexual reproduction having evolved by mutation. This highly structured diversity of farmer-managed varieties has consequences for the preservation of yam diversity.

  7. Characterisation of free and glycosidically bound odourant compounds of Aragonez clonal musts by GC-O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Goreti; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Clímaco, Maria Cristina

    2010-01-11

    To evaluate the potential aroma of Aragonez clonal red musts, several free and glycosidically bound odourant compounds were extracted. Then, the gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) posterior intensity method was used to evaluate their odour intensity and the compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A group of eight sniffers evaluated free and bound fractions of Aragonez musts and perceived forty-three and twenty-two odourant peaks respectively. Furaneol (burnt sugar, candy-cotton) and vanillin (vanilla, sweet) were identified in both free and bound fractions of Aragonez musts, indicating their grape-derived origin. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the posterior intensity method data and a relationship between the different odourant compound variables and the free fractions was established. Two principal components (PCs) were found which together explained 100% of the total variance. A large number of potentially important but yet unknown odourants was detected by the GC-O analysis.

  8. Cell proliferation in the Drosophila adult brain revealed by clonal analysis and bromodeoxyuridine labelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Andrea H

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of new neurons during adulthood and their subsequent integration into a mature central nervous system have been shown to occur in all vertebrate species examined to date. However, the situation in insects is less clear and, in particular, it has been reported that there is no proliferation in the Drosophila adult brain. Results We report here, using clonal analysis and 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU labelling, that cell proliferation does occur in the Drosophila adult brain. The majority of clones cluster on the ventrolateral side of the antennal lobes, as do the BrdU-positive cells. Of the BrdU-labelled cells, 86% express the glial gene reversed polarity (repo, and 14% are repo negative. Conclusion We have observed cell proliferation in the Drosophila adult brain. The dividing cells may be adult stem cells, generating glial and/or non-glial cell types.

  9. Clonal Occurrence of Salmonella Weltevreden in Cultured Shrimp in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Uddin, Gazi Md.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Barco, Lisa; Minh Phu, Tran; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence, serovar and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. in shrimp samples from intensive and extensive farms located in three different provinces in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Shrimp from 11 of the 48 farms all contained S. Weltevreden, except for one farm yielding S. Agona, with no difference in Salmonella occurrence between the two production systems. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of S. Weltevreden showed closely related XbaI pulse types, suggesting a clonal relationship despite the farms and shrimp samples being epidemiologically unrelated. S. Weltevreden was susceptible to most antimicrobials tested, with a few strains being resistant to florfenicol, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim. Future studies of the ecology of S. Weltevreden should establish if this serovar may survive better and even multiply in warm-water shrimp farm environments compared to other Salmonella serovars. PMID:26222547

  10. ROOT HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND PHOTOSYNTHETIC CAPACITY OF EUCALYPT CLONAL CUTTINGS WITH ROOT MALFORMATION INDUCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Afonso Mazzei Moura de Assis Figueiredo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509814566The gain reduction of wood biomass in trees has been assigned to root deformations even in the nursery phase. The objective of this work was the evaluation of the root system hydraulic conductivity, gas exchanges and photochemical efficiency of eucalypt clonal cuttings with and without root deformation inductions. The treatments were: 1 operational cuttings without root malformation inductions (grown according to the used methodology of Fibria Cellulose S.A.; 2 root deformation inductions. These inductions did not promote decrease in the root volume. However, the deformations brought reduction of the root system hydraulic conductivity. Lower photosynthetic rates were also observed along the day in the cuttings in the root deformed cuttings. This decreasing rate is connected to stomatal and non stomatal factors.

  11. Clonal Occurrence of Salmonella Weltevreden in Cultured Shrimp in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazi Md Noor Uddin

    Full Text Available This study investigated the occurrence, serovar and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. in shrimp samples from intensive and extensive farms located in three different provinces in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Shrimp from 11 of the 48 farms all contained S. Weltevreden, except for one farm yielding S. Agona, with no difference in Salmonella occurrence between the two production systems. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE of S. Weltevreden showed closely related XbaI pulse types, suggesting a clonal relationship despite the farms and shrimp samples being epidemiologically unrelated. S. Weltevreden was susceptible to most antimicrobials tested, with a few strains being resistant to florfenicol, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim. Future studies of the ecology of S. Weltevreden should establish if this serovar may survive better and even multiply in warm-water shrimp farm environments compared to other Salmonella serovars.

  12. A Robust Single Primate Neuroepithelial Cell Clonal Expansion System for Neural Tube Development and Disease Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing a model of primate neural tube (NT development is important to promote many NT disorder studies in model organisms. Here, we report a robust and stable system to allow for clonal expansion of single monkey neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs to develop into miniature NT-like structures. Single NESCs can produce functional neurons in vitro, survive, and extensively regenerate neuron axons in monkey brain. NT formation and NESC maintenance depend on high metabolism activity and Wnt signaling. NESCs are regionally restricted to a telencephalic fate. Moreover, single NESCs can turn into radial glial progenitors (RGPCs. The transition is accurately regulated by Wnt signaling through regulation of Notch signaling and adhesion molecules. Finally, using the “NESC-TO-NTs” system, we model the functions of folic acid (FA on NT closure and demonstrate that FA can regulate multiple mechanisms to prevent NT defects. Our system is ideal for studying NT development and diseases.

  13. Clonal spread of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to oxacillin in a dermatological hospital unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Rasmussen, Mads; Fuursted, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    transmission routes in order to intervene and prevent further spread. Clonality of the isolates was confirmed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Several breaches in infection control procedures were revealed suggesting both direct and indirect transmission between patients. Defective skin barriers, high...... carrier rates of S. aureus in dermatological patients and high consumption rates of dicloxacillin in the department might facilitate transmission. Following improvement of the general infection control measures, and after reassessment of the antibiotic policy in the department, the outbreak has......In November 2000, we became aware of isolates of Staphylococcus aureus with borderline resistance to oxacillin (BORSA) from patients in the Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital. The objective was to describe the isolates phenotypically and genotypically and to assess possible...

  14. The cacao pathogen Moniliophthora roreri (Marasmiaceae) possesses biallelic A and B mating loci but reproduces clonally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Valderrama, J R; Aime, M C

    2016-06-01

    The cacao pathogen Moniliophthora roreri belongs to the mushroom-forming family Marasmiaceae, but it has never been observed to produce a fruiting body, which calls to question its capacity for sexual reproduction. In this study, we identified potential A (HD1 and HD2) and B (pheromone precursors and pheromone receptors) mating genes in M. roreri. A PCR-based method was subsequently devised to determine the mating type for a set of 47 isolates from across the geographic range of the fungus. We developed and generated an 11-marker microsatellite set and conducted association and linkage disequilibrium (standardized index of association, IA(s)) analyses. We also performed an ancestral reconstruction analysis to show that the ancestor of M. roreri is predicted to be heterothallic and tetrapolar, which together with sliding window analyses support that the A and B mating loci are likely unlinked and follow a tetrapolar organization within the genome. The A locus is composed of a pair of HD1 and HD2 genes, whereas the B locus consists of a paired pheromone precursor, Mr_Ph4, and receptor, STE3_Mr4. Two A and B alleles but only two mating types were identified. Association analyses divided isolates into two well-defined genetically distinct groups that correlate with their mating type; IA(s) values show high linkage disequilibrium as is expected in clonal reproduction. Interestingly, both mating types were found in South American isolates but only one mating type was found in Central American isolates, supporting a prior hypothesis of clonal dissemination throughout Central America after a single or very few introductions of the fungus from South America.

  15. Clonal profile, virulence and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katheryne Benini Martins

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the clonal profile, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance, particularly oxacillin resistance, of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk. Milk samples were collected from all teats for the California Mastitis Test (CMT, somatic cell count, identification of S. aureus, investigation in these strains of genes encoding toxins (sea, seb, sec, sed, tst, biofilm (icaA, icaC, icaD, bap, leukocidin (luk-PV oxacillin resistance by mecA gene detection and susceptibility testing (12 antibiotics. Messenger RNA expression was evaluated by RT-PCR in isolates carrying toxin and biofilm genes. Biofilm formation was also evaluated phenotypically by adherence to polystyrene plates. The clonal profile of S. aureus was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 473 milk samples were collected from 242 animals on three farms and 20 S. aureus strains were isolated and none carried the mecA gene. The two sec gene-positive isolates and the isolates carrying the tst and luk-PV genes were positive by RT-PCR. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the three flocks studied showed high susceptibility to the drugs tested and none was biofilm producer, indicating that biofilm formation was not a virulence factor causing infection by these strains. The typing of 17 S. aureus isolates revealed the presence of a common clone on the three farms studied, and the presence and expression of the sec and tst genes in one strain of this clone suggest the possible acquisition of virulence genes by this clone, a fact that is important for animal health and food hygiene.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomholt, Hans; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-11-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins was significantly associated with exacerbation of eczema. In four children there was a shift between visits in agr group of colonizing clones. These shifts were associated with an increased SCORAD value of 19 (SE = 7, p = 0.009). Change of clones belonging to the same agr group was not associated with a higher SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr encoded octa peptides appeared to be active in vivo. Increased severity of eczema was related to a change in agr group and may have been because of inflammation triggered by the takeover of an antigenically different clone, as agr groups represent ancient phylogenetic lineages.

  17. Clonal profile, virulence and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Katheryne Benini; Faccioli-Martins, Patricia Yoshida; Riboli, Danilo Flávio Moraes; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Fernandes, Simone; Oliveira, Aline A; Dantas, Ariane; Zafalon, Luiz Francisco; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the clonal profile, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance, particularly oxacillin resistance, of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk. Milk samples were collected from all teats for the California Mastitis Test (CMT), somatic cell count, identification of S. aureus, investigation in these strains of genes encoding toxins (sea, seb, sec, sed, tst), biofilm (icaA, icaC, icaD, bap), leukocidin (luk-PV) oxacillin resistance by mecA gene detection and susceptibility testing (12 antibiotics). Messenger RNA expression was evaluated by RT-PCR in isolates carrying toxin and biofilm genes. Biofilm formation was also evaluated phenotypically by adherence to polystyrene plates. The clonal profile of S. aureus was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 473 milk samples were collected from 242 animals on three farms and 20 S. aureus strains were isolated and none carried the mecA gene. The two sec gene-positive isolates and the isolates carrying the tst and luk-PV genes were positive by RT-PCR. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the three flocks studied showed high susceptibility to the drugs tested and none was biofilm producer, indicating that biofilm formation was not a virulence factor causing infection by these strains. The typing of 17 S. aureus isolates revealed the presence of a common clone on the three farms studied, and the presence and expression of the sec and tst genes in one strain of this clone suggest the possible acquisition of virulence genes by this clone, a fact that is important for animal health and food hygiene.

  18. Clonal profile, virulence and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Katheryne Benini; Faccioli-Martins, Patricia Yoshida; Riboli, Danilo Flávio Moraes; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Fernandes, Simone; Oliveira, Aline A.; Dantas, Ariane; Zafalon, Luiz Francisco; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the clonal profile, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance, particularly oxacillin resistance, of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk. Milk samples were collected from all teats for the California Mastitis Test (CMT), somatic cell count, identification of S. aureus, investigation in these strains of genes encoding toxins (sea, seb, sec, sed, tst), biofilm (icaA, icaC, icaD, bap), leukocidin (luk-PV) oxacillin resistance by mecA gene detection and susceptibility testing (12 antibiotics). Messenger RNA expression was evaluated by RT-PCR in isolates carrying toxin and biofilm genes. Biofilm formation was also evaluated phenotypically by adherence to polystyrene plates. The clonal profile of S. aureus was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 473 milk samples were collected from 242 animals on three farms and 20 S. aureus strains were isolated and none carried the mecA gene. The two sec gene-positive isolates and the isolates carrying the tst and luk-PV genes were positive by RT-PCR. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the three flocks studied showed high susceptibility to the drugs tested and none was biofilm producer, indicating that biofilm formation was not a virulence factor causing infection by these strains. The typing of 17 S. aureus isolates revealed the presence of a common clone on the three farms studied, and the presence and expression of the sec and tst genes in one strain of this clone suggest the possible acquisition of virulence genes by this clone, a fact that is important for animal health and food hygiene. PMID:26273271

  19. Evolution and diversity of clonal bacteria: the paradigm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Dos Vultos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species display relatively static genomes and 99.9% nucleotide sequence identity. Studying the evolutionary history of such monomorphic bacteria is a difficult and challenging task. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis of DNA repair, recombination and replication (3R genes in a comprehensive selection of M. tuberculosis complex strains from across the world, yielded surprisingly high levels of polymorphisms as compared to house-keeping genes, making it possible to distinguish between 80% of clinical isolates analyzed in this study. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that a large number of these polymorphisms are potentially deleterious. Site frequency spectrum comparison of synonymous and non-synonymous variants and Ka/Ks ratio analysis suggest a general negative/purifying selection acting on these sets of genes that may lead to suboptimal 3R system activity. In turn, the relaxed fidelity of 3R genes may allow the occurrence of adaptive variants, some of which will survive. Furthermore, 3R-based phylogenetic trees are a new tool for distinguishing between M. tuberculosis complex strains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This situation, and the consequent lack of fidelity in genome maintenance, may serve as a starting point for the evolution of antibiotic resistance, fitness for survival and pathogenicity, possibly conferring a selective advantage in certain stressful situations. These findings suggest that 3R genes may play an important role in the evolution of highly clonal bacteria, such as M. tuberculosis. They also facilitate further epidemiological studies of these bacteria, through the development of high-resolution tools. With many more microbial genomes being sequenced, our results open the door to 3R gene-based studies of adaptation and evolution of other, highly clonal bacteria.

  20. MDS-associated somatic mutations and clonal hematopoiesis are common in idiopathic cytopenias of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Brian; Hall, Jeff M; Witte, John S; Xu, Yin; Reddy, Prashanti; Lin, Keming; Flamholz, Rachel; Dabbas, Bashar; Yung, Aine; Al-Hafidh, Jenan; Balmert, Emily; Vaupel, Christine; El Hader, Carlos; McGinniss, Matthew J; Nahas, Shareef A; Kines, Julie; Bejar, Rafael

    2015-11-19

    Establishing a diagnosis in patients suspected of having a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) can be challenging and could be informed by the identification of somatic mutations. We performed a prospective study to examine the frequency and types of mutations encountered in 144 patients with unexplained cytopenias. Based on bone marrow findings, 17% were diagnosed with MDS, 15% with idiopathic cytopenias of undetermined significance (ICUS) and some evidence of dysplasia, and 69% with ICUS and no dysplasia. Bone marrow DNA was sequenced for mutations in 22 frequently mutated myeloid malignancy genes. Somatic mutations were identified in 71% of MDS patients, 62% of patients with ICUS and some dysplasia, and 20% of ICUS patients and no dysplasia. In total, 35% of ICUS patients carried a somatic mutation or chromosomal abnormality indicative of clonal hematopoiesis. We validated these results in a cohort of 91 lower-risk MDS and 249 ICUS cases identified over a 6-month interval. Mutations were found in 79% of those with MDS, in 45% of those with ICUS with dysplasia, and in 17% of those with ICUS without dysplasia. The spectrum of mutated genes was similar with the exception of SF3B1 which was rarely mutated in patients without dysplasia. Variant allele fractions were comparable between clonal ICUS (CCUS) and MDS as were mean age and blood counts. We demonstrate that CCUS is a more frequent diagnosis than MDS in cytopenic patients. Clinical and mutational features are similar in these groups and may have diagnostic utility once outcomes in CCUS patients are better understood. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Assignment of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates to clonal complexes using a small set of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Gwendolyn L

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus (GBS is an important human pathogen, particularly of newborns. Emerging evidence for a relationship between genotype and virulence has accentuated the need for efficient and well-defined typing methods. The objective of this study was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP based method for assigning GBS isolates to multilocus sequence typing (MLST-defined clonal complexes. Results It was found that a SNP set derived from the MLST database on the basis of maximisation of Simpsons Index of Diversity provided poor resolution and did not define groups concordant with the population structure as defined by eBURST analysis of the MLST database. This was interpreted as being a consequence of low diversity and high frequency horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, a different approach to SNP identification was developed. This entailed use of the "Not-N" bioinformatic algorithm that identifies SNPs diagnostic for groups of known sequence variants, together with an empirical process of SNP testing. This yielded a four member SNP set that divides GBS into 10 groups that are concordant with the population structure. A fifth SNP was identified that increased the sensitivity for the clinically significant clonal complex 17 to 100%. Kinetic PCR methods for the interrogation of these SNPs were developed, and used to genotype 116 well characterized isolates. Conclusion A five SNP method for dividing GBS into biologically valid groups has been developed. These SNPs are ideal for high throughput surveillance activities, and combining with more rapidly evolving loci when additional resolution is required.

  2. Anaphylactic Reactions After Discontinuation of Hymenoptera Venom Immunotherapy: A Clonal Mast Cell Disorder Should Be Suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Zanotti, Roberta; Pagani, Mauro; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Scaffidi, Luigi; Olivieri, Elisa; Franchini, Maurizio; Reccardini, Federico; Costantino, Maria Teresa; Roncallo, Chiara; Mauro, Marina; Boni, Elisa; Rizzini, Fabio Lodi; Bilò, Maria Beatrice; Marcarelli, Anna Rosaria; Passalacqua, Giovanni

    2017-12-16

    Up to 75% of patients with severe anaphylactic reactions after Hymenoptera sting are at risk of further severe reactions if re-stung. Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is highly effective in protecting individuals with ascertained Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA) and previous severe reactions. After a 3- to 5-year VIT course, most patients remain protected after VIT discontinuation. Otherwise, a lifelong treatment should be considered in high-risk patients (eg, in mastocytosis). Several case reports evidenced that patients with mastocytosis and HVA, although protected during VIT, can re-experience severe and sometimes fatal reactions after VIT discontinuation. To evaluate whether patients who lost protection after VIT discontinuation may suffer from clonal mast cell disorders. The survey describes the characteristics of patients who received a full course of VIT for previous severe reactions and who experienced another severe reaction at re-sting after VIT discontinuation. Those with a Red Española de Mastocitosis score of 2 or more or a serum basal tryptase level of more than 25 ng/mL underwent a hematological workup (bone marrow biopsy, KIT mutation, expression of aberrant CD25) and/or skin biopsy. Nineteen patients (mean age, 56.3 years; 89.5% males) were evaluated. All of them had received at least 4 years of VIT and were protected. After VIT discontinuation they were re-stung and developed, in all but 1 case, severe anaphylactic reactions (12 with loss of consciousness, in the absence of urticaria/angioedema). Eighteen patients (94.7%) had a clonal mast cell disorder, 8 of them with normal tryptase. Looking at this selected population, we suggest that mastocytosis should be considered in patients developing severe reactions at re-sting after VIT discontinuation and, as a speculation, patients with mastocytosis and HVA should be VIT-treated lifelong. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Clonality of Clinical Ureaplasma Isolates in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Javier; Karau, Melissa J; Cunningham, Scott A; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Patel, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum are pathogens involved in urogenital tract and intrauterine infections and also in systemic diseases in newborns and immunosuppressed patients. There is limited information on the antimicrobial susceptibility and clonality of these species. In this study, we report the susceptibility of 250 contemporary isolates of Ureaplasma (202 U. parvum and 48 U. urealyticum isolates) recovered at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. MICs of doxycycline, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and levofloxacin were determined by broth microdilution, with MICS of the last three interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Levofloxacin resistance was found in 6.4% and 5.2% of U. parvum and U. urealyticum isolates, respectively, while 27.2% and 68.8% of isolates, respectively, showed ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml. The resistance mechanism of levofloxacin-resistant isolates was due to mutations in parC, with the Ser83Leu substitution being most frequent, followed by Glu87Lys. No macrolide resistance was found among the 250 isolates studied; a single U. parvum isolate was tetracycline resistant. tet(M) was found in 10 U. parvum isolates, including the single tetracycline-resistant isolate, as well as in 9 isolates which had low tetracycline and doxycycline MICs. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) performed on a selection of 46 isolates showed high diversity within the clinical Ureaplasma isolates studied, regardless of antimicrobial susceptibility. The present work extends previous knowledge regarding susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, resistance mechanisms, and clonality of Ureaplasma species in the United States. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Survival and growth of epiphytic ferns depend on resource sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Zheng eLu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Locally available resources can be shared within clonal plant systems through physiological integration, thus enhancing their survival and growth. Most epiphytes exhibit clonal growth habit, but few studies have tested effects of physiological integration (resource sharing on survival and growth of epiphytes and whether such effects vary with species. We conducted two experiments, one on individuals (single ramets and another on groups (several ramets within a plot, with severed and intact rhizome treatments (without and with physiological integration on two dominant epiphytic ferns (Polypodiodes subamoena and Lepisorus scolopendrium in a subtropical montane moist forest in Southwest China. Rhizome severing (preventing integration significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments. However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species. We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time.

  5. Clonality, genetic diversity and support for the diversifying selection hypothesis in natural populations of a flower-living yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, C M; Pozo, M I; Bazaga, P

    2011-11-01

    Vast amounts of effort have been devoted to investigate patterns of genetic diversity and structuring in plants and animals, but similar information is scarce for organisms of other kingdoms. The study of the genetic structure of natural populations of wild yeasts can provide insights into the ecological and genetic correlates of clonality, and into the generality of recent hypotheses postulating that microbial populations lack the potential for genetic divergence and allopatric speciation. Ninety-one isolates of the flower-living yeast Metschnikowia gruessii from southeastern Spain were DNA fingerprinted using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Genetic diversity and structuring was investigated with band-based methods and model- and nonmodel-based clustering. Linkage disequilibrium tests were used to assess reproduction mode. Microsite-dependent, diversifying selection was tested by comparing genetic characteristics of isolates from bumble bee vectors and different floral microsites. AFLP polymorphism (91%) and genotypic diversity were very high. Genetic diversity was spatially structured, as shown by amova (Φ(st)  = 0.155) and clustering. The null hypothesis of random mating was rejected, clonality seeming the prevailing reproductive mode in the populations studied. Genetic diversity of isolates declined from bumble bee mouthparts to floral microsites, and frequency of five AFLP markers varied significantly across floral microsites, thus supporting the hypothesis of diversifying selection on clonal lineages. Wild populations of clonal fungal microbes can exhibit levels of genetic diversity and spatial structuring that are not singularly different from those shown by sexually reproducing plants or animals. Microsite-dependent, divergent selection can maintain high local and regional genetic diversity in microbial populations despite extensive clonality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Empowering growth in Pakistan?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Siegmann (Karin Astrid); H. Majid (Hadia)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPakistan's Vision 2025 connects a policy commitment to greater gender equality with inclusive growth. It prioritises a "good quality of life and high living standard for all citizens across regions, gender" and to "achieve an annual average growth rate of 7 to 8 per cent that is

  7. Antimicrobial growth promoter ban and resistance to macrolides and vancomycin in enterococci from pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boerlin, P.; Wissing, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2001-01-01

    Ninety-six enterococcus isolates from fecal samples of pigs receiving tylosin as an antimicrobial growth promoter and 59 isolates obtained in the same farms 5 to 6 months after the ban of antimicrobial growth promoters in Switzerland were tested for susceptibility to nine antimicrobial agents....... A clear decrease in resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and tetracycline was visible after the ban. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium belonged to the same clonal lineage as vancomycin-resistant isolates previously isolated from Danish pigs....

  8. Population dynamics and clonal growth of Spartocytisus supranubius (Fabaceae), a dominant shrub in the alpine zone of Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyncl, Tomáš; Suda, J.; Wild, Jan; Wildová, Radka; Herben, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 186, - (2006), s. 97-108 ISSN 1385-0237 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/00/1445 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : dendrochronology * isozymes * population projection matrix Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.383, year: 2006

  9. Community-level effects of plant traits in a grassland community examined by multispecies model of clonal plant growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Wildová, Radka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 234, Sp. Iss. (2012), s. 60-69 ISSN 0304-3800 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/1471; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : spatial correlation * model * traits Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.069, year: 2012

  10. Marked heterogeneity in growth characteristics of myoblast clonal cultures and myoblast mixed cultures obtained from the same individual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, Andrea B.; Cohen, Ron; Blom, Joke; Van Heemst, Diana; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.

    Background: Sarcopenia is defined as an age-related decrease in skeletal muscle mass and function while adjacent satellite cells are unable to compensate for this loss. However, myoblast cultures can be established even in the presence of sarcopenia. Objective: It is yet unknown whether satellite

  11. Why are most aquatic plants widely distributed? Dispersal, clonal growth and small-scale heterogeneity in a stressful environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria, L.

    2002-01-01

    Non-marine aquatic vascular plants generally show broad distributional ranges. Climatic factors seem to have limited effects on their distributions, besides the determination of major disjunctions (tropical-temperate-subarctic). Dispersal should have been frequent enough to assure the quick

  12. Restoration handbook for sagebrush steppe ecosystems with emphasis on greater sage-grouse habitat - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A. Pyke; Jeanne C. Chambers; Mike Pellant; Steven T. Knick; Richard F. Miller; Jeffrey L. Beck; Paul S. Doescher; Eugene W. Schupp; Bruce A. Roundy; Mark Brunson; James D. McIver

    2015-01-01

    Sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the United States currently occur on only about one-half of their historical land area because of changes in land use, urban growth, and degradation of land, including invasions of non-native plants. The existence of many animal species depends on the existence of sagebrush steppe habitat. The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus...

  13. Association genetics of growth and adaptive traits in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using whole-exome-discovered polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengmeng Lu; Konstantin V. Krutovsky; C. Dana Nelson; Jason B. West; Nathalie A. Reilly; Carol A. Loopstra

    2017-01-01

    In the USA, forest genetics research began over 100 years ago and loblolly pine breeding programs were established in the 1950s. However, the genetics underlying complex traits of loblolly pine remains to be discovered. To address this, adaptive and growth traits were measured and analyzed in a clonally tested loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) population. Over 2.8 million...

  14. Circulating mutational portrait of cancer: manifestation of aggressive clonal events in both early and late stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumors residing in tissues and organs leave footprints in circulation through circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor DNAs (ctDNA. Characterization of the ctDNA portraits and comparison with tumor DNA mutational portraits may reveal clinically actionable information on solid tumors that is traditionally achieved through more invasive approaches. Methods We isolated ctDNAs from plasma of patients of 103 lung cancer and 74 other solid tumors of different tissue origins. Deep sequencing using the Guardant360 test was performed to identify mutations in 73 clinically actionable genes, and the results were associated with clinical characteristics of the patient. The mutation profiles of 37 lung cancer cases with paired ctDNA and tumor genomic DNA sequencing were used to evaluate clonal representation of tumor in circulation. Five lung cancer cases with longitudinal ctDNA sampling were monitored for cancer progression or response to treatments. Results Mutations in TP53, EGFR, and KRAS genes are most prevalent in our cohort. Mutation rates of ctDNA are similar in early (I and II and late stage (III and IV cancers. Mutation in DNA repair genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and ATM are found in 18.1% (32/177 of cases. Patients with higher mutation rates had significantly higher mortality rates. Lung cancer of never smokers exhibited significantly higher ctDNA mutation rates as well as higher EGFR and ERBB2 mutations than ever smokers. Comparative analysis of ctDNA and tumor DNA mutation data from the same patients showed that key driver mutations could be detected in plasma even when they were present at a minor clonal population in the tumor. Mutations of key genes found in the tumor tissue could remain in circulation even after frontline radiotherapy and chemotherapy suggesting these mutations represented resistance mechanisms. Longitudinal sampling of five lung cancer cases showed distinct changes in ctDNA mutation portraits that

  15. Strongyloidiasis and infective dermatitis alter human T lymphotropic virus-1 clonality in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas A Gillet

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic Virus-1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that persists lifelong by driving clonal proliferation of infected T-cells. HTLV-1 causes a neuroinflammatory disease and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Strongyloidiasis, a gastrointestinal infection by the helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, and Infective Dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH, appear to be risk factors for the development of HTLV-1 related diseases. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the HTLV-1-infected T-cell population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone. A newly developed biodiversity estimator called "DivE" was used to estimate the total number of clones in the blood. We found that the major determinant of proviral load in all subjects without leukemia/lymphoma was the total number of HTLV-1-infected clones. Nevertheless, the significantly higher proviral load in patients with strongyloidiasis or IDH was due to an increase in the mean clone abundance, not to an increase in the number of infected clones. These patients appear to be less capable of restricting clone abundance than those with HTLV-1 alone. In patients co-infected with Strongyloides there was an increased degree of oligoclonal expansion and a higher rate of turnover (i.e. appearance and disappearance of HTLV-1-infected clones. In Strongyloides co-infected patients and those with IDH, proliferation of the most abundant HTLV-1⁺ T-cell clones is independent of the genomic environment of the provirus, in sharp contrast to patients with HTLV-1 infection alone. This implies that new selection forces are driving oligoclonal proliferation in Strongyloides co-infection and IDH. We conclude that strongyloidiasis and IDH increase the risk of development of HTLV-1-associated diseases by increasing the rate of infection of new clones and the abundance of existing HTLV-1⁺ clones.

  16. Simple method for clonal selection of hepatitis A virus based on recovery of virus from radioimmunofocus overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemon, S M; Jansen, R W

    1985-06-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV), has been quantitated in cell culture by autoradiographic detection of foci of viral replication developing beneath an agarose overlay following fixation and 'staining' of the cell sheet with radiolabelled antibody (radioimmunofocus assay). Using a modification of this basic technique, a clonal variant of HM-175 strain HAV was isolated from agarose overlying individual radioimmunofoci. Virus recovered from the agarose was amplified in small volume cultures of BS-C-1 cells and identified in supernatant culture fluids by cDNA-RNA hybridizaton. No virus was recovered from agarose which did not overlie a focus of viral replication. This method offers a simple, yet relatively rapid and certain means of selecting clonal variants of non-plaquing viruses such as hepatitis A virus.

  17. A simple method for clonal selection of hepatitis A virus based on recovery of virus from radioimmunofocus overlays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, S.M.; Jansen, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV), has been quantitated in cell culture by autoradiographic detection of foci of viral replication developing beneath an agarose overlay following fixation and 'staining' of the cell sheet with radiolabelled antibody (radioimmunofocus assay). Using a modification of this basic technique, a clonal variant of HM-175 strain HAV was isolated from agarose overlying individual radioimmunofoci. Virus recovered from the agarose was amplified in small volume cultures of BS-C-1 cells and identified in supernatant culture fluids by cDNA-RNA hybridizaton. No virus was recovered from agarose which did not overlie a focus of viral replication. This method offers a simple, yet relatively rapid and certain means of selecting clonal variants of non-plaquing viruses such as hepatitis A virus. (Auth.)

  18. Clonal Clusters and Virulence Factors of Group C and G Streptococcus Causing Severe Infections, Manitoba, Canada, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lother, Sylvain A; Demczuk, Walter; Martin, Irene; Mulvey, Michael; Dufault, Brenden; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Keynan, Yoav

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of group C and G Streptococcus (GCGS) bacteremia, which is associated with severe disease and death, is increasing. We characterized clinical features, outcomes, and genetic determinants of GCGS bacteremia for 89 patients in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, who had GCGS bacteremia during 2012-2014. Of the 89 patients, 51% had bacteremia from skin and soft tissue, 70% had severe disease features, and 20% died. Whole-genome sequencing analysis was performed on isolates derived from 89 blood samples and 33 respiratory sample controls: 5 closely related genetic lineages were identified as being more likely to cause invasive disease than non-clade isolates (83% vs. 57%, p = 0.002). Virulence factors cbp, fbp, speG, sicG, gfbA, and bca clustered clonally into these clades. A clonal distribution of virulence factors may account for severe and fatal cases of bacteremia caused by invasive GCGS.

  19. Greater sage-grouse population trends across Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, David; Aldridge, Cameron L.; O'Donnell, Michael; Monroe, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    The scale at which analyses are performed can have an effect on model results and often one scale does not accurately describe the ecological phenomena of interest (e.g., population trends) for wide-ranging species: yet, most ecological studies are performed at a single, arbitrary scale. To best determine local and regional trends for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Wyoming, USA, we modeled density-independent and -dependent population growth across multiple spatial scales relevant to management and conservation (Core Areas [habitat encompassing approximately 83% of the sage-grouse population on ∼24% of surface area in Wyoming], local Working Groups [7 regional areas for which groups of local experts are tasked with implementing Wyoming's statewide sage-grouse conservation plan at the local level], Core Area status (Core Area vs. Non-Core Area) by Working Groups, and Core Areas by Working Groups). Our goal was to determine the influence of fine-scale population trends (Core Areas) on larger-scale populations (Working Group Areas). We modeled the natural log of change in population size ( peak M lek counts) by time to calculate the finite rate of population growth (λ) for each population of interest from 1993 to 2015. We found that in general when Core Area status (Core Area vs. Non-Core Area) was investigated by Working Group Area, the 2 populations trended similarly and agreed with the overall trend of the Working Group Area. However, at the finer scale where Core Areas were analyzed separately, Core Areas within the same Working Group Area often trended differently and a few large Core Areas could influence the overall Working Group Area trend and mask trends occurring in smaller Core Areas. Relatively close fine-scale populations of sage-grouse can trend differently, indicating that large-scale trends may not accurately depict what is occurring across the landscape (e.g., local effects of gas and oil fields may be masked by increasing

  20. Processing-Dependent and Clonal Contamination Patterns of Listeria monocytogenes in the Cured Ham Food Chain Revealed by Genetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Marina; Scaltriti, Erika; Cozzolino, Paolo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele; Pierantoni, Marco; Foni, Emanuela; Pongolini, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The quantitative and qualitative patterns of environmental contamination by Listeria monocytogenes were investigated in the production chain of dry-cured Parma ham. Standard arrays of surfaces were sampled in processing facilities during a single visit per plant in the three compartments of the food chain, i.e., ham production (19 plants) and postproduction, which was divided into deboning (43 plants) and slicing (25 plants) steps. The numbers of sampled surfaces were 384 in ham production, with 25 positive for L. monocytogenes, and 1,084 in postproduction, with 83 positives. Statistical analysis of the prevalence of contaminated surfaces showed that in ham production, contamination was higher at the beginning of processing and declined significantly toward the end, while in postproduction, prevalence rose toward the end of processing. Prevalence was higher in the deboning facilities than in slicing facilities and was dependent on the type of surface (floor/drainage > clothing > equipment). The qualitative pattern of contamination was investigated through an analysis of the survey isolates and a set of isolates derived from routine monitoring, including longitudinal isolations. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis revealed a remarkable clonality of L. monocytogenes within plants, with the detection of 16 plant-specific clones out of 17 establishments with multiple isolates. Repeated detections of clonal isolates >6 months apart were also observed. Six was the maximum number of between-isolate differences in core SNPs observed within these clones. Based on the same six-SNP threshold, three clusters of clonal isolates, shared by six establishments, were also identified. The spread of L. monocytogenes within and between plants, as indicated by its clonal behavior, is a matter of concern for the hygienic management of establishments. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

  1. Rapid Emergence and Clonal Dissemination of CTX-M-15-Producing Salmonella enterica Serotype Virchow, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Yun, Young-Sun; Kim, Soo Jin; Jeon, Se-Eun; Lee, Deog-Yong; Chung, Gyung Tae; Yoo, Cheon-Kwon; Kim, Junyoung

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cefotaxime-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Virchow has dramatically increased in South Korea since the first isolation in 2011. Of 68 isolates collected over 10 years, 28 cefotaxime-resistant isolates harbored the bla(CTX-M-15) extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene and were closely related genetically, demonstrating the clonal dissemination of CTX-M-15-producing Salmonella Virchow in South Korea.

  2. Analysis of clonal expansions through the normal and premalignant human breast epithelium reveals the presence of luminal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereser, Biancastella; Jansen, Marnix; Austin, Emily; Elia, George; McFarlane, Taneisha; van Deurzen, Carolien Hm; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Daidone, Maria G; Tadrous, Paul J; Wright, Nicholas A; Jones, Louise; McDonald, Stuart Ac

    2018-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the cell of origin of breast cancer is the adult mammary epithelial stem cell; however, demonstrating the presence and location of tissue stem cells in the human breast has proved difficult. Furthermore, we do not know the clonal architecture of the normal and premalignant mammary epithelium or its cellular hierarchy. Here, we use deficiency in the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO), typically caused by somatic mutations in the mitochondrial genome, as a means to perform lineage tracing in the human mammary epithelium. PCR sequencing of laser-capture microdissected cells in combination with immunohistochemistry for markers of lineage differentiation was performed to determine the clonal nature of the mammary epithelium. We have shown that in the normal human breast, clonal expansions (defined here by areas of CCO deficiency) are typically uncommon and of limited size, but can occur at any site within the adult mammary epithelium. The presence of a stem cell population was shown by demonstrating multi-lineage differentiation within CCO-deficient areas. Interestingly, we observed infrequent CCO deficiency that was restricted to luminal cells, suggesting that niche succession, and by inference stem cell location, is located within the luminal layer. CCO-deficient areas appeared large within areas of ductal carcinoma in situ, suggesting that the rate of clonal expansion was altered in the premalignant lesion. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Long-Term Efficacy and Patterns of Failure After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Molecular Assay-Based Clonality Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Antonucci, J. Vito; Wallace, Michelle R.N.; Gilbert, Samuel; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kestin, Larry; Chen, Peter; Kunzman, Jonathan; Boike, Thomas; Benitez, Pamela; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term efficacy and cosmetic results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by reviewing our institution's experience. Methods and Materials: A total of 199 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated prospectively with adjuvant APBI after lumpectomy using interstitial brachytherapy. All patients had negative margins, 82% had Stage I disease, median tumor size was 1.1 cm, and 12% had positive lymph nodes. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 8.6 years. Fifty-three patients (27%) have been followed for ≥10 years. Results: Six ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) were observed, for a 5-year and 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6% and 3.8%, respectively. A total of three regional nodal failures were observed, for a 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6%. Five contralateral breast cancers developed, for a 5- and 10-year actuarial rate of 2.2% and 5.2%, respectively. The type of IBTR (clonally related vs. clonally distinct) was analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay. Eighty-three percent of IBTRs (n = 5) were classified as clonally related. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for an association with the development of an IBTR, regional nodal failure, or contralateral breast cancer. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with any of these events. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 99% of patients. Conclusions: Long-term results with APBI using interstitial brachytherapy continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local and regional control rates and cosmetic results. According to a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay, 83% of recurrences were classified as clonally related

  4. IMPROVEMENTS OF CLONAL MICROPROPAGATION TECHNOLOGY OF APPLE ROOTSTOCKS AT THE STAGE OF INTRODUCTION TO IN VITRO CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Besedina E. N.; Buntsevich L. L.

    2015-01-01

    The stage of introduction of plantlets to in vitro culture is an important stage of technology of clonal micropropagation of plants. For the purpose of decrease in a share of the plantlets that were lost from an infection and increase of their regeneration ability, sterilizers and antibiotics, effective and safe for apple rootstocks’ plantlets wee allocated, and also favorable terms of introduction to in vitro culture were allocated. As a result of the conducted researches, we have establishe...

  5. South American Plasmodium falciparum after the malaria eradication era: clonal population expansion and survival of the fittest hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Griffing

    Full Text Available Malaria has reemerged in many regions where once it was nearly eliminated. Yet the source of these parasites, the process of repopulation, their population structure, and dynamics are ill defined. Peru was one of malaria eradication's successes, where Plasmodium falciparum was nearly eliminated for two decades. It reemerged in the 1990s. In the new era of malaria elimination, Peruvian P. falciparum is a model of malaria reinvasion. We investigated its population structure and drug resistance profiles. We hypothesized that only populations adapted to local ecological niches could expand and repopulate and originated as vestigial populations or recent introductions. We investigated the genetic structure (using microsatellites and drug resistant genotypes of 220 parasites collected from patients immediately after peak epidemic expansion (1999-2000 from seven sites across the country. The majority of parasites could be grouped into five clonal lineages by networks and AMOVA. The distribution of clonal lineages and their drug sensitivity profiles suggested geographic structure. In 2001, artesunate combination therapy was introduced in Peru. We tested 62 parasites collected in 2006-2007 for changes in genetic structure. Clonal lineages had recombined under selection for the fittest parasites. Our findings illustrate that local adaptations in the post-eradication era have contributed to clonal lineage expansion. Within the shifting confluence of drug policy and malaria incidence, populations continue to evolve through genetic outcrossing influenced by antimalarial selection pressure. Understanding the population substructure of P. falciparum has implications for vaccine, drug, and epidemiologic studies, including monitoring malaria during and after the elimination phase.

  6. Long-term consequences of disturbances on reproductive strategies of the rare epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria: clonality a gift and a curse

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Garima; Dal Grande, Francesco; Werth, Silke; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The effect of disturbance on symbiotic organisms such as lichens is particularly severe. In case of heterothallic lichen-forming fungi, disturbances may lead to unbalanced gene frequency and patchy distribution of mating types, thus inhibiting sexual reproduction and imposing clonality. The impact of disturbance on reproductive strategies and genetic diversity of clonal systems has so far received little attention. To infer the effects of disturbances on mating-type allele frequencies and pop...

  7. Low incidence of clonality in cold water corals revealed through the novel use of a standardized protocol adapted to deep sea sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheler, Ronan; Cassone, Anne-Laure; Noël, Philippe; Mouchel, Olivier; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2017-11-01

    Sampling in the deep sea is a technical challenge, which has hindered the acquisition of robust datasets that are necessary to determine the fine-grained biological patterns and processes that may shape genetic diversity. Estimates of the extent of clonality in deep-sea species, despite the importance of clonality in shaping the local dynamics and evolutionary trajectories, have been largely obscured by such limitations. Cold-water coral reefs along European margins are formed mainly by two reef-building species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Here we present a fine-grained analysis of the genotypic and genetic composition of reefs occurring in the Bay of Biscay, based on an innovative deep-sea sampling protocol. This strategy was designed to be standardized, random, and allowed the georeferencing of all sampled colonies. Clonal lineages discriminated through their Multi-Locus Genotypes (MLG) at 6-7 microsatellite markers could thus be mapped to assess the level of clonality and the spatial spread of clonal lineages. High values of clonal richness were observed for both species across all sites suggesting a limited occurrence of clonality, which likely originated through fragmentation. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation analysis underlined the possible occurrence of fine-grained genetic structure in several populations of both L. pertusa and M. oculata. The two cold-water coral species examined had contrasting patterns of connectivity among canyons, with among-canyon genetic structuring detected in M. oculata, whereas L. pertusa was panmictic at the canyon scale. This study exemplifies that a standardized, random and georeferenced sampling strategy, while challenging, can be applied in the deep sea, and associated benefits outlined here include improved estimates of fine grained patterns of clonality and dispersal that are comparable across sites and among species.

  8. Establishment of a clonal bank of Caesalpinia spinosa (Mol.) O. Kuntz by selection of plus trees and grafting

    OpenAIRE

    Jenny E Nuñez; Elisa Quiala; Manuel de Feria; Saúl Mestanza; Rafael Gómez-Kosky; Franklin R Cuadrado; Michel Leiva-Mora

    2017-01-01

    In Ecuador, plant propagation techniques are not available commercially to establish clonal banks of Caesalpinia spinosa (Mol.) O. Kuntz (guarango) plus trees, which limits the development of in vitro propagation protocols of this specie. The objective of the present work was to establish a clonal bank of C. spinosa by selecting plus trees and grafting. Guarango trees belonging to the province of Chimborazo, Guano canton were selected based on total height, height at the beginning of the crow...

  9. Massively parallel sequencing and genome-wide copy number analysis revealed a clonal relationship in benign metastasizing leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ren-Chin; Chao, An-Shine; Lee, Li-Yu; Lin, Gigin; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lu, Yen-Jung; Huang, Huei-Jean; Yen, Chi-Feng; Han, Chien Min; Lee, Yun-Shien; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chao, Angel

    2017-07-18

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare disease entity typically presenting as multiple extrauterine leiomyomas associated with a uterine leiomyoma. It has been hypothesized that the extrauterine leiomyomata represent distant metastasis of the uterine leiomyoma. To date, the only molecular evidence supporting this hypothesis was derived from clonality analyses based on X-chromosome inactivation assays. Here, we sought to address this issue by examining paired specimens of synchronous pulmonary and uterine leiomyomata from three patients using targeted massively parallel sequencing and molecular inversion probe array analysis for detecting somatic mutations and copy number aberrations. We detected identical non-hot-spot somatic mutations and similar patterns of copy number aberrations (CNAs) in paired pulmonary and uterine leiomyomata from two patients, indicating the clonal relationship between pulmonary and uterine leiomyomata. In addition to loss of chromosome 22q found in the literature, we identified additional recurrent CNAs including losses of chromosome 3q and 11q. In conclusion, our findings of the clonal relationship between synchronous pulmonary and uterine leiomyomas support the hypothesis that BML represents a condition wherein a uterine leiomyoma disseminates to distant extrauterine locations.

  10. Massively parallel sequencing and genome-wide copy number analysis revealed a clonal relationship in benign metastasizing leiomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Yu; Lin, Gigin; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lu, Yen-Jung; Huang, Huei-Jean; Yen, Chi-Feng; Han, Chien Min; Lee, Yun-Shien; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chao, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare disease entity typically presenting as multiple extrauterine leiomyomas associated with a uterine leiomyoma. It has been hypothesized that the extrauterine leiomyomata represent distant metastasis of the uterine leiomyoma. To date, the only molecular evidence supporting this hypothesis was derived from clonality analyses based on X-chromosome inactivation assays. Here, we sought to address this issue by examining paired specimens of synchronous pulmonary and uterine leiomyomata from three patients using targeted massively parallel sequencing and molecular inversion probe array analysis for detecting somatic mutations and copy number aberrations. We detected identical non-hot-spot somatic mutations and similar patterns of copy number aberrations (CNAs) in paired pulmonary and uterine leiomyomata from two patients, indicating the clonal relationship between pulmonary and uterine leiomyomata. In addition to loss of chromosome 22q found in the literature, we identified additional recurrent CNAs including losses of chromosome 3q and 11q. In conclusion, our findings of the clonal relationship between synchronous pulmonary and uterine leiomyomas support the hypothesis that BML represents a condition wherein a uterine leiomyoma disseminates to distant extrauterine locations. PMID:28533481

  11. Clonal expansion of genome-intact HIV-1 in functionally polarized Th1 CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guinevere Q; Orlova-Fink, Nina; Einkauf, Kevin; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Sun, Xiaoming; Harrington, Sean; Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Reddy, Kavidha; Dong, Krista; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Rosenberg, Eric S; Yu, Xu G; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2017-06-30

    HIV-1 causes a chronic, incurable disease due to its persistence in CD4+ T cells that contain replication-competent provirus, but exhibit little or no active viral gene expression and effectively resist combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). These latently infected T cells represent an extremely small proportion of all circulating CD4+ T cells but possess a remarkable long-term stability and typically persist throughout life, for reasons that are not fully understood. Here we performed massive single-genome, near-full-length next-generation sequencing of HIV-1 DNA derived from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ex vivo-isolated CD4+ T cells, and subsets of functionally polarized memory CD4+ T cells. This approach identified multiple sets of independent, near-full-length proviral sequences from cART-treated individuals that were completely identical, consistent with clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells harboring intact HIV-1. Intact, near-full-genome HIV-1 DNA sequences that were derived from such clonally expanded CD4+ T cells constituted 62% of all analyzed genome-intact sequences in memory CD4 T cells, were preferentially observed in Th1-polarized cells, were longitudinally detected over a duration of up to 5 years, and were fully replication- and infection-competent. Together, these data suggest that clonal proliferation of Th1-polarized CD4+ T cells encoding for intact HIV-1 represents a driving force for stabilizing the pool of latently infected CD4+ T cells.

  12. Discovering and differentiating new and emerging clonal populations of Chlamydia trachomatis with a novel shotgun cell culture harvest assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somboonna, Naraporn; Mead, Sally; Liu, Jessica; Dean, Deborah

    2008-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of preventable blindness and bacterial sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Plaque assays have been used to clonally segregate laboratory-adapted C. trachomatis strains from mixed infections, but no assays have been reported to segregate clones from recent clinical samples. We developed a novel shotgun cell culture harvest assay for this purpose because we found that recent clinical samples do not form plaques. Clones were strain-typed by using outer membrane protein A and 16S rRNA sequences. Surprisingly, ocular trachoma reference strain A/SA-1 contained clones of Chlamydophila abortus. C. abortus primarily infects ruminants and pigs and has never been identified in populations where trachoma is endemic. Three clonal variants of reference strain Ba/Apache-2 were also identified. Our findings reflect the importance of clonal isolation in identifying constituents of mixed infections containing new or emerging strains and of viable clones for research to more fully understand the dynamics of in vivo strain-mixing, evolution, and disease pathogenesis.

  13. Natural hybridization between a clonally propagated crop, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and a wild relative in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duputié, Anne; David, Patrice; Debain, Chantal; McKey, Doyle

    2007-07-01

    Because domestication rarely leads to speciation, domesticated populations often hybridize with wild relatives when they occur in close proximity. Little work has focused on this question in clonally propagated crops. If selection on the capacity for sexual reproduction has been relaxed, these crops would not be expected to hybridize with their wild relatives as frequently as seed-propagated crops. Cassava is one of the most important clonally propagated plants in tropical agriculture. Gene flow between cassava and wild relatives has often been postulated, but never demonstrated in nature. We studied a population of a wild Manihot sp. in French Guiana, which was recently in contact with domesticated cassava, and characterized phenotypes (10 morphological traits) and genotypes (six microsatellite loci) of individuals in a transect parallel to the direction of hypothesized gene flow. Wild and domesticated populations were strongly differentiated at microsatellite loci. We identified many hybrids forming a continuum between these two populations, and phenotypic variation was strongly correlated with the degree of hybridization as determined by molecular markers. Analysis of linkage disequilibrium and of the diversity of hybrid pedigrees showed that hybridization has gone on for at least three generations and that no strong barrier prevents admixture of the populations. Hybrids were more heterozygous than either wild or domesticated individuals, and phenotypic comparisons suggested heterosis in vegetative traits. Our results also suggest that this situation is not uncommon, at least in French Guiana, and demonstrate the need for integrated management of wild and domesticated populations even in clonally propagated crops.

  14. Detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements by the polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxin; Robetorye, Ryan S

    2013-01-01

    Although well-established diagnostic criteria exist for mature B-cell neoplasms, a definitive diagnosis of a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder cannot always be obtained using more conventional techniques such as flow cytometric immunophenotyping, conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or immunohistochemistry. However, because B-cell malignancies contain identically rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain genes, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be a fast, convenient, and dependable option to identify clonal B-cell processes. This chapter describes the use of PCR and capillary electrophoresis to identify clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) variable and joining region (VH-JH) gene rearrangements (IGH VH-JH PCR) using a commercially available method employing multiple multiplex PCR tubes that was originally developed as the result of a large European BIOMED-2 collaborative study (Invivoscribe Technologies). The core protocol involves the use of three separate master mix tubes that target the conserved framework (FR1, FR2, and FR3) and joining (J) regions of the IGH gene. Analysis of these three framework regions can detect approximately 88% of clonal IGH gene rearrangements.

  15. A Common Origin for B-1a and B-2 Lymphocytes in Clonal Pre- Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadland, Brandon K; Varnum-Finney, Barbara; Mandal, Pankaj K; Rossi, Derrick J; Poulos, Michael G; Butler, Jason M; Rafii, Shahin; Yoder, Mervin C; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Bernstein, Irwin D

    2017-06-06

    Recent evidence points to the embryonic emergence of some tissue-resident innate immune cells, such as B-1a lymphocytes, prior to and independently of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, whether the full hematopoietic repertoire of embryonic HSCs initially includes these unique lineages of innate immune cells has been difficult to assess due to lack of clonal assays that identify and assess HSC precursor (pre-HSC) potential. Here, by combining index sorting of single embryonic hemogenic precursors with in vitro HSC maturation and transplantation assays, we analyze emerging pre-HSCs at the single-cell level, revealing their unique stage-specific properties and clonal lineage potential. Remarkably, clonal pre-HSCs detected between E9.5 and E11.5 contribute to the complete B cell repertoire, including B-1a lymphocytes, revealing a previously unappreciated common precursor for all B cell lineages at the pre-HSC stage and a second embryonic origin for B-1a lymphocytes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Common Origin for B-1a and B-2 Lymphocytes in Clonal Pre- Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K. Hadland

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence points to the embryonic emergence of some tissue-resident innate immune cells, such as B-1a lymphocytes, prior to and independently of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. However, whether the full hematopoietic repertoire of embryonic HSCs initially includes these unique lineages of innate immune cells has been difficult to assess due to lack of clonal assays that identify and assess HSC precursor (pre-HSC potential. Here, by combining index sorting of single embryonic hemogenic precursors with in vitro HSC maturation and transplantation assays, we analyze emerging pre-HSCs at the single-cell level, revealing their unique stage-specific properties and clonal lineage potential. Remarkably, clonal pre-HSCs detected between E9.5 and E11.5 contribute to the complete B cell repertoire, including B-1a lymphocytes, revealing a previously unappreciated common precursor for all B cell lineages at the pre-HSC stage and a second embryonic origin for B-1a lymphocytes.

  17. Rearrangements of genes for the antigen receptor on T cells as markers of lineage and clonality in human lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, T A; Davis, M M; Bongiovanni, K F; Korsmeyer, S J

    1985-09-26

    The T alpha and T beta chains of the heterodimeric T-lymphocyte antigen receptor are encoded by separated DNA segments that recombine during T-cell development. We have used rearrangements of the T beta gene as a widely applicable marker of clonality in the T-cell lineage. We show that the T beta genes are used in both the T8 and T4 subpopulations of normal T cells and that Sézary leukemia, adult T-cell leukemia, and the non-B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias are clonal expansions of T cells. Furthermore, circulating T cells from a patient with the T8-cell-predominantly lymphocytosis associated with granulocytopenia are shown to be monoclonal. Finally, the sensitivity and specificity of this tumor-associated marker have been exploited to monitor the therapy of a patient with adult T-cell leukemia. These unique DNA rearrangements provide insights into the cellular origin, clonality, and natural history of T-cell neoplasia.

  18. GENETIC DIVERGENCE AND MORPHO - AGRONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF JATROPHA CURCAS L. CLONES FOR SELECTION OF CLONAL VARIETIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA QUEIROZ DE ALMEIDA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge about genetic diversity of jatropha crop is important for genetic conservation resources and breeding of this species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and performance of jatropha clones through morphological characterization to selection of clonal varieties for biofuels production. The clones were obtained through shoot cuttings from previous selection in a population of half - sibs progenies. The morphoagronomic analyses of clones was carried out at 180 days after transplantation and were evaluated plant height, stem diameter, number of primary branches and number of secondary branches, number of bunches and number of fruits per plant. Evaluating clones performance, significant results were found for the number of secondary branches. About analysis of genetic diversity, the measures of dissimilarity genetic varied from 0.62 to 13.11, this way, the UFRBPR14 and UFRBPR15 clones were more divergent. The Tocher method was efficient to verify formation of four groups. The characteristics that most contributed to the divergence among clones were branches number, height and number of bunches, and, stem diameter had lower contribution. The jatropha clones differed only in the secondary branches number and multivariate analysis showed divergence among the jatropha clones with formation of four groups. Also, branches number, plant height and number of bunches were characteristic that contributed to genetic divergence.

  19. Early circulating tumor DNA dynamics and clonal selection with palbociclib and fulvestrant for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Ben; Hrebien, Sarah; Morden, James P; Beaney, Matthew; Fribbens, Charlotte; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Koehler, Maria; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Bliss, Judith M; Turner, Nicholas C

    2018-03-01

    CDK4/6 inhibition substantially improves progression-free survival (PFS) for women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, although there are no predictive biomarkers. Early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) level may provide early response prediction, but the impact of tumor heterogeneity is unknown. Here we use plasma samples from patients in the randomized phase III PALOMA-3 study of CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib and fulvestrant for women with advanced breast cancer and show that relative change in PIK3CA ctDNA level after 15 days treatment strongly predicts PFS on palbociclib and fulvestrant (hazard ratio 3.94, log-rank p = 0.0013). ESR1 mutations selected by prior hormone therapy are shown to be frequently sub clonal, with ESR1 ctDNA dynamics offering limited prediction of clinical outcome. These results suggest that early ctDNA dynamics may provide a robust biomarker for CDK4/6 inhibitors, with early ctDNA dynamics demonstrating divergent response of tumor sub clones to treatment.

  20. Clonal Heterogeneity in the Neuronal and Glial Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser I. Young

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity presents an important challenge to the development of cell-based therapies where there is a fundamental requirement for predictable and reproducible outcomes. Transplanted Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells (DPSCs have demonstrated early promise in experimental models of spinal cord injury and stroke, despite limited evidence of neuronal and glial-like differentiation after transplantation. Here, we report, for the first time, on the ability of single cell-derived clonal cultures of murine DPSCs to differentiate in vitro into immature neuronal-like and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Importantly, only DPSC clones with high nestin mRNA expression levels were found to successfully differentiate into Map2 and NF-positive neuronal-like cells. Neuronally differentiated DPSCs possessed a membrane capacitance comparable with primary cultured striatal neurons and small inward voltage-activated K+ but not outward Na+ currents were recorded suggesting a functionally immature phenotype. Similarly, only high nestin-expressing clones demonstrated the ability to adopt Olig1, Olig2, and MBP-positive immature oligodendrocyte-like phenotype. Together, these results demonstrate that appropriate markers may be used to provide an early indication of the suitability of a cell population for purposes where differentiation into a specific lineage may be beneficial and highlight that further understanding of heterogeneity within mixed cellular populations is required.

  1. IgV gene intraclonal diversification and clonal evolution in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnara, Davide; Callea, Vincenzo; Stelitano, Caterina; Morabito, Fortunato; Fabris, Sonia; Neri, Antonino; Zanardi, Sabrina; Ghiotto, Fabio; Ciccone, Ermanno; Grossi, Carlo Enrico; Fais, Franco

    2006-04-01

    Intraclonal diversification of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) genes was evaluated in leukaemic cells from a B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) case over a 2-year period at four time points. Intraclonal heterogeneity was analysed by sequencing 305 molecular clones derived from polymerase chain reaction amplification of B-CLL cell IgV heavy (H) and light (C) chain gene rearrangements. Sequences were compared with evaluating intraclonal variation and the nature of somatic mutations. Although IgV intraclonal variation was detected at all time points, its level decreased with time and a parallel emergence of two more represented V(H)DJ(H) clones was observed. They differed by nine nucleotide substitutions one of which only caused a conservative replacement aminoacid change. In addition, one V(L)J(L) rearrangement became more represented over time. Analyses of somatic mutations suggest antigen selection and impairment of negative selection of neoplastic cells. In addition, a genealogical tree representing a model of clonal evolution of the neoplastic cells was created. It is of note that, during the period of study, the patient showed clinical progression of disease. We conclude that antigen stimulation and somatic hypermutation may participate in disease progression through the selection and expansion of neoplastic subclone(s).

  2. Bone marrow pre-B cells and the clonal anergy theory of immunologic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, G J

    1987-03-01

    This review begins with a summary of a decade's research from the author's own laboratory which documents the fact that B lymphocytes can receive and store negative, down-regulatory signals from an encounter with antigen, and that the sensitivity to such negative signalling depends critically on maturational status, the most immature B cells being the most susceptible. The review then examines the relationship between these experimentally-induced models of immunologic tolerance, with the pre-B to B cell transition as the critical stage for examination, and the real-life phenomenon of self-tolerance. It makes the point that no repertoire-purging mechanism to ensure self-tolerance can afford to be too effective, for fear of purging too many useful cells, given the number and variability of self-antigens. The review then examines certain dilemmas posed by recent findings in cellular and molecular immunology. These include: 1) the preferential use of particular VH gene families by B cells at different stages of the differentiation process; 2) the apparent frequency of B lymphocytes with the potential for antiself-reactivity in the B cell repertoire; and 3) the existence of a new type of B cell, the Ly-1-positive B cell, with peculiar characteristics. These findings are considered within the particular contexts of pre-B-to-B cell transition and tolerance induction through clonal anergy mechanisms.

  3. [Hyperspectral remote sensing image classification based on SVM optimized by clonal selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Jing, Lin-Hai; Wang, Meng-Fei; Lin, Qi-Zhong

    2013-03-01

    Model selection for support vector machine (SVM) involving kernel and the margin parameter values selection is usually time-consuming, impacts training efficiency of SVM model and final classification accuracies of SVM hyperspectral remote sensing image classifier greatly. Firstly, based on combinatorial optimization theory and cross-validation method, artificial immune clonal selection algorithm is introduced to the optimal selection of SVM (CSSVM) kernel parameter a and margin parameter C to improve the training efficiency of SVM model. Then an experiment of classifying AVIRIS in India Pine site of USA was performed for testing the novel CSSVM, as well as a traditional SVM classifier with general Grid Searching cross-validation method (GSSVM) for comparison. And then, evaluation indexes including SVM model training time, classification overall accuracy (OA) and Kappa index of both CSSVM and GSSVM were all analyzed quantitatively. It is demonstrated that OA of CSSVM on test samples and whole image are 85.1% and 81.58, the differences from that of GSSVM are both within 0.08% respectively; And Kappa indexes reach 0.8213 and 0.7728, the differences from that of GSSVM are both within 0.001; While the ratio of model training time of CSSVM and GSSVM is between 1/6 and 1/10. Therefore, CSSVM is fast and accurate algorithm for hyperspectral image classification and is superior to GSSVM.

  4. Cellular lead toxicity and metabolism in primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, G.J.; Rosen, J.F.; Pounds, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    A knowledge of bone lead metabolism is critical for understanding the toxicological importance of bone lead, as a toxicant both to bone cells and to soft tissues of the body, as lead is mobilized from large reservoirs in hard tissues. To further understand the processes that mediate metabolism of lead in bone, it is necessary to determine lead metabolism at the cellular level. Experiments were conducted to determine the intracellular steady-state 210 Pb kinetics in cultures of primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells. Osteoblastic bone cells obtained by sequential collagenase digestion of mouse calvaria or rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells were labeled with 210 Pb as 5 microM lead acetate for 20 hr, and kinetic parameters were determined by measuring the efflux of 210 Pb from the cells over a 210 -min period. The intracellular metabolism of 210 Pb was characterized by three kinetic pools of 210 Pb in both cell types. Although the values of these parameters differed between the primary osteoblastic cells and ROS cells, the profile of 210 Pb was remarkably similar in both cell types. Both types exhibited one large, slowly exchanging pool (S3), indicative of mitochondrial lead. These data show that primary osteoblastic bone cells and ROS cells exhibit similar steady-state lead kinetics, and intracellular lead distribution. These data also establish a working model of lead kinetics in osteoblastic bone cells and now permit an integrated view of lead kinetics in bone

  5. Cytoplasmic inheritance of parent-offspring cell structure in the clonal diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokawa, Yuka; Shimada, Masakazu

    2016-11-16

    In cytoplasmic inheritance, structural states of a parent cell could be transmitted to offspring cells via two mechanisms. The first is referred to as the hangover of parent structure, where the structure itself remains and faithfully transmits within offspring cells; the second is structural inheritance, wherein the parent structure functions as a template for development of new offspring structure. We estimated to what extent the parent structure affects the development of offspring structure by structural inheritance, using a clone of the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana The cell has two siliceous valves (a cell wall part at both cell poles): one is inherited from the parent and the other is newly formed. We estimated cytoplasmic heritability by comparing valve traits (central fultoportulae (CTFP), striae, central area, and cell diameter) of parent and new offspring valves, using single-cell isolation and valve labelling. Parent-offspring valve trait regressions showed that all traits, except CTFP, were significantly correlated. We formulated a quantitative genetic model considering the diatom inheritance system and revealed short-term rapid evolution compared with other inheritance systems. Diatom structural inheritance will have evolved to enable clonal populations to rapidly acquire and maintain suitable structures for temporal changes in environments and life-cycle stages. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Implications of the two stage clonal expansion model to radiation risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.; Hazelton, W.D.; Luebeck, E.G.; Moolgavkar, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    The Two Stage Clonal Expansion Model of carcinogenesis has been applied to the analysis of several cohorts of persons exposed to chronic exposures of high and low LET radiation. The results of these analyses are: (1) the importance of radiation-induced initiation is small and, if present at all, contributes to cancers only late in life and only if exposure begins early in life, (2) radiation-induced promotion dominates and produces the majority of cancers by accelerating proliferation of already-initiated cells, and (3) radiation-induced malignant conversion is important only during and immediately after exposure ceases and tends to dominate only late in life, acting on already initiated and promoted cells. Two populations, the Colorado Plateau miners (high-LET, radon exposed) and the Canadian radiation workers (low-LET, gamma ray exposed) are used as examples to show the time dependence of the hazard function and the relative importance of the three hypothesized processes (initiation, promotion and malignant conversion) for each radiation quality

  7. An application of clonal Japanese flounder, paralichthys olivaceus to the experiment on bioaccumulation of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Taeko; Nakahara, Motokazu; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hirano, Shigeki; Watabe, Teruhisa; Yamamoto, Eiichi

    2000-01-01

    A laboratory experiment of accumulation and excretion of radionuclides ( 125 I, 57 Co, 141 Ce, 103 Ru, 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 54 Mn) in juvenile Japanese flounder was carried out in order to elucidate the genetic factor intervening in the mineral balance, which possibly caused the fluctuation of so-called concentration factors. Fish originating from two populations, namely clone brood and hatchery-reared brood, were used in the present study. The variance of concentration of radionuclides was compared in terms of the radionuclides activity ratio, which was defined by radionuclide concentration in fish normalized by that in surrounding water. In general, narrower variations of concentration were observed in clone brood than in hatchery-reared brood, and significant differences were observed for 57 Co, 141 Ce and 137 Cs in the accumulation process and for five radionuclides other than 125 I and 103 Ru in excretion process. The present study suggested that a probability of application of clonal fish would be advantageous in experimental assessments of biological effects of environmental contaminants in the sea. (author)

  8. Mitochondrial depolarization in yeast zygotes inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Golyshev, Sergey A; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S; Severin, Fedor F; Knorre, Dmitry A

    2017-04-01

    Non-identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) compete with each other within a cell and the ultimate variant of mtDNA present depends on their relative replication rates. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as a model, we studied the effects of mitochondrial inhibitors on the competition between wild-type mtDNA and mutant selfish mtDNA in heteroplasmic zygotes. We found that decreasing mitochondrial transmembrane potential by adding uncouplers or valinomycin changes the competition outcomes in favor of the wild-type mtDNA. This effect was significantly lower in cells with disrupted mitochondria fission or repression of the autophagy-related genes ATG8 , ATG32 or ATG33 , implying that heteroplasmic zygotes activate mitochondrial degradation in response to the depolarization. Moreover, the rate of mitochondrially targeted GFP turnover was higher in zygotes treated with uncoupler than in haploid cells or untreated zygotes. Finally, we showed that vacuoles of zygotes with uncoupler-activated autophagy contained DNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mitochondrial depolarization inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA and this effect depends on mitochondrial fission and autophagy. These observations suggest an activation of mitochondria quality control mechanisms in heteroplasmic yeast zygotes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of oenological potential on clonal selections of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceppi de Lecco C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 13 clonal selections of cv Cabernet Sauvignon, established in Nancagua VI Region, Chile (34.39 °S 71.17 °W. The genetic identity of the vines was confirmed by ampelography and microsatellite markers (SSR. Evaluations in the 2012–2013 season include: performance, analytical and sensorial parameters on the wines made by microvinification. The results were statistically analyzed with the Statgraphics Plus program and multiple comparison test of Tukey at 95% confidence level. Sensorially, the wines were evaluated by a panel of 12 experts. The results were likewise analyzed by testing principal components (PCA with covariance matrix without rotation. In the season studied the selection 108 highlighted with a high yield (kg/plant, in the composition of the wine selections generally highlighted for contents of total polyphenols and anthocyanins over average. The results show typical sensory characteristics of wines from that grape variety, and it was possible to group the selections by their attributes (PCA with cherry red wines at different intensities, but without significant differences, with fruity and vegetal aromas, interesting complex flavors and with structured tannins.

  10. Observing Clonal Dynamics across Spatiotemporal Axes: A Prelude to Quantitative Fitness Models for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Andrew W; Chan, Fong Chun; Shah, Sohrab P

    2018-02-01

    The ability to accurately model evolutionary dynamics in cancer would allow for prediction of progression and response to therapy. As a prelude to quantitative understanding of evolutionary dynamics, researchers must gather observations of in vivo tumor evolution. High-throughput genome sequencing now provides the means to profile the mutational content of evolving tumor clones from patient biopsies. Together with the development of models of tumor evolution, reconstructing evolutionary histories of individual tumors generates hypotheses about the dynamics of evolution that produced the observed clones. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the concepts involved in predicting evolutionary histories, and provide a workflow based on bulk and targeted-genome sequencing. We then describe the application of this workflow to time series data obtained for transformed and progressed follicular lymphomas (FL), and contrast the observed evolutionary dynamics between these two subtypes. We next describe results from a spatial sampling study of high-grade serous (HGS) ovarian cancer, propose mechanisms of disease spread based on the observed clonal mixtures, and provide examples of diversification through subclonal acquisition of driver mutations and convergent evolution. Finally, we state implications of the techniques discussed in this review as a necessary but insufficient step on the path to predictive modelling of disease dynamics. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Clonal analysis of the cell lineages in the male flower of maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawe, R.K.; Freeling, M.

    1990-01-01

    The cell lineages in the male flower of maize were characterized using X-rays and transposable elements to produce clonal sectors differing in anthocyanin pigmentation. Less than 50% of the somatic tassel mutations (caused by reversion of unstable color mutations) that were visible on the anther wall were sexually transmitted by the male gametes, unless the sectors were larger than half the tassel circumference. This result is explained by showing that: (a) both the outer (LI) and inner (LII) lineages of the shoot apical meristem form a cell layer in the bilayered anther wall, and that anther pigmentation can be derived from either cell layer; and that (b) the male germ cells are derived almost exclusively from the LII. Therefore, while reversion events in either the LI or LII are visible on the anther, only the LII events are heritable. Reversion events that occur prior to the organization of the shoot apical meristem however, produce large (usually more than one-half tassel) sectors that include both the outer and inner lineages. In contrast to the high level of cell layer invasion previously reported during leaf development, during anther development less than 10(-3) cells in the LI invade the LII to form male gametes. The strong correlation between cell lineage and cell fate in the maize anther has implications for studies on plant evolution and the genetic improvement of cereals by DNA transformation

  12. Major clonal lineages in impetigo Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Machová, Ivana; Kostýlková, Karla; Doškař, Jiří

    2012-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven exfoliative toxin-producing (ET-positive) strains of Staphylococcus aureus collected in 23 Czech and one Slovak maternity hospitals from 1998 to 2011 were genotypically characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling, spa gene polymorphism analysis, and ETA-converting prophage carriage, which resulted in the identification of 21 genotypes grouped into 4 clonal complexes (CC). Ninety-one isolates carried the eta gene alone whilst 12 isolates harboured only the etb gene. Two new, to date not defined, spa types (t6644 and t6645) and 2 novel sequence types (ST2194 and ST2195) were identified in the set of strains under study. The predominant CC121 occurred in 13 Czech hospitals. CC15, CC9, and ST88 (CC88) exclusively included eta gene-positive strains while the strains belonging to ST121 harboured the eta and/or etb genes. This study highlights not only significant genomic diversity among impetigo strains and the distribution of major genotypes disseminated in the Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals, but also reveals their impact in epidermolytic infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of auxins and associated biochemical changes during clonal propagation of the biofuel plant - Jatropha curcas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochhar, Sunita; Singh, S.P.; Kochhar, V.K. [National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2008-12-15

    Rooting and sprouting behaviour of stem cuttings of biofuel plant Jatropha curcas and their performance under field conditions have been studied in relation to auxin application. Pretreatment with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) increased both the rooting and sprouting. Sprouting of buds on the cuttings preceded rooting. The rooting and sprouting in J. curcas was more with IBA than NAA. The endogenous auxin contents were found to increase almost 15 days prior to rooting, indicating that mobilization of auxin rather than the absolute contents of auxin may be involved in root initiation. Indole acetic acid oxidase (IAA-oxidase) seems to be involved for triggering and initiating the roots/root primordia, whereas peroxidase is involved in both root initiation and the elongation processes as supported by the peroxidase and IAA-oxidase isoenzyme analysis in the cuttings. The clonally propagated plants (cutting-raised plants) performed better in the field as compared to those raised from the seeds. The plants produced from auxin-treated cuttings produced fruits and seeds in the same year as compared to the plants raised from seeds or from untreated or control cuttings that did not produce any seeds in 1 year of this study. Jatropha plants in general produce seeds after 2-3 years. (author)

  14. Fatal toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed domestic cat from Brazil caused by Toxoplasma gondii clonal type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Fátima de Jesus Pena

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of the study was to report on a fatal case of feline toxoplasmosis with coinfection with the feline leukemia virus (FeLV. A domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus presented intense dyspnea and died three days later. In the necropsy, the lungs were firm, without collapse and with many white areas; moderate lymphadenomegaly and splenomegaly were also observed. The histopathological examination showed severe necrotic interstitial bronchopneumonia and mild necrotic hepatitis, associated with intralesional cysts and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii that were positive by anti-T. gondii immunohistochemical (IHC evaluation. The bone marrow showed chronic myeloid leukemia and the neoplastic cells were positive by anti-FeLV IHC evaluation. DNA extracted from lungs was positive for T. gondii by PCR targeting REP-529. T. gondii was characterized by PCR-RFLP and by the microsatellites technique. ToxoDB-PCR-RFLP #10, i.e. the archetypal type I, was identified. Microsatellite analysis showed that the strain was a variant of type I with two atypical alleles. This was the first time that a T. gondii clonal type I genotype was correlated with a case of acute toxoplasmosis in a host in Brazil.

  15. Selection on overdominant genes maintains heterozygosity along multiple chromosomes in a clonal lineage of honey bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, Frances; Allsopp, Michael H; Oldroyd, Benjamin P

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between fitness and genome-wide heterozygosity (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, HFCs) have been reported across a wide range of taxa. The genetic basis of these correlations is controversial: do they arise from genome-wide inbreeding ("general effects") or the "local effects" of overdominant loci acting in linkage disequilibrium with neutral loci? In an asexual thelytokous lineage of the Cape honey bee (Apis mellifera capensis), the effects of inbreeding have been homogenized across the population, making this an ideal system in which to detect overdominant loci, and to make inferences about the importance of overdominance on HFCs in general. Here we investigate the pattern of zygosity along two chromosomes in 42 workers from the clonal Cape honey bee population. On chromosome III (which contains the sex-locus, a gene that is homozygous-lethal) and chromosome IV we show that the pattern of zygosity is characterized by loss of heterozygosity in short regions followed by the telomeric restoration of heterozygosity. We infer that at least four selectively overdominant genes maintain heterozygosity on chromosome III and three on chromosome IV via local effects acting on neutral markers in linkage disequilibrium. We conclude that heterozygote advantage and local effects may be more common and evolutionarily significant than is generally appreciated. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Histopathological and clonal study of combined lobular and ductal carcinoma of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazaki, Eri; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Mizutani, Natsuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Isaka, Hirotsugu; Ito, Hiroki; Imi, Kentaro; Imoto, Shigeru; Kamma, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) clinically constitutes a risk factor for the subsequent development of either invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). In order to approach the possibility of this common precursor of both ILC and IDC, we investigated combined lobular and ductal carcinomas. Thirty-two cases of lobular carcinoma were picked up out of 773 cases of operated breast carcinomas. The histopathological detailed re-examination using immunostain of E-cadherin and β-catenin revealed a rather high frequency of combined lobular carcinomas than previous reports. Clinicopathologically, combined lobular carcinomas were younger and smaller than pure lobular carcinomas, and the cytological atypia was relatively low. These results suggested that combined lobular carcinomas could be detected in the earlier stage of breast cancer. Furthermore, the lobular and ductal components of combined carcinomas coexisted in the neighborhood and were distributed contiguously. The immunohistochemical phenotypes of both components were accorded in most combined cases. A genetic analysis using methylation-specific PCR on the HUMARA gene demonstrated that the same allele was inactivated in both lobular and ductal components in all detectable cases of combined carcinoma. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that both lobular and ductal components of combined carcinomas are clonal and derived from the LCIS as the common precursor lesion, which may contradict the conventional concept that the lobular and ductal carcinomas arise from distinct differentiation pathways. PMID:23782331

  17. Cellular aging (the Hayflick limit) and species longevity: a unification model based on clonal succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, D A

    1987-03-01

    A model is presented which proposes a specific cause-and-effect relationship between a limited cell division potential and the maximum lifespan of humans and other mammals. It is based on the clonal succession hypothesis of Kay which states that continually replicating cell beds (e.g. bone marrow, intestinal crypts, epidermis) could be composed of cells with short, well-defined division potentials. In this model, the cells of these beds are proposed to exist in an ordered hierarchy which establishes a specific sequence for cell divisions throughout the organism's lifespan. The depletion of division potential at all hierarchical levels leads to a loss of bed function and sets an intrinsic limit to species longevity. A specific hierarchy for cell proliferation is defined which allows the calculation of time to bed depletion and, ultimately, to organism mortality. The model allows the existence of a small number (n) of critical cell beds within the organism and defines organism death as the inability of any one of these beds to produce cells. The model is consistent with all major observations related to cellular and organismic aging. In particular, it links the PDLs (population doubling limit) observed for various species to their mean lifespan; it explains the slow decline in PDL as a function of age of the donor; it establishes a thermodynamically stable maximum lifespan for a disease-free population; and it can explain why tissue transplants outlive donors or hosts.

  18. Clonal evaluation of new ornamental pineapple hybrids to use as cut flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Silva Costa Junior

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Embrapa Cassava and Fruits has developed ornamental pineapple hybrids for several categories of ornamental use including cut flowers, potted plants and landscaping. The objective of this study was to carry out a clonal evaluation of two ornamental hybrids using quantitative and qualitative morphological descriptors to recommend these hybrids as new ornamental pineapple cultivars. Twenty plants of each hybrid (PL01 and PL04 were evaluated regarding the response to floral induction as well as the stability and homogeneity of the clones in two production cycles. The descriptive statistics were calculated and analyzed to determine the genetic distance based on the Gower algorithm. Four groups were formed, two using parental data and the other two containing the different hybrids that were evaluated in the two growing cycles. In the floral evaluation, the time from field planting to harvest of the stem as a cut flower was determined to be as long as 17 months in the first cycle and 13.5 months in the second cycle for both hybrids. They were characterized as a novelty in the flower market; they showed genetic stability and homogeneity and can be recommended as new cultivars of ornamental pineapple because they exhibit satisfactory quality and meet the market requirements.

  19. Clonal selection of vitis vinifera cv. malbec: Confluence of science and nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Biondolillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is not overstated that Argentinean viticulture identifies with Malbec, the vine which long ago was introduced in the country from France and which has marvelously naturalized here. However, the variety Malbec has many different expressions, depending very much on environmental and cultivating conditions and on natural mutations occurred over time. A modern viticulture cannot do without the capability of exactly identifying and differentiating clones of the same variety and from the ability to do that over contingency. This work on clonal selection, conceived and developed by a very polyvalent team, focuses exactly on defining instruments to unequivocally distinguish and select different clones and using these instruments to analyze, classify and select all different clones representing the highest variability of Malbec in Argentina ever sampled. The work bases on traditional instruments – phenotypic and enological analysis – and on a molecular marker selection program. Through the synergy of all these methods the team has come to the selection of 16 superior clones of Malbec and will proceed by sharing and mapping three of those clones on the country different micro-environments for grapevine growing regions, giving Argentinean viticulture a key instrument to identify its most valuable grape wine variety.

  20. Clonality of bacterial consortia in root canals and subjacent gingival crevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahitiyawa, Nipuna B; Chu, Frederick C S; Leung, Wai K; Yam, Wing C; Jin, Li Jian; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2015-02-01

    No oral niche can be considered to be segregated from the subjacent milieu because of the complex community behavior and nature of the oral biofilms. The aim of this study was to address the paucity of information on how these species are clonally related to the subjacent gingival crevice bacteria. We utilized a metagenomic approach of amplifying 16S rDNA from genomic DNA, cloning, sequencing and analysis using LIBSHUFF software to assess the genetic homogeneity of the bacterial species from two infected root canals and subjacent gingival crevices. The four niches studied yielded 186 clones representing 54 phylotypes. Clone library comparisons using LIBSHUFF software indicated that each niche was inhabited by a unique flora. Further, 42% of the clones were of hitherto unknown phylotypes indicating the extent of bacterial diversity, especially in infected root canals and subjacent gingival crevices. We believe data generated through this novel analytical tool shed new light on understanding oral microbial ecosystems. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Fatal infection in three Grey Slender Lorises (Loris lydekkerianus nordicus) caused by clonally related Trueperella pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagib, Samy; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Eisenberg, Tobias; Sammra, Osama; Lämmler, Christoph; Kämpfer, Peter; Schauerte, Nicole; Geiger, Christina; Kaim, Ute; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Becker, André; Abdulmawjood, Amir

    2017-08-29

    Trueperella pyogenes is a worldwide known bacterium causing mastitis, abortion and various other pyogenic infections in domestic animals like ruminants and pigs. In this study we represent the first case report of three unusual fatal infections of Grey Slender Lorises caused by Trueperella pyogenes. Meanwhile, this study represents the first in-depth description of the multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) on T. pyogenes species. Three Trueperella pyogenes were isolated from three different Grey Slender Lorises, which died within a period of two years at Frankfurt Zoo (Frankfurt am Main - Germany). The three Grey Slender Loris cases were suffering from severe sepsis and died from its complication. During the bacteriological investigation of the three cases, the T. pyogenes were isolated from different organisms in each case. The epidemiological relationship between the three isolates could be shown by four genomic DNA fingerprint methods (ERIC-PCR, BOX-PCR, (GTG) 5 -PCR, and RAPD-PCR) and by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) investigating four different housekeeping genes (fusA-tuf-metG-gyrA). In this study, we clearly showed by means of using three different rep-PCRs, by RAPD-PCR and by MLSA that the genomic fingerprinting of the investigated three T. pyogenes have the same clonal origin and are genetically identical. These results suggest that the same isolate contaminated the animal's facility and subsequently caused cross infection between the three different Grey Slender Lorises. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological approach concentrating on T. pyogenes using MLSA.

  2. Detection of clonal aberrations by cytogenetic analysis after different culture methods and by FISH in 129 patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenderny, Jutta; Goldmann, Claudia; Thede, Rebekka; Ebrecht, Monika; Korioth, Frank

    2014-01-01

    There are only a few cytogenetic analysis (CA) studies that directly compare the novel cultivation technique using immunostimulatory CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30/interleukin-2 (DSP30/IL2) with other culture methods. Therefore, parallel cultures of peripheral blood of 129 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients were set up in unstimulated cultures, in the presence of pokeweed medium (PWM), and with DSP30/IL2. Furthermore, CA results were compared with data obtained by FISH. Clonal aberrations were observed by CA in 6% of the cases in unstimulated cultures, in 27% of the cases with PWM, and in 40% of the cases with DSP30/IL2. Some clonal aberrations were detected by CA only with one culture method. Using 3 different culture methods, clonal aberrations were detected in 41% of the cases by CA and in 71% of the cases by FISH. Altogether, 78% of the cases exhibited clonal aberrations discovered by CA and FISH. Also, CA detected clonal aberrations not targeted by FISH in 7% of the cases, and FISH identified clonal aberrations not detected by CA in 36% of the cases. Our study demonstrates that the combined use of CA with different culture methods together with FISH increases our knowledge of the genetic complexity and heterogeneity in CLL pathogenesis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Measuring the Potential of Local Green Growth – An Analysis of Greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharpe, Samantha; Andersen, Maj Munch; Genoff, Rodin

    . Early results show that Copenhagen is well advanced on the path to a green economy; however, building on recent achievements, more can be done to accelerate the transition and secure Copenhagen’s leadership position in green industries and foster a green way of life for its citizens.......This briefing note summarises preliminary findings from the first case study in an OECD project to develop indicators for the green transition which can be used at the local level1. This new framework is being tested in regions in five countries: Denmark, Belgium, Chile, Germany and Luxembourg...

  4. Measuring the Potential of Local Green Growth – An Analysis of Greater Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Fernandez, Cristina; Sharpe, Samantha; Andersen, Maj Munch

    transition of Denmark. However, despite strong development of the cluster firms, the clean-tech industry is now at the centre of intense global competition and strategic choices will be essential. The report provides guidance for the choices to be made; highlighting those areas where further efforts need...

  5. Clonal expansion of CD4(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes in patients with IgG4-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, Hamid; Mahajan, Vinay S; Maehara, Takashi; Deshpande, Vikram; Della-Torre, Emanuel; Wallace, Zachary S; Kulikova, Maria; Drijvers, Jefte M; Daccache, Joe; Carruthers, Mollie N; Castelino, Flavia V; Stone, James R; Stone, John H; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-09-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic condition of unknown cause characterized by highly fibrotic lesions with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates. CD4(+) T cells constitute the major inflammatory cell population in IgG4-RD lesions. We used an unbiased approach to characterize CD4(+) T-cell subsets in patients with IgG4-RD based on their clonal expansion and ability to infiltrate affected tissue sites. We used flow cytometry to identify CD4(+) effector/memory T cells in a cohort of 101 patients with IgG4-RD. These expanded cells were characterized by means of gene expression analysis and flow cytometry. Next-generation sequencing of the T-cell receptor β chain gene was performed on CD4(+)SLAMF7(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and CD4(+)GATA3(+) TH2 cells in a subset of patients to identify their clonality. Tissue infiltration by specific T cells was examined by using quantitative multicolor imaging. CD4(+) effector/memory T cells with a cytolytic phenotype were expanded in patients with IgG4-RD. Next-generation sequencing revealed prominent clonal expansions of these CD4(+) CTLs but not CD4(+)GATA3(+) memory TH2 cells in patients with IgG4-RD. The dominant T cells infiltrating a range of inflamed IgG4-RD tissue sites were clonally expanded CD4(+) CTLs that expressed SLAMF7, granzyme A, IL-1β, and TGF-β1. Clinical remission induced by rituximab-mediated B-cell depletion was associated with a reduction in numbers of disease-associated CD4(+) CTLs. IgG4-RD is prominently linked to clonally expanded IL-1β- and TGF-β1-secreting CD4(+) CTLs in both peripheral blood and inflammatory tissue lesions. These active, terminally differentiated, cytokine-secreting effector CD4(+) T cells are now linked to a human disease characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Technical concept for a greater-confinement-disposal test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    Greater confinement disposal (GCO) has been defined by the National Low-Level Waste Program as the disposal of low-level waste in such a manner as to provide greater containment of radiation, reduce potential for migration or dispersion or radionuclides, and provide greater protection from inadvertent human and biological intrusions in order to protect the public health and safety. This paper discusses: the need for GCD; definition of GCD; advantages and disadvantages of GCD; relative dose impacts of GCD versus shallow land disposal; types of waste compatible with GCD; objectives of GCD borehole demonstration test; engineering and technical issues; and factors affecting performance of the greater confinement disposal facility

  7. Clonal replacement and expansion among invasive meningococcal isolates of serogroup W in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eva; Barret, Anne-Sophie; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Antona, Denise; Aouiti-Trabelsi, Myriam; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Parent du Châtelet, Isabelle; Levy-Bruhl, Daniel; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-02-01

    Neisseria meningitidis group W (NmW) belonging to the clonal complex ST-11 (NmW/cc11) spread in Europe and in France in 2000 and declined thereafter. In France, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) due to NmW increased again in 2012 and thereafter since 2015. Several sub-lineages of NmW/cc11 are circulating worldwide with successive epidemic waves. We aimed to describe recent epidemiological trends of NmW in France and to explore the microbiological and epidemiological characteristics associated with different NmW/cc11 sub-lineages. The epidemiology of NmW was described based on data collected through mandatory notification of IMD and strain typing data for culture-confirmed and PCR-confirmed cases for the period 2000-2016. All culture-confirmed cases due to NmW from the period 2010-2016 were characterised by whole genome sequencing (WGS). A detailed epidemiological analysis was performed for culture-confirmed cases on the basis of WGS data. During the period 2010-2016, genotyping was obtained for 148 cases including all the 132 culture-confirmed cases, among which 127 were matched with epidemiological data, and 16 PCR-confirmed cases (out of a total of 47 PCR-confirmed cases). An increase in IMD was observed in 2012 and was linked to isolates belonging to the "Anglo-French-Hajj" sub-lineage. These isolates have decreased significantly since 2013 and have been replaced by NmW/cc11 isolates related to the "South American - UK" sub-lineage which caused a marked increase in the number of cases of NmW in 2016. In this sub-lineage, the "original UK strain" was first detected in 2012 and increased thereafter, followed by the recently described "UK 2013-strain". Isolates related to the "South American-UK" sub-lineage represented 45% of all NmW cultured isolates from the whole period 2010-2016 but were the most frequent isolates in 2016, representing 76% of the total NmW typed isolates and 94% of the typed NmW/cc11 isolates. A changing pattern in the epidemiology of Nm

  8. Clonality, outer-membrane proteins profile and efflux pump in KPC- producing Enterobacter sp. in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Juliana Ferraz; Rizek, Camila; Marchi, Ana Paula; Guimaraes, Thais; Miranda, Lourdes; Carrilho, Claudia; Levin, Anna S; Costa, Silvia F

    2017-03-17

    Carbapenems resistance in Enterobacter spp. has increased in the last decade, few studies, however, described the mechanisms of resistance in this bacterium. This study evaluated clonality and mechanisms of carbapenems resistance in clinical isolates of Enterobacter spp. identified in three hospitals in Brazil (Hospital A, B and C) over 7-year. Antibiotics sensitivity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), PCR for carbapenemase and efflux pump genes were performed for all carbapenems-resistant isolates. Outer-membrane protein (OMP) was evaluated based on PFGE profile. A total of 130 isolates of Enterobacter spp were analyzed, 44/105 (41, 9%) E. aerogenes and 8/25 (32,0%) E. cloacae were resistant to carbapenems. All isolates were susceptible to fosfomycin, polymyxin B and tigecycline. KPC was present in 88.6% of E. aerogenes and in all E. cloacae resistant to carbapenems. The carbapenems-resistant E. aerogenes identified in hospital A belonged to six clones, however, a predominant clone was identified in this hospital over the study period. There is a predominant clone in Hospital B and Hospital C as well. The mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems differ among subtypes. Most of the isolates co-harbored blaKPC, blaTEM and /or blaCTX associated with decreased or lost of 35-36KDa and or 39 KDa OMP. The efflux pump AcrAB-TolC gene was only identified in carbapenems-resistant E. cloacae. There was a predominant clone in each hospital suggesting that cross-transmission of carbapenems-resistant Enterobacter spp. was frequent. The isolates presented multiple mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems including OMP alteration.

  9. Clonal expansion to anaplasia in Wilms` tumors is associated with p53 mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, J.; Beckwith, B.; Bardeesy, N. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)]|[McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    The genetics of Wilms` tumor (WT), a pediatric malignancy of the kidney, is complex. Three loci are implicated in WT initiation and include the WT1 tumor suppressor gene (residing at 11p13), an 11p15 locus, and a non-11p locus. As well, allelic loss at 16q24 in {approximately}20% of sporadic WTs suggests the location of (an) additional gene(s) involved in tumor progression. Initiation and progression in WTs is associated with multiple histological variants. Anaplasia is a rare WT subtype associated with poor prognosis and defined by enlarged and multipolar mitotic figures, a threefold nuclear enlargement (compared with adjacent nuclei of the same cell type), and hyperchromasia of the enlarged nuclei. We have previously demonstrated that p53 gene mutations are exclusively associated with anaplastic WTs, being absent from a large number of non-anaplastic WTs analyzed. To determine if such mutations are involved in clonal progression to anaplasia, we performed a retrospective analysis of histologically defined sections from tumor specimens. Six of ten WTs demonstrated p53 mutations by PCR-single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis. Two of these samples were paired, consisting of geographically demarcated anaplastic cells embedded within a non-anaplastic tumor bed. In these cases, p53 mutations were only present in the anaplastic region of the tumor. An overall decrease in the number of apoptotic cells was found associated with the anaplastic tumor region, compared to adjacent non-anaplastic tumor bed. These results indicate that p53 mutations arise during progression to anaplasia late in Wilms` tumor etiology and are associated with a more aggressive form of this cancer.

  10. Clonal chromosomal and genomic instability during human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells long-term culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Nikitina

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutagenesis often leads to appearance of genetic changes in cells. Although human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC are considered as genetically stable, there is a risk of genomic and structural chromosome instability and, therefore, side effects of cell therapy associated with long-term effects. In this study, the karyotype, genetic variability and clone formation analyses have been carried out in the long-term culture MSC from human gingival mucosa.The immunophenotype of MSC has been examined using flow cytofluorometry and short tandem repeat (STR analysis has been carried out for authentication. The karyotype has been examined using GTG staining and mFISH, while the assessment of the aneuploidy 8 frequency has been performed using centromere specific chromosome FISH probes in interphase cells.The immunophenotype and STR loci combination did not change during the process of cultivation. From passage 23 the proliferative activity of cultured MSCs was significantly reduced. From passage 12 of cultivation, clones of cells with stable chromosome aberrations have been identified and the biggest of these (12% are tetrasomy of chromosome 8. The random genetic and structural chromosomal aberrations and the spontaneous level of chromosomal aberrations in the hMSC long-term cultures were also described.The spectrum of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations in MSC long-term cultivation has been described. Clonal chromosomal aberrations have been identified. A clone of cells with tetrasomy 8 has been detected in passage 12 and has reached the maximum size by passage 18 before and decreased along with the reduction of proliferative activity of cell line by passage 26. At later passages, the MSC line exhibited a set of cells with structural variants of the karyotype with a preponderance of normal diploid cells. The results of our study strongly suggest a need for rigorous genetic analyses of the clone formation in cultured MSCs before

  11. Rohitukine inhibits in vitro adipogenesis arresting mitotic clonal expansion and improves dyslipidemia in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Salil; Shankar, Kripa; Beg, Muheeb; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Jagdale, Pankaj; Srivastava, Shishir; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Lakshmi, Vijai; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Bhatta, Rabi Shankar; Saxena, Anil Kumar; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth

    2014-06-01

    We developed a common feature pharmacophore model using known antiadipogenic compounds (CFPMA). We identified rohitukine, a reported chromone anticancer alkaloid as a potential hit through in silico mapping of the in-house natural product library on CFPMA. Studies were designed to assess the antiadipogenic potential of rohitukine. Rohitukine was isolated from Dysoxylum binacteriferum Hook. to ⬧95% purity. As predicted by CFPMA, rohitukine was indeed found to be an antiadipogenic molecule. Rohitukine inhibited lipid accumulation and adipogenic differentiation in a concentration- and exposure-time-dependent manner in 3T3-L1 and C3H10T1/2 cells. Rohitukine downregulated expression of PPARγ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), FAS, and glucose transporter 4. It also suppressed mRNA expression of LPL, sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) 1c, FAS, and aP2, the downstream targets of PPARγ. Rohitukine arrests cells in S phase during mitotic clonal expansion. Rohitukine was bioavailable, and 25.7% of orally administered compound reached systemic circulation. We evaluated the effect of rohitukine on dyslipidemia induced by high-fat diet in the hamster model. Rohitukine increased hepatic expression of liver X receptor α and decreased expression of SREBP-2 and associated targets. Rohitukine decreased hepatic and gonadal lipid accumulation and ameliorated dyslipidemia significantly. In summary, our strategy to identify a novel antiadipogenic molecule using CFPMA successfully resulted in identification of rohitukine, which confirmed antiadipogenic activity and also exhibited in vivo antidyslipidemic activity. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Long term persistence of clonal malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum lineages in the Colombian Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, Diego F; Nair, Shalini; Osorio, Lyda; Menon, Sanjay; Murillo, Claribel; Anderson, Tim J C

    2013-01-07

    Resistance to chloroquine and antifolate drugs has evolved independently in South America, suggesting that genotype - phenotype studies aimed at understanding the genetic basis of resistance to these and other drugs should be conducted in this continent. This research was conducted to better understand the population structure of Colombian Plasmodium falciparum in preparation for such studies. A set of 384 SNPs were genotyped in blood spot DNA samples from 447 P. falciparum infected subjects collected over a ten year period from four provinces of the Colombian Pacific coast to evaluate clonality, population structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD). Most infections (81%) contained a single predominant clone. These clustered into 136 multilocus genotypes (MLGs), with 32% of MLGs recovered from multiple (2 - 28) independent subjects. We observed extremely low genotypic richness (R = 0.42) and long persistence of MLGs through time (median = 537 days, range = 1 - 2,997 days). There was a high probability (>5%) of sampling parasites from the same MLG in different subjects within 28 days, suggesting caution is needed when using genotyping methods to assess treatment success in clinical drug trials. Panmixia was rejected as four well differentiated subpopulations (FST = 0.084 - 0.279) were identified. These occurred sympatrically but varied in frequency within the four provinces. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decayed more rapidly (r2 = 0.17 for markers Colombian populations have several advantages for association studies, because multiple clone infections are uncommon and LD decays over the scale of one or a few genes. However, the extensive population structure and low genotype richness will need to be accounted for when designing and analyzing association studies.

  13. Long term persistence of clonal malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum lineages in the Colombian Pacific region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echeverry Diego F

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance to chloroquine and antifolate drugs has evolved independently in South America, suggesting that genotype - phenotype studies aimed at understanding the genetic basis of resistance to these and other drugs should be conducted in this continent. This research was conducted to better understand the population structure of Colombian Plasmodium falciparum in preparation for such studies. Results A set of 384 SNPs were genotyped in blood spot DNA samples from 447 P. falciparum infected subjects collected over a ten year period from four provinces of the Colombian Pacific coast to evaluate clonality, population structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD. Most infections (81% contained a single predominant clone. These clustered into 136 multilocus genotypes (MLGs, with 32% of MLGs recovered from multiple (2 – 28 independent subjects. We observed extremely low genotypic richness (R = 0.42 and long persistence of MLGs through time (median = 537 days, range = 1 – 2,997 days. There was a high probability (>5% of sampling parasites from the same MLG in different subjects within 28 days, suggesting caution is needed when using genotyping methods to assess treatment success in clinical drug trials. Panmixia was rejected as four well differentiated subpopulations (FST = 0.084 - 0.279 were identified. These occurred sympatrically but varied in frequency within the four provinces. Linkage disequilibrium (LD decayed more rapidly (r2 = 0.17 for markers Conclusions We conclude that Colombian populations have several advantages for association studies, because multiple clone infections are uncommon and LD decays over the scale of one or a few genes. However, the extensive population structure and low genotype richness will need to be accounted for when designing and analyzing association studies.

  14. Clonal structure of Streptococcus sanguinis strains isolated from endocarditis cases and the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, T; Gilbert, S C; Klein, J; Warren, S; Wade, W G; Beighton, D

    2011-10-01

    A collection of Streptococcus sanguinis strains from patients with endocarditis (n = 21) and from the oral cavity (n = 34) was subjected to a multi-locus sequence typing analysis using seven housekeeping genes, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (carB), Co/Zn/Cd efflux system component (czcD), d-alanyl-d-alanine ligase (ddl), DNA polymerase III (dnaX), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (gdh), DNA-directed RNA polymerase, beta subunit (rpoB) and superoxide dismutase (sodA). The scheme was expanded by the inclusion of two the putative virulence genes, bacitracin-resistance protein (bacA) and saliva-binding protein (ssaB), to increase strain discrimination. Extensive intra-species recombination was apparent in all genes but inter-species recombination was also apparent with strains apparently harbouring gdh and ddl from unidentified sources and one isolate harboured a sodA allele apparently derived from Streptococcus oralis. The recombination/mutation ratio for the concatenated housekeeping gene sequences was 1.67 (95% confidence limits 1.25-2.72) and for the two virulence genes the r/m ratio was 3.99 (95% confidence limits 1.61-8.72); recombination was the major driver for genetic variation. All isolates were distinct and the endocarditis strains did not form distinct sub-clusters when the data were analysed using ClonalFrame. These data support the widely held opinion that infecting S. sanguinis strains are opportunistic human pathogens. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Clonal analysis of corn plant development. I. The development of the tassel and the ear shoot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johri, M.M.; Coe, E.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the tassel and the ear shoot has been investigated in corn (Zea mays L.). X irradiation of dry kernels and seedlings heterozygous for anthocyanin markers or for factors altering tassel and ear morphology results in the formation of clones (sectors) from cells of the apical meristem. Most tassels develop from 4 +/- 1 cells of the mature embryo. The expression of ramosa-1, tunicate, tassel seed-6, and vestigial is cell autonomous in the tassel. These genes act late in development and modify the developmental fate or decision of an individual clone and not of the whole group of cells producing a tassel. The ear shoot develops from lineages of one to three cells derived each from the L-I (outmost cell layer) and L-II (second cell layer) of the apical meristem. Typically the clones start in the ear shoot (in the husks and possibly in the cob), extend upward in an internode, continue along the margin of the leaf sheath or leaf blade at the node above, and terminate in this or the next higher leaf. The separation of lineages for ear shoot and internode occurs in the period around 13 days after sowing. The analysis of clonal boundaries shows that a small number of embryonic cells become isolated in their developmental capacity. This commitment process appears to be analogous to the process of compartmentation in the imaginal disks of fruit flies. The extent of proliferation of individual cells within a group of highly flexible and any particular clone does not generate a specific part of a tassel or an ear shoot. There must be cellular communication between various clones so that the overall size and morphology of an organ remain normal and more or less fixed. Thus the process of development in plants is also highly regulative in nature and shares many features in common with development in fruit flies

  16. Acinetobacter baumannii in intensive care unit: A novel system to study clonal relationship among the isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardis Francesca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nosocomial infections surveillance system must be strongly effective especially in highly critic areas, such as Intensive Care Units (ICU. These areas are frequently an epidemiological epicentre for transmission of multi-resistant pathogens, like Acinetobacter baumannii. As an epidemic outbreak occurs it is very important to confirm or exclude the genetic relationship among the isolates in a short time. There are several molecular typing systems used with this aim. The Repetitive sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR has been recognized as an effective method and it was recently adapted to an automated format known as the DiversiLab system. Methods In the present study we have evaluated the combination of a newly introduced software package for the control of hospital infection (VIGI@ct with the DiversiLab system. In order to evaluate the reliability of the DiversiLab its results were also compared with those obtained using f-AFLP. Results The combination of VIGI@ct and DiversiLab enabled an earlier identification of an A. baumannii epidemic cluster, through the confirmation of the genetic relationship among the isolates. This cluster regards 56 multi-drug-resistant A. baumannii isolates from several specimens collected from 13 different patients admitted to the ICU in a ten month period. The A. baumannii isolates were clonally related being their similarity included between 97 and 100%. The results of the DiversiLab were confirmed by f-AFLP analysis. Conclusion The early identification of the outbreak has led to the prompt application of operative procedures and precautions to avoid the spread of pathogen. To date, 6 months after the last A. baumannii isolate, no other related case has been identified.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity or speciation? A case from a clonal marine organism

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    Yoshioka Paul M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clonal marine organisms exhibit high levels of morphological variation. Morphological differences may be a response to environmental factors but also they can be attributed to accumulated genetic differences due to disruption of gene flow among populations. In this study, we examined the extensive morphological variation (of 14 characters in natural populations observed in the gorgonian Eunicea flexuosa, a widely distributed Caribbean octocoral. Eco-phenotypic and genetic effects were evaluated by reciprocal transplants of colonies inhabiting opposite ends of the depth gradient and analysis of population genetics of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, respectively. Results Significant differences (P 17 m. A discriminant function analysis based on a priori univariate and multivariate analyses (which separated the colonies in morphotypes correctly classified 93% of the colonies for each environment. Light, water motion and sediment transport might influence the distribution of the two morphotypes. Reaction norms of morphological characters of colonies reciprocally transplanted showed gradual significant changes through the 15 months of transplantation. Sclerites of shallow water colonies became larger when transplanted to deeper environments and vice versa, but neither of the two transplanted groups overlapped with the residents' morphology. Genetic analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear genes suggested that such discrete morphology and non-overlapping phenotypic plasticity is correlated with the presence of two independent evolutionary lineages. The distribution of the lineages is non-random and may be related to adaptational responses of each lineage to the environmental demands of each habitat. Conclusion The extensive distribution and ample morphological variation of Eunicea flexuosa corresponds to two distinct genetic lineages with narrower distributions and more rigid phenotypic plasticity than the original description. The

  18. The influence of alternative plant propagation and stand establishment techniques on survival and growth of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoids Bartr.) clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald J. Kaczmarek; Randall Rousseau; Jeff A. Wright; Brian Wachelka

    2014-01-01

    Four eastern cottonwood clones, including standard operational clone ST66 and three advanced clonal selections were produced and included in a test utilizing five different plant propagation methods. Despite relatively large first-year growth differences among clones, all clones demonstrated similar responses to the treatments and clone × cutting treatment interactions...

  19. Assessing Human Impacts on the Greater Akaki River, Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We assessed the impacts of human activities on the Greater Akaki River using physicochemical parameters and macroinvertebrate metrics. Physicochemical samples and macroinvertebrates were collected bimonthly from eight sites established on the Greater Akaki River from February 2006 to April 2006. Eleven metrics ...

  20. Comparative Education in Greater China: Contexts, Characteristics, Contrasts and Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Mark; Qin, Gui

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of comparative education in Greater China (mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau) has been influenced by size, culture, political ideologies, standard of living, and colonialism. Similarities and differences in conceptions of comparative education are identified among the four components and between Greater China and other…

  1. Greater temperature sensitivity of plant phenology at colder sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prevey, Janet; Vellend, Mark; Ruger, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Warmer temperatures are accelerating the phenology of organisms around the world. Temperature sensitivity of phenology might be greater in colder, higher latitude sites than in warmer regions, in part because small changes in temperature constitute greater relative changes in thermal balance...

  2. Breeding of Greater and Lesser Flamingos at Sua Pan, Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to fledging was unknown owing to the rapid drying of the pan in late March 1999. No Greater Flamingo breeding was seen that season. Exceptional flooding during 1999–2000 produced highly favourable breeding conditions, with numbers of Greater and Lesser Flamingos breeding estimated to be 23 869 and 64 287 pairs, ...

  3. Surgical anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The knowledge of the anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to occipital artery is important for the surgeon. Blockage or surgical release of greater occipital nerve is clinically effective in reducing or eliminating chronic migraine symptoms. Aim: The aim of this research was to study the anatomy of ...

  4. Surgical anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nancy Mohamed El Sekily

    2014-08-19

    Aug 19, 2014 ... Abstract Introduction: The knowledge of the anatomy of greater occipital nerve and its relation to occipital artery is important for the surgeon. Blockage or surgical release of greater occipital nerve is clinically effective in reducing or eliminating chronic migraine symptoms. Aim: The aim of this research was to ...

  5. INDUSTRIAL LAND DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURING DECONCENTRATION IN GREATER JAKARTA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudalah, Delik; Viantari, Dimitra; Firman, Tommy; Woltjer, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Industrial land development has become a key feature of urbanization in Greater Jakarta, one of the largest metropolitan areas in Southeast Asia. Following Suharto's market-oriented policy measures in the late 1980s, private developers have dominated the land development projects in Greater Jakarta.

  6. Corporate Stability and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    He, Kathy S.; Morck, Randall; Yeung, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Greater instability in a country's list of top corporations is associated with faster economic growth. This faster growth is primarily due to faster growth in total factor productivity in industrialized countries, and faster capital accumulation in developing countries. These findings are consistent with the view that economic growth is more closely tied to the rise of new large firms than to the prosperity of established large firms. Although a stable list of leading corporations is highly c...

  7. Innovative Payment Solutions in Agricultural Value Chain as a Means for Greater Financial Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Tushar; Krishna, Nagahari; Vickers, Venetia; Menezes, Antonio; Raghavendra, M.

    2010-01-01

    The efforts for financial inclusion need to be designed with a vision beyond just the percentage of the country population with access to a bank account or a no frills account; to focus more on how this can enhance the capability and convenience for the un-banked and under-banked, specifically the small and marginal farmers in this case, to enable greater transparency, accountability, efficiency and convenient access to necessary facilities. The growth of ICT industry and mobile telecom revol...

  8. Delayed growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; Growth delay Images Toddler development References Cooke DW, Divall SA, Radovick S. Normal and aberrant growth in children. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, ...

  9. Estudo de algumas propriedades mecânicas da madeira de um híbrido clonal de Eucalyptus urophylla X Eucalyptus grandis Study of some mechanical properties of wood in a clonal hybrid of Eucalyptus urophylla X Eucalyptus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Gomes Gonçalves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A procura por madeiras oriundas de reflorestamentos destinadas à serraria é uma realidade já há muitos anos, principalmente aquelas das espécies do gênero Eucalyptus. Visando buscar novas informações importantes para esse mercado, este trabalho objetivou determinar algumas propriedades mecânicas da madeira de um híbrido clonal de Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis de duas idades e provenientes de talhadia simples e de reforma. Os resultados indicaram que a madeira desse híbrido apresenta boas características tecnológicas, destacando-se a segunda tora (a partir de 3 m com as melhores propriedades de flexão estática (Módulo de Elasticidade - MOE e Módulo de Ruptura - MOR e Compressão Axial das fibras. As árvores de maior idade (166 meses e que sofreram dois desbastes apresentaram as melhores propriedades de flexão estática e compressão axial.The search for wood originated from reforestations destined to sawmill has been observed for many years, mainly for the Eucalyptus species. Searching for information to assist this market, the aim of this study was to determine some mechanical properties of the wood from a Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis clonal hybrid, at two different ages and coming from coppice and reform. The results show that the wood of this clonal hybrid presents good technological characteristics and is the second best log (starting from 3,0 m, as to static bending properties (Module of Elasticity - MOE and Module of Rupture - MOR. The oldest trees (166 months - E2 which suffered two thinning presented the best results for the property of static bending and axial crushing (CA.

  10. Clonal progression during the T cell-dependent B cell antibody response depends on the immunoglobulin DH gene segment repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad eTrad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the third complementarity determining region of the Ig H chain is constrained by natural selection of immunoglobulin diversity (DH sequence. To test the functional significance of this constraint in the context of thymus-dependent (TD immune responses, we immunized BALB/c mice with WT or altered DH sequence with 2-phenyloxazolone-coupled chicken serum albumin (phOx-CSA. We chose this antigen because studies of the humoral immune response to the hapten phOx were instrumental in the development of the current theoretical framework on which our understanding of the forces driving TD responses is based. To allow direct comparison, we used the classic approach of generating monoclonal Ab (mAb from various stages of the immune response to phOx to assess the effect of changing the sequence of the DH on clonal expansion, class switching and affinity maturation, which are hallmarks of TD responses. Compared to WT, TD-induced humoral IgM as well as IgG antibody production in the D-altered D-DFS and D-iD strains were significantly reduced. An increased prevalence of IgM producing hybridomas from late primary, secondary, and tertiary memory responses suggested either impaired class switch recombination (CSR or impaired clonal expansion of class switched B cells with phOx reactivity. Neither of the D-altered strains demonstrated the restriction in the VH/VL repertoire, the elimination of VH1 family-encoded antibodies, the focusing of the distribution of CDR-H3 lengths, or the selection for the normally dominant Ox1 clonotype which all are hallmarks of the anti-phOx response in WT mice. These changes in clonal selection and expansion as well as class switch recombination indicate that the genetic constitution of the DH locus, which has been selected by evolution, can strongly influence the functional outcome of a TD humoral response.

  11. Self-mating in the definitive host potentiates clonal outbreaks of the apicomplexan parasites Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii.

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    Jered M Wendte

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-encysting coccidia, including Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, are heterogamous parasites with sexual and asexual life stages in definitive and intermediate hosts, respectively. During its sexual life stage, T. gondii reproduces either by genetic out-crossing or via clonal amplification of a single strain through self-mating. Out-crossing has been experimentally verified as a potent mechanism capable of producing offspring possessing a range of adaptive and virulence potentials. In contrast, selfing and other life history traits, such as asexual expansion of tissue-cysts by oral transmission among intermediate hosts, have been proposed to explain the genetic basis for the clonal population structure of T. gondii. In this study, we investigated the contributing roles self-mating and sexual recombination play in nature to maintain clonal population structures and produce or expand parasite clones capable of causing disease epidemics for two tissue encysting parasites. We applied high-resolution genotyping against strains isolated from a T. gondii waterborne outbreak that caused symptomatic disease in 155 immune-competent people in Brazil and a S. neurona outbreak that resulted in a mass mortality event in Southern sea otters. In both cases, a single, genetically distinct clone was found infecting outbreak-exposed individuals. Furthermore, the T. gondii outbreak clone was one of several apparently recombinant progeny recovered from the local environment. Since oocysts or sporocysts were the infectious form implicated in each outbreak, the expansion of the epidemic clone can be explained by self-mating. The results also show that out-crossing preceded selfing to produce the virulent T. gondii clone. For the tissue encysting coccidia, self-mating exists as a key adaptation potentiating the epidemic expansion and transmission of newly emerged parasite clones that can profoundly shape parasite population genetic structures or cause

  12. Self-mating in the definitive host potentiates clonal outbreaks of the apicomplexan parasites Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendte, Jered M; Miller, Melissa A; Lambourn, Dyanna M; Magargal, Spencer L; Jessup, David A; Grigg, Michael E

    2010-12-23

    Tissue-encysting coccidia, including Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, are heterogamous parasites with sexual and asexual life stages in definitive and intermediate hosts, respectively. During its sexual life stage, T. gondii reproduces either by genetic out-crossing or via clonal amplification of a single strain through self-mating. Out-crossing has been experimentally verified as a potent mechanism capable of producing offspring possessing a range of adaptive and virulence potentials. In contrast, selfing and other life history traits, such as asexual expansion of tissue-cysts by oral transmission among intermediate hosts, have been proposed to explain the genetic basis for the clonal population structure of T. gondii. In this study, we investigated the contributing roles self-mating and sexual recombination play in nature to maintain clonal population structures and produce or expand parasite clones capable of causing disease epidemics for two tissue encysting parasites. We applied high-resolution genotyping against strains isolated from a T. gondii waterborne outbreak that caused symptomatic disease in 155 immune-competent people in Brazil and a S. neurona outbreak that resulted in a mass mortality event in Southern sea otters. In both cases, a single, genetically distinct clone was found infecting outbreak-exposed individuals. Furthermore, the T. gondii outbreak clone was one of several apparently recombinant progeny recovered from the local environment. Since oocysts or sporocysts were the infectious form implicated in each outbreak, the expansion of the epidemic clone can be explained by self-mating. The results also show that out-crossing preceded selfing to produce the virulent T. gondii clone. For the tissue encysting coccidia, self-mating exists as a key adaptation potentiating the epidemic expansion and transmission of newly emerged parasite clones that can profoundly shape parasite population genetic structures or cause devastating disease

  13. Clonal composition of human ovarian cancer based on copy number analysis reveals a reciprocal relation with oncogenic mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kazuko; Ukita, Masayo; Schmidt, Jeanette; Wu, Longyang; De Velasco, Marco A; Roter, Alan; Jevons, Luis; Nishio, Kazuto; Mandai, Masaki

    2017-10-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity of cancer cells remains largely unexplored. Here we investigated the composition of ovarian cancer and its biological relevance. A whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism array was applied to detect the clonal composition of 24 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of human ovarian cancer. Genome-wide segmentation data consisting of the log2 ratio (log2R) and B allele frequency (BAF) were used to calculate an estimate of the clonal composition number (CC number) for each tumor. Somatic mutation profiles of cancer-related genes were also determined for the same 24 samples by next-generation sequencing. The CC number was estimated successfully for 23 of the 24 cancer samples. The mean ± SD value for the CC number was 1.7 ± 1.1 (range of 0-4). A somatic mutation in at least one gene was identified in 22 of the 24 ovarian cancer samples, with the mutations including those in the oncogenes KRAS (29.2%), PIK3CA (12.5%), BRAF (8.3%), FGFR2 (4.2%), and JAK2 (4.2%) as well as those in the tumor suppressor genes TP53 (54.2%), FBXW7 (8.3%), PTEN (4.2%), and RB1 (4.2%). Tumors with one or more oncogenic mutations had a significantly lower CC number than did those without such a mutation (1.0 ± 0.8 versus 2.3 ± 0.9, P = 0.0027), suggesting that cancers with driver oncogene mutations are less heterogeneous than those with other mutations. Our results thus reveal a reciprocal relation between oncogenic mutation status and clonal composition in ovarian cancer using the established method for the estimation of the CC number. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of a clonal bank of Caesalpinia spinosa (Mol. O. Kuntz by selection of plus trees and grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny E Nuñez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In Ecuador, plant propagation techniques are not available commercially to establish clonal banks of Caesalpinia spinosa (Mol. O. Kuntz (guarango plus trees, which limits the development of in vitro propagation protocols of this specie. The objective of the present work was to establish a clonal bank of C. spinosa by selecting plus trees and grafting. Guarango trees belonging to the province of Chimborazo, Guano canton were selected based on total height, height at the beginning of the crown, height of crown, crown surface, crown symmetry, flowering, fruit production and content of tannins in the pod. The patron plants to make the grafts were obtained from scarified seeds, soaked for 48 hours at room temperature and planted in beds of 1.0 x 3.0 m. At 40 days, the seedlings were transplanted into pockets and at 16 months the grafts were made in the patron plants. Three types of graft were used (simple slit in the patron, single slit in the spike and bud grafting. For each, 100 patron were used. Of the eight trees plus collected in the field, the ecotype CHSt03 was used to make the grafts. It was showed the highest total height (6.6m, height at the beginning of the cup (2.2m, cup surface (> 70%, cup volume (> 10%, cup symmetry (1, fruit (40kg / tree and total polyphenol content in pods (5870 μgEAGgMS-1. The graft by simple slit in the patron had the highest stuck percentage (80%. These results allowed to establish a clonal bank of 80 plants grafted of C. spinosa of the ecotype CHSt03, which establish the bases to develop protocols for in vitro propagation of this forest species, native of Ecuador.   Keywords: biodiversity, biotechnology, forestry, industry, tannins

  15. Fractures of the greater trochanter following total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Ole-Christian L; Maansson, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    We studied the incidence of greater trochanteric fractures at our department following THR. In all we examined 911 patients retrospectively and found the occurance of a greater trochanteric fracture to be 3%. Patients with fractures had significantly poorer outcome on Oxford Hip score, Pain VAS, Satisfaction VAS and EQ-5D compared to THR without fractures. Greater trochanteric fracture following THR is one of the most common complications following THR. It has previously been thought to have little impact on the overall outcome following THR, but our study suggests otherwise.

  16. Competition between clonal plasma cells and normal cells for potentially overlapping bone marrow niches is associated with a progressively altered cellular distribution in MGUS vs myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, B; Pérez-Andrés, M; Vídriales, M-B; Almeida, J; de las Heras, N; Mateos, M-V; López-Corral, L; Gutiérrez, N C; Blanco, J; Oriol, A; Hernández, M T; de Arriba, F; de Coca, A G; Terol, M-J; de la Rubia, J; González, Y; Martín, A; Sureda, A; Schmidt-Hieber, M; Schmitz, A; Johnsen, H E; Lahuerta, J-J; Bladé, J; San-Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    2011-04-01

    Disappearance of normal bone marrow (BM) plasma cells (PC) predicts malignant transformation of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering myeloma (SMM) into symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). The homing, behavior and survival of normal PC, but also CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), B-cell precursors, and clonal PC largely depends on their interaction with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) expressing, potentially overlapping BM stromal cell niches. Here, we investigate the distribution, phenotypic characteristics and competitive migration capacity of these cell populations in patients with MGUS, SMM and MM vs healthy adults (HA) aged >60 years. Our results show that BM and peripheral blood (PB) clonal PC progressively increase from MGUS to MM, the latter showing a slightly more immature immunophenotype. Of note, such increased number of clonal PC is associated with progressive depletion of normal PC, B-cell precursors and CD34(+) HSC in the BM, also with a parallel increase in PB. In an ex vivo model, normal PC, B-cell precursors and CD34(+) HSC from MGUS and SMM, but not MM patients, were able to abrogate the migration of clonal PC into serial concentrations of SDF-1. Overall, our results show that progressive competition and replacement of normal BM cells by clonal PC is associated with more advanced disease in patients with MGUS, SMM and MM.

  17. PCR-based clonality analysis of B-cell lymphomas in paraffin-embedded tissues: diagnostic value of immunoglobulin kappa and lambda light chain gene rearrangement investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Khaled; Trimeche, Mounir; Ziadi, Sonia; Sriha, Badreddine; Mokni, Moncef; Korbi, Sadok

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis, employed for detecting immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangements, has become a diagnostic tool widely used in the investigation of B-cell lymphomas, but the overall sensitivity of these methods does not exceed 80%, notably in germinal center (GC) and post-GC B-cell origin lymphomas. Many PCR strategies devised for detecting immunoglobulin light chain (IgL) gene rearrangements have been developed to enhance the clonality detection rates. However, the feasibility of these methods in routine clinical diagnosis using paraffin-embedded tissues has not yet been investigated sufficiently. We studied a large series of 108 cases of B-cell lymphomas, as well as 20 reactive lymphoid tissues using degenerate primers to amplify immunoglobulin kappa (Igkappa) and lambda (Iglambda) light chain genes. B-cell clonality was further investigated using semi-nested PCR for IgH gene rearrangements. B-cell clonality was detected in 74%, 56.5%, and 43.5% of cases using IgH, Igkappa, and Iglambda PCR, respectively. By combining these methods, the clonality detection rate increased to 93.5%. Only polyclonal patterns were noted in reactive lymphoid samples. We concluded that in addition to the established methods for IgH analysis, a PCR-based approach for IgL gene rearrangements analysis improves the clonality detection rate in over 90% of B-cell lymphoma cases using routine histological specimens with poor preservation of the genomic DNA.

  18. Clonal evolution and progression of 20-methylcholanthrene-induced squamous cell carcinoma of mouse epidermis as revealed by DNA instability and other malignancy markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Hirai

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the clonal evolution of skin malignant lesions by repeated topical applications of 20- methylcholanthrene (20-MC to the skin, which induces hyperplastic epidermis, papillomatous lesion and invasive carcinoma in mice. The lesions were examined histologically and immunohistochemically with anti-single-stranded DNA after acid hydrolysis (DNA-instability test, p53, VEGF, DFF45, PCNA and AgNORs parameters analyses. Multiple clones with increased DNA instability comparable to that of invasive carcinoma were noted in early-stage (2-6 weeks hyperplastic epidermis, and their number increased in middle (7-11 weeks, and late-stages (12-25 weeks of hyperplastic epidermis, indicating that they belong to the malignancy category. All papillomatous lesions and invasive carcinomas showed a positive DNA-instability test. Positive immunostaining for various biomarkers and AgNORs parameters appeared in clones with a positive DNA-instability test in earlyor middle-stage hyperplastic epidermis, and markedly increased in late-stage hyperplastic epidermis, papillomatous lesions and invasive carcinomas. The percentage of PCNA-positive vascular endothelial cells was significantly higher in VEGFpositive lesions with a positive DNA-instability test and became higher toward the late-stage of progression. Cut-woundings were made to papillomatous and invasive carcinoma lesions, and the regeneration activity of vascular endothelial cells was determined by using flash labeling with tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR. In small papillomatous lesions, vascular endothelial cells showed regenerative response, but the response was weak in large lesions. No such response was noted in invasive carcinomas; rather, cut-wounding induced collapse of blood vessels, which in turn induced massive coagulative necrosis of cancer cells. These responses can be interpreted to reflect exhausted vascular growth activity due to excessive stimulation by VEGF-overexpression, which was persistently

  19. Temporal anomaly detection: an artificial immune approach based on T cell activation, clonal size regulation and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Mário J; Correia, Manuel E

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an artificial immune system (AIS) based on Grossman's tunable activation threshold (TAT) for temporal anomaly detection. We describe the generic AIS framework and the TAT model adopted for simulating T Cells behaviour, emphasizing two novel important features: the temporal dynamic adjustment of T Cells clonal size and its associated homeostasis mechanism. We also present some promising results obtained with artificially generated data sets, aiming to test the appropriateness of using TAT in dynamic changing environments, to distinguish new unseen patterns as part of what should be detected as normal or as anomalous. We conclude by discussing results obtained thus far with artificially generated data sets.

  20. Clonal relationships among penicillin-susceptible, multiresistant serotype 6B Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered in Greece and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrogiannopoulos, G A; Doit, C; Grivea, I N; Geslin, P; Bingen, E

    2001-01-01

    In January 1996 the emergence of penicillin-susceptible, multiresistant serotype 6B Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was observed in young carriers in the city of Patras, located in the southwestern region of Greece. Later, a significant spread of pneumococci with this unusual phenotype was noted in carriers living in various other areas of the country. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism of the ribosomal RNA genes, clonal relationships were found between these Greek strains and serotype 6B penicillin-susceptible, multiresistant pneumococci isolated in France between January 1992 and September 1996. The French and Greek isolates appear to have a common ancestry.