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Sample records for graves eye disease

  1. Classification of the eye changes of Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Prummel, M. F.; Mourits, M. P.; Koornneef, L.; Buller, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Classification of the eye changes of Graves' disease may have clinical use in the description of the present eye state, in the assessment of treatment results, and in the choice of therapy. Requirements for any classification system should include simplicity, clinical nature (i.e., easily carried

  2. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  3. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones can produce a number of effects, including fever, profuse sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, delirium, severe weakness, seizures, markedly irregular heartbeat, yellow skin and eyes (jaundice), severe low blood pressure, ...

  4. Current Concepts in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Christian M.; Champion, Bernard L.; Wall, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the developed world. It is caused by an immune defect in genetically susceptible individuals in whom the production of unique antibodies results in thyroid hormone excess and glandular hyperplasia. When unrecognized, Graves' disease impacts negatively on quality of life and poses serious risks of psychosis, tachyarrhythmia and cardiac failure. Beyond the thyroid, Graves' disease has diverse soft-tissue effects that reflect its systemic autoimmune nature. Thyroid eye disease is the most common of these manifestations and is important to recognise given its risk to vision and potential to deteriorate in response to radioactive iodine ablation. In this review we discuss the investigation and management of Graves' disease, the recent controversy regarding the hepatotoxicity of propylthiouracil and the emergence of novel small-molecule thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor ligands as potential targets in the treatment of Graves' disease. PMID:23148179

  5. Evidence for the possible occurrence of Grave's disease in a blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Benoît; Giorgiadis, Marine; Feirrera, Xavier; Lefaux, Brice; Schohn, Christophe; Lemberger, Karin

    2018-03-01

    The blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) is classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as critically endangered. A 23-year-old male housed at Mulhouse Zoo presented with lethargy, polyphagia, alopecia, and chronic weight loss. Clinical examination suggested an endocrine pathology such as hyperthyroidism. Secondary examinations included cervical ultrasound, thyroid biopsy, and scintigraphy. The latter revealed elevated thyroid activity. Blood analysis was performed to measure the level of anti-receptor thyroid-stimulating hormone antibodies, which allowed us to test the autoimmune hypothesis. The high level of antibodies together with levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone and the scintigraphy images led to the diagnosis of Grave's disease. Carbimazole treatment followed by thyroidectomy resulted in a quick weight gain and general improvement in health status. The following breeding season, the treated individual sired an offspring. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of likely Grave's disease in a non-human primate.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Graves disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Graves disease Graves disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Graves disease is a condition that affects the function of ...

  7. Grave's Eye disease developing following radioiodine treatment for toxic nodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahrani, A A; Rangan, S; Moulik, P

    2007-07-01

    The development of Grave's ophthalmopathy (GO) following radioiodine (RI) treatment for Grave's thyrotoxicosis, though controversial, is well described. The development of ophthalmopathy following RI treatment for toxic nodular goitre is much less recognised. We report a 49 year-old female patient who developed thyrotoxicosis and GO after receiving RI treatment for toxic nodular goitre and we also review the relevant literature.

  8. Graves' ophthalmopathy evaluated by infrared eye-movement recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldon, S.E.; Unsoeld, R.

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen patients with varying degrees of Graves' ophthalmopathy were examined using high-resolution infrared oculography to determine peak velocities for horizontal eye movements between 3 degrees and 30 degrees. As severity of the orbital disease increased, peak velocities became substantially lower. Vertical-muscle surgery failed to have any effect on peak velocity of horizontal eye movements. In contrast, orbital decompression caused notable improvement in peak velocity of eye movements. Eye-movement recordings, which provide a measure of extraocular muscle function rather than structure, may provide a safe, sensitive, and accurate method for classifying and following up patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy

  9. [Grave's disease in 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Jacques

    2009-04-08

    Grave's disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland characterized by hyperthyroidism, a homogenous goiter and occasionally an ophtalmopathy. It occurs in less than 1% of the population with a large predominance in women (10/1). Treatment is directed to inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis with carbimazole during 12-18 months. Recurrence rates after stopping treatment is about 50%; in these patients, radioactive iodine is the preferred treatment.

  10. Microchimerism in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofré, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Microchimerism is the presence of cells from one individual in another genetically distinct individual. Pregnancy is the main cause of natural microchimerism through transplacental bidirectional cell trafficking between mother and fetus. The consequences of pregnancy-related microchimerism are under active investigation. However, many authors have suggested a close relationship linking fetal microchimerism and the development of autoimmune diseases. It has been more than ten years now since the demonstration of the presence of a significant high number of fetal microchimeric cells residing in thyroid glands from operated patients with Graves' disease. This intrathyroidal fetal microchimerism is an attractive candidate mechanism for the modulation of Graves' disease in pregnancy and the postpartum period. PMID:22577597

  11. Genetic susceptibility to Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Qiuying

    2013-06-01

    The variety of clinical presentations of eye changes in patients with Graves' disease (GD) suggests that complex interactions between genetic, environmental, endogenous and local factors influence the severity of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). It is thought that the development of GO might be influenced by genetic factors and environmental factors, such as cigarette smoking. At present, however, the role of genetic factors in the development of GO is not known. On the basis of studies with candidate genes and other genetic approaches, several susceptibility loci in GO have been proposed, including immunological genes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), regulatory T-cell genes and thyroid-specific genes. This review gives a brief overview of the current range of major susceptibility genes found for GD.

  12. Graves' disease following subacute thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshishige; Kurihara, Hideo; Sasaki, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Subacute thyroiditis is a painful, inflammatory disease frequently accompanied with fever. It is suspected to be a viral infectious disease, while Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease. Thus, there appears to be no etiological relationship between the two diseases. A total of 25,267 thyroid disease patients made their first visits to our thyroid clinic during a period of 24 years between 1985 and 2008. Among them, subacute thyroiditis and Graves' disease accounted for 918 patients (3.6%) and 4,617 patients (18.2%), respectively. We have encountered 7 patients (one male and six female) with subacute thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in this period (0.15% of the 4,617 patients with Graves' disease and 0.76% of the 918 patients with subacute thyroiditis). The age ranges were 40~66 years (mean 48.7 years) at the onset of subacute thyroiditis. The intervals between the onsets of subacute thyroiditis and Graves' disease were 1~8 months (mean 4.7 months). Because Graves' disease was preceded by subacute thyroiditis, the signs and symptoms of both diseases were evident together in the intervening period. The diagnosis of Graves' disease in those patients is always difficult because of atypical signs and symptoms and an unclear onset time. The causes of the Graves'disease that followed subacute thyroiditis are still unknown. However, the inflammatory nature of subacute thyroiditis may lead to the activation of the autoimmune response in susceptible subjects, resulting in the onset of Graves' disease. Graves' disease should be suspected when a high blood level of thyroid hormone persists after subacute thyroiditis.

  13. The Eye/Brain Radioactivity Ratio for Assessment of Graves Ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. W.; Sung, S. K.; Suh, K. S.; Park, W.; Choi, D. J.; Kim, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    In Graves' disease, changes in orbital tissue and structure are caused by inflammatory infiltration, which induces increase of capillary permeability and breakdown of blood-tissue barriers. Using the uptake of 99m Tc-DTPA in inflammatory lesion, Eye/Brain radioactivity ratios in brain scintigraphy were evaluated in 15 normal controls and 40 Graves' patients. The results were as follows; 1) Eye/Brain radioactivity ratio was significantly higher in Graves' ophthalmopathy group than in control group (p 99m Tc-DTPA brain scintigraphy may be useful to determine the activity of Graves' ophthalmopathy and whether treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy is necessary or not.

  14. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  15. [Grave's disease and stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A Matos; Nobre, E Lacerda; Garcia e Costa, J; Nogueira, P J; Macedo, Ana; De Castro, J Jácome; Teles, A Galvão

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, there have been many reports about a possible association between Stressful Life Events (SLE) and the onset of Graves' Disease (GD). Nevertheless, most papers have been criticised and no such association has yet been proven. To assess the possible associations between SLE and the onset of GD. Retrospective study of 62 subjects, divided into 2 groups of 31 each, GD (Gp1) and controls (Gp2). The patients in Gp1 had thyroid disease diagnosed within the last 12 months, with clinical and biochemical confirmation. In Gp2, psychopathological and endocrine disturbances had been ruled out. Each 2 group consisted of 9 males (29%) and 22 females (71%). The mean age was 38.48 + 10.9 in Gp1 and 41.1 + 11.8 in Gp2. SLE evaluation (number and impact) was reported for the 12 months preceding the onset of symptoms of thyroid disease. To assess SLE, we used the Life Experiences Survey-LES from Saranson, Johnson and Siegel (1978; 1985). Statistical analysis was done using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Patients with GD had a significantly greater number of SLEs compared to Controls (p < .001). The number and impact of negative SLEs was significantly higher in Gp1 compared to Gp2 (p < .001). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the number and impact of both positive and neutral SLEs. The findings of this study support that SLEs may contribute to the precipitation of GD. We observed that patients with GD had significantly more negative events and experienced a greater negative impact from them prior to the onset of GD. The association of SLEs with GD is probably related to the association of stress with changes in the immune system, which can play an important role in the aetiology of thyrotoxicosis.

  16. Mouse Models of Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    Graves' disease is characterized by overstimulation of the thyroid gland with agonistic autoantibodies against the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, leading to hyperthyroidism and diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland. Our and other laboratories have recently established several animal models of Graves' hyperthyroidism with novel immunization approaches, i.e., in vivo expression of the TSH receptor by injection of syngeneic living cells co-expressing the TSH receptor and major histocompatibility...

  17. Graves disease hyperthyroidism and glycometabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qiting; Zhao Deshan

    2010-01-01

    The Patients with Graves disease hyperthyroidism are often accompanied by disorder of glycometabolism. β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance play a main role in this disease, while the immune and genetic factors are also relevant with the disease. The blood glycose level can become normal gradually with the recovery of thyroid hormone after 131 I and antithyroid drug treatment. Therefore, the blood glycose level could be improved and complications could be prevented by early treatment in the patients with Graves disease hyperthyroidism accompanied with glycometabolism disorder is helpful for improving the blood glycose level. (authors)

  18. Grave's disease 1835-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, A P

    2003-01-01

    This brief review describes the history of Graves' disease, starting with the original descriptions by Parry, Graves and von Basedow. The true aetiology of the disorder was uncovered in the 1950s and 1960s, based on the search for a novel thyroid stimulator which turned out to be an immunoglobulin G autoantibody. Assays for these thyroid stimulatory antibodies have been continually refined and their epitopes on the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor are increasingly well characterized. We also understand far more about the genetic and environmental susceptibility factors that predispose to disease, and even thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy has now been better defined as primarily a T-cell-mediated disease resulting from cytokine stimulation of orbital fibroblasts. These advances should improve treatment options for Graves' disease in the foreseeable future.

  19. Graves' disease and Thyroid anaplasic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero E, Helena; Quintero A, Flor Maria; Carmona C, Antonio

    1992-01-01

    A case of a 34 year-old patient is presented, who was diagnosed with Graves' disease and developed a thyroid anaplastic carcinoma from a clinically detected nodular mass. The incidence of thyroid cancer associated with Graves' disease is revisited

  20. Pathogenesis of Graves' disease and therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Graves' disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Selenium in Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Kryczyk

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present the current state of knowledge of the role of selenium in Graves’ disease. Recently, in the pathogenesis and course of this autoimmune disease, more attention has been paid to the relationship between oxidative stress and the antioxidant system, where selenium compounds play an important role. The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium concentration in the human body. Selenium compounds, having antioxidant properties, protect thyrocytes against the destructive effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are generated during the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Therefore, strengthening the body’s defense mechanisms, which protect against the formation and activity of ROS during medical treatment of Graves’ disease patients, may be an effective adjuvant in commonly used methods of therapy.

  2. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan

  3. Graves' disease in Albanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjikopulli, A; Tomori, Sonila; Kollçaku, L; Hoxha, P; Grimci, Lindita; Ylli, Zamira

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) accounts for 10-15% of thyroid disorders in patients less than 18 years of age. It is the most common cause of thyrotoxicosis in children and accounts for at least 95% of cases in children. Pediatric Treatment of Graves' disease consists of anti-thyroid drugs, radioactive iodide and thyroidectomy but the optimal treatment of GD in children is still controversial. To review treatment outcome of pediatric Graves' disease in Albania. Descriptive review of 15 children with Graves' disease, diagnosed from Jan.2007 to Dec. 2013, at the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre "Mother Teresa", Albania was performed. All patients, mean age 10.56 ± 3.37 years, (range 2.02-16.09 years) were presented with goiter and increased serum FT4, mean 39.80 ± 16.02 ng/mL, (range 21.0-74.70 ng/mL), serum FT3, mean 12.98 ± 3.45 pg/mL, (range 6.90 -17.90 pg/mL) and suppressed TSH levels, mean 0.02 ± 0.01 mUI/L, (range 0.01-0.05 mUI/L). Anti TSH Receptor were positive in 100% of patients mean value 6.51 ± 3.61 UI/mL (range 1.63 - 14.10 UI/mL). Anti-thyroglobulin and Anti-TPO antibodies were positive in 60% and 46.6% respectively. Clinical course of 15 patients after treatment with anti-thyroid drugs mainly MMI for 3.19 ± 1.48 (range 0.60 - 6.20) years is as follows: seven (46.66%) underwent remission, five out of seven (71.41%) who underwent remission, relapsed. Three of them (20%) were treated with I(131), and two (13.3%) underwent to total thyroidectomy. MMI was the most common first line therapy in the presented patients with Graves' disease. Remission rate was 46.66% after an average 1.48 ± 0.71 years (range 0.60 - 2.70 years) of treatment with anti-thyroid drugs. Remission period was 2.70 ± 0.36 years (2.1 - 3.1 years) Relapse occurred in 71.41% of patient. I(131) and thyroidectomy were used as second line therapy in the present study.

  4. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  5. Death by suicide in Graves' disease and Graves' orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Charlotte; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedus, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Graves' disease is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, but little is known about unnatural manners of death and the potential relation with Graves' orbitopathy. Here we investigate the risk of unnatural death in Graves' patients with orbitopathy (GO) and without (GD), comp...... in the pathophysiological mechanisms of suicidal behavior. Beyond independent confirmation, reasons for this need to be explored in order to introduce preventive measures....... with GD, and 3,965 with GO were identified and matched for age and gender with four subjects from the background population. Manner of death was identified and hazard ratios (HR) for mortality due to unnatural deaths (accident, suicide, violence/homicide, and unknown) were calculated using Cox regression...... analyses, adjusted for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric morbidity. RESULTS: In Graves' disease overall there was an increased risk of death from unknown unnatural manners [HR: 2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-3.45); P=0.012] and of suicide, although the latter difference was not with certainty...

  6. Current treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, T.; Shimaoka, K.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this review we have described the rationale for the appropriate treatment of patients with Graves' disease. Because the etiology of this disorder remains obscure, its management remains controversial. Since antithyroid drugs and radioiodine became readily available in the early 1950s, they have been widely used for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, and the number of cases treated surgically has markedly decreased. However, almost four decades of experience have disclosed an unexpectedly high incidence of delayed hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment and a low remission rate after antithyroid therapy. As a result, surgery is again being advocated as the treatment of choice. The three modalities of treatment have different advantages and disadvantages, and selection of treatment is of importance. In principle, we believe that for most patients a subtotal thyroidectomy should be performed after the patient has been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. We attempt to leave a thyroid remnant of 6 to 8 gm.36 references

  7. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge [de

  8. Temporal relationship between onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and onset of thyroidal Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Smit, T.; van der Gaag, R.; Koornneef, L.

    1988-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and the onset of thyroidal Graves' disease was evaluated in 125 consecutive patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroidal Graves' disease--past or present--was clinically evident in 99 patients (79%): hyperthyroidism in 3 cases.

  9. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  10. Resolution of Graves' disease after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yvonne; Butani, Lavjay; Glaser, Nicole; Nguyen, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of an adolescent boy with Down's syndrome and ESRD on hemodialysis who developed mild Graves' disease that was not amenable to radioablation, surgery, or ATDs. After 14 months of observation without resolution of Graves' disease, he successfully received a DDRT with a steroid minimization protocol. Thymoglobulin and a three-day course of steroids were used for induction and he was started on tacrolimus, MMF, and pravastatin for maintenance transplant immunosuppression. One month after transplantation, all biochemical markers and antibody profiling for Graves' disease had resolved and remain normal one yr later. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nodular Graves' disease with medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat Hussain; Rather, Tanveer Ahmed; Makhdoomi, Rumana; Malik, Dharmender

    2015-01-01

    Co-existence of thyroid nodules with Graves' disease has been reported in various studies. 10-15% of such nodules harbor thyroid cancer with papillary thyroid cancer being the commonest. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) in nodules associated with Graves' disease is rare. On literature survey, we came across 11 such cases reported so far. We report a 62-year-old female with Graves' disease who also had a thyroid nodule that on fine-needle aspiration cytology and the subsequent postthyroidectomy histopathological examination was reported to be MTC.

  12. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi Wei; Masterson, Liam; Fish, Brian; Jani, Piyush; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-11-25

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease caused by the production of auto-antibodies against the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, which stimulates follicular cell production of thyroid hormone. It is the commonest cause of hyperthyroidism and may cause considerable morbidity with increased risk of cardiovascular and respiratory adverse events. Five per cent of people with Graves' disease develop moderate to severe Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease commonly falls into one of three categories: 1) total thyroidectomy, which aims to achieve complete macroscopic removal of thyroid tissue; 2) bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy, in which bilateral thyroid remnants are left; and 3) unilateral total and contralateral subtotal thyroidectomy, or the Dunhill procedure. Recent American Thyroid Association guidelines on treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism emphasised the role of surgery as one of the first-line treatments. Total thyroidectomy removes target tissue for the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody. It controls hyperthyroidism at the cost of lifelong thyroxine replacement. Subtotal thyroidectomy leaves a thyroid remnant and may be less likely to lead to complications, however a higher rate of recurrent hyperthyroidism is expected and revision surgery would be challenging. The choice of the thyroidectomy technique is currently largely a matter of surgeon preference, and a systematic review of the evidence base is required to determine which option offers the best outcomes for patients. To assess the optimal surgical technique for Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and PubMed, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). The date of the last search was June 2015 for all databases. We did not apply any language restrictions. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving participants with a diagnosis

  13. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.R.; Crawley, J.C.W.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [ 9 -9μTc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity - TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p<0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  14. Postoperative hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Catherine E; Shiue, Zita; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Umbricht, Christopher B; Tufano, Ralph P; Dackiw, Alan P B; Kowalski, Jeanne; Zeiger, Martha A

    2010-11-01

    It is believed that patients who undergo thyroidectomy for Graves' disease are more likely to experience postoperative hypocalcemia than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. However, no study has directly compared these two groups of patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased incidence or severity of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. An institutional review board-approved database was created of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 1998 to 2009 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were a total of 68 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgery. Fifty-five patients who underwent total thyroidectomy were randomly selected and served as control subjects. An analysis was conducted that examined potential covariates for postoperative hypocalcemia, including age, gender, ethnicity, preoperative alkaline phosphatase level, size of goiter, whether parathyroid tissue or glands were present in the specimen, and the reason the patient underwent surgery. Specific outcomes examined were calcium levels on postoperative day 1, whether or not patients experienced symptoms of hypocalcemia, whether or not Rocaltrol was required, the number of calcium tablets prescribed upon discharge, whether or not postoperative tetany occurred, and calcium levels 1 month after discharge. Each outcome was analyzed using a logistic regression. Graves' disease patients had a significantly (p-value Graves' disease and no patient in the control group were readmitted with tetany (p = 0.033). There was a trend, though not significant, toward patients with Graves' disease having a higher prevalence of hypocalcemia the day after thyroidectomy and 1 month later. Patients with Graves' disease are more likely to require increased dosages of calcium as well as experience tetany postoperatively than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. This suggests that

  15. [Thyroid cancer in patients with Grave's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mssrouri, R; Benamr, S; Essadel, A; Mdaghri, J; Mohammadine, El H; Lahlou, M-K; Taghy, A; Belmahi, A; Chad, B

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in patients operated on for Graves' disease, to identify criteria which may predict malignancy, and to develop a practical approach to determine the extensiveness of thyroidectomy. Retrospective study of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 1995 and 2005. 547 patients underwent subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease during this period. Post-operative pathology examination revealed six cases of thyroid cancer (1.1%). All six cases had differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary carcinoma in 3 cases, follicular carcinoma in 2 cases and papillo-follicular carcinoma in 1 case). The indication for initial thyroidectomy was a palpable thyroid nodule in 3 cases (50%), failure of medical treatment for Grave's disease in 2 cases (33%), and signs of goiter compression in 1 case (17%). Five patients underwent re-operative total thyroidectomy. This study shows that while malignancy in Grave's disease is uncommon, the presence of thyroid nodule(s) in patients with Grave's disease may be considered as an indication for radical surgery. The most adequate radical surgery in this situation is to perform a total thyroidectomy.

  16. Neonatal Graves' Disease with Maternal Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akangire, Gangaram; Cuna, Alain; Lachica, Charisse; Fischer, Ryan; Raman, Sripriya; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal Graves' disease presenting as conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a diagnostic challenge because the differential includes a gamut of liver and systemic diseases. We present a unique case of neonatal Graves' disease in a premature infant with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia born to a mother with hypothyroidism during pregnancy and remote history of Graves' disease. Infant was treated with a combination of methimazole, propranolol, and potassium iodide for 4 weeks. Thyroid function improved after 8 weeks of treatment with full recovery of thyroid function, disappearance of thyroid-stimulating antibodies, and resolution of failure to thrive and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. This case provides several clinical vignettes as it is a rare, severe, presentation of an uncommon neonatal disease, signs, symptoms, and clinical history presented a diagnostic challenge for neonatologists and endocrinologists, normal newborn screen was misleading, and yet timely treatment led to a full recovery.

  17. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism and maternal Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, K; Chioukh, F Z; Marmouch, H; Ben Hamida, H; Bizid, M; Monastiri, K

    2015-04-01

    The onset of Graves disease during pregnancy exposes the neonate to the risk of hyperthyroidism. The newborn must be monitored and treatment modalities known to ensure early treatment of the newborn. We report on the case of an infant born at term of a mother with Graves disease discovered during pregnancy. He was asymptomatic during the first days of life, before declaring the disease. Neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed by hormonal assays. Hyperthyroidism was treated with antithyroid drugs and propranolol with a satisfactory clinical and biological course. Neonatal hyperthyroidism should be systematically sought in infants born to a mother with Graves disease. The absence of clinical signs during the first days of life does not exclude the diagnosis. The duration of monitoring should be decided according to the results of the first hormonal balance tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Serum glycosaminoglycans in Graves' disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna B; Olczyk, Krystyna Z; Koźma, Ewa M; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna B; Wisowski, Grzegorz R; Marcisz, Czesław

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the blood serum sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and hyaluronic acid (HA) concentration of Graves' disease patients before treatment and after attainment of the euthyroid state. The study was carried out on the blood serum obtained from 17 patients with newly recognised Graves' disease and from the same patients after attainment of the euthyroid state. Graves' patients had not any clinical symptoms neither of ophthalmopathy nor pretibial myxedema. GAGs were isolated from the blood serum by the multistage extraction and purification using papaine hydrolysis, alkali elimination, as well as cetylpyridium chloride binding. Total amount of GAGs was quantified by the hexuronic acids assay. HA content in obtained GAGs sample was evaluated by the ELISA method. Increased serum concentration of sulfated GAGs in non-treated Graves' disease patients was found. Similarly, serum HA level in untreated patients was significantly elevated. The attainment of euthyroid state was accompanied by the decreased serum sulfated GAGs level and by normalization of serum HA concentration. In conclusion, the results obtained demonstrate that the alterations of GAGs metabolism connected with Graves' disease can lead to systemic changes of the extracellular matrix properties.

  19. Changes of hepatofibrosis markers in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Feihua; Xu Haifeng; Zhou Runsuo; Gao Feng; Wang Lei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of hepatofibrosis markers (IV-C, PC III, HA, LN) in Graves' disease. Methods: Serum levels of hepatofibrosis were measured with RIA in 40 patients with Graves' disease (CD) before any treatment and 35 patients with Graves' disease after successful anti-thyroid drug therapy as well as in 30 controls. Results: The serum IV-C and PC III levels in GD patients were significant higher than those in controls before treatment (P<0.01). After successful treatment, the IV-C, PC III levels dropped markedly (vs before treatment, P<0.01). However, there were no significant differences among the serum HA, LN levels in all the subjects tested. Conclusion: Serum levels of IV-C and PC III increased markedly with hyperthyroidim. When IV-C and PC III levels were taken for assessment of degree of hepatofibeosis, GD must be ruled out first. (authors)

  20. Pancytopenia in a Patient with Grave's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Huai Heng; Tan, Florence

    2013-08-01

    Pancytopenia can rarely complicate Grave's disease. It can be due to uncontrolled thyrotoxicosis or as a result of rare side effect of antithyroid medication. Pernicious anemia leading to Vitamin B12 deficiency is another rare associated cause. We report a case of a patient with Grave's disease and undiagnosed pernicious anemia whom was assumed to have antithyroid drug induced pancytopenia. Failure to recognize this rare association of pernicious anemia as a cause of pancytopenia had resulted in delay in treatment and neurological complication in our patient.

  1. Rituximab in relapsing Graves' disease, a phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, Karen A.; Toes, Rene E.; Sepers, Jan; Pereira, Alberto M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional therapies for Graves' disease, consisting of medical therapy or radioiodine are unsatisfactory, because of limited efficacy and adverse events. Interventions aimed at the underlying autoimmune pathogenesis of Graves' disease may be worthwhile to explore. We therefore performed a

  2. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [/sup 99m/Tc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  3. [Orbital decompression in Grave's disease: comparison of techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellari-Franceschini, S; Berrettini, S; Forli, F; Bartalena, L; Marcocci, C; Tanda, M L; Nardi, M; Lepri, A; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    Grave's ophthalmopathy is an inflammatory, autoimmune disorder often associated with Grave's disease. The inflammatory infiltration involves the retrobulbar fatty tissue and the extrinsic eye muscles, causing proptosis, extraocular muscle dysfunction and often diplopia. Orbital decompression is an effective treatment in such cases, particularly when resistant to drugs and external radiation therapy. This work compares the results of orbital decompression performed by removing: a) the medial and lateral walls (Mourits technique) in 10 patients (19 orbits) and b) the medial and lower walls (Walsh-Ogura technique) in 17 patients (31 orbits). The results show that removing the floor of the orbit enables better reduction of proptosis but more easily leads to post-operative diplopia. Thus it proves necessary to combine the two techniques, modifying the surgical approach on a case-by-case basis.

  4. Development of Graves' disease following radiation therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, J.S.; Tarbell, N.J.; Garber, J.R.; Mauch, P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-related thyroid dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mantle field radiation. Although chemical and clinical hypothyroidism are most commonly seen, Graves' disease has also been described. We have examined the records of 437 surgically staged patients who received mantle field irradiation between April 1969 and December 1980 to ascertain the frequency of manifestations of Graves' disease. Within this group, seven patients developed hyperthyroidism accompanied by ophthalmic findings typical of those seen in Graves' disease. The actuarial risk of developing Graves' disease at 10 years following mantle irradiation for Hodgkin's disease was 3.3% in female patients and 1% in male patients in this study. The observed/expected ratios were 5.9 and 5.1 for female and male patients, respectively. This observed risk significantly exceeded that seen in the general population

  5. Thyroid cancer in Graves' disease: is surgery the best treatment for Graves' disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamatea, Jade A U; Tu'akoi, Kelson; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y

    2014-04-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of thyrotoxicosis. Treatment options include anti-thyroid medications or definitive therapy: thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine (I(131) ). Traditionally, I(131) has been the preferred definitive treatment for Graves' disease in New Zealand. Reports of concomitant thyroid cancer occurring in up to 17% of Graves' patients suggest surgery, if performed with low morbidity, may be the preferred option. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of thyroid cancer and surgical outcomes in a New Zealand cohort of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. This study is a retrospective review of Waikato region patients undergoing thyroid surgery for Graves' disease during the 10-year period prior to 1 December 2011. A total of 833 patients underwent thyroid surgery. Of these, 117 were for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 82, near-total in 33 and subtotal in 2 patients. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis developed in one subtotal patient requiring I(131) therapy. There were two cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism and one of permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Eight patients (6.8%) had thyroid cancer detected, none of whom had overt nodal disease. Five were papillary microcarcinomas (one of which was multifocal), two were papillary carcinomas (11 mm and 15 mm) and one was a minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. Thyroid cancer was identified in approximately 7% of patients undergoing surgery for Graves' disease. A low complication rate (<2%) of permanent hypoparathyroidism and nerve injury (<1%) supports surgery being a safe alternative to I(131) especially for patients with young children, ophthalmopathy or compressive symptoms. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. Hyperthyroidism: diagnosis and management of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, J S

    1997-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism, or thyrotoxicosis, results when the body's tissues are exposed to excessive levels of thyroid hormone. Hyperthyroidism affects 2% of women but only one-tenth as many men. Graves' disease is the most common form of hyperthyroidism, often occurring in young adults. It is an autoimmune disorder with an important genetic component. Hyperthyroidism's hallmarks include goiter and myriad signs and symptoms related to increased metabolic activity in virtually all body tissues. Increased sensitivity to circulating catecholamines adds to the clinical picture. Diagnosed by patient history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, Graves' disease is treated with antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine, and/or surgery, plus supportive therapy. A good treatment outcome can be expected; long-term follow-up is indicated.

  7. Graves disease with ophthalmopathy following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, D.R.; Fleming, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The number of patients achieving long-term survival following neck irradiation for Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies is increasing. Paralleling this increase in survivors is the development of late complications of the therapy itself. Eleven patients have previously been reported who developed Graves ophthalmopathy 18 months to seven years after receiving neck radiotherapy for nonthyroidal malignancies. The seven patients who had HLA typing were all HLA-B8 negative, despite the reported association of the HLA-B8 antigen with Graves disease. A patient who is HLA-B8 positive who developed Graves ophthalmopathy and hyperthyroidism nine years after receiving mantle radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease is reported. It is recommended that Graves disease be included among the thyroid diseases that receive consideration during follow-up of patients who have received mantle radiotherapy

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta in combination with Graves disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina S. Sheremeta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI – is a group of genetically disorders, which are charaterized by a disturbed bone formation. In turn, the excess of thyroid hormones in Graves' disease (GD also posses a negative effect on bone tissue, thereby aggravating OI. That requires from the endocrinologist the most careful management of patients with the combination of these pathologies. In this article, we present a unique clinical case of a combination of GD and OI.

  9. Thyroidectomy for Graves' disease: is hypothyroidism inevitable?

    OpenAIRE

    Davenport, M.; Talbot, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    The outcome of 234 patients with Graves' disease treated by subtotal thyroidectomy over a 12-year period is analysed with specific reference to hypothyroidism. Of definite hypothyroid cases, 98% occurred within 2 years. Failure to develop hypothyroidism was statistically related to large remnant size and a large goitre preoperatively. Histological review showed that any degree of lymphocytic infiltration was associated with the development of hypothyroidism (50% vs 22%). Late onset hypothyroi...

  10. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-03-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan.

  11. Graves' Disease Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Khochtali

    2010-01-01

    have increased risk for developing thromboembolic accidents, which are favoured by a simultaneous presence of antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. in this paper, we describe the case of a patient with Graves' disease, who developed strokes with antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome.

  12. B-cell depletion with rituximab in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Graves' ophthalmopathy the latest addition to an expanding family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; El Fassi, Daniel; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2007-01-01

    of 10 Graves' disease patients remained in remission 400 days after rituximab treatment versus none in the control group, and remarkable improvements in the eye symptoms of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were observed. This supports a role for B cells in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy...

  13. [Association Budd Chiari syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouelhi, Leila; Chaieb, Mouna; Debbeche, Radhouane; Salem, Mohamed; Sfar, Imene; Trabelsi, Sinda; Gorgi, Yosr; Najjar, Taoufik

    2009-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome in 5% of the cases. Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis, foetal loss and positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies, namely lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I. Anticardiolipin antibodies was reported in auto-immune thyroid disorders, particularly in Grave's disease. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated to Grave's disease was reported in only three cases. To describe a case report of association of Grave's disease and antiphospholipid syndrome. We report the first case of Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. Our observation is particular by the fact that it is about a patient presenting a Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. This triple association has never been reported in literature. Although association between antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease was previously described, further studies evaluating the coexistence of these two affections in the same patient would be useful.

  14. Hyperthyroidism in Patients with Graves' Ophthalmopathy, and Thyroidal, Skeletal and Eye Muscle Specific Type 2 Deiodinase Enzyme Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Ildikó; Szentmiklósi, József A; Somogyiné-Vári, Éva

    2017-09-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is characterized by hyperthyroidism, which is associated with higher serum T 3 levels than T 4 due to deiodinase enzymes.The effect of Graves' patient's sera (n=52) with elevated thyroid hormone and TSH receptor or thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO) levels was investigated on thyroidal, skeletal and eye muscle type 2 deiodinase enzyme (DII) activities. DII activities were measured with 125 I-T 4 substrate, while thyroid hormone and antibody levels with immunoassays.In Graves' ophthalmopathy, sera with elevated FT 4 or FT 3 levels reduced DII activites remarkably in all tissue fractions. Thyroidal DII activities were lower than those using eye muscle fraction (0.6±0.22 vs 1.14±0.43 pmol/mg/min, PEffect of sera with increased FT 3 levels demonstrated also reduced DII activities in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy after methimazole therapy compared to those who had no ophthalmopathy (2.88±2 vs 20.42±11.82 pmol/mg/min, PHyperthyroid sera with TSH receptor antibodies resulted in increased DII activities, while sera with anti-TPO antibodies were connected to lower DII activities in Graves' ophthalmopathy.In summary, the actions of hyperthyroid sera derived from patients with Graves' disease were tested on tissue-specific DII activities. Elevated FT 4 level-induced DII inactivation is present in Graves' ophthalmopathy, which seems to be also present at the beginning of methimazole therapy. Stimulating TSH receptor antibiodies increased DII activities via their nongenomic effects using sera of hyperthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy, but anti-TPO antibodies could influence DII activities via altering FT 4 levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Management of thyroid eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Tanda, Maria Laura; Marcocci, Claudio; Pinchera, Aldo

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. In most instances it is mild and non-progressive, but in 3%-5% of cases it is severe. Non-severe TED requires only supportive measures, such as eye ointments, sunglasses and prisms. By contrast, severe TED requires aggressive treatment, either medical (high-dose glucocorticoids, orbital radiotherapy) or surgical (orbital decompression). The choice of treatment relies on the assessment of both TED severity and activity. Removal of controllable risk factors, especially cigarette smoking, is important to improve the course and the therapeutic outcome. A coordinated approach to the treatment of hyperthyroidism and TED is also required. Novel promising treatments, to be verified in large series of patients, include somatostatin analogues and cytokine antagonists. (orig.)

  16. Management of thyroid eye disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Tanda, Maria Laura [Department of Endocrinology, University of Insubria, Ospedale di Circolo, Viale Borri, 57, 21100 Varese (Italy); Marcocci, Claudio; Pinchera, Aldo [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2002-08-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. In most instances it is mild and non-progressive, but in 3%-5% of cases it is severe. Non-severe TED requires only supportive measures, such as eye ointments, sunglasses and prisms. By contrast, severe TED requires aggressive treatment, either medical (high-dose glucocorticoids, orbital radiotherapy) or surgical (orbital decompression). The choice of treatment relies on the assessment of both TED severity and activity. Removal of controllable risk factors, especially cigarette smoking, is important to improve the course and the therapeutic outcome. A coordinated approach to the treatment of hyperthyroidism and TED is also required. Novel promising treatments, to be verified in large series of patients, include somatostatin analogues and cytokine antagonists. (orig.)

  17. Graves' disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a central nervous system disorder characterized by raised intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and absence of any structural anomaly on neuroimaging. Among all endocrine disorders associated with the development of IIH, the association of hyperthyroidism and IIH is very rare with few cases reported till date. Thyroid disturbances have a unique association with IIH. Hypo- and hyper-thyroidism have been reported in association with this disorder. We present a rare case of a 25-year-old man with Graves' disease with intractable headache that was later investigated and attributed to development of IIH.

  18. Dosimetry-based treatment for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Steve L; Pratt, Brenda; Gray, Matthew; Chittenden, Sarah; Du, Yong; Harmer, Clive L; Flux, Glenn D

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the long-term outcome of a personalized dosimetry approach in Graves' disease aiming to render patients euthyroid from a planned thyroid absorbed dose of 60 Gy. A total of 284 patients with Graves' disease were followed prospectively following administration of radioiodine calculated to deliver an absorbed dose of 60 Gy. Patients with cardiac disease were excluded. Outcomes were analysed at yearly intervals for up to 10 years with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. A single radioiodine administration was sufficient to render a patient either euthyroid or hypothyroid in 175 (62%) patients, the remainder requiring further radioiodine. The median radioactivity required to deliver 60 Gy was 77 MBq. Less than 2% patients required 400-600 MBq, the standard activity administered in many centres. In the cohort receiving a single administration, 38, 32 and 26% were euthyroid on no specific thyroid medication at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Larger thyroid volumes were associated with the need for further therapy. The presence of nodules on ultrasonography did not adversely affect treatment outcome. A personalized dosimetric approach delayed the long-term onset of hypothyroidism in 26% of patients. This was achieved using much lower administered activities than currently recommended. Future studies will aim to identify those patients who would benefit most from this approach.

  19. Diagnosis of Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension on chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Hye Rin; Chun, Eun Ju; White, Charles S

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of chest CT findings to diagnose Grave's disease in pulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively evaluated chest CT and the medical records of 13 patients with Grave's disease with (n=6) or without pulmonary hypertension (n=7) and in 17 control patients. Presence of iso-attenuation of diffusely enlarged thyroid glands compared with adjacent neck muscle on non-enhanced CT as a diagnostic clue of Grave's disease, and assessment of pulmonary hypertension on CT has high diagnostic accuracy. Chest CT has the potential to diagnose Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension in the absence of other information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Preoperative management in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantanida, Eliana

    2017-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-sufficient geographical areas and is characterized by the presence in patients' serum of autoantibodies directed against the thyrotropin receptor (TRAb) that cause overproduction and release of thyroid hormones. Clinical presentation results from both hyperthyroidism and underlying autoimmunity. The diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical features and biochemical abnormalities. If serum thyrotropin (TSH) is low, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations should be measured to distinguish between subclinical (with normal circulating thyroid hormones) and overt hyperthyroidism (with increased circulating thyroid hormones). Graves' disease is treated with any of three effective and relatively safe initial treatment options: antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioactive iodine ablation (RAIU), and surgery. Total thyroidectomy is favored in several clinical situations, such as intolerance, ineffectiveness or recurrence after ATD treatment, radioiodine therapy contraindicated, documented or suspected thyroid malignancy, one or more large thyroid nodules, coexisting moderate-to-severe active Graves' orbitopathy, women planning a pregnancy within 6 months. Whenever surgery is selected as treatment, selection of an expert high-volume thyroid surgeons is fundamental and careful preoperative management is essential to optimize surgical outcomes. Pretreatment with ATDs in order to promptly achieve the euthyroid state is recommended to avoid the risk of precipitating thyroid storm during surgery. For the majority of patients, euthyroidism is achieved after few weeks of ATD treatment. Beta-blockers, such as propranolol, are often added effectively to control hyperthyroid symptoms. Saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) or potassium iodine (Lugol's solution), given for a short period prior to surgery, in order to reduce both thyroid hormone release and thyroid gland

  1. The Role of Oxidative Stress on the Pathogenesis of Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Žarković

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It is an autoimmune disease, and autoimmune process induces an inflammatory reaction, and reactive oxygen species (ROSs are among its products. When balance between oxidants and antioxidants is disturbed, in favour of the oxidants it is termed “oxidative stress” (OS. Increased OS characterizes Graves' disease. It seems that the level of OS is increased in subjects with Graves' ophthalmopathy compared to the other subjects with Graves' disease. Among the other factors, OS is involved in proliferation of orbital fibroblasts. Polymorphism of the 8-oxoG DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1 involved in repair of the oxidative damaged DNA increases in the risk for developing Grave's disease. Treatment with glucocorticoids reduces levels of OS markers. A recent large clinical trial evaluated effect of selenium on mild Graves' ophthalmopathy. Selenium treatment was associated with an improved quality of life and less eye involvement and slowed the progression of Graves' orbitopathy, compared to placebo.

  2. Thymic hyperplasia in a patient with Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Amira A; Klii, Rim R; Salem, Randa R; Kochtali, Ines I; Golli, Mondher M; Mahjoub, Silvia S

    2012-02-09

    Hyperplastic changes of the thymus may be found in patients with Graves' disease. However, this rarely presents as an anterior mediastinal mass, particularly among adults. In this report, we describe a 46-year old woman with Graves' disease and thymic hyperplasia.

  3. Thymic hyperplasia in a patient with Grave's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzaoui Amira A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperplastic changes of the thymus may be found in patients with Graves' disease. However, this rarely presents as an anterior mediastinal mass, particularly among adults. In this report, we describe a 46-year old woman with Graves' disease and thymic hyperplasia.

  4. Eye Disease and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo

    This research advances the hypothesis that cross-country variation in the historical incidence of eye disease has influenced the current global distribution of per capita income. The theory is that pervasive eye disease diminished the incentive to accumulate skills, thereby delaying the fertility...... transition and the take-off to sustained economic growth. In order to estimate the influence from eye disease incidence empirically, we draw on an important fact from the field of epidemiology: Exposure to solar ultraviolet B radiation (UVB-R) is an underlying determinant of several forms of eye disease...

  5. Graves' disease with special reference to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegenschmidt, M. H.; Heyd, R.; Esser, J.; Mould, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Graves' disease, although not malignant, nevertheless can lead to serious events such as permanent loss of vision if it remains untreated. This review article describes the clinical symptoms of the disease, includes a commentary on the Graves' disease subgroup of thyroid-associated orbitipathy (TAO), and defines clinical activity scoring systems which grade the severity of the disease in patients (clinical activity, NOSPECS and LEMO scoring ). An review of radiotherapy in the 1980s is followed by a summary of the 2003 German national survey on radiotherapy for Graves' disease. Radiation therapy technique is then described and discussed. Case histories are from the Alfred Krupp Hospital in Essen. (author)

  6. Thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniforth, Joy U L; Erdirimanne, Senarath; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid carcinoma is increasing worldwide. Graves' disease is the most common hyperthyroid disease. Studies have suggested an increased risk of thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease: there has not yet been a meta-analysis to allow quantitative comparison. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease, and to gather information on the histological subtypes of carcinoma and the co-existence of thyroid nodules. Several databases and article reference lists were searched. Inclusion criteria included appropriate diagnostic criteria for thyroid conditions and a diagnoses of carcinoma based on histology. 33 studies were selected, all reporting on surgically-resected specimens. The event rate of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease was 0.07 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.12). There was no data to allow comparison with patients without hyperthyroid diseases. There was no increase in the odds of developing carcinoma in Graves' disease compared to toxic multinodular goitre and toxic uninodular goitre. 88% of thyroid carcinomas in Graves' disease were papillary, with solitary papillary micro-carcinoma (diameter 10 mm or less) comprising 23% of all detected thyroid carcinomas. Patients with Graves' disease and co-existing thyroid nodules were almost 5 times more likely to be diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma than those without nodules. Thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease requiring surgical treatment should be considered as likely as in other hyperthyroid diseases needing surgical treatment. Clinicians should consider screening selected patients with Graves' disease for nodules whilst being aware of potentially over-diagnosing papillary micro-carcinoma. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  8. Predictive factors of thyroid cancer in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Wu, Mu Chao; Shang, Chang Zhen; Wang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Jing Lu; Cheng, Hua; Xu, Ming Tong; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The best preoperative examination in Graves' disease with thyroid cancer still remains uncertain. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancer in Graves' disease patients, and to identify the predictive factors and ultrasonographic features of thyroid cancer that may aid the preoperative diagnosis in Graves' disease. This retrospective study included 423 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgical treatment from 2002 to 2012 at our institution. The clinical features and ultrasonographic findings of thyroid nodules were recorded. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was determined according to the pathological results. Thyroid cancer was discovered in 58 of the 423 (13.7 %) surgically treated Graves' disease patients; 46 of those 58 patients had thyroid nodules, and the other 12 patients were diagnosed with incidentally discovered thyroid carcinomas without thyroid nodules. Among the 58 patients with thyroid cancer, papillary microcarcinomas were discovered in 50 patients, and multifocality and lymph node involvement were detected in the other 8 patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed younger age was the only significant factor predictive of metastatic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonographic findings of calcification and intranodular blood flow in thyroid nodules indicate that they are more likely to harbor thyroid cancers. Because the influencing factor of metastatic thyroid cancers in Graves' disease is young age, every suspicious nodule in Graves' disease patients should be evaluated and treated carefully, especially in younger patients because of the potential for metastasis.

  9. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Yu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  10. Lymphocyte-platelet crosstalk in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznik, Boris I; Vitkovsky, Yuri A; Gvozdeva, Olga V; Solpov, Alexey V; Magen, Eli

    2014-03-01

    Platelets can modulate lymphocytes' role in the pathophysiology of thyroid autoimmune diseases. The present study was performed to clarify the status of platelet-lymphocyte subpopulations aggregation in circulating blood in patients with Graves' disease (GD). One hundred and fifty patients with GD (GD group) and 45 hyperthyroid patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG group) were recruited in the study. Control group consisted 150 healthy subjects. Immunophenotyping of lymphocytes was performed by flow cytometry. Detection of lymphocyte-platelet aggregates (LPAs) was done using light microscope after Ficoll-gradient centrifugation. The group of GD patients exhibited reduced CD8 lymphocyte and higher CD19 cell counts compared with TMG group and healthy controls. A greater number of activated CD3, HLA-DR+ lymphocytes were observed in GD than in TMG group and control group. GD group was characterized by lower blood platelet count (232 ± 89 × 10 cells/µL) than TMG group (251 ± 97 × 10 cells/µL; P TMG group (116 ± 67/µL, P < 0.005) and control group (104 ± 58 /µL; P < 0.001). GD is associated with higher levels of activated lymphocytes and lymphocyte-platelet aggregates.

  11. Radioiodine treatment for pediatric hyperthyroid Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ma; Jiawei, Xie; Guoming, Wang; Jianbin, Liu; Wanxia, Liu; Driedger, Al; Shuyao, Zuo; Qin, Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Grave's disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormones circulate in the blood. Treatment for pediatric GD includes (1) antithyroid drugs (ATD), (2) radioiodine, and (3) thyroidectomy. Yet, the optimal therapy remains controversial. We collected studies from all electronically available sources as well as from conferences held in China. All studies using radioiodine and/or ATD and/or thyroidectomy were included. Information was found on 1,874 pediatric GD patients treated with radioiodine, 1,279 patients treated with ATD and 1,362 patients treated surgically. The cure rate for radioiodine was 49.8%; the incidence of hypothyroidism, 37.8%; of relapse, 6.3%; of adverse effects, 1.55%; and of drop outs, 0.6%. These data show that radioiodine treatment is safe and effective in pediatric GD with significant lower incidence of relapse and adverse effects but significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism as compared with both ATD and thyroidectomy. For the time being, radioiodine treatment for pediatric GD remains an excellent first-line therapy and a good second-line therapy for patients with ATD failure, severe complications, or poor compliance.

  12. Concomitant Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, presenting as primary hypothyroidism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Hypothyroidism in patients with Graves\\' disease is usually the result of ablative treatment. We describe a 58 year old man with Graves\\' ophthalmopathy and pre-tibial myxoedema, who presented with spontaneous primary hypothyroidism. Circulating TSH receptor antibody activity was increased, while thyroid microsomal antibody was detectable in titres greater than one in one hundred thousand. It is likely that the TSH receptor antibody of Graves\\' disease was ineffective in stimulating hyperthyroidism because of concomitant thyroid destruction due to Hashimoto\\'s disease. Alternatively, primary hypothyroidism could have resulted from the effects of a circulating TSH receptor blocking antibody.

  13. Standardization of 131I therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jianlin; Li Yuying; Gao Liuyan; Tang Xiuping; Hu Hongyong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish the normative and standard measures, to ensure medical safety and quality of care of the patients with Graves disease treated by 131 I therapy. Methods: Formulating and strictly implementing the medical organizational and technical measures of 131 I therapy for Graves disease and regular follow-up. Results: Receiving 131 I treatment of 104 patients, follow-up 6-36 months, no adverse events, the cure rate of 59.6%, the efficient rate is 99.9%. Conclusion: It is important guarantee for the medical quality and safety to standardize the 131 I therapy of Graves disease. (authors)

  14. Immunoreactive 'TSH' in urinary concentrates of Graves' disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Herle, A.; Orgiazzi, J.; Greipel, M.A.; Slucher, J.A.; Honbo, K.S.; Hopital de l'Antiquaille, 69 - Lyon

    1978-01-01

    A double antibody radioimmunoassay was used to analyse immunoreactive thyrotrophin in urinary concentrates from fourteen patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, in three subjects with primary hypothyroidism, and in six normal subjects. Immunoreactive thyrotrophin was detectable in eleven subjects with Graves' disease, in one subject with primary hypothyroidism, and in four normal subjects. The mean urinary thyrotrophin concentration was significantly higher in Graves' disease (492+-99.9μU/24h(SEM)(n=11)) than in normal subjects (177+-26.4μU/24h(SEM)(n=4)(P [de

  15. Grave's disease associated with immunoglobulin A nephropathy: A rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I; Bhat, R A; Khan, I; Hameed, I

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (Ig A) nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis. The association of Ig A nephropathy with Grave's disease has not been reported so far. We report a case of 20-year-old female with Grave's disease who presented with edema, facial puffiness, and decreased urine output. She was found to be hypertensive with renal failure and nephrotic range proteinuria. Renal biopsy revealed features of Ig A nephropathy. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids (1 mg/kg/day). To our knowledge, this is the first case showing association of Grave's disease with Ig A nephropathy.

  16. B-cell depletion with rituximab in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Graves' ophthalmopathy the latest addition to an expanding family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; El Fassi, Daniel; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2007-01-01

    In this review, the authors summarise the clinical results obtained after therapy with rituximab in autoimmune diseases, including Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. On the basis of qualitative and quantitative analyses of B- and T-cell subsets, and autoantibody levels obtained in other...... diseases before and after rituximab therapy, the authors interpret the results of the only two clinical investigations of the efficacy of rituximab in the treatment of Graves' disease and Graves' opthalmopathy reported so far. No significant effect on autoantibody levels was observed. Nonetheless, 4 out...... of 10 Graves' disease patients remained in remission 400 days after rituximab treatment versus none in the control group, and remarkable improvements in the eye symptoms of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were observed. This supports a role for B cells in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy...

  17. Study progress on free radicals and graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiguo; Jin Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative injury has been closely implicated in the occurrence and development of many diseases. Graves disease was also accompanied by changes of the free radicals, especially for reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen, et al, and the oxidative stress can cause a certain degree of injury on the thyroid and other human important organs. Antithyroid drug and 131 I treatment of Graves disease, the oxidative and antioxidative parameters can also be changed. (authors)

  18. Concurrence of Grave's disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Takata, I; Taketani, T; Saida, K; Nakajima, H

    1977-01-01

    Early histological changes in the thyroid gland were examined in 30 patients with juvenile thyrotoxicosis, by means of needle biopsy. Based on the degree of lymphocytic infiltration and degenerative changes in follicular epithelium, results were classified into four groups. A: hyperplastic changes without cellular infiltration (6 patients, 20%); B: hyperplastic changes with areas of focal thyroiditis less than 30% of specimen (10 patients, 33%); C: those with 30 to 60% areas ot thyroiditis (10 patients, 33%); D: almost diffuse thyroiditis (4 patients, 13%). Moderate to severe lymphocytic thyroiditis was frequently present in the early stage of hyperplastic thyroid glands. The clinical significance of the 4 histological groups was evaluated. Neither clinical signs nor routine laboratory tests could differentiate these groups except group D, in which thyrotoxic signs were mild and transient. However, serum antithyroid antibodies tended to increase in accordance with severity of thyroiditis. The rate of remission was high in groups C and D, whereas relapse was frequent in group A. These results suggest that Grave's disease and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis are closely related in the early stage of thyrotoxicosis in children, and that the clinical course may be considerably altered by the degree of associated thyroiditis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 3 PMID:580172

  19. An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a medical college in eastern India. ... standard error of difference, the chi-square test, and paired Student's T-test. ... The common symptoms were insomnia, irritability, and anxiety.

  20. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms.

  1. Airway complication occurring during radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yoneyama, Tatsuya; Michigishi, Takatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Airway complications rarely occur in 131 I radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. This study presents two cases in which 131 I therapy caused this acute complication. The patients complained of the symptom 6 h and 33 h after administration of 131 I. A histamine H1 receptor antagonist and hydrocortisone rapidly resolved symptoms in both cases. These two cases remind physicians that 131 I therapy for Graves' disease may cause potentially life-threatening complications. (author)

  2. Hyperparathyroidism after radioactive iodine therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselstyn, C.B. Jr.; Schumacher, O.P.; Eversman, J.; Sheeler, L.; Levy, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The association of external ionizing radiation to the head and neck and the subsequent development of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands has been documented in recent years. This also has been demonstrated experimentally in animals. Despite the numbers of patients with Graves disease who have been treated with radioactive iodine, there are no reports in the literature of parathyroid surgery for hyperparathyroidism secondary to earlier treatment with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. This report describes the operative and pathologic findings in four patients with hyperparathyroidism. These patients had previously been treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. The pathologic findings at surgery included in three cases a single enlarged hyperplastic gland consistent with a parathyroid adenoma. One patient had hyperplasia of all four glands. The two largest glands and halves of the two remaining glands were removed. In a long-term follow-up of children and adolescents treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease, Levy and Schumacher found calcium elevations in 10 of 159 patients. The increased incidence of hyperparathyroidism following radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease in children and adolescents would seem several times higher than normal. Whether adults who have radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease have a similar increase incidence is not known. Meanwhile it would seem reasonable to suggest that patients whose hyperthyroidism is treated with radioactive iodine should have their serum calcium levels determined at 5-year intervals

  3. Graves' disease: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges (multimedia activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Grebe, Stefan K G; Lupo, Mark A; McDonald, Nicole; Sipos, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States. Graves' disease occurs more often in women with a female:male ratio of 5:1 and a population prevalence of 1% to 2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to Graves' disease is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies, and the 30% concordance in disease status between identical twins. Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor expressing tissues, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens, such as thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, and the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor is central to the regulation of thyroid growth and function. Stimulatory autoantibodies in Graves' disease activate the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Below-normal levels of baseline serum thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, normal to elevated serum levels of T4, elevated serum levels of T3 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor autoantibodies, and a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow) thyroid gland confirm diagnosis of Graves' disease (available at: http://supplements.amjmed.com/2010/hyperthyroid/faculty.php). This Resource Center is also available through the website of The American Journal of Medicine (www.amjmed.com). Click on the “Thyroid/Graves' Disease” link in the “Resource Centers” section, found on the right side of the Journal homepage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pretibial myxedema without ophthalmopathy: an initial presentation of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, Sheela; Lohiya, Vipin; Stahl, Elizabeth J

    2013-07-01

    To report a rare case of Graves' disease without ophthalmopathy presenting with pretibial myxedema (PM) as an initial presentation. We present the clinical history, physical findings, laboratory studies and biopsy data of a 62-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (DM2) presenting with arm and leg skin lesions in the absence of other physical findings. Histopathology confirmed PM. Graves' disease and its association with PM without Graves' ophthalmopathy and the pertinent literature are reviewed. A 60-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled DM2 presented for glycemic management. He described symptoms of anxiety, insomnia and fatigue for the last 5 to 6 months. He described diffuse chest pain, occasionally associated with palpitations, and a 50-pound weight loss. He also complained of severe itching and burning of his arms and legs for the past several months. Subsequent thyroid studies revealed hyperthyroidism suggestive of Graves' disease. In the interim, he was hospitalized for atrial flutter and was cardioverted. After being started on methimazole, his symptoms abated. His skin lesions were biopsied, and the leg biopsy was consistent with PM. He however had no lid lag or proptosis characteristic of Graves' disease. He subsequently underwent radioiodine ablation. His hyperglycemia was better control led after treatment of his hyperthyroidism. PM is an autoimmune manifestation of Graves' disease. Almost all cases of thyroid dermopathy are associated with relatively severe ophthalmopathy. Usually ophthalmopathy appears first and dermopathy much later. However, this case represents a rare initial presentation of Graves' disease with PM without ophthalmologic symptoms or findings. Hyperthyroidism is typically associated with worsening glycemic control and increased insulin requirements. In patients with diabetes having hyperthyroidism, deterioration in glycemic control should be anticipated and treatment should be adjusted accordingly

  5. Severe aplastic anaemia and Grave's disease in a paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manjusha; Goldman, Jeffrey

    2002-07-01

    Severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) is considered to be an autoimmune disorder affecting the haematopoietic cells and most often is idiopathic. An association between SAA and other autoimmune diseases is rare and has been described in adults for eosinophilic fasciitis, thymomas, systemic lupus erythematosus and thyroid disorders. We describe the first paediatric patient with chronic relapsing SAA and Grave's disease. We discuss the difficulty in diagnosis of Grave's disease, the possibility of its manifestation due to withdrawal of immunosuppressants, and issues to consider in the treatment of this disease in the setting of bone marrow failure.

  6. Hickam's dictum: Myasthenia Gravis presenting concurrently with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Shekhar; Rebello, Roshan; Wolmarans, Louise; Elston, Marianne

    2017-09-07

    We present two patients with Graves' disease and concurrent myasthenia gravis. The impact of the dual diagnosis on the clinical course and the potential for a delayed diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is discussed. Patient 1, a 28-year-old man was diagnosed with Graves' disease following his second respiratory arrest. His history was strongly suggestive of a second pathology. Patient 2, a 66-year-old Cantonese woman with established Graves' disease presented with thionamide-related neutropaenia. Examination revealed bilateral ptosis and right lateral rectus palsy. Both patients had thyrotoxicosis secondary to Graves' disease with concurrent myasthenia gravis. Although neuromuscular weakness is common in Graves' disease, coexisting myasthenia gravis (MG) is rare and can cause profound morbidity. Ocular signs in both diseases may cause diagnostic confusion although ptosis suggests coexisting MG. In both cases, the thyrotoxicosis delayed the diagnosis of MG. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Epidemiological survey of graves' disease in Tianjin area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuo; Fang Peihua; Lai Zemin; Chen Bingzhong; Lu Tizhang; Zhou Yinbao; Tan Jian; Ni Xiaoyan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the incidence of Graves' disease and associated factors. Methods: From 1997.4 to 1999.12, by using cluster and stratified sampling, total of 31530 people aged 6 years and over were surveyed epidemiologically for Graves' disease in five districts and one county of Tianjin area where the study subjects had been resided for at least one year. The researching team consisted of endocrinologists, epidemiologists and technicians and was divided into three branches, they served as investigators, professional experts and technicians, respectively. The serum thyroid hormones, thyroid antibodies, iodine in table salt, urine iodine and B-US were examined for the suspected cases, the final diagnoses were concluded by the professional experts. Results: Eighty-nine patients with Graves' disease were confirmed, 26 (0.166%) of them were males and 63(0.397%) of them were females, the total incidence was 0.282%. The incidence significantly associated with sex (female higher than male, P<0.001), age (50-60 group for male and 30-40 group for female higher than others, P<0.001) and family history (the patients with vs without family history, P<0.001). The survey showed an ascending trend of incidence of Graves' disease, along with decreasing of goiter rate and increasing of iodine contents in table salt and in urine. Further research work should be pursued. Conclusion: This study may provide some theoretical basis for prevention and treatment of Graves' disease

  8. Vitamin D and Graves' disease: a meta-analysis update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei-Yan; Cao, Bing; Yin, Jian; Wang, Dong-Fang; Chen, Kai-Li; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-05-21

    The association between vitamin D levels and Graves' disease is not well studied. This update review aims to further analyze the relationship in order to provide an actual view of estimating the risk. We searched for the publications on vitamin D and Graves' disease in English or Chinese on PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medical and Wanfang databases. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for the vitamin D levels. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI were calculated for vitamin D deficiency. We also performed sensitivity analysis and meta-regression. Combining effect sizes from 26 studies for Graves' disease as an outcome found a pooled effect of SMD = -0.77 (95% CI: -1.12, -0.42; p Graves' disease were more likely to be deficient in vitamin D compared to the controls (OR = 2.24, 95% CI: 1.31, 3.81) with a high heterogeneity (I2 = 84.1%, p Graves' disease.

  9. An unusual presenting symptom of graves' disease: myalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, N; Perros, P

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old female patient presented with severe myalgia involving her proximal muscles for 3-4 weeks. She also reported mild thyrotoxic symptoms over the same time period. Examination revealed mild thyrotoxicosis, a moderate diffuse goiter and no eye signs. The clinical picture was dominated by muscle pain and tenderness involving mainly her proximal arms and legs, her calves and her fingers, requiring opiate analgesia. Muscle power and tendon reflexes were normal. Laboratory evaluation revealed undetectable serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with raised FT4, FT3 and positive TSH receptor antibodies. Treatment with carbimazole was started. Additional laboratory investigations were negative (inflammatory markers, creatine kinase and antibodies to antinuclear antibodies, gastric parietal cell, smooth muscle, mitochondrial, dsDNA, centromere, extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) ribonucleoprotein, ENA Sm, ENA Ro, ENA Anti-La, ENA Scl70, ENA Jo-1, anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor). Further assessment in the rheumatology clinic confirmed there was no small joint tenderness or loss of range of movement of her limbs, but widespread and profound muscle tenderness of the common extensors of the forearms, biceps, trapezius, calves and thighs. She was treated symptomatically with analgesic medication and continued on carbimazole. A month later she was euthyroid and her myalgia had resolved. Hyperthyroidism has a profound effect on skeletal muscle and often leads to myopathy. Severe myalgia in association with Graves' disease is rare and resolves with the restoration of euthyroidism.

  10. Transient hypothyroidism after 131I treatment of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianfeng; Fang Yi; Zhang Xiuli; Ye Genyao; Xing Jialiu; Zhang Youren

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of the transient hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment of Graves disease. Methods: A total of 32 transient hypothyroidism patients treated with 131 I for Graves disease were studied and followed up. Results: Transient hypothyroidism occurred within 2-6 months after 131 I treatment and 19 patients were symptomatic. At diagnosis of transient hypothyroidism, T 3 and T 4 levels were decreased had normal, TSH levels were increased, normal or low. Follow-up examination found that 20 patients were normal and 12 patients had relapse of hyperthyroidism. Conclusions: Therapy of Graves disease with low doses of 131 I causes a high incidence of transient hypothyroidism. After recovery of transient hypothyroidism, some patients have relapse of hyperthyroidism

  11. F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, A.R.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Wienhard, K.; Wagner, R.

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluates F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves' disease. Methods: Thirty patients were investigated the day before radioiodine therapy, 15 patients 3-10 days after radioiodine therapy. Twenty patients with cancer of the head or neck and normal thyroid function served as controls. Results: F-18-FDG uptake was higher in Graves' disease patients than in controls. Negative correlations of F-18-FDG uptake with half-life of radioiodine and absorbed radiation dose due to radioiodine therapy were found along with a positive correlation to autoantibody levels. Conclusion: Thus F-18-FDG PET is likely to give information on the biological activity of Graves' disease as well as on early radiation effects. (orig.) [de

  12. A case of severe autoimmune hepatitis associated with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdulla Bokhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a common condition and is known to have a wide range of effects on a variety of organs. Hepatic dysfunction ranging from mild to severe due to direct effect of high circulating thyroid hormones as well as a deleterious effect of antithyroid medications (methimazole and propylthiouracil has been well - documented in literature. However, severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH associated with Graves' disease is rare and limited to few case reports only. A 38-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and yellowish discolouration of conjunctivae. On investigation, she was found to have Graves' disease and AIH. The liver histopathology showed typical features of AIH. She responded excellently to glucocorticoid therapy with normalisation of thyroid function and liver histology. The case is discussed with relevant literature review.

  13. Variation in the use of definitive treatment options in the management of Graves' disease: a UK clinician survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookham, Jessica; Collins, Emma E; Allahabadia, Amit; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease can be treated with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioiodine or surgery. Use of definitive treatments (radioiodine or surgery) varies widely across centres. Specific clinical circumstances, local facilities, patient and clinician preferences and perceptions will affect the choice of treatment. Detailed understanding of UK clinicians' views and their rationale for different treatments is lacking. To study the preferences and perceptions of UK clinicians on the role of surgery and radioiodine in the management of Graves' disease. 'British Thyroid Association' (BTA), 'Society for Endocrinology' (SFE) and 'British Association of Endocrine and Thyroid Surgeons' (BAETS) members were invited to complete an online survey examining their management decisions in Graves' disease and factors that influenced their decisions. 158 responses from UK consultants were included. The ratio of physicians to surgeons was 11:5 and males to females was 12:4. Most clinicians would commence ATDs in uncomplicated first presentation of Graves' disease. A wide range of risk estimates on the effectiveness and risks of treatment was given by clinicians. Radioiodine was used most frequently in relapsed Graves' disease. However, severe eye disease and pregnancy strongly influenced choice in favour of surgery. Surgeons underestimated the success of radioiodine (pGraves' disease. The variation appeared to be dependent on patient and disease-specific factors as well as physician experience, gender and specialty. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Graves' Disease Pharmacotherapy in Women of Reproductive Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunty, Jeremy J; Heise, Crystal D; Chaffin, David G

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder in which inappropriate stimulation of the thyroid gland results in unregulated secretion of thyroid hormones resulting in hyperthyroidism. Graves' disease is the most common cause of autoimmune hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. Treatment options for Graves' disease include thioamide therapy, partial or total thyroidectomy, and radioactive iodine. In this article, we review guideline recommendations for Graves' disease treatment in women of reproductive age including the recent guideline from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Controversy regarding appropriate thioamide therapy before, during, and after pregnancy is reviewed. Surgical and radioactive iodine therapy considerations in this patient population are also reviewed. In patients who may find themselves pregnant during therapy or develop Graves' disease during their pregnancy, consideration should be given to the most appropriate treatment course for the mother and fetus. Thioamide therapy should be used with either propylthiouracil or methimazole at appropriate doses that target the upper range of normal to slightly hyperthyroid to avoid creating hypothyroidism in the fetus. Consideration should also be given to the adverse effects of thioamide, such as agranulocytosis and hepatotoxicity, with appropriate patient consultation regarding signs and symptoms. Individuals who wish to breastfeed their infants while taking thioamide should receive the lowest effective dose. Surgery should be reserved for extreme cases and limited to the second trimester, if possible. Radioactive iodine therapy may be used in nonpregnant individuals, with limited harm to future fertility. Radioactive iodine therapy should be withheld in pregnant women and those who are actively breastfeeding. Clinicians should keep abreast of developments in clinical trials and evidence-based recommendations regarding Graves' disease in reproductive-age women for any changes in evidence

  15. Thyroid Ultrasonography in Differentiation between Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishdad, P; Pishdad, G R; Tavanaa, S; Pishdad, R; Jalli, R

    2017-03-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common causes of hyper and hypothyroidism, respectively. Differentiation of these 2 diseases, if the patient is euthyroid, may sometimes be extremely difficult on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of gray scale sonography in differentiation of Graves' disease from Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study included 149 patients divided into three groups, patients with Graves' disease (34 patients, mean age = 36.8 ± 10.17 years), Patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (62 patients, mean age = 33.4 ± 12.16 years) and control group (53 healthy people, mean age = 34.74 ± 16.87 years). Members of all groups were referred to a single radiologist for thyroid sonography for evaluation of thyroid echogenicity pattern. A total of 117 women and 32 men were examined by sonography. The most common sonographic pattern in Hashimoto and Graves' was homogenous hypo-echogenicity which was observed in 45.2% and 47.1% of cases, respectively. Peripheral hypo-echogenicity pattern was seen in 40.3% of Hashimoto's group with 100% specificity and 40.3% sensitivity. Central-hypoechogenic pattern was observed in 17.6% of Graves' group with 100% and 17.6% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Our findings indicate that sonography has high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It is therefore not possible to differentiate between these two diseases using sonography alone. Confirmation by laboratory data is also needed.

  16. Graves' disease presenting as pseudotumor cerebri: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Cláudia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pseudotumor cerebri is an entity characterized by elevated intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid and no structural abnormalities detected on brain MRI scans. Common secondary causes include endocrine pathologies. Hyperthyroidism is very rarely associated and only three case reports have been published so far. Case presentation We report the case of a 31-year-old Luso-African woman with clinical symptoms and laboratory confirmation of Graves' disease that presented as pseudotumor cerebri. Conclusion This is a rare form of presentation of Graves' disease and a rare cause of pseudotumor cerebri. It should be remembered that hyperthyroidism is a potential cause of pseudotumor cerebri.

  17. CT volumetric measurements of the orbits in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahe, T.; Schlolaut, K.H.; Poss, T.; Trier, H.G.; Lackner, K.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1989-01-01

    The volumes of the four recti muscles and the orbital fat was measured by CT in 40 normal persons and in 60 patients with clinically confirmed Graves' disease. Compared with normal persons, 42 patients (70%) showed an increase in muscle volume and 28 patients (46.7%) an increase in the amount of fat. In nine patients (15%) muscle volume was normal, but the fat was increased. By using volumetric measurements, the amount of fat in the orbits in patients with Graves' disease could be determined. (orig.) [de

  18. Facts and fallacies about radioactive iodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The therapeutic options available in the hyerthyroidism of Graves' disease are two basic treatments. Firstly antithyroid drugs and secondly one can 'ablate' the thyroid gland by means of thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine ( 131 I). At present 131 I is the current treatment of chioce for Graves' disease. In a follow-up study of 21 714 patients who were treated with 131 I and observed for a period of 8 years, there was no increase in the incidence of thyriod carcinoma. A possible explanation for this is that the dose of 131 I used destroys the ability of the thyroid cells to replicate and thus transmit genetically damaged material

  19. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis—An Unusual and Challenging Association

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial.

  20. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-An Unusual and Challenging Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2014-03-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial.

  1. Serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and Graves' disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carmen Sorina; Sirbu, Anca Elena; Betivoiu, Minodora Andreea; Florea, Suzana; Barbu, Carmen Gabriela; Fica, Simona Vasilica

    2017-02-01

    We investigated, at diagnosis, the relationship between serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and the main characteristics of Graves' disease: hyperthyroidism severity, goiter size, presence of active Graves' ophthalmopathy, antithyroid antibodies status, and titer. This prospective study included 80 newly diagnosed Graves' disease patients. The main parameters measured at diagnosis: thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine, total triiodothyronine, thyroglobulin, antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies, immunoglobulin G4. In Graves' disease patients, serum immunoglobulin G4 levels were higher than in general population (p = 0.028) and higher in men compared to women (p = 0.002). Only one female patient with intense hypoechoic goiter, high anti-thyroglobulin antibody, and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers had an elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 level at diagnosis. Patients with immunoglobulin G4 levels above the 75th percentile (>237.52 mg/dl, N = 20) were younger at Graves' ophthalmopathy onset (p 286.28 mg/dl, N = 8) had lower total triiodothyronine values (p = 0.001) than patients with IgG below the 90th percentile. No significant correlations were found between smoking status (p = 0.58), goiter size (p = 0.50), the presence of ophthalmopathy (p = 0.42) or thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody titers (p = 0.45) and the mean value of immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis. Our data suggest that Graves' disease patients with elevated immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis have a phenotype characterized by higher anti-thyroglobulin antibody and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers, less severe T3 hyperthyroidism, younger age at ophthalmopathy onset and require a shorter duration of the first methimazole treatment cycle.

  2. A Patient with Grave's Disease and Tuberculous Lymphadenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, M F; Chowdhury, M H; Khan, A H; Rahman, M; Barman, T K; Chowdhury, M J

    2016-04-01

    Immune reactivity between Mycobacteria and human antigens can play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We report a case of Graves's disease and tuberculous lymphadenitis to explain the mechanism of correlation between immune-mediated diseases and tuberculosis and to raise awareness of the importance of screening for TB in this context, especially in endemic country. Screening for latent TB at immune mediated disease diagnosis and regular timely screening thereafter may be beneficial.

  3. Death by Suicide in Graves' Disease and Graves' Orbitopathy: A Nationwide Danish Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Charlotte; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, but little is known about unnatural manners of death and the potential relation with Graves' orbitopathy (GO). This study investigated the risk of unnatural death in Graves' patients with and without orbitopathy compared to matched control populations. This was a cohort study covering all adult Danes (≥18 years) diagnosed with GD or GO during 1995-2012. Median follow-up time was 7.9 years (range 0-17.5 years). Utilizing the Danish Register of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Registry, 28,461 subjects with GD and 3965 with GO were identified and matched for age and sex with four subjects from the background population. The manner of death was identified, and hazard ratios (HR) for mortality due to unnatural deaths (accident, suicide, violence/homicide, and unknown) were calculated using Cox regression analyses, adjusted for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric morbidity. In Graves' disease overall (GD + GO), there was an increased risk of death from unknown unnatural manners (HR = 2.01 [confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.45], p = 0.012) and of suicide, although the latter difference was not with certainty statistically significant (HR = 1.43 [CI 1.00-2.04], p = 0.053). There was no significant difference in risk of death from suicide in GD subjects compared to their controls (HR = 1.27 [CI 0.85-1.89], p = 0.253). However, GO patients had a significantly higher risk of death from suicide (HR = 2.71 [CI 1.16-6.32], p = 0.022). Mortality by suicide was increased in Graves' disease overall, most significantly in patients with GO, also after adjustment for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric disease. These findings indicate that GD and GO may have a significant role in the pathophysiological mechanisms of suicidal behavior. Beyond independent confirmation, reasons for this need to be explored in order to introduce preventive measures.

  4. [Rituximab: a new therapeutic alternative in Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Winniczuk, Nina; Díaz-Jouanen, Efraín

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism, affecting mainly young aged women, with an etiology of autoimmune basis. One of its manifestations, Graves' ophthalmopathy whose pathophysiology is unknown, represents one of the greatest therapeutic challenges in these patients, because they require aggressive treatment with steroids and multiple subsequent reconstructive surgeries in certain cases. It also represents a high burden to the health system. Drugs targeting B cells have been very effective for many autoimmune diseases. Rituximab is a murine humanized monoclonal antibody against CD20 + cells currently being studied in various autoimmune diseases including Graves' disease. The objective of this paper is to expose possible mechanisms by which rituximab could act in both hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease, as well as the experience with its use acquired so far. The employment of rituximab in recently diagnosed patients or with mild ophthalmopathy is questionable with the evidence available today however, we think that it may have a role in refractory cases or those who have a contraindication for steroid use.

  5. In Graves' disease, increased muscle tension and reduced elasticity of affected muscles is primarily caused by active muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G. Kommerell (Guntram)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn three patients with Graves' disease of recent onset, length-tension diagrams were made during surgery for squint under eyedrop anesthesia, while the other eye looked ahead, into the field of action, or out of the field of action of the muscle that was measured. The affected muscles

  6. Significance of changes of serum TPOAb and TRAb levels in patients with Graves' disease (GD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongshu Xu Ruiji; Wang Guohong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of changes of serum TPOAb and TRAb levels in patients with Graves' dis- ease (GD). Methods: Serum TPOAb (with RIA) and TRAb (with RRA) levels were determined in 27 patients with Graves' disease, before treatment 10 patients with Graves' disease clinically cured and 35 controls. Results: The serum levels and positive rates of TPOAb and TRAb in patients with Graves' disease before treatment were significantly higher than those in the patients with Graves' disease clinically cured and controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: TPOAb and TRAb were involved in the pathogenesis of Graves' dis- ease and could be used as diagnostic and treatment indicators. (authors)

  7. Quality control of 131I treatment of graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zeng; Liu Guoqiang

    2009-01-01

    To make a preliminary quality control (QC) criteria and apply on the various stages of clinic 131 I treatment of Graves' disease in order to decrease the early happening of hypothyroidism and enhance the onetime 131 I cure rate of Graves' disease, the quality control criteria in the stochastic outpatient with 131 I treatment, such as plan of the indication, contraindication, method of treatment, matters needing attention, follow-up observation and curative effect appraisal, patient selection, RAIU, thyroid gland weight measurement and 131 I dose criteria for the various steps of 131 I medication were determined. The 131 I treatment effects of Graves' disease including the once-cure rate, the improving rate, duplicate cure rate and the early happening rate of hypothyroidism were analyzed in patients with applying QC and without QC ccriteria. The results showed that the oncecure rate in patients with applying QC criteria was increased from 76.6% to 90.9% (P≤0.01); the improving rate was decreased from 12.2% to 7.0% (P≤0.01); the duplicate cure rate was increased from 90.1% to 93.0% (P>0.05); the early happening rate of hypothyroidism was decreased from 11.0% to 2.1% (P≤0.01). The 131 I treatment of Graves' disease applying with QC criteria had tremendously improved the oncecure rate and decreased the early happening of hypothyroidism rate. (authors)

  8. 131I therapy of Graves' disease using lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kenshi

    1983-01-01

    Lithium is known to cause goiter and hypothyroidism. In the mechanism of goitrogenesis, there is general agreement that lithium inhibits the release of the thyroid hormones from the thyroid gland without significantly impairing other thyroid functions. The present study was undertaken, therefore, to investigate the usefulness of lithium in the radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease. Nine patients with Graves' disease who were all, except one, previously treated with antithyroid drugs were studied. 600 mg of lithium carbonate were administered daily to investigate the effects on thyroidal 131 I uptake, disappearance rate of 131 I from the prelabeled thyroid and the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. Lithium showed no significant effect on the thyroidal 131 I uptake when the 24 hour thyroidal 131 I uptakes were determined both before and during lithium treatment in the five cases. On the other hand, lithium clearly prolonged the mean value of effective half-lives of 131 I to approximately 8 days vs. 5.1 days before lithium treatment (p 4 and T 3 levels significantly decreased during lithium treatment, from 21.3 to 12.4μg/dl (n=9, p 131 I for the Graves' disease can be reduced by using lithium, the radiation exposure to the total body is decreased. Moreover, it is possible to perform the 131 I therapy while improving the thyrotoxicosis with lithium. Finally, it is concluded that lithium is a very useful drug to be combined with the 131 I therapy of Graves' disease. (author)

  9. [Guideline for the treatment of Graves' disease with antithyroid drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2006-12-01

    We have published "Guideline for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan 2006" in the middle of May from the Japan Thyroid Association. The background, working process, composition, aim and significance of this guideline are described. The most remarkable feature of this guideline is "evidence based".

  10. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms. PMID:21927380

  11. Personalised immunomodulating treatments for Graves' disease: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struja, Tristan Mirko; Kutz, Alexander; Fischli, Stefan; Meier, Christian; Müller, Beat; Schütz, Philipp

    2017-08-14

    Although Graves' disease has been recognised for more than 100 years, its physiopathological mechanisms are incompletely understood. Treatment strategies today mainly focus on suppression of thyroid hormone production by use of antithyroid drugs or radio-iodine, but neglect the underlying immunological mechanisms. Although Graves' disease is often seen as a prototype for an autoimmune mechanism, it is more likely to be a heterogeneous syndrome showing characteristics of both autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. The interplay of these two mechanisms may well characterise the physiopathology of this disease and its complications. Immunodeficiency may be either genetically determined or secondarily acquired. Various triggering events lead to autoimmunity with stimulation of the thyroid gland resulting in the clinical syndrome of hyperthyroidism. Also, relapse risk differs from patient to patient and can be estimated from clinical parameters incorporated into the Graves' Recurrent Events After Therapy (GREAT) score. Accurate risk stratification may help to distinguish high-risk patients for whom a more definitive treatment approach should be used from others where there is a high probability that the disease will recover with medical treatment alone. Several smaller trials having found positive effects of immunosuppressive drugs on recurrence risk in Graves' disease; therefoore, there is great potential in the use of novel immunomodulating drugs in addition to the currently used antithyroid drugs for the successful treatment of this condition. Further in-depth exploration of susceptibility, triggering factors and immunological mechanisms has the potential to improve treatment of Graves' disease, with more personalised, risk-adapted treatment strategies based on the different physiopathological concepts of this heterogeneous condition.

  12. Graves' hyperthyroidism and moderate alcohol consumption: evidence for disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, A.; Bülow Pedersen, I.; Knudsen, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism, similar to findings in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. We aimed to study a possible....... CONCLUSIONS: Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of Graves' disease with hyperthyroidism - irrespective of age and sex. Autoimmune thyroid disease seems to be much more dependent on environmental factors than hitherto anticipated....

  13. Subclinical Hypothyroidism after 131I-Treatment of Graves' Disease: A Risk Factor for Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Tian, Ai-Juan; Yuan, Xin; Cheng, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well accepted that there is a close relationship between hypothyroidism and depression, previous studies provided inconsistent or even opposite results in whether subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) increased the risk of depression. One possible reason is that the etiology of SCH in these studies was not clearly distinguished. We therefore investigated the relationship between SCH resulting from 131I treatment of Graves' disease and depression. The incidence of depression among 95 patients with SCH and 121 euthyroid patients following 131I treatment of Graves' disease was studied. The risk factors of depression were determined with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy was performed in patients with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels exceeding 10 mIU/L. Patients with SCH had significantly higher Hamilton Depression Scale scores, serum TSH and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) levels compared with euthyroid patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed SCH, Graves' eye syndrome and high serum TPO antibody level as risk factors for depression. L-thyroxine treatment is beneficial for SCH patients with serum TSH levels exceeding 10 mIU/L. The results of the present study demonstrated that SCH is prevalent among 131I treated Graves' patients. SCH might increase the risk of developing depression. L-thyroxine replacement therapy helps to resolve depressive disorders in SCH patients with TSH > 10mIU/L. These data provide insight into the relationship between SCH and depression.

  14. Follow-up of newborns of mothers with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Shraga, Yael; Tamir-Hostovsky, Liran; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit

    2014-06-01

    Overt neonatal Graves' disease is rare, but may be severe, even life threatening, with deleterious effects on neural development. The main objective of this study was to describe the course of thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxin (fT4) levels, as well as postnatal weight gain in relation to fT4 levels, in neonates born to women with Graves' disease without overt neonatal thyrotoxicosis. Such information is important to deduce the optimal schedule for evaluation. We conducted a retrospective chart review of neonates born to mothers with Graves' disease between January 2007 and December 2012. The records were reviewed for sex, gestational age, birth weight, maternal treatment during pregnancy, and maternal thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) level. For each visit in the clinic, the data included growth parameters, presence of symptoms suspected for hyperthyroidism, blood test results (levels of TSH, fT4, and TSI), and treatment. Ninety-six neonates were included in the study (49 males), with a total of 320 measurements of thyroid function tests (TSH and fT4). Four neonates (4%) had overt neonatal Graves' disease; one of them along with nine others were born preterm. In 77 (92.9%) of the remaining 83 neonates (the subclinical group), fT4 levels were above the 95th percentile on day 5. All had normal fT4 on day 15. A negative association was found between fT4 and weight gain during the first two weeks. In this cohort, most neonates born to mothers with Graves' disease had a subclinical course with abnormal fT4 levels that peaked at day 5. After day 14, all measurements of fT4 returned to the normal range, although measurements of TSH remained suppressed for up to three months. Elevated fT4 was associated with poor weight gain.

  15. SUBTOTAL THYROIDECTOMY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF GRAVE'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, P J; Garg, M K; Singh, Y; Bhalla, V P; Datta, S

    2001-07-01

    Treatment options for Grave's disease include radio-iodine ablation, which is the standard treatment in the USA, antithyroid drug therapy, which is popular in Japan, and surgery, which is commonly employed in Europe and India. There are very few reports about the outcome of surgery in Grave's disease in the Indian setting. Surgery for Grave's disease is an attractive option in under developed countries to cut short prolonged drug treatment, costly follow up and avoid the need for radio-isotope facilities for 1311 ablation. Aim of the present study was to assess the result of subtotal thyroidectomy in 32 cases of Grave's Disease referred for surgery by the endocrinologist in a teaching hospital. Patients were prepared for surgery with Lugol's iodine and propranalol. Subtotal thyroidectomy was performed by a standard technique, which included dissection and exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerves and parathyroid glands. Actual estimation of weight of the remnant gland was not part of the study. Duration of follow up ranged from 6 months to 4 years. 13 of 32 cases were males. Age ranged from 20 to 57 years. There was 1 death in the immediate post-operative period. There were no cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. 1 patient developed temporary hypoparathyroidism. 1 patient developed recurrence of hyperthyroidism and 3 cases developed hypothyroidism all within 2 years of surgery. The study has demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of surgery for Grave's Disease in comparison to the reported high incidence of hypothyroidism following radio-iodine therapy and high recurrence rate after anti thyroid drug therapy.

  16. Case report of Graves' disease manifesting with odynophagia and heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evsyutina, Yulia; Trukhmanov, Alexander; Ivashkin, Vladimir; Storonova, Olga; Godjello, Elina

    2015-12-28

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease, which can manifest with a variety of extrathyroidal clinical syndromes like ophthalmopathy, pretibial myxedema (dermopathy), acropathy, cardiomyopathy, and encephalopathy. Though quite rare, this disease can also manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms such as dysphagia, heartburn, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. We report a clinical case of Graves' disease manifesting with dysfunction of the esophagus and heartburn in a 61-year-old man. In the muscular layer of the esophagus we found dystrophic changes led to its atony, which was documented by endoscopy and high-resolution manometry. The pathology features of esophageal symptoms were: focal proliferation of the basal cells, vascular distension, and dystrophy of the epithelial cells. Antithyroid treatment led to decrease of all clinical symptoms after 5 d of Thiamazole administration. Complete restoration of peristalsis in the esophagus, according to manometry, was observed in 1 mo after initiation of treatment.

  17. Related factors of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy in patents with Graves' disease after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Lian; Lu Keyi; Chen Xia; Zhao Deshan; Liu Jianzhong; Li Sijin; Li Xianfeng; Sun Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the related factors of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy(TAO) in patients with Graves' disease after 131 I treatment. Methods: Five hundred and sixty two patients with Graves' disease were followed up after 131 I treatment, included 243 cases with TAO and 319 cases without TAO. Logistic multivariate regression analysis was used to analyse the data of the improvement of the TAO, stability and progression. Results: Of the patients without TAO, 10 new cases of TAO were diagnosed (3.13%). Of the patients with TAO, 134 (55.14%) had experienced improvement, 99 (40.74%) cases with stable disease and 10 (4.12%) cases with progressed disease. The progression rate were no difference between the part of patients with and without TAO (χ 2 =0.576, P>0.05), and were difference between simple and invasive prominent eyes groups (χ 2 =11.893, P 2 =10.621, P 131 I therapy had no obviously influence between Graves' disease with and without TAO, and early controling the risk factors and treatment with glucocorticoid could prevent aggravation of TAO. (authors)

  18. Clinical significance of determination of serum TRAb levels in patients with relapsing graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chunlei; Zhou Jiaqiang; Li Wenpeng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum TRAb levels in patients with relapsing Graves' disease. Methods: Serum TRAb (with RRA) and several other thyroid-related hormones (TT 4 , TT 3 , TSH, FT 3 , with CLIA) were determined in the following subjects: 1. 25 cases of relapsing Graves' disease after previous successful treatment; 2. 18 cases of recently diagnosed Graves' disease; 3. 31 cases of successfully treated Graves' disease; 4. 15 cases of simple goiter; 5. 10 cases of nodular goiter; 6. 18 cases of hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto disease. Results: Positive rate of TRAb was 76.00% in patients with relapsing Graves' disease and 77.78% in recently diagnosed Graves' disease cases, both being significantly higher than that in all the other sets of patients studied (P<0.01). Conclusion: Determination of serum TRAb levels was helpful for the diagnosis of relapse in Graves' disease

  19. Predictive factors for intraoperative excessive bleeding in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Kosho; Minami, Shigeki; Hayashida, Naomi; Sakimura, Chika; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    In Graves' disease, because a thyroid tends to have extreme vascularity, the amount of intraoperative blood loss (AIOBL) becomes significant in some cases. We sought to elucidate the predictive factors of the AIOBL. A total of 197 patients underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 2002 and 2012. We evaluated clinical factors that would be potentially related to AIOBL retrospectively. The median period between disease onset and surgery was 16 months (range: 1-480 months). Conventional surgery was performed in 125 patients, whereas video-assisted surgery was performed in 72 patients. Subtotal and near-total/total thyroidectomies were performed in 137 patients and 60 patients, respectively. The median weight of the thyroid was 45 g (range: 7.3-480.0 g). Univariate analysis revealed that the strongest correlation of AIOBL was noted with the weight of thyroid (p Graves' disease, and preparation for blood transfusion should be considered in cases where thyroids weigh more than 200 g. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Ultrasonographic Features of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients with Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin Ook; Cho, Dong Hyeok; Chung, Dong Jin

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims To characterize ultrasonographic findings in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) combined with Graves' disease. Methods Medical records and ultrasonographic findings of 1,013 patients with Graves' disease and 3,380 patients without Graves' disease were analyzed retrospectively. A diagnosis of PTC was based on a pathologic examination. Results The frequency of hypoechogenicity was lower in patients with PTC and Graves' disease than in patients with PTC alone (p Graves' disease was significantly higher than in those with PTC alone (p Graves' disease was characterized by more ill-defined borders and less frequency of overall calcification, punctate calcification, and heterogeneous echogenicity, although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that patients with Graves' disease more frequently have atypical PTC findings on ultrasonography. PMID:20195406

  1. Hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease: Is an ultrasound examination needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Varadhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to assess the limitation of clinical examination in determining the morphology of thyroid gland in patients with hyperthyroidism and its implications. Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism seen in a tertiary endocrine clinic were analyzed. Sub-analysis was performed on patients with proven Graves' disease. Results: Of the 133 patients included in this study with hyperthyroidism, 60 (45% patients had significant nodularity on ultrasound (US. However, only 67% of these were identified on clinical examination. In patients with confirmed Graves' disease (n = 73, the discordance between US and clinical examination was very similar (18 of 30 patients, 60%. Conclusion: US should form an essential part of the evaluation of hyperthyroidism as the morphology of thyroid gland could be variable and nodules in these glands would also need to be appropriately investigated. This would also significantly influence decision-making and appropriate immediate and follow-up management plan.

  2. Generalised pruritus as a presentation of Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ce; Loh, Ky

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus is a lesser known symptom of hyperthyroidism, particularly in autoimmune thyroid disorders. This is a case report of a 27-year-old woman who presented with generalised pruritus at a primary care clinic. Incidental findings of tachycardia and a goiter led to the investigations of her thyroid status. The thyroid function test revealed elevated serum free T4 and suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone levels. The anti-thyroid antibodies were positive. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and treated with carbimazole until her symptoms subsided. Graves' disease should be considered as an underlying cause for patients presenting with pruritus. A thorough history and complete physical examination are crucial in making an accurate diagnosis. Underlying causes must be determined before treating the symptoms.

  3. Relationship between the management of Graves' disease and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Suping; Kuang Anren

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To perform literature search and review on the controversial relationship between therapies of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease (GD) and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Methods: We searched the database of MEDLINE (1966-2006.3), EMBASE (1984-2005), Cochrane Library(2006 No. 1), CBMdisc (1978.1-2006.4) and CNKI (1994-2006). The methodological quality of the studies selected for review was assessed according to the quality assessment criteria suggested by the Cochrane systematic review guideline. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 4.2 software. Results: Eight studies were included in the systematic review. Meta-analysis showed that there was statistically significant difference between mi and other forms of therapy [surgery or antithyroid drugs (ATD)] (test value: 2.31, 5.97, 3.70, 5.55; all P 0.05). There were not yet any studies on the impact between early prevention of hypothyroidism after mi therapy and GO. Conclusions: Based on meta-analysis on literature data, if early measures are not performed to prevent hypothyroidism after mi therapy, it may induce or aggravate GO more frequently than ATD or surgical treatment. Symptomatic relief of GO after 131 I therapy is also less effective than the other 2 forms of therapy. Therefore, 131 I therapy should be delivered carefully in those patients with GO. (authors)

  4. [Efficacy of treatment with I(131) in paediatric Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enes Romero, P; Martín-Frías, M; de Jesús, M; Caballero Loscos, C; Alonso Blanco, M; Barrio Castellanos, R

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important therapeutic option in young patients with Grave's disease (GD). In the United States it is a widespread therapy, but in Europe its use in paediatrics is still controversial. To report our experience in radioiodine therapy of paediatric GD patients and analyse its effectiveness and safety. We retrospectively studied our paediatric population (de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Does radioiodine cause the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    This editorial briefly reviews studies which might answer the question as to whether radioiodine treatment causes the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease. However, the data do not allow any conclusion one way or the other. Other possible causal factors are discussed. Further studies are required to define whether treatment of hyperthyroidism aggravates the ophthalmopathy and whether one thereby is worse than the others and by how much. (UK)

  6. Hyperthyroidism and Graves? disease: Is an ultrasound examination needed?

    OpenAIRE

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Varughese, George Iype; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study was to assess the limitation of clinical examination in determining the morphology of thyroid gland in patients with hyperthyroidism and its implications. Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism seen in a tertiary endocrine clinic were analyzed. Sub-analysis was performed on patients with proven Graves' disease. Results: Of the 133 patients included in this study with hyperthyroidism, 60 (45%) patients had significant nodularity...

  7. Graves' disease: A comparison of CT and orthoptic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbertz, T.; Markl, A.; Pickardt, C.R.; Boergen, K.P.; Muenchen Univ.; Muenchen Univ.

    1988-01-01

    The correlation between the loss of function of the extrinsic rectus eyemuscles and their appearance on computed tomography images in patients with Graves' disease was examined. Pathologic changes of a single rectus eyemuscle normally blockade the movement of the corresponding antagonistic muscle. This is caused by the impossibility to relax due to fibrotic alterations. Nevertheless there are some hints, which indicate, that in some cases, especially concerning the lateral rectus muscle, the inherent function of the thickened muscle is restricted. (orig.) [de

  8. Piezosurgery in Modified Pterional Orbital Decompression Surgery in Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Masalha, Waseem; Jarc, Nadja; Grauvogel, Tanja; Beringer, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Piezosurgery uses microvibrations to selectively cut bone, preserving the adjacent soft tissue. The present study evaluated the use of piezosurgery for bone removal in orbital decompression surgery in Graves disease via a modified pterional approach. A piezosurgical device (Piezosurgery medical) was used in 14 patients (20 orbits) with Graves disease who underwent orbital decompression surgery in additional to drills and rongeurs for bone removal of the lateral orbital wall and orbital roof. The practicability, benefits, and drawbacks of this technique in orbital decompression surgery were recorded. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to safety, preciseness of bone cutting, and preservation of the adjacent dura and periorbita. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcome data were assessed. The orbital decompression surgery was successful in all 20 orbits, with good clinical outcomes and no postoperative complications. Piezosurgery proved to be a safe tool, allowing selective bone cutting with no damage to the surrounding soft tissue structures. However, there were disadvantages concerning the intraoperative handling in the narrow space and the efficiency of bone removal was limited in the orbital decompression surgery compared with drills. Piezosurgery proved to be a useful tool in bone removal for orbital decompression in Graves disease. It is safe and easy to perform, without any danger of damage to adjacent tissue because of its selective bone-cutting properties. Nonetheless, further development of the device is necessary to overcome the disadvantages in intraoperative handling and the reduced bone removal rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyperparathyroidism after radioactive iodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Juichi; Tobisu, Kenichi; Sanada, Shingo

    1983-01-01

    Herein we report a 36-year-old man with hyperparathyroidism and a past history of internal irradiation to the thyroid. Twelve years previously at age 24 years he had received 8 mCi of radioactive iodine for Graves' disease. An additional dose of 4 mCi was required 3 years later. A right lower parathyroid adenoma (28 x 23 x 20 mm, 5.7 g) was found at neck exploration. Although the association of external ionizing radiation to the head and neck and the subsequent development of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands has been described in recent years, there are only 4 cases in the literature of parathyroid surgery for hyperparathyroidism secondary to earlier treatment with radioactive iodine for Graves' disease. In a long-term follow-up of 180 patients treated with radioactive iodine for Graves' disease, neither hypercalcemia nor hypophosphatemia was found. Whether internal radiation therapy can be a causative factor in the development of hyperparathyroidism should be elucidated in future. However, it seems reasonable to suggest that patients whose hyper-thyroidism has been treated with radioactive iodine should have their scrum calcium levels examined at 5-year intervals. (author)

  10. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M.

    2002-01-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  11. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis—An Unusual and Challenging Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial. PMID:25755537

  12. The Genetic Basis of Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płoski, Rafał; Szymański, Konrad; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    The presented comprehensive review of current knowledge about genetic factors predisposing to Graves’ disease (GD) put emphasis on functional significance of observed associations. In particular, we discuss recent efforts aimed at refining diseases associations found within the HLA complex and implicating HLA class I as well as HLA-DPB1 loci. We summarize data regarding non-HLA genes such as PTPN22, CTLA4, CD40, TSHR and TG which have been extensively studied in respect to their role in GD. We review recent findings implicating variants of FCRL3 (gene for FC receptor-like-3 protein), SCGB3A2 (gene for secretory uteroglobin-related protein 1- UGRP1) as well as other unverified possible candidate genes for GD selected through their documented association with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Tenr–IL2–IL21, CAPSL (encoding calcyphosine-like protein), IFIH1(gene for interferon-induced helicase C domain 1), AFF3, CD226 and PTPN2. We also review reports on association of skewed X chromosome inactivation and fetal microchimerism with GD. Finally we discuss issues of genotype-phenotype correlations in GD. PMID:22654555

  13. Treatment of Graves' disease and the course of ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridama, V.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Contradictory results have been obtained with regards to the effect of various treatment modes on the exacerbation of Graves' ophthalmopathy, probably because the number of patients in each study was small and some studies were analyzed only in relation to one type of treatment. To circument these problems, we studied the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy after various modes of therapy for thyrotoxicosis among 537 patients with Graves' disease. A total of 537 patients with Graves' disease were prospectively studied over an 11-year period. Thirty-one patients were lost to follow-up during the first six months after treatment and were excluded from the study. Of those remaining, 426 received one form of treatment, 79 received two kinds of therapy, and one received three kinds of therapy. Thus, surgical treatments numbered 164, radioactive iodine-131 ( 13 1I) treatments numbered 241, and medical treatments numbered 182. Ocular signs were considered improved or exacerbated by the following criteria: decrement or increment of the exophthalmos of 2 mm or more, improvement or deterioration of visual acuity, and regression or progression of extraocular muscle involvement causing diplopia. Among patients who did not have infiltrative ophthalmopathy before treatment, there was no difference in the occurrence of posttreatment exophthalmos in the surgically, medically, and 131I-treated patients (7.1%, 6.7%, and 4.9%, respectively). The incidence and the degree of progression of ophthalmopathy in patients who already had exophthalmos before treatment were similar in the medically, surgically, and 131I-treated groups (19.2%, 19.8%, and 22.7%, respectively). Most of the progression occurred in the posttreatment euthyroid stage. The incidence of improvement of ophthalmopathy was also similar 14.1%, 12.6%, and 12.3% in the medically, surgically, and 131I-treated patients

  14. Telemedicine and Diabetic Eye Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    We know that the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults is eye disease related to poorly managed diabetes. In a prevention research study, telemedicine was shown to increase the number of people getting screened for diabetic eye disease.

  15. Enhanced thyroid iodine metabolism in patients with triiodothyronine-predominant Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, J.; Hosoya, T.; Naito, N.

    1988-01-01

    Some patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease have increased serum T3 and normal or even low serum T4 levels during treatment with antithyroid drugs. These patients with elevated serum T3 to T4 ratios rarely have a remission of their hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to investigate thyroid iodine metabolism in such patients, whom we termed T3-predominant Graves' disease. Mean thyroid radioactive iodine uptake was 51.0 +/- 18.1% ( +/- SD) at 3 h, and it decreased to 38.9 +/- 20.1% at 24 h in 31 patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease during treatment. It was 20.0 +/- 11.4% at 3 h and increased to 31.9 +/- 16.0% at 24 h in 17 other patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease who had normal serum T3 and T4 levels and a normal serum T3 to T4 ratio during treatment (control Graves' disease). The activity of serum TSH receptor antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in control Graves' disease patients. From in vitro studies of thyroid tissue obtained at surgery, both thyroglobulin content and iodine content in thyroglobulin were significantly lower in patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in the control Graves' disease patients. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity determined by a guaiacol assay was 0.411 +/- 0.212 g.u./mg protein in the T3-predominant Graves' disease patients, significantly higher than that in the control Graves' disease patients. Serum TPO autoantibody levels determined by immunoprecipitation also were greater in T3-predominant Graves' disease patients than in control Graves' disease patients. Binding of this antibody to TPO slightly inhibited the enzyme activity of TPO, but this effect of the antibody was similar in the two groups of patients

  16. The plastic surgeon and Graves disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, A

    2004-01-01

    Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy is a disease caused by autoimmune processes that also affects the thyroid gland and the lower limbs; at orbital level, it involves the muscle and adipose tissue. When medical treatment fails to achieve appreciable results, surgery aims to decompress the orbital cavity. In recent years, the treatment has been considerably improved by the introduction of transpalpebral lipectomy, which has produced valid results especially in cases when extrinsic muscle hypertrophy is limited; if it is severe, however, lipectomy can be combined with expansion of the orbital cavity, thus enabling the latter to be restricted to one or two walls instead of three. Studying 52 patients who underwent orbital decompression involving lipectomy and/or orbital expansion, affecting a total of 96 orbits, enabled an assessment of the pros and cons of the single techniques in an attempt to identify a rational approach to this pathology. It emerged that lipectomy alone may suffice and obtain valid results in cases of mild-to-moderate proptosis (up to 24 mm) with limited extrinsic muscle hypertrophy, whereas orbital expansion--with or without lipectomy--is likely to be necessary in moderate-to-severe cases (proptosis greater than 24 mm). Additional procedures to correct the elevator and retractor muscles of the eyelids were almost always necessary.

  17. Two adolescent patients with coexistent Graves' disease and Moyamoya disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Kim, Su Yung; Yoo, Jae-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular condition that results in the narrowing of the vessels of the circle of Willis and collateral vessel formation at the base of the brain. Although relationships between Graves' disease and cerebrovascular accidents in Moyamoya disease are obscure, the coexistence of the two diseases is noteworthy. Moyamoya disease has been rarely reported in adolescent patients with thyrotoxicosis. Recently, we encountered two adolescent Korean patients with Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease who presented with episodic right-sided hemiparesis and syncope. These two girls who had Graves' disease had no history of other diseases or head trauma. A thyroid function test revealed a euthyroid state and a high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody titer at that time. The patients were diagnosed with Moyamoya disease based on brain magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral four-vessel angiography. The patients underwent cranial revascularization by encephalo-duroarterio-synangiosis as soon as a diagnosis was made, which resulted in successful symptom resolution. They fared well and had no additional neurological symptoms as of their last follow-up visits. Here, we report these two cases of confirmed Moyamoya disease complicated by Graves' disease with a review of the literature, and discuss the possible association between the two diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report in South Korea on Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease in adolescents with a euthyroid.

  18. A report of three cases of untreated Graves' disease associated with pancytopenia in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafhati, Abdullah Noor; See, Chee Keong; Hoo, Fan Kee; Badrulnizam, Long Bidin Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Generally, clinical presentations of Graves' disease range from asymptomatic disease to overt symptomatic hyperthyroidism with heat intolerance, tremor, palpitation, weight loss, and increased appetite. However, atypical presentation of Graves' disease with hematological system involvement, notably pancytopenia, is distinctly uncommon. Hereby, we present and discuss a series of three untreated cases of Graves' disease clinically presented with pancytopenia and the hematological abnormalities that responded well to anti-thyroid treatment. With resolution of the thyrotoxic state, the hematological parameters improved simultaneously. Thus, it is crucial that anti-thyroid treatment be considered in patients with Graves' disease and pancytopenia after a thorough hematological evaluation.

  19. Characterization of radioiodine therapy failures in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Schreckenberger, M.; Reinartz, P.; Nowak, B.; Ostwald, E.; Schaefer, W.; Block, S.; Setani, K.; Buell, U.

    2001-01-01

    Aim of this study was a characterization of radioiodine therapy (RIT) failures in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole. Method: 226 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease received 686.8 ± 376.4 MBq of iodine-131 orally for thyroid ablation. Target dose was 250 Gy. All patients were followed up for 6 months. Therapy failures were compared with successes regarding possible influencing variables initial thyroid volume, thyroid function, immune activity (TRAb), I-131 uptake, effective half-life, absorbed energy dose, age and gender. Results: 212 of 226 patients (93.8%) were treated successfully, 14 (6.2%) showed a hyperthyroidism relapse within 6 months which required a second radioiodine therapy. A success rate of 92.5% (62/67) could also be achieved with 67 patients who were hyperthyroid at the time of RIT. Compared to the therapy successes, the 14 failures achieved significantly lower absorbed doses (223.8 ± 76.6 Gy vs. 285.2 ± 82.1 Gy, p 0.2). Of the 14 failures, n = 8 reached an absorbed dose 250 Gy. Stepwise logistic regression revealed only absorbed energy dose as a variable significantly influencing therapy success (p 0.2) or gender (p = 0.13). Two-tailed Fisher's exact test showed no significant influence of gender on success rates (failures/successes: male 1/36, female 13/176, p = 0.48). Conclusions: Except for the absorbed energy dose, no other significant variable influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole could be found. It should be noted, though, that 5 therapy failures (2.2%) reached an absorbed energy dose of >250 Gy. (orig.) [de

  20. The treatment of Graves' disease in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Sang Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease (GD accounts for 10%-15% of thyroid disorders in children and adolescents. The use of antithyroid drugs as the initial treatment option in GD is well accepted. An average two years remission is achieved in about 30% of children treated with antithyroid drugs. However, the optimal treatment duration and the predictive marker of remission after antithyroid drug therapy are still controversial. Additionally, 131I therapy and surgery are considered the option for treatment in children and adolescents with GD. We review the treatment options for pediatric GD and the possible determinants of remission and relapse on antithyroid drug treatment in children and adolescents.

  1. Treatment of Graves' disease with I131: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Povis, J.E.; Sandoval Okuma, J.C.; Contreras Carreno, S.E.; Cabello Morales, E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the response and complications in children and teenagers suffering Graves' disease who received radioactive iodine therapy. Material and Methods: The clinical records of the patients attended at Paediatric Endocrinology Unit of Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia who received therapy with I 131 were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, thyroid weight, radioactive iodine uptake, I 131 dose and clinical and thyroid function evolution were registered. Results: We include thirteen patients: 1 male and 12 females. The mean thyroid weight obtained was 47.56 ± 10.70 gr. Initial calculated dose was 3.92 ± 0.95 mCi, with a total dose of 4.47 ± 1.66 mCi, and mean following period of 2.76 years. Ten patients received only one dose, 2 patients received two doses and one patient received three doses; all cases remitted. Patients who received only 1 dose showed disease remission at 13.13 weeks and mean remission period of the population was 24.62 weeks. Hypothyroidism prevalence up to six months from initiating treatment was 66.66%, and up to 257 weeks 83.33%. Conclusions: We conclude that I 131 was 100% effective in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering Graves' disease in this small series. (author)

  2. Clinical significance of determination of serum BGP levels in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Liping; Zhang Chunyan; Wang Linglong; Yu Yuefang; Zhu Weijie; Cai Ao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum BGP levels in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum BOP levels as well as T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH, TGA, TMA levels were determined with RIA in 158 patients with Graves' disease and 145 controls. Results: The serum BGP levels in patients with Graves' disease were significantly higher than those in controls (P 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 levels, but not with TSH, TGA, TMA. Conclusion: Serum BGP levels is a useful marker for monitoring bone metabolism in patients with Graves' disease. (authors)

  3. Graves' hyperthyroidism and moderate alcohol consumption: evidence for disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlé, Allan; Bülow Pedersen, Inge; Knudsen, Nils; Perrild, Hans; Ovesen, Lars; Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Jørgensen, Torben; Laurberg, Peter

    2013-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism, similar to findings in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. We aimed to study a possible association between alcohol intake and autoimmune Graves' hyperthyroidism. This is a population-based, case-control study. In a well-defined Danish population (2,027,208 person-years of observation), we prospectively identified patients with new overt thyroid dysfunction and studied 272 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. For each patient, we recruited four age-gender-region-matched controls with normal thyroid function (n = 1088). Participants gave detailed information on current and previous alcohol intake as well as other factors to be used for analyses. The association between alcohol intake and development of hyperthyroidism was analysed in conditional multivariate Cox regression models. Graves' patients had a lower reported alcohol consumption than controls (median units of alcohol (12 g) per week: 2 vs 4, P hyperthyroidism. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) compared with the reference group with a recent (last year) consumption of 1-2 units of alcohol per week were as follows: 0 units/week 1·73 (1·17-2·56), 3-10 units/week 0·56 (0·39-0·79), 11-20 units/week 0·37 (0·21-0·65), ≥21 units/week 0·22 (0·08-0·60). Similar results were found for maximum previous alcohol consumption during a calendar year. No interaction was found with the type of alcohol consumed (wine vs beer), smoking habit, age, gender or region of inhabitancy. Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of Graves' disease with hyperthyroidism--irrespective of age and gender. Autoimmune thyroid disease seems to be much more dependent on environmental factors than hitherto anticipated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 affect the severity of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cerbo, Alfredo; Pezzuto, Federica; Di Cerbo, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease, the most common form of hyperthyroidism in iodine-replete countries, is associated with the presence of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) that are responsible for thyroid growth and hyperfunction. In this article, we report the unusual case of a patient with acromegaly and a severe form of Graves' disease. Here, we address the issue concerning the role of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) in influencing thyroid function. Severity of Graves' disease is exacerbated by coexistent acromegaly and both activity indexes and symptoms and signs of Graves' disease improve after the surgical remission of acromegaly. We also discuss by which signaling pathways GH and IGF1 may play an integrating role in regulating the function of the immune system in Graves' disease and synergize the stimulatory activity of Graves' IgGs. Clinical observations have demonstrated an increased prevalence of euthyroid and hyperthyroid goiters in patients with acromegaly.The coexistence of acromegaly and Graves' disease is a very unusual event, the prevalence being Graves' disease associated with acromegaly and show that surgical remission of acromegaly leads to a better control of symptoms of Graves' disease.

  5. Sudden unexpected death due to Graves' disease during physical altercation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dengming; Yuan, Xiaogang; Yang, Tiantong; Chang, Lin; Zhang, Xiang; Burke, Allen; Fowler, David; Li, Ling

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old woman who suddenly collapsed after having a physical altercation with her husband. Despite immediate resuscitation, she died on arrival at the hospital. The victim's parents requested an autopsy because they believed that their daughter was killed by her husband. Postmortem examination revealed that the victim had a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland and cardiomegaly with left ventricular hypertrophy. There was no evidence of significant trauma on the body. Further postmortem thyroid function tests and review of her medical history indicated that her death was due to Graves' disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported of sudden death due to cardiac arrhythmia from Graves' disease induced by physical and emotional stress associated with the criminal activity of another person. The autopsy findings are described. In addition, the literature is reviewed and the significance of postmortem evaluation of thyroid hormones in the cases of sudden death is discussed. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Radioiodine-induced hypothyroidism in Graves' disease: factors associated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnien, A.J.; Hay, I.D.; Gorman, C.A.; Offord, K.P.; Scanlon, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of the records of 454 patients who received their first 131 I treatment for Graves' disease during six periods covering 1951 to 1978. In the earliest group, 3% of patients were hypothyroid 3 mo after 131 I use, and 40% were hypothyroid at 1 yr. In the most recent group, 36% of patients were hypothyroid at 3 mo and 91% were myxedematous at 1 yr. Although no obvious trends were noted, whether in the number of patients pretreated with thionamide drugs, in the mean 24-hr 131 I uptake, or in the calculated dose of 131 I (muCi/estimated gram of thyroid tissue) during the years of the study, the initial mean dose of 131 I administered increased from 8.1 mCi in the earliest group to 13.8 mCi in the latest group. Concurrently, estimates of gland size increased from a mean of 26 g in the first group to 43 g in the last. If, in patients with Graves' disease, the thyroid gland size did not truly increase during the years of the study, the increasing occurrence of early hypothyroidism seen after 131 I use may reflect the conscious or unconscious decision to use larger doses of 131 I calculated on the basis of inflated estimates of thyroid gland weight

  7. Hyperthyroidism in Graves disease. Current trends in management and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haibach, H.

    1976-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay for T 3 is now widely available and is a useful diagnostic tool for hyperthyroidism, especially in T 3 -thyrotoxicosis. It is an essential tool in the management of hyperthyroidism that persists after treatment with normal T 4 serum levels or, in euthyroid cases, with low T 4 serum levels. In these conditions, it reflects the metabolic state more accurately than serum levels of T 4 . A promising new test is the response of radioimmunoassayable TSH to protirelin relin (TRH) administration. An absent response indicates pituitary suppression and thyroid autonomy as seen in frank hyperthyroidism or euthyroid Graves disease, treated or untreated. It is safer and quicker than the conventional T 3 suppression test of thyroid radioactive iodine uptake and may replace it at least partly in the future. The recently recognized sharp decline in the remission rate of patients subjected to thyroid drug therapy in the last decade has made this treatment much less efficacious. By necessity, it will probably lead to greater reliance on treatment with radioactive iodine in the majority of the patients with the hyperthyroidism of Graves disease

  8. [Severe neonatal hyperthyroidism which reveals a maternal Graves' disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, B; Vautier, V; Boin-Gay, V; Estrade, G; Choulot, J-J; Doireau, V

    2004-04-01

    Two of every thousand pregnancies are complicated by Graves' disease. Diagnosis is suggested by maternal disorders (tachycardia, exophthalmia, weight loss.) or fetal disorders (tachycardia, intra-uterine growth retardation, preterm birth.). Due to transfer into the fetal compartment of maternal antibodies which stimulate the fetal thyroid by binding to the thyroid thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, only 1% of children born to these mothers are described as having hyperthyroidism. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis disappears with clearance of the maternal antibodies; clinical signs usually disappear during the first four Months of life. The most frequent neonatal clinical signs of thyrotoxicosis are tachycardia, goiter, hyperexcitability, poor weight gain, hepatosplenomegaly, stare and eyelid retraction. Diagnosis is based on determination of the blood level of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and TSH. To confirm the nature of hyperthyroidism, thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) should be assayed. The kinetics of TSI provides a guide for therapeutic adaptation and disappearance of TSI is a sign of recovery. Rare cases of familial non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism have been shown to be caused by germline mutation of the thyrotropin receptor. We report a case of severe neonatal hyperthyroidism which led to the diagnosis of maternal Graves' disease.

  9. Graves' disease: cost-effectiveness of clinical and radioiodine treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz junior, Antonio F.; Takahashi, Miriam H.; Albino, Claudio C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this study, we set out to evaluate the costs and effectiveness of the two most used therapies in Graves' disease: antithyroid drugs (ATD) and radioiodine (RAI). Twenty-tree patients, 7 men and 16 women, with a mean age of 35.4 years, treated with ATD and 35 patients, 5 men and 30 women, mean age of 39.4 years, treated with RAI were studied. After 2 years receiving ATD, 21 patients achieved euthyroidism and 2 remained hyperthyroid. In the RAI group, 21 patients presented hypothyroidism and 13 became euthyroid. To calculate the costs of each therapy, we analysed the number of visits during this period, the laboratory data and the drugs needed, such as tiamazol and/or thyroxine. The group treated only with ATD needed a higher number of visits and laboratory measurements, with the mean total cost of U$ 791.65, while the RAI group spent a mean amount of U$ 366.44. Therefore, the costs of the RAI treatment were 53,7 % lower than clinical therapy with ATD. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that RAI treatment has a lower cost than ATD, being very effective in controlling the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease. (author)

  10. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Xie, Jiawei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Suyun

    2016-02-18

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Both antithyroid medications and radioiodine are commonly used treatments but their frequency of use varies between regions and countries. Despite the commonness of the diagnosis, any possible differences between the two treatments with respect to long-term outcomes remain unknown. To assess the effects of radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease. We performed a systematic literature search in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE and the trials registers ICTRP Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. The date of the last search was September 2015 for all databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease with at least two years follow-up. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance. One author carried out screening for inclusion, data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessment and a second author checked this. We presented data not suitable for meta-analysis as descriptive data. We analysed the overall quality of evidence utilising the GRADE instrument. We included two RCTs involving 425 adult participants with Graves' disease in this review. Altogether 204 participants were randomised to radioiodine therapy and 221 to methimazole therapy. A single dose of radioiodine was administered. The duration of methimazole medication was 18 months. The period of follow-up was at least two years, depending on the outcome measured. For most outcome measures risk of bias was low; for the outcomes health-related quality of life as well as development and worsening of Graves' ophthalmopathy risks of performance bias and detection bias were high in at least one of the two RCTs.Health-related quality of life appeared to be similar in the radioiodine and methimazole treatment groups, however no quantitative data were reported (425 participants; 2 trials; low quality evidence

  11. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe: a European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perros, P.; Hegedüs, L.; Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Baldeschi, L.; Salvi, M.; Lazarus, J. H.; Eckstein, A.; Pitz, S.; Boboridis, K.; Anagnostis, P.; Ayvaz, G.; Boschi, A.; Brix, T. H.; Currò, N.; Konuk, O.; Marinò, M.; Mitchell, A. L.; Stankovic, B.; Törüner, F. B.; von Arx, G.; Zarković, M.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is an autoimmune condition, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes including impaired quality of life and socio-economic status. Current evidence suggests that the incidence of GO in Europe may be declining, however data on the prevalence of this disease are sparse.

  12. Atypical Clinical Manifestations of Graves' Disease: An Analysis in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Mohamed Osama; Ahmed, Sherif

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the number of reports about newly recognized (atypical or unusual) manifestations of Graves' disease (GD), that are related to various body systems. One of these manifestations is sometimes the main presenting feature of GD. Some of the atypical manifestations are specifically related to GD, while others are also similarly seen in patients with other forms of hyperthyroidism. Lack of knowledge of the association between these findings and GD may lead to delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or unnecessary investigations. The atypical clinical presentations of GD include anemia, vomiting, jaundice, and right heart failure. There is one type of anemia that is not explained by any of the known etiological factors and responds well to hyperthyroidism treatment. This type of anemia resembles anemia of chronic disease and may be termed GD anemia. Other forms of anemia that are associated with GD include pernicious anemia, iron deficiency anemia of celiac disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Vomiting has been reported as a presenting feature of Graves' disease. Some cases had the typical findings of hyperthyroidism initially masked, and the vomiting did not improve until hyperthyroidism has been detected and treated. Hyperthyroidism may present with jaundice, and on the other hand, deep jaundice may develop with the onset of overt hyperthyroidism in previously compensated chronic liver disease patients. Pulmonary hypertension is reported to be associated with GD and to respond to its treatment. GD-related pulmonary hypertension may be so severe to produce isolated right-sided heart failure that is occasionally found as the presenting manifestation of GD. PMID:22132347

  13. Medical management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, M. F.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    In most patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism the eye signs are self-limiting and mostly subclinical. However, about one-third of the patients have clinically relevant ophthalmopathy, which can be disabling and disfiguring. The mechanical causes of the symptoms and signs of the eye disease are

  14. Primary biliary cirrhosis associated with Graves' disease in a male patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuji; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koeda, Norihiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Akiko; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), which predominantly affects women, has been associated with various autoimmune diseases. Although hypothyroidism accompanying PBC is well documented, the concomitance of PBC and hyperthyroidism is rare. Herein, we report the case of a 62-year-old man who was diagnosed with PBC several years after the development of Graves' disease. This is the first case of a male patient developing PBC with Graves' disease. Both serum alanine aminotransferase levels and serum thyroid hormone levels were normalized after the administration of thiamazole for Graves' disease. However, the cholestatic liver enzyme abnormalities continued, indicating that the PBC was actualized by the administration of thiamazole. After starting ursodeoxycholic acid treatment, cholestatic liver enzyme abnormalities improved. Taken together, when a cholestatic pattern of liver enzymes is observed during follow-up for Graves' disease, an association between Graves' disease and PBC should be considered as a differential diagnosis.

  15. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease - A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, B.R.; Bhattacharya, A.; Dutta, P.; Bhansali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine is a safe form of treatment for all patients with primary hyperthyroidism. The thyroid's unique capacity to store iodine (thus also radioiodine) makes it a natural target for radioiodine therapy. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of radioiodine therapy in a cohort of 151 patients of primary hyperthyroidism treated on an outpatient basis in our institute from January 2001 to November 2006. Of these 151 patients, 113 (38 male, 75 female; age range: 17- 65 years) were of Graves' disease. The median duration of symptoms in these patients was 4 years. (Range: 3 months to 20 years). Diagnosis was established on basis of clinical, biochemical and scintigraphic features. All the patients were treated medically with Neomercazole (Carbimazole) for varying durations (median 3.5 years). The dose range varied from 5 to 80 mg per day (median 20 mg per day). Clinical assessment of thyroid size revealed 39 patients with grade 0, 14 with grade 1, 30 with grade 2, and 30 with grade 3 goiters. Pre-therapy radioactive iodine uptake was done in 28 patients, which showed median values of 50 % at 4 hrs, 57.45 % at 24 hrs, and 56.2 % at 48 hrs respectively. These patients were treated empirically with I-131 in a dose range of 5 to 15 mCi, depending upon the clinical presentation and the RAIU values. Remission of symptoms with a single dose therapy was noticed in 68 patients. Of the 83 patients, 15 became hypothyroid within 3 months. These patients were on Neomercazole for a varying period of 2 to 20 years, at a dose range of 10 to 80 mg per day. 14 patients achieved remission after 2 doses with a cumulative RAI dose in the range of 10 to 19 mCi, at a median period of 7 to 24 months. Eight patients still showed hyperthyroid activity even after a second dose and are on follow-up. Seven patients achieved remission with a cumulative dose range of 17 to 35 mCi at a median duration of 10 months. One patient of Graves' disease who took Neomercazole for 10 years, at

  16. Thyroid mass estimation in Grave's disease by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, G.S.; Sharma, S.K.; Kumar, R.; Pandey, A.K.; Gupta, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: One of the important parts of treatment of Grave's disease with I-131 is the delivery of accurate dose to the target volume. Three important parameters that need to be accurately measured for dosimetry are; the 24 hr thyroid uptake (%), the thyroid mass and effective half life of I-131 in the gland. In this presentation we describe the estimation thyroid mass by SPECT. We have standardised a method to estimated thyroid volume by SPECT using thyroid phantoms of different sizes and then used them for routine thyroid mass estimation in patients with Graves' disease. Materials and Methods: Due to variation in thyroid weight in patients with Grave's disease, we standardised the scintigraphic (SPECT) technique using thyroid phantoms of different volumes such as 5 ml, 9.5 ml, 10.5 ml, 35 ml, 80 ml, 101ml and 110 ml. Each phantom was filled with 99 mTc solution with different activity concentration (100 μCi, 300 μCi, 600 μCi and 1.0 μCi) and SPECT images were acquired on a VARICAM dual head camera in 128x128 matrix. The acquired data was processed using a standardised Metz filter but without attenuation or scatter correction. Coronal slices were used with suitable threshold for edge detection. An irregular ROI was plotted around each lobe and isthmus of the thyroid gland and the enclosed slice area was measured. The area measured from all the frames was added and multiplied by the slice thickness to get the volume of the thyroid gland. The estimated volume of each phantom was compared and correlated with its actual volume. The thyroid mass in 40 patients was estimated by SPECT and compared with that estimated by ultrasonography.Results and Conclusion: The results of thyroid mass estimation with SPECT in phantom study suggested a 30% threshold for all phantom volumes. However, 35% threshold was used in patients' images for estimating thyroid volume. The estimated volumes by scintigraphy were compared with that estimated by ultrasonography. A correlation coefficient

  17. Guidelines for the treatment of childhood-onset Graves' disease in Japan, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitani, Kanshi; Sato, Hirokazu; Ohye, Hidemi; Harada, Shohei; Arisaka, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose behind developing these guidelines: Over one decade ago, the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug, 2006" (Japan Thyroid Association (JTA)) were published as the standard drug therapy protocol for Graves' disease. The "Guidelines for the Treatment of Childhood-Onset Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan, 2008" were published to provide guidance on the treatment of pediatric patients. Based on new evidence, a revised version of the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug, 2006" (JTA) was published in 2011, combined with the "Handbook of Radioiodine Therapy for Graves' Disease 2007" (JTA). Subsequently, newer findings on pediatric Graves' disease have been reported. Propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced serious hepatopathy is an important problem in pediatric patients. The American Thyroid Association's guidelines suggest that, in principle, physicians must not administer PTU to children. On the other hand, the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug, 2011" (JTA) state that radioiodine therapy is no longer considered a "fundamental contraindication" in children. Therefore, the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Childhood-Onset Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan, 2008" required revision.

  18. Hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy for treatment of Graves' disease: implications for patient management and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, O R; Scott-Coombes, D M

    2011-08-01

    No consensus exists on optimal treatment for Graves' disease once anti-thyroid medication fails to induce remission. Total thyroidectomy is a more cost-effective treatment than radioactive iodine or life-long anti-thyroid medication, but hypocalcaemia is an important complication, leading to longer hospital admissions and increased prescription costs. This study aimed to compare the relative risk of hypocalcaemia requiring medical treatment for patients with Graves' disease. Prospective cohort study of patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and for multinodular goitre, calculating serum calcium levels 24-hours post-operatively and prescription rates. Mean corrected calcium concentrations 24 hours post-operatively were 2.05 mmol/l for Graves' disease patients and 2.14 mmol/l for multinodular goitre patients (p = 0.003). Biochemical hypocalcaemia developed in 92 per cent (n = 34) of Graves' disease patients and 71 per cent (n = 43) of multinodular goitre patients (p = 0.012). Graves' disease patients were more likely to be prescribed calcium supplementation pre-discharge (p = 0.037). Total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease carries an increased risk of hypocalcaemia at 24 hours, and of calcium supplementation pre-discharge. Graves' disease patients should be informed of the increased risk of hypocalcaemia associated with total thyroidectomy, and this risk must be factored into future cost-effectiveness analysis.

  19. CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS haplotypes confers susceptibility to Graves' disease and modulates clinical phenotype of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Adamska, Edyta; Frydecka, Irena; Bolanowski, Marek; Tomkiewicz, Anna; Jonkisz, Anna; Karabon, Lidia; Partyka, Anna; Nowak, Oskar; Szalinski, Marek; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease, an autoimmune disease with heterogeneous symptoms including Graves' orbitopathy, has a combined genetic/environmental background, where variations within CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS genes are considered as disease markers.Association of CD28c.17+3T>C(rs3116496), CTLA-4g.319C>T(rs5742909), CTLA-4c.49A>G(rs231775), CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33), CT60(rs3087243), Jo31(rs11571302), ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15) polymorphisms with susceptibility to Graves' disease and clinical outcome was investigated. The study group comprised of 561 Polish Caucasians, including 172 unrelated Graves' disease patients. CTLA-4c.49A>G, CTLA-4g.319C>T, and CT60 were genotyped by PCR-RFLP; Jo31 and CD28c.17+3C>T by minisequencing; CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33) and ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15)-PCR and fluorescence-based technique. CD28c.17+3T>C(rs3116496)T/CTLA-4g.319C>T(rs5742909)C/CTLA-4c.49A>G(rs231775)G/CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33)(AT 16-21 )/CT60(rs3087243)G/Jo31(rs11571302)G/ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15)(m) and TCA(AT Graves' disease, especially in males, as well as overall Graves' orbitopathy development with severe outcome. TCG(AT 16-21 )GG(l) haplotype increased risk of Graves' disease and reduced the chance of successful medical treatment. Although this haplotype was mainly observed in patients without signs of Graves' orbitopathy, if Graves' orbitopathy developed it favored a Graves' orbitopathy outcome. Haplotype TCA(AT >21 )GT(m) increased Graves' disease risk in women and, in all patients, was linked to Graves' disease without Graves' orbitopathy. TCG(AT Graves' disease risk factor, whereas CT60 was an independent factor for disease progression. Sporadic Graves' disease was related to presence of CTLA-4c.49A>G[A] and the rare CTLA-4g.319C>T[T] allele variant. Familial background of the disease was exclusively associated with CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33)[AT >21 ]/[AT >21 ] genotype. CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS loci may confer inherited susceptibility to Graves' disease or may be involved in susceptibility to Graves' disease and play a

  20. Anxiety and depression are more prevalent in patients with graves' disease than in patients with nodular goitre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bové, Kira Bang; Watt, Torquil; Vogel, Asmus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Graves' disease has been associated with an increased psychiatric morbidity. It is unclarified whether this relates to Graves' disease or chronic disease per se. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with Graves......' disease compared to patients with another chronic thyroid disease, nodular goitre, and to investigate determinants of anxiety and depression in Graves' disease.METHODS: 157 cross-sectionally sampled patients with Graves' disease, 17 newly diagnosed, 140 treated, and 251 controls with nodular goitre......'/probable 'depression'. Determinants of anxiety and depression symptoms in Graves' disease were examined using multiple linear regression.RESULTS: In Graves' disease levels of anxiety (p = 0.008) and depression (p = 0.014) were significantly higher than in controls. The prevalence of depression was 10% in Graves...

  1. Prevalence and severity of ocular involvement in Graves' disease according to sex and age: A clinical study from Babol, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Sara; Moazezi, Zoleika; Bayani, Mohammad Ali

    2018-01-01

    Thyroid-associated eye disease (TED), previously known as Graves' ophthalmopathy is a cosmetically and functionally debilitating disease that is seen worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical severity of ocular manifestations of Graves' disease according to sex, age and duration in northern Iran. Between April 2011 and March 2012, 105 patients with Graves' disease, underwent ophthalmic examination, including ocular motility, exophthalmometry, intraocular pressure (IOP), slit lamp and fundoscopy. Patients received scores according to modified Werner's NO SPECS classification. Ocular involvement was found in 70 patients with established Graves's disease. The mean age was 35.0 years, (SD 13.0, range 15 to 69). The most common ocular findings were exophthalmometric proptosis of more than 20 mm (63.8%), lid lag (55.7%), lid retraction (52.8%) and tearing (38.6%). Almost 70% of patients had bilateral involvement. Elevated IOP was seen in 15 (25.4%) patients, and was significantly related to proptosis (P=0.007). More than half of the patients (n=36, 52.2%) had a modified Werner's NO SPECS score of 3.00. Clinical severity as shown by the increasing number of signs and symptoms per patient was correlated to increasing age (r=0.31, P=0.01) but not to gender (P=0.17). Both functional (ocular motility disorders, increased IOP) and cosmetic (proptosis, periorbital edema) sequels are common ocular presentations in patients with Graves' disease. Proptosis was the most common finding in this study and was associated with elevated IOP. Clinical severity was found to correlate to increasing age.

  2. Premature hair greying may predict reduced bone mineral density in Graves' disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leary, A C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Premature hair greying has been associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), and it may be more frequent in Graves\\' disease. AIMS: To determine whether premature greying is associated with reduced BMD in women with Graves\\' disease and in control women, and to examine whether premature greying is more common in Graves\\' disease. METHODS: Premature greying (> 50% grey by 40 years) and BMD were determined in 44 women with a history of Graves\\' disease and 133 female controls referred for routine BMD measurement. Exclusion criteria included diseases or drugs known to affect BMD. RESULTS: Mean Z and T scores at the lumbar spine were significantly lower (P < 0.04) in subjects with premature greying than in those not prematurely grey among women with Graves\\' disease, but not among control women. Multiple regression confirmed this difference between Graves\\' and control women (P = 0.041). There were no differences at other measurement sites. Of Graves\\' patients, 36% were prematurely grey compared with 25% of control women (P = 0.14). CONCLUSION: Premature greying may be a weak marker for reduced BMD in women with a history of Graves\\' disease, but it is not a marker in normal women.

  3. Grave's disease induced by radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-An; Li, Xuezhen; Zou, Wen; Zhou, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A number of thyroid dysfunctions are induced by damage resulting from the relatively high doses of radiation administered to the thyroid and pituitary gland during radiotherapy. Hypothyroidism constitutes the most frequent type of thyroid dysfunction induced by NPC radiotherapy, while hyperthyroidism, particularly Grave's disease, is extremely rare. The present study describes the case of a 40-year-old male who presented with Grave's disease 2 years after receiving radiotherapy for the treatment of NPC. The patient exhibited swelling of the eyes, an increased appetite, decreased levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, increased levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) demonstrated by the examination of thyroid function and enlargement of the bilateral intraocular rectus revealed by CT scan. The patient's symptoms were ameliorated following treatment with propylthiouracil and propranolol for 1 month, and the levels of T3 and T4 were restored to normal. The pathophysiological mechanism of radiotherapy-induced hyperthyroidism has yet to be elucidated. Hyperthyroidism is often neglected as several of its clinical manifestations are similar to other complications observed during and following cancer treatment. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor thyroid function following head and neck radiotherapy.

  4. Hypothyroidism caused by 131I treatment for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shouzhen; Lin Xiangtong; He Wanting; Zhang Kaili; Zhang Jinming; Kuai Dayu

    1991-01-01

    The refollow-up has been carried out in hypothyroidism caused by 131 I treatment for Graves disease. The serum HS-TSH(IRMA), FT3, TSH(RIA), TT3, TT4, FT4I, MCA, TGA, Cholesterol and Triglyceride has been measured in 26 patient after 131 I treatment for 9.5 years in average. At the same time TRH stimulation test was also performed, and the clinical symptoms and signs assessed. The results showed that TSH is the most sensitive criterion for hypothyroidism, followed by Cholesterol and FT 4 I. The occurence of hypothyroidism may be related to the presence of thyroid antibody as demonstrated by the elevation of serum MCA, TGA. Therefore measurement of serum TSH, FT 4 I and Cholesterol during long term follow-up is beneficial for early diagnosis of hypothyroidism and evaluating the effect of substitution treatment

  5. Evidence for a major role of heredity in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, T H; Kyvik, K O; Christensen, Kaare

    2001-01-01

    The etiology of Graves' disease (GD), affecting up to 2% of a population in iodine-sufficient areas, is incompletely understood. According to current thinking, the development of GD depends on complex interactions among genetic, environmental, and endogenous factors. However, the relative...... contributions of the genetic and environmental factors remain to be clarified. In this study we report probandwise concordance rates for GD in a new cohort of same sex twin pairs born between 1953 and 1976 (young cohort), ascertained from the nationwide population-based Danish Twin Register. To elucidate...... the magnitude of the genetic and environmental influence in the etiology of GD, these new twin data were pooled with our previously published twin data on GD (old cohort). The old cohort consisted of 2338 same sex twin pairs born between 1870 and 1920 who had participated in questionnaire surveys during...

  6. Marrow hypoplasia: a rare complication of untreated Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juliana; França, Larissa de; Ellinger, Vivian; Wolff, Mônica

    2014-12-01

    Atypical presentation forms of hyperthyroidism are always a challenge to the clinician. We present a female patient with the typical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis, without any thionamides treatment before, associated with pancytopenia, which recovered after euthyroidism state was achieved. Although the major cases of pancytopenia in Grave's disease are seen as a complication of antithyroid drugs (thioamides), in this case report the alteration in blood tests was associated with untreated hyperthyroidism. In the literature review, we found 19 case reports between 1981 to 2012, but it has been related to a hypercellular bone marrow with periferic destruction. Our case, however, is about a hypocellular bone marrow without fibrosis or fat tissue replacement, which proceeded with a periferic improvement following thyroid treatment. Although rare, pancytopenia, when present, may develop as an unusual and severe manifestation in untreated subjects.

  7. Pathogenesis of Graves` disease and therapeutic implications; Pathogenese des Morbus Basedow und therapeutische Implikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, F.J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1997-12-01

    Graves` disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Morbus Basedow manifestiert sich klinisch hauptsaechlich als Hyperthyreose und infiltrative Orbitopathie, waehrend Demopathie und Akropathie selten sind. Der Krankheit liegt ein Autoimmunprozess zugrunde, wobei stimuliernde Autoantikoerper gegen den TSH-Rezeptor die Hyperthyreose hervorrufen. Autoantikoerper und T-Lymphozyten gegen primaer thyreoidale Antigene verursachen durch Kreuzreaktion mit aehnlichen Antigenen an den Augenmuskeln und orbitalem Bindegewebe die Orbitopathie. Das therapeutsiche Ziel besteht nicht nur in der Behandlung der Hyperthyreose, sondern vor allem in der Induktion einer immuntoleranten Remission, um die irreversiblen Schaeden am Auge zu minimieren. Die Therapie umfasst Thyreostatika, Glukokortikoide und Orbitaspitzenbestrahlung sowie eine Schilddruesenablation entweder durch fast totale Schilddruesenresektion oder durch Radiojodtherapie. Die Differentialindikationen fuer die beiden ablativen Massnahmen werden eroertert. (orig.)

  8. Characteristics of patients with graves disease and intrathyroid hypovascularity compared to painless thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Shigihara, Nayumi; Takeno, Kageumi; Komiya, Koji; Goto, Hiromasa; Abe, Hiroko; Sato, Junko; Honda, Akira; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and sonographic and laboratory characteristics of Graves disease with intrathyroid hypovascularity in Japanese patients and to compare these characteristics in patients with painless thyroiditis. A total of 194 consecutive patients with Graves disease and 21 patients with painless thyroiditis were enrolled. The patients underwent thyroid volume measurement, mean superior thyroid artery peak systolic velocity (PSV) measurement, power Doppler sonography, and proper blood testing to discriminate between Graves disease and painless thyroiditis. Based on the power Doppler sonographic findings, they were divided into 4 groups: from pattern 0 (most hypovascular thyroid) to pattern III (most hypervascular thyroid). Comparisons of multiple thyroid parameters were made among the groups. The prevalence of Graves disease with pattern 0 (n = 27) was 13.9% among the patients with Graves disease. The sonographic and laboratory data for patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 were compared to those of the 21 patients with painless thyroiditis, which typically shows intrathyroid hypovascularity. Free triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels and the superior thyroid artery PSV were significantly lower in patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 than those with patterns I, II, and III (P thyroid volume and thyrotropin receptor antibody level were significantly lower in patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 than those with pattern III. In the comparison between patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 and those with painless thyroiditis and pattern 0, apart from thyrotropin receptor antibody, only the superior thyroid artery PSV was different. Although the clinical features of patients with Graves disease and intrathyroid hypovascularity were similar to those patients with painless thyroiditis, the superior thyroid artery PSV showed a moderate ability to discriminate these patients. © 2014 by the American Institute of

  9. [Macroeconomic costs of eye diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirneiß, C; Kampik, A; Neubauer, A S

    2014-05-01

    Eye diseases that are relevant regarding their macroeconomic costs and their impact on society include cataract, diabetic retinopathy, age-related maculopathy, glaucoma and refractive errors. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview of direct and indirect costs for major eye disease categories for Germany, based on existing literature and data sources. A semi-structured literature search was performed in the databases Medline and Embase and in the search machine Google for relevant original papers and reviews on costs of eye diseases with relevance for or transferability to Germany (last research date October 2013). In addition, manual searching was performed in important national databases and information sources, such as the Federal Office of Statistics and scientific societies. The direct costs for these diseases add up to approximately 2.6 billion Euros yearly for the Federal Republic of Germany, including out of the pocket payments from patients but excluding optical aids (e.g. glasses). In addition to those direct costs there are also indirect costs which are caused e.g. by loss of employment or productivity or by a reduction in health-related quality of life. These indirect costs can only be roughly estimated. Including the indirect costs for the eye diseases investigated, a total yearly macroeconomic cost ranging between 4 and 12 billion Euros is estimated for Germany. The costs for the eye diseases cataract, diabetic retinopathy, age-related maculopathy, glaucoma and refractive errors have a macroeconomic relevant dimension. Based on the predicted demographic changes with an ageing society an increase of the prevalence and thus also an increase of costs for eye diseases is expected in the future.

  10. Clinical significance and changes of TRAb and TSI assay in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaolin; Zhang Haiyan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes and clinical significance of TRAb and TSI detection in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum TRAb and TSI levels were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and thyroid hormone levels were detected by microparticle enzyme immunoassay, including normal controls, Graves' disease in period of onset, catabsis group and hashimotos thyroiditis group. Results: The positive rate of TRAb and TSI in Graves' in period of onset group is 86.67% and 95.0%, TGA and TMA in hashimotos thyroiditis group is 85.29% and 91.18%, respectively. More importantly these results were significant difference than normal controls. Conclusions: It's very important for Graves' disease patients to detect TRAb, TSI, TGA, TMA and thyroid hormone simulta-neously, especially to the curative effect and prognosis criterin in patients with Graves' disease and antidi-astole in patients with hashimotos thyroiditis. (authors)

  11. Treatment of Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leisa L; Roach, J Michael

    2016-02-01

    Review of the etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of dry eye disease (DED). Articles indexed in PubMed (National Library of Medicine), Iowa Drug Information Service (IDIS), and the Cochrane Reviews and Trials in the last 10 years using the key words "dry eye disease," "dry eye syndrome," "dry eye and treatment." Primary sources were used to locate additional resources. Sixty-eight publications were reviewed, and criteria supporting the primary objective were used to identify useful resources. The literature included practice guidelines, book chapters, review articles, original research articles, and product prescribing information for the etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of DED. DED is one of the most common ophthalmic disorders. Signs and symptoms of DED vary by patient, but may include ocular irritation, redness, itching, photosensitivity, visual blurring, mucous discharge, and decreased tear meniscus or break-up time. Symptoms improve with treatment, but the condition is not completely curable. Treatment includes reducing environmental causes, discontinuing medications that cause or worsen dry eye, and managing contributing ocular or systemic conditions. Most patients use nonprescription tear substitutes, and if these are not sufficient, other treatment is prescribed. These treatments include the ophthalmic anti-inflammatory agent cyclosporine, punctal occlusion, eye side shields, systemic cholinergic agents, and autologous serum tears. This article reviews the etiology, symptoms, and current therapy for DED.

  12. First reported case of unilateral Graves' disease in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Louis C; Green, Jennifer B

    2011-06-01

    Unilateral Graves' disease is a rare disease variant that can occur in a bilobar thyroid gland. We report the first documented case of unilateral Graves' disease in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland and review the pertinent literature. A 48-year-old man presented in June 2010 with thyrotoxicosis. I-131 radioisotope uptake was elevated at 33.4%, and scintigraphy revealed that uptake of the radioisotope was uniformly increased in the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed a non-nodular, enlarged, and heterogeneous left lobe; Doppler investigation of the lobe showed hypervascularity classically seen in Graves' disease. The right lobe of the thyroid, on the other hand, appeared homogeneous and hypovascular on ultrasonography. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin was significantly elevated at 191% (reference range disease was the most likely diagnosis. As has occasionally been described in the literature, unilateral involvement of the thyroid gland is a rare presentation of Graves' disease. Pre-existing functional or structural differences (either congenital or acquired) between the two lobes may contribute to this rare presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of unilateral Graves' disease presenting in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland. Although the pathophysiology of unilateral Graves's disease has not been clearly elucidated, clinicians should be aware that Graves' disease can present unilaterally in either lobe of the thyroid gland.

  13. Enhanced thyroid iodine metabolism in patients with triiodothyronine-predominant Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, J.; Hosoya, T.; Naito, N.; Yoshimura, H.; Kohno, Y.; Tarutani, O.; Kuma, K.; Sakane, S.; Takeda, K.; Mozai, T.

    1988-01-01

    Some patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease have increased serum T3 and normal or even low serum T4 levels during treatment with antithyroid drugs. These patients with elevated serum T3 to T4 ratios rarely have a remission of their hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to investigate thyroid iodine metabolism in such patients, whom we termed T3-predominant Graves' disease. Mean thyroid radioactive iodine uptake was 51.0 +/- 18.1% ( +/- SD) at 3 h, and it decreased to 38.9 +/- 20.1% at 24 h in 31 patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease during treatment. It was 20.0 +/- 11.4% at 3 h and increased to 31.9 +/- 16.0% at 24 h in 17 other patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease who had normal serum T3 and T4 levels and a normal serum T3 to T4 ratio during treatment (control Graves' disease). The activity of serum TSH receptor antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in control Graves' disease patients. From in vitro studies of thyroid tissue obtained at surgery, both thyroglobulin content and iodine content in thyroglobulin were significantly lower in patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in the control Graves' disease patients. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity determined by a guaiacol assay was 0.411 +/- 0.212 g.u./mg protein in the T3-predominant Graves' disease patients, significantly higher than that in the control Graves' disease patients. Serum TPO autoantibody levels determined by immunoprecipitation also were greater in T3-predominant Graves' disease patients than in control Graves' disease patients. Binding of this antibody to TPO slightly inhibited the enzyme activity of TPO, but this effect of the antibody was similar in the two groups of patients.

  14. Enhancement of soluble CD28 levels in the serum of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongwen; Yi, Lixian; Tao, Hong; Huang, Jingfang; Jin, Zhenghong; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Caiyun; Sun, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland mediated by T cells. CD28, a member of costimulatory molecules, plays a pivotal role in regulating T-cell responses. Plasma-soluble CD28 is one form of CD28 in peripheral blood. To investigate the concentrations of soluble CD28 in patients with Graves' disease, we used a sensitive dual monoclonal antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the soluble form of CD28. Our results suggested that mean concentrations of soluble CD28 in plasma of patients with Graves' disease were 1.79 ±1.52 ng/ml, and levels of soluble CD28 in healthy subjects were only 0.83 ±1.35 ng/ml. Concentrations of soluble CD28 detected in patients with Graves' disease were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (p Graves' disease. Therefore, aberrant elevation of plasma-soluble CD28 in patients with Graves' disease may reflect the dysregulation of immune system, and may serve as a useful biomarker in Graves' disease diagnosis.

  15. High-dose radioiodine therapy of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodky, V.; Fomin, D.; Pestritskaya, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objectives: to estimate the effectiveness and safety of the disease treatment under different modes of applying RIT. Materials and methods: 67 patients with the thyrotoxicosis condition associated with Graves disease were researched. The patients were divided into 2 groups: a control group with 25 people (18 women and 7 men), who underwent a low-dose therapy of 150-500 MBq; and a main group of 42 people (32 women and 10 men), who underwent a high-dose therapy of 550 and 800 MBq. The volume of thyroid prior to the treatment made up 23.8 ± 20 ml in the main group and 30.2 ± 23 ml in the control one. The average age in the high-dose group was 44.6 ±23 years old and in the low-dose -47.2 ± 24 years old. In terms of the hormone level before the RIT, 52% of the main group patients experienced euthyroidism, while 48% - thyrotoxicosis. The corresponding indices in the control group were 42% and 58% respectively. The cessation of the thyreostatic therapy came on 5. to 21. day prior to the treatment, with the average of 14 ±7 days in both groups. The diagnosis of the disease was based on ultrasonography, planar scintigraphy, the hormone level and antibody titer. The performance was assessed through the attainment of hypo-thyrosis and the transition to a substitutive hormonal therapy with L-thyroxine in 6 months or more. The attainment of euthyroidism was seen as a partial effect due to a possibility of relapse. Results: in 6 months a positive result in the form of hypo-thyrosis was achieved for 39 patients in the main group, which accounted for 93%, and 3 patients (7%) experienced euthyroidism. No symptomatic thyrotoxicosis relapses were revealed. In the control group, hypo-thyrosis was achieved by 18 patients, which accounted for 72%; euthyroidism came up to 12%; 4 patients needed a refresher course of RIT, which made up 16% of the group. 93% of the main group patients tolerated the treatment favourably. 3 patients complained of the

  16. Remission of aplastic anemia induced by treatment for Graves disease in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prabodh Kumar; Wherrett, Diane; Dror, Yigal

    2007-08-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is mediated by T-cell autoimmunity in the majority of cases; it is rare and mostly idiopathic in children. We describe a child, who developed AA following Graves' disease which could not be attributed to antithyroid drugs. We hypothesized that both diseases were caused by similar autoimmune process. We monitored the blood counts and did not administer any conventional treatment for AA assuming that the existing anti- hematopoietic stem cell humoral and cellular immunity might subside with induction of remission of Grave's disease. The child went into complete remission with the treatment of the Graves' disease.

  17. p27kip1 expression distinguishes papillary hyperplasia in Graves' disease from papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, L A; Yousef, O M; Jin, L; Lohse, C M; Pankratz, V S; Lloyd, R V

    2000-09-01

    In most cases, the histopathologic and cytologic distinction between Graves' disease and papillary thyroid carcinoma is relatively easy, but on occasion Graves' disease may simulate a thyroid papillary carcinoma. For example, papillary fronds with fibrovascular cores may be present in both Graves' disease and papillary carcinoma. p27kip1 (p27) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory protein that has been shown to be an independent prognostic factor in a variety of human tumors. Our previous studies of p27 expression in hyperplastic and neoplastic endocrine lesions showed that the level of p27 was quite different in these two conditions. To determine if this distinction could also be made between Graves' disease and papillary carcinoma, we analyzed expression of p27 and other cell cycle proteins in a series of cases of Graves' disease with papillary hyperplasia and a series of papillary thyroid carcinomas. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 61 randomly selected patients with thyroid disease, including 29 cases of Graves' disease with papillary architectural features and 32 cases of papillary carcinoma, were analyzed for expression of p27, Ki-67, and DNA topoisomerase II alpha (topo II alpha) by immunostaining. The distribution of immunoreactivity was analyzed by quantifying the percentage of positive nuclei that was expressed as the labeling index (LI) plus or minus the standard error of the mean. The papillary hyperplasia of Graves' disease had a p27 LI of 68.2 +/- 3.1 (range, 24 to 88), whereas papillary carcinomas had a LI of 25.6 +/- 2.5 (range, 12 to 70) (P hyperplasia in Graves' disease and papillary carcinoma. These results indicate that p27 protein expression is significantly higher in papillary hyperplasia of Graves' disease compared to papillary carcinoma, which may be diagnostically useful in difficult cases.

  18. Total thyroidectomy: is morbidity higher for Graves' disease than nontoxic goiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kellen C; McHenry, Christopher R

    2011-09-01

    Total thyroidectomy for treatment of Graves' disease is controversial and much of the debate centers on the concern for complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morbidity of total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and determine if it is different than for patients with nontoxic nodular goiter. The rates of life threatening neck hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, transient hypocalcemia, and hypoparathyroidism were determined for consecutive patients with Graves' disease treated with total thyroidectomy from 1996 to 2010. Results were compared with patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for nontoxic nodular goiter during the same period, matched for the weight of the excised thyroid gland. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 111 patients with Graves' disease (group I) and 283 patients with nontoxic nodular goiter (group II). Parathyroid autotransplantation was performed in 31(28%) patients in group I and 98 (35%) patients in group II (P = NS). Comparative analysis of morbidity revealed no significant difference in neck hematoma, 0(0%) (I) versus 3(1%) (II); permanent RLN injury, 0(0%) (I) versus 2(1%) (II); and permanent hypoparathyroidism in 1(1%) (I) versus 1 (0.4%) (II) (P = NS). Transient hypocalcemia was more common in patients with Graves' disease, 80(72%) (I) versus 170 (60%) (II) (P Graves' disease; only transient hypocalcemia occurred more often than in patients with nodular goiter. Total thyroidectomy should be presented as a therapeutic option for all patients with Graves' disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypocalcaemia after total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and for benign atoxic multinodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgrimsson, Páll; Nordenström, E; Bergenfelz, A; Almquist, M

    2012-10-01

    Postoperative hypocalcaemia has been reported to be more common after total thyroidectomy (TT) for Graves' disease than after TT for benign atoxic multinodular goitre (MNG). The reasons for this potential association are not clear. In the present study, the frequency and risk factors of hypocalcaemia after TT for Graves' vs MNG were compared. Between January 1999 and October 2009, patients with first-time surgery for Graves' disease or MNG treated with a TT were included in the study. Postoperative hypocalcaemia was defined by symptoms, calcium levels and treatment with calcium and/or vitamin D analogues during postoperative hospital stay, at discharge, and at the 6-week and 6-month follow-ups. Outcomes were compared with Mann-Whitney, chi(2) and Fishers' exact test where appropriate and by multivariable logistic regression analysis. There were 128 patients with Graves' disease and 81 patients with MNG. Patients with Graves' disease were younger than patients with MNG (median age, 35 vs 51 years, p Graves' disease (p Graves' disease, there was no difference in the overall frequency of biochemical hypocalcaemia, low levels of PTH and/or treatment with calcium and vitamin D.

  20. Histological Changes in Autoimmune Hepatitis with Graves' Disease: A Child Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mamiko; Shibata, Hironori; Masugi, Yohei; Ishi, Tomohiro; Kameyama, Kaori; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2017-08-15

    We herein report a child case of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) accompanied with Graves' disease. Elevated aminotransferase levels were found in a 12-year-old Japanese girl with Graves' disease. In her first liver biopsy, necrosis and inflammation was limited to the centrilobular area, while the second biopsy showed different findings. Namely, portal injury newly appeared, including interface hepatitis, which represents the histological characteristics of AIH. As the histological findings at the onset of AIH do not always show typical findings, a re-biopsy is considered to be important in individuals suspected to have AIH. AIH should be included in the differential diagnosis of liver dysfunction in Graves' disease, even in children.

  1. Chylothorax Associated with Substernal Goiter in Graves' Disease Treated with Radioactive Iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Oh, Seo; Hyun Kim, Bo; Young Kim, Do; Min Lee, Kyu; Jin Lee, Min; Su Kim, Sung; Ho Kim, Jong; Kyung Jeon, Yun; Soo Kim, Sang; Ki Kim, Yong; Joo Kim, In

    2017-04-01

    We present a rare case of chylothorax associated with an intrathoracic goiter in Graves' disease that was treated with radioactive iodine. A 23-year-old woman with Graves' disease was referred to our clinic with a pleural effusion, dyspnea, characteristic bilateral proptosis, and a diffuse goiter. The pleural fluid biochemistry was consistent with chylothorax. However, the chylothorax did not decrease with conservative therapy. Therefore, RAI was administered. Subsequently, the chylothorax and goiter improved more quickly than expected. This case illustrates that chylothorax associated with a substernal goiter in Graves' disease can be treated successfully with radioactive iodine instead of surgery.

  2. The curative effect analysis of 131I-therapy on patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Qin; Lu Shujun; Lu Tianhe

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the curative effect of 131 I-therapy on Graves' disease, the authors analyse conditions of patients who have received 131 I-therapy (n -674). These results showed that the incidence of fully recover, improve, Graves' disease and invalid is 80.11%, 7.28%, 11.87% and 0.74% respectively. Therefore, 131 I-therapy on Graves' disease is convenient. It has little side effect, low cost and better curative effect, it is one of the best therapeutic methods to treat hyperthyroidism

  3. Radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease. An assessment of its potential risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, G.D.; Burman, K.D.

    1986-01-01

    Concern about the side effects of radiation exposure has deterred physicians from using radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, although the efficacy and safety of this treatment have been established in the 35 years since its introduction. In that time, no significant side effects have been discovered. We believe iodine-131 should be considered the treatment of choice in most patients with Graves' disease. This article reviews the current understanding of the risks in radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease, including the risks for teratogenicity, genetic damage, carcinogenesis, and cellular dysfunction

  4. The experience of gasless endoscopic-assisted thyroidectomy via the anterior chest approach for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun; Yu, Shi-Tong; Cai, Qian; Liang, Fa-Ya; Han, Ping; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility, effectiveness, and cosmesis of a gasless endoscopic-assisted thyroidectomy via the anterior chest in patients with Graves' disease. We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients with Graves' disease treated with thyroidectomy from November 2007 to June 2015. We analyzed clinical characteristics of patients, type of operation, operative indications, operative duration, length of postoperative hospital stay, and postoperative complications. The thyroidectomies were classified as total thyroidectomy (n = 12) or near-total thyroidectomy with a remnant of Graves' disease is a safe, feasible, and effective and provides an excellent cosmetic outcome procedure. It is a valid option in appropriately selected patients.

  5. Activation of latent Graves' disease in children. Review of possible psychosomatic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, E; Gardner, L I

    1980-03-01

    In some children, psychological events have appeared to be important in the triggering of Graves' disease. This report examines the case histories of three children in whom the appearance of symptomatology of Graves' disease was associated with depression following the death of a loved one. An analysis of neuroendocrine and immunologie pathways suggests that depression, set off by bereavement, causes low levels of norepinephrine in the brain. The latter in turn may mediate an increase in ACTH and cortisol, leading to reductions in immune surveillance and resultant production of thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins, hence the development of Graves' disease.

  6. Strategies of radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET Center Klagenfurt, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-08-01

    Several therapeutic options are available for the treatment of Graves' disease (GD), including long-term antithyroid drug medication (ATD), near-total resection (NTR) and radioiodine therapy (RIT). These treatments are used with different frequencies depending on geographical location, size of the goitre, age of the patient and experience of the physician. It should be noted that RIT is still being applied more frequently in the United States than in Europe. Despite the fact that RIT was introduced as long ago as 1941, several questions are still the subject of debate: Should a fixed dose or a calculated dose be used. If the dose is calculated, how many Grays (Gy) should be delivered to the thyroid? What is the goal of RIT in GD? Which factors, including ATD, influence the outcome of RIT? Is RIT appropriate in GD with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO)? Although not all these questions have been answered yet, conclusions can be derived regarding a general strategy for use of RIT in GD. As with surgery, the goal of RIT in GD is euthyroidism with or without L-thyroxine medication. There is a clear advantage of dose calculation over use of a fixed dose because the only factor influencing the outcome is the dose delivered to a certain thyroid volume. To minimise recurrent hyperthyroidism, an ablative approach using a delivered dose of 250 Gy is widely accepted. Beside pretherapeutic T{sub 3} levels, thyroid volume and 24-h thyroid uptake, ATD may influence the outcome of RIT. Today it is accepted by most thyroidologists that, if ATD medication is necessary in overt hyperthyroidism, it should be withdrawn at least 2 days before RIT. In patients with GD and GO, RIT may worsen GO. If RIT is performed in GO it should be done under a 3-month steroid medication regimen. In conclusion, RIT can be considered an appropriate and cost-effective therapy in GD, although the decision regarding treatment should be taken on an individual basis, paying due respect to the course and

  7. Graves' disease associated with infectious mononucleosis due to primary Epstein-Barr virus infection: report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahori, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Yumie; Saito, Reina; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2010-01-01

    Although the etiology of Graves' disease is still not clear, it is generally suggested that environmental factors such as infections contribute to the development of Graves' disease. We report here three cases of Graves' disease which presented simultaneously with infectious mononucleosis due to primary EBV infection. Acute EBV infection might play an important role in the onset of Graves' disease. These three women complained of a sore throat or neck pain, resembling subacute thyroiditis. In the case of thyrotoxicosis accompanied by sore throat or neck pain, Graves' disease must be distinguished from subacute thyroiditis.

  8. Paradoxical euthyroid hormone profile in a case of Graves' disease with cardiac failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Aditya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac failure is an uncommon complication of juvenile hyperthyroidism. We describe an adolescent boy with Graves' disease who developed manifestations of heart failure while on antithyroid medications. There was no evidence of any underlying cardiac disease. He had paradoxical euthyroid hormone profile which rose to hyperthyroid range when the manifestations of the cardiac failure subsided. The case highlights several unusual features of Graves' disease.

  9. Important considerations in the management of Graves' disease in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okosieme, Onyebuchi E; Lazarus, John H

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder in which autoantibodies to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor cause hyperthyroidism through unregulated stimulation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Effective management of Graves' disease in pregnancy must address the competing fetal and maternal priorities of controlling hyperthyroidism in the mother on the one hand, and on the other, minimizing the impact of maternal disease and antithyroid drugs on the well-being of the fetus. Optimal strategies for achieving this intricate balance are currently a source of continued debate among thyroid experts and studies in recent decades are now providing greater clarity into the risk posed to the unborn baby by the combination of biochemical, immunological and pharmacological hazards arising from Graves' disease and its therapy. This review summarizes the current best practice and highlights important considerations and areas of uncertainty in the management of Graves' disease in pregnant women.

  10. Comparison of curative effect of 131I and antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ju; Lu, Xiuqing; Yue, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Radioactive 131I is currently reported to be a potential effective intervention for Graves' Disease treatment in China. Whether 131I treatment was associated with effective outcome or reduced risk of side effects, reccurence rate remained unknown. Eligible studies were selected from Chinese VIP, Wangfang, CNKI databases using the keywords "Iodine" and "Graves Disease". Finally, 13 clinical trials met the inclusion criterion and were included this meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis included 1355 patients diagnosed of Graves' Disease with regular anti-thyroid drugs oral administration and 1320 patients with 131I therapy. The results showed that there was significant symptom improvement with radioactive iodine intervention (Odd Ratio (OR)=4.50, 95% CI [3.55, 5.71], PGraves' Disease. Treatment with 131I was associated with better clinical outcome; it reduced side effects and reccurence rate but increased hypothyroidism in Graves' Disease.

  11. TSHR intronic polymorphisms (rs179247 and rs12885526) and their role in the susceptibility of the Brazilian population to Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalo, N E; Dos Santos, R B; Marcello, M A; Piai, R P; Secolin, R; Romaldini, J H; Ward, L S

    2015-05-01

    Intronic thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor polymorphisms have been associated with the risk for both Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, but results have been inconsistent among different populations. We aimed to investigate the influence of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor intronic polymorphisms in a large well-characterized population of GD patients. We studied 279 Graves' disease patients (231 females and 48 males, 39.80 ± 11.69 years old), including 144 with Graves' ophthalmopathy, matched to 296 healthy control individuals. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor genotypes of rs179247 and rs12885526 were determined by Real Time PCR TaqMan(®) SNP Genotyping. A multivariate analysis showed that the inheritance of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor AA genotype for rs179247 increased the risk for Graves' disease (OR = 2.821; 95 % CI 1.595-4.990; p = 0.0004), whereas the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor GG genotype for rs12885526 increased the risk for Graves' ophthalmopathy (OR = 2.940; 95 % CI 1.320-6.548; p = 0.0083). Individuals with Graves' ophthalmopathy also presented lower mean thyrotropin receptor antibodies levels (96.3 ± 143.9 U/L) than individuals without Graves' ophthalmopathy (98.3 ± 201.9 U/L). We did not find any association between the investigated polymorphisms and patients clinical features or outcome. We demonstrate that thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor intronic polymorphisms are associated with the susceptibility to Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy in the Brazilian population, but do not appear to influence the disease course.

  12. Antithyroid Drug Therapy for Graves' Disease and Implications for Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism worldwide. Current therapeutic options for GD include antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine, and thyroidectomy. ATD treatment is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians due to some advantages including normalizing thyroid function in a short time, hardly causing hypothyroidism, and ameliorating immune disorder while avoiding radiation exposure and invasive procedures. However, the relatively high recurrence rate is a major concern for ATD treatment, which is associated with multiple influencing factors like clinical characteristics, treatment strategies, and genetic and environmental factors. Of these influencing factors, some are modifiable but some are nonmodifiable. The recurrence risk can be reduced by adjusting the modifiable factors as much as possible. The titration regimen for 12–18 months is the optimal strategy of ATD. Levothyroxine administration after successful ATD treatment was not recommended. The addition of immunosuppressive drugs might be helpful to decrease the recurrence rate of GD patients after ATD withdrawal, whereas further studies are needed to address the safety and efficacy. This paper reviewed the current knowledge of ATD treatment and mainly focused on influencing factors for recurrence in GD patients with ATD treatment. PMID:28529524

  13. Apoptotic study in Graves disease treated with thyroid arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei; Gao Bulang; Yi Genfa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate apoptosis in the thyroid of Graves disease (GD) induced by thyroid arterial embolization. Forty one patients with clinically and laboratorily ascertained GD were treated with thyroid arterial embolization and followed up for 3-54 months following embolization. Prior to embolization and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 36 months following embolization, thyroid autoimmune antibodies were tested respectively, including thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb). Thyroid biopsy was performed under the guidance of computed tomography for immunohistochemistry examination using semi-quantity analysis. The positive staining of Fas and FasL was mostly in the cytoplasma and cell membrane, the positive expression of Bax was mainly in the cytoplasma, and no positive expression of P53 was detected in the thyroid cells before embolization. After arterial embolziation, the positive cell number and staining degree of these genes were both greater than before embolization. The treatment method of thyroid arterial embolization can effectively enhance the positive expression of pro-apoptotic genes of Fas, FasL, Bax, Bcl-2 and P53 in GD thyroid, thus promoting apoptosis of GD thyroid and helping restore the thyroid size and function to normal conditions. (author)

  14. Dilated cardiomyopathy with Graves disease in a young child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jung Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Graves disease (GD can lead to complications such as cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. Although dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP has been occasionally reported in adults with GD, it is rare in children. We present the case of a 32-month-old boy with DCMP due to GD. He presented with irritability, vomiting, and diarrhea. He also had a history of weight loss over the past few months. On physical examination, he had tachycardia without fever, a mild diffuse goiter, and hepatomegaly. The chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary edema, while the echocardiography revealed a dilated left ventricle with an ejection fraction (EF of 28%. The thyroid function test (TFT showed elevated serum T3 and decreased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels. The TSH receptor autoantibody titer was elevated. He was diagnosed with DCMP with GD; treatment with methylprednisolone, diuretics, inotropics, and methimazole was initiated. The EF improved after the TFT normalized. At follow-up several months later, although the TFT results again showed evidence of hyperthyroidism, his EF had not deteriorated. His cardiac function continues to remain normal 1.5 months after treatment was started, although he still has elevated T3 and high TSH receptor antibody titer levels due to poor compliance with drug therapy. To summarize, we report a young child with GD-induced DCMP who recovered completely with medical therapy and, even though the hyperthyroidism recurred several months later, there was no relapse of the DCMP.

  15. Treatment of Graves' disease in children: The Portuguese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Olinda; Antunes, Ana; Oliveira, Maria João

    2018-03-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune thyroid disease, common in adults but rare in children. The best therapeutic approach remains controversial. To ascertain the current treatment of pediatric GD in Portugal and to assess the clinical and biochemical factors that determine definitive/long-term remission after treatment with antithyroid drugs (ATDs). A retrospective analysis of data about pediatric GD treatment collected from a nationwide survey conducted by the Portuguese Society of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology from May to August 2013. Population was categorized based on sex, age, use of ATDs, dosage, treatment duration, adverse reactions, thyrotropin receptor-stimulating antibody (TRAB) titer, remission and remission/relapse rates, and definitive treatment, and divided into group A (with ongoing treatment) and group B (with treatment stopped). Group B was subdivided into 'Remission', 'Remission+relapse' and 'No remission' subgroups based on the course of disease. The same parameters were compared between both groups. Survey response rate was 77%; 152 subjects, 116 female, mean age at diagnosis 11.23±3.46 years. They all started treatment with ATDs, 70.4% with thiamazole, with a mean treatment duration of 32.38±28.29 months, and 5.9% had adverse effects. Remission rate was 32.6%. Lower age at diagnosis correlated with higher remission rates. Treatment duration was longer when propylthiouracil was used. Initial TRAB titer was significantly higher in the 'No remission' group. Surgery and radioiodine were used as second-line treatments. Our study results were similar to those reported in the literature. Age and TRAB titer were identified as potential clinical and laboratory determinants of remission. Based on risk/benefit analysis, it was concluded that treatment should be individualized based on age, accessibility to treatments, and physician's experience. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. 131I-therapy of graves' disease and non-immunogenic thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschel, M.; Heinze, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    From 1977 to 1982, 315 patients suffering from thyrotoxicosis with diffuse and/or nodular goitre or Graves' disease were treated with 131 I. In 246 patients, the results of treatment after 7 months to 5 1/2 years could be evaluated. After a single treatment with 131 I, 72% of the patients with hyperthyroid nodular goitre and 61% of those with diffuse goitre, but only 36% of the patients with Graves' disease showed normal thyroid function. By repeated 131 I treatments - as many as 5 for those with Graves' disease - normal thyroid function could be achieved in nearly all patients examined. Patients with immune thyrotoxicosis, type Graves' disease, showed a high resistance to therapy. A dependence was found between the results of these treatments and previous antithyroidal drug therapy or surgery. The rate of hypothyroidism varied between 4 and 15%. The highest rate of hypothyroidism was observed in operated patients with persistent or recurring thyrotoxicosis. (orig.) [de

  17. The observation on plasma endothelin levels in patients with graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaojun; Liu Changshan; Yang Lianrong; Zhang Qiliang; Wang Honggang; Liu Xudong

    2002-01-01

    Observing the plasma endothelin levels in patients with Graves' disease to probe its clinical significance, plasma endothelin levels were measured in 55 cases of Graves' disease before and after treatment respectively, and these were compared with that of 23 health subjects. Results: plasma endothelin levels in patients with Graves' disease significantly increase, compared with heath subjects (150.4 +- 29.31 ng/L vs 42.80 +- 7.58 ng/L, P < 0.01); post-treatment endothelin levels apparently decrease (97.61 +- 15.99 ng/L vs 150.4 +- 29.31 ng/L, P < 0.01). Plasma endothelin levels in patients with Graves' disease significantly increase, and after treatment the endothelin levels decrease following decreasing of thyroid hormone level and high hemodynamics

  18. A 27-year-old woman diagnosed as polycystic ovary syndrome associated with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Jung, Tae Sik; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Ho Soo; Kim, Sungsu; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Deok Ryong; Choi, Won Jun; Seo, Yeong Mi; Chung, Soon Il

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Graves' disease are the common causes of menstrual irregularity leading to infertility in women of child-bearing age. A 21-year-old female patient visited us with complaints of oligomenorrhea and hand tremor. She was diagnosed as having PCOS and hyperthyroid Graves' disease, simultaneously. She had low body weight (BMI: 16.4 kg/m(2)), mild hirsutism, and thyrotoxicosis. The patient was treated with anti-thyroid drug and beta-blocker for about two years, and then recovered to normal thyroid function. Although some studies have suggested a connection between PCOS and autoimmune thyroiditis, no study indicated that PCOS is associated with Graves' disease until now. Here, we describe the first case report of a lean woman with normal insulin sensitivity presenting PCOS and Graves' disease simultaneously.

  19. Postoperative Outcomes in Graves' Disease Patients: Results from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Gustavo A; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Vaghaiwalla, Tanaz M; Parikh, Punam P; Farra, Josefina C; Lew, John I

    2017-06-01

    Current surgical indications for Graves' disease include intractability to medical and/or radioablative therapy, compressive symptoms, and worsening ophthalmopathy. Total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease may be technically challenging and lead to untoward perioperative outcomes. This study examines outcomes in patients with Graves' disease who underwent total thyroidectomy and assesses its safety for this patient population. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Total thyroidectomy performed in patients with Graves' disease, benign multinodular goiter (MNG), and thyroid cancer was identified. Demographic factors, comorbidities, and postoperative complications were evaluated. Chi-square, one-way analysis of variance, and risk-adjusted multivariable logistic regression were performed. Of 215,068 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy during the study period, 11,205 (5.2%) had Graves' disease, 110,124 (51.2%) MNG, and 93,739 (43.6%) thyroid malignancy. Patients with Graves' disease were younger than MNG and thyroid cancer patients (M age  = 42.8 years vs. 55.5 and 51.0 years; p Graves' disease group included a higher proportion of women (p Graves' disease was independently associated with a higher risk of vocal-cord paralysis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36 [confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.69]), tracheostomy (OR = 1.35 [CI 1.1-1.67]), postoperative hypocalcemia (OR = 1.65 [CI 1.54-1.77]), and hematoma requiring reoperation (OR = 2.79 [CI 2.16-3.62]) compared to MNG patients. High-volume centers for total thyroidectomy were independently associated with lower risk of postoperative complications, including in patients with Graves' disease. Despite low overall morbidity following total thyroidectomy, Graves' disease patients are at increased risk of postoperative complications, including bleeding, vocal-cord paralysis, tracheostomy, and hypocalcemia. These risks appear

  20. Mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Robertas; Velickiene, Dzilda; Prange, Arthur J

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease and to compare them with the prevalence of such findings in women without past or present thyroid disease. Thirty inpatient women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease and 45 women hospitalized for treatment of gynecologic disorders such as abnormal vaginal bleeding, benign tumors or infertility were evaluated for the prevalence of mood and anxiety diagnoses using a standard Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and for mood and anxiety ratings using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). At the time of assessment, it was discovered that 14 of 30 women with treated hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease were still hyperthyroid, while 16 women were euthyroid. Significantly greater prevalence of social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depression and total mood and anxiety disorders, as well as higher symptom scores on the POMS, was found in hyperthyroid women with Graves' disease in comparison with the control group. A prevalence of total anxiety disorder, as well as history of mania or hypomania and lifetime bipolar disorder, but not lifetime unipolar depression, was more frequent in both the euthyroid and the hyperthyroid subgroups of study women in comparison with the control group. These results confirm a high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease. Hyperthyroidism plays a major role in psychiatric morbidity in Graves' disease.

  1. Case report of recurrent atrial fibrillation induced by thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaqi; Tan, Huiwen; Huang, Juan; Luo, Dan; Tang, Ying; Yu, Ruichao; Huang, Hui

    2018-06-01

    Thyrotropin-secreting adenoma (TSHoma) is rare. Even though the thyrotoxicosis is mild in patients with TSHoma, it is still a rare cause of arrhythmia, ignore of mild disfunction of thyroid function of TSHoma can lead to the delayed diagnosis of pituitary tumor or leading to recurring of complications. Graves' disease is an auto-immue endocrinological disorder. Association of TSHoma and Graves's disease is extremely rare. Coexistence of these two diseases made the diagnosis and treatment complicated. This patient was a 55-year-old man who had been referred to the department of endocrinology and metabolism of the West China Hospital due to recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF) and thyroxicosis. Examinations revealed pituitary thyrotropin-secreting macroadenoma with Graves' disease. We conducted transsphenoidal surgery. Thyrozol was used to treat the recurrence of Graves' disease after pituitary surgery. The TSHoma was successfully cured, and recurrent Graves' disease was controlled very well. The association of TSHoma and Graves' disease is extremely rare. Even though the clinical features of thyrotoxicosis are milder in patients with TSHoma, thyroid function tests are still important clinical assessment of patients with AF, which is an arrhythmia associated with hyperthyroidism. TSHoma is a rare cause of thyrotoxicosis; however, ignoring of the mild disfunction caused by TSHoma can lead to the delayed diagnosis of pituitary tumors or to recurring of complications of TSHoma.

  2. Pooled genome wide association detects association upstream of FCRL3 with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Jwu Jin; Burdon, Kathryn P; Lu, Yi; Laurie, Kate; Leonardos, Lefta; Baird, Paul N; Sahebjada, Srujana; Walsh, John P; Gajdatsy, Adam; Ebeling, Peter R; Hamblin, Peter Shane; Wong, Rosemary; Forehan, Simon P; Fourlanos, Spiros; Roberts, Anthony P; Doogue, Matthew; Selva, Dinesh; Montgomery, Grant W; Macgregor, Stuart; Craig, Jamie E

    2016-11-18

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disease of complex inheritance. Multiple genetic susceptibility loci are thought to be involved in Graves' disease and it is therefore likely that these can be identified by genome wide association studies. This study aimed to determine if a genome wide association study, using a pooling methodology, could detect genomic loci associated with Graves' disease. Nineteen of the top ranking single nucleotide polymorphisms including HLA-DQA1 and C6orf10, were clustered within the Major Histo-compatibility Complex region on chromosome 6p21, with rs1613056 reaching genome wide significance (p = 5 × 10 -8 ). Technical validation of top ranking non-Major Histo-compatablity complex single nucleotide polymorphisms with individual genotyping in the discovery cohort revealed four single nucleotide polymorphisms with p ≤ 10 -4 . Rs17676303 on chromosome 1q23.1, located upstream of FCRL3, showed evidence of association with Graves' disease across the discovery, replication and combined cohorts. A second single nucleotide polymorphism rs9644119 downstream of DPYSL2 showed some evidence of association supported by finding in the replication cohort that warrants further study. Pooled genome wide association study identified a genetic variant upstream of FCRL3 as a susceptibility locus for Graves' disease in addition to those identified in the Major Histo-compatibility Complex. A second locus downstream of DPYSL2 is potentially a novel genetic variant in Graves' disease that requires further confirmation.

  3. Thyrotoxic Graves' disease with normal thyroidal technetium-99m pertechnetate uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikekubo, Katsuji; Hino, Megumu; Ito, Hidetomi; Koh, Toshikiyo; Ishihara, Takashi; Kurahachi, Hiroyuki (Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)); Kasagi, Kanji; Hidaka, Akinari; Mori, Toru

    1990-07-01

    We saw 24 thyrotoxic Graves' patients with normal thyroidal uptake of technetium-99m pertechnetate ({sup 99m}Tc) out of 201 untreated thyrotoxic Graves' patients seen over 4 years. The clinical and laboratory findings for these patients were studied and analyzed. Thyroid uptake and scintigraphic examinations by means of {sup 99m}Tc, TBII and TSab activity measurement clearly distinguished these patients from other thyrotoxic disorders (destruction-induced thyrotoxicosis and autonomously functioning thyroid lesions). Different from other disorders, these patients had not lower but normal thyroid uptake and also showed diffuse and discrete trapping into the enlarged glands. These patients had significantly smaller goiters, a lower serum thyroid hormone level, and lower TBII and TSab activity, when compared with other high {sup 99m}Tc uptake groups with Graves' disease, and their condition could be easily controlled with small amounts of antithyroid drugs. Our study indicates that thyrotoxic Graves' disease with normal {sup 99m}Tc uptake exists and {sup 99m}Tc uptake study and TBII activity measurement is very useful for the diagnosis. The normal {sup 99m}Tc uptake thyrotoxic Graves' patient might be early stage patients with general Graves' disease and their early discrimination from general Graves' patients is very advantageous for treatment and prognosis. (author).

  4. [Grave's disease in children with 22q11 deletion. Report of three cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, J; Lebon-Labich, B; Lucron, H; Marçon, F; Leheup, B

    2004-12-01

    Hypothyroidism is a well recognized complication of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Auto-immune hyperthyroidism is less common. We report three patients with a 22q11.2 deletion and Graves' disease diagnosed at age 17, 14 and 11 years, respectively. The clinical and biological presentation was typical for auto-immune hyperthyroidism. Graves' disease should be periodically sought during the follow-up program of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis and management of fetal goiter caused by maternal Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, H A; Strickland, D

    1995-07-01

    We present a case of maternal Grave's disease associated with fetal goitrous hyperthyroidism. Fetal goiter was diagnosed by ultrasound and diagnosis of fetal hyperthyroidism was established by umbilical blood sampling. Fetus was successfully treated by increasing maternal propylthiouracil dosage. Fetal thyroid status was normal at birth. Role of sonography and umbilical blood sampling in management of fetal goiter complicated with maternal Grave's disease is discussed.

  6. Graves' disease presenting as right heart failure with severe pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Furqan Mohd Akram Khan; Anannya Mukherji; Shekhar T. Nabar; Ashwini G

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient who presented to our institution with clinical features of right sided heart failure and hyperthyroidism. Diagnosis of grave's disease induced reversible severe pulmonary hypertension leading to severe tricuspid regurgitation and right sided heart failure was made after all the common causes were ruled out using the biochemical and radiological investigations and review of literature. Graves disease is a common cause hyperthyroidism, is an immune system disorder that resul...

  7. Thyroid Follicular Carcinoma in a Fourteen-year-old Girl with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima-Ishii, Kanako; Ihara, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Terumichi; Toda, Naoko; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kono, Shinji; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-04-01

    Here we present the case of a 14-yr-old girl who developed thyroid follicular carcinoma accompanied by Graves' disease. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease at 10 yr of age and soon achieved a euthyroid state after starting treatment. When she was 13 yr of age, her hyperthyroidism and goiter worsened despite medical therapy. Multiple nodules were found in her enlarged thyroid gland by ultrasonography. Her serum Tg level seemed within the normal range. She underwent near-total thyroidectomy for control of thyroid function. Histopathological study demonstrated that multiple oxyphilic follicular neoplasms were surrounded by the thyroid tissue compatible with Graves' disease. Capsular invasion was identified in one of the nodules, and thus the histological diagnosis was minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. She did not have signs suggesting metastasis, and has had no relapse for 18 mo after the operation. Although some previous studies showed a high prevalence of thyroid cancer with an aggressive nature in adult patients with Graves' disease, few reports about thyroid cancer accompanied by Graves' disease are available in children. The present case, however, suggests that careful investigation is needed when we detect thyroid nodules or progressive thyroid enlargement, especially in children with Graves' disease.

  8. Treatment choice, satisfaction and quality of life in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaglen, Helen M; Tamatea, Jade A U; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S

    2018-04-06

    Thyrotoxicosis, most often caused by Graves' disease (GD), when treated inadequately may result in premature mortality. There is little consensus as to which of the 3 treatment options available - antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine (RAI) and surgery, is better. (i) To assess factors involved in treatment choice and treatment satisfaction in patients treated for Graves' disease; (ii) To assess quality of life (QoL) following treatment of Graves' disease. Participants were selected from a prospective study cohort assessing thyrotoxicosis incidence and severity. Of the 172 eligible patients with Graves' disease, 123 treated patients participated (64% had received ATD only, 11% RAI and 25% total thyroidectomy, the latter 2 usually after a period of ATD), along with 18 untreated patients with newly diagnosed Graves' disease (overall participation rate, 73%). Consented patients completed a questionnaire detailing factors involved in treatment choice, QoL and satisfaction with treatment. Participants reported that the most important factors in choosing a treatment were the following: the effects on activities of daily living, concern about use of radioiodine, possibility of depression or anxiety, and doctor's recommendations. Satisfaction levels were high across all 3 treatment types. QoL 1-year following treatment was higher than in untreated patients, and comparable with other international studies. Patient satisfaction with therapy and QoL does not differ by treatment type. Therefore, clinical and social factors, in combination with patient choice and resource availability, should determine which treatment modality patients with Graves' disease should receive. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The role of diffusion weighted MR imaging for differentiation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, T; Bozgeyik, Z; Ozturk, F; Burakgazi, G; Akyol, M; Coskun, S; Ozkan, Y; Ogur, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) for differentation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Fifty patients (27 Graves diseases and 23 Hashimoto thyroiditis) and twenty healthy volunteers were examined using T1, T2 and DWMRI. The patients were diagnosed on the basis of physical findings and the results of thyroid function tests and serological tests. Circular ROIs were positioned on the bilateral thyroid lobes and isthmus. All measurements were repeated three different b values including 100, 600 and 1000 s/mm2 in all cases. ADC (Apparent diffusion coefficient) maps were calculated automatically with the MR system. Mean ADC values were 2.93 × 10-3, 1.97 × 10-3 and 1.62 × 10-3 mm2/s in the healthy volunteers; 3.47 × 10-3, 2.25 × 10-3 and 1.64 × 10-3 mm2/s in Graves' disease; 2.53 × 10-3, 1.76 × 10-3, 1.28 × 10-3 mm2/s in Hashimoto thyroiditis for b100, b600 and b1000, respectively. The ADC values of the Graves diseases were higher than healty volunteers and Hashimoto thyroiditis. ADC values were statistically significant for differentation between Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease all b values (p Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease.

  10. Single dose planning for radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tamotsu; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Taki, Junichi; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2004-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied one year after radioiodine-131 therapy to assess the relationship between the effectiveness of the therapy and the radioiodine doses used. Patients were classified into three groups according to thyroid function as hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism and hypothyroidism at one year after I-131 therapy. In these groups we compared the mean values of dose, dose per thyroid weight calculated with I-123 uptake before the therapy (pre D/W), dose per thyroid weight calculated with therapeutic I-131 uptake (post D/W), and absorbed dose. No significant differences were found between the three groups in terms of dose or pre D/W. The mean values of post D/W and absorbed dose in the non-hyperthyroid (euthyroid and hypothyroid) group were significantly greater than those in the hyperthyroid group. Post D/W of 6.3 MBq/g was a threshold separating the non-hyperthyroid group from the hyperthyroid group. There was no correlation between pre D/W and post D/W; however, the mean post D/W was significantly greater than the mean pre D/W. All patients with pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g showed non-hyperthyroidism at one year after the radioiodine treatment. No indicators before the radioiodine therapy had significant relationships with the effectiveness of the therapy at one year after the treatment. However, the single therapy planned for setting the pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g will certainly make the patients non-hyperthyroid. As this proposal of dose planning is based on a small number of patients, further study is needed. (author)

  11. Current trends in the management of Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, B.; Glinoer, D.; Lagasse, R.; Wartofsky, L. (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Members of the American Thyroid Association were invited to participate in a survey of the management of Graves' disease. One primary case and several variations were provided, which differed in respect to age, sex, goiter size, severity, etc. The questionnaire was based on the format used in a similar survey of members of the European Thyroid Association. The aim of the survey was to determine (1) how expert thyroidologist employ diagnostic procedures for this disorder, and (2) the choice of therapy of the three treatment options and its manner of implementation. Questionnaires were sent only to clinically active members. The overall response rate was 62%. Data analysis was possible on 52% of members surveyed and was performed using SPSS and a specific Fortran program. In the laboratory evaluation of the primary case a radioiodine uptake, scan, serum total T4, and basal TSH were requested by 92%, 47%, 83%, and 66%, respectively, with 84% of respondents using an ultrasensitive TSH assay. For management of the primary case, radioiodine treatment was the first choice of 69% of the respondents. Antithyroid drugs were used briefly (3-7 days) before 131I by 28%, whereas 41% said they would employ thioureas after 131I. Of those using 131I, 66% tailored the dose to achieve euthyroidism as the goal of therapy, while 34% aimed for hypothyroidism requiring T4 replacement. Only 30% of respondents chose thioureas as a first line of treatment (72% propylthiouracil; 28% tapazole). The duration of drug therapy was a predetermined fixed interval for 80% of the respondents, with 90% treating for 1-2 yr. Other specific trends in diagnostic approach and therapeutic preferences were identified for the eight variations on the primary case problem.

  12. Management of Grave's disease is improved by total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerbo, Maria; Stålberg, Peter; Hellman, Per

    2012-08-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 267 consecutive patients with Graves' disease (GD). The principal aim of this study was to evaluate the risk for recurrence and complications when changing the surgical method from subtotal (ST) to total thyroidectomy (TT). Information from 267 consecutive patients operated on for GD between 2000 and 2006 was collected at Uppsala University Hospital (143) and Falun County Hospital (128). There were 229 women and 38 men. Four patients were operated on twice. A total of 40 STs and 229 TTs were performed. Results were compared to those of a previous cohort from the same hospital, with a majority of STs (157/176) performed from 1980 to 1992. The risk for relapse of GD was reduced from 20 to 3.3 % after the shift from ST to TT. In terms of surgical complications, 2.2 % demonstrated permanent vocal cord paralysis and 4.5 % had persistent hypocalcemia, not significant when compared to the previous cohort. In spite of TT, there were four recurrences, all due to remnant thyroid tissue high up at the hyoid bone. Changing the surgical method did not affect postoperative progression of dysthyroid ophthalmopathy (DO, 7.0 vs. 7.5 %). There were no differences in outcome with respect to which hospital the patients had their operation. Change from ST to TT dramatically reduced the risk for recurrence of GD without increasing the rate of complications. TT is not more effective than ST in hampering progression of DO as has been advocated by some. Careful surgical dissection up to the hyoid bone is necessary to avoid recurrence.

  13. Is Graves' disease a primary immunodeficiency? New immunological perspectives on an endocrine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struja, Tristan; Kutz, Alexander; Fischli, Stefan; Meier, Christian; Mueller, Beat; Recher, Mike; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-09-25

    Uncertainty about factors influencing the susceptibility and triggers for Graves' disease persists, along with a wide variation in the response to anti-thyroid drugs, currently at approximately 50% of non-responders. The aim of this narrative review is to summarize immunological concepts, with a combined endocrine and immunological perspective, to highlight potential new areas of research. Relevant studies were identified through a systematic literature search using the PubMed and EMBASE databases in March 2016. No cut-offs regarding dates were imposed. We used the terms "Graves' Disease" or "Basedow" or "thyrotoxicosis" together with the terms "etiology", "pathophysiology", "immunodeficiency", "causality", and "autoimmunity". The terms "orbitopathy", "ophthalmopathy", and "amiodarone" were excluded. Articles in English, French, German, Croatian, Spanish, and Italian were eligible for inclusion. While concepts such as the impact of iodine, smoking, human leucocyte antigen, infections, and ethnicity are established, new ideas have emerged. Pertaining evidence suggests the involvement of autoimmunity and immunodeficiency in the pathophysiology of Graves' disease. Recent studies point to specific immunological mechanisms triggering the onset of disease, which may also serve as targets for more specific therapies.

  14. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perros, Petros; Hegedüs, L; Bartalena, L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is an autoimmune condition, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes including impaired quality of life and socio-economic status. Current evidence suggests that the incidence of GO in Europe may be declining, however data on the prevalence of this dise...

  15. Predicting relapse of Graves' disease following treatment with antithyroid drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, LIN; LU, HONGWEN; LIU, YANG; LIU, CHANGSHAN; XUN, CHU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to monitor long term antithyroid drug treatments and to identify prognostic factors for Graves' disease (GD). A total of 306 patients with GD who were referred to the Endocrinology Clinic at Weifang People's Hospital (Weifang, China) between August 2005 and June 2009 and treated with methimazole were included in the present study. Following treatment, patients were divided into non-remission, including recurrence and constant treatment subgroups, and remission groups. Various prognosis factors were analyzed and compared, including: Patient age, gender, size of thyroid prior to and following treatment, thyroid hormone levels, disease relapse, hypothyroidism and drug side-effects, and states of thyrotropin suppression were observed at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Sixty-five patients (21.2%) were male, and 241 patients (78.8%) were female. The mean age was 42±11 years, and the follow-up was 31.5±6.8 months. Following long-term treatment, 141 patients (46%) demonstrated remission of hyperthyroidism with a mean duration of 18.7±1.9 months. The average age at diagnosis was 45.6±10.3 years in the remission group, as compared with 36.4±8.8 years in the non-remission group (t=3.152; P=0.002). Free thyroxine (FT)3 levels were demonstrated to be 25.2±8.9 and 18.7±9.4 pmol/l in the non-remission and remission groups, respectively (t=3.326, P=0.001). The FT3/FT4 ratio and thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb) levels were both significantly higher in the non-remission group (t=3.331, 3.389, P=0.001), as compared with the remission group. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that elevated thyroid size, FT3/FT4 ratio and TRAb at diagnosis were associated with poor outcomes. The ratio of continued thyrotropin suppression in the recurrent subgroup was significantly increased, as compared with the remission group (P=0.001), as thyroid function reached euthyroid state at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Patients with GD exhibiting

  16. Development of Graves' ophthalmopathy and uveitis after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in a patient with HTLA-I associated myelopathy (HAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yasunori; Migita, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Tomoji; Okuda, Itsuko; Takeshita, Akira; Takagi, Akio; Shishiba, Yoshimasa

    1994-01-01

    HTLV-I carriers or patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) are prone to immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present a 44-year-old female with HAM who developed Graves' disease. She developed severe Graves' ophthalmopathy shortly after 131 I therapy, concurrently with a remarkable increase in TSH-receptor antibody titer. Ophthalmopathy was aggravated in spite of prednisolone therapy and euthyroidism being maintained by thyroxine replacement. Uveitis also developed after 131 I therapy and iridocyclitis finally required trabeculotomy. This case suggests that HAM patients may have a higher risk of immune-mediated Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy.(author)

  17. Applied anatomy of thyroid arteries for interventional embolization of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhongxiang; Zhao Wei; Hou Jialin; Xiang Shutian; Li Liyuan; Zou Zhirong; Li Xingguo; Song Dianping; Yuan Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the anatomy and imaging manifestations of thyroid arteries for improving the efficiency and lowering the complication in interventional embolization of Graves' disease. Methods: Thyroid arteries were investigated, including 16 adult cadavers (Cadaver group), 8 non-thyropathic patients (Normal group)and 17 Graves patients (Graves group). The inner diameters of the trunk and supplying branches of thyroid artery, the angles between the origination of branches and the beginning of the trunk, and the angles between the trunk of thyroid artery and carotid or subclavian artery were measured. In addition, data of the three groups were statistically analyzed. Results: Many non-thyroid arterial branches arose from thyroid artery, with no statistical difference in their indexes between Cadaver group and Normal group. The thyroid arteries showed much longer, obviously wider in diameter, and larger angles between the trunk of thyroid artery and carotid artery in Graves group than those of Cadaver group and Normal group; outcoming with significant statistical differences; and furthermore, with increase of interglandular branches and dangerous internal and external anastomoses. Conclusions: The specific thyroid arterial changes of Graves' disease are helpful for the interventional embolization. Non-thyroid branches and dangerous anastomoses should not be embolized as far as possible, for decreasing the complications of the interventional procedure for Graves' disease. (authors)

  18. Comparison of Bilateral Axillo-Breast Approach Robotic Thyroidectomy with Open Thyroidectomy for Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyungju; Yi, Jin Wook; Song, Ra-Yeong; Chai, Young Jun; Kim, Su-jin; Choi, June Young; Lee, Kyu Eun

    2016-03-01

    There is an ongoing debate about whether robotic thyroidectomy (RT) is appropriate for Graves' disease. The aim of this study was to compare the safety of bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) RT with that of open thyroidectomy (OT) in patients with Graves' disease. From January 2008 to June 2014, 189 (44 BABA RT and 145 OT) patients underwent total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. Recurrence of Graves' disease, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, and complication rates including recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy and hypoparathyroidism were analyzed between BABA RT and OT groups, after propensity score matching according to age, gender, body mass index, surgical indication, the extent of operation, excised thyroid weight, and follow-up period. No patient experienced recurrence of Graves' disease after median follow-up of 35.0 months. Intraoperative blood loss (151.8 ± 165.4 mL vs. 134.5 ± 75.4 mL; p = 0.534) and hospital stay (3.4 ± 0.7 day vs. 3.3 ± 0.7 day; p = 0.564) were not different between BABA RT and OT groups. Complication rates including transient RLN palsy (11.4 vs. 11.4%; p = 1.000), transient hypoparathyroidism (18.2 vs. 20.5%; p = 0.787), permanent RLN palsy (0 vs. 2.3%; p = 0.315), and permanent hypoparathyroidism (2.3 vs. 2.3%; p = 1.000) were also comparable between groups. BABA RT for Graves' disease showed comparable surgical completeness and complications to conventional OT. BABA RT can be recommended as an alternative surgical option for patients with Graves' disease who are concerned about cosmesis.

  19. Irisin and Myostatin Levels in Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Mehmet Muhittin; Akturk, Mujde; Tohma, Yusuf; Cerit, Ethem Turgay; Altinova, Alev Eroglu; Arslan, Emre; Yetkin, Ilhan; Toruner, Fusun Balos

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle system, which is one of the primary targets for thyroid hormones, has an important role in energy metabolism. Some myokines such as irisin and myostatin have considerable effects on energy metabolism in addition to the musculoskeletal system. Our aim was to investigate circulating irisin and myostatin levels in patients with Graves' Disease (GD). This study included 41 patients with GD who were in overt hyperthyroid status and 44 healthy subjects. Serum irisin levels were higher in patients with hyperthyroidism than in control group (p = 0.003). However, there was no statistical difference in myostatin levels between groups (p = 0.21). Irisin levels were positively correlated with free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) (p = 0.03, p = 0.02, p = 0.02, respectively) and negatively correlated with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (p = 0.006) in both groups. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of GD was the only significant factor associated with serum irisin levels (β = 0.29, p = 0.01). Myostatin levels were positively correlated with age, body mass index (BMI), FT4, HOMA-IR (p = 0.001, p = 0.04, p = 0.003, p = 0.03, respectively) and negatively correlated with TSH (p = 0.01). Multiple regression analysis also revealed that age and FT4 were the significant factors associated with circulating myostatin levels (β = 0.27, p = 0.02; β = 0.22, p = 0.04, respectively). Our results suggest that increased irisin levels might contribute to altered energy metabolism in hyperthyroidism. Further studies to determine whether myostatin is affected due to hyperthyroidism are needed. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Common genetic variants associated with thyroid function may be risk alleles for Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Purdey; Brix, Thomas H; Wilson, Scott G; Ward, Lynley C; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John P; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Walsh, John P

    2015-02-14

    Recent studies have identified common genetic variants associated with TSH, free T4 and thyroid peroxidase antibodies, but it is unclear whether these differ between patients with Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. To examine whether 11 common genetic variants differ between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. We genotyped 11 common variants in a discovery cohort of 203 Australian patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Two variants with significant or suggestive associations were analysed in a replication cohort of 384 Danish patients. For rs753760 (PDE10A), the minor allele frequency in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·38 vs. 0·23, respectively, (P = 6·42 × 10 -4 ) in the discovery cohort, 0·29 vs. 0·24 (P = 0·147) in the replication cohort and 0·32 vs. 0·24 in combined analysis (P = 0·0021; all analyses adjusted for sex). In healthy controls from Busselton, the frequency was 0·29, significantly different from Hashimoto's disease but not Graves' disease. For rs4889009 (MAF gene region), the frequency of the minor G-allele in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·48 vs. 0·36 (P = 0·0156) in the discovery cohort, 0·48 vs. 0·34 (P = 1·83 × 10 -4 ) in the replication cohort and 0·48 vs. 0·35 in the combined analysis (P = 7·53 × 10 -6 ); in controls, the frequency was 0·38, significantly different from Graves' disease but not Hashimoto's disease. After further adjustment for smoking, associations with rs4889009 remained significant, whereas those with rs753760 were not. Common variants in PDE10A and MAF gene regions may influence whether patients with AITD develop Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Management of dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemp, Michael A

    2008-04-01

    The management of dry eye disease (DED) encompasses both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches, including avoidance of exacerbating factors, eyelid hygiene, tear supplementation, tear retention, tear stimulation, and anti-inflammatory agents. Artificial tears are the mainstay of DED therapy but, although they improve symptoms and objective findings, there is no evidence that they can resolve the underlying inflammation in DED. Topical corticosteroids are effective anti-inflammatory agents, but are not recommended for long-term use because of their adverse-effect profiles. Topical cyclosporine--currently the only pharmacologic treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration specifically for DED--is safe for long-term use and is disease-modifying rather than merely palliative. Treatment selection is guided primarily by DED severity. Recently published guidelines propose a severity classification based on clinical signs and symptoms, with treatment recommendations according to severity level.

  2. Comparative Study on the Long-Acting Thyroid Stimulator in Graves' Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Sup; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1973-01-01

    In order to study the role of LATS in the pathogenesis of the Graves' disease, the serum activity of the LATS was determined by the bioassay of the modified McKenzie method. The subjects examined in the study consisted of 76 individuals including 12 cases of normal control, 54 cases with typical Graves' disease and 10 cases of chronic thyroiditis. The data observed in the patients with the Graves' disease were analyzed in comparison with the clinical features, laboratory findings, and responsiveness to the treatment. The results obtained are as follows: 1) None of the subjects which did not have the Graves' disease showed a positive LATS activity, except one case with the chronic thyroiditis. 2) Twenty-two oui of the 54 cases with the Graves' disease showed positive results for LATS (40.7%). The positivity was significantly higher in the patients who had been treated with antithyroid regimen but still showed hyperthyroidism than in the patients who had not been treated. 3) The activity of LATS was gradually decreased or even became absent as the hyperthyroidism was corrected after the treatment. 4) No significant difference was noticed in age and-sex between the positive and negative groups of LATS. 5) There was no evidence of significant correlation between the LATS activity and clinical features.

  3. [Echo-tracking technology for evaluating femoral artery endothelial function in patients with Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Jingyuan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Jinru

    2012-10-01

    To assess the value of echo-tracking technology in evaluating endothelial function of the femoral artery in patients with Grave's disease. Thirty-four patients with Grave's disease patients and 30 normal adults as controls were recruited in this study. The intima-media thickness (IMT), arterial stiffness (β), pressure strain elastic modulus (Ep), arterial compliance (AC), pulse wave conducting velocity (PWVβ) and augmentation index (AI) parameters were examined using echo-tracking technology for evaluating the right femoral arterial elasticity. Compared with the control subjects, the patients with Grave's disease showed significantly increased β, Ep, and PWVβ and significantly decreased AC (P0.05). In patients with Grave's disease, β and Ep were positively correlated with FT3, FT4, TT3, TT4, and PWVβ was positively correlated with FT3 and FT4. Echo-tracking technology can provide more accurate quantitative evidences for early diagnosis of femoral artery endothelial dysfunction in patients with Grave's disease, but the influence of procedural factors on the measurement accuracy should be considered in the evaluation.

  4. Reduced parietooccipital white matter glutamine measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in treated graves' disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Else Rubæk; Elberling, T.V.; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients often have affective and cognitive complaints, whether these disappear after treatment remains disputed. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate cerebral biochemistry in acute and treated Graves' disease. DESIGN: We...... conducted a prospective study, investigating volunteers once and patients before and 1 yr after treatment. SETTING: The study was performed at a radiology department, a memory disorder clinic, and two endocrinology clinics. PATIENTS AND OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Of 53 consecutively referred, newly diagnosed...... and a battery of biochemical, affective, and cognitive tests were used. RESULTS: Previously reported findings of reduced choline and myo-inositol in acute Graves' disease were confirmed and reversibility was demonstrated. Parieto-occipital white matter glutamine was and remained significantly reduced (P

  5. Remission of Grave's disease after oral anti-thyroid drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, Osama; Waseem, Sabiha; Haque, M Naeemul; Islam, Najmul; Jabbar, Abdul

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate remission rate of anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Grave's disease, and to study the factors associated with remission. A cross sectional study. The Endocrine Department of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi from 1999 to 2000. Seventy four patients of Grave's disease were recruited who were prescribed medical treatment. Grave's disease was diagnosed in the presence of clinical and biochemical hyperthyroidism along with anti-microsomal (AMA) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (ATA) and thyroid scan. These patients were prescribed oral anti-thyroid drugs using titration regime and followed at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Patients were categorized into two groups: "remission group" and "treatment failure group" and results were compared using a chi-square test, t-test and logistic regression model with significance at p disease on initial presentation.

  6. Management of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: frequently asked questions and answers (if any).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Vitti, P

    2016-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-replete areas. Although progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, no treatment targeting pathogenic mechanisms of the disease is presently available. Therapies for Graves' hyperthyroidism are largely imperfect because they are bound to either a high rate of relapsing hyperthyroidism (antithyroid drugs) or lifelong hypothyroidism (radioiodine treatment or thyroidectomy). Aim of the present article is to offer a practical guidance to the reader by providing evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions in clinical practice.

  7. Anxiety and depression are more prevalent in patients with graves' disease than in patients with nodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bové, Kira Bang; Watt, Torquil; Vogel, Asmus; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bjoerner, Jakob Bue; Groenvold, Mogens; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-09-01

    Graves' disease has been associated with an increased psychiatric morbidity. It is unclarified whether this relates to Graves' disease or chronic disease per se. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with Graves' disease compared to patients with another chronic thyroid disease, nodular goitre, and to investigate determinants of anxiety and depression in Graves' disease. 157 cross-sectionally sampled patients with Graves' disease, 17 newly diagnosed, 140 treated, and 251 controls with nodular goitre completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The differences in the mean HADS scores between the groups were analysed using multiple linear regression, controlling for socio-demographic variables. HADS scores were also analysed dichotomized: a score >10 indicating probable 'anxiety'/probable 'depression'. Determinants of anxiety and depression symptoms in Graves' disease were examined using multiple linear regression. In Graves' disease levels of anxiety (p = 0.008) and depression (p = 0.014) were significantly higher than in controls. The prevalence of depression was 10% in Graves' disease versus 4% in nodular goitre (p = 0.038), anxiety was 18 versus 13% (p = 0.131). Symptoms of anxiety (p = 0.04) and depression (p = 0.01) increased with comorbidity. Anxiety symptoms increased with duration of Graves' disease (p = 0.04). Neither thyroid function nor autoantibody levels were associated with anxiety and depression symptoms. Anxiety and depression symptoms were more severe in Graves' disease than in nodular goitre. Symptoms were positively correlated to comorbidity and duration of Graves' disease but neither to thyroid function nor thyroid autoimmunity.

  8. Significance of changes of serum FT3, FT4, s-TSH, TGA, TPO-Ab levels in patients with non-Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lindi; Xu Changde; Xu Huogen; Wang Wei; Zhang Jie; Nie Shufen; Gu Zhenqi; Zeng Jihua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the changes of thyroid-related hormones (FT 3 , FT 4 , s-TSH, TGA, TPO-Ab) levels in patients with Graves' and non-Graves' hyperthyroidism. Methods: Serum FT 3 , FT 4 , TGA, TPO-Ab (with RIA) and s-TSH (with IRMA) were determined in 43 patients with non-Graves' hyperthyroidism, 29 patients with Graves' disease and 40 controls. Results: In both groups of hyperthyroid patients, the serum levels of FT 3 (15.01 ± 11.01 pg/ml in the non - Graves' group and 15.23 ± 9.57pg/ml in the Graves' group), FT 4 (38.30 ± 19.82, 38.87 ± 17.39pg/ml), TGA(33.89 ± 22. 43%, 49.72 ± 20.55% ) and TPO-Ab (1319.24 ± 1037.78, 2023.24 ± 621.00IU/ml) were significantly higher than those (FT 3 , 6.76 ± 2.01pg/ml, FT 4 16.16 ± 2.58pg/ml, TGA 6.76 ± 2.01%, TPO-Ab 0.01 ± 0.01IU/ml) in the controls (all P 3 , FT 4 and s-TSH levels in both groups were not significantly different from each other. Conclusion: In this study, serum TGA and TPO -Ab levels were lower in patients with non-Graves' hyperthyroidism than those in patients with Graves' disease. (authors)

  9. Mediastinal neoplasms in patients with Graves disease: a possible link between sustained hyperthyroidism and thymic neoplasia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd Jonathan D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anterior mediastinal masses are a rare but well documented finding in Graves disease. The vast majority of these lesions represents benign thymic hypertrophy and regress after treatment of the hyperthyroidism. A small percentage of these cases however represent neoplastic/malignant diseases which require further treatment. Cases 12 year old boy with one year history of refractory Graves disease was found to have an anterior mediastinal mass and underwent curative thyroidectomy for sustained hyperthyroidism. Cervical lymphadenopathy was detected during the procedure and biopsy was obtained. A 23 year old woman who presented with a one month history of hyperthyroid symptoms, was diagnosed with Graves disease and also was found to have an anterior mediastinal mass on imaging. Biopsy of the anterior mediastinal mass was obtained and subsequently the patient underwent robotic thymectomy. Histologic examination and immunophenotyping of the cervical lymph node in a 12 year old boy revealed neoplastic proliferation of T lymphoblasts diagnostic of T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Examination of the anterior mediastinal mass biopsy in the 23 year old woman revealed type B1 thymoma which was confirmed after examination of the subsequent robotic thymectomy specimen. Conclusion This is the first reported case of T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma and the third reported case of thymoma associated with sustained hyperthyroidism due to Graves disease. These cases indicate that an anterior mediastinal mass in a patient with active Graves disease may be due to a neoplastic cause, which may require definitive treatment. Caution should be exercised when dismissing a mediastinal mass as benign thymic hyperplasia in patients with active Graves disease.

  10. [Diagnostic difficulties in Grave's orbitopathy--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejowski, Maciej; Grzesiuk, Wiesław; Szwejda, Elzbieta; Bar-Andziak, Ewa

    2004-03-01

    Graves' orbitopathy is caused by intraorbital inflammatory reaction due to autoimmune thyroid disease. In most cases the diagnosis is based on the coexistence of typical eye signs and hyperthyroidism symptoms. In presented case, the absence of thyroid dysfunction implicated performance of differential diagnosis. Among many available diagnostic tools nuclear magnetic resonance seems to be the most accurate in confirmation of diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy.

  11. Radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid nodules and of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guhlmann, C.A.; Rendl, J.; Boerner, W.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effects of radioiodine therapy (RIT) for autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTNs) and Graves' disease on thyroid function and size up to one year after RIT. In 230 patients with AFTNs, a dose of 300 Gy was effective in about 90% of the cases 6 months after RIT. Out of 65 patients suffering from Graves' disease, 5 patients (8%) had persisting hyperthyroidism 6 months after RIT with a dose of 150 Gy. This group consisted exclusively of patients with manifest hyperthyroidism at the time of RIT. As determined by ultrasonography 6 months after RIT, a reduction of thyroid size by about 40% and 60% was observed in patients with AFTNs and Graves' disease, respectively. (orig.) [de

  12. Effects of radioiodine on thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, A.M.; Petersen, M.M.; Capiferri, R.; Evered, D.C.; Rees Smith, B.; Hall, R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of 131 I therapy on thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) were studied in fifty-five patients with Graves' disease and five patients with toxic multinodular goitre (MNG). A group of forty patients with Graves' disease and four patients with toxic MNG were treated with drugs and acted as controls. In 78% of patients treated with 131 I there was a dramatic increase in serum TBII activity during the 3 months following therapy, whereas drug-treated patients showed a decrease (77%) or no change in TBII activity over the same period. TBII activity was not detectable in patients with toxic MNG before or after drug or 131 I therapy. Consideration of the mechanisms involved in the changes in serum TBII activity after 131 I treatment or during drug treatment provide insight into the basic defects responsible for the development of Graves' disease and suggest that both the thyroid and immune system are involved. (author)

  13. Analysis of adverse reactions and complications of Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Chen Wei; Yang Jianyong; Xiao Haipeng; Huang Yonghui; Li Jiaping; Guo Wenbo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyse the adverse reactions and complications of Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization. Methods: 41 patients of Graves' disease underwent interventional embolization have been analysed with its adverse reactions and complications. Polyvinyl alcohol or bletilla microspheres and micro-coils were used in these patients. Results: Laryngopharyngeal and neck pain occurred in all patients. T 3 and T 4 increased in 3 days to one week after the procedure. Thirty of them showed fever. Dystopia embolism happened in two cases with one of transitory hypoparathyroidism. No hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism or hoarseness occur during long term follow up. Conclusions: The adverse reactions and complications of Graves disease after thyroid arteries embolization may occur. Some of them are preventable and curable

  14. The mid-to-long term therapeutic efficacy of Graves' disease after interventional embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weiduo; Yang Jianyong; Zhuang Wenquan; Chen Wei; Li Heping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mid-to-long term therapeutic efficacy of Graves' disease after interventional embolization. Methods: Twenty-five patients of Graves' disease treated with interventional embolization were followed up for 24-57 months. T 3 and T 4 were monitored at pre-operation, six months, 12 months, 2, 3 and 4 years after operation, respectively. Other references included pulse, thyroid size, and vessel's murmur. Results: Twenty-two patients completely relieved from the hyperthyroidism during the follow-up. Only one patient suffered from recurrence. Other two patients were still on maintaining dosage of antithyroid drug therapy. No hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism was found during this term. Conclusion: Mid-to-long term follow-up showed satisfactory efficacy of interventional therapy, offering another alternative for treatment of refractory Graves' disease

  15. Secondary Pulmonary Hypertension and Right-Sided Heart Failure at Presentation in Grave's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshpure, Swapnil Panjabrao; Vaidya, Gaurang Nandkishor; Gattani, Vipul

    2012-01-01

    A young female presented with evidence of right-sided heart failure and was subsequently found to have significant pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Because of her normal left ventricular function and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, the most probable site of etiology seemed to be the pulmonary vasculature. All the common possible secondary causes of PAH were ruled out, but during the investigations, she was found to have elevated thyroid function tests compatible with the diagnosis of Grave's disease. The treatment of Grave's disease, initially by medications and subsequently by radioiodine therapy, was associated with a significant reduction in the pulmonary artery systolic pressure. The purpose of this case report is to highlight one of the unusual and underdiagnosed presentations of Grave's disease.

  16. Variation in phenotypic appearance of Graves' disease: effect of genetic anticipation and duration of complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Xander; Smit, Natalie; Endert, Erik; Tijssen, Jan; Wiersinga, Wilmar

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to susceptibility of Graves' disease. In this study. we evaluated whether the duration of symptoms or a positive family history of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) are related to specific phenotypes in patients with a first episode of

  17. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease and the effects of prior carbimazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyampudi, Arun; Hamide, Abdoul; Halanaik, Dhanapathi; Sahoo, Jaya Prakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2014-09-01

    The use of radioiodine as the first line of treatment in Graves' disease is restricted in India because of its limited availability and an unrealistic risk perception associated with it. Additionally, the effectiveness of radioiodine ablation in Graves' disease is influenced by many factors. Prior medical antithyroid therapy is one such important factor. To analyze the efficacy of low dose radioiodine therapy (5 mCi) in treatment of naive patients of Graves' disease in comparison to that in which it was already primed with an antithyroid drug, carbimazole. A non-randomized, interventional study conducted in the Department of Medicine and Endocrinology of a tertiary care institute in South India. The study had two groups; Group A (36 treatment naive, uncomplicated Graves' disease patients) and B (34 Graves' disease patients on carbimazole prior to radioiodine therapy). Both groups had baseline clinical, biochemical evaluation and were reassessed at 3 and 6 months for evaluating the clinical status for possible documentation of cure. The cure rate was 61.1% in drug naive group and 58.8% in pretreated group at 6 months following radioiodine (P = 0.845). Higher baseline 999m technicium (99m Tc) uptake, male gender, BMI and higher baseline free thyroxine (fT4) level predicted treatment failure following radioiodine therapy. Administration of carbimazole prior to low dose radioiodine therapy does not alter the efficacy of radioiodine. Low fixed dose (5 mCi) of radioactive iodine may be a safe and effective primary therapeutic option in Graves' disease patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs.

  18. Analysis of the factors associated with Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake in thyrotoxicosis and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidokoro-kunii, Yo; Emoto, Naoya; Cho, Keiichi; Oikawa, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    To determine the factors associated with 20 minute Tc-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake, we examined all patients in whom thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed at Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, Nippon Medical School from 2001 April through 2003 March. Patients with thyrotoxicosis diagnosed during this period were 57 with Graves' disease (76%), 11 with transient hyperthyroxinemia (TH) (14.7%), and 7 with subacute thyroiditis (SAT) (9.3%). The uptake of Tc-99m ranged from 0.97% to 40.1% in Graves' disease and from 0.15% to 0.8% in TH. Although TH may include spontaneous resolution of Graves' disease as well as painless thyroiditis, no treatment was necessary for these patients. Uptake in all patients with SAT was less than 0.5%. There were significant correlations between the level of Tc-99m uptake and the levels of free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII), and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) in patients with Graves' disease. Older patients with Graves' disease showed lower uptake than did younger patients. Both Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake and TBII levels, but not fT3, fT4 or TSAb levels, at the beginning of antithyroid drug treatment correlated significantly with the duration of treatment until the daily dose of methimazole reached 5 mg. These data suggest that Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake reflects the severity of Graves' disease and its response to the medical treatment and that antithyroid drug therapy is not necessary when the uptake is less than 0.9%. (author)

  19. Thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma simultaneously existing with Graves' disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Inaba, Makoto; Ichijyo, Takamasa; Kagami, Hiroshi; Mine, Yutaka

    2017-01-06

    Thyrotropin-producing pituitary tumor is relatively rare. In particular, concurrent cases associated with Graves' disease are extremely rare and only nine cases have been reported so far. We describe a case of a thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma concomitant with Graves' disease, which was successfully treated. A 40-year-old Japanese woman presented with mild signs of hyperthyroidism. She had positive anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody, anti-thyroglobulin antibody, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody. Her levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, which ranged from low to normal in the presence of high levels of serum free thyroid hormones, were considered to be close to a state of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a macropituitary tumor. The coexistence of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma and Graves' disease was suspected. Initial therapy included anti-thyroid medication, which was immediately discontinued due to worsening symptoms. Subsequently, surgical therapy for the pituitary tumor was conducted, and her levels of free thyroid hormones, including the thyroid-stimulating hormone, became normal. On postoperative examination, her anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody levels decreased, and the anti-thyroglobulin antibody became negative. The coexistence of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma and Graves' disease is rarely reported. The diagnosis of this condition is complicated, and the appropriate treatment strategy has not been clearly established. This case suggests that physicians should consider the coexistence of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma with Graves' disease in cases in which thyroid-stimulating hormone values range from low to normal in the presence of thyrotoxicosis, and the surgical treatment of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma could be the first-line therapy in patients with both thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma

  20. Epidemiology, management and outcomes of Graves' disease-real life data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Y S; Hookham, J C; Allahabadia, A; Balasubramanian, S P

    2017-06-01

    Treatment options in Graves' disease are clearly defined, but management practices and the perceptions of success are varied. The outcomes of treatment in large consecutive cohorts of Graves' disease have not been well characterised. The study describes the epidemiology, management strategies and medium term outcomes following anti-thyroid drug treatment, radio-iodine ablation and surgery in Graves' disease. All patients (n = 659) who received treatment for a new diagnosis of Graves' disease in secondary care over a 5 year period were included with a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 42.9 (29-57.5) months. The age adjusted incidence of adult onset Graves' disease in Sheffield, UK was 24.8 per 100,000 per year. Excluding 35 patients lost to follow-up, 93.1% (n = 581) were controlled on anti-thyroid drug treatment. Of these, 73.6% went into remission following withdrawal of anti-thyroid drugs; 5.2% were still undergoing initial therapy; 13.3% lost control whilst on anti-thyroid drugs; and 7.9% went on to have either surgery or radio-iodine ablation whilst controlled on anti-thyroid drugs. Of the 428 patients who achieved remission, 36.7% relapsed. Of 144 patients who had radio-iodine ablation treatment, 5.6% relapsed and needed further treatment. Of 119 patients having surgery, 5.2% had long-term hypoparathyroidism and none had documented long-term recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. In the follow-up, 39.9% of patients underwent surgery or radio-iodine ablation with little morbidity. Up to two-thirds of patients who achieved remission did not relapse. Data on effectiveness and risks of treatments for Graves' disease presented in this study will help clinicians and patients in decision making.

  1. Circulating microRNA-1a is a biomarker of Graves' disease patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Sheng-Jie; Yao, Xuan; Tian, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Ke-Qin; She, Dun-Min; Guo, Fei-Fan; Zhai, Qi-Wei; Ying, Hao; Xue, Ying

    2017-07-01

    It has been increasingly suggested that specific microRNAs expression profiles in the circulation and atrial tissue are associated with the susceptibility to atrial fibrillation. Nonetheless, the role of circulating microRNAs in Graves' disease patients with atrial fibrillation has not yet been well described. The objective of the study was to identify the role of circulating microRNAs as specific biomarkers for the diagnosis of Graves' disease with atrial fibrillation. The expression profiles of eight serum microRNAs, which are found to be critical in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation, were determined in patients with Graves' disease with or without atrial fibrillation. MicroRNA expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR in normal control subjects (NC; n = 17), patients with Graves' disease without atrial fibrillation (GD; n = 29), patients with Graves' disease with atrial fibrillation (GD + AF; n = 14), and euthyroid patients with atrial fibrillation (AF; n = 22). Three of the eight serum microRNAs,i.e., miR-1a, miR-26a, and miR-133, had significantly different expression profiles among the four groups. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that the relative expression level of miR-1a was positively correlated with free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4), and negatively related to thyroid stimulating hormone. Spearman's correlations analysis also revealed that the level of miR-1a was negatively correlated with a critical echocardiographic parameter (left atrial diameter), which was dramatically increased in GD + AF group compared to GD group. Furthermore, the receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that, among the eight microRNAs, miR-1a had the largest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves not only for discriminating between individuals with and without Graves' disease, but also for predicting the presence of atrial fibrillation in patients with Graves' disease. Our findings

  2. Production of non-stimulatory immunoglobulins that inhibit TSH binding in Graves' disease after radioiodine administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, K.; Bliddal, H.; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K.; Friis, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of single dose of 131 I upon thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins has been studied in twenty-two patients with Graves' disease. The thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins were assessed by parallel measurements of thyrotrophin receptor binding inhibitory immunoglobulins (TBII) and of thyroid adenylate cyclase stimulating immunoglobulins (TACSI) in serum by radioreceptor assay and stimulation of adenylate cyclase respectively. The present study thus confirms that radioiodine therapy is followed by an increase of TBII and TACSI in most patients with Graves' disease. The level of TBII can probably provide a marker for development of hypothyroidism following 131 I therapy and might be involved in its pathogenesis. (author)

  3. Radioreceptor assay study of thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) in Grave's diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chao; Lin Xiangtong

    1989-01-01

    Here was reported the assay system using pig thyroid TSH receptor and 125 I-bTSH purified by receptor of thyroid cell membrane for the study of TRAb activity. The binding rate of ASH soluble receptor with 125 I-bTSH was 22.2 ∼ 37.4%, while as the control was only 1.0 ∼ 2.1%. TRAb was measured clinically in 48 cases of Grave's diseases and 25 normal persons. The TSH binding inhabitory index(TRII) was introduced for reflection of TRAb activity. The results showed that TBII was positure in 30 of 48 patients of Grave's diseases, the detctactibility was 79.2%

  4. [Treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: what is the recommended antithyroid drug during pregnancy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, P

    2013-05-01

    Clinical hyperthyroidism during the first trimester of pregnancy due to Graves' disease can be associated with maternal, obstetrical and fetal complications, indicating an active treatment to restore normal thyroid function. Antithyroid drugs are the first line treatment in pregnant women with hyperthyroidism. Due to the increased congenital malformations reported in neonates after first-trimester carbimazole/methimazole treatment and propylthiouracil associated hepatotoxicity, the recommended treatment for pregnant women with hyperthyroid Graves' disease is propylthiouracil during the first trimester of pregnancy and following the first trimester, consideration should be given switching to carbimazole/methimazole during the second part of gestation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism in a premature infant born to a mother with Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, C; Gire, C; Brémond, V; Minodier, P; Soula, F; d'Ercole, C; Palix, C

    2000-05-01

    Neonatal thyrotoxicosis is most commonly due to transplacental transfer of maternal thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb). Bioassay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies may help to determine the risk for neonatal hyperthyroidism. Thyrotoxicosis developed in a premature infant born to a mother with Graves' disease, with a low level of TRAb by bioassay. The infant was treated with carbimazole for two months, until TRAb had disappeared. Bioassay TRAb is not always reliable for predicting the development of neonatal hyperthyroidism in infants born to mothers with Graves' disease. Thyroid function should be measured in all these neonates.

  6. The eye and its diseases in Ancient Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. Ry

    1997-01-01

    Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification......Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification...

  7. Radioiodine treatment of recurrent hyperthyroidism in patients previously treated for Graves' disease by subtotal thyroidectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Laurberg, P

    1992-01-01

    showed a higher sensitivity to radioiodine, with more cases of early hypothyroidism, than non-operated patients. However, after 50 months of follow-up the outcome was identical. The results indicate that frequent assessment is necessary after radioiodine treatment of previously operated patients, since......Radioiodine therapy is often employed for treatment of patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, after previous thyroid surgery. Little is known about the outcome of this treatment compared to patients with no previous surgery. A total of 20 patients who had received surgical...... treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism 1-46 years previously and with relapse of the hyperthyroidism, and 25 patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and no previous thyroid surgery were treated with radioiodine, following the same protocol. Early after treatment the previously operated patients...

  8. Prediction of remission in Graves' disease after thionamide therapy by technetium-99m early uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Takashi; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Koh, Toshikiyo; Shimbo, Shin-ichiro; Hidaka, Akinari; Iida, Yasuhiro; Kasagi, Kanji; Konishi, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    In the clinical management of Graves' thyrotoxicosis, one of the most important subject is when to stop antithyroid drugs after achieving an euthyroid state. T 3 suppression test and other methods have been used to forecast the outcome after drug cessation, but the results were not always satisfactory. We have attempted to predict remission of Graves' disease by single measurement of early technetium uptake without administration of triiodothyronine. Drugs were discontinued in the seventy-five patients with Graves' disease on maintenance doses of either methimazole or propylthiouracil who showed normalized uptake (4.0% or less). Of 64 patients evaluable after twelve months, 55 (86%) remained euthyroid, 8 relapsed, and 1 became hypothyoid. With its accuracy in prediction of short-term remission comparable or superior to T 3 suppression test, this rapid and simple method seemed suitable for routine use in clinical practice. (author)

  9. The natural history and prognostic factors of Graves' disease in Korean children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Min Song

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children and adolescents. In this study, we investigated the natural course and the prognostic factors of Graves' disease in Korean children and adolescents. Methods : One-hundred thirteen (88 girls and 25 boys patients were included in this study. A retrospective analysis was made of all patients who were diagnosed with Graves' disease. The following parameters were recorded and analyzed: patient's sex, age at diagnosis, duration of disease, laboratory findings, symptoms and signs, and family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. Results : All patients were initially treated with antithyroid drugs, either methimazole (93.8% or propylthiouracil (6.2%. Antithyroid drugs had been discontinued in 75 (66.4% of 113 patients. Of these 75 patients, 23 (20.4% relapsed after 25.5¡?#?3.7; months. Thirteen (11.5% of 23 patients, who experienced the first relapse, showed a second remission. However, 2 (1.8% of 13 patients relapsed again. Euthyroid state could not be achieved by antithyroid drugs in 1 patient, and radioactive iodine therapy was performed. The older the patient at diagnosis, the greater the likelihood of remission (P =0.034. Conclusion : Age at diagnosis seems to be a prognostic factor in Korean children and adolescents with Graves' disease, and should be taken into account in treatment plan determination.

  10. Symmetric increased skeletal muscular uptake of 18F fluoro-deoxyglucose: a clue for the diagnosis of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Baljinder

    2011-01-01

    18 F fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the thyroid and thymus is well reported in patients with Grave's disease. Incidental skeletal muscle uptake has also been reported in other non-musculoskeletal (benign and malignant) pathologies. We report a patient of Grave's disease showing symmetrical skeletal muscle uptake but no thyroidal or thymus uptake of FDG. (author)

  11. Guide-line of the radio-iodine (131I) therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yutaka; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    2005-01-01

    Radio-iodine ( 131 I) therapy has been using in Graves' disease and well differentiated thyroid cancer. The rules of control in the discharge from radio-isotope hospital were notified in 1999 in Japan. Guideline of the 131 I therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer were prepared by sub-group of Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  12. 78 FR 31570 - Prospective Grant of a Start-Up Exclusive Patent License Agreement: Treatment of Graves' Disease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...-Up Exclusive Patent License Agreement: Treatment of Graves' Disease, Hyperthyroidism and Thyroid... Patent License Agreement may be worldwide and the field of use may be limited to: Treatment of Graves' Disease, hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. DATES: Only written comments or applications for a license...

  13. Effectiveness and Mechanism of Preoperative Lugol Solution for Reducing Thyroid Blood Flow in Patients with Euthyroid Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Ming; Liao, Wei-Ting; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Sun, H Sunny; Chow, Nan-Haw

    2016-03-01

    To reduce intraoperative and postoperative complications, using Lugol solution to preoperatively prepare patients with Graves' disease has (1) rapidly reduced the severity of thyrotoxicosis and (2) reduced the vascularity of the thyroid gland. The vascularity reduction normally accompanies reducing the severity of thyrotoxicosis. However, the effects and mechanism of Lugol solution for reducing blood flow have not been well investigated in the patients with euthyroid (normally functioning thyroid) Graves' disease. Twenty-five patients with euthyroid Graves' disease being preoperatively treated with Lugol solution for 10 days were measured, at baseline and on the operative day, for (1) superior thyroid artery blood flow; (2) systemic angiogenic factor (VEGF); and (3) systemic inflammatory factor [interleukin (IL)-16]. All three parameters were significantly (p Graves' disease. We recommend routine preoperative Lugol solution treatment for all patients with Graves' disease.

  14. Genetic Testing and Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition called Cogan’s syndrome. Google AI May Reveal Health Risks Through Your Eyes FEB 20, 2018 By Ari Soglin Researchers at Google say a new application of artificial intelligence shows whether a patient’s eyes point to high ...

  15. Postpartum thyrotoxicosis in a patient with Graves' disease. Association with low radioactive iodine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckel, R.H.; Green, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with previously diagnosed Graves' hyperthyroidism had a transient episode of thyrotoxicosis three months postpartum. This was associated with a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland, a rise in antithyroid microsomal antibody titer, a 24-hour radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) of 1%, and an aspiration biopsy specimen suggestive of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. An alternative cause for the depressed RAIU was not discovered. This case would suggest that patients with previously diagnosed Graves' disease can have thyrotoxicosis without an enhanced RAIU and that the postpartum thyrotoxin syndrome may involve an immunologic injury causing a release of performed thyroid hormone

  16. Incidence of hypothyroidism following small doses of 131I in the treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullagh, F.P.; Jelden, G.L.; Rodriguez-Antunez, A.

    1976-01-01

    In a group of 147 patients treated with 131 I in doses of 3.0 millicuries or less for Graves' disease, the incidence of hypothyroidism was calculated 10 to 17 years after treatment. This paper emphasizes the frequency of hypothyroidism after treatment with 131 I in small doses, if sufficient time lapse is considered

  17. Review of Mouse Models of Graves' Disease and Orbitopathy-Novel Treatment by Induction of Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerer, Martin; Faßbender, Julia; Li, Zhongmin; Münch, Götz; Holthoff, Hans-Peter

    2017-04-01

    Various approaches have been used to model human Graves' disease in mice, including transfected fibroblasts, and plasmid or adenoviral immunisations with the extracellular A subunit of the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR). Some of these models were only observed for a short time period or were self-limiting. A long-term model for human Graves' disease was established in mice using continuing immunisations (4-weekly injections) with recombinant adenovirus expressing TSHR. Generation of TSHR binding cAMP-stimulatory antibodies, thyroid enlargement and alterations, elevated serum thyroxin levels, tachycardia and cardiac hypertrophy were maintained for at least 9 months in all Ad-TSHR-immunised mice. Here, we show that these mice suffer from orbitopathy, which was detected by serial orbital sectioning and histomorphometry. Attempts to treat established Graves' disease in preclinical mouse model studies have included small molecule allosteric antagonists and specific antagonist antibodies which were isolated from hypothyroid patients. In addition, novel peptides have been conceived which mimic the cylindrical loops of the TSHR leucine-rich repeat domain, in order to re-establish tolerance toward the antigen. Here, we show preliminary results that one set of these peptides improves or even cures all signs and symptoms of Graves' disease in mice after six consecutive monthly injections. First beneficial effects were observed 3-4 months after starting these therapies. In immunologically naïve mice, administration of the peptides did not induce any immune response.

  18. Multiple Fractures in Patient with Graves' Disease Accompanied by Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hyon-Seung; Kim, Ji Min; Ju, Sang Hyeon; Lee, Younghak; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Koon Soon

    2016-02-01

    Isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is known to decrease bone mineral density due to deficiency of sex steroid hormone. Graves' disease is also an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. However, IHH does not preclude the development of primary hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease, leading to more severe osteoporosis rapidly. Here, we describe the first case of 35-year-old Asian female patient with IHH accompanied by Graves' disease and osteoporosis-induced multiple fractures. Endocrine laboratory findings revealed preserved anterior pituitary functions except for secretion of gonadotropins and showed primary hyperthyroidism with positive autoantibodies. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed slightly small sized pituitary gland without mass lesion. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed severe osteoporosis in lumbar spine and femur neck of the patient. Plain film radiography of the pelvis and shoulder revealed a displaced and nondisplaced fracture, respectively. After surgical fixation with screws for the femoral fracture, the patient was treated with antithyroid medication, calcium, and vitamin D until now and has been recovering fairly well. We report a patient of IHH with Graves' disease and multiple fractures that is a first case in Korea.

  19. Pregnancy after definitive treatment for Graves' disease--does treatment choice influence outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Marianne S; Tu'akoi, Kelson; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y; Tamatea, Jade A U; Conaglen, John V

    2014-08-01

    Women requiring thyroid hormone replacement after definitive therapy (surgery or radioiodine) for Graves' disease who later conceive require an early increase in levothyroxine dose and monitoring of thyroid hormone levels throughout pregnancy. In addition, as TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) can cross the placenta and affect the fetus, measurement of these antibodies during pregnancy is recommended. To review the management of pregnancies following definitive treatment for Graves' disease in order to assess the rates of maternal hypothyroidism and TRAb measurement. Retrospective chart review of women who had undergone definitive treatment for Graves' disease at a tertiary hospital and subsequently had one or more pregnancies. A total of 29 women were identified, each of whom had at least one pregnancy since receiving definitive treatment for Graves' disease: there were a total of 49 pregnancies (22 in the surgical group and 27 in the radioiodine group). Both groups had high rates of hypothyroidism documented during pregnancy (47 and 50%, respectively). The surgical group was more likely to be euthyroid around the time of conception. Less than half of the women were referred to an endocrinologist or had TRAb measured during pregnancy. Neonatal thyroid function was measured in one-third of live births. One case of neonatal thyrotoxicosis was identified. Adherence to the current American Thyroid Association guidelines is poor. Further education of both patients and clinicians is important to ensure that treatment of women during pregnancy after definitive treatment follows the currently available guidelines. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Regulation mechanisms of pituitary-thyroid axis in normal subjects and patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Shinko; Yamauchi, Kazuyuki; Mori, Yuichi

    1986-01-01

    The regulatory mechanism of the pituitary-thyroid axis in normal subjects and patients with Graves' disease was investigated using a highly sensitive TSH assay based on the immunoradiometric assay. All of the normal subjects had detectable TSH values within the range 0.35 to 6.0 μU/ml. No negative correlations between TSH and free thyroid hormones existed in normal subjects. Patients with thyroid carcinoma who seemed to have normal pituitary-thyroid function showed a rapid increase of TSH after total thyroidectomy. On the other hand, while untreated patients with Graves' disease all had undetectable TSH values, these patients took 1 to 3.5 months longer to normalize their TSH values than to normalize free thyroid hormones on antithyroid drug therapy. During the recovery phase by the treatment with decrease of antithyroid drug or supplement of T 4 from iatrogenic hypothyroid state after treatment for Graves' disease and thyroid carcinoma, normalization of TSH levels was delayed than that of free thyroid hormones. Patients with Graves' disease in remission showed an extremely positive correlation between basal and peak TSH levels in TRH test, and a negative correlation between basal TSH and FT 4 . In conclusion, an individual patient may have a different set point concerning the regulatory mechanism of the pituitary-thyroid axis, and the persistence of the hyperthyroid state would seem to have caused some reversible dysfunction of the pituitary gland. (author)

  1. B lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab in Graves' disease: a controlled pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus H; Bonnema, Steen J

    2007-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb)-mediated disorder. Because B lymphocytes are important self-antigen presenting cells and precursors for antibody-secreting plasma cells, temporary B-lymphocyte depletion with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) might...

  2. Too early to dismiss Yersinia enterocolitica infection in the aetiology of Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas H; Hansen, Pia S; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) infection has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease (GD). The association between YE and GD could, however, also be due to common genetic or environmental factors affecting the development of both YE infection and GD. This potential...

  3. Deep lateral wall orbital decompression following strabismus surgery in patients with Type II ophthalmic Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael P; Broxterman, Emily C; Hromas, Alan R; Whittaker, Thomas J; Sokol, Jason A

    2018-01-10

    Surgical management of ophthalmic Graves' disease traditionally involves, in order, orbital decompression, followed by strabismus surgery and eyelid surgery. Nunery et al. previously described two distinct sub-types of patients with ophthalmic Graves' disease; Type I patients exhibit no restrictive myopathy (no diplopia) as opposed to Type II patients who do exhibit restrictive myopathy (diplopia) and are far more likely to develop new-onset worsening diplopia following medial wall and floor decompression. Strabismus surgery involving extra-ocular muscle recession has, in turn, been shown to potentially worsen proptosis. Our experience with Type II patients who have already undergone medial wall and floor decompression and strabismus surgery found, when additional decompression is necessary, deep lateral wall decompression (DLWD) appears to have a low rate of post-operative primary-gaze diplopia. A case series of four Type II ophthalmic Graves' disease patients, all of whom had already undergone decompression and strabismus surgery, and went on to develop worsening proptosis or optic nerve compression necessitating further decompression thereafter. In all cases, patients were treated with DLWD. Institutional Review Board approval was granted by the University of Kansas. None of the four patients treated with this approach developed recurrent primary-gaze diplopia or required strabismus surgery following DLWD. While we still prefer to perform medial wall and floor decompression as the initial treatment for ophthalmic Graves' disease, for proptosis following consecutive strabismus surgery, DLWD appears to be effective with a low rate of recurrent primary-gaze diplopia.

  4. Clinical investigation of 131I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haiqing; Wu Bian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical curative effects of 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease. Methods: Patients with Graves disease took lithium carbonate (250 mg, once per day) orally for 5 weeks. Then they were treated with 131 I (doses=3.15 MBq(80 uCi)/g, based on 60%-70% of the thyroid size). We kept track from 6 to 24 months (averaging 14 months) and classified the results into three: cured, improved or no effect. Results: After a single cycle of 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate, 106 patients with Graves disease were cured, 28 were improved and 8 saw no effects, respectively 74.6%, 19.7% and 5.6% among the 142 patients. We then treated 23 of them with another 131 I therapy (without lithium carbonate). 10 of such were cured (43.5%), 8 were improved (34.8%) and the other 5 saw no effects. Among all patients, hypothyroidism was observed from 25(17.6%), 6 months after the first 131 I therapy. Conclusions: Notable curative results were observed from 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease. Moreover, the dosage of 131 I was therefore decreased, which also lowered the toxicity response. (authors)

  5. A case of metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma complicated with Graves' disease after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Mariko; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Tsuboi, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Tangoku, Akira

    2017-12-28

    Thyroid cancer and Graves' disease may present simultaneously in one patient. The incidence of the development of hyperthyroidism from metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma is rare. We herein report a case of metastatic follicular carcinoma complicated with Graves' disease after total thyroidectomy. A 57-year-old woman underwent right hemithyroidectomy for follicular carcinoma. Metastatic lesions appeared in the lungs and skull two years after the first surgery, and remnant thyroidectomy was performed for radioactive iodine-131 (RAI) therapy, during which the TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) was found to be negative. The patient was treated with RAI therapy four times for four years and was receiving levothyroxine suppressive therapy. Although radioiodine uptake was observed in the lesions after the fourth course of RAI therapy, metastatic lesions had progressed. Four years after the second surgery, she had heart palpitations and tremors. Laboratory data revealed hyperthyroidism and positive TRAb. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and received a fifth course of RAI therapy. 131I scintigraphy after RAI therapy showed strong radioiodine uptake in the metastatic lesions. As a result, the sizes and numbers of metastatic lesions decreased, and thyroid function improved. Metastatic lesions produced thyroid hormone and caused hyperthyroidism. RAI therapy was effective for Graves' disease and thyroid carcinoma.

  6. Treatment of pediatric Graves' disease is associated with excessive weight gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veenendaal, Nicole R.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Little information is available about changes in body weight and body mass index in children before, during, and after treatment for Graves' disease (GD). Our objective was to examine changes in body weight after treatment for GD in children as related to clinical features. The medical records of 43

  7. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Recurrent Hyperthyroidism Caused by Graves' Disease: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wang, B; Chen, S R; Hou, X; Wang, X F; Zhao, S H; Song, J Q; Wang, Y G

    2016-09-01

    The effect of selenium supplementation on recurrent hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease is unclear. Our study aimed to assess the efficacy of selenium supplementation therapy on recurrent Graves' disease. Forty-one patients with recurrent Graves' disease were enrolled in this study. All patients received the routine treatment using methimazole (MMI), while patients allocated to the selenium group received additional selenium therapy for 6 months. The influence of selenium supplementation on the concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAb), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were assessed. The remission rate was also compared between 2 groups. There was no obvious difference in the demographic data and the levels of serum FT4, FT3, TSH, and TRAb between the 2 groups at baseline. Both FT4 and FT3 decreased more at 2 months in the selenium group than the controls, while the TSH level increased more in patients receiving selenium supplementation (pGraves' disease. Randomized trials with large number of participants are needed to validate the finding above. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Clinical value of serum TRAb levels determination in diagnosis of Graves's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhaosui; Huang Chunhong; Liu Kaiyuan; Huang Shengli

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical diagnostic value of serum TRAb levels determination in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum TRAb (with RRA), FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH (with CLIA) levels were measured in 223 patients with Graves' disease both before and 6, 12, 36 months after treatment with antithyroid drugs (ATD) as well as in 50 controls. Results: Positive rate of serum TRAb was 93.3% in patients with Graves' disease before treatment. Six months after ATD therapy the positive rate dropped to 41.3%, being still significantly higher than that in controls (P<0.05). The TRAb positive rate dropped steadily with 12 (18.3% ), 24 (8.9% ) and 36 months (4.9%) of ATD treatment. In the 21 patients who had hyperthyroidism recurred after the course of treatment, TRAb remained positive in 18 of them (80.7%). Conclusion: Persistent positive TRAb despite euthyroid status in patients with Graves' disease after seemingly successful ATD treatment donates persistent immunodysfunction and possible recurrence. It is mandatory to continue ATD treatment until TRAb negative. (authors)

  9. [Management of Grave's disease in the tropics (experience at Bouffard Army Hospital Center in Djibouti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulet, O; Kraemer, P; Leyral, G; Cloatre, G

    2004-01-01

    Based on their experience in managing Grave's disease at the Bouffard Army Hospital Center within the local health care context in Djibouti, the authors advocate surgery as the first line treatment. Medical and economical factors supporting this preference are discussed so that readers can adapt them to his own local context.

  10. A 3-year-old girl with Graves' disease with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Han Ho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease, the main cause of hyperthyroidism in the pediatric age group, is very rare in children younger than 4 years old but can seriously interfere with growth and development if not recognized and treated. Here we report a case of a 3-year-old girl with Graves' disease who presented with goiter, exophthalmos, heat intolerance, and hyperactivity. At her first visit, her serum concentrations of triiodothyronine (T3 and free thyroxine (free T4 were normal, whereas that of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH was decreased. Antimicrosomal antibody was 7,053.94 IU/mL, and TSH-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin was 31.62%. A thyroid scan showed diffuse enlargement with markedly increased uptake of both thyroid glands. Although T3 and free T4 levels were initially normal, she developed hyperthyroidism 3 months later. She was finally diagnosed with Graves' disease and treated with methimazole for 6 months. This is the first report of Graves' disease in children younger than 4 years old in Korea.

  11. The clinical experience of interventional embolization in treatment of graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Zhenhai; Wang Xiaochuan; Liu Longtu; Wang Xiuhua; Wang Zubin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the method and result of thyroid artery embolization as a new therapy for Graves disease. Methods: Ten patients with Graves disease underwent selective thyroid artery embolization. Totally 25 thyroid arteries were embolized with PVA microspheres. The indications to this therapy were as following: Graves disease with recurrent clinical symptoms or with leucopenia during the period of treating with administration of antithyroid drugs or recurrence after subtotal thyroidectomy. Results: Serum level of thyroid hormones dropped significantly [median FT 3 from 20.90 pmol/L (13.36-50.92 pmol/L) to 7.81 pmol/L (3.67-35.3 pmol/L), median FT 4 from 57.9 pmol/L (30.96-57.9 pmol/L) to 28.13 pmol/L (20.44-39.60 pmol/L), (P < 0.005)] and then followed-up for 5-8 months. The symptoms of hyperthyroidism were controlled in 7 patients and the remaining 3 cases were treated with lower dosage of antithyroid drug therapy. None serious complications were found. Conclusions: thyroid artery embolization represents a promising new method for treating Graves disease with safety and good clinical results. Further investigation would be required to assess its long-term effect

  12. Purpura fulminans and anticardiolipin antibodies in a patient with Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligier, Sophie; Pham, Cuong D; Watters, A Kevin; Kassis, Jeannine; Fortin, Paul R

    2002-01-01

    We describe a patient with Grave's discase who developed purpura fulminans and who was found to have anticardiolipin antibodies after being started on propylthiouracil (PTU). We discuss the potential role of the antiphospholipid antibody in this woman's presentation, and its association to both PTU and autoimmune thyroid disease.

  13. Greek mythology: the eye, ophthalmology, eye disease, and blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompoukis, Constantinos; Kourkoutas, Dimitrios

    2007-06-01

    In distant eras, mythology was a form of expression used by many peoples. A study of the Greek myths reveals concealed medical knowledge, in many cases relating to the eye. An analysis was made of the ancient Greek texts for mythological references relating to an understanding of vision, visual abilities, the eye, its congenital and acquired abnormalities, blindness, and eye injuries and their treatment. The Homeric epics contain anatomical descriptions of the eyes and the orbits, and an elementary knowledge of physiology is also apparent. The concept of the visual field can be seen in the myth of Argos Panoptes. Many myths describe external eye disease ("knyzosis"), visual disorders (amaurosis), and cases of blinding that, depending on the story, are ascribed to various causes. In addition, ocular motility abnormalities, congenital anomalies (cyclopia), injuries, and special treatments, such as the "licking" method, are mentioned. The study of mythological references to the eye reveals reliable medical observations of the ancient Greeks, which are concealed within the myths.

  14. Clinical studies on thyroid CT number in Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamijo, Keiichi

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate CT Hounsfield unit (H.U.) of the thyroid in hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis. The mean thyroid CT number in 95 controls was 122±18 H.U.(±SD) and did not change significatly with advancing age. The mean thyroid CT number (±SD) of 85±22 H.U. in 60 patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease was significantly lower than either in normal controls or 116±22 H.U. in 11 patients with euthyroid Graves' disease. Comparison of thyroid hormones and TSH receptor Ab values of untreated patients with a normal and an abnormally low thyroid CT number showed that serum total and free T 3 were significantly higher in the latter group than the former group. With respect to the effect of methimazol (MMI) on the thyroid CT number, in the untreated 10 patients with a low thyroid CT number, the initial mean CT number was 65±11 H.U. and increased significantly to 76±14 H.U. after treatment with MMI. In contrast, in 6 patients with a normal thyroid CT number prior to therapy, the initial mean thyroid CT number was 102±11 H.U. and fell significantly to 84±16 H.U. after treatment with MMI. The thyroid CT number in destructive thyrotoxicosis is markedly decreased to less than 70 H.U. and the mean values of 57±7 H.U. in 6 patients with silent thyroiditis and of 61±5 H.U. in 7 with subacute thyroiditis differ significantly from Graves' disease. In conclusion, the thyroid CT number is significantly reduced in hyperthyroid Graves' disease, normal in euthyroid Graves' disease and markedly decreased in destructive thyrotoxicosis. The high T-3 value seemed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a decline in the thyroid CT number in Graves' disease. An antithyroid drug therapy caused two different changes in the thyroid CT number, depending on whether the thyroid CT number prior to therapy was normal or low. (author)

  15. Clinical studies on thyroid CT number in Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamijo, Keiichi (Kamijo Thyroid and Pituitary Clinic, Sapporo (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate CT Hounsfield unit (H.U.) of the thyroid in hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves' disease and destructive thyrotoxicosis. The mean thyroid CT number in 95 controls was 122[+-]18 H.U.([+-]SD) and did not change significatly with advancing age. The mean thyroid CT number ([+-]SD) of 85[+-]22 H.U. in 60 patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease was significantly lower than either in normal controls or 116[+-]22 H.U. in 11 patients with euthyroid Graves' disease. Comparison of thyroid hormones and TSH receptor Ab values of untreated patients with a normal and an abnormally low thyroid CT number showed that serum total and free T[sub 3] were significantly higher in the latter group than the former group. With respect to the effect of methimazol (MMI) on the thyroid CT number, in the untreated 10 patients with a low thyroid CT number, the initial mean CT number was 65[+-]11 H.U. and increased significantly to 76[+-]14 H.U. after treatment with MMI. In contrast, in 6 patients with a normal thyroid CT number prior to therapy, the initial mean thyroid CT number was 102[+-]11 H.U. and fell significantly to 84[+-]16 H.U. after treatment with MMI. The thyroid CT number in destructive thyrotoxicosis is markedly decreased to less than 70 H.U. and the mean values of 57[+-]7 H.U. in 6 patients with silent thyroiditis and of 61[+-]5 H.U. in 7 with subacute thyroiditis differ significantly from Graves' disease. In conclusion, the thyroid CT number is significantly reduced in hyperthyroid Graves' disease, normal in euthyroid Graves' disease and markedly decreased in destructive thyrotoxicosis. The high T-3 value seemed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a decline in the thyroid CT number in Graves' disease. An antithyroid drug therapy caused two different changes in the thyroid CT number, depending on whether the thyroid CT number prior to therapy was normal or low. (author).

  16. Efficiency of radioiodine therapy in Graves disease and adenoma toxicum and incidence of hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Z.P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the this study was to evaluate different states in hyperthyroid patients and incidence of hypothyroidism after I-131 therapy.We observed a total of 184 hyperthyroid pts, from which 108(58,7%)pts with Graves' disease,65(35,3%)pts with single toxicum nodule and 11(6%)pts with toxicum multinodular goitre,treated with radioiodine therapy during the period 1986-2001.Dose of I-131 orally administered ranged 150-1100MBq and was calculated according to the 'MBq/gram' method.The radioiodine-131 therapy was performed once in 69,5%(128/184)pts,twice in 21,2%(39/184)pts and in 9,3%(17/184)pts more than two doses. Completely cured of hyperthyroidism occurred in 61%(66/108)pts with Graves' disease,81,8%(9/11)pts with toxic multinodular goiter and 90,7%(59/65)pts with single toxic nodule. The patients in our study were evaluated 6 months to 15 years after received J-131 therapy. Incidence of early hypothyroidism within one year was 23,1%(25/108) in Graves' disease,9%(1/11) in toxic multinodular goiter and 4,6%(3/65) with single toxicum nodule.Overall incidence of hypothyroidism within one year was 17,6% and had cumulative increase of Graves' disease every following year approximately for 3%,while for adenoma toxicum there was no any significant changes. We concluded that radioiodine therapy is simple,comfortable radical method for medical treatment of hyperthyroidism and indicate higher incidence of hypothyroidism in patients treated with I-131 for Graves' disease than that of patients treated for toxicum multinodular goiters and single toxic nodule

  17. Outcomes analysis of radioactive iodine and total thyroidectomy for pediatric Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Reuven Zev; Felner, Eric I; Heiss, Kurt F; Wyly, J Bradley; Muir, Andrew B

    2016-03-01

    The majority of pediatric patients with Graves' disease will ultimately require definitive therapy in the form of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation or thyroidectomy. There are few studies that directly compare the efficacy and complication rates between RAI and thyroidectomy. We compared the relapse rate as well as the acute and long-term complications of RAI and total thyroidectomy among children and adolescents with Graves' disease treated at our center. Medical records from 81 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of Graves' disease who received definitive therapy over a 12-year period were reviewed. Fifty one patients received RAI and 30 patients underwent thyroidectomy. The relapse rate was not significantly different between RAI and thyroidectomy (12.1% vs. 0.0%, p=0.28). There were no acute or long-term complications in the RAI group, but there were eight cases of hypoparathyroidism (two transient and six permanent) in the thyroidectomy group. None of the patients developed a recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. RAI is a safe and effective option for treatment of children and adolescents with Graves' disease. In light of the rate of permanent hypoparathyroidism seen at our center with thyroidectomy and previously published long-term safety of RAI, we recommend RAI as the first line treatment for children and adolescents with Graves' disease. For those centers performing thyroidectomies, we recommend that each center select 1-2 high-volume pediatric surgeons to perform all thyroid procedures, allowing individuals to increases case volume and potentially decrease long-term complications of thyroidectomy.

  18. Course of depression in Cushing's syndrome: response to treatment and comparison with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonino, N; Fava, G A; Belluardo, P; Girelli, M E; Boscaro, M

    1993-01-01

    Depression in a common, life-threatening complication of Cushing's syndrome and may occur in several other endocrine disorders. It is not clear, however, whether distinct features pertain to hypercortisolism. We studied depression in Cushing's syndrome differentiating pituitary-dependent and pituitary-independent forms, its incidence compared to Graves' disease, and its appearance in the prodromal phase of both conditions. To 66 consecutive patients with Cushing's syndrome and 70 with Graves' disease, after treatment, a semistructured interview for depressive symptoms based on Paykel's clinical interview for depression was administered. In Cushing's syndrome, the response of depression to normalization of urinary cortisol levels was evaluated by Kellner's global rating method. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of depression (p Cushing's syndrome (62%) and Graves' disease (23%). Depression appeared in the prodromal phase in 27% of patients with Cushing's syndrome and in 14% of those with Graves' disease, but the difference was not significant. In Cushing's syndrome, there were no significant differences in depression between patients with pituitary-dependent (n = 41) and pituitary-independent (n = 20) forms, or in their response to treatment. About 70% of patients fully recovered from their depression, whereas there was no substantial change in the others and even worsening in 2. Our findings in Cushing's syndrome and Graves' disease are in agreement with previous investigations using specific diagnostic criteria for depression. We found a tendency for this symptom to manifest in the prodromal phase of both illnesses. An endocrine etiology should be, therefore, considered in depressed patients not responding to standard psychiatric treatment.

  19. [Characteristics of thyroid carcinoma in Grave's disease Hashimoto's thyroiditis and nodular goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, A; Paunović, I

    2003-01-01

    The biology of thyroid cancer represents a spectrum of behavior ranging from well-differentiated lesions with an excellent prognosis to anaplastic carcinoma, which is almost fatal. For this reason, it is important that clinicians have methods at their disposal to asses the characteristics of patient's thyroid malignancy. In this work we discuss the behavior of differentiated thyroid cancer in associated diseases of thyroid as: Graves' disease, chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis--Hashimoto and nodular goiter. This is retrospectively reviewing of 50 patients treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma at Department of surgery, Clinical Centre of Montenegro in Podgorica from 1998 until 2003. We evaluated occurrence, as well as the role of this diseases in patients with thyroid cancer. We found a more favorable course of thyroid cancer in the presence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and nodular goiter, a contrary Graves' disease. In associated diseases of thyroid, a significantly greater proportion of patients with thyroid cancer, have modular goiter.

  20. Clinical significance of monitoring of serum TRAb in pregnant women with graves' disease treated by propylthiouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jinhai; Li Xue; Wang Yansheng; Zhang Qingfeng; Wang Jianchun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the change of serum TRAb and changeable regularity of thyroid function and clinical significance of pregnant women with Graves' diease treated by propylthiouracil. Methods: Detecting the serum TRAb, FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH levels of pregnant women with Graves' disease treated by propylthiouracil using radioreceptor assay and electro chemiluminescence. Results: The serum TRAb level of the pregnant women with Graves' disease in early gestation treated by propylthiouracil descended much more than that in the initial diagnosis (P<0.01). The positive rates of TRAb in the women before treated by propylthiouracil and treated 3 months, 6 months, 8 months were 90.2%, 82.9%, 68.2% and 21.9% separately. The activity of TRAb descended slightly 3 months latter after treated. The activity of TRAb descend obviously and the positive rates changed largely 8 months after treated. Conclusion: There is very important clinical significance of monitoring of serum TRAb in pregnant women with Graves' disease in diagnosis and differential diagnosis and observation of therapeutic effects. Also, a favourable prognosis judgement. Meanwhile, provides significant reference index of pathogenetic condition judgement and drug discontinuance whether or not for the clinician. (authors)

  1. Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... below. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical to maintaining your child’s eye health. Follow these screening recommendations ... About the Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of ...

  2. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease; Radioiodoterapia em pacientes com doenca de Basedow-Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Margarida Maria Galvao; Blum, Bernardo; Pellegrini, Paulo Martins [Instituto Brasileiro de Medicina Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Corbo, Rossana [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Rebello, Ana Maria de Oliveira [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2000-04-01

    We studied retrospectively 104 patients with Graves' disease who underwent radioiodine therapy between 1983 and 1993. The administered dose varied from 2.0 to 9.0 mCi (74 to 333 MBq). In 1994 and 1998 the patients were asked to answer a questionnaire and were considered to have hypothyroidism when receiving T4 therapy. The importance of radioiodine therapy, its indications and the different methods of calculating the administered activity were studied. The results were compared with the literature. At the end of the evaluation, 62,4% of the patients presented hypothyroidism and 37,6% euthyroidism. There was no significant difference regarding the development of hypothyroidism when sex, number of doses, total activity (mCi), effective radiation ({mu}Ci per gram of tissue) and use of antithyroid drugs were considered. In conclusion, the period of time of post-radioiodine therapy is the most important factor in the analysis of the results, which may interfere with the development of hypothyroidism. (author)

  3. Specialist report : Dry eye disease and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilborg, M.M.A.; Kort, H.S.M.; Murphy, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The common ocular pathologies relating to the aging eye, such as cataract, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or macular degeneration, are all known to reduce visual functioning. Less wellknown is the effect of common, age-related dry eye disease (DED). The impact of DED on daily activities can be

  4. Adipogenesis in thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, M; Starkey, K J; Lane, C; Ham, J; Ludgate, M

    2000-10-01

    Adipogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease (TED). Thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) transcripts are present in orbital fat. This study was conducted to determine whether they are expressed as functional protein, and if so, whether this is restricted to TED orbits or to a particular stage in adipocyte differentiation. Samples of fat were obtained from 18 TED-affected orbits and 4 normal orbits, and 9 were obtained from nonorbital locations. Frozen sections were examined by immunocytochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific for the human TSHR. Samples were disaggregated and the preadipocytes separated from the mature by differential centrifugation and cultured in serum-free or DM and examined for morphologic changes, oil red O and TSHR staining, and TSH-induced cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. Marked immunoreactivity was observed in frozen sections from all three TED samples and faint staining in both normal orbital fat samples. In vitro, 1% to 5% of preadipocytes displayed TSHR immunoreactivity in five of six TED and two of three normal orbital samples and in three of five nonorbital samples. Differentiation, was induced in all 14 orbital samples. Three of four nonorbital samples contained occasional differentiated cells. Fifty percent to 70% of differentiating cells demonstrated receptor immunoreactivity. Two of three TED and four of four nonorbital preadipocytes in DM and/or mature adipocytes displayed a TSH-mediated increase in cAMP. The results indicate that orbital fat TSHR transcripts are expressed as protein, which can be functional. This is not aberrant in TED orbits, although expression may be upregulated. The majority of preadipocytes undergoing differentiation express the receptor, indicating a key role for this population in one mechanism for increasing orbital volume.

  5. Development of Graves' ophthalmopathy and uveitis after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in a patient with HTLA-I associated myelopathy (HAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Yasunori; Migita, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Tomoji; Okuda, Itsuko; Takeshita, Akira; Takagi, Akio; Shishiba, Yoshimasa (Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    HTLV-I carriers or patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) are prone to immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present a 44-year-old female with HAM who developed Graves' disease. She developed severe Graves' ophthalmopathy shortly after [sup 131]I therapy, concurrently with a remarkable increase in TSH-receptor antibody titer. Ophthalmopathy was aggravated in spite of prednisolone therapy and euthyroidism being maintained by thyroxine replacement. Uveitis also developed after [sup 131]I therapy and iridocyclitis finally required trabeculotomy. This case suggests that HAM patients may have a higher risk of immune-mediated Graves' ophthalmopathy after [sup 131]I therapy.(author).

  6. Dry Eye: an Inflammatory Ocular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, Michelle; Akpek, Esen Karamursel

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconjunctivitis sicca, or dry eye, is a common ocular disease prompting millions of individuals to seek ophthalmological care. Regardless of the underlying etiology, dry eye has been shown to be associated with abnormalities in the pre-corneal tear film and subsequent inflammatory changes in the entire ocular surface including the adnexa, conjunctiva and cornea. Since the recognition of the role of inflammation in dry eye, a number of novel treatments have been investigated designed to inhibit various inflammatory pathways. Current medications that are used, including cyclosporine A, corticosteroids, tacrolimus, tetracycline derivatives and autologous serum, have been effective for management of dry eye and lead to measurable clinical improvement. PMID:25279127

  7. Stressful life events and Graves' disease: Results of a case control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintor, A.B.; Barrenechea, E.A.; Laureta, E.G.; Ligon, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Prolonged worry has generally been acknowledged as one of the main precipitating factors of the onset of Graves' disease. A review of literature reveals that emotional stresses of considerable severity precede the onset of hyperthyroidism in about 90% of cases. However, not everyone subscribes to the Stress/Graves' disease hypothesis. Attempts to resolve this issue have tended to focus on whether a correlation can be shown between the magnitude of antecedent life events and the disease. Hence the main objective of the present study was to identify the possible association between stressful life events and Graves' disease. This paper presents the results of a case-control study, involving patents and subjects from the Veterans Memorial Medical Centre of Manila. A total of 224 patients of Graves' disease, newly or previously diagnosed, representing the 'patient's' arm were interviewed. All patients were questioned regarding various stresses, which greatly affected their life style spanning over a 12-month period prior to the onset of the disease. Simultaneously, 224 control subjects were also interviewed, and their stresses spanning over a similar period preceding the dates of interviews were recorded in quantifiable terms. Different stresses were given different intensity scores based on a social readjustment scale taking into consideration the life situations, emotions and diseases. In cases of multiple stresses, intensity scores were added to obtain the total stress intensity. Results were expressed as mean, standard deviation, median, frequency and percent distribution. Scatter plot was also constructed for intensity of stressful life events. To determine association of different factors with Graves' disease, Students t-test and chi-square tests were applied to the data. Odds ratio (OR) was also computed to determine risk attributed to each factor. Since there was significant difference in gender distribution between the patients and controls, stratified Mantel

  8. Graves' disease: an analysis of thyroid hormone levels and hyperthyroid signs and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzepacz, P T; Klein, I; Roberts, M; Greenhouse, J; Levey, G S

    1989-11-01

    Assessment of disease severity for patients with hyperthyroidism involves clinical evaluation and laboratory testing. To determine if there is a correlation between symptoms and thyroid function test results, we prospectively studied hyperthyroid patients using a standardized symptom rating scale and serum thyroid function parameters. We examined 25 patients with untreated, newly diagnosed Graves' disease using the Hyperthyroid Symptom Scale (HSS) and serum levels of thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) relative insulin area (RIA), and estimates of free thyroxine index (FTI). In addition, we compared thyroid hormone levels with standard measures of depression and anxiety in these patients. When regression analyses controlling for age were performed, none of these symptom ratings were associated with FTI or T3 RIA. The HSS was correlated with goiter size and anxiety ratings and was inversely correlated with age. The present study suggests that there is no relationship between the clinical assessment of disease severity and serum levels of thyroid hormone in untreated Graves' disease.

  9. [Autogenous tarsus transplant as spacer for treatment of lower lid retraction in Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittkowski, M P; Fichter, N; Guthoff, R F

    2008-08-01

    Lower lid retraction in dysthyroid orbitopathy is of less functional concern than optic neuropathy or diplopia in central positions of gaze. However, it may lead to incomplete lid closure resulting in corneal exposure. Patients often suffer from aesthetic impairment. A retrospective analysis of 13 consecutive patients treated for lower lid retraction due to Grave's Disease between 2005 and 2007 was undertaken. In spite of regular ophthalmological examinations, specific attention was directed to measurement of the lid fissure width and scleral show for quantification of lower lid retraction. OPERATION: The lower lid is everted and the conjunctiva is opened horizontally underneath the tarsal edge. Lower lid retractors are disinserted and dissected until the lower lid might be elevated in symmetry to the fellow eye. This procedure is continued until 1 mm overcorrection is gained. A free tarsal transplant is harvested from the ipsilateral upper lid tarsus. At least 4 mm vertical tarsus have to be left. Tarsus is sutured with absorbable material. In the 13 patients operated upon (9 women, 4 men) aged 23 - 67 years, scleral show was preoperative 2.7 mm (mean) and postoperative 0.1 mm. Lid fissure width was preoperative 13 mm (10 - 16 mm) and immediately postoperative 10.3 mm (7 - 13). 6 months postoperative the lid-elevating effect was reduced by 0.5 mm in maximum in the 9 patients available for control. The lid closure deficit, which was present in 7 patients before, could be corrected completely in 5 and diminished to 1 mm in 2 patients. Using this particular technique, functional and aesthetical satisfying results are obtained. The main advantages are renunciation of allogen, xenogeny or synthetic material with its possible risks of slow-virus infection and/or extrusion. Further studies are necessary to evaluate long-term results.

  10. The Evolving Role of Selenium in the Treatment of Graves' Disease and Ophthalmopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Duntas, Leonidas H.

    2012-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) and ophthalmopathy (GO) are organ-specific autoimmune-inflammatory disorders characterized by a complex pathogenesis. The inflammatory process is dominated by an imbalance of the antioxidant-oxidant mechanism, increased production of radical oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines which sustain the autoimmune process and perpetuate the disease. Recently, selenium, which is a powerful antioxidant, has been successfully applied in patients with mild GO, slowing the progression ...

  11. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  12. Application of new therapies in Graves' disease and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy: animal models and translation to human clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banga, J Paul; Nielsen, Claus H; Gilbert, Jacqueline A

    2008-01-01

    Most current approaches for treating Graves' disease are based essentially upon regimes developed nearly 50 years ago. Moreover, therapeutic approaches for complications such as thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) and dermopathy are singularly dependent on conventional approaches of nonspecific...... immunosuppression. The recent development of an induced model of experimental Graves' disease, although incomplete as it lacks the extrathyroidal manifestations, provided opportunities to investigate immune intervention strategies, including influence upon the autoreactive B and T cell players in the autoimmune...... process. These major advances are generating new possibilities for therapeutic interventions for patients with Graves' disease and TAO....

  13. Effect of 131I therapy on outcomes of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Renfei; Tan Jian; Zhang Guizhi; Yin Liang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between the therapeutic effect of Graves' hyperthyroidism and the outcomes of Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy, and to explore the effect of 131 I treatment on turnout of Graves' ophthalmopathy. Methods: Six hundreds and fifty-two patients of Graves' disease accompanied with Graves' ophthalmopathy, received one-time 131 I treatment according to routine procedure. We recorded exophthalmometer readings, the signs and symptoms of eyes before therapy. Regular follow-up and appraisal of curative effect were carried out. Results: At least six months after 131 I therapy, the effective rate of Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' ophthalmopathy were 94.3% and 73.3% respectively. The total effective rate of hyperthyroidism with ophthalmopathy was 71.2%. There was a significant correlation between the prognosis of Graves' ophthalmopathy and therapeutic efficacy of hyperthyroidism (r=0.302, P 131 I therapy (χ 2 =0.296, P>0.05). Conclusions: The key to treat Graves' ophthalmopathy is the cure of Graves' hyperthyroidism through 131 I therapy. The timely diagnosis and replacement treatment of hypothyroidism can effectively avoid the aggravation of Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy. (authors)

  14. mRNA-Seq Reveals Novel Molecular Mechanisms and a Robust Fingerprint in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachidanandam, Ravi; Morshed, Syed; Latif, Rauf; Shi, Ruijin; Davies, Terry F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The immune response in autoimmune thyroid disease has been shown to occur primarily within the thyroid gland in which the most abundant antigens can be found. A variety of capture molecules are known to be expressed by thyroid epithelial cells and serve to attract and help retain an intrathyroidal immune infiltrate. Objective: To explore the entire repertoire of expressed genes in human thyroid tissue, we have deep sequenced the transcriptome (referred to as mRNA-Seq). Design and Patients: We applied mRNA-Seq to thyroid tissue from nine patients with Graves' disease subjected to total thyroidectomy and compared the data with 12 samples of normal thyroid tissue obtained from patients having a thyroid nodule removed. The expression for each gene was calculated from the sequencing data by taking the median of the coverage across the length of the gene. The expression levels were quantile normalized and a gene signature was derived from these. Results: On comparison of expression levels in tissues derived from Graves' patients and controls, there was clear evidence for overexpression of the antigen presentation pathway consisting of HLA and associated genes. We also found a robust disease signature and discovered active innate and adaptive immune signaling networks. Conclusions: These data reveal an active immune defense system in Graves' disease, which involves novel molecular mechanisms in its pathogenesis and development. PMID:24971664

  15. Thyroxine, shape, and weight: interaction of Graves' disease and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Martin; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Lehr, Jule; Becker, Sandra; Muthig, Michaela; Zipfel, Stephan; Kuprion, Jürgen

    2013-03-01

    A case of a 25-year-old woman with bulimia nervosa and Graves' disease is presented. Graves' disease is the cause of 50-80 % of hyperthyroidism. The disease is characterized by increases of thyroid hormone production, activation of the metabolism, and successive weight loss. Bulimia nervosa is characterized by purging behavior after binge eating episodes. We report a patient suffering from both entities. A pronounced non-compliance to the intake of antithyroid drugs (Carbimazole) correlated with eating disorder symptoms like negative evaluation of the body and fear of weight gain. Thus, elevated hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease served as a purging method. During 8 weeks of inpatient psychotherapy, the patient adapted to a structured eating behavior. Self-esteem was less influenced by body shape and body weight, and compliance to endocrinological recommendations improved. Non-compliance to antithyroid drugs may be a symptom of an eating disorder. A careful and primarily non-confronting interdisciplinary diagnostic and treatment approach is required.

  16. Clinical results of treating Graves's disease with percutaneous intrathyroidal ethanol injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Guoliang; Li Xiangguo; Qian Zhendong; Wang Cheng; Jiang Zhonglin; Zhang Dengbao; Cheng Qiang; Ye Xianci; Wu Dezhong; Chen Yingzhi; Zhu Shufang; Chen Yong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effectiveness of percutaneous intrathyroidal ethanol injection in the treatment of Graves's disease. Methods: 42 patients with Graves' disease were given percutaneous intrathyroidal ethanol injection (PEI) for treatment. The control group consists of 47 patients given per-oral antithyroid drug (PATD). clinical response, levels of serum TT 3 , TT 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH and size of thyroid were observed and followed up for six months. Results: In PEI group, 17 cases were cured, 24 cases were improved and only one case had no response. Total effective rate was 97.6% with no significant difference from that of PATD (p > 0.05). The size of gland after treatment were significantly smaller in PEI than that of PATD (p < 0.01). No severe adverse effect occurred in the PEI group. Conclusion: PEI is a new way in treating GD which is simple economical and effective

  17. Graves disease and papillary thyroid cancer: An association that can be missed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Omari, Ahmad A.; Haddad, Fares H.; Malkawi, Omar M.; Khushman, Haytham M.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequently found in association with Graves' disease. Papillary carcinoma can arise from these nodules. We report a 65-year-old gentleman who presented with classical features of Graves disease. Technetium 99 scintigraphy revealed diffuse goiter with a cold nodule over the isthmus. Papillary thyroid cancer was suggested by the enlarging thyroid gland, and by the presence of cold nodule, and was proven by fine needle aspiration biopsy of this nodule. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology of thyroid specimen after total thyroidectomy, which also showed local invasion; metastatic work up revealed pulmonary and liver metastasis. Despite treatment by total thyroidectomy, twice radioactive iodine I131 ablation and levothyroxine replacement in a thyroid stimulating hormone suppressive dose, he still harbors metastases with elevated thyroglobulin level. This case should raise the index of suspicion of the treating physician to consider similar association, and to prompt early diagnosis and surgical treatment to prevent dreadful consequences that might adversely affect the outcome. (author)

  18. The role of nuclear medicine in the management of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    1 31 I therapy is safe and effective for most Graves' disease patients. It is being used more frequently in previously restricted populations such as children, adolescents, and women of childbearing age. It affords prompt, consistent relief of hyperthyroidism, but permanent hypothyroidism ensues in almost all patients. This complication is readily diagnosed with modern in vitro assays and inexpensive, life-long replacement therapy renders the patient asymptomatic and able to resume a normal lifestyle. Recent changes in NRC requirements have further liberalized the use of 1 31 I for Graves' disease in the USA, permitting more patients to be treated with effective outpatient therapy. The controversial role of 1 31 I in exacerbation of GO has been further clarified and preventive measures are available

  19. Correlation of stress with outcome of radioiodine therapy for Graves disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, T.; Rochon, J.; Lenfestey, R.; Wise, P.

    1985-06-01

    Between November 1965 and December 1983, 293 patients were treated for Graves disease using /sup 131/I. All patients were asked to identify a stressful event antedating the onset of overt clinical symptoms. Eighty-one patients were able to do this (27.6%). Two hundred forty-four patients received a single treatment, 49 required two or more treatments. Patients with stress initiating the symptoms of Graves disease became hypothyroid earlier, 50% at 12 mo compared with 36 mo for the nonstress group. At 10 yr 5% of the stress group remained euthyroid compared with 17% nonstress. The authors conclude that stress in the 12 mo or less before the onset of clinical symptoms potentiates the development of hypothyroidism induced by a standard dose of radioiodine.

  20. Grave's disease with transverse and sigmoid sinus thrombosis needing surgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikant, Banumathy; Balasubramaniam, Srikant

    2013-07-01

    Thrombosis of venous sinuses associated with thyrotoxicosis is rare, and isolated transverse and sigmoid sinus thrombosis is rarer and reported only once previously. We present a case of Graves disease, who suffered unilateral sigmoid and transverse sinus thrombosis with intracranial hemorrhage. A 42-year-old female, a diagnosed case of Graves disease, presented to us with headache, drowsiness, and hemiparesis. Computed Tomography revealed a large right temporo-parieto-occipital venous infarct. The patient needed surgical intervention in the form of decompressive craniotomy following which she improved, and on follow-up is having no deficits. Thrombophilia profile showed a low Protein S and Anti thrombin III (AT III) levels. Deranged thrombophilia profile in combination with the hypercoagulable state in thyrotoxicosis, most likely precipitated the thrombotic event. Timely surgical intervention can be offered in selective cases with a good clinical outcome.

  1. [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1] octreotide scintigraphy in thyroidal and orbital Graves' disease: a parameter for disease activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, P. T.; Krenning, E. P.; Wijngaarde, R.; Kooy, P. P.; Oei, H. Y.; van den Bosch, W. A.; Reubi, J. C.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Hooijkaas, H.; van der Loos, T.

    1994-01-01

    Visualization of malignant lymphomas and granulomatous disease is possible by [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]octreotide scintigraphy through binding of the radioligand to somatostatin receptors on activated leukocytes. Because thyroidal and orbital tissues are infiltrated by activated leukocytes in Graves'

  2. Predictor factors in the effectiveness of the therapeutic dose in the Graves diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puscar, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of the Graves diseases includes different options, between which are the antithyroid drugs, 131 I and/or the surgery. Of all of them, the 131 I, it has been increasing the use through the years, going to constitute the treatment of election for many authors, due to the big effectiveness to obtain a rapid healing of this illness. On the other hand, controversies exist about this use, related about the administration doses of 131 I [es

  3. Dr Google: The readability and accuracy of patient education websites for Graves' disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Amanda C; Idriss, Almoatazbellah; Ahern, Susan; Lin, Elizabeth; Elfenbein, Dawn M

    2017-11-01

    National guidelines emphasize the importance of incorporating patient preferences into the recommendations for the treatment of Graves' disease. Many patients use the Internet to obtain health information, and search results can affect their treatment decisions. This study compares the readability and accuracy of patient-oriented online resources for the treatment of Graves' disease by website affiliation and treatment modality. A systematic Internet search was used to identify the top websites discussing the treatment of Graves' disease. Readability was measured using 5 standardized tests. Accuracy was assessed by a blinded, expert panel, which scored the accuracy of sites on a scale of 1 to 5. Mean readability and accuracy scores were compared among website affiliations and treatment modalities. We identified 13 unique websites, including 2 academic, 2 government, 5 nonprofit, and 4 private sites. There was a difference in both readability (mean 13.2, range 9.1-15.7, P = .003) and accuracy (mean 4.04, range 2.75-4.50, P = .019) based on website affiliation. Government sites (mean readability 11.1) were easier to read than academic (14.3, P < .01), nonprofit (13.9, P < .01), and private sites (13.5, P < .05). Academic sites (mean accuracy 4.50) were more accurate than private sites (3.56, P < .05). Online patient resources for the treatment of Graves' disease are written at an inappropriately high reading level. Academic sites contain both the most accurate and the most difficult to read information. Private sites represented the majority of our top results but contained the least accurate information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Graves' disease in two pregnancies complicated by fetal goitrous hypothyroidism: successful in utero treatment with levothyroxine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Sundberg, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of Graves' disease during pregnancy with antithyroid drugs (ATDs) poses a risk of inducing hypothyroidism and, thus, development of a goiter to the fetus. PATIENT FINDINGS: We report two patients referred to our department after discovery of a fetal goiter by ultrasound examination...... hypothyroidism as the cause of goiter development. Reduction of maternal ATD dose and injection of levothyroxine intra-amniotically quickly reduced the goiter size, and both babies were born euthyroid and without goiters....

  5. Differentiating Graves' disease from subacute thyroiditis using ratio of serum free triiodothyronine to free thyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn; Bhasipol, Adikan

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of free thyroid hormone, instead of the total form, is more commonly used in current practice. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of the ratio of serum free triiodothyronine (FT3, pg/mL) to free thyroxine (FT4, ng/dL) for differentiating Graves' disease from subacute thyroiditis. Medical records of thyrotoxic patients aged >15 years who had measurement of FT3, FT4 and thyrotropin on the first diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis before initiating treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected from all clinics, and were not limited to the endocrine clinic. Pregnant women were excluded. A total of 548 patients (468 with Graves' disease, 40 with subacute thyroiditis and 40 with toxic adenoma/multinodular goiter) were recruited. Mean age was 43.9 ± 15.4 years. Most were female 434 (79.2%), and goiter was present in 55.3%. Prevalence of T3-toxicosis and T4-toxicosis were 5.6% and 6.6%, respectively. Mean FT3/FT4 ratios were 4.62 ± 2 (10(-2) pg/ng) in patients with Graves' disease and 2.73 ± 0.5 in subacute thyroiditis. The area under the ROC curve of the FT3/FT4 ratio for diagnosis of Graves' disease was 0.83 (95%CI, 0.76-0.91). Cutoff level of this ratio >4.4 offered sensitivity of 47.2% and specificity of 92.8%. FT3/FT4 ratio of >4.4 (10(-2) pg/ng) may help in differentiating the cause of thyrotoxicosis.

  6. Graves' disease in children: long-term outcomes of medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabon, Shona; Burton, Amy M; White, Perrin C

    2016-10-01

    Management options are limited for the treatment of Graves' disease, and there is controversy regarding optimal treatment. We describe the demographic and biochemical characteristics of children with Graves' disease and the outcomes of its management. This is a retrospective study reviewing medical records from 2001 to 2011 at a tertiary-care paediatric hospital. Diagnostic criteria included elevated free T4 and total T3, suppressed TSH, and either positive thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin or thyroid receptor antibodies or clinical signs suggestive of Graves' disease, for example exophthalmos. Patients were treated with antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine, or thyroidectomy. The main outcome measures were remission after medical therapy for at least 6 months and subsequent relapse. A total of 291 children met diagnostic criteria. A total of 62 were male (21%); 117 (40%) were Hispanic, 90 (31%) Caucasian, and 59 (20%) African American. Mean age (±standard deviation) at diagnosis was 12·3 ± 3·8 (range 3-18·5) years. At diagnosis, 268 patients were started on an antithyroid drug and 23 underwent thyroid ablation or thyroidectomy. Fifty-seven (21%) children achieved remission and 16 (28%) of these patients relapsed, almost all within 16 months. Gender and ethnicity did not affect rates of remission or relapse. Of 251 patients treated with methimazole, 53 (21%) had an adverse reaction, including rash, arthralgias, elevated transaminases, or neutropenia. Most children with Graves' disease treated with ATD do not experience remission, but most remissions do not end in relapse. Adverse reactions to methimazole are common but generally mild. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Both interleukin-23A polymorphism and serum interlukin-23 expression are associated with Graves' disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huiying; Tao, Feng; Liu, Changqin; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Shu; Cui, Bin; Ning, Guang

    2015-03-01

    Two independent Chinese cohorts were used to study the genetic association between the interleukin-23A (IL-23A) gene polymorphism (rs11171806) and susceptibility to Graves' disease (GD). The initial Shanghai cohort consisted of 712 unrelated patients with GD and 705 healthy control subjects, and the replication cohort from Xiamen Island included 433 patients with GD and 410 healthy control subjects. The serum concentration of IL-23 in GD patients was measured significantly higher than in health controls. Moreover in the subgroup analysis, higher concentrations of IL-23 were identified in patients of older age (⩾40 years) and female gender. We also performed an association study with the IL-23 gene polymorphism rs11171806 in both cohorts, in Shanghai cohorts, the frequencies of rs11171806 alleles were strongly different between Graves' disease patients (G 95.7% and A 4.3%) and healthy controls (G 97.7% and A 2.3%) (P=2.6×10(-3), OR=1.93 (95% CI: 1.25-2.97)), and in Xiamen cohorts, the proportion of individuals carrying the A allele of rs11171806 was the same significantly higher in Graves' disease patients than in controls [Graves' disease vs. control, 4.8% vs. 4.3%, OR=2.15 (95% CI: 1.23-3.79), P(allele)=6.3×10(-3)]. The distribution of rs11171806 genotype was also investigated in subgroups according to the age and gender. All of these findings suggested that IL-23 may play an important role in the development of GD, and the IL-23A gene is a genetic risk marker for GD in Han Chinese population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thyroid volume reduction following radioiodine therapy in patients with autonomous goitre and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, B.; Otte, R.; Klink, J.E.; Schicha, H.

    1996-01-01

    Aim: It is well known that radioiodine therapy (RITh) leads to a significant thyroid volume reduction (TVR). But until now only little data has been presented due to the course of time and the extent of TVR. Method: Therefore the data of 33 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 36 patients with multifocal (MAG) and 31 with solitary (SAG) autonomous goitre were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All the patients showed a highly significant (p [de

  9. Does radioiodine cause the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease; Editorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, I.R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Medical Center)

    1993-02-01

    This editorial briefly reviews studies which might answer the question as to whether radioiodine treatment causes the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease. However, the data do not allow any conclusion one way or the other. Other possible causal factors are discussed. Further studies are required to define whether treatment of hyperthyroidism aggravates the ophthalmopathy and whether one thereby is worse than the others and by how much. (UK).

  10. Use of spiral computed tomography volumetry for determining the operative approach in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, June Young; Lee, Kyu Eun; Koo, Do Hoon; Kim, Kyu Hyung; Kim, Eun young; Bae, Dong Sik; Jung, Sung Eun; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of the present study were to assess (1) the correlation between the weight of the postoperative thyroid specimen and the spiral computed tomography (CT) volumetry results of the thyroid gland in patients with Graves' disease, and (2) the utility of CT volumetry for determining the operative approach. From 2009 to 2010, a total of 56 patients with Graves' disease underwent total or subtotal thyroidectomy. An enhanced spiral CT was taken in all patients prior to the operation. From 2.5 mm-thick slices of the thyroid gland, the surface area was calculated to measure the volume of the thyroid gland. The glandular volume was compared to the weight of the postoperative thyroid specimen. A total of 42 and 14 patients underwent total and subtotal thyroidectomy, respectively. The mean weight of the postoperative thyroid specimen was 43.9 ± 33.4 g, and the mean volume obtained by CT volumetry was 44.2 ± 32.8 mL. A good correlation was observed between the weight of the postoperative thyroid specimen and the volume calculated by CT (r = 0.98, p 100 mL and the ≤100 mL groups (608.3 ± 540.8 vs. 119.7 ± 110.4 mL; p = 0.036). Spiral CT volumetry may be used to measure the thyroid volume reliably in patients with Graves' disease. For cases in which surgery is indicated in patients with Graves' disease, CT volumetry provides useful information from which to determine the operative approach. One hundred milliliter or less of thyroid volume in CT volumetry is recommended to perform minimally invasive thyroid surgery.

  11. The thyroid function of Graves' disease patients is aggravated by depressive personality during antithyroid drug treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Miyauchi Akira; Kubota Sumihisa; Takamatsu Junta; Fukao Atsushi; Hanafusa Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We previously reported that depressive personality (the scores of hypochondriasis, depression and psychasthenia determined by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)) and daily hassles of Graves' disease (GD) patients treated long trem with antithyroid drug (ATD) were significantly higher in a relapsed group than in a remitted group, even in the euthyroid state. The present study aims to examine the relationship among depressive personality, emotional stress...

  12. Histologic Findings and Cytological Alterations in Thyroid Nodules After Radioactive Iodine Treatment for Graves' Disease: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hussein, Siba; Omarzai, Yumna

    2017-06-01

    Unlike the well-documented relation between radiation to the neck and development of papillary thyroid carcinoma, a causal association between radioactive iodine treatment for Graves' disease and development of thyroid malignancy is less defined. However, patients with a background of thyroid dysfunction presenting with clinically palpable thyroid nodules are followed more closely than the average population, and fine needle aspiration is recommended in such circumstances. Cytological examination of aspirates, and histologic examination of tissue provided from patients with a known history of Graves' disease, managed by radioactive iodine therapy can create a diagnostic dilemma, as the distinction between radiation effect and a malignant primary thyroid neoplasm can be very challenging. Thus, pathologists should be aware of the existence of these changes in the setting of radiation therapy for Graves' disease. Providing pathologists with appropriate clinical history of Graves' disease treated with radioactive iodine is of paramount importance in order to prevent an overdiagnosis of malignancy.

  13. Application of new therapies in Graves' disease and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy: animal models and translation to human clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banga, J Paul; Nielsen, Claus H; Gilbert, Jacqueline A

    2008-01-01

    Most current approaches for treating Graves' disease are based essentially upon regimes developed nearly 50 years ago. Moreover, therapeutic approaches for complications such as thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) and dermopathy are singularly dependent on conventional approaches of nonspecif...

  14. Proposal of a methodology for individualized iodine-131 therapy for Graves' disease in patients with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Francisco de; Melo, Rossana Corbo de; Rebelo, Ana Maria de Oliveira; Dantas, Bernardo Maranhao; Dantas, Ana Leticia A.; Lucena, Eder Augusto de

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Several methods are utilized for determining the radioiodine activity in the treatment of Graves' disease (hyperthyroidism). Some of this methods do not take into consideration the thyroid absorbed dose or the necessary parameters for this estimation. The association between absorbed dose and administered activity depends on effective half-life, iodine uptake and thyroid mass of each patient. The present study was aimed at developing a methodology for individualized 131 I therapy for Graves' disease in patients with hyperthyroidism of the Graves' disease. Materials and methods: A neck-thyroid phantom developed at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, containing a standard solution of 131 I, was utilized for calibrating the scintillation gamma camera and uptake probe installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Results: The view angle of the collimator/detector assembly presented values compatible with the thyroid gland size for distances of 25 cm (uptake probe) and 45.8 cm (scintillation gamma camera). Calibration factors were 39.3 ± 0.78 and 4.3 ± 0.17 cpm/kBq, respectively. The 14-30-hour interval in the retention curve allows the estimation of activity between two points for determining the effective iodine half-life in the thyroid. Conclusion: The utilization of equipment usually available in nuclear medicine clinics is feasible, so this is a simple, effective and low cost methodology. (author)

  15. A dosimetry based on artificial neural net theory in treatment of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Luo Dongyun; Lin Yongxia; Zeng Shiquan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of radioactive treatment of Graves disease with dosimetry of 131 I in novel method by computer. Methods: The database comprised 206 selected Graves disease cases and according to this database the nonlinear functions could be inferred consequently, then 206 Graves disease patients were divided into two groups. The group one, 109 patients, was treated with back-propagation (BP) dosimetry method. The group two was treated with traditional method. The results were analyzed. Results: Group one had an effective rate of 93.5%, cure rate of 90.8%, recurrent rate of 3.6% and early stage of hypothyroidism rate of 3.6%. Group two had an effective rate of 90.7%, cure rate of 85.5%, recurrent rate of 5.1% and early stage of hypothyroidism rate of 5.1%. Conclusion: The BP method is efficient and the results reflect that this method might increase the accuracy of the dosimetry of 131 I and reduce recurrent rate and early stage of hypothyroidism occurrence

  16. Analysis of complications in thyroid arterial embolization for hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Bulang; Zhao Wei; Huang Jianqiang; Xiang Shutian; Li Liyuan; Li Minghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate complications and causes of thyroid arterial embolization for hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease had been treated through transcathter arterial embolization with mid-term follow up. The thyroid angiography, interventional treatment, complications and causes were investigated. Results Followed up for over one year (12-24 months), mid-term rate of efficiency was 78.6% with recurrent rate of one year being 14.2%. Two patients (7.1%) had brain infarction with one partially recovered after proper therapy and the other died due to subsequent hyperthyroidism crisis. One case had temporary hypothyroidism, and another hypoparathyroidism but no permanent hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism occurred. One patient suffered relatively severe post-embolization syndrome. All the other complications disappeared after proper treatment. Followed up for more than a year, no other complications occurred. Conclusion: Misembolization due to regurgitation of embolized agent is one of the most important factors leading to complications of arterial embolization for Graves' disease. In order to reduce complications and improve therapeutic efficacy, it is essential to superselectively catheterize the thyroid, avoid dangerous anastomose, prevent regurgitation misembolization and strictly operate under fluoroscopy. (authors)

  17. Outcome of graves' disease after anti-thyroid drug treatment in South West of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, H.; Saiedinia, S.; Aleali, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to observe the optimal results of long term treatment with antithyroid drugs in patients with graves' disease. Methodology: Total of 268 patients with graves' disease who were referred to endocrinology clinic during 2005 - 2008 and treated with anti-thyroid drugs for a long term were studied. Data about the age, gender, estimated weight of thyroid before and after the treatment, level of thyroid hormones, disease relapse, hypothyroidism and the drug side-effects were collected and analyzed. Results: Eighty two (31%) patients were males, 186 (69%) females, mean age of 35 +- 27 years and follow-up course of 31+- 16 months], were studied. After the discontinuation of long term treatment, 53% were affected with relapse of hyperthyroidism. The mean duration of hyperthyroidism relapse after the treatment was 8.3 +- 7.3 months. The relapse rate was and patients with large thyroid and lower TSH level at the end of treatment, the rate of relapse treatment was about 6%. More decrease of thyroid size during the treatment course, higher level of serum TSH after discontinuation of the treatment, and lower thyroid hormone levels before the treatment were some of the effective factors in hypothyroidism incidence (P=0.005, patients (39%) remained euthyroid in the follow-up course. Conclusion: patients with graves' especially in middle-aged women with smaller goiters. (author)

  18. Outcome analysis of 250 cases of Graves disease with large goiter treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qinfen; Zhang Chenggang; Zhao Xiaobin; Shi Longbao

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the treatment effects of Graves disease with large goiter treated with 131 I and the method of 131 I individualized estimated dose. Methods: Two hundred and fifty patients with Graves disease with large goiter (mean of thyroid weight 113.0 ± 39.2 g; range 90-450 g) were studied according to patient individual factors, the dose per g thyroid tissue ranging from 2. 775-5.18 MBq/g was determined, then the administered dose was calculated using the special formula. The follow-up was for 15.9 ± 9.9 (range 3-44.7) months. Results: After one dose of 131 I, 154 patients (61.6%) became euthyroid, 53 patients (21.2%) remained to be hyperthyroidism, 43 patients (17.2%) became hypothyroidism. Large goiter in 219 patients (87.6%) was normalized. Conclusions: Treatment with 131 I is an effective method for Graves disease with large goiter; According to factors affecting outcome, employing the method of individualized radioiodine therapy can improve the efficacy of 131 I treatment

  19. Antithyroid drugs and 131I treatment of Graves' disease: an efficacy relationship analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yi; Liu Jianfeng; Zhang Xiuli; Xiao Shuping; Zhang Youren

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of taking antithyroid drugs (ATD) or stopping therapy with ATD for a variable periods of time before 131 I treatment on efficacy of 131 I treatment. Methods: A total of 99 patients with Graves' disease were divided into two groups on the basis of taking antithyroid drugs (ATD) or not (the patients who had undergone operation for Graves' disease or had received 131 I therapy were excluded). The patients who had taken ATD were separated into four groups, 2 W, ∼4 W, ∼8 W, >8 W before 131 I treatment, to assess the influence on the cure rate after the 131 I treatment. Results: The cure rate of hyperthyroidism after 131 I treatment in patients not taking and taking ATD before 131 I treatment was 89.5% and 57.5%, respectively. The difference between two groups was significant. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the variable parameters (P=0.00863). The patients who had taken ATD and discontinued had no difference in the cure rate, although the duration of discontinuance of ATD was different (P=0.627). Conclusions: The cure rate will be reduced when ATD is used as initial therapy for Graves' disease even if ATD is discontinued for some period of time before the treatment. With regard to those patients having used ATD before the treatment, the cure rate of 131 I is not raised with prolonging ATD withdrawal

  20. [Atypical subacute thyroiditis in combination with Grave's disease:Diagnostic difficulties in a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutouridou, Emmanouela; Planck, Tereza; Uddman, Erik; Lantz, Mikael

    2018-04-13

    Subacute thyroiditis is a common inflammatory disorder of the thyroid gland, possibly of viral etiology, that typically presents with neck pain, fever and tenderness on palpation of the thyroid gland. Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder caused by stimulation of the thyroid gland by thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb). The development of Graves´ disease and subacute thyroiditis simultaneously is an uncommon condition and only a few cases have been reported. In this article we present a case of a 46-year old woman diagnosed with Graves´ disease who was started on thiamazole and weeks later developed high fever. Several differential diagnoses were considered such as infection, lymphoma and vasculitis due to thiamazole. Finally, the fine needle aspiration of the thyroid gland displayed histopathological features of subacute thyroiditis. Remarkably, our patient did not have neck pain or tenderness on palpation of the thyroid gland and overall the clinical presentation of subacute thyroiditis was atypical. Thus, subacute thyroiditis may be considered as a potential cause of fever of unknown origin.

  1. The negative correlation between thyrotropin receptor-stimulating antibodies and bone mineral density in postmenopausal patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Medea; Korinteli, Maka; Zerekidze, Tamar; Jikurauli, Nino; Shanava, Shorena; Tsagareli, Marina; Giorgadze, Elen

    2013-06-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder with various clinical manifestations. Thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs), the circulating autoantibodies specific to Graves' disease, are the cause for hyperthyroidism, the most prevalent abnormality. Hyperthyroidism leads to increased bone turnover and a negative bone balance. The aims of the present study were to determine the relationship between TRAbs and bone mineral density (BMD), to assess the extent of BMD change in patients with Graves' disease, and to determine the impact of conservative and surgical therapy on BMD. Fifty female postmenopausal patients with Graves' disease were chosen for this study. Twenty women had a recent diagnosis of Graves' disease, 30 women presented with a compensated disease state after either conservative or surgical treatment, and 30 healthy postmenopausal women served as controls. Thyroid parameters were measured, and BMD values were obtained by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scan.Femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD and T-scores were significantly lower in newly diagnosed patients compared with the control group, but a difference was not observed between the treated and control groups. Statistical analysis revealed a strong and significant negative correlation between femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD and TRAb values.Both surgical and conservative therapies are effective for restoring BMD in postmenopausal patients with Graves' disease, and the increased level of TRAb can be a useful marker of bone density impairment.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of Graves' disease with particular emphasis on appropriate techniques in nuclear medicine. General state of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasek, Karolina; Płazińska, Maria Teresa; Królicki, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease. It accounts for 50-80% of cases of hyperthyroidism. Antibodies against the TSH receptor (TRAb) are responsible for hyperthyroidism (TRAB). The key role in monitoring and diagnosis of Graves' disease plays the level of hormones of free thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Helpful is an ultrasound of the thyroid scintigraphy which due to its functional character is both a valuable addition to morphological studies as well as plays an important role in the diagnosis and therapy in patients with Graves' disease. There is no perfect treatment for Graves' disease. The reason for this is the lack of therapy directed against primary pathogenic mechanisms. Currently available treatments need to be thoroughly discussed during the first visit as the patient's understanding of the choice of a treatment constitutes a vital role in the success of therapy. Graves' disease treatment is based on three types of therapies that have been carried out for decades including: pharmacological treatment anti-thyroid drugs, I131 therapy and radical treatment - thyroidectomy. The purpose of the treatment is to control symptoms and patient to return to euthyreosis. Treatment of Graves' disease is of great importance because if left untreated, it can lead to long-term harmful effects on the heart, bone and mental well-being of patients.

  3. Genetic association between Interleukin-17A gene polymorphisms and the pathogenesis of Graves' disease in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yicheng; Zheng, Huan; Liu, Nan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Shu; Cui, Bin; Ning, Guang

    2015-01-19

    Graves' disease, one of the commonest autoimmune disorders, has a complex genetic basis. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is an important cytokine involved in innate and adaptive immune responses. This case-control study sought to investigate genetic association between the IL-17A gene and the process of Graves' disease (GD). Our pilot study was performed on a cohort from Shanghai, which included 713 patients with GD and 756 healthy controls. A replicate cohort was from Xiamen, recruiting 444 patients with GD and 427 healthy subjects. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs4711998, rs3819024, rs2275913, rs8193037, rs3819025 and rs3748067) within the IL-17A gene were genotyped by the SNPstream Genotyping Systems and Taqman PCR method. In Shanghai cohorts, the frequencies of rs8193037 alleles were strongly different between patients with Graves' disease (G, 87·6% and A, 12·4%) and healthy controls (G, 91·4% and A, 8·6%) (P = 0·00067). The A carriers were associated with increased Graves' disease risks when compared with the G carriers (OR = 1·51, 95%CI = 1·19-1·92). In replicate cohorts, the proportion of individuals carrying the A allele of rs8193037 was significantly higher in patients with Graves' disease than in controls [Graves' disease vs control, 14·3% vs 9·1%, OR = 1·66 (95% CI: 1·23-2·24), P allele  = 0·0082]. In addition, rs8193037 and rs3748067 were found to be different in both genotype and allele distributions in Graves' disease-associated ophthalmopathy patients and controls in Shanghai cohorts. Haplotype association analysis also identified five main haplotypes of those six SNPs. These results suggested that the polymorphism of IL-17A rs8193037 was strongly associated with Graves' disease susceptibility in the Chinese Han population.z. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Advance of study on the influence of different drugs on the efficacy of 131I treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Tan Jian

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. 131 I treatment is one main treatment method for Graves' disease, and being used on an increasing scale in China recently. During the peritherapeutic period, however, the application of other drugs may affect the efficacy of 131 I treatment. In this review, the advances of study were summarized on the influence of different drugs on the efficacy of 131 I treatment in recent years. (authors)

  5. Doença de Graves associada à artrite idiopática juvenil Graves' disease associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Matos Santos Mendonça Marques

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma menina de 10 anos de idade com diagnóstico de doença de Graves (DG, em tratamento com propiltiouracil, que desenvolveu uveíte e artrite poliarticular e cuja mãe também tem DG e lúpus discoide. São discutidos os diagnósticos diferenciais de artrite inflamatória que surge em uma criança com doença tireoidiana autoimune medicada com drogas antitireóideas.The authors report the case of a 10-year-old girl with Graves' disease (GD, treated with propylthiouracil, who developed uveitis and polyarticular arthritis, and whose mother also had GD and discoid lupus. The differential diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis that appears in a child with autoimmune thyroid disease managed with antithyroid drugs is discussed.

  6. Graves' disease presenting as pyrexia of unknown origin.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaked, Y.; Samra, Y.; Zwas, S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Fever is a common clinical manifestation of inflammatory processes of the thyroid and thyroid crisis. On the other hand, fever alone as a presenting symptom of thyrotoxicosis, without other manifestations, is extremely rare. A female patient is described in whom fever persisted for two months prior to hospitalization, but without clinical symptoms or signs to lead to suspicion of thyroid disease. After exhaustive investigation it was found that the patient was suffering from hyperthyroidism. ...

  7. Determinants of Extraocular Muscle Volume in Patients with Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer El-Kaissi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To examine factors contributing to extraocular muscle (EOM volume enlargement in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Methods. EOM volumes were measured with orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in 39 patients with recently diagnosed Graves’ disease, and compared to EOM volumes of 13 normal volunteers. Thyroid function tests, uptake on thyroid scintigraphy, anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity and other parameters were then evaluated in patients with EOM enlargement. Results. 31/39 patients had one or more enlarged EOM, of whom only 2 patients had clinical EOM dysfunction. Compared to Graves’ disease patients with normal EOM volumes, those with EOM enlargement had significantly higher mean serum TSH (0.020±0.005 versus 0.007±0.002 mIU/L; P value 0.012, free-T4 (52.9±3.3 versus 41.2±1.7 pmol/L; P value 0.003 and technetium uptake on thyroid scintigraphy (13.51±1.7% versus 8.55±1.6%; P value 0.045. There were no differences between the 2 groups in anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity, the proportion of males, tobacco smokers, or those with active ophthalmopathy. Conclusions. Patients with recently diagnosed Graves’ disease and EOM volume enlargement have higher serum TSH and more severe hyperthyroidism than patients with normal EOM volumes, with no difference in anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity between the two groups.

  8. Severe fetal and neonatal hyperthyroidism years after surgical treatment of maternal Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, I; Decallonne, B; Billen, J; Vanhole, C; Lewi, L; De Catte, L; Verhaeghe, J

    2014-02-01

    Fetal/neonatal hyperthyroidism is a well-known complication of maternal Graves' disease with high concentrations of TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAb). Few data are available on the management of fetal hyperthyroidism in surgically treated Graves' disease. Clinical, ultrasound and biochemical data are reported in a fetus/neonate whose mother underwent a thyroidectomy > 10 years before and whose sibling was thin and hyperthyroid at birth. Maternal TRAb were persistently > 40 U/l; unequivocal signs of fetal hyperthyroidism were identified at 29 weeks gestational age (GA). The fetus was treated through maternal antithyroid drug (ATD) administration; the dose was reduced gradually once fetal tachycardia and valve dysfunction disappeared and normal T4 was confirmed by fetal blood sampling. Maternal euthyroidism was maintained. The neonate showed normal growth for GA and T4 concentration at birth but severe hyperthyroidism relapsed from day 13 until day 58. TSH remained strongly suppressed throughout the pre- and postnatal course. Prenatal ATD in a taper-off regime allowed normal T4 and growth in a hyperthyroid fetus from a thyroidectomised Graves' mother. Fetal TSH cannot be used to adjust the ATD dose. Prenatal ATD appears to postpone the onset but does not affect the severity or duration of the neonatal hyperthyroid flare.

  9. Periodic Granulocyte Count Measuring Is Useful for Detecting Asymptomatic Agranulocytosis in Antithyroid Drug-Treated Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Ide, Akane; Kudo, Takumi; Nishihara, Eijun; Ito, Mitsuru; Miyauchi, Akira

    2016-12-01

    Finding agranulocytosis (AG) at an early stage is important to improve outcome, but periodic granulocyte count monitoring is not generally recommended for patients with Graves' disease, because AG develops suddenly. At the Kuma Hospital, Graves' patients under antithyroid drug (ATD) treatment in an outpatient clinic have a granulocyte count examination during each visit, and if it is Graves' disease were 131 I-radioisotope therapy (19 patients), thyroidectomy (2 patients), inorganic iodine (1 patient), or another ATD (1 patient). Among the 33 GP patients, 31 (94%), including 20 asymptomatic cases, were discovered during periodic granulocyte count monitoring. Most of them stopped ATD, and other treatments for Graves' disease were selected. Periodic monitoring of granulocyte counts is useful for identifying AG and GP patients with no or minimum infection symptoms.

  10. Radioactive iodine ablation of Grave disease; Traitement ablatif par iode

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    Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Nwatsock, F.J.; Mundler, O. [Service central de biophysique et de medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalo-universitaire de la Timone, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The isotopic destruction by iodine of the thyroid body is an alternative to the surgery in the radical treatment of the Basedow disease, particularly for recurrent forms. Several strategies are possible in the use of iodine 131. between 2004 and 2008, 240 patients with a Basedow disease were treated in our service by an ablative activity of iodine 131 (555 MBq on average). the results are rather reproducible, that is to say a quasi constant hypothyroidism in the first three months. It appears important to underline that the ambulatory management of induced hypothyroidism is often unappropriated with too progressive introductions of LT4, leaving the patient in deep hypothyroidism during several weeks. The recurrences at short and middle term are very rare ( under 4%). A case of severe exophthalmos was observed. The other patients did not progressed with corticosteroids. The evolution of anti receptors autoantibodies of the TSH have been studying. to conclude, this kind of strategy is very efficient and reproducible, but needs an appropriate management of post therapy hypothyroidism, source of discomfort and potential morbidity. (N.C.)

  11. Celiac disease, iron deficiency anaemia, grave's disease, osteopenia and short stature in single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radaideh, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal immune mediated disorder, triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic pre-disposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2 positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease in high worldwide and it has been estimated to be 1-26% in Western countries. Many auto-immune diseases can be associated with celiac disease including auto-immune thyroid disease; hashimoto thyroiditis and grave's disease. The opposite also appears to be true, celiac disease is found on persons with auto-immune thyroid disorders at high rates than the general population. Celiac disease is also associated with other extraintestinal diseases other the auto-immune diseases like anemia, short stature, metabolic bone disease and others. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with auto-immune thyroid disease, anemia, short stature and metabolic bone disease. The life-long adherence to gluten-free diet is the only cure in celiac disease and can improve the quality of patients life and prevent future complications. This report describes a case of Grave's disease, Iron deficiency anemia, Short stature, Osteopenia, diagnosed to have Celiac disease. (author)

  12. Orbital flourine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients with Graves' disease for evaluation of active inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu-Beşli, Lebriz; Kabasakal, Levent; Sağer, Sait; Cicik, Erdoğan; Asa, Sertaç; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2017-11-01

    Prediction and early diagnosis of orbitopathy is needed in patients with Graves' disease, especially when radioiodine therapy is planned. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) using flourine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an effective imaging modality in detection of inflammation, however, its ability to detect orbital inflammation has not been well studied. The aim of our study is to determine the ability of FDG PET/CT to detect orbital inflammation related with Graves' disease, identify active orbitopathy, predict the radioiodine-triggered orbitopathy, and find out the effects of radioiodine on orbital inflammation. Total 31 Graves' disease patients and 17 controls were included. All Graves' disease patients underwent cranial FDG PET/CT imaging prior therapy. Radioiodine therapy and post-treatment PET/CT study was applied to 21 patients. PET/CT images of all examinees were evaluated, measuring extraocular muscle maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and muscle thickness. FDG uptake was increased in the majority of extraocular muscles in Graves' disease patients in comparison to controls and this increase was found to be irrelevant from muscle thickness. Extraocular muscle SUVmax values did not increase in Graves' orbitopathy patients who received radioiodine under corticosteroid prophylaxis. SUVmax level of all orbital rectus muscles were increased after radioiodine therapy in nonsmokers, whereas no increase was detected in smokers. FDG PET/CT may be helpful in detection of extraocular muscle inflammation and it may show ongoing orbitopathy in early stages of inflammation before anatomical changes occur.

  13. Health locus of control in patients with graves-basedow disease and hashimoto disease and their acceptance of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinska, Malgorzata Anna; Andruszkiewicz, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to a chronic somatic disease depends on a variety of factors, including belief in health locus of control. Correlation between health locus of control and illness acceptance in patients with Graves-Basedow and Hashimoto diseases as well as correlation between health locus of control, illness acceptance, sex, and age. THREE METHODS WERE APPLIED: Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale by K.A. Wallston, B.S. Wallston and R. DeVellis; the Acceptance of Illness Scale by B.J. Felton, T.A. Revenson, and G.A. Hinrichsena; and a personal questionnaire. Two groups were subject to the research: 68 patients with Graves-Basedow disease and 54 patients with Hashimoto disease. Patients with Graves-Basedow disease, women above all, have their health locus of control in other persons (P = 0,001) and are less inclined to accept their illness (P = 0,005) when compared to patients with Hashimoto disease. A statistically significant correlation occurred between the age of patients and external (i.e., in other persons) health locus of control. Beliefs in health locus of control and type of illness in female patient group are predictors of illness acceptance (P = 0,0009).

  14. Clinical study of 1003 cases with Graves' disease treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qinfen; Zhang Chenggang; Zhao Xiaobin; Shi Longbao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the treatment effects of individual 131 I dose treatment of Graves' disease. Methods: Graves' disease patients were given individual 131 I dose ( 131 I MBq/per gram thyroid tissue), which ranged at 1.48-4.07 MBq/g. A total of 1003 cases (76.9%) were successfully followed up. The mean administered dose of 131 I was (329.3 ± 307.1, 44.4-3700) MBq. The term of follow-up was (16.4 ± 10.0, 3.0-44.7) months. Results: After one dose 131 I treatment, 593 patients (59.1%) were with euthyroid, 200 patients (19.9%) hypothyroidism, 190 patients (18.9%) were partially remitted, 20 patients (2.0%) showed no changes; 259 patients (25.8%) suffered from early hypothyroidism, 88 patients were with transient hypothyroidism. Logistic stepwise regression analysis revealed that hard thyroid texture was a risk factor for developing early hypothyroidism, whereas large goiter was a protective factor for developing permanent hypothyroidism. Partial-correlations analysis showed that curative effects correlated negatively with the weight of goiter mass, the course of disease and the use of antithyroid drugs (ATD). After 131 I treatment, for 195 patients (41.7%) the ophthalmopathy was cured, 155 patients (33.1%) were partially remitted, 105 patients (22.4%) showed no effects, 13 patients (2.8%)were deteriorated. For 56 patients (77.8%) their hyperthyroid heart disease was cured, 10 patients(13.9%) were partially remitted, 6 patients (8.3%) were of no effects. For 60 patients (85.7%) periodic paralysis associated with thyrotoxicosis were cured, 2 patients (2.9%) were partially remitted, 8 patients (11.4%) were of no effects. Of 249 patients with large goiter (≥90 g), 219 cases (88.0%) were completely remitted. Conclusions: The individual 131 I dose treatment for Graves' disease exerts good therapeutic efficiencies. 131 I treatment for ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid heart disease and Graves' disease with lager goiter is effective and safe. (authors)

  15. A review of treatment options for Graves' disease: why total thyroidectomy is a viable option in selected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Vinuta; Lind, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. If left untreated, patients may have multiple systemic complications such as cardiac, reproductive, and skeletal disease. Thionamides, such as methimazole and propylthiouracil, and I(131) iodine ablation are the most commonly prescribed treatment for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy is often overlooked for treatment and is usually only offered if the other options have failed. In our case, we discuss a patient who was admitted to our medical center with symptomatic hyperthyroidism secondary to long-standing Graves' disease. She had a history of non-compliance with medications and medical clinic follow-up. The risks and benefits of total thyroidectomy were explained and she consented to surgery. A few months after the procedure, she was biochemically and clinically euthyroid on levothyroxine. She had no further emergency room visits or admissions for uncontrolled thyroid disease. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of the more typically prescribed treatments, thionamides and I(131)iodine ablation. We also review the importance of shared decision making and the benefits of total thyroidectomy for the management of Graves' disease. Given the improvement in surgical techniques over the past decade and a significant reduction of complications, we suggest total thyroidectomy be recommended more often for patients with Graves' disease.

  16. Graves disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aimed at controlling your overactive thyroid. Medicines called beta-blockers are often used to treat symptoms of rapid heart rate, sweating, and anxiety until the hyperthyroidism is controlled. Hyperthyroidism is treated ...

  17. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  18. Dry eye disease: pathophysiology, classification, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry D

    2008-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disorder of the tear film and ocular surface that results in eye discomfort, visual disturbance, and often ocular surface damage. Although recent research has made progress in elucidating DED pathophysiology, currently there are no uniform diagnostic criteria. This article discusses the normal anatomy and physiology of the lacrimal functional unit and the tear film; the pathophysiology of DED; DED etiology, classification, and risk factors; and DED diagnosis, including symptom assessment and the roles of selected diagnostic tests.

  19. Spectral color Doppler in the diagnosis and follow-up of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sponza, Massimo; Bertolotto, Michele; Ricci, Claudio; Fabris, Bruno; Armini, Lorenzo

    1997-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease is caused by the presence of circulating autoantibodies to the THS receptors on the thyroid cells. Thyroid-suppression therapy prevents hormone production directly, without affecting the pathogenetic process. They performed color Doppler US of the thyroid gland and pulsed Doppler analysis of thyroid artery flow in 21 patients with Graves' disease before and during medical treatment. US results were compared with those of a control group of 40 healthy subjects and correlated with the values of thyroid hormones, TSH and thyroid microsomal and thyroglobulin antibodies. The thyroid gland was hypo vascularized in the control group. Pulsed Doppler examination of the thyroid arteries exhibited peak systolic velocity of PSV 20 ± 4 cm/s, diastolic velocity of 8 ± 1 cm/s, and resistive index of 0.60 ± 0.04. The thyroid gland of Graves' disease patients was hyper vascularized. Pulsed Doppler examination of the thyroid arteries exhibited peak systolic velocity (PSV = 51 ± 12 cm/s), end diastolic velocity (VD = 15 ± 4 cm/s) and resistive index (RI = 0.71 ± 0.04) significantly higher than in normal subjects (p < 0.001). Circulating thyroid hormones and flow parameters normalized after 6-8 months of medical therapy (PSV = 20 ± 6 cm/s, VD = 9 ± 3 cm(s, RI = 0.58 ± 0.07). The color Doppler patterns normalized only in a patient with normal TSH and antibodies. Sampling of the thyroid arteries proved more repeatable than sampling of parenchymal vessels

  20. Management of Graves' disease during pregnancy: the key role of fetal thyroid gland monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luton, Dominique; Le Gac, Isabelle; Vuillard, Edith; Castanet, Mireille; Guibourdenche, Jean; Noel, Michèle; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Léger, Juliane; Boissinot, Christine; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Garel, Catherine; Tébeka, Brigitte; Oury, Jean-François; Czernichow, Paul; Polak, Michel

    2005-11-01

    Fetuses from mothers with Graves' disease may experience hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism due to transplacental transfer of antithyroid drugs (ATD) or anti-TSH receptor antibodies, respectively. Little is known about the fetal consequences. Early diagnosis is essential to successful management. We investigated a new approach to the fetal diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and validated the usefulness of fetal thyroid ultrasonograms. Seventy-two mothers with past or present Graves' disease and their fetuses were monitored monthly from 22 wk gestation. Fetal thyroid size and Doppler signals, and fetal bone maturation were determined on ultrasonograms, and thyroid function was evaluated at birth. Thyroid function and ATD dosage were monitored in the mothers. The 31 fetuses whose mothers were anti-TSH receptor antibody negative and took no ATDs during late pregnancy had normal test results. Of the 41 other fetuses, 30 had normal test results at 32 wk, 29 were euthyroid at birth, and one had moderate hypothyroidism on cord blood tests. In the remaining 11 fetuses, goiter was visualized by ultrasonography at 32 wk, and fetal thyroid dysfunction was diagnosed and treated; there was one death, in a late referral, and 10 good outcomes with normal or slightly altered thyroid function at birth. The sensitivity and specificity of fetal thyroid ultrasound at 32 wk for the diagnosis of clinically relevant fetal thyroid dysfunction were 92 and 100%, respectively. In pregnant women with past or current Graves' disease, ultrasonography of the fetal thyroid gland by an experienced ultrasonographer is an excellent diagnostic tool. This tool in conjunction with close teamwork among internists, endocrinologists, obstetricians, echographists, and pediatricians can ensure normal fetal thyroid function.

  1. Comparison of thyroid uptake of 131I capsule and solution in rabbits and graves disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xinjian; Li Fang; Lu Jingqiao; Chen Daming; Zhang Ruilin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To observe the difference between thyroid uptake rates (TUR) of 131 I capsule and solution in rabbits and Graves disease patients. Methods: Part one: 6 rabbits randomized into two groups received capsule or solution of 131 I 7.4 MBq. Then with SPECT scintigraphy 2,4,6 and 24 h thyroid pure counts in percentage of stomach counts (first frame) were determined. Part two: 1) Measured 131 I capsule standard. 2) 104 patients with Graves disease were administered tracing and therapeutic dose of 131 I capsule (capsule group), 118 of 131 I solution (solution group). Compared the tracing and therapeutic 131 I TUR at 24 h. Results: Part one: There were no significant difference at 2,4,6,24 h TUR between capsule and solution group. For 1 case the maximum TUR was at 6 h in capsule group and 2 cases in solution groups. Part two: 1) For the 131 I capsule administered immediately after being dissolved in 30 mL of water, the activity counts measured were higher by (13.8 +- 2.8)% than it was administered directly, t8.97, P 0.05) and in solution group were (71.3 +- 12.3)% and (65.1 +- 13.0)% (t = 3.82, P 131 I capsule standard should be dissolved before being measured. 3) 131 I capsules can be used as a standard formulation for Graves disease patients. 4) The dose of 131 I should be increased as tracer TUR is larger than 80.0%

  2. Comparison of Fixed versus Calculated Activity of Radioiodine for the Treatment of Graves Disease in Adults

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    Abigail U. Canto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRadioactive iodine as a treatment modality has been shown in several studies to be a safe and effective therapy for Graves disease. However, there is still no uniformity regarding optimal dosing method. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of calculated and fixed dosing of radioiodine for the treatment of Graves disease.MethodsA hundred twenty-two patients diagnosed with Graves disease were randomized to receive either fixed or calculated dose of radioiodine. Those randomized to fixed activity received either low fixed activity at 9.9 mCi for thyroid gland size <40 g or high fixed activity at 14.9 mCi for thyroid gland size 40 to 80 g, and those grouped to calculated activity received 160 µCi/g of thyroid tissue adjusted for 24 hours radioiodine uptake. Thyroid function tests (free thyroxine [T4] and thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] were monitored at 10, 16, and 24 weeks after radioactive iodine therapy. The primary outcome, treatment failure was defined as persistently elevated free T4 and low TSH.ResultsOf the 122 patients randomized, 56 in the fixed dose group and 56 in the calculated dose group completed the follow-up. At the end of 6 months, the percentage of treatment failure was 37.50% in the calculated dose group versus 19.64% in the fixed dose group with a relative risk of 0.53 (95% confidence interval, 0.28 to 0.98 favoring the fixed dose group.ConclusionFixed dose radioiodine has a significantly lower incidence of persistent hyperthyroidism at 6 months post-radioactive therapy.

  3. Discordant hypothyroxinemia and hypertriiodothyroninemia in treated patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.J.; Ladenson, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    Hypothyroxinemia and hypertriiodothyroninemia may occur in the course of antithyroid drug or 131 I treatment for hyperthyroid Graves' disease. To determine the frequency of combined high serum T3 and low serum T4 concentrations during such treatment and to assess the clinical significance of its recognition, we reviewed 60 patients treated for hyperthyroid Graves' disease with antithyroid drugs (n = 43) or radioactive iodine (n = 17). Six of these patients (10%) were found to have high serum T3 and low serum T4 concentrations during therapy. Four were receiving antithyroid drugs, and 2 had received radioactive iodine. At the time this abnormality occurred, 4 patients were euthyroid, 1 was hypothyroid, and 1 was hyperthyroid. The serum TSH concentration was increased in 2, at the upper limit of normal in 1, and undetectable in 3 patients. After discontinuation or reduction in the dose of antithyroid drug, clinical and chemical euthyroidism was restored in 2 additional patients with previously elevated TSH levels. In 2 patients, both of whom previously had undetectable serum TSH levels, clinical hyperthyroidism persisted or recurred, and additional therapy was required. No patient developed permanent hypothyroidism during the period of follow-up (1-22 months). An additional 19 of the 60 patients (32%) had an elevated serum T3 level with a normal serum T4 concentration during the course of follow-up. Among the 19 patients, the magnitude of serum T3 elevation was not different between clinically euthyroid (n = 13) and hyperthyroid (n = 6) patients. We conclude that discordance of serum T4 and T3 concentrations is frequently encountered in patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease during or after therapy. The low serum T4 level does not predict hypothyroidism, nor does a high serum T3 level predict hyperthyroidism

  4. Cost-utility analysis of antithyroid drug therapy versus 131I therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Abe, Katsumi; Sakata, Ikuko; Sakaguchi, Chiharu; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Kosuda, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    There is no comparative cost-utility study between 131 I therapy and antithyroid drugs (ATD) therapy for Graves' disease, though 131 I therapy has higher remission rate and less side effects. The objective of the study was to analyze the cost-utility of ATD therapy versus 131 I therapy by calculating life-long medical costs and utility, based on the responses of Graves' disease patients to questionnaires. To determine the expected cost and expected utility, a decision tree analysis was designed on the basis of the 2 competing strategies of ATD therapy versus 131 I therapy. A simulation of 1,000 female patients weighing≥50 kg who assumed to experience the onset of Graves' disease at the age of 30, to first complain of thyrotoxic symptoms and moderate goiter 2-3 mo. previously, and to undergo a 40-years-long cohort study, was created for each strategy using a decision tree and baselines of other relevant variables. The variables and costs were based on the literature and hospital bills. The maximum and minimum values of utility were defined as 1.0 and 0.0, respectively. Future costs and utilities were discounted 5%. The medical costs and utilities were 85,739-88,650 yen/patient/40 years and 16.47-16.56/patient/40 years, respectively, for the ATD therapy strategy, and 81,842 yen/patient/40 years and 17.41/patient/40 years, respectively, for the 131 I therapy strategy. These results quantitatively demonstrated that the 131 I therapy strategy was superior to the ATD therapy strategy in terms of both cost and utility. 131 I therapy should be used more widely in Japan because of its greater utility and lower cost. (author)

  5. HLA DRB1*03 as a possible common etiology of schizophrenia, Graves' disease, and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeh, Aicha; Ben Cheikh, Cheker; Mardessi, Ali; Mrad, Meriem; Nsiri, Brahim; Oumaya, Abdelaziz; Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases and schizophrenia share many common features. Association studies confirm a shared genetic association in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region between schizophrenia and most autoimmune diseases. To our knowledge, the simultaneous syndromes of Graves' disease (GD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in schizophrenia are rare in Tunisia. We report a case of a 42-year-old woman admitted to the department of psychiatry for an acute relapse of chronic schizophrenia. Her medical history revealed that she was followed for Graves' disease and for a type 2 diabetes mellitus. A low-resolution HLA typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) techniques according to determine the patient's haplotype. Our study suggests that the HLA DRB1*03 allele may explain a common etiology underlying the co-morbidity of Graves' disease, type 2 diabetes, and schizophrenia in our patient.

  6. Diffusion-weighed MR of the thyroid gland in Graves' disease: assessment of disease activity and prediction of outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Sadek, Ahmed Galal; Gaballa, Gada

    2010-06-01

    To assess the activity and clinical course of Graves' disease with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Fifty-one patients with Graves' disease and 25 volunteers underwent diffusion MR imaging of the thyroid gland using a single shot echo-planar imaging with b-factor of 0, 300 and 600 second/mm(2). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the thyroid gland were calculated. Patients with active Graves' disease included untreated patients at initial diagnosis (n = 12), patients under antithyroid drugs (n = 11), and patients in relapse after withdrawal of therapy (n = 13). Patients with inactive disease had a remission of hyperthyroidism (n = 15). The mean ADC values of thyroid gland with active Graves' disease was 0.65 +/- 0.03 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients at initial diagnosis, 0.81 +/- 0.02 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients undergoing antithyroid drug and 0.72 +/- 0.07 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism. The mean ADC of patients with remission was 0.94 +/- 0.03 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second and for normal volunteer was 1.06 +/- 0.08 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second. There was significant difference in the ADC value of patients with active disease and remission (P = .001). The cutoff ADC value used for differentiating patients with active disease from patients with remission was 0.82 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second. The mean ADC value of thyroid gland had positive correlation with thyroid-stimulating hormone (r = 0.87, P = .001) and negative correlation with serum T4 (r = -0.82, P = .001) and serum T3 (r = -0.71, P = .001). The ADC value of the thyroid gland is a promising non invasive parameter for diagnosis of different clinical stages of Graves' disease. Hence it can be used to assess the activity and predict the outcome of patients during and after medical treatment. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radioactive iodine therapy for patients with Graves' disease aged 18 or younger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Goshi, Kazuto; Tajiri, Junichi

    2008-01-01

    There have been few reports concerning radioactive iodine therapy (RI therapy) for Graves' disease in children, even in the United States of America (USA), and there have been no reports of such treatment in Japan. We evaluated the short-term results of RI therapy for Graves' disease aged 18 or younger. A total of 36 patients (10 male and 26 female) with Graves' disease, aged 18 and younger (range, 13 to 18 years; mean age, 15.8±1.5 years), received RI therapy on an outpatient basis at our clinic between July 1999 and July 2005. The mean interval from initiation of an antithyroid drug (ATD) to RI therapy was 25.3±21.5 months (range, 1 to 78 months). Twenty patients received therapy once, 14 twice, and 2 three times. The mean initial dose of radioactive iodine was 7.8±2.9 mCi (range, 3.6 to 13.0 mCi) and the mean total dose was 12.3±7.7 mCi (range, 3.6 to 29.8 mCi). The mean estimated weight of the thyroid gland was 42.6±23.4 g (range, 15.5 to 99.4 g) before RI therapy and 7.1±3.0 g (range, 2.0 to 13.6 g) after RI therapy. The mean follow-up period after RI therapy was 41.1±18.0 months (range, 6 to 71 months). Currently, 15 patients (42%) have hypothyroidism, 8 (22%) have subclinical hypothyroidism, 5 (14%) have euthyroidism, and 8 (22%) have subclinical hyperthyroidism. Patients taking thyroid hormone were considered hypothyroid. Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism are currently being monitored without treatment. No patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism are taking an ATD or KI (potassium iodide). A total of 36 patients with Graves' disease, aged 18 and younger, received RI therapy, and the short-term outcome in these patients were favorable. However, prolonged follow-up observation is required to confirm long-term safety. (author)

  8. Hyperthyroidism Improves the Pathological Condition of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: A Case of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Teruki; Matsuura, Bunzo; Furukawa, Shinya; Todo, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Shin; Yoshida, Osamu; Imai, Yusuke; Watanabe, Takao; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Hirooka, Masashi; Tokumoto, Yoshio; Kumagi, Teru; Abe, Masanori; Seike, Hirotaka; Miyauchi, Shozo; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine regulates the glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and hepatic steatosis. Several groups have shown the relationships between hypothyroidism and nonalcoholic fatty liver and hypothyroidism and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, the effect of hyperthyroidism on NASH has not yet been investigated. We herein report effects of thyroid hormone on the pathological condition of NASH in a patient with NASH complicated by Graves' disease. In our case, the liver enzyme level improved with the increasing thyroid hormone level; however, the liver enzyme level was aggravated with the improving thyroid hormone level. Therefore, hyperthyroidism may improve the pathological condition of NASH.

  9. Dry Eye as a Mucosal Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Michael E.; Schaumburg, Chris S.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Dry eye is a common ocular surface inflammatory disease that significantly affects quality of life. Dysfunction of the lacrimal function unit (LFU) alters tear composition and breaks ocular surface homeostasis, facilitating chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Accordingly, the most effective treatments to date are geared towards reducing inflammation and restoring normal tear film. The pathogenic role of CD4+ T cells is well known, and the field is rapidly realizing the complexity of other innate and adaptive immune factors involved in the development and progression of disease. The data support the hypothesis that dry eye is a localized autoimmune disease originating from an imbalance in the protective immunoregulatory and proinflammatory pathways of the ocular surface. PMID:23360156

  10. Quality-of-life outcomes in Graves disease patients after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Lukas H; Hopman, Wilma M; Witterick, Ian J; Freeman, Jeremy L

    2017-01-01

    Historically, research into surgical treatment of Graves disease has assessed subtotal rather than total thyroidectomy. Most clinicians now recommend total thyroidectomy, but little information is available regarding quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes for this procedure. Our aim was to assess QOL after total thyroidectomy. This is a retrospective, pilot study of patients with Graves disease who underwent total thyroidectomy from 1991 to 2007 at a high-volume tertiary referral center in Toronto, Canada. Questionnaires addressing disease-specific symptoms and global QOL concerns were sent to 54 patients. Analyses included parametric and nonparametric tests to assess the differences between perception of symptoms and global QOL before and after surgery. Forty patients responded (response rate: 74%) at a median of 4.8 years postoperatively. On a 10-point scale, overall wellness improved from 4.1 preoperatively to 8.7 postoperatively (p total thyroidectomy. Patients experienced marked and rapid improvement in QOL postoperatively. These findings suggest that total thyroidectomy is a safe and effective treatment.

  11. Association between Age at Diagnosis of Graves' Disease and Variants in Genes Involved in Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Ploski, Rafal; Kula, Dorota; Krol, Aleksandra; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kolosza, Zofia; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Stanjek-Cichoracka, Anita; Polanska, Joanna; Jarzab, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background Graves' disease (GD) is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. Methods 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. Results Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. Conclusions HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in polish population. PMID:23544060

  12. Prediction of thyroidal 131I effective half-life in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiguo; Zhang, Guizhi; Wang, Renfei; Tan, Jian; He, Yajing; Meng, Zhaowei

    2017-10-06

    Calculation of effective thyroidal half-life (Teff) of iodine-131( 131 I) is cumbersome and tedious. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that could be used to predict Teff and to develop a Teff prediction model in Graves' disease patients. A total of 256 patients with GD were involved in this study. We investigated the influences of age, gender, disease duration, thyroid weight, antithyroid drugs, antithyroid drugs discontinuation period (ADP), thyroid function indexes, thyroid autoantibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TRAb) level and radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) values before 131 I therapy on Teff, applying univariate and multivariate analyses. Teff correlated negatively with thyroid peroxidase antibody, TRAb and thyroid weight, as well as positively with 24-hour, 48-hour, and 72-hour RAIU. Additionally, a longer ADP (especially≥ 14d) or without antithyroid drugs before 131 I therapy led to a longer Teff. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that 24-hour and 72-hour RAIU were statistically significant predictors of Teff ( P Graves' disease, with high prediction accuracy.

  13. Thyroid storm following radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy for pediatric graves disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrs, Henry J; Silverstein, Janet H; Weinstein, David A; Amdur, Robert J; Haller, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Female, 11 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Thyroid storm Symptoms: Diarrhea • tachycardia • tachypnea • tremor • wheezing - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: - Rare disease. A growing number of pediatric endocrinologists treat Graves disease with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy due to the typically definitive nature of I-131 therapy. Given the published benefits and perceived low risks of RAI when compared to surgery or long-term anti-thyroid medication, the trend towards therapy with RAI is likely to continue. Nevertheless, RAI is not without significant risk. An 11-year-old girl with newly diagnosed Graves disease received RAI for definitive treatment of her hyperthyroidism. Within 24 hours of receiving I-131, she developed increasing sleepiness and eventually became unresponsive. Upon arrival at the emergency department she had a tonic-clonic seizure and was diagnosed with thyroid storm. Despite best efforts to manage her hyperthyroidism, she suffered a stroke of the left cerebral hemisphere that left her with persistent neurological deficits. Although thyroid storm after thyroid ablation is rare, the significant morbidity and potential mortality of pediatric thyroid storm warrant further studies to determine if children with markedly elevated thyroid hormone concentrations at diagnosis should receive prolonged pretreatment with anti-thyroid drugs. While such an approach may reduce the efficacy of I-131 ablation, it can also reduce and hopefully eliminate the risk of post-ablative thyroid storm.

  14. Periodic Paralysis and Encephalopathy as Initial Manifestations of Graves' Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsironis, Theocharis; Tychalas, Athanasios; Kiourtidis, Dimitrios; Kountouras, Jannis; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Rudolf, Jobst; Deretzi, Georgia

    2017-07-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an uncommon complication of Graves' disease, characterized by the triad of acute hypokalemia without total body potassium deficit, episodic muscle paralysis, and thyrotoxicosis. Graves' encephalopathy is an extremely rare form of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD), characterized by neuropsychiatric symptoms, increased antithyroid antibodies and cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, nonspecific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and cortico-responsiveness. Coexistence of both these complications in the same patient has not been reported before. We herein present a 48-year-old white male patient with TPP and encephalopathy as initial presentations of Graves' disease. Flaccid tetraparesis was reversed a few hours after potassium level correction and the patient did not suffer any relapse with the successful pharmaceutical management of the thyroid function. One month later, the patient presented with dizziness and behavioral symptoms, such as inappropriate laughter and anger. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed meningeal enhancement and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a mild protein increase, with a blood-brain barrier disruption. With the suspicion of EAATD, the patient was treated with high doses of corticosteroids and improved dramatically. To our knowledge this is the first reported coexistence of potentially treatable TPP and EAATD as initial neurological manifestations of Graves' disease, thereby underscoring the necessity of suspicion of possible underlying Graves' disease in patients with acute paralysis and encephalopathy of unclear origin.

  15. Hypothyroid Graves' disease complicated with elephantiasis nostras verrucosa (ENV): a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukinç, Kubilay; Bayraktar, Miyase; Gedik, Arzu

    2009-08-01

    Thyroid dermopathy is not a frequent feature of hyperthyroid Graves' disease, being present in less than 5% of the patients. Graves' disease has been shown to exist in euthyroid or hypothyroid forms in untreated patients. Here, we describe a case of hypothyroid Graves' disease with elephantiasis nostras verrucosa (ENV), which is an extreme form of thyroid dermopathy (TD). A 58-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with somnolence, hypothermia, and bradycardia. Her mental status gradually worsened, resulting in a deep coma. She was intubated and followed in the intensive care unit, as she needed mechanical ventilatory assistance due to respiratory failure. She also had bilateral non-pitting edema, a cobblestone-like appearance, and hyperkeratotic greenish-brown-colored lesions in the pretibial and dorsal regions of the feet that were compatible with ENV. Hypothyroid Graves' disease is a very rare condition among autoimmune thyroid disorders, and ENV is an extremely rare form of TD. Here, we present a patient with hypothyroid Graves' disease and ENV.

  16. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy; Morbus Basedow und Autonomie - Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2002-04-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [German] In dem vorliegenden Beitrag wird ueber die Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen referiert. Dies betrifft gesetzliche Regelungen in Deutschland, grundlegende Ueberlegungen zur Therapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen, die Diskussion konservative versus definitive Therapieindikation der Hyperthyreose und schliesslich die Themenkomplexe Vorbereitung, Durchfuehrung, Ergebnisse, Nebenwirkungen und Komplikationen, Kosten sowie Nachsorge der Radioiodtherapie. Im Vordergrund steht die Abgrenzung der konservativen Therapieindikation gegenueber der primaeren Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow in Deutschland. Waehrend in den USA 70-90% der Morbus-Basedow-Faelle primaer mit Radioiodtherapie behandelt werden, wird in Deutschland bei 90% zunaechst ein

  17. [Influence of selected endogenous and environmental factors on the course and complications of Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzynska, Anna; Przybylik-Mazurek, Elwira; Węgrzynowicz, Katarzyna; Morzywołek, Aleksandra; Wieczorek, Agata; Żarnowska, Maja; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune thyroid disease with complex and not fully established etiology. It occurs when environmental factors influence people genetically prone to this illness. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of selected factors (endogenous and environmental) on the course and complications of disease in patients with recurrent GD. Two hundred and four patients with relapsed GD, treated in the Clinical Department of Endocrinology in University Hospital in Cracow in years 2004-2006 and then in 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients who agreed to participate in the study were sent questionnaire to complete. Demographic and clinical data were collected and entered into a database. Patient data included: gender, place of living, lifestyle (smoking), family history of autoimmune diseases, the course of the disease, its symptoms and the treatment strategy. Furthermore the medical documentation was analyzed. Descriptive statistical analyses were made. The study showed a significant difference in the frequency of appearance of ophthalmopathy between men and women (80% and 37.14%, respectively, p = 0.041), between smokers and nonsmokers (61.9% and 21.05%, respectively, p = 0.022) and between the age of patients with positive and negative family history of autoimmune diseases (37.6 years and 50.5 years respectively, p = 0.002). 1. Male gender is a risk factor for ophthalmopathy in GD. 2. Cigarette smoking affects the risk of Graves' ophthalmopathy. 3. A positive family history of thyroid diseases and/or autoimmune diseases promotes the development of GD at a younger age.

  18. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Molecular Genetic Studies of Some Eye Diseases Affecting the Indian Population. Single gene disorders. Complex eye diseases. Genotype-phenotype correlation. Molecular diagnostics.

  19. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  20. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A H; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Regression of Ophthalmopathic Exophthalmos in Graves' Disease After Total Thyroidectomy: a Prospective Study of a Surgical Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargav, P R K; Sabaretnam, M; Kumar, S Chandra; Zwalitha, S; Devi, N Vimala

    2017-12-01

    Autoimmune ophthalmopathy is one of the salient clinical features associated with Graves' disease. Exophthalmos is one of the commonest manifestations of Graves' associated ophthalmopathy. It is reported to regress after thyroidectomy favourably compared to radioiodine or antithyroid drug therapy. In this context, we present our experience based on a surgical series of Graves' disease. This is a prospective study of 15 patients of Graves' disease associated with ophthalmopathic exophthalmos. Preoperative and monthly postoperative evaluation of exophthalmos was done with Hertel's exophthalmometer, apart from documenting lid, extra-ocular muscle and orbital involvement. The minimum follow-up of the cohort was 12 months. The female to male ratio was 12:3 and the mean age of the subjects was 33.4 years (18-55). Exophthalmos was bilateral in 13 and unilateral in 2 patients. All the 15 patients underwent total thyroidectomy without any major morbidity. Exophthalmos regressed in 12 patients at a mean follow-up of 15.6 ± 6.4 months (14-38) and was static in 3. None of the cases had worsened ophthalmopathy at the final follow-up. Mean regression of exophthalmos was 2.1 mm (1-5). The regression was statistically significant at P value = 0.035. Surgery has a positive impact on the regression of ophthalmopathic exophthalmos associated with Graves' disease.

  2. Cytokine Status, Thyroid Autoantibodies and Their Dynamic Changes During the Treatment of Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Lazanovich

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been found during the research that the changes of Th1 and Th2 marker cytokine content in Graves Disease are dynamic and are directly correlated not only with the severity of autoimmune thyrotoxicosis, but also with the method of treatment used and duration of Thiamazole therapy. The beginning of autoimmune thyrotoxicosis shows the largest amounts of both pro-inflammatory (IL-1a, IL-8, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 cytokines which are significantly reduced during Thiamazole therapy, with the exception of the cases of severe disease course. Thyroid resection does not result in immunologic remission either, which is confirmed by persisting high serum levels of IL-1a, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-10 and TSH antibodies in the severe GBD group. Among the unfavorable prognostic factors for recurrent disease are high serum levels of TSH antibodies, IL-1a and IFN-γ during pre-surgery period.

  3. STAT6 deficiency ameliorates Graves' disease severity by suppressing thyroid epithelial cell hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuechao; Zha, Bingbing; Liu, Xiaoming; Liu, Ronghua; Liu, Jun; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Tingting; Liu, Jiajing; Wang, Zhiming; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Luman; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-12-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) is involved in epithelial cell growth. However, little is known regarding the STAT6 phosphorylation status in Graves' disease (GD) and its role in thyroid epithelial cells (TECs). In this study, we found that STAT6 phosphorylation (p-STAT6) was significantly increased in TECs from both GD patients and experimental autoimmune Graves' disease mice and that STAT6 deficiency ameliorated GD symptoms. Autocrine IL-4 signalling in TECs activated the phosphorylation of STAT6 via IL-4 R engagement, and the downstream targets of STAT6 were Bcl-xL and cyclin D1. Thus, the IL-4-STAT6-Bcl-xL/cyclin D1 pathway is crucial for TEC hyperplasia, which aggravates GD. More importantly, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that STAT6 phosphorylation inhibited by AS1517499 decreased TEC hyperplasia, thereby reducing serum T3 and T4 and ameliorating GD. Thus, our study reveals that in addition to the traditional pathogenesis of GD, in which autoantibody TRAb stimulates thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors and consequently produces T3, T4, TRAb could also trigger TECs producing IL-4, and IL-4 then acts in an autocrine manner to activate p-STAT6 signalling and stimulate unrestricted cell growth, thus aggravating GD. These findings suggest that STAT6 inhibitors could be potent therapeutics for treating GD.

  4. Transient Hypothyroidism after Radioiodine for Graves' Disease: Challenges in Interpreting Thyroid Function Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Michael T; Doi, Suhail A R

    2016-03-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism and is often managed with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. With current dosing schemes, the vast majority of patients develop permanent post-RAI hypothyroidism and are placed on life-long levothyroxine therapy. This hypothyroidism typically occurs within the first 3 to 6 months after RAI therapy is administered. Indeed, patients are typically told to expect life-long thyroid hormone replacement therapy to be required within this timeframe and many providers expect this post-RAI hypothyroidism to be complete and permanent. There is, however, a small subset of patients in whom a transient post-RAI hypothyroidism develops which, initially, presents exactly as the typical permanent hypothyroidism. In some cases the transient hypothyroidism leads to a period of euthyroidism of variable duration eventually progressing to permanent hypothyroidism. In others, persistent hyperthyroidism requires a second dose of RAI. Failure to appreciate and recognize the possibility of transient post-RAI hypothyroidism can delay optimal and appropriate treatment of the patient. We herein describe five cases of transient post-RAI hypothyroidism which highlight this unusual sequence of events. Increased awareness of this possible outcome after RAI for Graves' disease will help in the timely management of patients. © 2016 Marshfield Clinic.

  5. Analysis of factors affecting the early hypothyroidism following 131I treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Rong; Kuang Anren; Qin Weishi

    2001-01-01

    Objective: It is a retrospective study designed to evaluate the early therapeutic outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease and determine whether the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease depends on thyroid volume, function, thyreo-stasis, therapeutic dosage, 131 I uptake, age, sex, and absorbed doses by per gram of thyroid tissue. Methods: One year after treatment, 342 patients were divided into two groups according to whether there was hypothyroidism, t test and x 2 test were used to compare the variable parameters between the two groups. Results: 92.1% were cured with a single dose of 131 I, and 21.2% contracted hypothyroidism at 12 months after treatment. The outcome of treatment at 12 months depended on the volume of thyroid and the absorbed doses by per gram of thyroid tissue. And pretreatment with thyreo-stasis did not reduce the therapeutic efficacy of 131 I in hyperthyroidism if antithyroid drugs were discontinued at least 3 days before 131 I treatment. Conclusions: Since most hypothyroidism occurred in patients whose thyroid volume is small, appropriate reduction of target dose is recommended here for those patients

  6. Factors predlisposing to developing early hypothyroidism after 131I therapy in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingfeng; Wen Chijun; Qian Hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical meanings of changes of serum TRAb, TGA, TMA contents during treatment of Graves' disease with 131 I, especially in those patients developing early hypothyroidism. Methods: Serum levels of TRAb, TGA, TMA, TSH, T 3 , T 4 were measured in 167 patients with Graves' disease both before and six months after mi therapy. Results: Six months after 131 I treatment, the original 167 patients could be divided into three groups based apon their thyroid ruction statas: Group A, improved but remained hyperthyroid, n=91, Group B, enthyroid, n=48, Group C, developing early hypothyroidism, n=28. Average age in Group C (hypothyroid) was significantly lower than that in Group A (hyperthyroid) (P 131 I treatment in younger patients. (2) Patients with high TRAb levels before 131 I therapy were less likely to be rendered enthyroid after a single course of treatment while those with low TRAb levels were easily rendered hypothyroid. (3) Development of hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment was closely related to the increase of TGA, TMA levels. (authors)

  7. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease: Comparison of outcome between Freiburg and Munich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, E.; Dagres, E.; Blattmann, H.; Kreisig, T.; Mann, K.

    1990-01-01

    The aim on this paper was to compare the results of radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease treated at two different nuclear medicine departments, Freiburg (FR); Munich (M). A low dose concept applying 60-80 Gy provides only a moderate rate of success: FR (80 Gy): 80%; M (60 Gy): 54%. A dose of 150 Gy, however, succeeds in 81% of the FR-cases and in 86% of the M-cases. As a consequence, this 150 Gy approach has a higher incidence of post-treatment hypothyroidism: FR: 49%; M: 62%. As the rate of post-treatment hypothyroidism seems to be independent of the dose concept these early post-treatment numbers will increase by about 4% per year in all patients. Nevertheless, the high dose concept is recommended, because the aim of RIT is to remove hyperthyroidism reliably, as the surgeons have told us. A hypothyroidism after RIT of Graves' disease, however, is the lesser evil compared to remaining or recurrent hyperthyroidism since these patients can be treated with thyroid hormones without problems. (orig.) [de

  8. Comparative study of low dose 131I treatment in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Lan; Shan Menglin; Wang Junqi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the low dose 131 I therapy for Graves' disease we compared the results of 277 patients in our department with the report of Howarth D et al. Methods: 277 patients were classified as 45 Gy group and 77 Gy group according to the dose level. The results of these two groups were compared separately with results of 60 Gy group and 90 Gy group reported by Howarth D et al. Results: The euthyroidism rate and hypothyroidism rate among these four groups had no significant statistical difference after 6 months of 131 I therapy, but there were high significant statistical difference between our study and Howarth D research about euthyroidism rate and hypothyroidism rate 24 months later. Conclusion: The low dose 131 i management refered by Howarth D et al was an effective method for Graves' disease which could reduce or delay the incidence of hypothyroidism. Our study show that subsection on the foundation of this low dose procedure could further reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism and improve the euthyroidism rate. (authors)

  9. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This meta-analysis was performed to compare radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in terms of clinical outcomes, including development or worsening of ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid cure rate, hypothyroidism, relapse rate and adverse events. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed and National Knowledge Infrastructure, China, were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in patients with Graves' disease. Results were expressed as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and weighted mean differences with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: 17 RCTs involving 4024 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included. Results showed that radioiodine treatment has increased risk in new ophthalmopathy, development or worsening of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Whereas, compared with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine treatment seems to have a higher hyperthyroid cure rate, lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is associated with a higher hyperthyroid cure rate and lower relapse rate compared with antithyroid drugs. However, it also increases the risk of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Advances in knowledge: Considering that antithyroid drug treatment can be associated with unsatisfactory control of hyperthyroidism, we would recommend radioiodine therapy as the treatment of choice for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27266544

  10. Low-dose radioiodine given six-monthly in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, P.J.; McCready, V.R.; Harmer, C.L.; Spathis, G.S.; Cosgrove, D.O.

    1985-01-01

    Experience using low-dose radioiodine given six-monthly instead of yearly in hyperthyroid patients with Graves' disease is reported. One hundred and thirty-five patients have been treated over a three-year period with 74 MBq (2 mCi) doses of 131 I. |Thirty-eight|percent| were controlled with a single dose. Those patients requiring more than one dose were treated with a further 74 MBq (2 mCi) 131 I at six-monthly intervals until euthyroid. Using this approach, 46% were euthyroid one year after starting treatment, and 75% were euthyroid at two years. The incidence of hypothyroidism following treatment was 2.2% at one year, with a yearly incidence thereafter of 4-6%. Six-monthly scheduling of low-dose radioiodine in Graves' disease can reduce the time taken to become euthyroid, compared with conventional yearly low-dose treatments. Further follow up is required to confirm the present low incidence of hypothyroidism following treatment. (author)

  11. Influence of treatment with radioiodine and propylthiouracil on thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, K.; Nistrup Madsen, S.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins (TSAb) were measured in fifty-four patients with Graves' disease before treatment with either radioiodine (seventeen patients) or propylthiouracil (PTU) (thirty-seven patients) and followed during treatment. After radioiodine TSAb increased to levels exceeding pretreatment values, and became detectable in three of six originally TSAb negative patients. In most patients TSAb decreased during treatment with PTU, and became undetectable after a mean of 12 months in patients above 40 years, and after a mean of 6 months in patients below 40 years. In order to eliminate the presumed causative agent in Graves' disease, antithyroid treatment should be at least 18 months in patients above 40 years, and at least 12 months in patients below 40 years of age. In twenty-nine patients TSAb were measured at cessation of 2 years antithyroid drug therapy. Ten patients were TSAb positive and all except one relapsed. Five of nineteen TSAb negative patients relapsed. Although TSAb positivity predicts relapse, it is not an ideal index of prognosis after antithyroid therapy. (author)

  12. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemsen, U.F.; Knesewitsch, P.; Kreisig, T.; Pickardt, C.R.; Kirsch, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  13. Adverse Events Associated with Methimazole Therapy of Graves' Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Stephenson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the pediatric population. Antithyroid medications used in children and adults include propylthiouracil (PTU and methimazole (MMI. At our center we have routinely used MMI for Graves' disease therapy. Our goals are to provide insights into adverse events that can be associated with MMI use. Methods. We reviewed the adverse events associated with MMI use in our last one hundred consecutive pediatric patients treated with this medication. Results. The range in the patient age was 3.5 to 18 years. The patients were treated with an average daily dose of MMI of 0.3±0.2 mg/kg/day. Adverse events attributed to the use of the medication were seen in 19 patients at 17±7 weeks of therapy. The most common side effects included pruritus and hives, which were seen in 8 patients. Three patients developed diffuse arthralgia and joint pain. Two patients developed neutropenia. Three patients developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome, requiring hospitalization in 1 child. Cholestatic jaundice was observed in 1 patient. No specific risk-factors for the development of adverse events were identified. Conclusions. MMI use in children is associated with a low but real risk of minor and major side effects.

  14. Appearance of Graves' disease after percutaneous ethanol injection for the treatment of hyperfunctioning thyroid adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzani, F; Del Guerra, P; Caraccio, N; Casolaro, A; Lippolis, P V; Goletti, O

    1997-05-01

    In this report we describe an unusual patient with hyperfunctioning thyroid adenoma in whom percutaneous ethanol injection (p.e.i.) therapy was followed by typical Graves' disease. His history revealed the presence of a sister with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. 99-mTc thyroid scintiscan showed focal uptake in the nodule, with suppression of extranodular parenchyma. P.e.i. therapy was followed by the development of severe hyperthyroidism. One month after a second p.e.i. cycle, recurrence of hyperthyroidism associated with diffuse 99-mTc uptake by the gland was observed. TSH-receptor and thyroglobulin autoantibodies were undetectable before p.e.i. therapy, appeared during the first cycle, and showed a further increase after the second p.e.i. therapy cycle. Though spontaneous switch to Graves' disease cannot be excluded in patients with toxic nodules, the massive release of thyroid materials from follicular cells, among these TSH-receptor antigenic components partially denatured by ethanol, may indeed trigger an autoimmune response to the TSH-receptor, thus accounting for this observation. Patients with possible autoimmune disposition, as selected by familiar history and/or laboratory markers should be carefully monitored during p.e.i. treatment.

  15. Can bone loss be reversed by antithyroid drug therapy in premenopausal women with Graves' disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belsing Tina Z

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Hyperthyroidism can lead to reduced bone mineral density (BMD and increased fracture risk particularly in postmenopausal women, but the mechanism behind is still unclear. Objective Prospective examination of the influence of thyroid hormones and/or thyroid autoantibodies on BMD in premenopause. Design We have examined 32 premenopausal women with untreated active Graves' disease from time of diagnosis, during 18 months of antithyroid drug therapy (ATD and additionally 18 months after discontinuing ATD. Variables of thyroid metabolism, calcium homeostasis and body composition were measured every 3 months. BMD of lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured at baseline, 18 ± 3 and 36 ± 3 months. Data were compared to base line, a sex- and age matched control group and a group of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis treated with non-suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Results The study showed significantly (p Conclusion The results indicated a clinically relevant impact of thyroid function on bone modulation also in premenopausal women with Graves' disease, and further indicated the possibility for a direct action of TRAb on bones.

  16. Thyroid γ ray measurement after iodine-131 therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianfeng; Guo Qingling; Ye Genyao; Li Xin; Wang Anyu; Wang Ying; Zhu Hui; He Ling; Yuan Chao

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the thyroid 131 I uptake within 24 hours following 131 I therapy for Graves' disease. Methods: Eighteen hyperthyroidism patients were divided into two groups according to thyroid weight and radiotherapy dosage. Low-dose group and high-dose group received the mean dose 162.8 MBq (4.4 mCi) and 255.3 MBq (6.9 mCi), respectively. The γ ray dose rates from thyroids were measured in all patients at 1, 2, 4, 8,12 and 24 h after 131 I therapy. Results: γ ray dose rates were elevated rapidly at 1 hour and continued at high level between 2-12 h and slowly fell in 24 h after 131 I therapy. γ Rat curve of low-dose group was lower than that of high-dose group. Conclusion: There was a rapid absorption and concentration period in 1 h and slow metabolism and release period after 12 h in thyroid following radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease. The thyroids of hyperthyroidism patients displayed different γ ray curves. (author)

  17. Clinical significance of serum leptin levels in patients with graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Ying; Du Fuman; Teng Haikun; Yang Yuzhi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the levels of serum leptin in patients with graves' disease. Methods: Serum leptin levels were measured with IRMA in 51 patients with hyperthyroidism as well as 46 hypothyroid and 50 euthyroid subjects as controls. Serum TSH, free T 3 and free T 4 (FT 3 and FT 4 ) were also measured. Body fat percentage (% Fat) and body mass index (BMI) were calculated. Results: Serum leptin levels were significantly lower in patients with graves' disease (male 2.05 ± 1.54μg/L, female 7.47±5. 08 μg/L), than those in hypothyroid and euthyroid subjects. Levels in hypothyroid patients were significantly higher than those in controls, however, excluding the body fat factor, there were no obvious difference. Serum leptin levels in all the 3 groups were significantly positively correlated with BMI. The levels were negatively correlated with FT 3 , FT 4 levels and positively correlated with TSH levels but both were not significant. Serum leptin levels were 2-3 times higher in women than in men among all 3 groups. Conclusion: Thyroid functional status affected serum leptin levels indirectly through the amount of body fat. (authors)

  18. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemsen, U.F. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Knesewitsch, P. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Kreisig, T. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Pickardt, C.R. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Kirsch, C.M. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  19. Cost-effectivness analysis of total thyroidectomy vs radioiodine for Graves disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokić Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the patients suffering from hyperthyroidism 60-80% have Graves' disease. The initial therapy of Graves's disease are antithyroid drugs. If the remission is not achieved after 12-18 months, the patients should be directed to surgical treatment or to the therapy with radioactive iodine. The aim of this study was to compare cost/effectiveness ratios for radioactive iodine and total thyroidectomy. The analysis was made using Markov model, from the perspective of Republic Fund for Health Insurance in Serbia. Duration of one cycle in the model is six months, and the time horizon is 30 years. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for 1000 virtual patients as well as the analysis of sensitivity with the variation of parameters ± 50%. For total thyroidectomy the insurance should provide 138.389,72 RSD / 57, 83 QALY i.e. 2.393,04 dinars for one quality-adjusted life year, and for radioactive iodine the insurance should provide 110.043,64 RSD / 57,82 QALY i.e. 1.903,37 dinars for one quality-adjusted life year. This economic analysis showed that radioactive iodine has better ratio of costs to clinical effectiveness as opposed to total thyroidectomy.

  20. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  1. Pathological evaluation of thyroid glands in Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Xiao Haipeng; Cheng Wei; Yang Jianyong; Chen Guorui; Ling Qibo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathological morphology of thyroid specimen after thyroid arteries embolization. In order to select appropriate size of embolizing granules, the diameters of thyroid arteries in Graves' disease were measured. Methods: Multiple slides of embolized thyroid tissues from superior pole, body and inferior pole of the resected thyroid glands were made. After being embedded and stained, pathological morphology was observed and diameters of arteries in various parts of thyroid glands were measured under microscopy. Results: Pathological examination of thyroid glands showed that superior and inferior thyroid arteries and most of their branches were embolized with ischemic necrosis and fibrosis in the embolized thyroid tissue. Follicular epithelium appeared as flat or cubic shapes with colloid reduction. Average diameter of main branches of superior artery was 440-550 μm and that of inferior artery was 300-375 μm. The diameters of capillary network in the thyroid body was 120-250 μm, and the non-embolized ones was 40-110 μm. The diameter of isthmus was 130-150 μm. Conclusions: Pathological morphology of Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization showed that the excretion of thyroid glands would be decreased and equivalents to subtotal thyroidectomy

  2. Rapid resolution of fetal goiter associated with maternal Grave's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, D R; Rothschild, M A

    2000-08-11

    The incidence of abnormal fetal thyroid function with maternal Grave's disease is about 2-12%. The development of larger fetal goiters can complicate labor and precipitate life-threatening airway obstruction at delivery. A case is presented of a large stable goiter confirmed by sonography, which unexpectedly resolved by the time of parturition. A 3 x 6 cm fetal goiter was detected at 34 weeks gestation in a mother treated with propylthiouracil for Grave's disease. A repeat sonogram at 36 weeks showed no change in goiter size. Umbilical blood sampling showed the fetus to be markedly hyperthyroid. Planned Cesarean section took place 11 days after the final sonogram. A multi-disciplinary operative team was present including the Otolaryngology service with equipment for emergency intubation, bronchoscopy and tracheotomy. Upon delivery, the infant had no evidence of goiter and no airway compromise. Fetal goiter is a rare entity, and recent advances in the field of maternal-fetal medicine have enabled intra-uterine diagnosis and treatment of such conditions. A review of published case reports demonstrates two trends in treated fetuses: preterm progressive resolution of the goiter, or delivery with gross evidence of goiter. This reported case is unique, as a persistent goiter resolved completely in less than 2 weeks. Otolaryngologic response to and management of potential congenital airway compromise is discussed.

  3. [Is subtotal bilateral thyroidectomy still indicated in patients with Grave's disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilosi, M; Binquet, C; Goudet, P; Lalanne-Mistrih, M L; Brun, J M; Cougard, P

    2002-02-01

    To evaluate the morbidity and the functional results of subtotal bilateral thyroidectomy in patients (TST) with Graves' disease. A retrospective study was performed in 128 patients. They were 23 males and 105 females with a median age of 34 years (range: 14-68). Weight of remnant tissue was between 4 and 5 g. Thyroid functional status was evaluated, at 3 months and after a follow-up period ranged from 1 to 5 years, by measurement of serum concentration of free T4 and/or free T3 and TSH. They were no post-operative death. Surgical complications were 2 vocal cord palsies and 17 hypocalcemia (inf. to 2 mmol/L). After a median follow-up of 2 years, they were no longer any cases of vocal cord dysfunction and no case of permanent hypoparathyroidism. Functional results were established in 118 patients: 46 patients had clinical hypothyroidism (39%), 64 patients had latent hypothyroidism or euthyroidism (54.2%), and 8 had recurrent hyperthyroidism (6.8%). These results suggest that TST with a remnant mass inferior to 5 g provides a low level of recurrent hyperthyroidism and allows to give no drug therapy to half patients. In our opinion, TST is still indicated in Graves' disease.

  4. Radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease - a dosimetric comparison of different strategies concerning antithyroid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbannek, V.; Voth, E.; Moka, D.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Premedication with antithyroid drugs (ATD) compared to patients not pretreated with ATD causes a higher failure rate of radioiodine therapy (RITh) or demands higher therapeutical dosage of radioiodine (RI). For clinical reasons and because of accelerated iodine metabolism in hyperthyreosis a compensated thyroid metabolism is desirable. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ATD on the biokinetics of RI in case of Graves' disease in order to improve RITh of patients pre-treated with ATD. Methods: 385 consecutive patients who underwent RITh because of Graves' disease for the first time were included: Group A (n = 74): RITh under continuous medication with ATD; Group B (n = 111): Application of RI under continuous medication with ATD, in case of insufficient RI-uptake or shortened effective RI-half-life ATD were stopped 1-5 days after RITh; Group C (n = 200): ATD were stopped 2 days prior to RITh in all patients. We examined the influence of ATD on RI-uptake and effective RI-half-life as well as the absorbed dose achieved on the thyroid in dependence of thyroid volume and applied RI-dosage [TEQ - therapy efficiency quotient, (2)]. Results: In the RI-pretest (all patients under ATD) the RI-uptake was comparable in all three groups. During RITh-RI-uptake, effective RI-half-life and therefore the TEQ were significantly higher in Group C as compared to Groups A and B (p [de

  5. Diagnostic Utility of Contrast-enhanced 3D T1-weighted Imaging in Acute Cerebral Infarction Associated with Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Yasufumi; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Oyama, Naoki; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2017-02-01

    Graves disease is rarely complicated with cerebrovascular steno-occlusive diseases. Previous studies have suggested several hypotheses for this occurrence, including excess thyroid hormone, which stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, which in turn causes an abnormal hemodynamic response with consequent atherosclerotic changes, and antithyroid antibodies cause local vascular inflammation in patients with Graves disease. However, radiological findings of vasculitis in patients with Graves disease and cerebral infarction remain less known. We report the case of a 30-year-old Japanese woman with acute cerebral infarction due to vasculitis associated with Graves disease. She was admitted to our hospital with a 4-day history of intermittent transient dysarthria and limb shaking of the left leg when standing. Three weeks before admission, she went to a local hospital because of general malaise and was diagnosed with Graves disease. Neurological examination revealed paralytic dysarthria, left central facial nerve palsy, and left hemiparesis (manual muscle testing, 4 of 5). Blood examinations showed hyperthyroidism (thyroid-stimulating hormone ≤.010 µU/mL; free T3 ≥25.0 pg/mL; free T4 ≥8.0 ng/dL) and elevation of antithyroid antibody levels (thyroid peroxidase antibody, 87 IU/mL). The vessel wall of the right internal carotid artery was markedly enhanced on contrast-enhanced three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, suggesting vasculitis. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion after the branching ophthalmic artery. Arterial stenosis due to vasculitis was considered the cause of hemodynamic ischemic stroke. Vessel wall imaging such as high-resolution contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging seems useful for assessing the underlying mechanism of stroke in patients with Graves disease. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Herpetic Eye Disease in a Public Eye Hospital in Nigeria | Nwosu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the aetiology, pattern and complications of herpetic eye disease seen at the Guinness Eye Centre, Onitsha, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The case files of all patients with herpetic eye disease who presented at the centre between January 1998 and December 2003 were reviewed. Information on ...

  7. Relationship between the serum TGA, TMA positiveness and development of hypothyroidism after 131I therapy in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hui; Xu Xiaohong; Yu Hui

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the likelihood of development of hypothyroidism after 131 I therapy in patients with Graves' disease as related to the serum positiveness of TGA and TMA before treatment. Methods: Altogether, 176 patients with Graves' disease were treated with 131 I and followed for 3 years of these patients, serum TGA and TMA were positive in 70 and were negative in 106. Results: In the 70 patients with positive TGA and TMA, development of hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment occurred in 22 subjects three years later (31.4%). However, only 4 of the 106 patients with negative TGA and TMA developed hypothyroidism 3 years after 131 I therapy (3.8%). Difference in the incidence of hypothyroidism was significant (P 131 I be administered to patients with Graves' disease and positive serum TGA, TMA. (authors)

  8. The observation of curative effects by therapy with low-dose 131I in younger with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Liqun; Li Lingling; Zhang Chenggang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the the curative effects in younger with Graves disease therapied by 131 I. Methods: The dose of 131 I is administrated with 1480-2220kBq/g of thyroid tissue which was decided by many factors that include the paticnt's Age, volume of thyroid, course and if antihyroid drug is administrated. The curative effects was classfide into four groups: complete remission, excellence, parts of remission, no effect. Results: 47 were complete remission, 34 were excellence, 10 were the parts of remission and 0 was no effects. The total effective power was 100%. Conclusions: Therapy with low-dose of mi for younger with Graves' disease is an effect, simple and safe method. Repeating treatment with 131 I will improve the curative rate of Graves' disease in younger, and the incidence of hypothyroidism cannot be increased. (authors)

  9. Changes of serum TSI, TGI and peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets in patients with graves disease before and after therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jindong; Fang Peihua; Tang Te

    1994-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) and thyroid growing immunoglobulin (TGI) were measured and pan T cells (CD 3 ), helper/inducer T cells (CD 4 ) and suppressor/cytoxic T cells (CD 8 ) in peripheral blood were enumerated in 37 patients with Graves disease and 32 normal individuals. The results showed that the positive rates of TSI and TGI were 83.8% and 58.3% respectively in patients with Graves disease. The TSI activity was positively correlated with the level of serum TT 4 (P 3 + cells and CD 8 + cells were decreased (P 4 + /CD 8 + ratio increased (P 3 + and CD 8 + cells, and the CD 4 + /CD 8 + ratio were not changed obviously. Pathogenic roles and clinical significance of serum TSI, TGI and peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets in Graves disease were also discussed

  10. Observation of changes of serum leptin and lipid (TG and TC) levels in patients with graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhaobao; Cheng Guanghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum leptin (with RIA) and lipid (TG and TC) (with biochemistry) levels in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum Leptin, TG and TC levels were determined in 29 patients with Graves' disease both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, serum Leptin, TG and TC levels in the patients were significantly lower than those in the controls. After treatment, serum Leptin, TG and TC levels increased and were significantly higher than those before treatment and were not much different from those in controls. Conclusion: The changes of serum Leptin, TG and TC levels may be of value for outcome prediction in patients with Graves' disease. (authors)

  11. Dynamic monitoring of serum IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-6 contents in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianwen; Li Weiguo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible role of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6) in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. Methods: Serum FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH (with CLIA), IL-2, IL-6 (with RIA) and IFN-γ (with ELISA) contents were measured in the following subjects: (1) 42 patients with Graves' disease before any treatment, (2) 40 patients in remission after successful treatment with antithyroid drugs (ATD), (3) 25 patients in relapse (around 6 months after cessation of two years' ATD treatment, (4) 40 controls. Results: The serum IFN-γ and IL-6 contents in the patients before treatment and patients in relapse were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 3 , FT 4 levels while the serum IL-2 contents were linearly negatively correlated with FT 3 , FT 4 levels before treatment. Conclusion: Contents of these cytokines fluctuated dynamically along with the status of Graves' disease and might be related to the pathogenesis in some way. (authors)

  12. [Treatment of eyelid retraction in Grave's disease by recession of the levator complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, N; Schittkowski, M; Guthoff, R F

    2004-11-01

    The chronic stage in Grave's orbitopathy is characterised by fibrotic changes within the orbital soft tissues, especially the extraocular muscles. Retraction of the eyelids is a common clinical feature of this phenomenon. To solve this problem several techniques for lengthening the upper eyelid have been described with variable rates of success. In this report we describe our modified Harvey's technique for the correction of upper eyelid retraction which includes a complete recession of the Muller's muscle/levator complex from the tarsal plate without the interposition of a spacer. Finally only the skin and the superficial orbicularis muscle are sutured. We also report about our results with this procedure. 8 patients (1 male, 7 female) with lid retraction in Grave's ophthalmopathy were recorded who had undergone the modified lengthening technique by an external approach between 2001 and 2004. Four patients underwent a bilateral procedure and 1 patient showed a significant under-correction, necessitating reoperation. So a total of 13 procedures were included in this follow-up study. Beside the common ophthalmological examination, special interest was put in the difference of the two eyelid apertures in primary position pre- and postoperatively. Within a follow-up period of at least 3 months we recorded an averaged lengthening of the upper eyelid of 3.1 mm. The difference of the two eyelid apertures in primary position improved from 2.2 mm preoperatively to 1.0 mm postoperatively. Only 1 patient needed reoperation because of a significant under-correction. There were no late over-corrections observed. The modified Harvey's technique to lengthen the upper eyelid is a safe and effective method to reduce upper eyelid retraction in Grave's disease. An eventually required orbital decompression or extraocular muscle surgery has to be done before the lid surgery.

  13. Changes and clinical significance of CD4+CD25+CD127- regulatory T cells in Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jintao; Yu Peiling; Dong Jingwei; Liao Qihong; Liu Dongliang; Zeng Hongyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of Graves disease by observing the changes of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - regulatory T cells (Treg) population in the patients. Methods: Flow cytometry was used to detect the proportion of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg of CD4 + T cells in 90 Graves disease patients (Graves disease group) and 50 healthy adults (control group). Thyroid function and autoantibody levels were determined simultaneously. The t test was adopted for comparison between groups. The relationship between CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg and thyroid function was analyzed by linear correlation analysis. Results: The percentages of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg in Graves disease group and control group were 1.39%±1.09% and 4.59%±1.14% separately. There was significant difference between the two groups (t=16.4, P<0.01). There were negative correlation between CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg percentages and total triiodothyronine, total thyroxine,free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine and thyrotropin receptor antibody,thyroglobulin antibody, thyroid microsomal antibody (r=-0.62, -0.65, -0.56, -0.71, -0.50, -0.15, all P<0.01). Conclusions: The reduction of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg percentages in Graves disease group and close relations of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg with thyroid function and thyroid autoantibody levels suggest that CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg decrease in the number may be associated with the onset of Graves disease. CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - may be the specific marker of Treg. (authors)

  14. Occurrence of Type 1 Diabetes in Graves' Disease Patients Who Are Positive for Antiglutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies: An 8-Year Followup Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo Taniyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs are one of the markers of islet cell autoimmunity and are sometimes present before the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D. GADA can be present in Graves' patients without diabetes; however, the outcome of GADA-positive Graves' patients is not fully understood, and the predictive value of GADA for the development of T1D in Graves' patients remains to be clarified. We investigated the prevalence of GADA in 158 patients with Graves' disease and detected GADA in 10 patients. They were followed up to discover whether or not T1D developed. In the course of eight years, 2 patients with high titers of GADA developed T1D, both had long-standing antithyroid drug-resistant Graves' disease. Thus, Graves' disease with high GADA titer seems to be at high risk for T1D.

  15. Graves' disease in 2.5 years old girl - 6-years-long observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonak, Olimpia; Połubok, Joanna; Barg, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Graves' disease is rare in young children, more frequent in children with other autoimmune diseases or with family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. The 2.5 year old girl was admitted to the hospital with tachycardia and subfebrile temperature. The girl presented symptoms of atopic dermatitis. Child's mother was diagnosed with Hashimoto disease two months after the child's diagnosis. In physical examination of the child, enlarged thyroid was found. At the admission, the laboratory tests revealed decreased TSH (0.001 uIU/ml), increased both FT3 (>30 pg/ml) and FT4 (3.43 ng/dl), but normal levels of anti-thyreoglobulin antibodies (ATG - 0.64 IU/ml) and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO - 0 IU/ml); thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb) were not identified. The Graves' disease was diagnosed. The girl started treatment with methimazole (2x5mg) and propranolol (due to tachycardia, 2x5mg). The thyroid function (TSH, FT4 and FT3) normalized 1 year after diagnosis and hormone levels remained within normal reference values, but she received methimazole for 18 months. At presen, the patient is 8 years old. She is not receiving any treatment and her thyroid function is correct. The girl still presents symptoms of atopy. In case of symptoms of tachycardia in children, the hyperthyroidism should be taken into consideration. Numerous methods of treatment provide a therapy appropriate to the age and condition of patients. Long remission after treatment with antithyroid drugs could also be achieved in younger (prepubertal) children. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  16. Optimal management of Graves orbitopathy: a multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, M. R.; van Zeijl, C. J. J.; Boelen, A.; Kloos, R.; Saeed, P.; Vriesendorp, T. M.; Mourits, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Graves' thyroid disease is a relatively common disorder in endocrinology and general internal medicine practice. Graves' hyperthyroidism is mediated by circulating stimulating autoantibodies. Up to 60% of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism develop some form of Graves' orbitopathy. Immune

  17. Dual thyroid ectopia with Graves' disease: a Case Report and a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Teik Hin; Lee, Boon Nang; Hassan, Siti Zarina Amir [Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Lumpur (Malaysia); Ch' ng, Ewe Seng [Univ. Sains Malaysia, Kerian (Malaysia); Hussein, Zanariah [Putrajaya Hospital, Putrajaya (Malaysia)

    2012-12-15

    Ectopic thyroid of thyroid ectopia is a rare developmental anomaly with the prevalence of 1 per 100,000 300,000 population. Even rarer, such an anomaly manifests as dual thyroid ectopia. To our best knowledge, only one case has been reported on dual thyroid ectopia with graves' disease in the Eglish literature. We present here a case of dual thyroid ectopia complicated by graves' disease, where by the diagnosis was rendered through judicious use of various diagnostic modalities coupled with a close clinical follow up. In this case, therapeutic consideration should be personalized with proper informed consent of the patient.

  18. Treatment with radioiodine of Graves' disease. Calculated activity; fixed activity or ablation. Were are we going?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrossi, O.

    2006-01-01

    The new tendencies of radioiodine ( 131 I) treatment of Graves'disease are presented . One group have the objective of administrate an activity of radioiodine to bring back the patient to euthyroidism , using individual activities to each patient. Others propose a fixed dose, with high activity to cure the disease and anticipating the hypothyroidism of the patient. The third group propose directly the ablation of the thyroids with a calculated activity to deliver 300 Gy .This calculi demand the investigation of the maximum uptake of radioiodine, the biological half life, and the thyroid weight with adequate method (US, TC, MR) Finally, the dose to not thyroid tissues are discussed and the risk of these procedures are presented. (author)

  19. The early development of transient and permanent hypothyroidism following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, N.R.; Hart, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The outcome in 110 patients first treated with radioiodine (mean dose 6.56 mCi) for hyperthyroid Graves' disease in 1980 was reviewed. In 23 percent of the patients the disease had not been controlled by the initial dose after 3 months, and 17 percent were given one or two more doses. Within 2 years 65 percent of the patients required replacement thyroxine therapy. Although about half of the patients were biochemically hypothyroid 3 months after the last dose of iodine 131, this condition was transient in a third of them; five of these patients even became hyperthyroid again. Patients with transient, as opposed to permanent, hypothyroidism at 3 months tended to be clinically euthyroid but to have residual palpable thyroid tissue and only a modest reduction in the serum thyroxine level. It is therefore recommended that patients not overtly hypothyroid 3 months after treatment with 131 I be observed still longer before thyroxine replacement therapy is instituted

  20. Clinical study of color Doppler sonography in Graves' disease blood flow changes after thyroid arteries embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Li Weiduo; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Huang Yonghui; Guo Wenbo; Li Jiaping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the color doppler image characteristics of thyroid arteries pre- and post-interventional procedure and to assess the clinical efficacy in Gnaves' disease. Methods: 11 from 31 patients diagnosed as Graves' disease undertaken thyroid arteries embolization, were analyzed. Color Doppler sonography was applied to monitor the pre-and post- procedure thyroid size and diameters of thyroid arteries. Power Doppler was used to detect the Vmax, Vmin, RI and blood flow. Results: After thyroid arteries embolization, the size and vascularity of thyroids were reduced. The thyroid arteries showed shrinkage and stoppage blood flow at the embolized site. The changes of RI, blood parameters of Vmax, Vmin and diameters of the thyroid arteries pre- and post-procedure turned out to be statistically significant for clinical restriction. Conclusion: The color Doppler sonography plays an important role for preoperative diagnosis and predicting the prognosis

  1. Development of Grave's disease seven months after Hashimoto's thyroiditis: a rare occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Llerena, Wilfredo Eddy; Valderrabano-Wagner, Rodrigo J; Quevedo-Quevedo, Juan; Reyes-Ortiz, Luis M

    2010-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are two opposite poles in the spectrum of autoimmune thyroid disease. On one extreme, HT or Chronic Lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) courses, as its name implies, with lymphocytic infiltrates replacing thyroid follicles, resulting in a loss of hormone-producing cells and, thus, primary hypothyroidism. On the other extreme, GD is characterized by primary hyperthyroidism due to stimulating autoantibodies against thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors (TSHRs) localized on thyrocytes' membranes of intact thyroid follicles. The presence of HT after GD or the concomitant combination of these two autoimmune entities ending in HT-depending hypothyroid state is well known. However, occurrence of GD after primary hypothyroidism due to CLT is very rare since thyrocytes with their TSHRs are promptly lost. We report a case in which hyperthyroidism occurred seven months after presentation of primary hypothyroidism and discuss potential mechanisms involved.

  2. Peripheral blood T cell activation after radioiodine treatment for graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Weiping; Weetman, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis produces a rise in thyroid autoantibodies in the first three months after treatment, but little is known of its effects on T cells. We have therefore followed the changes in T cells subsets in sequential samples from 23 patients with Graves' disease treated with radioiodine, using dual-colour flow cytometry. In the first month after treatment there was a significant rise in activated T cells, identified by the markers HLA-DR (Ia) and CDW 26/Ta 1 (P<0.025 in both case). CD45RO-positive T cells, which are the prime population containing memory cells, also increased (P<0.025), but there was no change in CD45R-positive, resting cells or in the CD4/CD8 (helper to cytotoxic/suppressor) ratio. Vicia villosa-binding T cells, containing the contra-suppressor population, showed a more variable response, but the trend was to an overall increase from pre-treatment values (P<0.025). The change did not appear to be related to antithyroid drugs treatment, since they were seen irrespective of whether patients convinced such therapy. These results suggest that T cell activation and enhanced contra-suppressor activity may in part be responsible for the rise in autoantibodies after radioiodine therapy

  3. Peripheral blood T cell activation after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Teng; Stark, R.; Borysiewicz, L.K.; Weetman, A.P. (Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge Clinical School, Level 5, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (UK)); Munro, A.J. (Department of Clinical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); McHardy Young, S. (Department of Medicine, Central Middlesex Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis produces a rise in thyroid autoantibodies in the first three months after treatment, but little is known of its effects on T cells. We have therefore followed the changes in T cell subsets in sequential samples from 23 patients with Graves' disease treated with radioiodine, using dualcolour flow cytometry. In the first month after treatment there was a significant rise in activated T cells, identified by the markers HLA-DR(la) and CDw26/Tal (p<0.025 in both cases). CD45RO-positive T cells, which are the primed population containing memory cells, also increased (p<0.025), but there was no change in CD45R-positive, resting T cells or in the CD4 to CD8 (helper to cytotoxic/suppressor) ratio. Vicia villosa-binding T cells, containing the contrasuppressor population, showed a more variable response, but the trend was to an overall increase from pre-treatment values (p<0.025). The changes did not appear to be related to antithyroid drug treatment, since they were seen irrespective of whether patients continued such therapy. These results suggest that T cell activation and enhanced contrasuppressor activity may in part be responsible for the rise in autoantibodies after radioiodine. The T cell changes could also contribute to the worsening of ophthalmopathy seen in some radioiodine-treated patients. (author).

  4. [Particular evolution of the thyroid state in Grave's disease: two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Néjib; Khairi, Karima; Hadj Ali, Inçaf; Turki, Sami; Ben Maïz, Hédi

    2003-09-01

    We report two cases of Grave's disease (GD) caracterized by the succession of hypothyroid and hyperthyroid states. Case 1: A 32 years old woman, has presented initially a typical GD with hyperthyroidism. Grave's ophtalmopathy and homogenous goiter. Four months later, she presented a spontaneous hypothyroidism necessiting treatment with thyroxine and a severe myasthenia gravis. More later (6 months), she experienced symptoms of hyperthyroidism after thymectomy. The level of anti-thyrotropin-receptor antibodies (TSab) was very high (141 UI/I, NV < 10). Case 2: A 29 years old woman has been treated by thyroxine (150 microg/day) for a primary hypothyroidism. Ten months later, she presented symptoms of hyperthyroidism even after stoppage of thyroxine. TSH value was decreased (TSH < 0.05 microU/ml) and FT4 level was raised (FT4 = 25.5 pmol/l). The thyroid antibodies were positive. We discuss, after review of the litterature, the physiopathological mecanisms of these changes in the thyroid state, particularly the role of the blocking and stimulating anti-thyrotropin-receptor antibodies.

  5. Graves' Disease as a Manifestation of Immune Reconstitution in HIV-Infected Individuals after Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Samad Rasul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in certain HIV-1-infected individuals has been described as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. This phenomenon should be suspected in individuals who present with clinical deterioration and a presentation suggestive of hyperthyroidism despite good virological and immunological response to HAART. Signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism may be discrete or overt and typically develop 8–33 months after initiating therapy. One to two percent of HIV-infected patients can present with overt thyroid disease. Relatively few cases of Graves' IRIS have been reported in the literature to date. We describe four cases of Graves' IRIS in HIV-infected patients who were started on HAART therapy.

  6. Prediction of remission in Graves' disease after thionamide therapy by technetium-99m early uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misaki, Takashi; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Koh, Toshikiyo; Shimbo, Shin-ichiro (Kyoto City Hospital, Kyoto (Japan)); Hidaka, Akinari; Iida, Yasuhiro; Kasagi, Kanji; Konishi, Junji

    1991-02-01

    In the clinical management of Graves' thyrotoxicosis, one of the most important subject is when to stop antithyroid drugs after achieving an euthyroid state. T{sub 3} suppression test and other methods have been used to forecast the outcome after drug cessation, but the results were not always satisfactory. We have attempted to predict remission of Graves' disease by single measurement of early technetium uptake without administration of triiodothyronine. Drugs were discontinued in the seventy-five patients with Graves' disease on maintenance doses of either methimazole or propylthiouracil who showed normalized uptake (4.0% or less). Of 64 patients evaluable after twelve months, 55 (86%) remained euthyroid, 8 relapsed, and 1 became hypothyoid. With its accuracy in prediction of short-term remission comparable or superior to T{sub 3} suppression test, this rapid and simple method seemed suitable for routine use in clinical practice. (author).

  7. The effect of 131I on apoptosis of thyrocytes in patients with Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Min; Li Xianfeng; Feng Xiaoyan; Chen Haibin; Liu Jianzhong; Zhao Deshan; Li Sijin; He Zouxiang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of 131 I on apoptosis of thyrocytes in patients with Graves disease. Methods: Forty-seven patients with Graves disease were divided into two groups, two week group (G 2w ) and four week group (G 4w ). All patients underwent thyroid needle biopsy before 131 I treatment and the repeated biopsy at two weeks (G 2w ) or four weeks (G 4w ) after 131 I treatment. The positive units of pro-apoptotic proteins (Fas, FasL) and anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2) were studied with immunohistochemistry staining. The differences of the two groups were compared with t-test. Liner correlation analysis was applied to study the correlation between 131 I dose and apoptosis-related proteins and that between serum sTSH after 131 I treatment and apoptosis-related proteins. Results: Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 expression (positive units) were significantly increased in both groups after 131 I treatment, G 2w :22.84±9.31 vs 16.20±6.75, 21.13±6.29 vs 14.56±4.06, 21.69±7.83 vs 15.22±5.94, t=-3.08, -3.73, -4.05 (all P 4w : 21.69±4.52 vs 15.83±5.03, 19.11±3.75 vs 14.02±4.98, 19.06±3.44 vs 16.63±4.73, t =-5.26, -5.00, -2.41 (all P 2w and G 4w (t =0.53, 0.82, 1.46, all P>0.05). Significant correlation was found between 131 I 0.727, r FasL =0.763 (both P Bcl-2 =- 0.094, 0.102(both P > 0.05). There were significant correlation between serum sTSH three months after 131 I treatment and apoptosis-related proteins, r Fas = 0.433, r FasL = 0. 601, r Bcln2 = - 0.397, (all P 131 I can induce thyrocytes to express the pro-apoptotic proteins in patients with Graves disease. (authors)

  8. The assessment of adverse events of radioactive iodine therapy in patients with Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaeva, Olga; Dreval, Alexander; Chikh, Irina

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the adverse events of RAI in patients with Graves disease. Study design: have analyzed the data of 42 patients (33 women, 9 men, median age 46,6 years) with Graves disease without thyroid ophthalmopathy, who were treated with RAI to control thyrotoxicosis. Radioiodine dose was determent individually and was taken into consideration of goiter volume and turnover of 13 21I. Patients received one dose of 131 I - median 10,2 (from 2,0 to 34,1 m #N-tilde# i). We asked the patients to fill questionnaire of sings and symptoms about their complaints after treatment. Results: The most frequent adverse events after radioiodine treatment were: fallout hair - in 31%, headache - in 28,5%, muscle pain - in 24,0%, edema of upper and lower eyelids - in 20,0%, pain in joints - in 19,0%, pain in thyroid gland - in 14,0%. Other adverse events were determent rarer: pain in eyeballs - 12,0%, sensation of the pressure in eyeballs - in 12,0%, tension in the field of thyroid gland - in 9,5%, muscle compactions - in 9,5%, diplopia - in 7,1%, deterioration of concomitant chronic diseases - in 7,1%, pain in hypochondrium- in 7,1%, heartburn - in 7,1%, weakness in legs- in 4,8%, dryness skin cover -in 2,4%, sleeplessness - in 2,4%. All adverse events were not serious, were nor demand of administration of special treatment and ended in 5 days after using of radioactive iodine. Conclusion: Radioactive iodine treatment does not entail of significant deterioration of condition of the patients. (author)

  9. Dry eye disease as an inflammatory disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonge, Margarita; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Amalia; Diebold, Yolanda; González-García, María J; Reinoso, Roberto; Herreras, José M; Corell, Alfredo

    2010-08-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a prevalent inflammatory disorder of the lacrimal functional unit of multifactorial origin leading to chronic ocular surface disease, impaired quality of vision, and a wide range of complications, eventually causing a reduction in quality of life. It still is a frustrating disease because of the present scarcity of therapies that can reverse, or at least stop, its progression. A comprehensive literature survey of English-written scientific publications on the role of inflammation in DED. New investigations have demonstrated that a chronic inflammatory response plays a key role in the pathogenesis of human DED. Additionally, correlations between inflammatory molecules and clinical data suggest that inflammation can be responsible for some of the clinical symptoms and signs. Research efforts to clarify its pathophysiology are leading to a better understanding of DED, demonstrating that inflammation, in addition to many other factors, plays a relevant role.

  10. Detection of erythrovirus B19 in thyroidectomy specimens from Graves' disease patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Cyril; Hoffmann, Thomas Walter; Benzerdjeb, Nassim; Duverlie, Gilles; Sevestre, Henri; Desailloud, Rachel

    2013-08-01

    Environmental factors, such as viruses, are thought to contribute to the development of thyroid autoimmunity. Erythrovirus B19 (EVB19) is suspected to be involved in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, but no direct evidence is available concerning the role of EVB19 infection in Graves' disease. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the presence of EVB19 is more frequent in thyroidectomy specimens of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves' disease (cases) than for multinodular thyroid (controls). Serum and thyroidectomy specimens were prospectively collected from 64 patients referred for total thyroidectomy over a 5-year period (2007-2011) and were investigated retrospectively and blindly for circulating EVB19 DNA by q-PCR (Qiagen), and for EVB19 thyrocyte infection by immunochemistry (VP2-Antibody, Dako). EVB19 serology was also determined. General clinical and laboratory data were collected. Twenty patients were referred for Graves' disease and 44 patients were referred for non-autoimmune multinodular thyroid. Patients with thyroid cancer were excluded. Ten percent of Graves' disease patients and 27.7% of control patients had positive staining of thyrocytes for EVB19 antibodies (ns). EVB19-positive and EVB19-negative cases did not differ. EVB19-positive controls were older than EVB19-negative controls (mean age: 57.5 [35-74] vs. 45 [28-80] years, P=0.03) No case of acute EVB19 infection was identified. EVB19-positive serology was more frequent in controls than in Graves' disease patients (88% vs. 45%, PGraves' disease patients than in controls. Further studies are needed to determine the role of EVB19 infection in thyroid diseases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Dosimetric comparison between fixed and individualized activity in Graves' disease treatment with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melgar Perez, J.; Orellana Salas, A.; Santaella Guardiola, Y.; Arrocha Acevedo, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    A patient-especific method has been used to calculate the therapeutic 1 '3 1 I activity to administer to patients with Graves disease in order to obtain the optimal thyroid dose. The aim of this study was to analyze the dose variation in contrast to the fixed a ctivity regimen. In 30 patients, biokinetic and morfological parameters were estimated from planar scintigraphic images obtained at 4, 24 and 96 hours after injection of 123 I and 131 I activities were calculated to deliver 120 Gy to the thyroid. Comparative dose calculations were carried out assuming that the individual patients had been treated according to 370 MBq activity administration. Activity (or dose) was reduced by an average factor of 2.4 and up to a factor 4.9 for an individual patient. The implemen ted method seeks a balance among the accuracy of the calculations, resource consumption and patient comfort. (Author)

  12. Early prediction of hypothyroidism following 131I treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.; McKillop, J.H.; Jenkins, C.; Thomson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold. Firstly to assess the post treatment predictive value of various biochemical and immunological tests for early hypothyroidism after 131 I therapy of Graves' disease, and secondly to determine whether or not pretreatment with Carbimazole protects against post treatment hypothyroidism. The early changes observed in serum T 3 , T 4 , TSH, thyroid microsomal and thyroglobulin antibody levels were found to be of no predictive value. A sharp rise, around 2 months, in TRAb levels following 131 I therapy indicated that hypothyroidism was likely to occur. This rise was thought to reflect a greater degree of thyroid damage. Lower levels of thyroglobulin in patients who had become hypothyroid by 12 months after treatment would support this view. Five weeks Carbimazole pretreatment in this relatively small group of patients did not appear to protect against hypothyroidism. (orig.)

  13. Systemic adverse events following rituximab therapy in patients with Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, D; Nielsen, C H; Junker, P

    2010-01-01

    had the third highest increase in immunoglobulin deposition on monocytes by day 14. The arthralgias persisted in two of the patients, despite glucocorticoid rescue therapy. Conclusions: We report articular adverse events in three and gastrointestinal symptoms in two out of ten GD patients who received...... methimazole only. Adverse events were recorded, and the presence of circulating immune complexes (CICs) was measured as IgG, IgM and complement component 3 (C3) depositing on normal monocytes following incubation with patient plasma. Results: Five patients had benign infusion-related adverse events at first......Background and aim: Rituximab (RTX) therapy has shown promising results in Graves´ disease (GD), with or without ophthalmopathy. We examined the occurrence of adverse events in GD patients treated with RTX. Subjects and methods: Ten patients received RTX and methimazole, while ten patients received...

  14. Myopathy Associated with Acute Hypothyroidism following Radioiodine Therapy for Graves Disease in an Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivkees ScottA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe acute myopathy following I-131 treatment for hyperthyroidism due to Graves Disease (GD in an adolescent. A 15 year-old diagnosed with GD required treatment with radioactive iodine (I-131 therapy. Six weeks post I-131, he developed generalized muscle cramps. The CK was 19.800 U/L, the total thyroxine was 2.3 mcg/dL (29.6 nmol/L SI and the estimated free thyroxine (EFT was 0.5 ng/dL (6.4 pmol/L SI. The ALT was 112 U/L and AST was 364 U/L (normal

  15. The effect of dexamethasone on thyrocytes from patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yaping; Wang Jialin

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) on thyrocytes of patients with Graves' Disease (GD), thyrocytes from GD were cultured in the presence of 10 -6 -10 -2 mol/L DEX. the growth of thyrocyte was measured by MTT method. Apoptosis, Fas expression were detected by Tunnel method and S-P method respectively. The result showed that 1) DEX in 10 -6 -10 -2 mol/L could kill the thyrocytes directly in time dependently. 2) Apoptosis and fas expression of thyrocyte cultured with DEX were significantly increased. 3) The rate of apoptosis was positively correlated with Fas expressions level. This results suggest that DEX can regulate the functions of thyroid by killing thyrocytes directly and inducing thyroid apoptosis

  16. Graves' Disease Mechanisms: The Role of Stimulating, Blocking, and Cleavage Region TSH Receptor Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, S. A.; Davies, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    The immunologic processes involved in Graves' disease (GD) have one unique characteristic – the autoantibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) – which have both linear and conformational epitopes. Three types of TSHR antibodies (stimulating, blocking, and cleavage) with different functional capabilities have been described in GD patients, which induce different signaling effects varying from thyroid cell proliferation to thyroid cell death. The establishment of animal models of GD by TSHR antibody transfer or by immunization with TSHR antigen has confirmed its pathogenic role and, therefore, GD is the result of a breakdown in TSHR tolerance. Here we review some of the characteristics of TSHR antibodies with a special emphasis on new developments in our understanding of what were previously called “neutral” antibodies and which we now characterize as autoantibodies to the “cleavage” region of the TSHR ectodomain. PMID:26361259

  17. Increased macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Eriko; Sekiya, Akiko; Hayashi, Tomoe; Kadohira, Yasuko; Maekawa, Mio; Yamazaki, Masahide; Asakura, Hidesaku; Nakao, Shinji; Ohtake, Shigeki

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have found markedly elevated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with Graves' disease (GD). We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in GD. We assayed concentrations of M-CSF in sera from 32 patients with GD (25 untreated; 7 receiving thiamazole therapy). We also studied 32 age-matched healthy subjects as controls. Relationships between serum M-CSF and both thyroid state and serum lipids were examined. Moreover, to examine the effect of thyroid hormone alone on serum M-CSF, T3 was administered orally to normal subjects. Serum concentrations of M-CSF in GD patients who were hyperthyroid were significantly increased compared with GD patients who were euthyroid (P oral T3 administered to 15 volunteers for 7 days produced significant increases in serum levels of M-CSF (P production of M-CSF in patients with GD.

  18. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with antithyroid drugs corrects mild neutropenia in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, N; Tee, S A; Saqib, W; Fretwell, T; Summerfield, G P; Razvi, S

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia secondary to antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy in Graves' disease (GD) is well recognized. However, the effect of hyperthyroidism, prior to and after ATD therapy, on neutrophil counts in patients with GD is unclear. To study the prevalence of neutropenia in newly diagnosed untreated GD and the effect of ATD on the neutrophil count. Prospective study from August 2010 to December 2014. Endocrinology outpatient clinic in a single centre. Consecutive patients (n = 206) with newly diagnosed GD. ATD therapy. Prevalence and factors predicting neutropenia (treatment with ATD and are related to reduction in thyroid hormone concentrations. It is therefore important to check neutrophil levels in newly diagnosed patients with GD prior to commencing ATD therapy as otherwise low levels may incorrectly be attributed to ATD therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The impact of graves' disease and its treatment on handwriting characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papi, Giampaolo; Botti, Cristina; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid hormones are crucial for metabolism in all tissues in humans, including the nervous system and muscles, and could thus affect handwriting, which is the synthesis of complex and fine movements. Hyperthyroidism, characterized by symptoms such as tremor and weakness, could affect...... handwriting, although this has not been studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate handwriting characteristics before and after therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease (GD). METHODS: Twenty-two patients (15 women, 7 men) with untreated GD (median age: 44 years; range: 20-70 years) were asked to write...... a "standard text" before and 12 months after being rendered euthyroid. The letters underwent a standardized detailed analysis by a handwriting expert, through inspection and stereoscopic microscope and magnifying glass. RESULTS: All patients demonstrated handwriting variations, perceptible even to direct...

  20. Onset of Graves' disease during pregnancy in a woman with established hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberiche, María; Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa María; López Mérida, Xabier; Wägner, Ana María

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy strongly influences the thyroid gland and its function. Thyroid guidelines recommend a 30 to 50% increase of the preconceptional levothyroxine dose in women with hypothyroidism, when pregnancy is diagnosed. A 33 year-old, 8-week pregnant woman with hypothyroidism, presents with a 2-week history of palpitations, sweating, nervousness and fatigue. Physical examination shows tachycardia (108 bpm), distal tremors and diffuse goiter. After biochemical confirmation of hyperthyroidism, her levothyroxine dose is reduced and finally interrupted. Propylthiouracil is started and maintained until after the delivery of a healthy baby at week 40. Two weeks postpartum, hyperthyroidism worsens and propylthiouracil is replaced by methimazole. Eighteen months after delivery 7.5 mCi 131Iodine was given. Two months later, hypothyroidism developed and levothyroxine was initiated. Although conversion of Hashimoto's hypothyroidism into Graves' disease is exceptional in pregnancy, pregnant women with autoimmune hypothyroidism should ideally have their TSH concentrations measured before empirically increasing their levothyroxine dose.

  1. Radioiodine uptake following iodine-131 therapy for Graves' disease: an early indicator of need for retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, W.R.; Gilliland, P.F.; Piziak, V.K.; Petty, F.C.; McConnell, B.G.; Verdonk, C.A.; Ibarra, J.D.; Thompson, J.Q.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-five patients with Graves' disease were studied prospectively to determine if 24-hour I-131 uptake measurements alone or in combination with serum thyroid hormone levels at six weeks would determine the necessity for retreatment of the thyrotoxicosis. All patients with an I-131 uptake greater than 30% at six weeks required retreatment. No patient with an I-131 uptake of less than 15% required retreatment. Patients with uptakes between 15% and 30% were variable. An elevated free thyroxin index at 6 weeks is not helpful to determine which patients will remain thyrotoxic. Patients with a free thyroxin index within the normal range at six weeks can be predicted to be euthyroid by 12 weeks if their 24-hour I-131 uptake is between 15% and 30% and to be hypothyroid if their 24-hour I-131 uptake is below 15%. There was no difference between patient groups treated initially with antithyroid medication and those who were not

  2. The use of lithium carbonate in the treatment of Graves' disease with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Yuguo; Chen Miao; Kuang Anren

    2004-01-01

    Lithium carbonate involving radioactive iodine uptake, goiter volume, thyroid hormone and applying range is reviewed briefly. Lithium may elongate the T 1/2 of iodine in thyroid gland, decrease 131 I dosage and enhance curative effect. Lithium carbonate inhibit iodine uptake and thyroid hormone synthesize, blocks the release of iodine and thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland, which lead to reduce the 131 I dosage the patients need and to decrease the surge of serum FT 3 and FT 4 levels caused by 131 I therapy. so lithium carbonate can alleviate the symptoms caused by 131 I treatment. For lithium carbonate can increase leucocyte amount, there are some merits with lithium carbonate in treating Graves' disease by 131 I. (authors)

  3. Insulin autoimmune syndrome induced by methimazole in a Korean girl with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia was detected in a 15-year-old girl due to loss of consciousness. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and was being treated with methimazole for the past 4 months. A paradoxically increased insulin levels was found when she suffered from the hypoglycemic episode. An imaging study showed no mass lesion in the pancreas, and insulin antibodies were found in the serum. She was diagnosed with insulin autoimmune syndrome. Her HLA typing was performed, and it revealed HLA-DRB1 *04:06. The patient was treated with a corticosteroid for 2 months. After discontinuing the steroid, the insulin antibody titer decreased dramatically, and she did not have any episode of hypoglycemia since. This is the first report of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a Korean girl, and we have revealed the connection between HLA type and insulin autoimmune syndrome in Korea.

  4. The influence of immunosuppressive treatment on the progression of Graves' disease after radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurca, T.; Pirnat, E.; Hojker, S.; Avcin, J.

    1994-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) for Graves' disease could produce a rise in autoimmune activity expressed as elevation of antibody against TSH receptors (TSI). In our retrospective study the influence of different immunosuppressive therapy on autoimmune activity was studied. Patients, treated with radioiodine or surgery for the first time, between January 1989 and March 1992 were included in the study, divided in the 5 groups (patients after thyroidectomy, and patients after RIT divided into groups according to treatment with different combinations of corticosteroids and cyclosporine A). Patients were examined and TT 4 , TT 3 TSH and TSI were collected before and 3, 6 and 9 months after treatment. There was no differences between groups before and according to the thyroid status the patients of all groups received antithyroid drugs or substitution therapy after the RIT or surgery. Immunosuppressive therapy was indicated because of Graves' ophthalmopathy. After surgery, the progressive fall of TSI and no relapses of the disease were stated. After first 3 months the situation was very similar in group of patients treated with cyclosporine A after RIT, later after the cessation of treatment, there were a slight elevation of TSI. In all other groups of patients after RIT there was a constant positive trend of TSI and the significant correlation was found between TSI before and after treatment. We conclude, that autoimmune response after RIT is a consequence of activity of T cells and therefore cyclosporine A could be taken in mind when we want to prevent it. Corticosteroids on the other hand had no such an effect. (author)

  5. The Natural History of Subclinical Hyperthyroidism in Graves' Disease: The Rule of Thirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyzhneuskaya, Sviatlana; Addison, Caroline; Tsatlidis, Vasileios; Weaver, Jolanta U; Razvi, Salman

    2016-06-01

    There is little information regarding the natural history of subclinical hyperthyroidism (SH) due to Graves' disease (GD). A prospective analysis was conducted of patients with SH due to GD between 2007 and 2013 with at least 12 months of follow-up. SH was diagnosed if serum thyrotropin (TSH) was below the laboratory reference range (0.4-4.0 mIU/L) and when thyroid hormones were normal. GD was confirmed by either a raised TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) level or uniform uptake on Technetium scan. Forty-four patients (89% female, 16% current smokers, and 5% with active Graves' orbitopathy) were diagnosed with SH due to GD. Over the follow-up period (median 32 months), approximately one third (34%) of the cohort progressed to overt hyperthyroidism, one third (34%) normalized their thyroid function, slightly less than one third (30%) remained in the SH state, while one person became hypothyroid. Multivariate regression analysis showed that older age and positive antithyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody status had a positive association with risk of progression to overt hyperthyroidism, with hazard ratios of 1.06 ([confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.10], p < 0.01) per year and 10.15 ([CI 1.83-56.23], p < 0.01), respectively, independent of other risk factors including, smoking, TRAb levels at diagnosis, and sex. A third each of patients with SH due to GD progress, normalize, or remain in the SH state. Older people and those with positive anti-TPO antibodies have a higher risk of progression of the disease. These novel data need to be verified and confirmed in larger cohorts and over longer periods of follow-up.

  6. Rescue pre-operative treatment with Lugol's solution in uncontrolled Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Falhammar, Henrik

    2017-05-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of hyperthyroidism. Three therapies have been used for decades: pharmacologic therapy, surgery and radioiodine. In case of adverse events, especially agranulocytosis or hepatotoxicity, pre-treatment with Lugol's solution containing iodine/potassium iodide to induce euthyroidism before surgery could be advocated, but this has rarely been reported. All patients hospitalised due to uncontrolled hyperthyroidism at the Karolinska University Hospital 2005-2015 and treated with Lugol's solution were included. All electronic files were carefully reviewed manually, with focus on the cause of treatment and admission, demographic data, and effects of iodine on thyroid hormone levels and pulse frequency. Twenty-seven patients were included. Lugol's solution had been chosen due to agranulocytosis in 9 (33%), hepatotoxicity in 2 (7%), other side effects in 11 (41%) and poor adherence to medication in 5 (19%). Levels of free T4, free T3 and heart rate decreased significantly after 5-9 days of iodine therapy (free T4 53-20 pmol/L, P  = 0.0002; free T3 20-6.5 pmol/L, P  = 0.04; heart rate 87-76 beats/min P  = 0.0007), whereas TSH remained unchanged. Side effects were noted in 4 (15%) (rash n  = 2, rash and vomiting n  = 1, swelling of fingers n  = 1). Thyroidectomy was performed in 26 patients (96%) and one was treated with radioiodine; all treatments were without serious complications. Treatment of uncontrolled hyperthyroidism with Lugol's solution before definitive treatment is safe and it decreases thyroid hormone levels and heart rate. Side effects were limited. Lugol's solution could be recommended pre-operatively in Graves' disease with failed medical treatment, especially if side effects to anti-thyroid drugs have occurred. © 2017 The authors.

  7. Results of a risk adapted and functional radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Neumann, V.; Staub, U.; Groth, P.; Kuenstner, H.; Schuemichen, C. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Aim of this study was to find out, if results of a functional orientated radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease could be optimized using a risk adopted dose concept. Patients, method: 351 patients with Graves' disease were treated for the first time between 11/97 and 8/01. The basic dose was 125 Gy, which was increased up to 250 Gy in a cumulative manner depending on clinical parameters (initial thyroid metabolism, thyroid volume, immunoreactivity). Two different methods of dosimetry were used. Occasional thyreostasis was withdrawn two days before the radioiodine test was started. Follow up was done on overage 8 {+-} 2,4 (4-17,2) months. TSH {>=}0,27 {mu}IU/mL confirmed as a measure of the success. Results: With improved pretherapeutic dosimetry and a mean target dose of 178 {+-} 31 Gy (n = 72) therapeutic success occurred in 66,7%, in 51,4% euthyreosis was restalled and in 15,3% of patients hypothyroidism was seen (TSH >4,20 {mu}IU/mL). With simplified pretherapeutic dosimetry and a mean target dose of 172 {+-} 29 Gy (n = 279) results were moderately impaired (63,8%, 40,1% and 23,7%). With increasing target dose therapeutic failure increased, as unsufficiently adopted risk factors for therapeutic failure turned out the initial thyroid metabolism, the TcTU(s) as the (h)TRAb titer. Conclusion: Functional orientated RIT can be optimized by including illness specific characteristics, principal limitations are a high initial thyroid metabolism, a large thyroid volume and a high (h)TRAb-titer. (orig.)

  8. Physiological and Metabolic Changes During the Transition from Hyperthyroidism to Euthyroidism in Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Chiaw-Ling; Lim, Adoree Yi Ying; Tan, Hong Chang; Kovalik, Jean-Paul; Tham, Kwang Wei; Bee, Yong Mong; Lim, Weiying; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Lai, Oi Fah; Chong, Mary Foong-Fong; Yen, Paul Michael

    2016-10-01

    The serum metabolomic profile and its relationship to physiological changes during hyperthyroidism and restoration to euthyroidism are not known. This study aimed to examine the physiological, adipokine, and metabolomic changes that occur when subjects with Graves' disease transition from hyperthyroidism to euthyroidism with medical treatment. Chinese women between 21 and 50 years of age and with newly diagnosed Graves' disease attending the endocrine outpatient clinics in a single institution were recruited between July 2012 and September 2014. All subjects were treated with thioamides to achieve euthyroidism. Clinical parameters (body weight, body composition via bioelectrical impedance analysis, resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient via indirect calorimetry, and reported total energy intake via 24 h food diary), biochemical parameters (thyroid hormones, lipid profile, fasting insulin and glucose levels), serum leptin, adiponectin, and metabolomics profiles were measured during hyperthyroidism and repeated in early euthyroidism. Twenty four Chinese women with an average age of 36.3 ± 8.6 years were included in the study. The average duration of treatment that was required to reach euthyroidism for these subjects was 38 ± 16.3 weeks. There was a significant increase in body weight (52.6 ± 9.0 kg to 55.3 ± 9.4 kg; p hyperthyroidism were noted. Serum metabolomics profile changes complemented the physiological changes observed during the transition from hyperthyroidism to euthyroidism. This study provides a comprehensive and integrated view of the changes in fuel metabolism and energy balance that occur following the treatment of hyperthyroidism.

  9. Non-invasive management of fetal goiter during maternal treatment of hyperthyroidism in Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembet, Arda; Eroglu, Derya; Kinik, Sibel Tulgar; Gurakan, Berkan; Kuscu, Esra

    2005-01-01

    There is an increased risk of fetal goiter in patients who have a history of Grave's disease and undergo propylthiouracil (PTU) treatment during pregnancy. In this report, we describe a case of a fetal goiter detected by antenatal ultrasound at the 26th week of gestation in a mother treated with PTU for Grave's disease. A 32 x 38 x 20 mm fetal goiter was detected, each lobe measured 30 x 18 x 18 mm and estimated volume was 10 cm3. Subsequently, fetal thyroid function was assessed by umbilical fetal blood sampling. Cord blood showed elevated serum TSH (40.2 mU/l) and normal concentrations of free T4 (9.5 pmol/l) and free T3 (2.6 pmol/l). There were no other ultrasonographic signs of fetal hypothyroidism. Based on the above findings, the mother's PTU dosage was reduced to 50 mg daily from a total of 150 mg and weekly ultrasonographic examinations were performed. Six weeks after the initial ultrasound, a complete regression of the fetal goiter was noted. At the 34th week of gestation, the patient was delivered due to intrauterine growth restriction and oligohydramnios and gave birth to a male, weighing 1,920 g. The newborn thyroid was not palpable and thyroid ultrasonography was normal. Cord blood TSH was normal (8.4 mU/l) and free T4 was within lower normal limit (9.03 pmol/l). Ten days later, newborn thyroid function was normal and the baby did well afterwards. In conclusion, after the evaluation of fetal thyroid status, selected cases with fetal goiter can be initially managed without intrauterine treatment. (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Cho

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n = 93 and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83 and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10. From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11. Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves' disease.

  11. Loss of integrity of thyroid morphology and function in children born to mothers with inadequately treated Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempers, Marlies J. E.; van Trotsenburg, A. S. Paul; van Rijn, Rick R.; Smets, Anne M. J. B.; Smit, Bert J.; de Vijlder, Jan J. M.; Vulsma, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Context: Central congenital hypothyroidism (CH-C) in neonates born to mothers with inadequately treated Graves' disease usually needs T-4 supplementation. The thyroid and its regulatory system have not yet been extensively studied after T-4 withdrawal, until we observed disintegrated thyroid glands

  12. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves' disease.

  13. Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins in Graves' disease with goitre growth, low thyroxine and increasing triiodothyronine during PTU treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Hansen, J M; Bech, K

    1984-01-01

    In 50 consecutive patients with Graves' disease treated with PTU, 7 (group 1) developed increasing goitre in spite of unmeasurable TSH. Thyroid variables were compared with those from 10 controls with an ordinary response to PTU (group 2). Serum T4 decreased in group 1 from 246 +/- 47 nmol/l (mea...

  14. Migratory polyarthritis as an adverse effect of thiamazole use in a 13-year-old girl with Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janson, J.A.; Laat, P. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most prevalent cause of hyperthyroidism in children. The treatment commonly involves antithyroid therapy using a thionamide. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl with the antithyroid arthritis syndrome, presenting as a migratory polyarthritis, after the initiation of

  15. Ablative doses of radioiodine show a high efficacy and safety in the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juri, A.; Pitoia, Fabian; Lopaczek, N.; Mana, D.; Niepomniscze, Hugo; El Tamer, Elias A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the frequency of healing and persistence/relapse of hyperthyroidism using two protocols of different 131 I doses in patients with Graves diseases, and to evaluate the presence of adverse effects observed in the patients after each of the protocols. (author) [es

  16. Ivermectin for onchocercal eye disease (river blindness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejere, Henry OD; Schwartz, Ellen; Wormald, Richard; Evans, Jennifer R

    2015-01-01

    Background It is believed that ivermectin (a microfilaricide) could prevent blindness due to onchocerciasis. However, when given to everyone in communities where onchocerciasis is common, the effects of ivermectin on lesions affecting the eye are uncertain and data on whether the drug prevents visual loss are unclear. Objectives The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ivermectin in preventing visual impairment and visual field loss in onchocercal eye disease. The secondary aim was to assess the effects of ivermectin on lesions affecting the eye in onchocerciasis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE (January 1950 to April 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 April 2012. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials with at least one year of follow-up comparing ivermectin with placebo or no treatment. Participants in the trials were people normally resident in endemic onchocercal communities with or without one or more characteristic signs of ocular onchocerciasis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. We contacted study authors for additional information. As trials varied in design and setting, we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. Main results The review included four trials: two small studies (n = 398) in which people with onchocercal infection were given one dose of ivermectin or placebo and followed up for one year; and two larger community-based studies (n = 4941) whereby all individuals in

  17. Eye diseases in Akon Payam, South Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lado L Sube

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence and causes of blindness and visual impairment among patients in Akon payam, Warrap State, South Sudan. Methods and materials: This was a cross-sectional study of 862 patients conducted at Akon in the period 18 – 31 September 2015. The Snellen E chart was used to measure visual acuity, and all patients had a basic eye examination. Their vision status was categorized according to the World Health Organization classification. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 22(IBM. Results: The age range of the study population was 3 - 86 years; 81.9% were aged 41-80 years. 50.8% were males and 49.2% were females. There were 1483 bilaterally blind eyes giving a prevalence of blindness of 86% (95% CI: 3.2497-3.3531 with prevalence of visual impairment of 3.9 %( 95% CI: 2.5001-3.0944. Cataract (59.7% was the commonest eye disease, followed by glaucoma (15.1%, corneal dystrophy (9.3%, allergic conjunctivitis (5.5%, corneal scar (1.9%, refractive errors(1.8% and others(6.7%. Among those who are blind cataract (66% was the major agent with females affected more than males .It was followed by glaucoma (16.7%, corneal dystrophy (10%, corneal scar(1.8% and the rest of agents(5.4%. The main age group affected by blindness was the 41- 80 years age group (87% and the least was below 20 years (1.1%. There was a strong association between age and sex with the causes of blindness. Conclusion: There was equal sex preponderance with more blindness in those aged 41 years or above. Cataract and glaucoma still remained major cause of blindness in this payam. More effort is needed by the government to reduce the burden of these diseases.

  18. A predictive mathematical model for the calculation of the final mass of Graves' disease thyroids treated with 131I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traino, Antonio C.; Di Martino, Fabio; Grosso, Mariano; Monzani, Fabio; Dardano, Angela; Caraccio, Nadia; Mariani, Giuliano; Lazzeri, Mauro

    2005-05-01

    Substantial reductions in thyroid volume (up to 70-80%) after radioiodine therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism are common and have been reported in the literature. A relationship between thyroid volume reduction and outcome of 131I therapy of Graves' disease has been reported by some authors. This important result could be used to decide individually the optimal radioiodine activity A0 (MBq) to administer to the patient, but a predictive model relating the change in gland volume to A0 is required. Recently, a mathematical model of thyroid mass reduction during the clearance phase (30-35 days) after 131I administration to patients with Graves' disease has been published and used as the basis for prescribing the therapeutic thyroid absorbed dose. It is well known that the thyroid volume reduction goes on until 1 year after therapy. In this paper, a mathematical model to predict the final mass of Graves' diseased thyroids submitted to 131I therapy is presented. This model represents a tentative explanation of what occurs macroscopically after the end of the clearance phase of radioiodine in the gland (the so-called second-order effects). It is shown that the final thyroid mass depends on its basal mass, on the radiation dose absorbed by the gland and on a constant value α typical of thyroid tissue. α has been evaluated based on a set of measurements made in 15 reference patients affected by Graves' disease and submitted to 131I therapy. A predictive equation for the calculation of the final mass of thyroid is presented. It is based on macroscopic parameters measurable after a diagnostic 131I capsule administration (0.37-1.85 MBq), before giving the therapy. The final mass calculated using this equation is compared to the final mass of thyroid measured 1 year after therapy administration in 22 Graves' diseased patients. The final masses calculated and measured 1 year after therapy are in fairly good agreement (R = 0.81). The possibility, for the physician, to decide a

  19. A predictive mathematical model for the calculation of the final mass of Graves' disease thyroids treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traino, Antonio C; Martino, Fabio Di; Grosso, Mariano; Monzani, Fabio; Dardano, Angela; Caraccio, Nadia; Mariani, Giuliano; Lazzeri, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    Substantial reductions in thyroid volume (up to 70-80%) after radioiodine therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism are common and have been reported in the literature. A relationship between thyroid volume reduction and outcome of 131 I therapy of Graves' disease has been reported by some authors. This important result could be used to decide individually the optimal radioiodine activity A 0 (MBq) to administer to the patient, but a predictive model relating the change in gland volume to A 0 is required. Recently, a mathematical model of thyroid mass reduction during the clearance phase (30-35 days) after 131 I administration to patients with Graves' disease has been published and used as the basis for prescribing the therapeutic thyroid absorbed dose. It is well known that the thyroid volume reduction goes on until 1 year after therapy. In this paper, a mathematical model to predict the final mass of Graves' diseased thyroids submitted to 131 I therapy is presented. This model represents a tentative explanation of what occurs macroscopically after the end of the clearance phase of radioiodine in the gland (the so-called second-order effects). It is shown that the final thyroid mass depends on its basal mass, on the radiation dose absorbed by the gland and on a constant value α typical of thyroid tissue. α has been evaluated based on a set of measurements made in 15 reference patients affected by Graves' disease and submitted to 131 I therapy. A predictive equation for the calculation of the final mass of thyroid is presented. It is based on macroscopic parameters measurable after a diagnostic 131 I capsule administration (0.37-1.85 MBq), before giving the therapy. The final mass calculated using this equation is compared to the final mass of thyroid measured 1 year after therapy administration in 22 Graves' diseased patients. The final masses calculated and measured 1 year after therapy are in fairly good agreement (R = 0.81). The possibility, for the physician, to

  20. Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging in Differentiation Between Graves' Disease and Painless Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Abd Allah, Sieza Samir; El-Said, Amr Abd El-Hamid

    2017-01-01

    To assess the role of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in differentiation between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis. A prospective study was conducted among 37 consecutive patients with untreated thyrotoxicosis (25 female and 12 male; mean age of 44 years) and 15 ageand sex-matched controls. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the thyroid gland was performed in patients and controls. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the thyroid gland was calculated and correlated with Tc-99m uptake and thyroid function tests of the patients. There was a significant difference in the ADC value of the thyroid gland between patients and the control group ( P =0.001). The mean ADC value of the thyroid gland in Graves' disease was 2.03±0.28×10 -3 mm 2 /sec, and in patients with painless thyroiditis 1.46±0.22×10 -3 mm 2 /sec, respectively. There was a significant difference in the ADC values between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis ( P =0.001). When the ADC value of 1.45×10 -3 mm 2 /sec was used as a threshold value for differentiating Graves' disease from painless thyroiditis, the best result was obtained with area under the curve of 0.934, accuracy of 83.8%, sensitivity of 95.8%, and specificity of 61.5%. The mean ADC value of the thyroid gland in patients positively correlated with serum TRAb and Tc-99m uptake ( r =0.57, P =0.001 and r =0.74, P =0.001, respectively). We concluded that ADC values of the thyroid gland can be used to differentiate Graves' disease from painless thyroiditis in patients with untreated thyrotoxicosis.

  1. Interferon-alpha-induced destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in a patient with chronic hepatitis C: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu Kyung; Choi, Young Sik; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Sang Uk

    2011-12-01

    Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) is a major clinical problem for patients receiving interferon-alpha (IFN-α) therapy. But, destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease associated with IFN-α therapy is very rarely reported. Herein, we report a rare case of pegylated IFN-α (pegIFN-α) induced destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in a patient with HCV infection. A 31-yr-old woman suffered from chronic active hepatitis C and was treated with pegIFN-α and ribavirin for 12 months. Results of a thyroid function test and autoantibody levels were normal before IFN-α therapy was initiated. Destructive thyrotoxicosis appeared seven months after the initiation of IFN-α therapy, followed by Graves' thyrotoxicosis two months after the cessation of therapy. The diagnoses of destructive thyroiditis and Graves' disease were confirmed by the presence of TSH receptor antibodies in addition to Tc-99m scintigraphy findings. The patient's antithyroglobulin antibody titer increased gradually during IFN-α therapy and remained weakly positive after IFN-α therapy was discontinued.

  2. The Evolving Role of Selenium in the Treatment of Graves' Disease and Ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas H. Duntas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease (GD and ophthalmopathy (GO are organ-specific autoimmune-inflammatory disorders characterized by a complex pathogenesis. The inflammatory process is dominated by an imbalance of the antioxidant-oxidant mechanism, increased production of radical oxygen species (ROS, and cytokines which sustain the autoimmune process and perpetuate the disease. Recently, selenium, which is a powerful antioxidant, has been successfully applied in patients with mild GO, slowing the progression of disease, decreasing the clinical activity score, and appreciably improving the quality of life. The mechanisms of selenium action are variable. The aim of this review is to summarize the actions of selenium in GD and GO. Selenium as selenocysteine is incorporated in selenoproteins, such as glutathione peroxidase which catalyzes the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and lipid hydroperoxide that are increasingly produced in hyperthyroidism. Moreover, selenium decreases the formation of proinflammatory cytokines, while it contributes, in synergy with antithyroid drugs, to stabilization of the autoimmune process in GD and alleviation of GO. It is now to be clarified whether enforced nutritional supplementation has the same results and whether prolonging selenium administration may have an impact on the prevention of disease.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Arguments for the prolonged use of antithyroid drugs in children with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Juliane; Carel, Jean-Claude

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder. It is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism, but is rare in children. Patients are initially managed with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), such as methimazole/carbimazole. A major disadvantage of treatment with ATD is the high risk of relapse, exceeding 70% of children treated for duration of 2 years, and the potential major side effects of the drug reported in exceptional cases. The major advantage of ATD treatment is that normal homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis may be restored, with periods of drug treatment followed by freedom from medical intervention achieved in approximately 40-50% of cases after prolonged treatment with ATD, for several years, in recent studies. Alternative ablative treatments such as radioactive iodine and, less frequently and mostly in cases of very high volume goiters or in children under the age of 5 years, thyroidectomy, performed by pediatric surgeons with extensive experience should be proposed in cases of non-compliance, intolerance to medical treatment or relapse after prolonged medical treatment. Ablative treatments are effective against hyperthyroidism, but they require the subsequent administration of levothyroxine throughout the patient's life. This review considers data relating to the prognosis for Graves' disease remission in children and explores the limitations of study designs and results; and the emerging proposal for management through the prolonged use of ATD drugs. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. Usefulness of Measuring Thyroid Stimulating Antibody at the Time of Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal for Predicting Relapse of Graves Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Kwon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHyperthyroidism relapse in Graves disease after antithyroid drug (ATD withdrawal is common; however, measuring the thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb at ATD withdrawal in order to predict outcomes is controversial. This study compared measurement of thyroid stimulatory antibody (TSAb and thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII at ATD withdrawal to predict relapse.MethodsThis retrospective study enrolled patients with Graves disease who were treated with ATDs and whose serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were normal after receiving low-dose ATDs. ATD therapy was stopped irrespective of TRAb positivity after an additional 6 months of receiving the minimum dose of ATD therapy. Patients were followed using thyroid function tests and TSAb (TSAb group; n=35 or TBII (TBII group; n=39 every 3 to 6 months for 2 years after ATD withdrawal.ResultsTwenty-eight patients (38% relapsed for a median follow-up of 21 months, and there were no differences in baseline clinical characteristics between groups. In the TSAb group, relapse was more common in patients with positive TSAb at ATD withdrawal (67% than patients with negative TSAb (17%; P=0.007. Relapse-free survival was shorter in TSAb-positive patients. In the TBII group, there were no differences in the relapse rate and relapse-free survivals according to TBII positivity. For predicting Graves disease relapse, the sensitivity and specificity of TSAb were 63% and 83%, respectively, whereas those of TBII were 28% and 65%.ConclusionTSAb at ATD withdrawal can predict the relapse of Graves hyperthyroidism, but TBII cannot. Measuring TSAb at ATD withdrawal can assist with clinical decisions making for patients with Graves disease.

  5. Usefulness of Measuring Thyroid Stimulating Antibody at the Time of Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal for Predicting Relapse of Graves Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyemi; Jang, Eun Kyung; Kim, Mijin; Park, Suyeon; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Tae Yong; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism relapse in Graves disease after antithyroid drug (ATD) withdrawal is common; however, measuring the thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) at ATD withdrawal in order to predict outcomes is controversial. This study compared measurement of thyroid stimulatory antibody (TSAb) and thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) at ATD withdrawal to predict relapse. Methods This retrospective study enrolled patients with Graves disease who were treated with ATDs and whose serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels were normal after receiving low-dose ATDs. ATD therapy was stopped irrespective of TRAb positivity after an additional 6 months of receiving the minimum dose of ATD therapy. Patients were followed using thyroid function tests and TSAb (TSAb group; n=35) or TBII (TBII group; n=39) every 3 to 6 months for 2 years after ATD withdrawal. Results Twenty-eight patients (38%) relapsed for a median follow-up of 21 months, and there were no differences in baseline clinical characteristics between groups. In the TSAb group, relapse was more common in patients with positive TSAb at ATD withdrawal (67%) than patients with negative TSAb (17%; P=0.007). Relapse-free survival was shorter in TSAb-positive patients. In the TBII group, there were no differences in the relapse rate and relapse-free survivals according to TBII positivity. For predicting Graves disease relapse, the sensitivity and specificity of TSAb were 63% and 83%, respectively, whereas those of TBII were 28% and 65%. Conclusion TSAb at ATD withdrawal can predict the relapse of Graves hyperthyroidism, but TBII cannot. Measuring TSAb at ATD withdrawal can assist with clinical decisions making for patients with Graves disease. PMID:27118279

  6. Prevalence of Eye Disease among Inmates of Ilesa Prison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In Nigeria, like many other developing countries where prisoners have restricted access to health care including eye health care, severe untreated eye disorders are common causes of ocular morbidity and blindness. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and pattern of eye disease among ...

  7. Aberrant Expression of miRNA and mRNAs in Lesioned Tissues of Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Qin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Abnormal microRNA (miRNA expression is found in many diseases including autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the role of miRNA regulation in Graves' disease (GD. Here, we simultaneously detected different expressions of miRNA and mRNAs in thyroid tissues via a high-throughput transcriptomics approach, known as microarray, in order to reveal the relationship between aberrant expression of miRNAs and mRNAs spectrum and GD. Methods: Totally 7 specimens of thyroid tissue from 4 GD patients and 3 controls were obtained by surgery for microarray analysis. Then, 30 thyroid specimens (18 GD and 12 controls were also collected for further validation by quantitative real-time PCR ( qRT-PCR . Results: Statistical analysis showed that the expressions of 5 specific miRNA were increased significantly while those of other 18 miRNA were decreased in thyroid tissue of GD patients (FC≥1.3 or≤0.77 and pConclusion: Our study highlights the possibility that miRNA-target gene network may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD and could provide new insights into understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of GD.

  8. Iodine-131 induced hepatotoxicity in previously healthy patients with Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhummon, Navina Priya; Tohooloo, Bhavna; Qu, Shen

    2013-01-01

    To describe the association of the rare and serious complication of liver toxicity in previously healthy Grave's disease (GD) patients after the treatment with radioactive iodine (131)I (RAI). We report the clinical, laboratory and pathologic findings of 2 cases of severe liver toxicity associated with the treatment with RAI in previously healthy patients with GD. Clinical examination and laboratory investigations excluded viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, granulomatous disease, primary biliary disease, extrahepatic biliary obstruction, and heart failure. Case 1: A previously healthy 52-years old man reportedly having a typical GD but following RAI treatment, concomitantly developed severe liver toxicity that required 1 week of treatment in hospital. Case 2: A previously healthy 34-years old woman is reported as having a typical GD but developed jaundice following RAI treatment that required several weeks of in hospital treatment in the hepato-biliary department. In both cases, the liver dysfunction resolved after intensive treatment with hepato-protective agents. In this report the therapeutic considerations as well as the pathogenetic possibilities are reviewed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the association observed, which is rare but may be severe and should be considered in any case of thyrotoxicosis where a liver dysfunction develops after the treatment with radioactive iodine (131)I.

  9. Eye diseases in children in jourdan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousa, A.M.V.; Suha, A.E.M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate eye diseases in children in Jordan and to see whether it is necessary to conduct a visual screening programme. Methods: The study was conducted between July 2010 and July 2012 at four Royal Medical Service hospitals located in northern, eastern, middle and southern parts of Jordan. Children aged (6-14 years) attending paediatric clinics for various reasons were enrolled. Ophthalmologic assessment included visual acuity and anterior and posterior segment examination. Patients with visual acuity of less than 20/20 underwent refraction under cyclopegia. Results: Of the 3200 children in the study ocular abnormalities were found in 366 (11.4%); 312 (9.8%) had visual acuity less than 20/20 in one or both eyes. Refractive error was seen in 286 (8.9%); while vernal catarrh was the second most common ocular abnormality with 51 (1.6%) patients followed by squint 16(0.5%). Four (0.12%) patients had severe visual impairment and one (0.03%) patient was blind. Conclusion: The prevalence of refractive error was high in school children in the study area. It is important to conduct a visual screening programme in early school years in order to prevent amblyopia. (author)

  10. A mild Grave's ophthalmopathy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbouda, Alessandro; Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Bruscolini, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid ophthalmopathy is a complication most commonly associated with Grave's disease. The disease course ranges from mild to severe, with severe cases resulting in major visual impairment. A complete ophthalmic examination in a 35-year-old secundigravida to 14 weeks of gestation presented to the hospital for a routine ophthalmological examination with eyelid retraction in the right eye was made. We studied the course of ocular disease through the gestation with orbit ecography and a 3T MRI. A diagnosis of Grave's Ophthalmopathy was made. This case presents an unusual course of the GD during pregnancy and a normal post-partum relapse, according to the Th1/Th2 balance. The frequent follow-up and the use of MRI allowed a prompt identification and complete control of the disease.

  11. Optimizing a single fixed dose of Iodine-131 in Graves' Disease (An Experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Kashmir is a Himalayan mountain state of India enclosed by high snow capped ridges of Pir Panjal Mountains at an average height of 4000-5000 meters above the sea level. For most of the 4 million inhabitants in this land locked valley, agriculture horticulture and handcrafts are the main source of income. Due to long and severe winters the terraced farming on the mountain slopes yield just a single crop of rice which is barely sufficient to meet the local needs of this staple diet. People are relatively poor with low annual per capita income. Goiter is endemic in the Valley of Kashmir. In a published report the overall prevalence of goiter among the school going children in Kashmir between the ages of 5 years is 45.2% (+ SEM) with urinary iodine excretion of 49 + 3.55 μg per gram of creatinine. The extremely shy people of Kashmir are casual towards the aesthetic aspects of their goiters but nevertheless seek medical advice when associated with physical symptoms. In a published study of 203 patients of thyrotoxicosis from Kashmir, Graves' disease was the commonest cause, accounting for 63% of patients. One hundred and twentyone patients of Graves' disease were prospectively studied for their response to a single fixed dose of I-131. Patients were randomly treated with two different fixed doses of I- 131. Sixty four patients belonging to Group-I received a fixed dose of 185 MBq (Low Dose) and 57 patients belonging to Group -2 received 370 MBq (High Dose) of I- 131. Following therapy all patients were evaluated at 3 months. Patients with normal or reduced thyroid hormone levels were termed as responders and those with persistently elevated levels of thyroid hormone were termed as non responders. The response rates among the two groups were analyzed for their statistical significance. Patients treated with the high fixed dose of 370 MBq revealed good response to therapy achieving a rate of 91.22%, while the response rate in the group of patients treated with

  12. Characterization of Regulatory B Cells in Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Lundy, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of regulatory B cells is IL-10 production, hence their designation as IL-10+ B cells. Little is known about the ability of self-antigens to induce IL-10+ B cells in Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), or other autoimmune disease. Here we pulsed purified B cells from 12 HT...... patients, 12 GD patients, and 12 healthy donors with the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) and added the B cells back to the remaining peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This procedure induced IL-10+ B-cell differentiation in GD. A similar tendency was observed in healthy donors...... and correlated with free T3 levels in GD patients. IL-10+ B cells from both patient groups displayed CD25 or TIM-1 more frequently than did those from healthy donors. B-cell expression of two surface marker combinations previously associated with regulatory B-cell functions, CD24hiCD38hi and CD27+CD43+, did...

  13. [Triggering role of emotional stress and childbirth. Unexpected occurrence of Graves' disease compared to 96 cases of Hashimoto thyroiditis and 97 cases of thyroid nodules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-du Pan, R C

    1998-07-01

    98 patients with Graves' disease have been compared to 95 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and to 97 patients with benign thyroid nodules (control group) in order to evaluate the triggering role of major stressors and pregnancy in the occurrence of autoimmune thyroid diseases. A stress factor has been encountered in 11% cases of Graves' disease and in 6% of Hashimoto's and thyroid nodes (chi 2 test, not different). Graves' disease occurred after a pregnancy in 25% of the women in child bearing age versus 10% of the cases of Hashimoto's (p thyroid nodes. The role of stressors, if any, in triggering Graves' disease seems to be weak and dubious compared to the role of pregnancy and post-partum. It is assumed that the decrease of immunosuppressive hormones occurring after stress or delivery could induce a rebound autoimmune reaction responsible for the thyroid disease. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, stress and pregnancies do not seem to have any triggering role.

  14. Gene Map of the HLA Region, Graves' Disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis, and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazuki, Takehiko; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Morishima, Satoko; Morishima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genomic region spanning about 4 Mb is the most gene dense and the polymorphic stretches in the human genome. A total of the 269 loci were identified, including 145 protein coding genes mostly important for immunity and 50 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Biological function of these ncRNAs remains unknown, becoming hot spot in the studies of HLA-associated diseases. The genomic diversity analysis in the HLA region facilitated by next-generation sequencing will pave the way to molecular understanding of linkage disequilibrium structure, population diversity, histocompatibility in transplantation, and associations with autoimmune diseases. The 4-digit DNA genotyping of HLA for six HLA loci, HLA-A through DP, in the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) identified six susceptible and three resistant HLA alleles. Their epistatic interactions in controlling the development of these diseases are shown. Four susceptible and one resistant HLA alleles are shared by GD and HT. Two HLA alleles associated with GD or HT control the titers of autoantibodies to thyroid antigens. All these observations led us to propose a new model for the development of GD and HT. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donor (UR-HSCT) provides a natural experiment to elucidate the role of allogenic HLA molecules in immune response. Large cohort studies using HLA allele and clinical outcome data have elucidated that (1) HLA locus, allele, and haplotype mismatches between donor and patient, (2) specific amino acid substitution at specific positions of HLA molecules, and (3) ethnic background are all responsible for the immunological events related to UR-HSCT including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, and graft failure. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes of serum levels of some relevant cytokine (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α) after antithyroid treatment in patients with graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiaohua; Jiang Boyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of antithyroid treatment on the changes of serum levels of IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-α in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured with RIA in 30 patients with Graves' disease (both before and after treatment with antithyroid drug) and 30 controls. Results: Before treatment serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Changes of serum IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-α levels might be important in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. (authors)

  16. Quality of life assessment in patients with Graves' disease and progressive infiltrative ophthalmopathy during combined treatment with methylprednisolone and orbital radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulig, G.; Andrysiak-Mamos, E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess quality of life (QoL) in patients with infiltrative form of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) during the combined pulse treatment with methylprednisolone and orbital radiotherapy, and also to search for the relation between the results of ophthalmopathy treatment and changes in QoL. Material and methods: The study involved 29 patients aged 25-74 (the mean age: 52 ±6 years) with infiltrative form of GO. They were classified for ophthalmopathy treatment on the basis of the following factors: the obtained euthyreosis, progressive character of eye changes, the level of eye changes determined on the basis of NO SPECS classification (at least class 3c), ophthalmopathy index (OI) according to Donaldson. 4. GO was diagnosed as active if CAS (clinical activity score) . 4. During the treatment, the patients received 6 cycles of methylprednisolone sodium succinate in doses of 1,0 g/24 h given as one-hour-long intravenous infusions for three successive days in a week. Between the 2 nd and 4 th cycle of Solu-Medrol, orbital radiotherapy with 10 MeV X-rays was performed. The control group was made up of healthy volunteers selected with regard to sex, age, educational background and nicotine addiction so as they corresponded with the study group. It involved 53 individuals aged 21-75 (the mean age: 52,4 ±14 years). QoL was assessed by means of the MOS SF-36 estionnaire. Results: Patients with GO evaluated their QoL lower than healthy individuals, which referred to physical functioning, physical and emotional role functioning, general health, vitality, social functioning, mental health and bodily pain. No correlation was found between quality of life and such factors as age, sex, or duration time of Graves disease and ophthalmopathy. Analogically, no relation was observed between the activity and stage of clinical development of eye changes and QoL. The use of the combined GO therapy contributed to a considerable decrease in the

  17. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease; Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge < 3,5 {mu}Sv/h at 2 m). An adjuvant treatment with cortisone is recommended in a simultaneous endocrine ophthalmopathy to prevent from deterioration. Radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is cost effective with a low probability of side-effects and is not associated with an increased genetic or somatic risk. Therapy control and life span follow up has to be carried out by the expert physician legally responsible for the radioiodine therapy. (orig.) [German] Die Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow wird in Deutschland, bei Patienten aelter als 20 Jahre, erst nach mindestens einjaehriger, erfolgloser thyreostatischer Therapie, bei Thyreostatikaunvertraeglichkeit, Rezidiven nach Operation und kleinen Strumen durchgefuehrt. Die Beseitigung der Hyperthyreose wird mit einem ablativen Dosiskonzept (300 Gy) in > 90%, verbunden mit einer Hypothyreoserate von ebenfalls > 90% erreicht. Prognostisch unguenstige Einflussfaktoren sind eine zu niedrig gewaehlte Herddosis und/oder eine begleitende Thyreostase. Aus Gruenden der Qualitaetssicherung und des Strahlenschutzes muss in Deutschland die Radiojodtherapie stationaer als Einzeittherapie durchgefuehrt werden. Die

  18. The role of imaging in Graves' disease: A cost-effectiveness analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, C. [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Internal Medicine and Endocrinology Unit, University of Brescia (Italy)], E-mail: cappelli@med.unibs.it; Pirola, I.; De Martino, E.; Agosti, B.; Delbarba, A.; Castellano, M.; Rosei, E. Agabiti [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Internal Medicine and Endocrinology Unit, University of Brescia (Italy)

    2008-01-15

    According to many guidelines, scintigraphy remains the first suggested diagnostic procedure in hyperthyroid patients in spite of the widespread availability of ultrasounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of sonography versus scintigraphy in the management of Graves's disease, and to assess ultrasound features suggesting cancer in detecting thyroid nodules. Among 1470 hyperthyroid patients evaluated in our department from 2002 to 2005, 426 (29%) had Graves' disease: echographic and scintigraphic features were not suggestive of GD in 20/426 (4.8%) and 11/426 (2.6%) patients, respectively (p = 0.763), even if one of the two procedures was almost always diagnostic. Ultrasound identified 68/426 (16%) patients with a concomitant solid lesion, while scintigraphy detected only 9/426 (2.1%) 'cold' nodules (p < 0.001). Thyroid cancer was diagnosed in 30/68 (47.7%) patients. Malignancy presented at ultrasound investigation blurred margins (26.7% versus 15.8%), microcalcifications (33.3% versus 28.9%) and an anteroposterior and transverse diameter ratio {>=}1 (73.3% versus 71.1%); more frequently than benign nodules, but this was not statistically significant. The total cost to obtain a diagnosis by ultrasound was Euro 14645.34 ( Euro 13312.5 for echography + Euro 1332.84 for scintigraphy in the 29 patients 'negative' at echographic evaluation for GD) versus Euro 19922.71 by scintigraphy ( Euro 19578.96 for scan + Euro 343.75 for ultrasounds in the 11 patients 'negative' at scintigraphy). Our data show no difference in terms of diagnosis between sonography and scintigraphy. Indeed, scintigraphy was less sensitive in detecting nodules (often of malignant nature) than ultrasound, and, moreover, with a consequent increase of the direct cost of nodule management when scintigraphy is the first line procedure. In conclusion, according to our results, we suggest that ultrasounds with color-Doppler evaluation should

  19. The grave necessity to make eye bank specular microscopy mandatory in all eye banks in the subcontinent to improve utilization of scarce donor corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadeja, Jagruti N; Patel, Bharati D; Shanbhag, Swapna S

    2013-12-01

    Donor tissue scarcity, Eye Bank Specular Microscopy as yet not made mandatory and tissue utilization often based on clinical judgment only. Prospectively analyze alteration in clinical grading of donor corneas and hence utilization, based on Eye Bank Specular Microscopy (EBSM) and to infer if EBSM should be mandatory in all eye banks. 200 consecutive otherwise 'suitable for surgery' donor eyes were graded clinically. On quantitative and qualitative analysis of endothelial cells by EBSM, final grading was adjusted. Impact on subsequent utilization for various surgeries was analyzed with regard to Age of Donor, Death to Enucleation Time, Death to Preservation Time and Lens Status of Donor Eye. 76 eyes (38%) (P 60 years showed CD >= 2500. From donor >=81 years, 2/13 (15.3%) eyes showed CD between 2501-3000 and 1 (7.6%) eye showed CD > 3000. Owing to better grading after EBSM, 13/14 (92.85%) tissues with DTET >6 hours and 5/5 (100%) tissues with DTPT > 16 hours were transplanted. Out of 45 (22.5%) pseudo-phakic tissues, 21 (46.67%) tissues were used for Therapeutic/Tectonic Penetrating Keratoplasty (PKP) while 24 (53.33%) tissues were used for Optical PKP. EBSM significantly alters final grading of tissues and its subsequent utilization. Acquiring huge importance in areas where adequate supply of corneas is lacking, EBSM becomes an indispensable tool for optimizing availability of qualified tissues for surgery. EBSM should be made a mandatory analysis.

  20. Indigenous practices among Palestinians for healing eye diseases and inflammations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rabia, Aref

    2005-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the state health services in general, and eye care in particular for Palestinian Arabs under the British Mandate (1917-1948). The paper will also discuss the environmental and cultural origins of the prevalence of eye diseases among Palestinian Arabs. The second part of the research describes in detail indigenous practices of traditional medicine for healing trachoma and other eye diseases, inflammation that were prevalent in Mandatory Palestine.

  1. Dry Eye Disease and Microbial Keratitis: Is There a Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Srihari; Redfern, Rachel L.; Miller, William L.; Nichols, Kelly K.; McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Dry eye is a common ocular surface disease of multifactorial etiology characterized by elevated tear osmolality and inflammation leading to a disrupted ocular surface. The latter is a risk factor for ocular surface infection, yet overt infection is not commonly seen clinically in the typical dry eye patient. This suggests that important innate mechanisms operate to protect the dry eye from invading pathogens. This article reviews the current literature on epidemiology of ocular surface infection in dry eye patients and laboratory-based studies on innate immune mechanisms operating at the ocular surface and their alterations in human dry eye and animal models. The review highlights current understanding of innate immunity in dry eye and identifies gaps in our knowledge to help direct future studies to further unravel the complexities of dry eye disease and its sequelae. PMID:23583043

  2. Comprehensive analysis of the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurring in patients with Graves' disease after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Jian; Wang Peng; Zhang Lijuan; He Yajing; Wang Renfei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To make a comprehensive analysis of the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurring in patients with Graves' disease after 131 I treatment. Methods: The information of 131 I treated Graves' disease was collected including general data, clinical observation, laboratory data, thyroid function test, etc. Then a retrospective statistical analysis was carried out, using cluster analysis, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, multivariate regression analysis, etc. Results: 1) Cluster analysis and factor analysis showed that among clinical observation such as clinical course, treatment course, patients' state and disease occurrance, the first three factors correlated highly; among laboratory data such as thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb), thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb), both the first two and the last two correlated highly, each two factors had the similar effect. 2) Fsher discriminant analysis showed that among the thyroid weight, the effective half life, the maximum 131 I uptake percentage, total dose of 131 I and the average dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid, the last one had the most predicting value for incidence of early hypothyroidism. 3) Logistic regression analysis showed that among all the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurred after 131 I treated Graves' disease, thyroid weight, average dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid, the maximum 131 I uptake percentage and the level of TSI were effective factors. Conclusions: The occurrence of early hypothyroidism for 131 I-treated Graves' disease is probably affected by many factors. If more factors are taken into consideration before therapy and the theraputic dose is well adjusted accordingly, it can reduce the incidence of early hypothroidism to a certain extent. (authors)

  3. Prediction of response to medical therapy by serum soluble (pro)renin receptor levels in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Yuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Kimura, Shihori; Takano, Noriyoshi; Yamashita, Kaoru; Seki, Yasufumi; Bokuda, Kanako; Yatabe, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ando, Takashi; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Antithyroid drugs are generally selected as the first-line treatment for Graves' Disease (GD); however, the existence of patients showing resistance or severe side effects to these drugs is an important issue to be solved. The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is a multi-functional protein that activates the tissue renin-angiotensin system and is an essential constituent of vacuolar H+-ATPase, necessary for the autophagy-lysosome pathway. (P)RR is cleaved to soluble (s)(P)RR, which reflects the status of (P)RR expression. In this retrospective study, we aimed to investigate whether serum s(P)RR concentration can be used as a biomarker to predict the outcome of antithyroid drug treatment in GD patients. Serum s(P)RR levels were measured in 54 untreated GD patients and 47 control participants. Effects of medical treatment with antithyroid drugs on these levels were investigated in GD patients. Serum s(P)RR levels were significantly higher in patients with Graves' disease than in control subjects (PGraves' disease. High serum s(P)RR levels were associated with resistance to antithyroid drug treatment, suggesting that serum s(P)RR concentration can be used as a useful biomarker to predict the outcome of antithyroid drug treatment in these patients. Patients with Graves' disease with low body mass index showed higher levels of serum soluble (pro)renin receptor levels than those with high body mass index. In addition, in patients with Graves' disease, serum triglyceride levels were negatively correlated with serum soluble (pro)renin receptor levels. All these data indicated an association between low nutrient condition due to hyperthyroidism and increased (pro)renin receptor expression in these patients, suggesting that (pro)renin receptor expression could be increased in the process of stimulating intracellular energy production via activating autophagy function to compensate energy loss.

  4. Thyrotropin receptor antibody activities significantly correlate with the outcome of radioiodine (131I) therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaise, Kazuro; Kaise, Nobuko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Koki; Yamamoto, Makiko; Sakurada, Toshiro; Saito, Shintaro; Yoshinaga, Kaoru

    1991-01-01

    The outcome of 131 I therapy for 109 patients with Graves' disease was analysed according to pretreatment laboratory data including thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) activities. Forty-five percent of patients became euthyroid, and 13% of patients became hypothyroid within one year after 131 I therapy. Forty-two percent of patients remained hyperthyroid one year after 131 I therapy. Pretreatment values for serum T 4 , T 3 , and the estimated weight of the thyroid were significantly higher in the hyperthyroid group. The mean for the TRAb index of the hyperthyroid group was significantly higher than that of the euthyroid group. Life table analysis revealed a significant effect of the TRAb index on the rate of hyperthyroidism after 3 months or later. These results appear to suggest that the TRAb index is one of the factors which influence the outcome of 131 I therapy for Graves' disease. (author)

  5. Clinical significance of determination of serum and urine β2-microglobulin (β2-m) in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Luhua; Mai Mang; Ouyang Xiaoqing; Wang Shuhua; Lin Cen; Fang Linli

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the serum, urine contents of β 2 -m and serum thyroid hormones levels in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum, urine β 2 -m contents (with RIA), serum FT 3 , FT 4 levels (with CLIA), TGA, TMA positive rates (with RIA) were determined in 82 patients with Graves' disease both before and after treatment as well as in 40 controls. Results: The serum and urine β 2 -m contents as well as the serum FT 3 , FT 4 levels in the 82 hyperthyroid patients before treatment were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 2 -m, FT 3 , FT 4 levels dropped to approaching normal (vs controls, P>0.05). In the 13 treatment failures, the levels remained significantly higher than those in controls (P 2 -m contents after treatment paralleled those of FT 3 , FT 4 levels. β 2 -m could be used as a diagnostic indicator for hyperthyroidism. (authors)

  6. Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis and Polymorphisms of the , , and Genes in Men with Graves Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyeon Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis characterized by acute attacks of muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Recently, variation in several genes was suggested to be associated with TPP. This study evaluated the genetic predisposition to TPP in terms of the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, androgen receptor (AR, and γ-aminobutyric acid receptor α3 subunit (GABRA3 genes.MethodsThis study enrolled 48 men with Graves disease (GD and TPP, and 48 GD patients without TPP. We compared the frequencies of candidate polymorphisms between the two groups.ResultsThe frequency of the Gly16/Gly16 genotype in ADRB2 was not significantly associated with TPP (P=0.32. More CAG repeats (≥26 in the AR gene were not correlated with TPP (odds ratio [OR], 2.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81 to 8.09; P=0.08. The allele frequency of the TT genotype in the GABRA3 gene was not associated with TPP (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 0.54 to 6.74; P=0.41.ConclusionThe polymorphisms in the ADRB2, AR, and GABRA3 genes could not explain the genetic susceptibility to TPP in Korean men with GD.

  7. The outcome of adjusted accumulation dose of treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Yukari; Inoue, Takeshi; Suzuki, Seiji; Hamada, Noboru; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Momotani, Naoko; Ito, Kunihiko.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the outcome of 131 I treatment of Graves' disease in two different protocols (old and new protocol) of adjusted accumulation dose from 1988 to 1995. Adjusted accumulation doses of patients with above 50 g thyroid weights were increased by 5-20 Gy/g tissue in new protocol compared to those in old one. In 166 patients treated with single and plural doses of 131 I treatment in 1990 (Group In), the therapeutic doses were calculated according to new protocol and in 130 patients in 1988 (Group Io), according to old one, modification of Quimby's formula. The patients treated with plural doses were classified as hyperthyroidism because the efficacies of the first treatments with 131 I were insufficient. At the 5-yr follow up, the incidence of hypothyroid in Group In was 9%, subclinical hypothyroid 17%, euthyroid 30%, subclinical hyperthyroid 7%, hyperthyroid 37%. In Group Io, 11% of the patients were hypothyroid, 6% subclinical hypothyroid, 29% euthyroid, 3% subclinical hyperthyroid, 51% hyperthyroid. The incidence of hyperthyroid in Group In was lower than that in Group Io (p 131 I in relation to the patients' thyroid weight shows some room for improvement. (author)

  8. Relationship between prognosis of Graves' disease treated with 131I and three kinds of cell factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingfeng; Wen Chijun; Qian Hong

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between prognosis of Graves' disease (GD) treated with 131 I and IL-2, IL-10 and TNF-α, the levels of IL-2, IL-10, TNF-α, T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 and s-TSH in serum of 158 patients with GD were measured before first 131 I treatment and after five months. The patients were divided into the transient hypothyroidism group, the hyperthyroidism group and the cure group according to the serum level of T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 and s-TSH after fives months of treatment. The results showed that the IL-2 and IL-10 levels in GD patient were remarkably higher (P 131 I treatment. The serum IL-2 level in each group after 131 I treatment was higher than that of before treatment (P the cure group >the transient hypothyroidism group. The levels of IL-10 in the hyperthyroidism group after treatment were higher than those in the cure and the transient hypothyroidism group (P the transient hypothyroidism group > the cure group. The results indicate that Th1 plays a predominant role in the pathogenesis of GD, in which the cytokines production is shifted toward the Th1 type. The patients with lower ratio of IL-2 to IL-10 and higher level of TNF-α occur hypothyroidism easily. (authors)

  9. A patient with stress-related onset and exacerbations of Graves disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Roberto; Lapa, Daniela; Vita, Giuseppe; Trimarchi, Francesco; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old, nonsmoking woman presented to her general practitioner with a 1-week history of weakness, fatigue, palpitations, nervousness, tremors, insomnia, heat intolerance, and sudden enlargement of a thyroid goiter that had been detected 2 years earlier. The patient's symptoms had started shortly after she experienced emotional stress. Diagnostic work-up disclosed an avid radioactive iodine uptake by the goiter. On ultrasound examination, the thyroid gland was enlarged with a diffusely hypoechogenic structure and intense vascularization. Thyroid scintigraphy with (131)I; ultrasonography of the thyroid gland; and measurements of serum free T(3), free T(4), TSH levels and thyroid autoantibodies, including autoantibodies against thyroglobulin (TgAb), thyroperoxidase (TPOAb) and TSH receptor (TRAb). Graves disease, with stress-related onset and subsequent stress-related exacerbations. The patient was treated with methimazole to normalize levels of thyroid hormone and thyroid autoantibodies, and with bromazepam to help her cope with stress. The daily dose of methimazole was kept low during pregnancy. Over the 4 year period when the patient was taking methimazole, exacerbations of hyperthyroidism occurred twice: during her first pregnancy and 9 months after her first delivery. On all three occasions, symptoms were preceded by stressful life events. Further exacerbations were avoided by starting bromazepam treatment soon after the patient experienced stressful events.

  10. Follow-up studies on children and adolescents with Graves' disease after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Danyun; Chen Tanghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe relative long-term radioactive therapy effects, clinical follow-up after 131 I treatment was conducted in children and adolescent patients with Graves' disease (GD). Methods: In 161 GD patients, aged from 8 to 17 years, m I was given at a dosage of 1.85 to 3.70 MBq per gram of thyroid tissue and a maximum dose ranging from 74 to 1221 MBq per patient. The patients were then followed up for 24 to 104 months [averagely (62±22) months]. Results: After 131 I treatment, ninety-eight (60.87%) patients were found to be euthyroid. Nine (5.59%) patients remained hyperthyroid and another three (1.86%) had recurrence of hyperthyroidism. Thirty-seven (22.98%) patients turned to be hypothyroid. Fourteen patients lost in follow-up. During the follow-up period, no thyroid cancer or genetic abnormalities were ever found in the group of patients, neither in their offsprings. Conclusion: 131 I may well be considered as an effective and safe method for treating children and adolescents with GD. . (authors)

  11. Longterm results and their prognosis in surgical treatment of Grave's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Makarov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on improving the results of surgical treatment of patients with diffuse toxic goiter way jus tify the selection of thyroid residue and thyroid status in predicting longterm periods. The basis of the study is the immediate and longterm results of surgical treatment of 138 patients suffering from diffuse toxic goi ter. As a result of the research, with a modern point of clinical and statistical analysis proved the effective ness of fascial subtotal resection of the thyroid gland in patients with diffuse toxic goiter (Graves' disease. The dependence of disorders of the thyroid is remainded of its volume, autoimmune changes and limitations of the operation. The quality of life of patients in the late postoperative period is studied. The tactics of sur gical treatment of patients with diffuse toxic goiter, aimed at the prevention of postoperative recurrence of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism on the basis of prediction of the functional state of the thyroid residue in the longterm period, is proposed. Detected optimal sizes of thyroid balance after subtotal resection of the thyroid gland in patients with diffuse toxic goiter permit to objectify the technique of intervention.

  12. Does an individual estimation of halflife improve the results of radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.; Koerber, C.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, Chr.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The impact of our dosimetry concept on radioiodine therapy success in Graves' disease (GD) was analysed. Three questions arised: Did individual estimation of pretherapeutic halflife improve therapeutic success? Did individual dosimetry result in accurate dose calculation? Did antithyroid medication have a measurable influence on therapeutic success under the prevailing conditions? Methods: 126 consecutive patients were treated with 200 Gy I-131 in our therapy ward for GD and followed-up six to nine months after therapy. Success quote was assessed using a standardized protocol and treatment was classified as successful when the patients was eu- or hypothyroid, or unsuccessful when he or she presented with a suppressed TSH-level or in hyperthyroid condition after antithyroid medication withdrawal. Antithyroid medication, activity I-131, dose, concentration of fT 3 and fT 4 , specific delivered dose and halflife were put into a multiple regression model to assess their influence on therapeutic success. In order to assess possible factors disturbing the therapeutic outcome, relevant parameters were analyzed using Logit transformation. Results: Out of 126 patients 84 were classified as successfully treated and 42 (33,3%) as failures. A significant influence on the outcome only was found for thyroid mass. However, therapeutic success appeared to be more distinctly determined by the specific delivered dose using an estimated halflife of 5.5 days (Odds: 10.0, p [de

  13. Misdiagnosis of Graves' Disease with Apparent Severe Hyperthyroidism in a Patient Taking Biotin Megadoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbesino, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Accurate immunoassays measuring minute quantities of hormones are the cornerstone of the practice of endocrinology. Despite tremendous advances in this field, novel pitfalls in these tests emerge from time to time. Oral biotin can interfere with immunoassays of several hormones. The purpose of this report is to relate an extreme case of such interference. A patient with progressive multiple sclerosis was found to have extremely elevated free thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and suppressed thyrotropin (TSH) levels. His TSH receptor binding inhibiting antibody level was also elevated. This constellation of laboratory findings suggested a diagnosis of severe Graves' disease. All of the assays yielding abnormal results employed the biotin-streptavidin affinity in their design. The patient had no symptoms of hyperthyroidism, and detailed review of his medications revealed intake of megadoses of biotin. Temporary discontinuation of biotin treatment resulted in complete resolution of the biochemical abnormalities. Non-physiologic biotin supplementation may interfere with several immunoassays, including thyroid hormones, TSH, thyroglobulin, and TSH receptor binding inhibiting antibody, leading to erroneous diagnoses. Questioning for biotin intake should be part of the evaluation for patients undergoing endocrine tests. Interruption of biotin supplementation for at least two days prior to biotin-sensitive tests should be sufficient to avoid major misdiagnoses.

  14. The impact of Graves' disease and its treatment on handwriting characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Giampaolo; Botti, Cristina; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones are crucial for metabolism in all tissues in humans, including the nervous system and muscles, and could thus affect handwriting, which is the synthesis of complex and fine movements. Hyperthyroidism, characterized by symptoms such as tremor and weakness, could affect handwriting, although this has not been studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate handwriting characteristics before and after therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease (GD). Twenty-two patients (15 women, 7 men) with untreated GD (median age: 44 years; range: 20-70 years) were asked to write a "standard text" before and 12 months after being rendered euthyroid. The letters underwent a standardized detailed analysis by a handwriting expert, through inspection and stereoscopic microscope and magnifying glass. All patients demonstrated handwriting variations, perceptible even to direct observation. Graphological examination showed statistically significant changes after patients become euthyroid, in the following parameters: size of letters (4.5±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.3 mm; phandwriting in all patients. Following recovery from hyperthyroidism, a state of hypertrophic and contracted handwriting resulted in greater fluency and fluidity. Variations in handwriting should be included as signs/symptoms in GD.

  15. Comparison of effects of {sup 131}I treatment for Graves' diseases in Asian countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Mami; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Kanaya, Kazuko; Kanaya, Shinichi; Noguchi, Yasushi; Maki, Masako [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan); Fukuhisa, Kenjiro; Yamazaki, Toshiro

    2001-06-01

    For the purpose to establish the standard therapy regimen of Graves' disease, an autoimmune hyperthyroidism, IAEA, since 1994, has been conducting a study on its treatment with {sup 131}I with certain conditions in 10 Asian countries to examine the effect, its dose dependency and area difference. The condition involves, in randomized patients, a low (50-60 Gy) and high (80-90 Gy) dose dependency. This report describes results (summarized in Japan) until the end of March 2000, of 573 patients receiving the treatment for more than 15 months in 9 countries. The {sup 131}I dose (Gy) is calculated by the Quimby equation: 14.7 x EHL (day) x U (%) x Dose (MBq)/W (g) x 3.7 x 100, where W is the thyroid weight determined by thyroid scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate; U, 24 hr iodine uptake by the organ determined by a tracer amount of {sup 131}I; and EHL, effective half life. Evaluation is done on clinical symptoms and thyroid hormones. There is no clear significant difference in doses at present; however, it is considered for the low dose to be suitable in China, India and Japan and for the high dose, in Bangladesh, Singapore and Thailand. (K.H.)

  16. Treatment with antithyroid drugs or iodine following radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeto, Glaucia; Leal, B.M.B.; Souza, L.S.; Griva, B.L.; Moriguchi, S.M.; Moreira, C.C.; Lemos, A.C.; Kiy, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The effect of radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy in Graves' disease is gradual and the patients continue to be hyperthyroid for much time after this therapy. In a retrospective study, we compared the evolution of 196 patients in this situation treated with some therapeutic regimens. They received propylthiouracil or methimazole (ATD), one of them and potassium iodide (KI), KI only, or no drugs after 131 I therapy. ATD was started usually one day and KI two months after the radioiodine. The groups had similar age, pretreatment serum T 4 concentrations and 131 I treatment dose. Cure of the hyperthyroidism occurred in 83,9%, 75,5%, 75,0% and 70,6% in no-drugs, KI, ATD and KI-ATD groups, respectively. Hyperthyroidism was longer in KI and KI-ATD groups. Definitive hypothyroidism occurred in 39,2%, 47,2%, 52,9% and 66,1% in KI-ATD, KI, ATD and no-drugs groups, respectively. This condition appeared more quickly in no-drugs and ATD groups. Conclusion: We conclude that KI and ATD groups had similar evolutions as to cure of hyperthyroidism and occurrence of hypothyroidism. (author)

  17. Late onset of atypical paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia with remote history of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Nadeem, Ambreen; Yousuf, Muhammad Saad; Kachhvi, Zakerabibi M

    2013-10-01

    Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a rare hyperkinetic movement disorder and falls under the category of paroxysmal movement disorders. In this condition, episodes are spontaneous, involuntary, and involve dystonic posturing with choreic and ballistic movements. Attacks last for minutes to hours and rarely occur more than once per day. Attacks are not typically triggered by sudden movement, but may be brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, or chocolate. We report a patient with multiple atypical features of PNKD. She had a 7-year history of this condition with onset at the age of 59, and a remote history of Graves' disease requiring total thyroidectomy. The frequency of attacks in our case ranged from five to six times a day to a minimum of twice per week, and the duration of episode was short, lasting not more than 2 min. Typically, PNKDs occur at a much younger age and have longer attack durations with low frequency. Administering clonazepam worked to reduce her symptoms, although majority of previous research suggests that pharmacological interventions have poor outcomes.

  18. Remission of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a patient with Grave's disease by treatment with methimazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, R; Inaba, M; Hosoi, M; Ishimura, E; Kumeda, Y; Nishizawa, Y; Morii, H

    1999-06-01

    The patient, a 24-year-old man, had suffered from hunger, sweating, tachycardia and palpitation for three years. He was diagnosed as having Graves' disease (GD) and treated with methimazole (MMI) for 3 months. He noted that palpitation and perspiration seemed to particularly occur when he was hungry, and thus he was examined to determine whether these symptoms were caused by hypoglycemia. As a markedly elevated immunoreactive insulin level and the presence of insulin antibody in serum were found, he was diagnosed as having insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS). HLA typing revealed the patient to be positive for group Bw62/Cw4/DR4, which is reportedly a specific HLA type in MMI-treated euthyoroid GD patients with IAS. In spite of the continuation of MMI treatment, the % binding of IRI decreased and the hypoglycemic episode disappeared. In contrast to the previously reported MMI induced IAS in GD cases, MMI is unlikely to have exacerbated IAS in the present case, although his HLA combination is identical to that of the previous cases.

  19. Thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by diabetic ketoacidosis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Erika; Hiroi, Naoki; Sue, Mariko; Masai, Natsumi; Iga, Ryo; Shigemitsu, Rika; Oka, Reiko; Miyagi, Masahiko; Iso, Kaoru; Kuboki, Koji; Yoshino, Gen

    2011-04-14

    Thyroid storm is a condition in which multiple organ dysfunction results from failure of the compensatory mechanisms of the body owing to excessive thyroid hormone activity induced by some factors in patients with thyrotoxicosis. While diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an important trigger for thyroid storm, simultaneous development of DKA and thyroid storm is rare. A 59-year-old woman with no history of either diabetes mellitus or thyroid disease presented to our hospital because of developing nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for 2 days. Physical examination showed mild disturbance of consciousness, fever, and tachycardia. There were no other signs of thyrotoxicosis. Laboratory studies revealed elevation of random blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, strongly positive of urine acetone, and metabolic acidosis. Since DKA was diagnosed, we initiated the patient on treatment with administration of insulin and adequate fluid replacement. Although the hyperglycemia and acidosis were immediately relieved, the disturbance of consciousness and tachycardia remained persistent. Levels of FT3 and FT4 were extremely high and TSH was below the detectable limit. TRAb was positive. The thyroid storm score of Burch & Wartofsky was 75/140, and the thyroid storm diagnostic criteria of the Japan Thyroid Association were satisfied. Oral administration of thiamazole, potassium iodide and propranolol resulted in immediate relief of the tachycardia. We encountered a case of thyroid storm associated with Graves' disease covered by DKA. Thyroid storm and DKA are both potentially fatal, and the prognosis varies depending on whether or not these conditions are detected and treated sufficiently early. The thyroid storm diagnostic criteria prepared in 2008 by the Japan Thyroid Association are very simple as compared to the Burch & Wartofsky scoring system for thyroid storm. The Japanese criteria may be useful in the diagnosis of this condition since they enable clinicians to identify a broad

  20. The interactions among impact factors affecting 131I treatment efficacy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Tan Jian; Zhang Guizhi; He Yajing; Dong Feng; Wang Renfei; Xiao Qian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possible interactions among different impact factors possibly affecting the treatment efficacy of 131 I in Graves' disease (GD). Methods: Six hundred and thirty two GD patients that had been treated by 131 I, with or without antithyroid drugs (ATD), were included in this study. The impact factors were pre-defined as age (x 1 ), sex (x 2 ), mass of thyroid (x 3 ), course of disease (x 4 ), initial symptom (x 5 ), condition of disease (x 6 ), ATD treatment duration (x 7 ), effective half life time (x 8 ), maximum 131 I uptake rate (x 9 ), total dose of 131 I (x 10 ), dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid (x 11 ), TRAb (x 12 ), TSI (x 13 ), TgAb (x 14 ), and thyroid microsomal antibody(TMAb) level (x 15 ). Interactions among different impact factors were studied by t-test, χ 2 test and multi-variant logistic regression. Results: Age, mass of thyroid, ATD treatment duration, maximum 131 I uptake rate, dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid tissue and TSI level were identified as independent impact factors affecting the 131 I treatment efficacy on GD (χ 2 =6.908, t=-4.063, χ 2 =13.558, t=-2.553, t=4.528, χ 2 =9.716, all P 131 I uptake rate (likelihood χ 2 =8.176, P>0.05; F=2.928, 1.992, 2.629, 2.215, all P 131 I treatment, which might guide the prescription of 131 I dosage for GD treatment. (authors)

  1. A comparative study of the long-term effect of thyroid arterial embolization with surgical thyroidectomy in treating Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jinlin; Chen Shuofei; Du Yahui; Li Chunlei; Wang Wei; Li Yunsong; Guo Yuehui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare long-term (5 years) therapeutic effect of thyroid arterial embolization with surgical thyroidectomy in treating Graves' disease. Methods: A total of 54 patients with Graves' disease, who were encountered during the period from Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2010 and received thyroid arterial embolization treatment, were collected and were used as interventional group. While 40 patients with Graves' disease, who were encountered during the same period and received surgical thyroidectomy, were used as surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year cure rates and efficiency rates (improved and cure) were calculated and the results were compared between the two groups. Results: The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year cure rates of the interventional group were 68.52%, 61.18% and 47.88%, respectively. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year cure rates of the surgical group were 97.50%, 78.54% and 69.48%, respectively. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year efficiency rates in the interventional group and in the surgical group were 98.15%, 80.48%, 60.90% and 97.50%, 76.42%, 67.60%, respectively. By using Ridit analysis, statistically significant difference in the 1-year, 3-year and 5-year cure rates and efficiency rates existed between the interventional group and the surgical group (P 0.05%). Conclusion: For the treatment of Graves' disease, thyroid arterial embolization has satisfactory short-term and mid-term result, although its long-term result is less effective than that of thyroidectomy. (authors)

  2. Cost-utility analysis comparing radioactive iodine, anti-thyroid drugs and total thyroidectomy for primary treatment of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Peter J; McLeod, Donald S A; Little, Richard; Gordon, Louisa

    2016-12-01

    Little data is in existence about the most cost-effective primary treatment for Graves' disease. We performed a cost-utility analysis comparing radioactive iodine (RAI), anti-thyroid drugs (ATD) and total thyroidectomy (TT) as first-line therapy for Graves' disease in England and Australia. We used a Markov model to compare lifetime costs and benefits (quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs)). The model included efficacy, rates of relapse and major complications associated with each treatment, and alternative second-line therapies. Model parameters were obtained from published literature. One-way sensitivity analyses were conducted. Costs were presented in 2015£ or Australian Dollars (AUD). RAI was the least expensive therapy in both England (£5425; QALYs 34.73) and Australia (AUD5601; 30.97 QALYs). In base case results, in both countries, ATD was a cost-effective alternative to RAI (£16 866; 35.17 QALYs; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) £26 279 per QALY gained England; AUD8924; 31.37 QALYs; ICER AUD9687 per QALY gained Australia), while RAI dominated TT (£7115; QALYs 33.93 England; AUD15 668; 30.25 QALYs Australia). In sensitivity analysis, base case results were stable to changes in most cost, transition probabilities and health-relative quality-of-life (HRQoL) weights; however, in England, the results were sensitive to changes in the HRQoL weights of hypothyroidism and euthyroidism on ATD. In this analysis, RAI is the least expensive choice for first-line treatment strategy for Graves' disease. In England and Australia, ATD is likely to be a cost-effective alternative, while TT is unlikely to be cost-effective. Further research into HRQoL in Graves' disease could improve the quality of future studies. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. The effects of radioiodine therapy on peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with Graves' disease. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turowska, M.D.; Rogowski, F.; Turowski, D.; Wysocka, J.

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of Graves' disease patients with radioactive iodide ( 131 I) is becoming the standard therapy in an increasing group of cases but can induce alterations in immune response, like increasing levels of thyroid autoantibodies, and, in part, exacerbation of ophthalmopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in peripheral blood (PB) lymphocyte subpopulations after 131 I treatment of patients with Graves' disease. The study was carried out in a group of 30 patients with Graves' disease (23 f; 7 m) 49.5±10.0 years of age, 26 with different subjective ocular signs like gritty sensation, increased lacrimation, orbital pain, and exophthalmos. PB lymphocyte subsets were analysed by cytofluorometry, serum concentration of TSH and fT4 were evaluated before and 6 weeks after radioiodine treatment. After 131 I treatment a significant increase in CD3+, CD4+, CD3+HLA-DR+ and a decrease in CD19+ percentages of lymphocyte subsets were found in comparison with the initial evaluation. No significant changes in percentage of CD8+ and NK (CD3-CD16+ CD56+) cells were observed during this study. A significant increase in TSH and a slight decrease in fT4 concentration concentration took place in the 6th week after 131 I application. The patients without subjective improvement of ocular signs during the therapy initially had a percentage of CD3+, CD8+ lymphocytes which was significantly lower compared with those with regression of ocular signs observed after 131 I treatment. The changes in PB lymphocyte subsets caused by 131 I treatment of Graves' disease confirm the involvement of acquired cellular immunity after radiation damage of the thyroid gland. The decreased initial percentage of CD8+ and CD3+ lymphocytes could help make a prediction of ocular symptoms persisting after radioiodine treatment in some patients with ophthalmopathy. (author)

  4. The grave necessity to make eye bank specular microscopy mandatory in all eye banks in the subcontinent to improve utilization of scarce donor corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagruti N Jadeja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Donor tissue scarcity, Eye Bank Specular Microscopy as yet not made mandatory and tissue utilization often based on clinical judgment only. Aims: Prospectively analyze alteration in clinical grading of donor corneas and hence utilization, based on Eye Bank Specular Microscopy (EBSM and to infer if EBSM should be mandatory in all eye banks. Materials and Methods: 200 consecutive otherwise ′suitable for surgery′ donor eyes were graded clinically. On quantitative and qualitative analysis of endothelial cells by EBSM, final grading was adjusted. Impact on subsequent utilization for various surgeries was analyzed with regard to Age of Donor, Death to Enucleation Time, Death to Preservation Time and Lens Status of Donor Eye. Results: 76 eyes (38% (P 60 years showed CD >= 2500. From donor >=81 years, 2/13 (15.3% eyes showed CD between 2501-3000 and 1 (7.6% eye showed CD > 3000. Owing to better grading after EBSM, 13/14 (92.85% tissues with DTET >6 hours and 5/5 (100% tissues with DTPT > 16 hours were transplanted. Out of 45 (22.5% pseudo-phakic tissues, 21 (46.67% tissues were used for Therapeutic/Tectonic Penetrating Keratoplasty (PKP while 24 (53.33% tissues were used for Optical PKP. Conclusions: EBSM significantly alters final grading of tissues and its subsequent utilization. Acquiring huge importance in areas where adequate supply of corneas is lacking, EBSM becomes an indispensable tool for optimizing availability of qualified tissues for surgery. EBSM should be made a mandatory analysis.

  5. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-04-28

    Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  6. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  7. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byung I

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is characterized by neurological/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves' disease (GD have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  8. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  9. Semifluorinated Alkane Eye Drops for Treatment of Dry Eye Disease Due to Meibomian Gland Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Augustin, Albert J; Geerling, Gerd; Kaercher, Thomas; Kretz, Florian; Kunert, Kathleen; Menzel-Severing, Johannes; Schrage, Norbert; Schrems, Wolfgang; Krösser, Sonja; Beckert, Michael; Messmer, Elisabeth M

    2017-11-01

    Meibomian gland disease is generally accepted as the leading cause for evaporative dry eye disease (DED). In a previous study, perfluorohexyloctane, a semifluorinated alkane, has been demonstrated to significantly increase tear film breakup time and to reduce corneal fluorescein staining in patients with evaporative DED, thereby vastly reducing dry eye-related symptoms. This study was set up to evaluate perfluorohexyloctane in a larger population of patients with Meibomian gland dysfunction. Seventy-two patients with Meibomian gland disease and associated dry eye received 1 drop of perfluorohexyloctane 4 times daily during an observational, prospective, multicenter, 6-8-week study. Clinical assessment included best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, Schirmer test I, tear film breakup time, anterior and posterior blepharitis assessment, number of expressible Meibomian glands, meibum quality and quantity, ocular surface fluorescein staining, lid margin and symptom assessment, and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI © ). From the 72 patients recruited, 61 completed the trial per protocol. Nine patients did not apply the medication as recommended and 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Tear film breakup time, corneal and conjunctival fluorescein staining, number of expressible Meibomian glands, and severity of anterior and posterior blepharitis significantly improved after 6-8 weeks of perfluorohexyloctane application. In addition, symptoms improved as demonstrated by a significant decrease of OSDI-values from 37 (±13) to 26 (±16). In concordance with previous findings, 6-8 weeks of topical application of perfluorohexyloctane significantly improves clinical signs of Meibomian gland disease and associated mild to moderate DED.

  10. Association between TSH-Receptor Autoimmunity, Hyperthyroidism, Goitre, and Orbitopathy in 208 Patients Included in the Remission Induction and Sustenance in Graves' Disease Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Peter; Nygaard, Birte; Andersen, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Background. Graves' disease may have a number of clinical manifestations with varying degrees of activity that may not always run in parallel. Objectives. To study associations between serum levels of TSH-receptor autoantibodies and the three main manifestations of Graves' disease (hyperthyroidism...... and Sustenance in Graves' Disease (RISG)." Patients were systematically tested for degree of biochemical hyperthyroidism, enlarged thyroid volume by ultrasonography, and the presence of orbitopathy. Results. Positive correlations were found between the levels of TSH-receptor autoantibodies in serum and the three...... manifestations of Graves' disease: severeness of hyperthyroidism, presence of enlarged thyroid, and presence of orbitopathy, as well as between the different types of manifestations. Only around half of patients had enlarged thyroid gland at the time of diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, whereas 25-30% had...

  11. Association of single nucleotide polymorphism in CD28(C/T-I3 + 17) and CD40 (C/T-1) genes with the Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Saima; Fatima, Hira; Fatima, Sadia; Khosa, Tafheem; Akbar, Atif; Shaikh, Rehan Sadiq; Iqbal, Furhan

    2018-01-01

    To find out a correlation between the single nucleotide polymorphisms in cluster of differentiation 28 and cluster of differentiation 40 genes with Graves' disease, if any. This case-control study was conducted at the Multan Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy, Multan, Pakistan, and comprised blood samples of Graves' disease patients and controls. Various risk factors were also correlated either with the genotype at each single-nucleotide polymorphism or with various combinations of genotypes studied during present investigation. Of the 160 samples, there were 80(50%) each from patients and controls. Risk factor analysis revealed that gender (p=0.008), marital status (pGraves' disease. Both single-nucleotide polymorphisms in both genes were not associated with Graves' disease, either individually or in any combined form.

  12. Interphase ribosomal RNA cistron staining in thyroid epithelial cells in Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and benign and malignant tumours of the thyroid gland

    OpenAIRE

    Mamaev, N N; Grynyeva, E N; Blagosklonnaya, Y V

    1996-01-01

    Aim—To evaluate the expression of ribosomal cistrons in human thyroid epithelial cells (TECs) of patients with Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and benign and malignant tumours of the thyroid gland.

  13. The change of serum TRAb and its prognosis assess to graves disease with one-off successful 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yubo; Liu Ping'an; Gu Aichun; Yan Weili; Yuan Jimin

    2008-01-01

    To investigate dynamic change of serum receptor and antibody of thyrotrophic anti- body (TRAb) and its prognosis value after a one-off successful therapy on Graves disease with 131 I, 257 Graves disease patients were treated with one dose of 131 I therapy. 175 of them with average age of 40 (43 male and 132 female patients) were cured. The 131 I activity given to patients was 207.2±66. 6 MBq. The serum levels of TRAb were determined once every three months before and after 131 I therapy. The results showed that the serum TRAb levels in all patients were positive before 131 I therapy. The serum TRAb levels in 60. 6% of patients were raised once, and then reduced to normal, The serum levels of TRAb in 16.0% of patients were remained high or reduce slowly, and the clinical symptom was improved slowly, but these patients didn't recrudesce. The TRAb levels in 9.7% of patients decreased continually, their prognosis was well. The TRAb levels in 13.7% of patients were raised twice after the therapy, and appear hypothyroidism. The detection of dynamic changes of serum TRAb levels in Graves disease patients may be useful in assessing prognosis after 131 I therapy. (authors)

  14. Proposal of a methodology for individualized iodine-131 therapy for Graves' disease in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Francisco de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: faraujo@ird.gov.br; Melo, Rossana Corbo de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Rebelo, Ana Maria de Oliveira [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE); Dantas, Bernardo Maranhao; Dantas, Ana Leticia A.; Lucena, Eder Augusto de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    Objective: Several methods are utilized for determining the radioiodine activity in the treatment of Graves' disease (hyperthyroidism). Some of this methods do not take into consideration the thyroid absorbed dose or the necessary parameters for this estimation. The association between absorbed dose and administered activity depends on effective half-life, iodine uptake and thyroid mass of each patient. The present study was aimed at developing a methodology for individualized {sup 131}I therapy for Graves' disease in patients with hyperthyroidism of the Graves' disease. Materials and methods: A neck-thyroid phantom developed at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, containing a standard solution of {sup 131}I, was utilized for calibrating the scintillation gamma camera and uptake probe installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Results: The view angle of the collimator/detector assembly presented values compatible with the thyroid gland size for distances of 25 cm (uptake probe) and 45.8 cm (scintillation gamma camera). Calibration factors were 39.3 {+-} 0.78 and 4.3 {+-} 0.17 cpm/kBq, respectively. The 14-30-hour interval in the retention curve allows the estimation of activity between two points for determining the effective iodine half-life in the thyroid. Conclusion: The utilization of equipment usually available in nuclear medicine clinics is feasible, so this is a simple, effective and low cost methodology. (author)

  15. Changing trends in the treatment of Graves' disease with radioiodine: a 12-year experience in a university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Marcus Vinicius Leitao de; Souza, Honomar Ferreira de; Buescu, Alexandru; Vaisman, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the changes in clinical parameters and in the approach to patients submitted to radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Materials and methods: Dossiers of 226 patients submitted to radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in the period between January 1990 and December 2001 were retrospectively evaluated. For the purposes of statistical analysis, the 12-year period was subdivided into three periods of 4 years, with a comparison of clinical and laboratory variables in these periods. Results: The authors have observed that the total number of patients referred for radioiodine therapy as well as the percentage of female patients presented a significant increase (from 62% to 86%; p = 0.005). The percentage of patients pretreated with methimazole before radioiodine therapy increased significantly (from 9.1% to 35.6%; p = 0.03). The mean radioiodine dose delivered has also presented a significant increase (from 7.6 mCi to 12.7 mCi; p = 0.000003) with a direct reflection on a higher percentage of patients cured one year after the radioiodine therapy (from 55.6% to 83.7%; p = 0.004). Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy has increasingly been accepted for treatment of patients with Graves' disease and the doses delivered have increased to achieve a permanent cure as well as a reduction of the chances of recurrence. (author)

  16. F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves` disease; F-18-FDG-PET der Schilddruese bei Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A.R.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Wienhard, K.; Wagner, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    This study evaluates F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves` disease. Methods: Thirty patients were investigated the day before radioiodine therapy, 15 patients 3-10 days after radioiodine therapy. Twenty patients with cancer of the head or neck and normal thyroid function served as controls. Results: F-18-FDG uptake was higher in Graves` disease patients than in controls. Negative correlations of F-18-FDG uptake with half-life of radioiodine and absorbed radiation dose due to radioiodine therapy were found along with a positive correlation to autoantibody levels. Conclusion: Thus F-18-FDG PET is likely to give information on the biological activity of Graves` disease as well as on early radiation effects. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Diese Studie evaluiert F-18-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glukose (F-18-FDG) PET der Schilddruese bei Patienten mit M. Basedow. Methoden: 30 Patienten wurden am Tag vor Radioiod-Therapie, 15 Patienten am 3.-10. Tag nach Radioiodtherapie untersucht. 20 Patienten mit Kopf/Halstumoren und normaler Schilddruesenfunktion dienten als Kontrollgruppe. Ergebnisse: Die F-18-FDG-Aufnahme in der Schilddruese war signifikant hoeher bei Patienten mit M-Basedow im Vergleich zu den Kontrollen. Sie stieg mit hoeheren, antithyreoidalen Antikoerpern und sank bei laengerer I-131-Halbwertzeit. Es bestand eine Korrelation einer reduzierten Glukose-Utilisation bei hoeherer absorbierter Schilddruesendosis nach Radioiod-Therapie. Schlussfolgerung: Damit erscheint die F-18-FDG-PET-Untersuchung zur biologischen Aktivitaetsbeurteilung des M. Basedow und Darstellung von fruehen Strahleneffekten geeignet. (orig.)

  17. Application of CT-guided percutaneous thyroid biopsy in basic study of interventional therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Genfa; Zhao Wei; Hu Jihong; Jin Cangzheng; Yang Huiying

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of application of CT-guided percutaneous thyroid biopsy in basic study of interventional treatment for Graves disease. Methods: Fifteen patients of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease had been undertaken transcathter arterial embolizsation with PVA micropheres including 52 core needle biopsy(CNB)of pre-or post-interventional procedure. All procedures were divided into 2 groups according to the size of the thyroid enlargement: (1) II degree enlargement (n=19)under palpation puncture. (2) No enlargement or under II degree enlargement (n=33)with palpation and CT-guided puncture. Results: In group (1), 17 of the 19 procedures with palpation puncture were succeeded, reaching a successful rate of 89.5%. For group (2), the successful rate of CT-guided puncture was 91.7%. The di