WorldWideScience

Sample records for grass cymbopogon citratus

  1. Scientific basis for the therapeutic use of Cymbopogon citratus, stapf (Lemon grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf (Lemon grass is a widely used herb in tropical countries, especially in Southeast Asia. The essential oil of the plant is used in aromatherapy. The compounds identified in Cymbopogon citratus are mainly terpenes, alcohols, ketones, aldehyde and esters. Some of the reported phytoconstituents are essential oils that contain Citral a, Citral b, Nerol Geraniol, Citronellal, Terpinolene, Geranyl acetate, Myrecene and Terpinol Methylheptenone. The plant also contains reported phytoconstituents such as flavonoids and phenolic compounds, which consist of luteolin, isoorientin 2′-O-rhamnoside, quercetin, kaempferol and apiginin. Studies indicate that Cymbopogon citratus possesses various pharmacological activities such as anti-amoebic, antibacterial, antidiarrheal, antifilarial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties. Various other effects like antimalarial, antimutagenicity, antimycobacterial, antioxidants, hypoglycemic and neurobehaviorial have also been studied. These results are very encouraging and indicate that this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects.

  2. Lemon grass ( Cymbopogon citratus ) essential oil as a potent anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Results of the present study indicate that LGEO has a noteworthy potential for the development of drugs for the treatment of fungal infections and skin inflammation that should be explored in future studies. Keywords: lemon grass; essential oil; antifungal activity; anti-inflammatory effect; citral; aromatherapy ...

  3. Treatment of oral thrush in HIV/AIDS patients with lemon juice and lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) and gentian violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S C; Maree, J E; Sibanyoni, M

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of lemon juice and lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) in the treatment of oral thrush in HIV/AIDS patients when compared with the control group using gentian violet aqueous solution 0.5%. Oral thrush is a frequent complication of HIV infection. In the Moretele Hospice, due to financial constraints, the treatment routinely given to patients with oral thrush is either lemon juice directly into the mouth or a lemon grass infusion made from lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) grown and dried at the hospice. These two remedies have been found to be very efficacious therefore are used extensively. Gentian violet, the first line medication for oral thrush in South Africa, is not preferred by the primary health clinic patients due to the visible purple stain which leads them to being stigmatized as HIV-positive. Cymbopogon citratus and Citrus limon have known antifungal properties. The study design was a randomised controlled trial. Ninety patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: gentian violet, lemon juice or lemon grass. Inclusion criteria included being HIV-positive with a diagnosis of oral thrush. The study period was 11 days and patients were followed up every second day. International ethical principles were adhered to during the study. Of the 90 patients, 83 completed the study. In the intention-to-treat analysis, none of the p-values were significant therefore the null hypothesis could not be rejected. In the analysis of the participants who actually completed the trial, the lemon juice showed better results than the gentian violet aqueous solution 0.5% in the treatment of oral thrush in an HIV-positive population (plemon grass and gentian violet could also be rejected on the basis of the Chi-square test and the likelihood ratio test (plemon juice and lemon grass for the treatment of oral candidiasis in an HIV population was validated by the randomised controlled trial.

  4. Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus essential oil as a potent anti-inflammatory and antifungal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Nadjib Boukhatem

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Volatile oils obtained from lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf, Poaceae family] are used in traditional medicine as remedies for the treatment of various diseases. Aims: In the present study, lemon grass essential oil (LGEO was evaluated for its in vivo topical and oral anti-inflammatory effects, and for its in vitro antifungal activity using both liquid and vapor phases. Methods: The chemical profile of LGEO as determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed two major components: geranial (42.2%, and neral (31.5%. The antifungal activity of LGEO was evaluated against several pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi using disc diffusion and vapor diffusion methods. Results: LGEO exhibited promising antifungal effect against Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and Aspergillus niger, with different inhibition zone diameters (IZDs (35–90 mm. IZD increased with increasing oil volume. Significantly, higher anti-Candida activity was observed in the vapor phase. For the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effect, LGEO (10 mg/kg, administered orally significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema with a similar effect to that observed for oral diclofenac (50 mg/kg, which was used as the positive control. Oral administration of LGEO showed dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, topical application of LGEO in vivo resulted in a potent anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by using the mouse model of croton oil-induced ear edema. To our knowledge, this is the first such report to be published. The topical application of LGEO at doses of 5 and 10 µL/ear significantly reduced acute ear edema induced by croton oil in 62.5 and 75% of the mice, respectively. In addition, histological analysis clearly confirmed that LGEO inhibits the skin inflammatory response in animal models. Conclusion: Results of the present study indicate that LGEO has a noteworthy potential for the development of drugs for

  5. Toxicity of lemon grass Cymbopogon citratus powder and methanol extract against rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Osaigbokan Uwamose

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the toxicity potential of lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (C. citratus] products against adult rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae. Methods: Lemon grass (C. citratus leaves were sundried for 7 days, pulverized and sieved using 0.5 mm mesh size to obtain fine powders. About 500 g of the powder were dissolved in 1000 mL of 90% methanol to produce the extract. The powder and extract were used for the bioassay. The powder was tested at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 g/10 g rice grains, respectively. The toxic potential of the extract of concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mg/mL were evaluated using the filter paper method. The experiment was setup on a completely randomized design using three replicates per treatment. Results: The results indicated significant difference (F = 7.450; df = 3.15; P < 0.05 in mean percentage mortality after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h exposure with the powder compared with the control. Significantly (F = 5.519; df = 3.15; P < 0.05 higher percentage adult mortality was also observed in the extract after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h exposure compared with the control. The LC50 value of the powder was 4.91 g/10 g of rice while the LT50 was 160.51 h. The LC50 value of the extract was 2.16 mg/20 mL of methanol with an LT50 of 75.10 h. The methanol extract of C. citratus showed the highest mortality compared to the powder which was less toxic. Conclusions: The study showed that C. citratus products are promising insecticides and can be used effectively in the management of Sitophilus oryzae in storage..

  6. Broiler Pre-Slaughter Water Diet with Grass Lemongrass (Cymbopogon Citratus Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG Garcia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The pre-slaughter management is one of the predisposing factors to the reduction in the quality of the carcass and broiler meat, mainly for being a stressful condition. This study evaluates the inclusion of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf in the water used in the diet of pre-slaughter broilers for the first time. The carcass and meat quality parameters were evaluated. The experiment was carried out in the poultry production of an experimental sector of the Federal University of Grande Dourados - UFGD. A total of 2,594 broilers were distributed in an entirely randomized design in a factorial arrangement of 3x2x2, with three different lemongrass concentrations in the form of infusion (0. 1 and 5 g/L, two sexes and two genetic strains (Ross 308® and Cobb 500®, and with four replications. After 42 days, 144 broilers were slaughtered, and the quality parameters of carcass and meat were evaluated. A higher incidence of scratches and higher water retention capacity were found in Ross 308® male (p<0.05. Less exudate of breast fillets loss was observed in broiler Ross 308® males 72 h post-mortem (p<0.05. There was an interaction between sex and lemongrass levels in the drinking water of the broilers in the sensory analysis of meat (p<0.05, more preferably of chewiness and juiciness for males undergoing free diet for juiciness and lemongrass in the female diet with 5g/L. The use of lemongrass infusions in pre-slaughter did not bring considerable benefits to the quality of carcass and meat of broiler.

  7. Influence of extraction methodologies on the analysis of five major volatile aromatic compounds of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) grown in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthai, Saksit; Prachakoll, Sujitra; Ruangviriyachai, Chalerm; Luthria, Devanand L

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the systematic comparison of extraction of major volatile aromatic compounds (VACs) of citronella grass and lemongrass by classical microhydrodistillation (MHD), as well as modern accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). Sixteen VACs were identified by GC/MS. GC-flame ionization detection was used for the quantification of five VACs (citronellal, citronellol, geraniol, citral, and eugenol) to compare the extraction efficiency of the two different methods. Linear range, LOD, and LOQ were calculated for the five VACs. Intraday and interday precisions for the analysis of VACs were determined for each sample. The extraction recovery, as calculated by a spiking experiment with known standards of VACs, by ASE and MHD ranged from 64.9 to 91.2% and 74.3 to 95.2%, respectively. The extraction efficiency of the VACs was compared for three solvents of varying polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, and methanol), seven different temperatures (ranging from 40 to 160 degrees C, with a gradual increment of 20 degrees C), five time periods (from 1 to 10 min), and three cycles (1, 2, and 3 repeated extractions). Optimum extraction yields of VACs were obtained when extractions were carried out for 7 min with dichloromethane and two extraction cycles at 120 degrees C. The results showed that the ASE technique is more efficient than MHD, as it results in improved yields and significant reduction in extraction time with automated extraction capabilities.

  8. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of Cymbopogon citratus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effect of Cymbopogon citrates Stapf. (CS, lemongrass) extract on paracetamol (PCM)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Methods: The rats were orally administered CS extract (1000 mg/kg/day) for 30 days prior to induction of hepatotoxicity by a single oral administration of PCM (3 g/kg).

  9. In vitro cytotoxic activity of Cymbopogon citratus L. and Cymbopogon nardus L. essential oils from Togo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffi Koba

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The leaf essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus L. and Cymbopogon nardus L.(Poaceae from Togo were steam-distilled, analyzed for percentage composition and investigated in vitro for their potential cytotoxic activity on human epidermic cell line HaCat. The percentage composition showed that the main constituents of essential oils samples were respectively geranial (45.2%, neral(32.4% and myrcène (10.2% for C. citratus essential oil and citronellal (35.5%, geraniol (27.9% and citronellol (10.7% for that of C. nardus. The in vitro cytotoxicity bioassays on human epidermic cell line HaCaT revealed that the toxicityof the essential oil from C. citratus (IC50: 150 μL.mL-1 was higher than that of the essential oil from C. nardus (IC50: 450 μL.mL-1. Pure commercial neral, geranial, and citronellal standards showed respectively the following IC50 values: 100, 250 and 300 μL.mL-1. Conversely, pure citronellol standard appeared almost non-toxic (IC50>1000 μL.mL-1, proving the major role played in synergyby neral and geranial in the overall toxicity showed by the citratus oil sample tested in this work.

  10. STUDI PERBANDINGAN PERLAKUAN BAHAN BAKU DAN METODE DISTILASI TERHADAP RENDEMEN DAN KUALITAS MINYAK ATSIRI SEREH DAPUR (Cymbopogon citratus)

    OpenAIRE

    -, Slamet; -, Supranto; -, Riyanto

    2013-01-01

    Indonesia is rich in plant biodiversity. Indonesia volatile oil development efforts through increased development of one plant of lemon grass, which is one of the essential oil producing plants known as Cymbopogon citratus. Lemongrass essential oil in the chemical industry used as raw materials in the manufacture of cosmetics, perfume, deodorant, deodorant soap, floor cleaners and detergents.The purpose of this study was to determine the highest yield of lemongrass essential oil distillation ...

  11. Influence of agar concentration on in vitro multiplication of Cymbopogon citratus (D. C. Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J. Licea Moreno

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Here are presented the results on in vitro multiplication of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus (D. C. Stapf.; it is a very important medicinal plant because its analgesic, antinflamatory and hipotensor properties, among others, useful to elaborate several medicaments with a high popular acceptation. The main aim of this research was to set up the influence of agar concentration in culture medium during in vitro establishment on multiplication of lemon grass. Were used three treatments: (1 liquid medium with filter paper bridges, (2 3 g.l-1 of agar (BIOCEN and (3 6 g.l-1 of agar (BIOCEN. The explants were inoculated on a culture media containing Murashige and Skoog salts (1962, Heinz and Mee vitamins (1969, myoinositol 100 mg.l-1, 6-BAP 0.2 mg.l-1 and sucrose 20 g.l-1. Meristematic tips were inoculated on the treatments described above under sun light conditions, once desinfected. The explants Influence of agar concentration on in vitro multiplication of Cymbopogon citratus (D. C. Stapf. were maintained 21 days in this culture media and later it is were subcultured 5 times each 21 days, on the same multiplication culture media containing Murashige and Skoog salts (1962, tiamine 1 mg.l-1, myoinositol 100 mg.l-1, 6-BAP 0.3 mg.l-1 and sucrose 30 g.l-1. The pH was 5.7 for all culture media. The results showed the relevance of agar concentration during in vitro establishment on multiplication of lemon grass. Differences among treatments until the 2nd subculture was observed. 3.43 new axillary shoots from each explant cultured on a culture media supplemented with 3 g.l-1 of agar was reached. Key words: lemon grass, medicinal plants, micropropagation, tissue culture

  12. Antifungal activity of Cymbopogon citratus against Colletotrichum gloesporioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Francisco Pérez Cordero

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate in vitro the inhibitory activity of essential oils from fresh leaves of Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in yam. The research was conducted in the department of Sucre, Colombia. The essential oils of C. citratus were collected in the municipalities of Sincelejo, La Union and Sampues, in September and October 2015. The essential oil was extract from fresh leaves using the microwave-assisted hydrodistillation. Concentrations of 5000, 8000 and 10 000 ppm of each essential oil were prepared. An absolute control, a positive control (benomyl 1 g/l and a negative control was used. An inhibitory activity was obtained by using the direct seeding on surface of the potato-dextrose-agar method and it was expressed as percentage of inhibition rate. The chemical characterization of essential oils was performed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The highest percentages of antifungal index were observed in the lemongrass from Sincelejo at concentrations of 5000, 8000 and 10 000 ppm, after in La Union at 8000 and 10 000 ppm, and finally at Sampues at 10 000 ppm, with a value of 97.77%; the effect was similar to the positive control with benomyl 1 g/l. Citral was the main constituent of the essential oils extracted. The essential oils obtained from the three municipalities showed antifungal activity against C. gloeosporioides.

  13. Bioactivity of essential oil from lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf) as antioxidant agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraeni, Nenden Indrayati; Hidayat, Ika Wiani; Rachman, Saadah Diana; Ersanda

    2018-02-01

    Free radical induced oxidative stress that influences the occurrence of various degenerative diseases such as cancer, coronary heart disease and premature aging. In the case that body's antioxidant defense system does not have excessive antioxidants, additional natural antioxidant via food or other nutrients intake is needed. Stems of lemongrass Cymbopogon citratus Stapf are known to contain phenolic compounds that are known to have antioxidant activity. Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf) plant is well known herb in Asia, espesially in Indonesia and used for cooking and has many health benefits. A study has been carried out to determine antioxidant potential of stems of lemongrass. In this the primary study is to examine essential oil Cymbopogon citratus Stapf from Cileles Jatinangor as an antioxidant agent. Essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus Stapf was isolated from 1272 g of dried stem by using Karlsruhe steam distillation methods with 0.24% in yield. The product of essential oil was also tested against antioxidant activity DPPH and resulted low activity compare to ascorbic acid and lemongrass oil standard as reference material.

  14. Efficacité des huiles essentielles de Cymbopogon citratus et de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    essential oils extracted from leaves of Cymbopogon citratus and Mentha piperita in conservation of fresh cow's milk in southern Benin. ... hydrogenated monoterpenes content of 5.1%, oxygenated monoterpenes 87.0% and 2.1% for hydrogenated sesquiterpenes. ..... évaluation biologique et applications potentielles.

  15. Efficacité des huiles essentielles de Cymbopogon citratus et de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacité des huiles essentielles de Cymbopogon citratus et de Mentha piperita dans la stabilisation du lait frais de vache au Sud du Bénin. G. René Degnon, Euloge S. Adjou, Grâce Metome, Edwige Dahouenon-Ahoussi ...

  16. Effects of essential oil from Cymbopogon citratus leaves and its susceptibility on the quality of fresh orange juice during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Adjou, Euloge; Dahouenon Ahoussi, Edwige; Dègnon, René G.; Mongazi, Chrystelle; M. Soumanou, Mohamed; Sohounhloue, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of essential oil (EO) from Cymbopogon citratus leaves against the spoilage flora of fresh orange juice. Thus, the EO was extracted by hydrodistillation from fresh leaves of Cymbopogon citratus collected in southern Benin and its chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography, coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Orange samples were collected from large production areas of South and Central Benin and juices were extracted by mechanical ...

  17. Cellular Suspensions Establishment and Multiplication of Cymbopogon citratus (D.C Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Quiala

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular suspensions settled down starting from callus of Cymbopogon citratus (D.C Stapf cultivated in semisolid medium, according to the methodology described for Freire (1998, for the cultivation of the cane of sugar and later on modified by Licea and Gómez (2000 for the cultivated callus of Cane Santa, with the objective of analyzing the effect of the cellular density on the cellular growth, being studied the behavior of the fresh mass, dry mass and the pH in three inocule densities (20, 40 and 60 gMF.l-1. The development of roots was evaluated in the cellular aggregated and it was also analyzed directly the influence of the explants on the callus formation cultivated directly in liquid medium, starting from cultivated plants in vitro. The biggest increment of fresh mass was obtained when 20 gMF.l-1 was used, the values of mass dry off they behaved in a similar way, being obtained the biggest rate of growth in this same treatment. The pH in the three densities of studied inocule, diminished during the first eight days and stayed stable starting from this moment. The alone presence of roots was appreciated only in the cellular aggregated cultivated without coconut water. The formation of callus directly in liquid medium took place in the region near to the meristematic area. Key words: coconut water, biomass production, lemon grass, root formation

  18. Combination of Cymbopogon citratus and Allium cepa essential oils increased antibacterial activity in leafy vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Ramirez, Luis A; Silva-Espinoza, Brenda A; Vargas-Arispuro, Irasema; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Gustavo A; Cruz-Valenzuela, M Reynaldo; Nazzaro, Filomena; Ayala-Zavala, J Fernando

    2017-05-01

    Cymbopogon citratus and Allium cepa essential oils (EOs) are rich in terpenes and sulfur compounds respectively, both with antibacterial activity and different cell targets, supporting the idea that their combination can increase their efficacy. Major constituents of C. citratus were geranial and neral, while A. cepa presented dipropyl disulfide and dipropyl trisulfide. Cymbopogon citratus and A. cepa EOs inhibited the in vitro growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (minimal inhibitory concentrations of 2.21 and 5.13 g L -1 respectively), Salmonella Choleraesuis (3.04 and 1.28 g L -1 ), Listeria monocytogenes (1.33 and 2.56 g L -1 ) and Staphylococcus aureus (0.44 and 5.26 g L -1 ). Application of the EO combination to spinach caused a greater reduction in E. coli (2.34 log colony-forming units (CFU) g -1 ), S. Choleraesuis (2.94 log CFU g -1 ), L. monocytogenes (2.06 log CFU g -1 ) and S. aureus (1.37 log CFU g -1 ) compared with higher doses of individual EOs; a similar effect was observed for romaine lettuce. Individual and combined EOs caused a reduction in flavor acceptability level; however, no significant differences were found among odor acceptability of control vegetables and those treated with the EO combination and C. citratus EO. Leafy vegetables treated with the EO combination showed higher antibacterial protection and odor acceptability compared with individual EO treatments. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Efficacy of Aqueous Extract of Lemon Grass ( Andropogon citratus L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment to determine the effects of lemon grass, Andropogon citratus L. extract on the rootknot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) of okra was conducted. Phytochemical analyses of the bioactive ingredients in lemon grass were carried out to determine the chemical compounds with nematicidal activities present in lemon ...

  20. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of Cymbopogon citratus Stapf

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the protective effect of Cymbopogon citrates Stapf. (CS, lemongrass) extract on paracetamol (PCM)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Methods: The rats were orally administered CS extract (1000 mg/kg/day) for 30 days prior to induction of hepatotoxicity by a single oral administration of PCM (3 g/kg).

  1. Control of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (penz. Sacc. In yellow passion fruit using Cymbopogon citratus essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Duarte Anaruma

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in agriculture is limited when compared to their applications in human and veterinary medicine. On the other hand, the use of antimicrobials in agriculture contributes to the drug resistance of human pathogens and has stimulated the search for new antibiotics from natural products. Essential oils have been shown to exert several biological activities including antibacterial and antifungal actions. The aim of this study was to determine the activity of 28 essential oils from medicinal plants cultivated at CPMA (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Collection, CPQBA/UNICAMP, against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz. Sacc., the anthracnose agent in yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims f. flavicarpa Deg, as well as evaluating their effect in the control of post-harvest decay. The oils were obtained by water-distillation using a Clevenger-type system and their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC determined by the micro-dilution method. According to the results, 15 of the 28 essential oils presented activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and the following four oils presented MIC values between 0.25 and 0.3 mg/mL: Coriandrum sativum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon flexuosus and Lippia alba. The evaluation of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil in the control of post-harvest decay in yellow passion fruit showed that the disease index of the samples treated with the essential oil did not differ (P < 0.05 from that of the samples treated with fungicide. The present study shows the potential of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil in the control of the anthracnose agent in yellow passion fruit.

  2. Control of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (penz.) Sacc. In yellow passion fruit using Cymbopogon citratus essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaruma, Nina Duarte; Schmidt, Flávio Luís; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Delarmelina, Camila; Benato, liane Aparecida; Sartoratto, Adilson

    2010-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in agriculture is limited when compared to their applications in human and veterinary medicine. On the other hand, the use of antimicrobials in agriculture contributes to the drug resistance of human pathogens and has stimulated the search for new antibiotics from natural products. Essential oils have been shown to exert several biological activities including antibacterial and antifungal actions. The aim of this study was to determine the activity of 28 essential oils from medicinal plants cultivated at CPMA (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Collection), CPQBA/UNICAMP, against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Sacc., the anthracnose agent in yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims f. flavicarpa Deg), as well as evaluating their effect in the control of post-harvest decay. The oils were obtained by water-distillation using a Clevenger-type system and their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) determined by the micro-dilution method. According to the results, 15 of the 28 essential oils presented activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and the following four oils presented MIC values between 0.25 and 0.3 mg/mL: Coriandrum sativum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon flexuosus and Lippia alba. The evaluation of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil in the control of post-harvest decay in yellow passion fruit showed that the disease index of the samples treated with the essential oil did not differ (P ≤ 0.05) from that of the samples treated with fungicide. The present study shows the potential of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil in the control of the anthracnose agent in yellow passion fruit. PMID:24031465

  3. Revue De La Litterature : Cymbopogon citratus (Dc) Stapf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les molécules les plus importantes responsables de ses propriétés thérapeutiques sont : citral, myrcène, limonène, tanins, nerol acetate, neryl acetate, linalool, geranyl acetate, terpin-4-ol, â-caryophyllène, geraniol, saponosides, composés phénoliques, flavonoïdes. Bien que les extraits du C citratus ou certains de ses ...

  4. Comparative anticonvulsant activities of the essential oils (EOs) from Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt and Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf. in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Monalisa Ribeiro; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Leal, L Kalyne A M; de Lopes, Amanda A; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2010-05-01

    The fresh leaves of Cymbopogon citratus are a good source of an essential oil (EO) rich in citral, and its tea is largely used in the Brazilian folk medicine as a sedative. A similar source of EO is Cymbopogon winterianus, rich in citronellal. The literature presents more studies on the EO of C. citratus and their isolated bioactive components, but only a few are found on the EO of C. winterianus. The objective of the present study was then to study, in a comparative way, the effects of both EOs on three models of convulsions (pentylenetetrazol, pilocarpine, and strychnine) and on the barbiturate-induced sleeping time on male Swiss mice. The animals (20-30 g) were acutely treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg kg(-1), intraperitoneally, of each EO, and 30 min later, the test was initiated. The observed parameters were: latency to the first convulsion and latency to death in seconds. Furthermore, the in vitro effects of the EOs were also studied on myeloperoxidase (MPO; a biomarker for inflammation) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; an index of cytotoxicity) releases from human neutrophils. The EOs radical-scavenging activities were also evaluated by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The results showed that both EOs were more active on the pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsion model, and C. citratus was even more efficient in increasing latency to the first convulsion and latency to death. Both parameters were potentiated in the presence of a lower dose of diazepam (reference drug) when associated to a lower dose of each EO (25 mg kg(-1)). Besides, their anticonvulsant effects were blocked by flumazenil, a known benzodiazepine antagonist. This effect was somewhat lower on the pilocarpine-induced convulsion, and better effects were seen only with the EOs' higher doses (200 mg kg(-1)). A similar result was observed on the strychnine-induced convulsion model. Both EOs potentiated the barbiturate-induced sleeping time. However, C. citratus was more efficient

  5. Repellent effects of the essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Tagetes minuta on the sandfly, Phlebotomus duboscqi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimutai, Albert; Ngeiywa, Moses; Mulaa, Margaret; Njagi, Peter G N; Ingonga, Johnstone; Nyamwamu, Lydia B; Ombati, Cyprian; Ngumbi, Philip

    2017-02-15

    The sandfly, Phlebotomus duboscqi is a vector of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) that is an important public health problem in Eastern Africa. Repellents have been used for protection of humans against vectors of ZCL and other vectors that transmit killer diseases including malaria, Rift Valley fever, dengue, and yellow fever. The repellent effects of different doses of the essential oils from the lemon grass, Cymbopogon citratus and Mexican marigold, Tagetes minuta were evaluated in a two-chamber bioassay against 3- to 7-day-old unfed females of P. duboscqi in the laboratory. The results were compared with those that were obtained when test animals were treated with an equivalent dose of diethyl-3-methylbenzamide, which is a repellent that is commonly used as a positive control. Overall, percentage repellency increased with increasing doses of the essential oils while biting rates decreased with increasing concentrations of the oils. Further, the oil of C. citratus was more potent than that of T. minuta with regard to protection time and biting deterrence. The effective doses at 50% (ED 50 ) and at 90% (ED 90 ) for the oil of C. citratus, were 0.04 and 0.79 mg/ml, respectively. Those of the oil of T. minuta were 0.10 and 12.58 mg/ml. In addition, the percentage repellency of 1 mg/ml of the essential oils of C. citratus and T. minuta against sandflies was 100% and 88.89%, respectively. A lower dose of 0.5 mg/ml of the oils, elicited 89.13% repellency for C. citratus and 52.22% for T. minuta. The laboratory tests showed that the essential oils of the two plants were highly repellent to adult sand flies, P. duboscqi. Thus, the two essential oils are candidate natural repellents that can be used against P. duboscqi due to their high efficacy at very low doses, hence, the envisaged safety in their use over chemical repellents. It remains to carry out clinical studies on human subjects with appropriate formulations of the oils prior to recommending their

  6. Effet comparé des poudres de Nicotiana tabacum L, Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf et de l'huile de Ricinus communis L sur la conservation des graines de Vigna unguiculata (L Walp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gakuru, S.

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared Effect of Nicotiana tabacum L, Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf Powders and Castor Oil Ricinus communis L. on Conservation of Cowpea Vigna Unguiculata (L. Walp Grains. The effect of powder of tobacco Nicotiana tabacum L. and citronella grass Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf and castor oil Ricinus communis L. on conservation of cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. grains was investigated in Kisangani, Zaire. After 5 months of conservation, infestation rates by bean weevil Acanthoscelides obtectus Say were 72.5 %, 74.5 %, 49.5 % and 5 % respectively for the check, the samples treated by 1 % of citronella grass and tobacco powder and 1 % of castor oil. The powder dose of 7.5 % did not give more interesting results.

  7. Evaluation of the lemongrass plant (Cymbopogon citratus extracted in different solvents for antioxidant and antibacterial activity against human pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balachandar Balakrishnan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test antibacterial and antioxidant activity of the lemongrass plant Cymbopogon citratus (C. citratus leaves extracted serially by the solvents (chloroform, methanol and water. Methods: The plant leaves extracts were used for antibacterial activity on Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, Nocardia sp., Serratia sp., and Enterobacter aeruginosa microorganisms by the Kirby Bauer agar disc diffusion method. This study was carried out on lemongrass plant leaf extracts in different concentration of all solvents. The leaf extracts from different solvents were tested for their scavenging activity against the stable free radical DPPH in quantization using a spectrophotometric assay. Oxidative damage was induced in vitro by treating blood DNA and analyzing the effects of the leaf extracts. Results: The results showed that C. citratus extracts exhibited maximum zones of inhibition in chloroform, methanol and water extracts. It was Observed that the C. citratus extracts exhibited maximum zone of inhibition against Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus vulgaris. Analyzed data in the present work suggested that antibacterial activity of C. citratus plant leaf extracts showed good results for Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. DPPH scavenging activity was highly elicited by the extract of C. citratus. Chloroform, methanol and water extracts of C. citratus leaves effectively decreased the extent of DNA damage. Conclusions: The present study suggested that the lemongrass plant extracts could offer various health benefits.

  8. Efecto anti-Trypanosoma cruzi del aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf (hierba luisa en ratones Balb/c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la actividad anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in vivo del aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus en ratones Balb/c. Diseño: Estudio experimental, prospectivo. Institución: Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas e Instituto de Medicina Tropical de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú. Material biológico: Aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus; ratones albinos Balb/c. Intervenciones: Los animales fueron asignados aleatoriamente a seis grupos de 15 ratones cada uno: infectados y no tratados (G1, infectados y tratados con benznidazol 100 mg/kg (G2, infectados y tratados con aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus 100 mg/kg y 250 mg/kg (G3 y G4, respectivamente, no infectados y no tratados (G5, y no infectados y tratados con 250 mg de Cymbopogon citratus (G6. La infección con T. cruzi se realizó con 10(4 trypomastigotes sanguíneos y el tratamiento empezó en el 8º día post infección (dpi hasta el 28° dpi. La parasitemia se determinó con microscopia óptica cada dos días en 5 µL de sangre de la cola. En el 14°, 21° y 28° dpi, cinco animales de cada grupo fueron sacrificados y se removió el corazón para estudio histopatológico. Principales medidas de resultados: Parasitemia, número de nidos de amastigotes e infiltrados inflamatorios. Resultados: El aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus 250 mg/kg/día produjo una reducción significativa en el pico de parasitemia desde 113,92 ± 25,66 hasta 74,60 ± 12,37 tripomastigotes/mL (p < 0,05. Con 100 mg/kg/día se produjo una reducción hasta 77,40 ± 14,93 tripomastigotes/ mL (p < 0,05. También redujo el número de amastigotes y de infiltrados inflamatorios en el corazón. Conclusiones: El aceite esencial de Cymbopogon citratus tuvo efecto anti-Trypanosoma cruzi en ratones Balb/c en lo referente a la disminución de la parasitemia, el número de nidos de amastigotes y los resultados inflamatorios.

  9. Evaluation of the Chemical Composition of Brazilian Commercial Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro de Castro Melo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The concentration and the chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from different samples of Cymbopogon citratus were evaluated. Among the 12 samples investigated (11 dried leaf samples and fresh plant leaves, seven presented essential oil concentrations within the threshold established by the Brazilian legislation. The moisture content was also determined and the majority of the samples presented humidity contents near 12%. The GC and GC/MS analyses of the essential oils led to identification of 22 compounds, with neral and geranial as the two major components. The total percentage of these two compounds varied within the investigated sample oils from 40.7% to 75.4%. In addition, a considerable variation in the chemical composition of the analyzed samples was observed. The process of grinding the leaves significantly decreased (by up to 68% the essential oil content, as well as the percentage of myrcene in the oils.

  10. Use of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil in food preservation: Recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Christopher E; Akpan, Ernest E

    2017-08-13

    The economic burdens and health implications of food spoilage are increasing. Contamination of food sources by fungi, bacteria, yeast, nematodes, insects, and rodents remains a major public health concern. Research has focused on developing safer natural products and innovations to meet consumers' acceptance as alternatives to synthetic food preservatives. Many recent novel preservative techniques and applications of both natural and synthetic origin continue to proliferate in food and chemical industries. In particular, some essential oils of plant origin are potent food preservatives and are thus attractive alternatives to synthetic preservatives. This paper provides an overview of recent advances and future prospects in assessing the efficacy of the use of Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass) essential oil in food preservation. The possible mechanisms of action and toxicological profile as well as evidence for or against the use of this essential oil as an alternative to synthetic food preservatives in domestic and industrial applications are discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Aminoglycosides and Modulating the Essential Oil of Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo R. TINTINO

    2015-01-01

    Vários trabalhos vêm demonstrando a importância do estudo de produtos naturais como fonte alternativa para novos antimicrobianos ou que venham potencializar os já existentes. Neste contexto este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a atividade antibacteriana e as possíveis interações entre o óleo essencial de Cymbopogon citratus combinados a aminoglicosídeos frente a linhagens padrões e multirresistentes de S. aureus, E. coli e de P. aeruginosa provenientes de isolados clínicos. Um ensaio de microdiluição foi realizado para verificar a atividade antibacteriana e as possíveis interacções entre o produto natural e os antibióticos, utilizando uma concentração sub-inibitória. Através dos resultados foi constatado a interferência sinérgica dos aminoglicosídeos quando associados com o óleo essencial em uma concentração de CIM/8, com redução das CIMs em até quatro pontos frente às linhagens de S. aureus 358, E. coli 27 e P. aeruginosa-143. Mas nenhuma atividade modificadora foi observada frente a P. aeruginosa 78 e P. aeruginosa 91. Através dos resultados pode-se concluir que o óleo essencial de Cymbopogon citratus pode ser uma fonte alternativa de produtos naturais com atividade antibacteriana. Vários trabalhos vêm demonstrando a importância do estudo de produtos naturais como fonte alternativa para novos antimicrobianos ou que venham potencializar os já existentes. Neste contexto este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar a atividade antibacteriana e as possíveis interações entre o óleo essencial de Cymbopogon citratus combinados a aminoglicosídeos frente a linhagens padrões e multirresistentes de S. aureus, E. coli e de P. aeruginosa provenientes de isolados clínicos. Um ensaio de microdiluição foi realizado para verificar a atividade antibacteriana e as possíveis interacções entre o produto natural e os antibióticos, utilizando uma concentração sub-inibitória. Através  dos resultados foi constatado a

  12. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil from Cuba and Brazil against housefly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Zeneida Teixeira; Sánchez, Félix Fernández; dos Santos, Arith Ramos; Amaral, Ana Claudia Fernandes; Ferreira, José Luiz Pinto; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Queiroz, Margareth Maria de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus collected from Brazil and Cuba was tested to a chemical characterization and then was tested on the post-embryonic development of Musca domestica. The chemical composition analysis by GC-MS of the oils from Brazil/Cuba allowed the identification of 13 and 12 major constituents respectively; nine of them common to both. In the both oils, the main components were the isomers geranial and neral, which together form the compound citral. This corresponds to a total of 97.92%/Brazil and 97.69%/Cuba of the compounds identified. The monoterpene myrcene, observed only in the sample of Cuba, presented a large relative abundance (6.52%). The essential oil of C. citratus (Brazil/Cuba) was dissolved in DMSO and tested at concentrations of 5, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100% and citral was prepared by mixing 16.8 mg with 960 µL DMSO. Both essential oils and monoterpene citral were applied topically to newly-hatched larvae (1µL/larva). The results showed a lethal concentration (LC50) of 4.25 and 3.24% for the Brazilian and Cuban essential oils, respectively. Mortalities of larval and newly-hatched larvae to adult periods were dose-dependent for the two both oils as for monoterpene citral, reaching 90%. Both essential oils and citral caused morphological changes in adult specimens.

  13. Cymbopogon citratus essential oil: effect on polymicrobial caries-related biofilm with low cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Alcionéia Carvalho de; Borges, Aline Chiodi; Brighenti, Fernanda Lourenção; Salvador, Marcos José; Gontijo, Aline Vidal Lacerda; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi

    2017-11-06

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and its main compound (citral) against primary dental colonizers and caries-related species. Chemical characterization of the essential oil was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), and the main compound was determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. sanguinis and S. sobrinus. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations were determined by broth microdilution assay for streptococci and lactobacilli reference, and for clinical strains. The effect of the essential oil on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation/disruption was investigated. Negative (without treatment) and positive controls (chlorhexidine) were used. The effect of citral on preformed biofilm was also tested using the same methodology. Monospecies and microcosm biofilms were tested. ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (α=0.05). Cytotoxicity of the essential oil to human keratinocytes was performed by MTT assay. GC/MS demonstrated one major component (citral). The essential oil showed an inhibitory effect on all tested bacterial species, including S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Essential oil of C. citratus (10X MIC) reduced the number of viable cells of lactobacilli and streptococci biofilms (p essential oil inhibited adhesion of caries-related polymicrobial biofilm to dental enamel (p essential oil showed low cytotoxicity to human keratinocytes. Based on these findings, this study can contribute to the development of new formulations for products like mouthwash, against dental biofilms.

  14. Activation of intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in cancer cells by Cymbopogon citratus polysaccharide fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangam, Ramar; Sathuvan, Malairaj; Poongodi, Arasu; Suresh, Veeraperumal; Pazhanichamy, Kalailingam; Sivasubramanian, Srinivasan; Kanipandian, Nagarajan; Ganesan, Nalini; Rengasamy, Ramasamy; Thirumurugan, Ramasamy; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-07-17

    Essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus were already reported to have wide ranging medical and industrial applications. However, information on polysaccharides from the plant and their anticancer activities are limited. In the present study, polysaccharides from C. citratus were extracted and fractionated by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Two different polysaccharide fractions such as F1 and F2 were obtained, and these fractions were found to have distinct acidic polysaccharides as characterized by their molecular weight and sugar content. NMR spectral analysis revealed the presence of (1→4) linked b-d-Xylofuranose moiety in these polysaccharides. Using these polysaccharide fractions F1 and F2, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities were evaluated against cancer cells in vitro and the mechanism of action of the polysaccharides in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells via intrinsic pathway was also proposed. Two different reproductive cancer cells such as Siha and LNCap were employed for in vitro studies on cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis and apoptotic DNA fragmentation, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and profiles of gene and protein expression in response to treatment of cells by the polysaccharide fractions. These polysaccharide fractions exhibited potential cytotoxic and apoptotic effects on carcinoma cells, and they induced apoptosis in these cells through the events of up-regulation of caspase 3, down-regulation of bcl-2 family genes followed by cytochrome c release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil from Cuba and Brazil against housefly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeneida Teixeira Pinto

    Full Text Available Essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus collected from Brazil and Cuba was tested to a chemical characterization and then was tested on the post-embryonic development of Musca domestica. The chemical composition analysis by GC-MS of the oils from Brazil/Cuba allowed the identification of 13 and 12 major constituents respectively; nine of them common to both. In the both oils, the main components were the isomers geranial and neral, which together form the compound citral. This corresponds to a total of 97.92%/Brazil and 97.69%/Cuba of the compounds identified. The monoterpene myrcene, observed only in the sample of Cuba, presented a large relative abundance (6.52%. The essential oil of C. citratus (Brazil/Cuba was dissolved in DMSO and tested at concentrations of 5, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100% and citral was prepared by mixing 16.8 mg with 960 µL DMSO. Both essential oils and monoterpene citral were applied topically to newly-hatched larvae (1µL/larva. The results showed a lethal concentration (LC50 of 4.25 and 3.24% for the Brazilian and Cuban essential oils, respectively. Mortalities of larval and newly-hatched larvae to adult periods were dose-dependent for the two both oils as for monoterpene citral, reaching 90%. Both essential oils and citral caused morphological changes in adult specimens.

  16. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasha Momo H. Anal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration.

  17. Cymbopogon citratus essential oil: effect on polymicrobial caries-related biofilm with low cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alcionéia Carvalho de OLIVEIRA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and its main compound (citral against primary dental colonizers and caries-related species. Chemical characterization of the essential oil was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS, and the main compound was determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. sanguinis and S. sobrinus. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations were determined by broth microdilution assay for streptococci and lactobacilli reference, and for clinical strains. The effect of the essential oil on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation/disruption was investigated. Negative (without treatment and positive controls (chlorhexidine were used. The effect of citral on preformed biofilm was also tested using the same methodology. Monospecies and microcosm biofilms were tested. ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (α=0.05. Cytotoxicity of the essential oil to human keratinocytes was performed by MTT assay. GC/MS demonstrated one major component (citral. The essential oil showed an inhibitory effect on all tested bacterial species, including S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Essential oil of C. citratus (10X MIC reduced the number of viable cells of lactobacilli and streptococci biofilms (p < 0.05. The essential oil inhibited adhesion of caries-related polymicrobial biofilm to dental enamel (p < 0.01. Citral significantly reduced the number of viable cells of streptococci biofilm (p < 0.001. The essential oil showed low cytotoxicity to human keratinocytes. Based on these findings, this study can contribute to the development of new formulations for products like mouthwash, against dental biofilms.

  18. Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon giganteus essential oils have cytotoxic effects on tumor cell cultures. Identification of citral as a new putative anti-proliferative molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayala, Bagora; Bassole, Imaël H N; Maqdasy, Salwan; Baron, Silvère; Simpore, Jacques; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A

    2018-03-06

    Cymbopogon species are used as traditional remedies in Burkina Faso for treating several diseases. We aimed to study the effects of their essential oils on cancer cell lines. For that purpose, Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. and Cymbopogon giganteus Chiov. were studied for their essential oils after various chemical extractions. Antioxidant, potential anti-inflammatory action (inhibition of lipoxygenase) and cytotoxic activities were also tested on various prostate cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. Thirty-three compounds were identified in the essential oil of C. giganteus: Limonene (19.33%), Mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol cis (17.34%), Mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol trans (13.95%), trans-Mentha-2,8-diene-para-ol 1 (13.91%) and Mentha-2,8-diene-1-ol, cis-para (8.10%) were the most abundant. C. citratus essential oil contained 15 compounds and the major ones were geranial/citral A (48.18%) and neral/citral B (34.37%). Essential oil of C. citratus showed the highest ability to scavenge DPPH + radicals (approximately 68% at 8 mg/mL) while C. giganteus exhibited the highest capability to reduce ABTS + (0.59μmolET/g). The essential oil of C. citratus was the most effective on prostate cell lines LNCaP (IC 50  = 6.36 μg/ml) and PC-3 (IC 50  = 32.1 μg/ml), and on glioblastoma cell lines (SF-767 (IC 50  = 45.13 μg/ml) and SF-763 (IC 50  = 172.05 μg/ml). Interestingly, the activity of essential oil of C. citratus was statistically equal to that of its major component, citral. Combination of both oils showed antagonist, additive, indifferent and synergistic effects on LNCaP, PC-3, SF-767 and SF-763 cell lines, respectively. In conclusion, plants from the traditional medicine in Burkina Faso could be of interest for identifying new compounds, such as citral, for the treatment of prostate cancer and glioblastoma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  19. Acaricidal activity of Cymbopogon citratus and Azadirachta indica against house dust mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifah, Azima Laili; Awang, Siti Hazar; Ming, Ho Tze; Abidin, Suhaili Zainal; Omar, Maizatul Hashima

    2011-10-01

    To examine the acaricidal effects of the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus leaf extract (lemongrass) and ethanolic Azadirachta indica leaf extract (neem) against house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus). Twenty-five adults mites were placed onto treated filter paper that is soaked with plant extract and been tested at different concentrations (50.00%, 25.00%, 12.50%, 6.25% and 3.13%) and exposure times (24hrs, 48hrs, 72hrs and 96 hrs). All treatments were replicated 7 times, and the experiment repeated once. The topical and contact activities of the two herbs were investigated. Mortalities from lemongrass extract were higher than neem for both topical and contact activities. At 50 % concentration, both 24 hrs topical and contact exposures to lemongrass resulted in more than 91% mortalities for both species of mites. At the same concentration and exposure time, neem resulted in topical mortalities of 40.3% and 15.7% against D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae respectively; contact mortalities were 8.0% and 8.9% against the 2 mites, respectively. There was no difference in topical mortalities of D. pteronyssinus from exposure to concentrations of lemongrass and neem up to 12.50%; lemongrass was more effective than neem at the higher concentrations. Generally, topical mortalities of D. farinae due to lemongrass are higher than that due to neem. Contact mortalities of lemongrass are always higher that neem against both species of mites.

  20. Use of gamma radiation cobalt 60 for disinfestation of Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1972) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae) in Cymbopogon citratus stapf and Ocimun basillicum L. dehydrated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Amanda C.O.; Potenza, Marcos R.; Alves, Juliana N.; Justi Junior, Joao [Instituto Biologico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento de Sanidade Vegetal]. E-mail: potenza@biologico.sp.gov.br; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Stored products such as grains, flours, dry fruits and spices are normally infested by pests as beetles (Lasioderma serricorne), mites and moths, depreciating the product visually and promoting its deterioration. To improve the quality of spices, medicinal plants, seasoning and others foodstuffs there is a need for adequate methods of handling, correct identification of the species, adequate collection, pre and post-treatment procedures and adequate storage. The objective of this work was to determine the dose of gamma radiation for the disinfestations of medicinal and aromatic plants dehydrated infested by L. serricone. The plants used in this study were Cymbopogon citratus stapf (lemon grass) and Ocimun basillicum L. (basil) in this dehydrated form. The experiment was carried out in the Arthropods Laboratory of the Instituto Biologico/SP, during the months of January and May 2006, and the irradiations were carried out in the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN/CNEN/SP, using an experimental Cobalt 60 irradiator, model Gammacell 220. Each treatment consisted of 5 parcels containing 10g of dehydrated products infested with 20 last instar larvae of L. serricorne, conditioned in plastic 10x10 cm containers with small punctures in the cover to allow internal aeration. The substratum previously infested was kept for 1 day in a acclimatized room at 27 {+-} 2 deg C, after this period the substratum was submitted to increasing doses of gamma radiation: 0; 0,5; 0,75; 1,0; 1,25; 1,50; 1,75; 2,0; 2,25; 2,50 e 2,75 kGy. After irradiation, the samples were kept in a acclimatized room at 27 {+-} 2 deg C of temperature and relative humidity of 70 {+-} 5 % and after a 45 days period the number of adults insects emerged was evaluated. The lethal dose of gamma radiation for L. serrricorne last instar larvae on Cymbopogon citratus stapf and Ocimun basillicum L. was 1,75 kGy. (author)

  1. Food preservative potential of essential oils and fractions from Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum gratissimum and Thymus vulgaris against mycotoxigenic fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguefack, J.; Dongmo, J. B. Lekagne; Dakole, C. D.

    2009-01-01

    The food preservative potential of essential oils from three aromatic plants Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum gratissimum and Thymus vulgaris and their fractions was investigated against two mycotoxigenic strains each of Aspergillus ochraceus, Penicillium expansum and P. verrucosum. The fungicidal...... activity was determined and expressed as a Number of Decimal Reduction of the colony forming units per ml (NDR cfu). The influence of pH variation on this activity was studied. The NDR cfu varied with the essential oils and its concentration, the pH of the medium and the strain tested. The essential oils...... from O. gratissimum exhibited the highest activity against the six fungal strains under the three pH tested. T. vulgaris and C. citratus essential oils were less active against the Penicillium species tested and A. ochraceus, respectively. Potassium sorbate did not present any activity at pH 6 and 9...

  2. Effects of essential oil from Cymbopogon citratus leaves and its susceptibility on the quality of fresh orange juice during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euloge Adjou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the effect of essential oil (EO from Cymbopogon citratus leaves against the spoilage flora of fresh orange juice. Thus, the EO was extracted by hydrodistillation from fresh leaves of Cymbopogon citratus collected in southern Benin and its chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography, coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Orange samples were collected from large production areas of South and Central Benin and juices were extracted by mechanical pressing. After identification of spoilage flora of fresh orange juice, antimicrobial tests were carried out with the EO of Cymbopogon citratus to evaluate its antimicrobial activity on spoilage flora of fresh orange juice.  Results indicate that the spoilage flora of fresh orange juice is mainly composed of fungi belonging to the genera of Cladosporium, Penicillium and Fusarium. Bacteria such as Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes were also identified in some samples. The major compounds identified in the EO by GC/MS are Neral (33.0% and geranial (41.3% with a predominance of oxygenated monoterpenes (85.5%. Antimicrobial tests have revealed a high antibacterial activity of the EO, with minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC between 0.1 and 0.15 μL.mL-1. Antifungal tests revealed that fungi are also susceptible to this EO with minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC between 0.15 and 0.25 μL.mL-1. Results obtained during the evaluation of the physicochemical characteristics of the orange juice stored by adding EO, indicated a significant decrease in the pH and vitamin C content. However, with EO concentration of 0.250 μL.mL-1, the pH of stored juice was 6.4 ± 0.1 after 15 days of preservation, with a best vitamin C content of 28.06 ± 0.03 mg / 100mL. The EO of Cymbopogon citratus, with high antimicrobial activity, could be used as an alternative in the preservation of fruit juices, replacing antimicrobials from chemical synthesis.

  3. Effect of lemon grass ( Cymbopogon citratus Stapf) powder and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four mould species: Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, A. tamarii and Penicillium citrinum were inoculated in the form of conidia suspension (approx. ... oil at 0.1 and 0.25% (v/w) and ground leaves at 10% (w/w) significantly reduced deterioration and aflatoxin production in shelled melon seeds inoculated with toxigenic A. flavus.

  4. Anticancer Effect and Apoptosis Induction of Cymbopogon citratus Plant on Head and Neck HTB43 Cancer Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, N.; Zainah Adam; Arapoc, D.J.; Mohamed Zaffar Ali Mohamed Amiroudine; Shafii Khamis

    2016-01-01

    Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) is a major crop in Asia, South and Central America, Africa and other tropical countries. It is commonly used as a culinary herb in Asian cuisine and also as medicinal herb in India. The objective of the present study was to investigate the anticancer effect of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil on human head and neck cancer cell lines. Lemongrass essential oil was obtained from fresh lemongrass leaves using the microwave extractor. The yield of the highly purified oil obtained was 0.62 %. The oil was investigated for its in-vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction against human head and neck HTB43 cancer cell lines. The results showed promising cytotoxic effects with IC 50 value of 15.42 ± 6.10 μg/ ml (HTB43) respectively. In addition, the essential oil has found inducing apoptotic effect within HTB43 cells (25.71 ± 1.43 %). These preliminary results indicated that the oil had apoptosis-based cytotoxicity against head and neck cancer cells. However, further investigations need to be carried out in order to elucidate the anti-cancer properties of the oil. The phytochemicals properties of the active compounds found in the oil also need to be studied. (author)

  5. In vitro activity of the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus and its major component (citral) on Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Marta Regina; dos Santos, Adriana Oliveira; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Ferreira, Izabel Cristina Piloto; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia

    2009-11-01

    Leishmaniasis causes considerable mortality throughout the world, affecting more than 12 million people. Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf, Family Poaceae, is a widely used herb in tropical countries and is also known as a source of ethnomedicines. In this study, the inhibitory effect and the morphological and ultrastructural alterations on Leishmania amazonensis by the essential oil (EO) of C. citratus and its main constituent, citral, were evaluated. The results showed that the antiproliferative activity of EO on promastigotes and axenic amastigotes, and intracellular amastigote forms of L. amazonensis was significantly better than citral, and indicated a dose-dependent effect. Neither compound showed a cytotoxic effect on macrophage strain J774G8. The promastigote forms of L. amazonensis underwent remarkable morphological and ultrastructural alterations compared with untreated cultures. These alterations were visible by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy of promastigotes treated with EO and citral at concentrations corresponding to the IC(50) (1.7 and 8.0 microg/ml) and IC(90) (3.2 and 25 microg/ml), respectively, after 72 h of incubation. This study revealed that citral-rich essential oil from C. citratus has promising antileishmanial properties, and is a good candidate for further research to develop a new anti-protozoan drug.

  6. In vitro antimicrobial properties of plant essential oils thymus vulgaris, cymbopogon citratus and laurus nobilis against five important foodborne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Farias Millezi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Several essential oils of condiment and medicinal plants possess proven antimicrobial activity and are of important interest for the food industry. Therefore, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC of those oils should be determined for various bacteria. MIC varies according to the oil used, the major compounds, and the physiology of the bacterium under study. In the present study, the essential oils of the plants Thymus vulgaris (time, Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass and Laurus nobilis (bay were chemically quantified, and the MIC was determined on the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117, Salmonella enterica Enteritidis S64, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The essential oil of C. citratus demonstrated bacterial activity at all concentrations tested and against all of the bacteria tested. The majority of essential oil compounds were geranial and neral. The major constituent of T. vulgaris was 1.8-cineol and of L. nobilis was linalool, which presented lower antibacterial activity, followed by 1.8-cineol. The Gram-negative bacteria demonstrated higher resistance to the use of the essential oils tested in this study. E. coli was the least sensitive and was inhibited only by the oils of C. citratus and L. nobilis.

  7. Effect of Lippia alba and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils on biofilms of Streptococcus mutans and cytotoxicity in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofiño-Rivera, A; Ortega-Cuadros, M; Galvis-Pareja, D; Jiménez-Rios, H; Merini, L J; Martínez-Pabón, M C

    2016-12-24

    Caries is a public health problem, given that it prevails in 60 to 90% of the school-age global population. Multiple factors interact in its etiology, among them dental plaque is necessary to have lactic acid producing microorganisms like Streptococcus from he Mutans group. Existing prevention and treatment measures are not totally effective and generate adverse effects, which is why it is necessary to search for complementary strategies for their management. The study sought to evaluate the eradication capacity of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the toxicity on eukaryotic cells of Lippia alba and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils. Essential oils were extracted from plant material through steam distillation and then its chemical composition was determined. The MBEC-high-throughput (MBEC-HTP) (Innovotech, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) assay used to determine the eradication concentration of S. mutans ATCC 35668 strain biofilms. Cytotoxicity was evaluated on CHO cells through the MTT cell proliferation assay. The major components in both oils were Geraniol and Citral; in L. alba 18.9% and 15.9%, respectively, and in C. citratus 31.3% and 26.7%. The L. alba essential oils presented eradication activity against S. mutans biofilms of 95.8% in 0.01mg/dL concentration and C. citratus essential oils showed said eradication activity of 95.4% at 0.1, 0.01mg/dL concentrations and of 93.1% in the 0.001mg/dL concentration; none of the concentrations of both essential oils showed toxicity on CHO cells during 24h. The L. alba and C. citratus essential oils showed eradication activity against S. mutans biofilms and null cytotoxicity, evidencing the need to conduct further studies that can identify their active components and in order to guide a safe use in treating and preventing dental caries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Food preservative potential of essential oils and fractions from Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum gratissimum and Thymus vulgaris against mycotoxigenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguefack, J; Dongmo, J B Lekagne; Dakole, C D; Leth, V; Vismer, H F; Torp, J; Guemdjom, E F N; Mbeffo, M; Tamgue, O; Fotio, D; Zollo, P H Amvam; Nkengfack, A E

    2009-05-31

    The food preservative potential of essential oils from three aromatic plants Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum gratissimum and Thymus vulgaris and their fractions was investigated against two mycotoxigenic strains each of Aspergillus ochraceus, Penicillium expansum and P. verrucosum. The fungicidal activity was determined and expressed as a Number of Decimal Reduction of the colony forming units per ml (NDR cfu). The influence of pH variation on this activity was studied. The NDR cfu varied with the essential oils and its concentration, the pH of the medium and the strain tested. The essential oils from O. gratissimum exhibited the highest activity against the six fungal strains under the three pH tested. T. vulgaris and C. citratus essential oils were less active against the Penicillium species tested and A. ochraceus, respectively. Potassium sorbate did not present any activity at pH 6 and 9. At pH 3, its NDR cfu was the lowest against the six fungal strains. At the same pH and at 4000 ppm, the three essential oils presented a NRD cfu > or = 6 against strains of A. ochraceus and P. expansum. The same result was obtained with T. vulgaris and C. citratus at 8000 ppm against both strains of P. verrucosum. The highest activity of the three essential oils was recorded at pH 3 against A. ochraceus strains and at pH 9 against both species of Penicillium. From the fractionation, three active fractions were obtained each from C. citratus and O. gratissimum, and two active fractions from T. vulgaris. These active fractions exhibited a NDR cfu, two to seven folds higher than that of the complete essential oils.

  9. Extratos Cymbopogon citratus e Annona muricata como inibidores do crescimento micelial de fungos fitopatogênicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa da Silva Bibiano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Produtos alternativos vêm sendo utilizados para manejo de fitopatógenos com extratos ou óleos essenciais. A utilização de óleos essenciais é promissora para o desenvolvimento de agentes antimicrobianos por oferecer propriedades antibacterianas e antifúngicas. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar os efeitos inibitórios in vitro do óleo essencial do capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus e do hidrolato de graviola (Annona muricata sobre desenvolvimento de fungos fitopatogênicos. Os extratos vegetais foram extraídos pela técnica de arraste a vapor e testados nas concentrações de 0,05 %, 1 %, 5 %, 10 %, 15 %, 25 %, 35 %, 45 %, 50 % e 100 %. Os fitopatógenos utilizados foram Pestalotiopsis sp., Monilinia sp. e Rhizopus spp. Todos os micro-organismos foram obtidos da coleção de micro-organismos da Universidade do Vale do Sapucaí (Univás em Pouso Alegre (MG. O óleo essencial do capim-limão inibiu o crescimento dos fungos testados nas concentrações de 50 % e 100 %. Houve inibição total do crescimento micelial de Pestalotiopsis sp. nas concentrações de 35 % a 100 %; nas concentrações abaixo de 25 %, houve inibição parcial. Com o fungo Rhizopus spp., houve crescimento parcial nas concentrações de 0,05 % a 45 %; nas concentrações de 50 % e 100 %, houve inibição total do crescimento fúngico. A Monilinia sp. obteve inibição total a partir da concentração de 35 %; abaixo da concentração de 25 %, o crescimento fúngico foi parcial. Com relação ao hidrolato da graviola (Annona muricata, os resultados indicam que não houve inibição no desenvolvimento micelial dos fungos testados, independentemente da concentração utilizada. Portanto o óleo essencial do capim-limão pode ser utilizado como alternativa ao controle desses patógenos.

  10. Extraction of citral oil from lemongrass (Cymbopogon Citratus) by steam-water distillation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, P. N.; Husin, H.; Asnawi, T. M.; Adisalamun

    2018-04-01

    In Indonesia, production of citral oil from lemon grass (Cymbopogon Cytratus) is done by a traditional technique whereby a low yield results. To improve the yield, an appropriate extraction technology is required. In this research, a steam-water distillation technique was applied to extract the essential oil from the lemongrass. The effects of sample particle size and bed volume on yield and quality of citral oil produced were investigated. The drying and refining time of 2 hours were used as fixed variables. This research results that minimum citral oil yield of 0.53% was obtained on sample particle size of 3 cm and bed volume of 80%, whereas the maximum yield of 1.95% on sample particle size of 15 cm and bed volume of 40%. The lowest specific gravity of 0.80 and the highest specific gravity of 0.905 were obtained on sample particle size of 8 cm with bed volume of 80% and particle size of 12 cm with bed volume of 70%, respectively. The lowest refractive index of 1.480 and the highest refractive index of 1.495 were obtained on sample particle size of 8 cm with bed volume of 70% and sample particle size of 15 cm with bed volume of 40%, respectively. The solubility of the produced citral oil in alcohol was 70% in ratio of 1:1, and the citral oil concentration obtained was around 79%.

  11. Chemical composition and cardiovascular effects induced by the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus DC. Stapf, Poaceae, in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia V. Moreira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus DC. Stapf, Poaceae, is used in the folk medicine for hypertension treatment. This work investigated the chemical composition and cardiovascular effects in rats of C. citratus essential oil (EOCC. A phytochemical screening demonstrated the presence of eight constituents, being geranial the major compound (43.08%. In rats, EOCC (1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.v. induced transient hypotension and bradycardia that were attenuated by atropine and sodium thiopental, but not by L-NAME or indomethacin. In rings of rat superior mesenteric artery pre-contracted with phenylephrine, EOCC (1 to 3000 µg/mL induced relaxation that was not affected after removal of the endothelium, after TEA or in rings pre-contracted with KCl (80 mM. Furthermore, EOCC (1000 µg/mL was not able to induce additional effect on maximal relaxation of nifedipine (10 µM. In conclusions, EOCC induces hypotension, possibly by reduction in vascular resistance caused by inhibition of the Ca2+ influx, and bradycardia probably due to an activation of cardiac muscarinic receptors.

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of Cymbopogon citratus leaves infusion via proteasome and nuclear factor-κB pathway inhibition: contribution of chlorogenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Vera; Costa, Gustavo; Figueirinha, Artur; Marques, Carla; Pereira, Paulo; Miguel Neves, Bruno; Celeste Lopes, Maria; García-Rodríguez, Carmen; Teresa Cruz, Maria; Teresa Batista, Maria

    2013-06-21

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf leaves infusion is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, however little is known about their bioactive compounds. Investigate the compounds responsible for anti-inflammatory potential of Cymbopogon citratus (Cy) on cytokines production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human and mouse macrophages, and the action mechanisms involved. An essential oil-free infusion of Cy was prepared and polyphenol-rich fractions (PFs) were obtained from it by column chromatography. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) was identified, by HPLC/PDA/ESI-MS(n). The expression of cytokines, namely TNF-α and CCL5, was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, on LPS-stimulated human macrophages. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, a master regulator of inflammation, was investigated by western blot and gene reporter assay. Proteasome activity was assessed using a fluorogenic peptide. Cymbopogon citratus extract and its polyphenols inhibited the cytokine production on human macrophages. This supports the anti-inflammatory activity of Cy polyphenols in physiologically relevant cells. Concerning the effect on the activation of NF-κB pathway, the results pointed to an inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB activation by Cy and PFs. CGA was identified, by HPLC/PDA/ESI-MS(n), as the main phenolic acid of the Cy infusion, and it demonstrated to be, at least in part, responsible by that effect. Additionally, it was verified for the first time that Cy and PFs inhibited the proteasome activity, a complex that controls NF-κB activation, having CGA a strong contribution. The results evidenced, for the first time, the anti-inflammatory properties of Cymbopogon citratus through proteasome inhibition and, consequently NF-κB pathway and cytokine expression. Additionally, Cy polyphenols, in particular chlorogenic acid, were highlighted as bioactive compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microscopic investigation to determine the effect of Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuill. and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. treatment on different life stages of Musca domestica (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sapna; Kumar, Peeyush; Malik, Anushree

    2017-06-01

    Microscopic investigation was done to determine the effect of entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana and essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus on different life stages of Musca domestica . Scanning electron microscopy investigation of fungal infected larvae showed sluggish movement, rigor, and failure of body to balance in water. Treated larvae also revealed varied level of cuticle shrinkage and extreme dehydration. Surface of B. bassiana infected pupae showed varied stage of mycelial growth, while the cadaver of adult fly was observed to have extensive fungal growth covering their entire body surface. The application of C. citratus oils on M. domestica larvae resulted in skin shrinkage, spinous cells proliferation and bleb formation, while the treated pupae showed high incidence of incomplete emergence and malformation in emerged adult flies. The current study establishes effect of C. citratus essential oil and B. bassiana infection on different life stages of M. domestica .

  14. Controle da ferrugem das folhas do capim-limão [Cymbopogon citratus (DC: Stapf] com produtos naturais Rust control in leaves of lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC: Stapf] by using natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Lorenzetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf é uma planta medicinal pertencente a família Poaceae, perene, importante para a indústria farmacêutica e alimentícia devido ao óleo essencial que produz. Um problema limitante para a produção comercial é a ferrugem, doença cujo agente etiológico é o fungo Puccinia nakanishikii Dietel. O presente trabalho objetivou avaliar a ação de produtos naturais no controle da doença in vitro e in vivo. Para os testes in vitro, empregaram-se os seguintes produtos sobre a germinação de esporos do patógeno: óleos essenciais de eucalipto, palma-rosa, cravo-da-índia, menta, limão, citronela e mil-folhas; extrato pirolenhoso de eucalipto e mentol cristalizado, em diferentes concentrações. Para os testes de campo foram selecionados quatro produtos, o óleo de citronela e de eucalipto, o extrato pirolenhoso, e o mentol. In vitro, todos os agentes mostraram-se promissores no controle do patógeno. Quando em condições in vivo, sob alta severidade da doença no ato da avaliação, os produtos testados foram capazes de reduzir a severidade da doença em comparação com a testemunha. O controle da doença com os agentes naturais variou de 38% (extrato pirolenhoso a 61%(óleo essencial de eucalipto.Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf is a medicinal plant that belongs to the Poaceae family; it is perennial and important for the pharmaceutical and food industry due to the essential oil it produces. A limiting problem for commercial production is rust, a disease that has as etiological agent the fungus Puccinia nakanishikii Dietel. The present study aimed to evaluate the action of natural products on the disease control, in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro tests, the following products were employed on the germination of the pathogen spores: essential oils from eucalyptus, palmarosa, clove, peppermint, lemon, citronella and yarrow, pyroligneous extract from eucalyptus, and crystallized menthol, at different

  15. Toxicity and gastric tolerance of essential oils from Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum gratissimum and Ocimum basilicum in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandohan, P; Gnonlonfin, B; Laleye, A; Gbenou, J D; Darboux, R; Moudachirou, M

    2008-07-01

    Oils of Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum gratissimum and Ocimum basilicum are widely used for their medicinal properties, and as food flavours and perfumes. Recently in a study in West Africa, these oils have been recommended to combat Fusarium verticillioides and subsequent fumonisin contamination in stored maize, but their toxicological profile was not investigated. The current study was undertaken to provide data on acute and subacute toxicity as well as on gastric tolerance of these oils in rat. For this purpose, the oils were given by gavage to Wistar rats for 14 consecutive days. The animals were observed daily for their general behaviour and survival, and their visceral organs such as stomach and liver were taken after sacrifice for histological analyses. A dose-dependent effect of the tested oils was observed during the study. Applied at doses generally higher than 1500 mg/kg body weight, the oils caused significant functional damages to stomach and liver of rat. Unlike the other oils, administration of O. gratissimum oil did not result in adverse effects in rat liver at the tested doses. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of the tested oils has been established. The three tested oils can be considered as safe to human when applied on stored maize at recommended concentrations.

  16. Treatment of pityriasis versicolor with topical application of essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf - therapeutic pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Egberto Santos; Pereira, Fillipe de Oliveira; Cavalcante, Neuza Maria; Gayoso, Carla Wanderley; Lima, Edeltrudes de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Pityriasis versicolor is a fungal infection caused by Malassezia spp. that has frequent relapses. The main objective of this research was to perform phase I and II clinical studies, using formulations containing essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus in patients with pityriasis versicolor. Phase I study included twenty volunteers to ascertain the safety of the formulations. In phase II, 47 volunteers randomly received essential oil formulations at 1.25 μL/mL concentration, for forty days. The shampoo should be applied three times a week and the cream twice a day. A control group in phase II, consisting of 29 volunteers, received the same formulations but with 2% ketoconazole as the active ingredient. No significant adverse events were observed in volunteers during Phase I. In Phase II, 30 (63.83%) volunteers using essential oil and 18 (62.07%) using ketoconazole remained until the end of the study. We observed a predominance of lesions in disseminated form, with M. sympodialis detected as the predominant agent identified in cultures. After 40 days of treatment, the rate of mycological cure was 60% (p Pityriasis versicolor.

  17. Treatment of pityriasis versicolor with topical application of essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf - therapeutic pilot study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Egberto Santos; Pereira, Fillipe de Oliveira; Cavalcante, Neuza Maria; Gayoso, Carla Wanderley; Lima, Edeltrudes de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pityriasis versicolor is a fungal infection caused by Malassezia spp. that has frequent relapses. OBJECTIVES The main objective of this research was to perform phase I and II clinical studies, using formulations containing essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus in patients with pityriasis versicolor. METHODS Phase I study included twenty volunteers to ascertain the safety of the formulations. In phase II, 47 volunteers randomly received essential oil formulations at 1.25 μL/mL concentration, for forty days. The shampoo should be applied three times a week and the cream twice a day. A control group in phase II, consisting of 29 volunteers, received the same formulations but with 2% ketoconazole as the active ingredient. RESULTS No significant adverse events were observed in volunteers during Phase I. In Phase II, 30 (63.83%) volunteers using essential oil and 18 (62.07%) using ketoconazole remained until the end of the study. We observed a predominance of lesions in disseminated form, with M. sympodialis detected as the predominant agent identified in cultures. After 40 days of treatment, the rate of mycological cure was 60% (p Pityriasis versicolor. PMID:23793205

  18. Monoterpenic aldehydes as potential anti-Leishmania agents: activity of Cymbopogon citratus and citral on L. infantum, L. tropica and L. major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M; Pires, P; Dinis, A M; Santos-Rosa, M; Alves, V; Salgueiro, L; Cavaleiro, C; Sousa, M C

    2012-03-01

    In order to contribute for the search of new drugs for leishmaniasis, we study the susceptibility of Leishmania infantum, Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major to Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and major compounds, mrycene and citral. C. citratus and citral were the most active inhibiting L. infantum, L. tropica and L. major growth at IC(50) concentrations ranging from 25 to 52 μg/ml and from 34 to 42 μg/ml, respectively. L. infantum promastigotes exposed to essential oil and citral underwent considerable ultrastructural alterations, namely mitochondrial and kinetoplast swelling, autophagosomal structures, disruption of nuclear membrane and nuclear chromatin condensation. C. citratus essential oil and citral promoted the leishmanicidal effect by triggering a programmed cell death. In fact, the leishmanicidal activity was mediated via apoptosis as evidenced by externalization of phosphatidylserine, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell-cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase. Taken together, ours findings lead us to propose that citral was responsible for anti-Leishmania activity of the C. citratus and both may represent a valuable source for therapeutic control of leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Activity of Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum canum, and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils against Plasmodium falciparum and mature-stage larvae of Anopheles funestus s.s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akono Ntonga, Patrick; Baldovini, Nicolas; Mouray, Elisabeth; Mambu, Lengo; Belong, Philippe; Grellier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The biological activities of essential oils from three plants grown in Cameroon: Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum canum, and Cymbopogon citratus were tested against Plasmodium falciparum and mature-stage larvae of Anopheles funestus. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analyses showed that the main compounds are geranial, 1,8-cineole and linalool in C. citratus, O. canum and O. basilicum, respectively. Larvicidal tests carried out according to the protocol recommended by the World Health Organization showed that the essential oil of leaves of C. citratus is the most active against larvae of An. funestus (LC50 values = 35.5 ppm and 34.6 ppm, respectively, for larval stages III and IV after 6 h of exposure). Besides, the in vitro anti-plasmodial activity evaluated by the radioisotopic method showed that the C. citratus oil is the most active against P. falciparum, with an IC50 value of 4.2 ± 0.5 μg/mL compared with O. canum (20.6 ± 3.4 μg/mL) and O. basilicum (21 ± 4.6 μg/mL). These essential oils can be recommended for the development of natural biocides for fighting the larvae of malaria vectors and for the isolation of natural products with anti-malarial activity. © P. Akono Ntonga et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  20. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Leandro Coutinho de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf. essential oils (EOs against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p < 0.05 after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products.

  1. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products.

  2. Chemical Composition of Essential Oils from Thymus vulgaris, Cymbopogon citratus, and Rosmarinus officinalis, and Their Effects on the HIV-1 Tat Protein Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriotto, Giordana; Marchetti, Nicola; Costa, Valentina; Beninati, Simone; Tagliati, Federico; Mischiati, Carlo

    2018-02-01

    New drugs would be beneficial to fight resistant HIV strains, in particular those capable of interfering with essential viral functions other than those targeted by highly active antiretroviral therapy drugs. Despite the central role played by Tat protein in HIV transcription, a search for vegetable extracts able to hamper this important viral function was never carried out. In this work, we evaluated the chemical composition and possible interference of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris, Cananga odorata, Cymbopogon citratus, and Rosmarinus officinalis with the Tat/TAR-RNA interaction and with Tat-induced HIV-1 LTR transcription. GC/MS Analysis demonstrated the biodiversity of herbal species translated into essential oils composed of different blends of terpenes. In all of them, 4 - 6 constituents represent from 81.63% to 95.19% of the total terpenes. Essential oils of Thymus vulgaris, Cymbopogon citratus, and Rosmarinus officinalis were active in interfering with Tat functions, encouraging further studies to identify single terpenes responsible for the antiviral activity. In view of the quite different composition of these essential oils, we concluded that their interference on Tat function depends on specific terpene or a characteristic blend. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  3. Effects of essential oils from Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf., Lippia sidoides Cham., and Ocimum gratissimum L. on growth and ultrastructure of Leishmania chagasi promastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Valéria C S; Moura, Daniela M S; Lopes, José A D; de Andrade, Paulo P; da Silva, Nicácio H; Figueiredo, Regina C B Q

    2009-04-01

    The current therapy for leishmaniasis, which affects annually about 2 million people, is far from satisfactory. All available drugs require parenteral administration and are potentially toxic. Plant essential oils have been traditionally used in folk medicine and appear as valuable alternative source for chemotherapeutic compounds. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of essential oils from Cymbopogon citratus, Lippia sidoides, and Ocimum gratissimum on growth and ultrastructure of Leishmania chagasi promastigote forms. Steam distillation was used to isolate the essential oils, and their constituents were characterized by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. All essential oils showed in vitro inhibitory action on L. chagasi promastigotes growth in a dose-dependent way, with IC(50)/72 h of 45, 89, and 75 microg/mL for C. citratus, L. sidoides, and O. gratissimum, respectively. Drastic morphological alterations were observed in all essential oil-treated parasites, including cell swelling, accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm, and increase of acidocalcisome volume. Furthermore, aberrant-shaped cells with multi-septate body were observed by scanning electron microscopy, suggesting an additional effect on cytokinesis. Taken together, our data show that these essential oils affect the parasite viability being the C. citratus essential oil the most effective against L. chagasi.

  4. Cymbopogon citratus as source of new and safe anti-inflammatory drugs: bio-guided assay using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Vera; Figueirinha, Artur; Neves, Bruno Miguel; García-Rodríguez, Carmen; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Batista, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-27

    Aqueous extracts of Cymbopogon citratus (Cy) leaves are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, however, little is known about their mechanism of action. The aim of this study is to explore the anti-inflammatory properties of Cymbopogon citratus leaves and their polyphenol-rich fractions (PFs), as well its mechanism of action in murine macrophages. A lipid- and essential oil-free infusion of Cy leaves was prepared (Cy extract) and fractionated by column chromatography. Anti-inflammatory properties of Cy extract (1.115 mg/ml) and its PFs, namely phenolic acids (530 μg/ml), flavonoids (97.5 μg/ml) and tannins (78 μg/ml), were investigated using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 macrophages as in vitro model. As inflammatory parameters, nitric oxide (NO) production was evaluated by Griess reaction, as well as effects on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression and on intracellular signaling pathways activation, which were analyzed by Western blot using specific antibodies. Cy extract inhibited iNOS expression, NO production and various LPS-induced pathways like p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2 and the transcription nuclear factor (NF)-κB. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt activation were not affected by Cy extract. Both phenolic acid- and tannin-rich fractions significantly inhibited NF-κB activation, iNOS expression and NO production but none of the PFs modulated MAPKs or PI3K/Akt activation. Neither Cy extract nor PFs affected LPS-induced COX-2 expression but LPS-induced PGE(2) production is inhibited by Cy extract and by phenolic acid-rich fraction. Our data provide evidence that support the usage of Cymbopogon citratus leaves extract in traditional medicine, and suggest that Cy, in particular its polyphenolic compounds, could constitute a natural source of a new and safe

  5. In vitro antimicrobial properties of plant essential oils thymus vulgaris, cymbopogon citratus and laurus nobilis against five important foodborne pathogens Propriedades antibacterianas in vitro de óleos essenciais de thymus vulgaris, cymbopogon citratus e laurus nobilis contra cinco importantes bactérias patogênicas veiculadas por alimentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Farias Millezi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Several essential oils of condiment and medicinal plants possess proven antimicrobial activity and are of important interest for the food industry. Therefore, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC of those oils should be determined for various bacteria. MIC varies according to the oil used, the major compounds, and the physiology of the bacterium under study. In the present study, the essential oils of the plants Thymus vulgaris (time, Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass and Laurus nobilis (bay were chemically quantified, and the MIC was determined on the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117, Salmonella enterica Enteritidis S64, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The essential oil of C. citratus demonstrated bacterial activity at all concentrations tested and against all of the bacteria tested. The majority of essential oil compounds were geranial and neral. The major constituent of T. vulgaris was 1.8-cineol and of L. nobilis was linalool, which presented lower antibacterial activity, followed by 1.8-cineol. The Gram-negative bacteria demonstrated higher resistance to the use of the essential oils tested in this study. E. coli was the least sensitive and was inhibited only by the oils of C. citratus and L. nobilis.Diversos óleos essenciais de plantas condimentares e medicinais possuem atividade antimicrobiana comprovada, sendo de grande interesse para a indústria de alimentos. Dessa forma, as Concentrações Mínimas Inibitórias (CMI desses óleos para diversas bactérias devem ser determinadas. As CMI variam de acordo com o óleo utilizado, dos compostos majoritários e da fisiologia da bactéria em estudo. Na presente pesquisa, os óleos essenciais das plantas Thymus vulgaris (tomilho, Cymbopogon citratus (capim-limão e Laurus nobilis (louro foram quantificados quimicamente e determinou-se a CMI sobre as bactérias Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia. coli

  6. Chemical composition and cardiovascular effects induced by the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus DC. Stapf, Poaceae, in rats Composição química e efeitos cardiovasculares do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon citratus DC. Stapf, Poaceae, em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia V. Moreira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus DC. Stapf, Poaceae, is used in the folk medicine for hypertension treatment. This work investigated the chemical composition and cardiovascular effects in rats of C. citratus essential oil (EOCC. A phytochemical screening demonstrated the presence of eight constituents, being geranial the major compound (43.08%. In rats, EOCC (1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.v. induced transient hypotension and bradycardia that were attenuated by atropine and sodium thiopental, but not by L-NAME or indomethacin. In rings of rat superior mesenteric artery pre-contracted with phenylephrine, EOCC (1 to 3000 µg/mL induced relaxation that was not affected after removal of the endothelium, after TEA or in rings pre-contracted with KCl (80 mM. Furthermore, EOCC (1000 µg/mL was not able to induce additional effect on maximal relaxation of nifedipine (10 µM. In conclusions, EOCC induces hypotension, possibly by reduction in vascular resistance caused by inhibition of the Ca2+ influx, and bradycardia probably due to an activation of cardiac muscarinic receptors.C. citratus é utilizada na medicina popular para tratar hipertensão. Este trabalho investigou a composição química e os efeitos cardiovasculares do óleo essencial do C. citratus (OECC. Foram identificados oito constituintes no OECC, sendo geranial o majoritário (43,08%. Em ratos, o OECC (1, 5, 10 e 20 mg/kg, i.v. induziu hipotensão e bradicardia que foram atenuadas pela atropina e tiopental sódico, mas não por L-NAME ou indometacina. Em anéis de artéria mesentérica de ratos pré-contraídos com fenilefrina, o OECC (1 a 3000 µg/mL induziu relaxamento que não foi afetado após remoção do endotélio, após TEA ou em anéis pré-contraídos com KCl (80 mM. Além disso, o OECC (1000 µg/mL não induziu efeito adicional sobre o relaxamento máximo da nifedipina (10 µM. Em conclusão, o OECC induz hipotensão possivelmente devido à redução da resistência vascular que pode ser causada

  7. Avaliação da eficácia do fitoterápico a base de Cymbopogon citratus no tratamento da Candidose em usuários de prótese

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso, Keila Martha Amorim

    2009-01-01

    Objetivo: Avaliar a eficácia do gel de Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (capim santo) no tratamento da candidose bucal em pacientes usuários de prótese, comparando os resultados com o Daktarin® gel oral. Para tanto, realizou-se um estudo randomizado, cego, controlado. Material e método: A amostra foi constituída por 30 pacientes adultos, voluntários, de ambos os sexos, submetidos a exame clínico e laboratorial (micológico) para diagnóstico de candidose bucal. Os pacientes foram ...

  8. Treatment of pityriasis versicolor with topical application of essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf - therapeutic pilot study Tratamento de pitiríase versicolor com aplicação tópica do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf - estudo terapêutico piloto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberto Santos Carmo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pityriasis versicolor is a fungal infection caused by Malassezia spp. that has frequent relapses. OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this research was to perform phase I and II clinical studies, using formulations containing essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus in patients with pityriasis versicolor. METHODS: Phase I study included twenty volunteers to ascertain the safety of the formulations. In phase II, 47 volunteers randomly received essential oil formulations at 1.25 μL/mL concentration, for forty days. The shampoo should be applied three times a week and the cream twice a day. A control group in phase II, consisting of 29 volunteers, received the same formulations but with 2% ketoconazole as the active ingredient. RESULTS: No significant adverse events were observed in volunteers during Phase I. In Phase II, 30 (63.83% volunteers using essential oil and 18 (62.07% using ketoconazole remained until the end of the study. We observed a predominance of lesions in disseminated form, with M. sympodialis detected as the predominant agent identified in cultures. After 40 days of treatment, the rate of mycological cure was 60% (p FUNDAMENTOS: Pitiríase versicolor é uma micose causada pela Malassezia spp., e que apresenta frequentes recidivas. OBJETIVOS: Este trabalho objetivou realizar estudos clínicos de fase I e II, para essa patologia, com óleo essencial de Cymbopogon citratus. MÉTODOS: Na fase I, participaram vinte voluntários para averiguar a segurança das formulações. Na fase II, 47 voluntários receberam as formulações do óleo essencial a 1,25 μL/mL, as quais deveriam ser utilizadas por quarenta dias, sendo o xampu três vezes por semana e o creme duas vezes ao dia. Um grupo controle na fase II, constituído por 29 voluntários recebeu as mesmas formulações, com cetoconazol a 2%. RESULTADOS: Verificada a segurança das formulações com a finalização da fase I, onde nenhuma reação adversa significativa foi

  9. Sugarcane Molasse and Whey as Additives in the Silage of Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus [DC.] Stapf Leaves Melaza de Caña de Azúcar y Suero de Leche como Aditivos en el Ensilaje de Hojas de Zacate de Limón (Cymbopogon citratus [DC.] Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía María Cristina Ventura-Canseco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available After extraction of essential oil from lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus [DC.] Stapf leaves by steam distillation (heat treatment, large amounts of organic wastes are obtained. This by-product could easily be used as animal feed. The potential of sugarcane molasse and whey as additives to ensile lemongrass leaves was investigated. The vegetative material was obtained after essential oils were extracted from lemongrass leaves with steam distillation. Lemongrass leaves were chopped, mixed with sugarcane molasse and whey, placed in cylindrical plastic containers, hermetically closed. The experimental design for pH optimization was a response surface 3-level factorial design 3² with three replicates. Sugarcane molasse at 5, 10 and 15% (w/w and whey at 20, 25 and 30% (w/w were used. The pH of the silage decreased significantly in each treatment, but it was faster when sugarcane molasse was added. The lactic acid concentration was 2.8 g kg-1 DM in silage amended with 15% molasse plus 25% whey and was higher than in silage supplemented with commercial additive after 15 d. In conclusion, it was shown that lemongrass leaves obtained as by product after extracting essential oils can be effectively ensiled with whey and sugarcane molasse as additives inducing a faster production of lactic acid.Después de la extracción del aceite esencial de zacate limón (Cymbopogon citratus [DC.] Stapf por destilación con vapor (tratamiento térmico se obtiene un residuo. Este residuo podría ser utilizado para alimentación animal. El potencial de la melaza de caña y suero de leche como aditivos para ensilar hojas de zacate limón fue investigado. El material vegetal se obtuvo después que los aceites esenciales se extrajeron de las hojas de zacate limón usando destilación con vapor. Las hojas de zacate limón se picaron, mezclaron con melaza de caña y suero de leche y se colocaron en recipientes cilíndricos de plástico y se cerraron herméticamente. El dise

  10. Phenotypic recurrent selection on herb growth yield of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus grown in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMED M. IBRAHIM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim MM,Khalid KA. 2013. Phenotypic recurrent selection on herb growth yield of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus grown in Egypt. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 68-72. This investigation was conducted in four generations: base population (G0, G1, G2 and G3 (clone selection generation to evaluate the genetic variability of citronella clones. Thirteen clones were selected from base population to study the herb growth yield characters and oil production as well as genetic parameters, correlation and regression. Results were recorded for herb growth characters (i.e. plant high (PH, no. of tillers (NOT, dry yield (DY, viability percentage (VP and oil production. Significant variation was observed among citronella clones in base population for most studied traits. Wide range of mean values was observed among the characters for generations and cuts in most of traits. High heritability values (0.95, 0.93, 0.89 and 0.72 were estimated in NOT, LG, HY and VP., respectively. Clone code no. 39/3, 17/4 and 8/1 gave highest values of dry weight, oil yield and viability percentage. Selected clones showed significant positive regression and correlation between dry weight and each of number of tillers and linear growth. On contrary, viability percentage had significant negative correlation and regression with other characters. These results raveled high yielding selected citronella clones will be utilized in medicinal plant breeding program.

  11. Atividade fungitóxica in vitro dos óleos essenciais de Lippia sidoides Cham., Cymbopogon citratus(D.C. Stapf. e de seus constituintes majoritários no controle de Rhizoctonia solani e Sclerotium rolfsii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. GONÇALVES

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o potencial fungitóxicos dos óleos essenciais de Cymbopogon citratus, Lippia sidoides, e de seus constituintes majoritários, sobre o crescimento micelial dos fitopatógenos Rhizoctonia solani e Sclerotium rolfsii. A caracterização química do óleo de L. sidoides demonstrou a presença do carvacrol (33,27% e o 1,8-cineol (24,41% como seus componentes majoritários. Enquanto que o citral (77,6% foi o constituinte majoritário do óleo essencial de C. citratus. A avaliação do potencial fungitóxico dos óleos essenciais e de seus constituintes majoritários foi realizada por meio de ensaios in vitro, avaliando a inibição do crescimento micelial dos microrganismos. Ambos os óleos essenciais inibiram totalmente o crescimento micelial de R. solani na concentração de 400 µg mL-1. O crescimento micelial de S. rolfsii foi inibido pelo óleo essencial de C. citratus na concentração de 300 µg mL-1 e pelo óleo essencial de L. sidoides na concentração de 400 µg mL-1. Em relação aos constituintes majoritários, o 1,8-cineol não apresentou efeito fungitóxico nas concentrações avaliadas. No entanto, o carvacrol e o citral foram mais efetivos que os óleos essenciais havendo ausência de crescimento micelial de R. solani e de S. rolfsii nas concentrações de 200 µg mL-1 e 225 µg mL-1, respectivamente.

  12. Antimicrobial Effects of Trachyspermum ammi and Cymbopogon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of semisolid formulations of Trachyspermum ammi and Cymbopogon citratus essential oils against five common strains of pathogenic fungi was carried out using the agar well diffusion method. The results indicated that 1 % v/w of T. ammi and C. citratus oils prepared in some bases ...

  13. Antibacterial activity and stability of microencapsulated lemon grass essential oil in feeds for broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Assis, Yhago Patrycky Antunes Souza; Almeida, Anna Christina de; Nogueira, Wedson Carlos Lima; Souza, Cintya Neves de; Gonçalves, Samuel Ferreira; Silva, Flavio Emanuel Gomes; Santos, Vanessa Kelly Ferreira do Rosário; Martins, Ernane Ronie

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY The antibacterial effect of microencapsulated lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil on strains of Escherichia coli (ATCC8739), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (ATCC 6017), and the stability of this oil in feeds for broiler chickens were evaluated. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) were determined by the macrodilution method, using the microencapsulated lemon grass essential oil at...

  14. Avaliação da composição química de Cymbopogon citratus Stapf cultivado em ambientes com diferentes níveis de poluição e a influência na composição do chá = Evaluation of the chemical composition of Cymbopogon citratus Stapf growing in environments with different pollution levels and the influence on tea composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Almerice Lopes da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus Stapf, o popular capim-santo, é espécie originária da Índia, que chegou ao Brasil, possivelmente, no tempo colonial, e era utilizada como planta ornamental, sendo encontrada cultivada em todo o país. Diversos são os usos populares para essa planta, desde tratamento de dores estomacais, intestinais, antidiarreico, até anticelulite e estética de cabelos oleosos. Essa planta se desenvolve em ambientes insalubres como beira de estrada, e isso pode levar a mudanças no seu aspecto químico e, em consequência disso, mudanças em seus derivados. Este trabalho analisou se ocorreu variação da composição química da planta cultivada na presença ou ausência de estresse ambiental (poluição urbana. Foram pesquisados por meio de cromatografia de camada delgada os seguintes compostos: saponinas, iridoides e proantocianidinas, mono e sesquiterpenos, triterpenos e esteroides, luteolina, polifenóis e alcaloides. Concluiu-se que este fator pode ter contribuído para modificação da composição química de suas folhas, reduzindo a síntese de compostos mais polares e favorecendo a síntese de possíveis leucoantocianidinas para provável proteção. Isso poderá acarretar ao chá alterações em sua propriedade farmacológica e toxicológica.Cymbopogon citratus Stapf, popularly known as lemongrass, is an Indian species. It possibly arrived in Brazil during colonial times, where it was used as an ornamental plant, and is found growing throughout the country. There are several popular uses for this plant, including as treatment for stomach pains, diarrhea and cellulite. This plant grows in polluted and unpolluted environments such as roadsides, which can lead to changes in its chemical aspects, and consequently changes in its manufacturing products. This study examined whether there were changes in the chemical composition of plants grown in the presence or absence of environmental stress (urban pollution. The following

  15. Efficiency of Citronella grass (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt extracts to control Zoothamnium sp. in black tiger shrimp (PL15 stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areechon, N.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Study on the efficiency of Citronella grass (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt extracts to control Zoothamnium sp. was conducted in the laboratory at Kasetsart University. Comparison between two methods of extractor, water distillation and soxhlet extractor, revealed that soxhlet extractor was about 225 times more efficient than the water distillation, based on the concentration that could give 100% mortality of Zoothamnium sp. in 24 hours (0.008 g/l from soxhlet extractor and 1.8 g/l from water distillation. The LC50 of PL15 shrimp in 24 hours of this extract from water distillation was 21.05 g/l while from soxhlet extractor was 1.88 g/l. Those concentrations, 0.008 g/l from soxhlet extractor and 1.8 g/l from water distillation did not harmful to the PL15 shrimp measured by dissolved oxygen and pH of water.

  16. Viability of Vigna unguiculata bean seeds treated with essential oil of Java grass (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt)

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier, M.V.A.; Oliveira, C.R.F.; Brito, S.S.S.; Matos, C.H.C.; Pinto, M.A.D.S.C.

    2012-01-01

    O tratamento de sementes com óleos essenciais é um método alternativo que auxilia o manejo integrado de pragas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência do tratamento de sementes de feijão Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. com o óleo essencial de citronela (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt). Foi avaliado o efeito do óleo essencial de C. winterianus sobre V. unguiculata nas dosagens 20 μL, 15 μL, 10 μL, 5 μL e testemunha. A qualidade fisiológica das sementes foi determina...

  17. AVALIAÇÃO DE POTENCIAL DE ERVAS MEDICINAIS: CAPIM-LIMÃO (Cymbopogon citratus D.C., CHÁ VERDE (Camellia sinensis L. E HIBISCO (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. PARA OBTENÇÃO DE CHÁS SOLÚVEIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uellison dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar características físico-químicas de extrato aquoso e liofilizado de capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus D.C., chá verde (Camellia sinensis L. e hibisco (Hibiscus sabdariffa L., foram realizadas analises em triplicata  de teor de sólidos solúveis, acidez titulável, pH, atividade de água e solubilidade em água. Os resultados do extrato aquoso e liofilizado para o capim limão apresentaram (SST variando de 3,0333 a 38,3066, valores de pH variando de 5,08 e 6,32 além de atividade de água características para os estados em que os extratos se encontravam, para o resultado do chá verde obtivemos teor de (SST variando de 2,81 a 45,52, pH entre 5,04 e 6,28 além de atividade de água característica. Os extratos de hibisco também apresentaram resultados satisfatórios com teor (SST entre 3,28 e 34,16, pH de 2,34 e 3,16 e atividade de água característica.  Os resultados obtidos revelaram a importância do processo de liofilização nas amostras, uma vez que houve um aumento da qualidade dos chás sem que houvesse danos na sua qualidade sensorial.

  18. Biodelignification of Lemon Grass and Citronella Bagasse by White-Rot Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolz, C.; de Leon, R.; de Arriola, M. C.; de Cabrera, S.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve white-rot fungi were grown in solid-state culture on lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) and citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) bagasse. The two lignocellulosic substrates had 11% permanganate lignin and a holocellulose fraction of 58%. After 5 to 6 weeks at 20°C, nine fungi produced a solid residue from lemon grass with a higher in vitro dry matter enzyme digestibility than the original bagasse; seven did the same for citronella. The best fungus for both substrates was Bondarzewia berkeleyi; it increased the in vitro dry matter enzyme digestibility to 22 and 24% for lemon grass and citronella, respectively. The increases were correlated with weight loss and lignin loss. All fungi decreased lignin contents: 36% of the original value for lemon grass and 28% for citronella. Practically all fungi showed a preference for hemicellulose over cellulose. PMID:16347155

  19. Efeito alelopático de sabugueiro e capim-limão na germinação de picão-preto e soja = Allelophatic effect of Sambucus australis Cham. and Schltdl. and Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf. in the germination of Bidens pilosa L. and soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Maria Teixeira Fortes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available As plantas invasoras são constantes e diminuem a produtividade das culturas por competirem por espaço, nutrientes e água. Dessa forma, os agricultores adotam, em grande escala, produtos químicos eficientes no controle da lavoura e com alta toxicidade ao meioambiente. Existem, no entanto, formas alternativas para o controle de invasoras, por meio de aleloquímicos presentes em algumas plantas, dentre elas, as medicinais. Este trabalho tem como objetivo analisar as propriedades alelopáticas dos extratos das plantas medicinais Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf. e Sambucus australis Cham. and Schltdl. em inibir a germinação de Bidens pilosa L., sem interferir na germinação de Glycine max L. Merrill. Os extratos foram obtidos triturandose 200 g de folhas com 1 L de água destilada. As sementes foram mantidas em B.O.D. à temperatura de 25°C, com fotoperíodo de 12h de luz. Nas condições em que foram realizados os experimentos, constatou-se que o extrato de capim-limão inibiu a germinação de picão-preto sem que este inibisse a germinação da soja, enquanto o extrato de sabugueiro inibiu a germinação de picão-preto e a germinação da soja. Assim, indica-se a utilização do capim-limão, como um herbicida natural para o picão-preto.Agriculture has been suffering adaptations throughout time, from hard hand labor to the most advanced sowing and harvesting techniques. Invasive plants are a constant, diminishing productivity by competing for space, nutrients, and water. Therefore, farmers have adopted, on alarge scale, the use of efficient synthetic chemicals, which are highly toxic to the environment, in order to control plant production. However, there are other alternative means to control those competitors: using allelochemicals present in some plants, such as medicinal ones. The objective of this paper is to analyze allelophatic properties of the medicinal plants Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf. and Sambucus australis Cham. and Schltdl

  20. Produtividade e qualidade do óleo essencial de capim-limão, Cymbopogon citratus, DC., submetido a diferentes lâminas de irrigação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Pinto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Devido às poucas informações sobre as práticas de cultivo do capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus, DC. objetivou-se avaliar o efeito de lâminas de irrigação sobre: a produção de biomassa, o rendimento e composição do óleo essencial. O experimento foi instalado em ambiente protegido para possibilitar o controle das lâminas de irrigação e avaliar a viabilidade para situações em que as condições climáticas normais sejam inadequadas. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos inteiramente casualizados com cinco tratamentos e três repetições. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância pelo tese F e as médias comparadas pelo teste de Tukey a 5% de probabilidade. Na etapa um, os tratamentos consistiram da aplicação de lâminas referentes a 50%, 75%, 100%, 125% da evapotranspiração da cultura (ETc, irrigando duas vezes por semana e de 100% da evapotranspiração da cultura (ETc, irrigando uma vez por semana, sendo denominados de T1, T2, T3, T4 e T5, respectivamente. Na etapa dois, os tratamentos consistiram da aplicação de lâminas referentes a 50%, 75%, 100%, 125% da ETc irrigando uma vez por semana e de 100% da ETc, irrigando a cada 14 dias, sendo denominados de T6, T7, T8, T9 e T10 respectivamente. O corte do capim-limão foi realizado após 60 dias do início dos tratamentos. Avaliou-se a altura de plantas, o número de perfilhos por touceira, a massa seca da parte aérea, o rendimento e a composição do óleo essencial. O T5, caracterizado por estresse hídrico e intervalo de irrigação moderado, foi o que apresentou a maior produção de matéria seca, maior produtividade do capim-limão e maior estimativa da produtividade de óleo essencial e maior concentração de citral, na primeira etapa. Na etapa dois, o T6, correspondente ao estresse hídrico crescente e acentuado, foi o que apresentou maior estimativa da produtividade de óleo essencial. De acordo com os resultados observados, não foi possível definir

  1. Avaliação da composição química de Cymbopogon citratus Stapf cultivado em ambientes com diferentes níveis de poluição e a influência na composição do chá - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i1.4543 Evaluation of the chemical composition of Cymbopogon citratus Stapf growing in environments with different pollution levels and the influence on tea composition - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i1.4543

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroudo Sátiro Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus Stapf, o popular capim-santo, é espécie originária da Índia, que chegou ao Brasil, possivelmente, no tempo colonial, e era utilizada como planta ornamental, sendo encontrada cultivada em todo o país. Diversos são os usos populares para essa planta, desde tratamento de dores estomacais, intestinais, antidiarreico, até anticelulite e estética de cabelos oleosos. Essa planta se desenvolve em ambientes insalubres como beira de estrada, e isso pode levar a mudanças no seu aspecto químico e, em consequência disso, mudanças em seus derivados. Este trabalho analisou se ocorreu variação da composição química da planta cultivada na presença ou ausência de estresse ambiental (poluição urbana. Foram pesquisados por meio de cromatografia de camada delgada os seguintes compostos: saponinas, iridoides e proantocianidinas, mono e sesquiterpenos, triterpenos e esteroides, luteolina, polifenóis e alcaloides. Concluiu-se que este fator pode ter contribuído para modificação da composição química de suas folhas, reduzindo a síntese de compostos mais polares e favorecendo a síntese de possíveis leucoantocianidinas para provável proteção. Isso poderá acarretar ao chá alterações em sua propriedade farmacológica e toxicológica.Cymbopogon citratus Stapf, popularly known as lemongrass, is an Indian species. It possibly arrived in Brazil during colonial times, where it was used as an ornamental plant, and is found growing throughout the country. There are several popular uses for this plant, including as treatment for stomach pains, diarrhea and cellulite. This plant grows in polluted and unpolluted environments such as roadsides, which can lead to changes in its chemical aspects, and consequently changes in its manufacturing products. This study examined whether there were changes in the chemical composition of plants grown in the presence or absence of environmental stress (urban pollution. The following

  2. Plantes aromatiques du Plateau des Cataractes (Bassin du Congo). Caractérisation du chémotype de l'huile essentielle de Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle acclimaté au Congo-Brazzaville

    OpenAIRE

    Silou, T.; Bikanga, R.; Nsikabaka, S.; Nombault, J.; Mavoungou, C.; Figuérédo, G.; Chalchat, JC.

    2017-01-01

    Aromatic plants from the Plateau des Cataractes (Congo Basin). Chemotype characterization of essential oil of Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle acclimatized in Congo-Brazzaville. Description. The essential oils of Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle, Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt, Cymbopogon flexuosus (Nees ex Steud.) Wats and Cymbopogon citratus L. (DC.) Stapf (lemongrass) consist of more than 80% of the following constituents: citronellal, geraniol, citral, citronellol, geranyl acetate, and limonene....

  3. Exploring the potential use of whole plant therapies, Cymbopogon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exploring the potential use of whole plant therapies, Cymbopogon citratus, as alternatives/complements to antimalarial pharmaceuticals: A preliminary report. U.M. Chukwuocha, F. Orlando-Buendia, O. Fernandez-Rivera, J. Aguilar-Castro, I.N.S. Dozie ...

  4. Bioatividade de extratos hidroalcoólicos de Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf. sobre picão-preto (Bidens pilosa L. e alface (Lactuca sativa L. Bioactivity of hydroalcoholic extracts of Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf. on germination and early growth of beggartick (Bidens pilosa L. and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Lousada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou avaliar a bioatividade de extratos hidroalcoólicos de capim-limão sobre germinação e crescimento inicial da planta daninha picão-preto (Bidens pilosa L. e da planta teste alface (Lactuca sativa L.. A partir de maceração hidroalcoólica de folhas secas e rasuradas (127,46 g de capim-limão em 1L de álcool de cereais (70%, foram preparados os tratamentos como extratos hidroalcoólicos (HA pela diluição (v/v do macerado filtrado em água deionizada na proporção 1:1 (HA1:1 e 1:2 (HA1:2; dos quais foram obtidos os respectivos extratos secos (ES, a partir da evaporação da fase líquida de duas alíquotas de 50 mL de cada extrato HA, que após re-suspendidas em igual volume de água, sendo uma autoclavada (1 atm por 15 minutos, resultando nos extratos secos de HA1:1 e HA1:2 autoclavados (ES1:1A e ES1:2A e nos extratos secos não autoclavados (ES1:1 e ES1:2; e água (AG como controle. No primeiro dia dos bioensaios, foram aplicados 2 mL dos tratamentos, em DIC, com cinco repetições. Avaliou-se a porcentagem de germinação (G%, Índice de Velocidade de Germinação (IVG, altura da parte aérea (AA e comprimento de radícula (CR de aquênios (25 de picão-preto e de alface distribuídos em placas de Petri e mantidos em câmara de germinação (B.O.D. por duas semanas. Os extratos HA1:1 e HA1:2 inibiram a G%, AA e CR das duas espécies. Todos os extratos secos reduziram a G%, IVG e o CR da alface. Para o picão preto, apenas o extrato ES1:1 reduziu a G% e o IVG foi reduzido por todos os extratos, a exceção do ES1:1A, mas nenhum extrato influenciou o crescimento inicial desta espécie.This study aimed to evaluate the bioactivity of hydroalcoholic extract of lemongrass on the germination and early growth of the weed plant beggartick (Bidens pilosa L. and the test plant lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.. From the hydroalcoholic maceration of dried and cut leaves of lemon grass (127.46 g in 1 L grain alcohol (70%, the following

  5. WELFARE OF BROILERS INGESTING A PRE-SLAUGHTER HYDRIC DIET OF LEMON GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AFB Royer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe pre-slaughter period is considered critical in broiler production. Several factors contribute to increase the birds' stress, such as handling, harvesting, and transportation, negatively affecting their welfare. This study aimed at evaluating the addition of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratusStapf to the drinking water of broilers during the pre-slaughter period on their behavior, blood cortisol, and surface temperature. The study was carried out at the experimental farm of the Federal University of Grande Dourados (UFGD, Dourados, MS, Brazil. In total, 2594 broilers were distributed according to a completely randomized experimental design, in a 3x2x2 factorial arrangement, with four replicates per treatment. Treatments consisted of three different lemon grass levels (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf used in the form of an infusion (0, 0.1, and 5 g per L of water, sex (male or female, and genetic strain (Ross(r 308 or Cobb(r 500. The infusion was offered when birds were 42 days old. On that day, blood was collected for blood cortisol level determination, broiler surface temperature was recorded, and an ethogram was applied to register broiler behavior. Blood cortisol level and broiler surface temperature were not affected by treatments (p>0.05. The behavior of beak opening was different between the genetic strains (p<0.05, being more frequent in Ross(r 308 broilers. Lemon grass water content did not affect broilers' surface temperature when consumed during the pre-slaughter period.

  6. Antihypertensive potential of the aqueous extract which combine leaf of Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae), stems and leaf of Cymbopogon citratus (D.C) Stapf. (Poaceae), fruits of Citrus medical L. (Rutaceae) as well as honey in ethanol and sucrose experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzeufiet, Paul Désiré Djomeni; Mogueo, Amélie; Bilanda, Danielle Claude; Aboubakar, Bibi-Farouck Oumarou; Tédong, Léonard; Dimo, Théophile; Kamtchouing, Pierre

    2014-12-17

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of the aqueous extract obtained from the mixture of fresh leaf of Persea americana, stems and fresh leaf of Cymbopogon citratus, fruits of Citrus medica and honey on ethanol and sucrose induced hypertension in rats. Rats were divided into eight groups of 6 rats each and daily treated for 5 weeks. The control group received distilled water (1 mL/kg) while rats of groups 2, 3 and 4 received ethanol 40 degrees (3 g/kg/day), 10% sucrose as drinking water and the two substances respectively. The remaining groups received in addition to sucrose and ethanol, the aqueous extract (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) or nifedipine (10 mg/kg) respectively. Many parameters including hemodynamic, biochemical and histopathological were assessed at the end of the study. The concomitant consumption of ethanol and sucrose significantly (p cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic index, glucose, proteins, AST, ALT, creatinin, potassium, sodium and albumin increased while the HDL-cholesterol decreased under ethanol and sucrose feeding. Chronic ethanol and sucrose intake significantly decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the contents of reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitrites whereas elevated the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Histological analysis revealed among other vascular congestion, inflammation, tubular clarification and thickening of the vessel wall in rats treated with alcohol and sucrose. Administration of the aqueous extract or nifedipine prevented the hemodynamic, biochemical, oxidative and histological impairments induced chronic ethanol and sucrose consumption. Current results suggest that the aqueous extract used in this study possess antihypertensive activity against ethanol and sucrose induced hypertension in rats by the improvement of biochemical and oxidative status, and by protecting liver, kidney and vascular endothelium against damages induced by chronic

  7. Effect of Cymbopogon ctratus L. essential oil on the growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Addition of 2.0 l/ml of Cymbopogon citratus L. essential oil to the Sabouraud\\'s medium was inhibited growth completely of Candida albicans in liquid medium. Light microscope and scanning electron microscope observation showed morphogenic changes in the treated cells including decrease in cell size.

  8. ANÁLISE DA COMPOSIÇÃO QUÍMICA DO ÓLEO ESSENCIAL DE CAPIM SANTO (Cymbopogon citratus OBTIDO ATRAVÉS DE EXTRATOR POR ARRASTE COM VAPOR D´ÁGUA CONSTRUÍDO COM MATERIAS DE FÁCIL AQUISIÇÃO E BAIXO CUSTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Maia Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Os óleos essenciais são substâncias naturais de grande importância econômica, sendo utilizados em perfumaria, cosméticos, alimentos e medicamentos. São obtidos por diferentes métodos de extração e encontrados em diferentes partes de plantas aromáticas. Contudo, a aquisição de equipamentos para extração de óleos essenciais representa um custo significativo para as instituições de ensino e pesquisa do país, principalmente nos últimos anos em que tem ocorrido redução de investimentos nas áreas de Ciência e Tecnologia. Desta forma, esse trabalho teve como objetivo a construção de um extrator de óleo essencial utilizando materiais de fácil acesso e mão de obra local. O extrator construído possui as dimensões de 60 cm de altura e 30 cm de diâmetro. Seu aquecimento é realizado por resistência elétrica com temperatura controlada por termostato (faixa de 0 a 120°C e possui uma campânula metálica vedada por selo d’água que está acoplada a um sistema de condensação. O experimento teste foi realizado fazendo extração de 612 g de capim santo (Cymbopogon citratus. Após análise obteve-se um rendimento de 0,48% de óleo essencial na extração. Portanto, este trabalho demonstra a busca no desenvolvimento de tecnologias inovadoras, fazendo uso de materiais facilmente encontrados no mercado e utilizando mão de obra local, contribuindo, não só para o acúmulo de conhecimento acadêmico, mas, acima de tudo, com a capacitação de recursos humanos, geração de renda local e com a transferência de novas tecnologias que possam servir de base para a elaboração de novos produtos, neste caso, os óleos essenciais.

  9. Development of lignin in Themeda triandra, Cymbopogon plurinodis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amount and distribution of lignin in three grass species was determined. Two climax species, Themeda triandra and Cymbopogon plurinodis and one pioneer species, Eragrostis lehmanniana were used in the investigation. Leaf samples of the three grass species were taken at four stages of growth and samples of the ...

  10. Viabilidade de sementes de feijão caupi após o tratamento com óleo essencial de citronela (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt Viability of Vigna unguiculata bean seeds treated with essential oil of Java grass (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V.A. Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento de sementes com óleos essenciais é um método alternativo que auxilia o manejo integrado de pragas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência do tratamento de sementes de feijão Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. com o óleo essencial de citronela (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt. Foi avaliado o efeito do óleo essencial de C. winterianus sobre V. unguiculata nas dosagens 20 μL, 15 μL, 10 μL, 5 μL e testemunha. A qualidade fisiológica das sementes foi determinada pela porcentagem de emergência, velocidade de emergência e índice de velocidade de emergência. A análise dos dados foi realizada no delineamento inteiramente casualizado, disposto em esquema fatorial 5 x 2 com cinco repetições. As sementes fumigadas apresentaram diferenças estatísticas entre os parâmetros avaliados em relação à testemunha. O óleo essencial de citronela revelou potencialidade alelopática sobre a germinação de sementes de feijão que variou de acordo com a concentração do óleo.Seed treatment with essential oils is an alternative method tool in integrated pest management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of treating Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. bean seeds with essential oil of Java grass (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt. The effect of C. winterianus essential oil on P. vulgaris was evaluated at levels of 20 μL, 15 μL, 10 μL, 5 μL and control. The physiologic quality of the seeds was determined by percentage emergence, speed emergence and speed emergence index. The data analysis was carried out using an entirely randomized design, in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme with five repetitions. The fumigated bean seeds showed the statistics differences among the analyzed parameters when was compared with the no treated check. The essential oil of Java grass revealed allelopathic potentiality on bean seed germination which varied according to the oil concentration.

  11. ESSENTIAL OILS OF CYMBOPOGON SP. IN THE CONTROL OF FOODBORNE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Florisvaldo BRUGNERA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the agar well diffusion technique was used to determine the antibacterial activity of Cymbopogon nardus (citronella and Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass essential oils, which were applied at different concentrations. The bacterial species used were the foodborne pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both essential oils presented antibacterial activity in most concentrations tested. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs founded were: 7.81μL/mL (S. aureus and 3.90μL/mL (E. coli and P. aeruginosa, for C. nardus essential oil; and 3.90μL/mL (S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa, for C. citratus essential oil. The essential oils used were shown as promising natural antibacterials for pathogenic bacteria control in the food industry.

  12. Controle fitopatológico do Fusarium subglutinans pelo óleo essencial do capim-citronela (Cymbopogon nardus L. e do composto citronelal Fungitoxic activity of essential oil of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus L. and compound citronellal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.T.L. Seixas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito fungitóxico do óleo essencial de capim-citronela e do seu constituinte majoritário citronelal sobre a inibição micelial do fitopatógeno Fusarium subglutinans, agente causal da fusariose da cultura do abacaxi (Ananas comosus. Para avaliar o efeito do óleo essencial no crescimento micelial do fungo, foram utilizadas seis alíquotas (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 e 25 ìL do óleo e do citronelal que foram distribuídas na superfície do meio BDA (batata-dextrose-ágar antes da repicagem do fungo. O crescimento micelial foi medido após 48 h de instalação do experimento e em cinco épocas de avaliação (2, 4, 6, 8 e 10 dias após repicagem. Os resultados indicaram que o óleo essencial do capim-citronela demonstrou maior efeito inibitório do crescimento micelial do fungo F. subglutinans do que o composto citronelal. Em todas as alíquotas utilizadas o óleo essencial proporcionou menor taxa de crescimento micelial do que o citronelal.This study aimed to evaluate the fungitoxic effect of the essential oil of citronella grass and its major constituent citronellal on the inhibition of mycelial pathogen Fusarium subglutinans, the causal agent of Fusarium culture of pineapple (Ananas comosus. To evaluate the effect of essential oil in the mycelial growth of the fungus were used six rates (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mL of oil that were distributed on the surface of PDA medium (potato dextrose agar before subculturing of the fungus. Mycelial growth was measured after 48 h of the experiment and five times of assessment (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days after subculturing. The results indicated that the essential oil of citronella grass showed higher inhibitory effect of mycelial growth of the fungus F. subglutinans than compound citronellal. In all rates used of the essential oil gave lower growth rate than the mycelial citronellal.

  13. Foliar epidermal and phytochemical studies of the grasses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With respect to their phytochemical characteristic, Cymbopogon citratus tested positive for alkaloid, saponin, inulin, cellulose, tannin and lignin; Eragrostis tremula tested negative for lignin and positive for cellulose, saponin and alkaloids while Axonopus compressus tested negative for lignin, but positive for alkaloid, ...

  14. Plantes aromatiques du Plateau des Cataractes (Bassin du Congo. Caractérisation du chémotype de l'huile essentielle de Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle acclimaté au Congo-Brazzaville

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silou, T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic plants from the Plateau des Cataractes (Congo Basin. Chemotype characterization of essential oil of Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle acclimatized in Congo-Brazzaville. Description. The essential oils of Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle, Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt, Cymbopogon flexuosus (Nees ex Steud. Wats and Cymbopogon citratus L. (DC. Stapf (lemongrass consist of more than 80% of the following constituents: citronellal, geraniol, citral, citronellol, geranyl acetate, and limonene. For the purposes of business transactions, it is therefore important to know the exact chemical composition of the essential oils produced. Objectives. Chemotype evaluation of C. nardus acclimatized on the Plateau des Cataractes. Method. The essential oils of C. nardus were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by chromatography (GC and GC/MS over a period of more than ten years. Results. Cymbopogon nardus was found to produce a Java type citronella essential oil (C. winterianus with the following profile: citronellal (40-48%, geraniol (10-22%, citronellol (10-12%, limonene (2-3%, geranyl acetate (1-2%, linalool (1%. The difference between these two types of citronella, Java and Ceylon, was based on the relative proportions of their three main constituents: citronellal, geraniol and citronellol. Cymbopogon nardus is known for its high variability, with two varieties and sept subvarieties. Conclusions. The citronella established in West and Central Africa under the name of Cymbopogon nardus (Java type could be considered a Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt, based on the chemical composition of its essential oil.

  15. Fire and the dynamics of two unpalatable grass species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fire and the dynamics of two unpalatable grass species ( Cymbopogon pospischilii and Elionurus muticus ) in a semi-arid climate. ... Cymbopogon pospischilii and Elionurus muticus are unpalatable for most of the growing season and form a reasonably large component of the vegetation composition in semi-arid grassland ...

  16. Rendimento, composição química e atividade antilisterial de óleos essenciais de espécies de Cymbopogon Yield, chemical composition and antilisterial activity of essential oils from Cymbopogon species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.M Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se determinar o rendimento, a composição química e avaliar a atividade antilisterial dos óleos essenciais de Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf. (capim-limão e Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle (capim-citronela, puros e em combinação. A obtenção dos óleos essenciais foi realizada a partir de folhas frescas, empregando-se a técnica de hidrodestilação e utilizando-se aparelho de Clevenger modificado. Os rendimentos foram calculados a partir da massa obtida na extração e da umidade do material vegetal. A análise qualitativa foi realizada por cromatografia em fase gasosa acoplada à espectrometria de massas e a avaliação dos teores dos constituintes químicos por cromatografia em fase gasosa com detector de ionização de chamas. O efeito bacteriostático de diferentes concentrações dos óleos essenciais, puros e em combinação, foi determinado pela técnica de difusão em ágar. As concentrações mínimas inibitórias (CMIs foram utilizadas na determinação do tempo de ação bactericida. O rendimento, em base seca, foi de 1,39% (v/p para o óleo essencial de C. citratus e de 2,27% (v/p para o óleo essencial de C. nardus. Geranial e neral foram os constituintes majoritários do óleo essencial de C. citratus, enquanto, para C. nardus, foram citronelal, geraniol e citronelol. A maioria das concentrações utilizadas mostrou-se efetiva contra Listeria monocytogenes e observaram-se efeitos bactericidas nas CMIs. Óleos essenciais de C. citratus e C. nardus, puros e em combinação, constituem novas alternativas de antibacterianos naturais a serem utilizados no controle de L. monocytogenes na indústria de alimentos.The aim of this study was to determine the yield and the chemical composition of essential oils from Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf. (lemongrass and Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle (citronella, and to evaluate their antilisterial activity when pure and combined. The essential oils were obtained from fresh leaves

  17. Produção de mudas de capim-limão em diferentes recipientes e substratos Transplant production of lemon grass in different recipients and substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie F Blank

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos de recipientes e misturas de substratos, diâmetros de perfilho e comprimentos de lâmina foliar mantida no perfilho foram avaliados para produção de mudas de capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf.. No primeiro ensaio testaram-se dois recipientes e nove misturas de substratos. Os substratos avaliados foram pó de coco, casca de arroz carbonizada e esterco bovino na proporção 1:1:2; pó de coco, casca de arroz carbonizada, solo e esterco bovino na proporção 1:1:1:3. O recipiente tubete de 110 cm³ foi melhor que a bandeja de poliestireno expandido com 72 células de 121,2 cm³ para a produção de mudas de capim-limão. Todos os substratos testados resultaram na produção de mudas de capim-limão de boa qualidade. No segundo ensaio, foram testados dois diâmetros de perfilho (>1,5 e The effect of recipients, substrate mixtures, diameters of tillers and of different leaf lengths kept on the tiller was evaluated for transplant production of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf.. In the first assay, we tested two recipients and nine mixtures of substrates. The tublet recipient of 110 cm3 was better than the expanded polystyrene foam bed with 72 cells of 121.2 cm3 and all the tested substrates (coconut dust, carbonized rice hulls and bovine manure at rates of 1:1:2, and coconut dust, carbonized rice hulls, soil and bovine manure at rates of 1:1:1:3 resulted in good quality of lemon grass transplants. In the second assay, we tested two tiller diameters (>1.5 and <1.5 cm and the maintenance of four leaf lengths on tiller (0, 3, 6 and 9 cm. It was concluded that if tillers were thicker than 1.5 cm diameter, then 5.5 cm of leaf length should be kept and if the tiller diameter were inferior to 1.5 cm, then the total leaf area should be cut off in order to promote tilling.

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF SODA PULPING PROCESS OF LIGNO-CELLULOSIC RESIDUES OF LEMON AND SOFIA GRASSES PRODUCED AFTER STEAM DISTILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    Harjeet Kaur; Dharm Dutt; C. H. Tyagi

    2011-01-01

    Sofia (Cymbopogon martini), and lemon (Cymbopogon flexuosus) grasses, are exclusively cultivated for extraction of important lemongrass and palma rosa oils. Lignocellulosic residue (LCR) of sofia and lemon grasses left after steam distillation can successfully be used for the production of chemical grade pulp. Steam distillation mitigates the problem of mass transfer, and facilitates the faster penetration of cooking liquor by leaching out a part of extraneous components. Sofia grass produces...

  19. Antimicrobial Effects of Trachyspermum ammi and Cymbopogon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicated that 1 % v/w of T. ammi and C. citratus oils prepared in some bases exhibited remarkable antifungal activity with zone inhibition diameters greater than those for standard antifungal agents. The growth of all five fungal strains was inhibited when T. ammi and C. citratus oil were formulated separately in ...

  20. Crescimento, produção de fitomassa e teor de óleo essencial de folhas de capim citronela (Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle em cultivo consorciado com algodoeiro colorido no semiárido mineiro Growth, phytomass yield and essential oil content of leaves of citronella grass [Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle] intercropping with colored cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.C.R. Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o crescimento, a produção e o teor do óleo essencial de dois cortes de capim citronela em cultivo consorciado com algodoeiro colorido no semiárido. Para isso foram utilizados dois sistemas de consórcios (tratamentos: algodão colorido consorciado com capim citronela 3x1 e algodão colorido consorciado com capim citronela 1x1. A variedade de algodão colorido utilizada foi a BRS Rubi e as mudas de capim citronela foram produzidas no Horto de Plantas Medicinais da Unimontes. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi em blocos casualizados com dois tratamentos e 16 repetições. O experimento foi mantido em regime de sequeiro e foi avaliado a altura das plantas de capim citronela. Foram realizadas duas colheitas das folhas de capim citronela, sendo a primeira no momento da colheita da fibra do algodão e a segunda na rebrota do capim, seis meses após. Todas as plantas da parcela foram colhidas e as folhas frescas foram pesadas, no campo, com o auxílio de balança digital. Amostras das folhas colhidas foram retiradas e levadas para secagem em estufa com circulação forçada de ar a 35ºC até atingirem massa constante. Foi verificada a massa seca e posteriormente realizada a extração do óleo essencial pelo método de hidrodestilação em aparelho modificado de Clevenger. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância e as médias comparadas pelo teste Skott-Knott (pThe research was performed to evaluate the growth, production and essential oil content of the two harvests of citronella grass in intercropped with colored cotton in semiarid.For this, was used two system consortium (treatments: colored cotton intercropped with citronella grass 3X1 and colored cotton intercropped with citronella grass 1X1. The variety of colored cotton used was BRS Rubi and the citronella grass seedlings were produced in the Medicinal Plants Garden of Unimontes. The experimental design used was randomized blocks with two treatments and 16

  1. Etude de l'activité antifongique d'extraits de Cymbopogon citratus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cependant, l'introduction des pesticides bio s'avère une alternative judicieuse et moins onéreuse pour la production, d'où l'objectif de notre étude qui était de promouvoir l'efficacité des extrait aqueux et huiles essentiels de quelques plantes locales dans la lutte contre les microorganismes. A travers la méthode de la ...

  2. Essential oil production of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus under organic compost containing sewage sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia V. d'Ávila

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT One of the main urban polluting agents are the sewers, which even with proper treatment end up generating a polluting waste, the sewage sludge. One of the options for the disposal of this sludge is the use in agriculture, due to its high content of organic matter and nutrients. This study aimed to use urban sewage sludge for lemongrass cultivation and essential oil production. The plants were grown in soil containing different organic compost doses (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 t ha-1, formed from the sewage sludge composting process and waste of urban vegetation pruning. At harvest, plants were analyzed for the concentration of nutrients, chlorophyll content, number of tillers, biomass production, essential oil content and the microbiological quality of the leaves. The results showed that the addition of the compost increased the levels of nutrients in the plants, mainly nitrogen, positively influencing the production of tillers, biomass, chlorophyll contents, yield and essential oil content.

  3. Kajian Aktivitas Antibakteri Minyak Daun Sereh (Cymbopogon citratus pada Adonan Sate Lilit Ikan Laut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DewaNyoman Adi Paramartha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lemongrass is one of the spceies often used in cooking or as traditional medicine.The importance components in lemongrass oil that act as antimicrobial is citral. In this research lemongrass oil isolated by steam distilation method and lemongrass oil were tested against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella typhi using the agar diffusion method. Antibacterial activity also evaluated on traditional fish satay dough, and tested its organoleptic value. The result showed that lemongrass oil significantly inhibited E. coli with minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC 0.72 µl/ml and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC 2.89 µl/ml, S. typhi with MIC 0.65 µl/ml and MBC 2.59 µl/ml, S. aureus with MIC 0.64 µl/ml and MBC 2.57 µl/ml. Antibacterial activity studies of lemongrass oil as potential food aditive was evaluated by adding highest MIC and MBC value (0.72 and 2.89 µl/g on traditional fish satay dough. The result showed that adding lemongrass oil 0.72µl/g is not significantly inhibit nature growing bacteria E. coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus on satay dough, but adding 2.89 µl/g lemongras oil only can signigicantly inhibit E. coli, Salmnoella, and Staphylococcus at 0 hours of incubation period, but cannot inhibit it’s log phase up to 24 hours of incubation. Organoleptic of added lemongrass oil on fish satay douh was showed that adding 0.72 µl/g of lemongrass oil was not significant on taste and smell, but adding 2.89 µl/g was significant on taste and smell compared to control.

  4. Kajian Aktivitas Antibakteri Minyak Daun Sereh (Cymbopogon citratus) pada Adonan Sate Lilit Ikan Laut

    OpenAIRE

    DewaNyoman Adi Paramartha

    2015-01-01

    Lemongrass is one of the spceies often used in cooking or as traditional medicine.The importance components in lemongrass oil that act as antimicrobial is citral. In this research lemongrass oil isolated by steam distilation method and lemongrass oil were tested against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella typhi using the agar diffusion method. Antibacterial activity also evaluated on traditional fish satay dough, and tested its organoleptic value. The result showed...

  5. Etude de l'activité antifongique d'extraits de Cymbopogon citratus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extraits de plante (Amadioha, 2000). En plus des extraits de plantes utilisés, les extraits d'autres plantes ont été efficaces contre les champignons étudiés; c'est le cas des extraits aqueux de Portulaca oleracea et de Cassia occidentalis qui contrôlent efficacement la production mycélienne de Bipolaris oryzae,. Curvularia sp.

  6. Volatile constituents and behavioral change induced by Cymbopogon winterianus leaf essential oil in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Bárbara Lima Simioni; Souza, Thaís Teles de; Antoniolli, Angelo Roberto; Guimarães, Adriana Gibara; Barreto, Rosana de Souza Siqueira; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rogoldi; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Lima, Julianeli Tolentino de; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza

    2011-01-01

    Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt (‘Java citronella’) is an important essential oil yielding aromatic grass cultivated in India and Brazil and its volatile essential oils extracted from its leaves are used in perfumery, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and flavoring industries. However, there is no report on any psychopharmacological study of C. winterianus leaf essential oil (LEO) available to date. In this study, the pharmacological effects of the LEO were investigated in animal models and its phy...

  7. PENENTUAN WAKTU PENYULINGAN DARI SEREH WANGI (CYMBOPOGON NARDUS L. Rendle UNTUK MEMPEROLEH KADAR MAKSIMAL MINYAK ATSIRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Diana Sari

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This research conduct to determination of Volatile Oil and citral level from lemon grass (Cymbopogon nardus L. Rendle in the based of refening destillation time (1 to 4 hours. Destillation of Volatile Oil had been carried but by direct steam destillation and citral level was measured by Chromatography Gas. The results showed that refining destillation time give significant differential of Volatile Oil and citral level. Whereas the highest Volatile Oil (0,32% and citral level (36,70% showed at the first, and the lowest showed in the fourth (0,02% and 18,70% of refining destillation time hours. In this observation showed that the increase of refining destillation time, give decrease of Volatile Oil and citral level.   Keyword : Cymbopogon nardus L. Rendle, Poaceae, destillation time, Volatile Oil, Citral

  8. Short Communication: Association of Cymbopogon plurinodis with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a camp, typical of the Sourish Mixed Bushveld, a marked decrease in the abundance of Cymbopogon plurinodis along a soil gradient from high to low clay content was found. The association appears to be independent of the grazing treatment over a 51-year period as the population size of C. plurinodis has remained ...

  9. Responses of Cymbopogon schoenanthus to salt stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-27

    Mar 27, 2012 ... Responses of Cymbopogon schoenanthus to salt stress. Ayda Khadhri1*, Ridha El Mokni2, Khaled Mguis3, Mohamed Neffati4 and Samira Smiti1. 1Research Unit of ... medium (Garg et al., 2002; Moinuddin et al., 2005), and measures their ..... The ability of a plant to survive under restrictive environmental.

  10. (Cymbopogon martinii Roxb. Wats. var. motia) in

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2.1 Plant material and chemicals. Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii, Roxb. Wats. var. motia) plants were raised from seedlings at the experimental farm of Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic. Plants (CIMAP), Lucknow, India. The samples were taken at eight day intervals, representing five develop- mental stages viz.

  11. Ethanol and High-Value Terpene Co-Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass of Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake L Joyce

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon flexuosus, lemongrass, and C. martinii, palmarosa, are perennial grasses grown to produce essential oils for the fragrance industry. The objectives of this study were (1 to evaluate biomass and oil yields as a function of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization, and (2 to characterize their utility for lignocellulosic ethanol compared to Panicum virgatum (switchgrass. Mean biomass yields were 12.83 Mg lemongrass ha-1 and 15.11 Mg palmarosa ha-1 during the second harvest year resulting in theoretical biofuel yields of 2541 and 2569 L ethanol ha-1 respectively compared to reported 1749-3691 L ethanol ha-1 for switchgrass. Pretreated lemongrass yielded 198 mL ethanol (g biomass-1 and pretreated palmarosa yielded 170 mL ethanol (g biomass-1. Additionally, lemongrass yielded 85.7 kg essential oil ha-1 and palmarosa yielded 67.0 kg ha-1 with an estimated value of USD $857 and $1005 ha-1. These data suggest that dual-use crops such as lemongrass and palmarosa may increase the economic viability of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  12. Changes in essential oil during enzyme-assisted ensiling of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf.) and lemon eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora Hook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudai, N; Weinberg, Z G; Larkov, O; Ravid, U; Ashbell, G; Putievsky, E

    2001-05-01

    Changes in essential oil during ensiling of lemongrass and lemon eucalyptus were studied. Wilted lemongrass and eucalyptus leaves were ensiled in 0.25-L anaerobic jars. Samples consisted of a control (no additives) and a treated sample (0.5% glucose and lactic acid bacteria and 1% cellulase plus 1% hemicellulase plus pectinase). Three jars per treatment were sampled on days 2, 6, 10, and 36 for analysis of essential oil. Essential oil was obtained by extraction and by hydrodistillation. Extraction efficacy of essential oil from the lemongrass was improved by the enzyme treatment, but it was much lower than the amount obtained by distillation. The major components of the essential oil were neral and geranial. In the eucalyptus, total essential oils obtained by distillation decreased during ensiling, and the amount was similar to the amount obtained by extraction. Citronellal, which was the major component of the essential oil in the fresh eucalyptus leaves, decreased, whereas isopulegol and 3,8-terpinolhydrate increased during ensiling.

  13. Ethanol extract of Cymbopogon winterianus on mortality and number of eggs of Tetranychus urticae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Bernardo Vicentini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant extracts have been studied as a promising source of natural insecticides. This study assessed the effect of the ethanol extract of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt (citronella grass in comparison with an insecticide containing azadirachtin (ICA on mortality and number of eggs of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae in laboratory conditions. For the tests, the mites were sprayed with the aid of a Potter spray tower. To assess the mortality of females, LC50 value for extract of citronella grass and ICA was, respectively, 2.63 and 2.83%. With respect to the number of eggs, the greatest reduction was observed at a concentration of 5% for the evaluation period of 120h, both for the extract of citronella grass (86% and for ICA (81%. These results suggest the potential of the ethanol extract of citronella grass to control of T. urticae. However, experiments, under field conditions, involving other populations of T. urticae should be performed to verify the efficacy of this extract as an alternative to be used in pest management programs

  14. Essential oil biosynthesis and regulation in the genus Cymbopogon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjewala, Deepak; Luthra, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils distilled from Cymbopogon species are of immense commercial value as flavors and fragrances in the perfumery, cosmetics, soaps, and detergents and in pharmaceutical industries. Two major constituents of the essential oil, geraniol and citral, due to their specific rose and lemon like aromas are widely used as flavors, fragrances and cosmetics. Citral is also used for the synthesis of vitamin A and ionones (for example, beta-ionone, methyl ionone). Moreover, Cymbopogon essential oils and constituents possess many useful biological activities including cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. Despite the immense commercial and biological significance of the Cymbopogon essential oils, little is known about their biosynthesis and regulatory mechanisms. So far it is known that essential oils are biosynthesized via the classical acetate-MVA route and existence of a newly discovered MEP pathway in Cymbopogon remains as a topic for investigation. The aim of the present review is to discuss the biosynthesis and regulation of essential oils in the genus Cymbopogon with given emphasis to two elite members, lemongrass (C. flexuosus Nees ex Steud) and palmarosa (C. martinii Roxb.). This article highlights the work done so far towards understanding of essential oil biosynthesis and regulation in the genus Cymbopogon. Also, based on our experiences with Cymbopogon species, we would like to propose C. flexuosus as a model system for the study of essential oil metabolism beyond the much studied plant family Lamiaceae.

  15. Efficiency of guva and lemon grass fine dusts on the potato tuber moth Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, H A; El-Kady, Magda B; Mourad, A K; Kordy, A M; Gouda, Randa M; Ibrahim, Gehan M

    2012-01-01

    The present study was initiated to elucidate the effect of potato tubers treatment using fine dusts of Psidium guajava, Cymbopogon citratus, talc powder and their progressive dilutions(w/w) on the fitness components of raised generations of the potato tuber moth (PTM), Phthorimaea operculella. Results showed a direct as well as cumulative delayed effect of the tested plants fine dusts, either alone or admixed with talc powder in progressive dilutions from 5% up to 50% w/w on the viability of developing immatures and potentiality of adult moths. The revealed effects of each of the tested crude plant fine dusts or talc powder alone and/or their progressive dilutions (w/w) could be explained briefly as gradual significant shortening of life span of both sexes, prolongation of larval duration, reduction in number of raised pupae, increase of malformed ones, sharp decrease in the rate of emerged moths, deposited eggs, and developing of immatures; According to lower used dilutions of each tested plant fine dust from 5% to 20%, the complete inhibition of reproductive potential of both adult sexes, the going on metamorphic development of deposited eggs and/or raised immatures of the following generation, after the treatment of parent one, had been revealed the following distinct failure of: a) F1 development after former treatment of parent generation with the higher concentrations of 30-50% of both tested plant fine dusts and the lower prepared dilutions (10% and 20% (w/w)) of both the tested Psidium guajava and (20% (w/w)) Cymbopogom citratus plant fine dusts, resulted in fewer number of the emerged moths that were unviable, weak, sterile and died before induction the F1 progeny, b) F2 development due to the former treatment of the parents with talc powder, Psidium guajava fine dusts alone or its prepared dilutions of (5% (w/w)) and Cymbopogom citratus dilution of (10%(w/w)) gave unviable weak and sterile moths unable to induce the F2 progeny, c) F3 development post

  16. Efficacy of herbal essential oils as insecticide against Aedes aegypti (Linn.), Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) and Anopheles dirus (Peyton and Harrison).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phasomkusolsil, Siriporn; Soonwera, Mayura

    2011-09-01

    The essential oils of Cananga odorata (ylang ylang), Citrus sinensis (orange), Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass), Cymbopogon nardus (citronella grass), Eucalyptus citriodora (eucalyptus), Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) and Syzygium aromaticum (clove), were tested for their insecticide activity against Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles dirus using the WHO standard susceptibility test. These were applied in soybean oil at dose of 1%, 5% and 10% (w/v). C. citratus had the KT, values against the three mosquito species tested but the knockdown rates (at 10, 30 and 60 minutes) were lower than some essential oils. C. citratus oil had high insecticidal activity against Ae. aegypti, Cx. quinquefasciatus and An. dirus, with LC50 values of < 0.1, 2.22 and < 0.1%, respectively. Ten percent C. citratus gave the highest mortality rates (100%) 24 hours after application. This study demonstrates the potential for the essential oil of C. citratus to be used as an insecticide against 3 species of mosquitoes.

  17. Densidades de plantio e doses de biofertilizante na produção de capim-limão Density and biofertilizer levels for lemon grass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie F Blank

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de densidades de plantio e doses de biofertilizante comercial na produção de capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf. O experimento foi implantado em parcelas subdivididas com três repetições, colocando-se nas parcelas as densidades de plantio (33.333, 49.382, 55.555 e 111.111 plantas ha-1 e nas subparcelas as doses de biofertilizante (0; 20; 40 e 60 t ha-1. Foram realizadas nove colheitas em intervalos de 42 dias. Avaliou-se a sobrevivência, a altura de planta, o número de perfilhos por touceira, a massa seca por touceira e da parte aérea, o teor e o rendimento de óleo essencial. O teor de óleo essencial não foi influenciado pelas densidades de plantio e doses de biofertilizante. A densidade crescente resultou em regressões lineares crescentes para o rendimento de óleo essencial e a massa seca da parte aérea e em uma regressão linear decrescente para a massa seca por touceira. A dose de biofertilizante resultou em regressões lineares crescentes para o rendimento de óleo essencial e a massa seca por touceira e da parte aérea. A densidade de 111.111 plantas ha-1 (0,30 x 0,30 m e a dose de biofertilizante de 60 t ha-1 no primeiro ano de cultivo poderão ser recomendados para produção do capim-limão.The aim of this work was to evaluate the plant density and biofertilizer levels on lemon grass (Cymbopogom citratus (D.C. Stapf. The experiment was installed in split plot design with three replications, having plant density as plots (33,333; 49,382; 55,555 and 111,111 plants ha-1 and biofertilizer doses as sub plots (0; 20; 40; 60 t ha-1 year-1. Nine cuttings were realized using an interval of 42 days between cuttings. We evaluated survival, plant height, number of tillers per plant, dry weight per plant and of biomass yield, essential oil content and yield. The essential oil content was not influenced by the plant densities and biofertilizer doses. The crescent density resulted in

  18. Molluscicidal and larvicidal activities and essential oil composition of Cymbopogon winterianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da F; Dias, Clarice N; do Amaral, Flavia Maria M; Moraes, Denise F C; Mouchrek Filho, Victor E; Andrade, Eloisa Helena A; Maia, Jose Guilherme S

    2013-10-01

    CONTEXT. Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor (Poaceae), known as citronella grass, is an aromatic herbaceous plant and the essential oil extracted from this grass is used in cosmetics, perfumes, hygiene and cleanliness products worldwide. This study investigated the composition and molluscicidal and larvicidal activities of the essential oil of C. winterianus cultivated in North Brazil. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation, analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry and then its molluscicidal and larvicidal activities against snails (Biomphalaria glabrata) and hatched larvae of Artemia salina, respectively, were evaluated at concentrations from 10 to 1000 mg/L. The main constituents of oil were citronellal (26.5%), geraniol (16.2%), elemol (14.5%) and citronellol (7.3%). The molluscicidal test revealed significant lethal concentration (LC) values (LC90=97.0 mg/L, LC50=54.0 mg/L and LC20=22.0 mg/L), indicating the presence of molluscicidal compounds in the oil. In addition, the oil showed moderate larvicidal activity (LC50=181.0 mg/L) against the larvae of A. salina, which could justify its use in the aquatic environment without affecting other living organisms. The results suggest that the oil of C. winterianus could be an effective alternative to control schistosomiasis, with an average margin of safety to other living organisms that coexist with snails.

  19. Short Communication: Response of Cymbopogon validus tillers to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of tagged Cymbopogon validus tillers to three clipping frequencies indicated that this species is intolerant of severe and frequent defoliation. This could account for its decreased abundance in heavily-grazed areas in and around Mkambati Game Reserve, Transkei.Language: English. Keywords: abundance ...

  20. The effect of selective defoliation and fertilization on Cymbopogon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small plot trial with different heights of defoliation of unpalatable and other plant species at three levels of fertilization was conducted over a three year period in Cymbopogon-Themeda veld. Keywords: defoliations|fertilisation|veld|defoliation heights|unpalatable plants|plant species|simulations|grazing ...

  1. Habitat factors influencing the distribution of Cymbopogon validus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The factors influencing the distribution of Cymbopogon validus in Mkambati Game Reserve were investigated using multivariate techniques. C. validus was found to be present on nutrient-rich, clay soils and absent from dystrophic, sandy soils. This could account for the patchy distribution of C. validus in the reserve and may ...

  2. Libyan Journal of Medicine - Vol 9, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived barriers to preventive dental care among Libyan dentists · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT .... Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil as a potent anti-inflammatory and antifungal drugs · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  3. In vitro evaluation of the effect of aqueous extracts of Agave sisalana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of aqueous extracts of Agave sisalana (sisal) and Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass) on mycelial growth and conidia production of Pyricularia oryzae, causal agent of Rice Blast. Methodology and Results: The plants aqueous extracts were used at concentrations 0.1; 0.2; 0.3; 0.4; 0.5;1; 2; ...

  4. Potentials of two bio-pesticides in the control of some field insect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was carried out to determine the predominate order of insects associated with Bambara groundnut and to compare the efficacy of aqueous leaf extracts of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) and lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), used as bio-pesticides in controlling some field insect pests of Bambara ...

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 399 ... ... Efficacy of aqueous leaf extracts of negro coffee (Cassia occidentalis) and lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) in the management of nematode pests of ... Vol 4, No 4 (2015), EFL Teachers' Productive Skills Errors and their Effects on Students English Language Proficiency: The Case of Selected ...

  6. A comparative assessment of the the nutritional contents of 'wara' a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The processing line of West African soft cheese varieties (processed with Calotropis procera (Sodom apple) and Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass) leaf extracts was assessed for nutrient compositions (nitrogen, crude protein, fat, lactose, moisture content), pH, total aerobic plate count and trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, ...

  7. Evaluation of the antimicrobial properties of unripe banana ( Musa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the antimicrobial properties of unripe banana ( Musa sapientum L.), lemon grass ( Cymbopogon citratus S.) and turmeric ( Curcuma longa L.) on pathogens. ... The solvents were ethanol (70%, v/v) and water. Antimicrobial activity was carried out by the agar well diffusion method. The clinical isolates include ...

  8. Evaluation of in vivo antimalarial activity of the ethanolic leaf extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    (nanimgebi or Awolowo) and Cymbopogon citratus locally known as( achara tea or lemon grass) were collected from their natural ... Water bath was used to evaporate the solvent (ethanol). The extract was then left overnight at room temperature. (36-380C) for the remaining ethanol to evaporate. The procedure was done ...

  9. Nyegue et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med., (2017) 14 (6): 27 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VOUNDI

    2017-11-15

    Nov 15, 2017 ... Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass) is a plant with thin and linear leaves coloured green releasing a fresh and relaxing smell. It is a traditional cooking ... description of stools revealed the presence of mucus, blood or water (Case Example: loose stools or molded; mucoid and liquid diarrhea). The result of ...

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEWUMI, A A J. Vol 11, No 3 (2014) - Articles Phytochemical Studies And Antimicrobial Properties Of Methanolic And Aqueous Extracts Of Lemon Grass Leaves (Cymbopogon Citratus) Abstract. ISSN: 1596-8499. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  11. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GODWIN, ADEJO. Vol 11, No 3 (2014) - Articles Phytochemical Studies And Antimicrobial Properties Of Methanolic And Aqueous Extracts Of Lemon Grass Leaves (Cymbopogon Citratus) Abstract. ISSN: 1596-8499. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  12. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABDULSALAMI, M S. Vol 11, No 3 (2014) - Articles Phytochemical Studies And Antimicrobial Properties Of Methanolic And Aqueous Extracts Of Lemon Grass Leaves (Cymbopogon Citratus) Abstract. ISSN: 1596-8499. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  13. Science World Journal - Vol 5, No 1 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and phytochemical studies of the grasses Cymbopogon citratus (stapf.), Axonopus compressus (P. Beauv.) and Eragrostis tremula (S. W. Beauv) in Ekpoma, Edo state, Nigeria. EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. E.A Ogie-Odia, D Eseigbe, M.N Ilechie, ...

  14. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ugoji, E. Vol 8, No 7 (2009) - Articles Evaluation of the antimicrobial properties of unripe banana (Musa sapientum L.), lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus S.) and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) on pathogens. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1684-5315. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  15. Phytochemical Studies And Antimicrobial Properties Of Methanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical studies were carried out on aqueous and methanolic extracts of Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass). Agar well diffusion method was employed to assess the antimicrobial potency of the extracts against selected microbial pathogens. The mean zone of inhibition (mm) produced by methanolic extract at four ...

  16. Genome wide transcriptome profiling reveals differential gene expression in secondary metabolite pathway of Cymbopogon winterianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Mishra, Surajit K; Sahu, Jagajjit; Panda, Debashis; Modi, Mahendra K; Sen, Priyabrata

    2016-02-15

    Advances in transcriptome sequencing provide fast, cost-effective and reliable approach to generate large expression datasets especially suitable for non-model species to identify putative genes, key pathway and regulatory mechanism. Citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) is an aromatic medicinal grass used for anti-tumoral, antibacterial, anti-fungal, antiviral, detoxifying and natural insect repellent properties. Despite of having number of utilities, the genes involved in terpenes biosynthetic pathway is not yet clearly elucidated. The present study is a pioneering attempt to generate an exhaustive molecular information of secondary metabolite pathway and to increase genomic resources in Citronella. Using high-throughput RNA-Seq technology, root and leaf transcriptome was analysed at an unprecedented depth (11.7 Gb). Targeted searches identified majority of the genes associated with metabolic pathway and other natural product pathway viz. antibiotics synthesis along with many novel genes. Terpenoid biosynthesis genes comparative expression results were validated for 15 unigenes by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. Thus the coverage of these transcriptome is comprehensive enough to discover all known genes of major metabolic pathways. This transcriptome dataset can serve as important public information for gene expression, genomics and function genomics studies in Citronella and shall act as a benchmark for future improvement of the crop.

  17. Kangaroo grass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... in Australia (Hayman, 1960) and is often used as a forage species for domestic and wild animals. It is also found in some parts of Africa, Asia and the Pacific. It commonly grows in grassland and opens woodland communities. Kangaroo grass is a tufted perennial that can grow up to 1.5 m tall and 0.5 m ...

  18. Grass Lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Danny E.

    Grass lignocelluloses are limited in bioconversion by aromatic constituents, which include both lignins and phenolic acids esters. Histochemistry, ultraviolet absorption microspectrophotometry, and response to microorganisms and specific enzymes have been used to determine the significance of aromatics toward recalcitrance. Coniferyl lignin appears to be the most effective limitation to biodegradation, existing in xylem cells of vascular tissues; cell walls with syringyl lignin, for example, leaf sclerenchyma, are less recalcitrant. Esterified phenolic acids, i.e., ferulic and p-coumaric acids, often constitute a major chemical limitation in nonlignified cell walls to biodegradation in grasses, especially warm-season species. Methods to improve biodegradability through modification of aromatics include: plant breeding, use of lignin-degrading white-rot fungi, and addition of esterases. Plant breeding for new cultivars has been especially effective for nutritionally improved forages, for example, bermudagrasses. In laboratory studies, selective white-rot fungi that lack cellulases delignified the lignocellulosic materials and improved fermentation of residual carbohydrates. Phenolic acid esterases released p-coumaric and ferulic acids for potential coproducts, improved the available sugars for fermentation, and improved biodegradation. The separation and removal of the aromatic components for coproducts, while enhancing the availability of sugars for bioconversion, could improve the economics of bioconversion.

  19. Phytoremediation of metals using lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C.) Stapf.) grown under different levels of red mud in soil amended with biowastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Meenu; Pandey, Divya; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2017-06-03

    Due to hostile condition of red mud (RM), its utilization for vegetation is restricted. Therefore, RM with biowastes as soil amendment may offer suitable combination to support plant growth with reduced risk of metal toxicity. To evaluate the effects of RM on soil properties, plant growth performance, and metal accumulation in lemongrass, a study was conducted using different RM concentrations (0, 5, 10, and 15% w/w) in soil amended with biowastes [cow dung manure (CD) or sewage-sludge (SS)]. Application of RM in soil with biowastes improved organic matter and nutrient contents and caused reduction in phytoavailable metal contents. Total plant biomass was increased under all treatments, maximally at 5% RM in soil with SS (91.4%) and CD (51.7%) compared to that in control (no RM and biowastes). Lemongrass acted as a potential metal-tolerant plant as its metal tolerance index is >100%. Based on translocation and bioconcentration factors, lemongrass acted as a potential phytostabilizer of Fe, Mn, and Cu in roots and was found efficient in translocation of Al, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, As, and Ni from roots to shoot. The study suggests that 5% RM with biowastes preferably SS may be used to enhance phytoremediation potential of lemongrass.

  20. Estudo farmacológico e neuroquímico dos óleos essenciais de Cymbopogon citratus (D.C) Stapf e Citrus ayrantium L

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Celso Acácio Rodrigues de Almeida [UNESP

    2011-01-01

    A depressão e a ansiedade representam algumas das mais comuns e proliferativas desordens mentais no mundo. Tradicionalmente se postula que ansiedade e depressão são desordens separadas e distintas. Entretanto, muitos estudos clínicos têm demonstrado uma grande sobreposição entre esses dois estados. Atualmente, a maioria dos transtornos de ansiedade é tratada com drogas que interferem, de modo mais ou menos seletivo, com a neurotransmissão gabaérgica, serotonérgica e/ou noradrenérgica. A depre...

  1. Purificação do oleo essencial de "Cymbopogon Citratus" para a concentração de citral utilizando a destilação molecular

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Plazas Tovar

    2008-01-01

    Resumo: Os óleos essenciais são extratos concentrados de plantas aromáticas constituídos por substâncias orgânicas voláteis, formando uma mistura complexa de hidrocarbonetos terpênicos e derivados oxigenados, havendo sempre a predominância de um ou dois deles, constituindo o(s) principal(is) componente(s) bioquímico(s) de ação terapêutica e responsáveis pelas características organolépticas. O óleo essencial de Capim-Limão, conhecido internacionalmente como óleo essencial ''lemongrass” e de...

  2. Evaluation de la toxicité des huiles essentielles de Cymbopogon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation de la toxicité des huiles essentielles de Cymbopogon nardus (L) et Ocimum gratissimum (L) contre Sitophilus zeamais Motsch et Rhyzopertha dominica F, les principaux insectes nuisibles au maïs en stockage...

  3. De novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provides First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Meena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavour, fragrance, cosmetic and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step towards understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases (TPS, pyrophosphatases (PPase, alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH, aldo-keto reductases (AKR, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD, alcohol acetyltransferases (AAT and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified enzymes in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats (SSRs were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition.

  4. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provide First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Seema; Kumar, Sarma R; Venkata Rao, D K; Dwivedi, Varun; Shilpashree, H B; Rastogi, Shubhra; Shasany, Ajit K; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family) represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step toward understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass) by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases, pyrophosphatases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldo-keto reductases, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, alcohol acetyltransferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type) with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes, and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified protein sequences in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition.

  5. Influência da luz e da temperatura sobre a oxidação do óleo essencial de capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C. Stapf Influence of light and temperature on the oxidation of the essential oil of lemongrass (Cymbopogon Citratus (D.C. Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo de L. Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the chemical compounds of the essential oil was performed with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The oil was left in the presence and absence of light and submitted to different temperatures to evaluate its stability. The yields of the major compounds were evaluated every fifteen days. Citral and myrcene, the major compounds of the essential oil, were degraded over time in both the presence and absence of light, but temperature only influenced the degradation of myrcene.

  6. Qualidade de produtos a base de plantas medicinais comercializados no Brasil: castanha-da-índia (Aesculus hippocastanum L., capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf e centela (Centella asiatica (L. Urban Quality of products made from medicinal plants commercialized in Brazil: horsechestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L., lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf, and gotu kola (Centella asiatica (L. Urban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joabe Gomes de Melo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a qualidade de produtos a base de plantas medicinais, analisou-se dez amostras de castanha-da-índia, onze de capim-limão e seis de centela, comercializadas em farmácias da cidade do Recife, provenientes de indústrias de várias partes do país. Analisamos as informações técnico-científicas nos rótulos e/ou bulas de acordo com as exigências e obrigatoriedades da legislação brasileira (RDC n. 140 de 29/05/2003 e na RDC n. 102 de 30/11/2000, e embasamento da literatura científica. Também avaliou-se as características organolépticas, a autenticidade e a pureza dos produtos. Constatou-se ausência das informações obrigatórias em 92,59% das amostras. Dentre os termos vedados, foi comum a sugestão da inexistência de efeitos colaterais ou adversos. Quanto as indicações terapêuticas não se observou padronização técnica dos termos nem comprovação científica para algumas das atividades atribuídas pelos fabricantes. Todas as amostras foram consideradas autênticas com base nos testes fitoquímicos e farmacobotânicos. Na análise da pureza 59,26% das amostras foram reprovadas, devido principalmente ao elevado teor de umidade e cinzas totais. Constata-se que além dos produtos comercializados carecerem de informações e qualidade adequadas, há necessidade urgente de uma fiscalização efetiva por parte dos órgãos competentes.Aiming to evaluate the quality of products made from medicinal plants, there were analyzed ten samples of horsechestnut, eleven samples of lemongrass, and six samples of gotu kola commercialized in pharmacies from the city of Recife (Pernambuco, Brazil, coming from industries of several parts of the country. We analyzed the technical-scientific information on the labels and/or directions according to the requirements and obligations of Brazilian law (laws "RDC 140 of 29/05/2003" and "RDC 102 of 30/11/2000" and to scientific literature embasement. The products' organoleptic characteristics, authenticity, and purity were also evaluated. The absence of obligatory information was verified in 92.59% of the samples. Among the blacked terms, it was common to find products that suggested inexistent collateral or adverse effects. Technical terms were not standardized and the manufacturers did not provide scientific proof for some of the activities credited to the products. All samples were considered authentic based on the phytochemical and pharmacobotanical tests. The purity analysis considered 59.26% of the samples inappropriate, mainly due to the high total levels of humidity and ashes. It was verified that besides the lack of adequate information and quality of the commercialized products, there is an urgent need for an effective inspection by the suitable agencies.

  7. Chemical Fingerprinting of the Fragrant Volatiles of Nineteen Indian Cultivars of Cymbopogon Spreng. (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra C. Padalia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil compositions of total nineteen cultivars of Cymbopogon Spreng. (Poaceae species viz. C. martinii (Roxb. Wats. var. motia Burk., C. flexuosus Nees ex Steud, C. winterinus Jowitt., C. pendulus Nees ex Steud. and a hybrid of C. khasianus (Hack Stapf. ex Bor and C. pendulus Nees ex Steud. were examined and compared using capillary GC and GC-MS . The analysis led to the identification of 48 constituents forming 90.1% to 99.7% of their total oil compositions with monoterpenoids (78.9% to 97.4% as the most exclusive constituents. The comparative results showed considerable variation in the qualitative and quantitative compositions of essential oils from nineteen different cultivars of the studied Cymbopogon species. On the basis of chemical similarity the cultivars of genus Cymbopogon was divided into five chemical variants/groups within two series viz. Citrati and Rusae. The volatile profile of existing cultivars of Cymbopogon are useful for their commercial utilization as they possess range of essential oils and aroma chemicals used in perfumery, flavour, pharmaceutical and other allied industries. Moreover, the marker constituents in their essential oils may be utilized as an important tool in oil authentication.

  8. Grazing of Cymbopogon-Themeda veld in the dormant period | G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence on summer-rested veld of grazing during autumn, winter and early summer was studied in Cymbopogon-Themeda veld at Potchefstroom. Continuous grazing throughout the winter period, and even during early summer, severely damaged species such as Themeda triandra, Eragrostis curvula and Digitaria ...

  9. resistance of napier grass clones to napier grass stunt disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach) is the major livestock fodder under intensive and semi-intensive systems in East Africa. However, the productivity of the grass is constrained by Napier grass Stunt Disease. (NSD). The purpose of this study was to identify Napier grass clones with resistance to NSD.

  10. Resistance of Napier grass clones to Napier grass Stunt Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach) is the major livestock fodder under intensive and semi-intensive systems in East Africa. However, the productivity of the grass is constrained by Napier grass Stunt Disease (NSD). The purpose of this study was to identify Napier grass clones with resistance to NSD.

  11. GRASS GIS Vector Processing: Towards GRASS 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Markus; Landa, Martin; Petrasova, Anna; Petras, Vaclav; Chemin, Yann; Neteler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The upcoming GRASS GIS 7 release improves not only raster processing and general design but the vector processing in the first place. GRASS GIS, as a topological GIS, recognizes that the topology plays the key role in the vector processing and analysis. Topology ensures that adjacent geographic components in a single vector map are related. In contrast to non-topological GIS, a border common to two areas exists only once and is shared between the two areas. Topological representation of vector data helps to produce and maintain vector maps with clean geometry as well as enables the user to perform certain analyses that can not be conducted with non-topological or spaghetti data. Non-topological vector data are automatically converted to a topological representation upon import. Further more, various cleaning tools exist to remove non-trivial topological errors. In the upcoming GRASS GIS 7 release the vector library was particularly improved to make it faster and more efficient with an improved internal vector file format. This new topological format reduces memory and disk space requirements, leading to a generally faster processing. Opening an existing vector requires less memory providing additionally support for large files. The new spatial index performs queries faster (compared to GRASS GIS 6 more than 10 times for large vectors). As a new option the user can select a file-based version of the spatial index for large vector data. All topological cleaning tools have been optimized with regard to processing speed, robustness, and system requirements. The topological engine comes with a new prototype for direct read/write support of Simple Features API/OGR. Additionally vector data can be directly exchanged with topological PostGIS 2 databases. Considering the wide spread usage of ESRI Shapefile, a non-topological format for vector data exchange, it is particularly advantageous that GRASS GIS 7 offers advanced cleaning tools. For power users and programmers, the

  12. Antifungal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus jowitt ex bor against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, Wylly Ara?jo; de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; de Luna, Giliara Carol Diniz Gomes; Lima, Igara Oliveira; Wanderley, Paulo Alves; de Lima, Rita Baltazar; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast and a member of the normal human flora that commonly causes infections in patients with any type of deficiency of the immune system. The essential oils have been tested for antimycotic activity and pose much potential as antifungal agents. This work investigated the activity of the essential oil of Cymbopogon winterianus against C. albicans by MIC, MFC and time-kill methods. The essential oil (EO) was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-t...

  13. An assessment on performance, emission and combustion characteristics of single cylinder diesel engine powered by Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhinesh, B.; Isaac JoshuaRamesh Lalvani, J.; Parthasarathy, M.; Annamalai, K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cymbopogon Flexuosus biofuel is used as an alternative energy source. • Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel 20% + Diesel 80% blend profile stayed close to diesel. • Resulting in higher thermal efficiency and reduced fuel consumption. • Reduced hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide and smoke emission. • Oxides of nitrogen and carbon di-oxide emission was marginally higher. - Abstract: The novelty of this manuscript is that it discusses about the experimental analysis of a new biofuel feedstock as an alternative fuel that has not drawn much attention among the researchers. An exploration for a new biofuel feedstock resulted in Cymbopogon flexuosus as an alternative energy source. Raw oil of Cymbopogon flexuosus was obtained through steam distillation process. Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel was blended with diesel fuel in various proportions on volume basis, namely 10, 20, 30, 40, and 100 percent and its properties were assessed according to American Society for Testing and Materials standards. The considered test fuel was experimentally analysed in a single cylinder diesel engine at 1500 rpm for its performance, emission and combustion characteristics. Among various blends, Fuel blend of Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel 20% + diesel 80% fuel profile stayed close to diesel fuel resulting in higher thermal efficiency and lower hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and smoke emission. However, oxides of nitrogen and carbon dioxide emission was marginally higher for the test fuel considered. Cylinder pressure and heat release rate curves were lower at full load condition as compared with diesel fuel. Against the grim background of fossil fuel depletion, Fuel blend of Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel 20% + diesel 80% fuel acts as a promising alternative fuel and brings hope to the nation as well as the research world.

  14. GUI development for GRASS GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Landa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses GUI development for GRASS GIS. Sophisticated native GUI for GRASS is one of the key points (besides the new 2D/3D raster library, vector architecture improvements, etc. for the future development of GRASS. In 2006 the GRASS development team decided to start working on the new generation of GUI instead of improving the current GUI based on Tcl/Tk.

  15. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tostabilize metal-contaminated soils, and sequester toxic metals. Identification of rhizospheric microbial communities that toler- ate contaminants and promote transformations that render the soil less toxic, are invaluable for phytoremediation and restoration of degraded lands. An Example of Bacterial Communities in Grass ...

  16. Metagenomics at Grass Roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Metagenomics at Grass Roots. Sudeshna ... benefit human health, agriculture, and ecosystemfunctions. This article provides a brief history of technicaladvances in metagenomics, including DNA sequencing methods,and some case studies.

  17. Effect of essential oils of medicinal plants on leaf blotch in Tanzania grass Efeito de óleos essenciais de plantas medicinais sobre a helmintosporiose do capim Tanzânia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Rodrigues dos Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf spots caused by phyto-pathogenic fungi, can reduce the production of forage plants. The essential oils of medicinal plants have antimicrobial potential. The objective here was to evaluate the fungotoxicity in vitro of the essential oils of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf (Poaceae, citronella (Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle (Poaceae, lemon balm (Lippia alba (Mill. NE Br ex Britton & P. Wilson (Verbenaceae and peppermint (Mentha piperita L. (Lamiaceae on the fungus Helminthosporium sp. and the in vivo effect of these oils and of commercial neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (Meliaceae on leaf blotch in Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzania-1. The mycelial growth of the fungus was evaluated over five periods (2; 4; 6; 8 and 10 days from incubation and with five concentrations of essential oils (C1 = 250 ppm; C2 = 500 ppm; C3 = 750 ppm; C4 = 1,000 ppm e C5 = 1,250 ppm. As an alternative control, the preventative and curative effect on leaf blotch of five oil-based treatments were evaluated: lemongrass, citronella, lemon balm, peppermint and neem in four concentrations (2,500; 5,000; 7,500 and 10,000 ppm. The essential oils of lemongrass and citronella were the most effective in reducing mycelial growth of Helminthosporium sp. With the essential oil of lemongrass, the pathogen presented the highest growth concentration (1.250 ppm. The results obtained showed that all the essential oils and concentrations tested presented a preventive and curative effect, reducing the severity of leaf blotch.Manchas foliares, causadas por fungos fitopatogênicos, podem reduzir a produção de forrageiras. Óleos essenciais de plantas medicinais apresentam potencial antimicrobiano. Objetivou-se avaliar a fungitoxicidade in vitro dos óleos essenciais de capim-limão (Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf (Poaceae, citronela (Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle (Poaceae, erva-cidreira (Lippia alba (Mill. N.E. Br. ex Britton & P. Wilson (Verbenaceae e hortel

  18. Response of Java citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt) to toxic heavy metal cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, H P; Handique, A K; Borah, G C

    2000-12-01

    Cadmium at 200 mg kg-1 soil and above concentrations was fatal as growth was inhibited ultimately leading to death of Java citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt.). The surviving plants at 50 and 100 mg kg-1 treatments also exhibited pronounced retardation of growth and biomass yield. There was considerable reduction in the level of essential oil in herbage and oil quality deteriorated. Cadmium accumulation profile showed that highest accumulation was in root, followed by stem, leaf sheath and leaf. Very high accumulation in root for higher doses appeared to be the reason for fatality.

  19. Influence of metals on essential oil content and composition of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (D.C.) Stapf.) grown under different levels of red mud in sewage sludge amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Meenu; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2017-05-01

    Lemongrass is a commercially important perennial herb with medicinal value and ability to tolerate high alkaline and saline conditions. Essential oil bearing plants can grow safely in soil contaminated with heavy metals without severe effects on morphology and oil yield. The present study was aimed to assess the essential oil content and composition in lemongrass in response to elevated metals in above-ground plant parts. Pot experiment was conducted for six months using sewage sludge as soil amendment (soil: sludge: 2:1 w/w) followed by red mud treatments (0, 5, 10 and 15% w/w). Garden soil without sludge and red mud was control and there were ten replicates of each treatment. Oil content in leaves was differently affected due to presence of metals in soil under different treatments. Oil content under S RM5 (5% red mud) treatment was raised by 42.9 and 11.5% compared to the control and S RM0 treatment, respectively. Among identified compounds in oil under red mud treatments, 17 compounds contributed more than 90% of total volatiles (citral contributing approximately 70%). Under S RM10 treatment, essential oil showed maximum citral content (75.3%). Contents of Fe, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni and Pb in above-ground plant parts exceeded, whereas Mn was detected within WHO permissible limits for medicinal plants. However, metal contents in essential oil were well within FSSAI limits for food. The study suggests utilization of 5 and 10% red mud in sludge amended soil for lemongrass cultivation to have better oil yield and quality, without metal contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. OBTENÇÃO, LIOFILIZAÇÃO E CARACTERIZAÇÃO DE EXTRATO DE CAPIM-LIMÃO (Cymbopogon citratus D.C. E HIBISCO (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Silva dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extratos de vegetais, como o capim-limão e hibisco, não apresentam propriedades medicinais e são adequados para aplicações em alimento, devido às suas funcionalidades e propriedades de atribuir aroma e aspecto mais agradável aos alimentos. Transformar o extrato aquoso em pó melhora sua conservação e comercialização. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram a obtenção e liofilização de extrato de capim-limão e hibisco. Foram determinadas por análises físico-químicas, em triplicata: teores de sólidos solúveis totais (SST, acidez total titulável (ATT, pH e cor (reference points L, a*, b*, c* and h. Para o capim-limão, os teores de SST para o produto liofilizado foi de 49,10 ºBrix; a ATT e o pH do extrato e do pó foram próximos, ao redor de 1,5 e 5,55, respectivamente; os valores de b* do extrato aquoso e do liofilizado diferenciaram significativamente, entretando ambos apresentaram cor tendendo para o amarelo. Para o hibisco, o liofilizado apresentou 43 ºBrix; a ATT do extrato aquoso foi de 7,53g de ácido cítrico/100g, aproximadamente o dobro para a amostra do produto liofilizado; os valores a* aumentaram após o tratamento aplicado, como consequência os valores de L* diminuíram, tendendo para o vermelho; os valores de h(º obtidos para o extrato e o liofilizado,  foram de 27,00 e 10,67, respectivamente, indicando que o menor ângulo representa maior intensidade, faixa de cor entre vermelho e azul, representando o roxo. Como resultados, a liofilização é capaz de produzir um produto desidratado com altos teores de sólidos solúveis, e qualidade em termos sensoriais como a cor.

  1. Elevated atmospheric CO2 triggers compensatory feeding by root herbivores on a C3 but not a C4 grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Johnson

    Full Text Available Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations often reduce nutritional quality for herbivores by increasing the C:N ratio of plant tissue. This frequently triggers compensatory feeding by aboveground herbivores, whereby they consume more shoot material in an attempt to meet their nutritional needs. Little, however, is known about how root herbivores respond to such changes. Grasslands are particularly vulnerable to root herbivores, which can collectively exceed the mass of mammals grazing aboveground. Here we provide novel evidence for compensatory feeding by a grass root herbivore, Sericesthis nigrolineata, under elevated atmospheric CO2 (600 µmol mol(-1 on a C3 (Microlaena stipoides but not a C4 (Cymbopogon refractus grass species. At ambient CO2 (400 µmol mol(-1 M. stipoides roots were 44% higher in nitrogen (N and 7% lower in carbon (C concentrations than C. refractus, with insects performing better on M. stipoides. Elevated CO2 decreased N and increased C:N in M. stipoides roots, but had no impact on C. refractus roots. Root-feeders displayed compensatory feeding on M. stipoides at elevated CO2, consuming 118% more tissue than at ambient atmospheric CO2. Despite this, root feeder biomass remained depressed by 24%. These results suggest that compensatory feeding under elevated atmospheric CO2 may make some grass species particularly vulnerable to attack, potentially leading to future shifts in the community composition of grasslands.

  2. Extending juvenility in grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeppler, Shawn; de Leon Gatti, Natalia; Foerster, Jillian

    2017-04-11

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for modulating the juvenile to adult developmental growth transition in plants, such as grasses (e.g. maize). In particular, the invention provides methods for enhancing agronomic properties in plants by modulating expression of GRMZM2G362718, GRMZM2G096016, or homologs thereof. Modulation of expression of one or more additional genes which affect juvenile to adult developmental growth transition such as Glossy15 or Cg1, in conjunction with such modulation of expression is also contemplated. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of GRMZM2G362718 and/or GRMZM2G096016 are also contemplated, as are transgenic plants and products produced there from, that demonstrate altered, such as extended juvenile growth, and display associated phenotypes such as enhanced yield, improved digestibility, and increased disease resistance. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved forage or feed crops or in biofuel production.

  3. Breeding for Grass Seed Yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Birte; Studer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Seed yield is a trait of major interest for many fodder and amenity grass species and has received increasing attention since seed multiplication is economically relevant for novel grass cultivars to compete in the commercial market. Although seed yield is a complex trait and affected...... important aspects and components affecting the seed yield potential and the agronomic and environmental aspects affecting the utilization and realization of the seed yield potential. Finally, it discusses the potential of plant breeding to sustainably improve total seed yield in fodder and amenity grasses....

  4. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF Cymbopogon nardus (L. Rendle (CITRONELLA AGAINST Microsporum canis FROM ANIMALS AND HOME ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis Regina Grenier CAPOCI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytosis is a common zoonosis in urban centers. Dogs and cats have played an important role as its disseminators. Environmental decontamination is essential for the prevention of its propagation to humans and animals. However, sanitizers or disinfectants with antifungal activity, currently available, have high toxicity. The present study evaluated the in vitro effects of an extract of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus on 31 Microsporum canis isolates from animals and home environments. Susceptibility tests were performed based on document M38-A2 (2008 of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute with modifications for natural products. Although susceptibility variation was observed between the fungus tested, the concentrations that inhibited the growth of 50 and 90% of the microorganisms were low (19.5 and 78 µg/mL, respectively. Thus, this citronella extract showed potent fungistatic and fungicide activities against M. canis isolated from animals and home environments. Therefore, it could be an alternative for dermatophytosis prophylaxis in the home environment.

  5. Radiation induced methyl-eugenol deficient mutant of Cymbopogon flexuosus (Nees ex Steud) wats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, D.K.; Kaul, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    The presence of methyl eugenol in the oil and the difficulty experienced in its separation was considered to be a negative attribute in the Cymbopogon flexuosus (Var. RRL-59). A mutation breeding programme was initiated to rectify this inherent defect. A massive screening of irradiated vegetative slips of this essential oil-bearing plant resulted in the isolation of a methyl-eugenol deficient mutant. The results show that once the methyl-eugenol is absent from the oil, the oil as such closely resembles the oil of citronella (Java type) and can be a good substitute for the same. This investigation supports the view that beneficial mutations at specific gene loci once isolated in a vegetatively propagated species can be easily stabilised and propagated. (auth.)

  6. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle (CITRONELLA) AGAINST Microsporum canis FROM ANIMALS AND HOME ENVIRONMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Cunha, Michele Milano da; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patricia de Souza; Ghiraldi-Lopes, Luciana Dias; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Kioshima, Erika Seki; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet

    2015-12-01

    Dermatophytosis is a common zoonosis in urban centers. Dogs and cats have played an important role as its disseminators. Environmental decontamination is essential for the prevention of its propagation to humans and animals. However, sanitizers or disinfectants with antifungal activity, currently available, have high toxicity. The present study evaluated the in vitro effects of an extract of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus) on 31 Microsporum canis isolates from animals and home environments. Susceptibility tests were performed based on document M38-A2 (2008) of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute with modifications for natural products. Although susceptibility variation was observed between the fungus tested, the concentrations that inhibited the growth of 50 and 90% of the microorganisms were low (19.5 and 78 µg/mL, respectively). Thus, this citronella extract showed potent fungistatic and fungicide activities against M. canis isolated from animals and home environments. Therefore, it could be an alternative for dermatophytosis prophylaxis in the home environment.

  7. Phythochemical screening and anticonvulsant activity of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt (Poaceae) leaf essential oil in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintans-Júnior, L J; Souza, T T; Leite, B S; Lessa, N M N; Bonjardim, L R; Santos, M R V; Alves, P B; Blank, A F; Antoniolli, A R

    2008-08-01

    Cymbopogon winterianus (Poaceae) is used for its analgesic, anxiolytic and anticonvulsant properties in Brazilian folk medicine. This report aimed to perform phythochemical screening and to investigate the possible anticonvulsant effects of the essential oil (EO) from fresh leaves of C. winterianus in different models of epilepsy. The phytochemical analysis of EO showed presence of geraniol (40.06%), citronellal (27.44%) and citronellol (10.45%) as the main compounds. A behavioral screening demonstrated that EO (100, 200 and 400mg/kg; ip) caused depressant activity on CNS. When administered concurrently, EO (200 and 400mg/kg, ip) significantly reduced the number of animals that exhibited PTZ- and PIC-induced seizures in 50% of the experimental animals (p<0.05). Additionally, EO (100, 200 and 400mg/kg, ip) significantly increased (p<0.05) the latencies of clonic seizures induced by STR. Our results demonstrated a possible activity anticonvulsant of the EO.

  8. Grass fungal endophytes and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craven, Kelly

    2015-03-10

    The invention provides isolated fungal endophytes and synthetic combinations thereof with host grass plants. Methods for inoculating grass plant with the endophytes, for propagating the grass-endophyte combinations, and for producing feeds and biofuels from grass-endophyte combinations are also provided.

  9. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  10. Fumigant Antifungal Activity of Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oils and Citronellal against Three Fungal Species

    OpenAIRE

    Raimundo Wagner de S. Aguiar; Marcio A. Ootani; Sérgio Donizeti Ascencio; Talita P. S. Ferreira; Manoel M. dos Santos; Gil R. dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus essential oils samples were analyzed by GC and GC-MS and their qualitative and quantitative compositions established. The main component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus was citronellal, at 61.78% and 36.6%, respectively. The essential oils and citronellal were tested for their fumigant antifungal activity against Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ra...

  11. Growth Inhibition and Morphological Alterations of Trichophyton Rubrum Induced by Essential oil from Cymbopogon Winterianus Jowitt Ex Bor

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; Alves Wanderley, Paulo; Cavalcanti Viana, Fernando Ant?nio; Baltazar de Lima, Rita; Barbosa de Sousa, Frederico; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2011-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is one of the most common fungi causer of dermatophytosis, mycosis that affect humans and animals around the world. Researches aiming new products with antifungal activity become necessary to overcome difficulties on treatment of these infections. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of essential oil from Cymbopogon winterianus against the dermatophyte T. rubrum. The antifungal screening was performed by solid medium diffusion method with 16...

  12. Molecular Evolution of Grass Stomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Guang; Dai, Fei; Wang, Yizhou; Hills, Adrian; Ruan, Yong-Ling; Zhang, Guoping; Franks, Peter J; Nevo, Eviatar; Blatt, Michael R

    2017-02-01

    Grasses began to diversify in the late Cretaceous Period and now dominate more than one third of global land area, including three-quarters of agricultural land. We hypothesize that their success is likely attributed to the evolution of highly responsive stomata capable of maximizing productivity in rapidly changing environments. Grass stomata harness the active turgor control mechanisms present in stomata of more ancient plant lineages, maximizing several morphological and developmental features to ensure rapid responses to environmental inputs. The evolutionary development of grass stomata appears to have been a gradual progression. Therefore, understanding the complex structures, developmental events, regulatory networks, and combinations of ion transporters necessary to drive rapid stomatal movement may inform future efforts towards breeding new crop varieties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the extraction process of the essential oil from Cymbopogon schoenanthus with pressurized carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maria Bittencourt Dutra de Sousa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the essential oil extraction process of Cymbopogon schoenanthus Spreg with pressured CO2, and to compare the results with a conventional extraction process. The experiment was conducted at 15°C, 66.7 bar and a medium flow rate of 1.23 g CO2/min, in a fixed bed extractor and a dynamic method was adopted for the solubility calculation. The solvent extraction was realized with ethanol in an incubator, followed by a vacuum filtration and solvent evaporation. The composition of the oil was analyzed by a gas chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer. The extraction with CO2 showed a yield of 2.78%, and solubility of 1.48 x 10-2 g oil/ g CO2.O objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar um estudo do processo de extração do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon schoenanthus Spreg com CO2 pressurizado, e comparar os resultados obtidos com um processo convencional de extração. Os experimentos foram realizados numa temperatura de extração de 15ºC, pressão de 66,7 bar e vazão média de 1,23 gCO2/min. O processo ocorreu num extrator em leito fixo e foi adotado o método dinâmico para o cálculo da solubilidade. A extração com solvente orgânico foi realizada com etanol através de uma incubadora a 15ºC, seguida de filtração a vácuo e posterior evaporação do solvente. A composição do óleo foi analisada por cromatografia gasosa acoplada a espectrômetro de massa. A extração com CO2 apresentou um rendimento de 2,78% e solubilidade de 1,51.10-2 g óleo/g CO2.

  14. Performance of beef steers on Smuts finger grass and Nile grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature where animal performance is quantified for. Smuts finger grass and Nile grass pastures in South Africa is limited. In some trials, animal performance on Smuts finger grass and/or Nile grass was reported (Rhind & Goodenough,. 1979, Dannhauser, 1982 Grunow, et al., 1984). The ADG achieved by .steers on Smuts ...

  15. Use of Lippia rotundifolia and Cymbopogon flexuosus essential oils, individually or in combination, in broiler diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Lorena Azevedo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study investigated the effects of Cymbopogon flexuosus and Lippia rotundifolia microencapsulated essential oils on broiler performance and carcass yield. One hundred and fifty mixed-sex Cobb broiler chicks were used, from one day up to 42 days of age, in a completely randomized design, with five treatments and three replicates of ten birds each. The treatments were: negative control (basal diet, positive control (diet with enramycin and salinomycin, and three diets with microencapsulated essential oils from lemongrass, L. rotundifolia, and combination with 50% of both. The performance and carcass yield were not affected by the treatments. The intestine absolute weight was lower in the combination treatment compared with the negative control treatment and the lemongrass essential oil. The intestine relative weight was higher in the treatments with lemongrass and L. rotundifolia essential oils in relation to the combination. The liver relative weight was lower with the lemongrass essential oil and the combination compared with the treatment with the L. rotundifolia essential oil. The trial could not find results enough to recommend the use of the lemongrass and L. rotundifolia essential oils as an additive in broiler diets.

  16. Acaricidal properties of the formulations based on essential oils from Cymbopogon winterianus and Syzygium aromaticum plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Valéria; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; da Silva, Márcio Roberto; Daemon, Erik; da Silva, Luciane Santos; Guimarães, Flávia del Gaudio; de Mendonça, Alessandra Esther; Folly, Evelize; Vilela, Fernanda Maria Pinto; do Amaral, Lilian Henriques; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; do Amaral, Maria da Penha Henriques

    2014-12-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has caused serious harm to livestock raising in Brazil, considering the costs of controlling it, loss of revenue due to smaller production of milk and meat, and damage to leather, in addition to transmitting diseases. The use of medicinal plants is considered an alternative to the recurring resistance to chemicals. Due to the need for efficient alternatives with less environmental impact, this study aimed to develop contact formulations with essential oils from the Java citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) and clove (Syzygium aromaticum) plants and to assess in vitro the effects in different stages of the tick cycle. In the present study, concentrations from 0.5-15.0% of the essential oils incorporated in the formulations were used. The ticks from different geographical areas were treated with those formulations, and their effects on the production levels of eggs, on the larvae hatching, and their efficiency on ticks were assessed. The obtained results were compared with other commercial acaricidal products. After the 20th day of treatment, the formulations with citronella essential oil had 2.09-55.51% efficiency, depending on the concentration of the oil incorporated. The efficiency of the treatment with formulations containing clove essential oil was higher, from 92.47-100%. The results showed the acaricidal effects of the formulations tested when compared to commercial chemical products. In vivo studies should be performed in order to assess the efficiency of those formulations in the fields, aiming to use these products as an alternative for controlling cattle ticks.

  17. PERBANDINGAN KANDUNGAN MINYAK ATSIRI TANAMAN SEREH WANGI (Cymbopogon nardus L. Rendle YANG DITANAM DI LOKASI BERBEDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Dacosta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been conducted a research that aims to determine the ratio of essential oil content of citronella stalks (Cymbopogon nardus Rendle L. grown in the lowlands of Denpasar and the highlands of Bedugul. The experiment was conducted by using experimental designs. The parameters measured were the volume and the level of citronella oil produced. The sample preparation of powdered citronella stalks was as much as 200 grams, macerated with 96% ethanol and evaporated with Vacuum rotary evaporator to form condensed extract. The research used quantitative methods. The volume of hydro distillation was to obtain a crude extract of citronella stalks and the identification of active compounds was conducted by using Gas Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. It can be concluded that the levels of citronella essential oil stalks from the highland of Bedugul was higher than the lowland areas of Denpasar, while the quality of essential oil of the lowland of Denpasar was better than that of the Bedugul highland. The content of secondary metabolites of the results of GC-MS analysis obtained from the essential oils contained in the analyzed crude extract of citronella stalks namely the compound of Selina-6-en-4-ol (2287322, the compound of n-hexadecanoic acid (1238019 and the compound of Driman-8,11-diol from the lowland of Denpasar while the Selina compound-6-en-4-ol (1856137 from the highland of Bedugul. Keywords: Citronella, essential oil content, altitude

  18. Vermicomposting of distillation waste of citronella plant (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt.) employing Eudrilus eugeniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, H; Deka, S; Baruah, C K; Das, J; Hoque, S; Sarma, N S

    2011-07-01

    Laboratory experiment on vermicomposting of distillation waste of java citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt.) was carried out employing Eudrilus eugeniae, in two seasonal trials, covering summer and winter periods. Two vermicomposting treatments were conducted in earthen pots, one with citronella plant waste only (CW) and the other, a mixture of citronella waste and cowdung in the proportion 5:1 (CW+CD). Vermicomposting of citronella waste resulted reduction in C/N ratio (83.5-87.7%), enhancement of ash content and a number of macro and micronutrients. The FT-IR spectroscopy of the vermicompost revealed the reduction in aliphatic and aromatic compound as well as increase in amide group after the 105 days stabilization process. The vermicompost output was significantly enhanced in CW+CD treatment than CW treatment. Even, nutrient content of the vermicompost was also higher in CW+CD treatment than CW alone indicating the positive role of cowdung in improvement of quantity and quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Study on Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oils of Different Cultivars of Lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Gupta, Ritam Muhury, Deepak Ganjewala

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cymbopogon flexuosus popularly known as lemongrass provides a lemon scented essential oil which is widely used in flavour and fragrance, perfumery, food and pharmaceuticals. The aim of the present study was to assess antimicrobial activities of essential oils of three lemongrass cultivars viz., Pragati, Praman and Suvarna. Methods: Essential oils were isolated from one month old plants by hydro-distillation in mini Clevenger apparatus for 2 h. Antimicrobial activities were determined by agar well diffusion method Results: Lemongrass oils exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against all the microbes except E coli. Mean inhibition zone diameter (mm against bacteria was ranged 27-38 mm. B. Subtilis was the most sensitive bacterium to all essential oils. Essential oils also showed strong antifungal effects against both A. niger and C. albicans with mean inhibition zone diameter (mm values 20-26 and 27-29 mm, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed that antimicrobial activity shown by essential oils were significant (p > 0.05. Conclusion: The study revealed strong antimicrobial potential of the essential oil against pathogenic microbial strains which may be of high clinical importance in future.

  20. Optimal Extraction and Evaluation on the Oil Content of Citronella Oil Extracted From Cymbopogon Nardus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, D.C.J.; Jalifah Latip; Siti Aishah Hasbullah; Sastrohamidjojo, H.

    2015-01-01

    An investigation on the extraction of citronella oil from Cymbopogon nardus (C. nardus) using a custom made medium scale steam distillation apparatus has been conducted. The Clevenger apparatus was used to generate a continuous flow of the hydrosol, creating an efficient distillation system. In the case for C. nardus leave samples orientation; the sleeping/ standing and close/ loose packing in steam distillator was found to have significant effects on the yield of extraction. The 3.5 hours distillation process produced an extraction yield of 0.64 % in sleeping position of the leaves as compared to the standing position (0.43 %), while the loose packing (0.70 %) has almost two fold of yield percentage as compared to the close-packing (0.40 %) of the leaves. Therefore, the steam distillation of C. nardus leaves using a custom made medium scale steam distillation apparatus was found to be most effective in the combination of sleeping position with a loose packing. Furthermore, the age of C. nardus leaves also affect the physical and chemical quality of the citronella oil extracted. The younger leaves produced citronella oil that consists mainly of citronellal, citronellol and geraniol while the older leaves contained a high composition of citral. (author)

  1. Antifungal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus jowitt ex bor against Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wylly Araújo de Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast and a member of the normal human flora that commonly causes infections in patients with any type of deficiency of the immune system. The essential oils have been tested for antimycotic activity and pose much potential as antifungal agents. This work investigated the activity of the essential oil of Cymbopogon winterianus against C. albicans by MIC, MFC and time-kill methods. The essential oil (EO was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus. It was tested fifteen strains of C. albicans. The MIC was determined by the microdilution method and the MFC was determined when an aliquot of the broth microdilution was cultivated in SDA medium. The phytochemical analysis of EO showed presence of citronellal (23,59%, geraniol (18,81% and citronellol (11,74%. The EO showed antifungal activity, and the concentrations 625 µg/mL and 1250 µg/mL inhibited the growth of all strains tested and it was fungicidal, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of various concentrations of EO was analyzed over time, it was found concentration-dependent antifungal activity, whose behavior was similar to amphotericin B and nystatin.

  2. Antifungal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus jowitt ex bor against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Wylly Araújo; de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; de Luna, Giliara Carol Diniz Gomes; Lima, Igara Oliveira; Wanderley, Paulo Alves; de Lima, Rita Baltazar; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2011-04-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast and a member of the normal human flora that commonly causes infections in patients with any type of deficiency of the immune system. The essential oils have been tested for antimycotic activity and pose much potential as antifungal agents. This work investigated the activity of the essential oil of Cymbopogon winterianus against C. albicans by MIC, MFC and time-kill methods. The essential oil (EO) was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus. It was tested fifteen strains of C. albicans. The MIC was determined by the microdilution method and the MFC was determined when an aliquot of the broth microdilution was cultivated in SDA medium. The phytochemical analysis of EO showed presence of citronellal (23,59%), geraniol (18,81%) and citronellol (11,74%). The EO showed antifungal activity, and the concentrations 625 µg/mL and 1250 µg/mL inhibited the growth of all strains tested and it was fungicidal, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of various concentrations of EO was analyzed over time, it was found concentration-dependent antifungal activity, whose behavior was similar to amphotericin B and nystatin.

  3. Assessment of antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of Cymbopogon winterianus leaf essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Bárbara L S; Bonfim, Rangel R; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Thomazzi, Sara M; Araújo, Adriano A S; Blank, Arie F; Estevam, Charles S; Cambui, Erica V F; Bonjardim, Leonardo R; Albuquerque Júnior, Ricardo L C; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2010-10-01

    The present study investigated the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of the leaf essential oil (LEO) of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt (Poaceae). In the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin tests, the LEO (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the number of writhings and paw licking times in the first (0-5 min) and second (15-30 min) phases, respectively. In contrast, the LEO did not alter the latency time for mice licking the rear paws in hot-plate test. The LEO inhibited the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity in a dose-dependent manner (35.5%, 42.8%, and 66.1% at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively, p < 0.001). Moreover, LEO exhibited higher scavenging activity toward 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals with an IC(50) (12.66 ± 0.56 μg/mL). Our present results demonstrated that the LEO has antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties.

  4. Influence of season, harvest time and drying on Java citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt volatile oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie F. Blank

    Full Text Available Java citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt is member of the Poaceae family. Java citronella volatile oil has been reported to be among the volatile oils, showing repellent, antimycotic, and acaricide activities. It has been known that agronomical factors have a great effect on both the quality and quantity of essential metabolites. For this reason, it is necessary to determine optimum levels of agronomical factors affecting plant growth and production. Harvest time and drying are very important agronomical factors. This study has been conducted in the Research farm of the " Universidade Federal de Sergipe" , Agronomical Engineering Department along 2002-2003 on the base of factorial experiment in randomized complete block design with three replications. Java citronella was cultivated in a 60 x 60 cm space. Early, midday, and late harvest at 9:00 h, 12:00 h, and 15:00 h were conducted on four different seasons. Fresh and dried leaves were used on the experiments. In order to study the effects of harvest time and drying, yields of dry and fresh herbage (kg/ha, moisture content (%, volatile oil content (% and yield (L/ha, and chemical composition of the volatile oil were measured. Seasonal changes had significant effect on yield of fresh herbage, yield and volatile oil content. Maximum volatile oil yields were observed at 9:00 during summer, winter, and spring. Volatile oil content was influenced by season and drying, but not influenced by harvest time.

  5. Allergenicity and crossreactivity of buffalo grass ( Stenotaphrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In the subtropical climate of South Africa, grasses of the subfamily Panicoideae are predominant. Bermuda grass has previously been shown to be an important local allergen, and immunoglobulin E (IgE) epitopes of Bermuda grass extracts are known to be distinct from those of the Pooid pollen extracts.

  6. Antistress Effects of the Ethanolic Extract from Cymbopogon schoenanthus Growing Wild in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Ben Othman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the antistress properties of the ethanol extract of Cymbopogon schoenanthus (CSEE, growing wild in the southern part of Tunisia. The effect of extracts on H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Its effect on stress-induced in ICR mice was exposed to force swim and tail suspension, in concordance with heat shock protein expression (HSP27 and HSP90, corticosterone, and catecholamine neurotransmitters level. Our results demonstrated that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with CSEE at 1/2000, 1/1000, and 1/500 v/v dilutions significantly inversed H2O2-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, CSEE treatments significantly reversed heat shock protein expression in heat-stressed HSP47-transformed cells (42°C, for 90 min and mRNA expression of HSP27 and HSP90 in H2O2-treated SH-SY5Y. Daily oral administration of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg CSEE was conducted to ICR mice for 2 weeks. It was resulted in a significant decrease of immobility time in forced swimming and tail suspension tests. The effect of CSEE on animal behavior was concordant with a significant regulation of blood serum corticosterone and cerebral cortex levels of catecholamine (dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. Therefore, this study was attempted to demonstrate the preventive potential of CSEE against stress disorders at in vitro and in vivo levels.

  7. Comparison of Citronella Oil Extraction Methods from Cymbopogon nardus Grass by Ohmic-heated Hydro-distillation, Hydro-Distillation, and Steam Distillation

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Hazwan Hamzah; Hasfalina Che Man; Zurina Zainal Abidin; Hishamuddin Jamaludin

    2013-01-01

    A proposed method for citronella oil extraction was developed with the application of ohmic heated hydro-distillation. The objective was to compare the performance of three different extraction methods, viz. ohmic heated hydro-distillation, hydro-distillation, and steam distillation. The maximum amount of extracted oil yield by ohmic heated hydro-distillation was 7.64 mL/kWh as compared to hydro-distillation and steam distillation methods that resulted oil yields of 3.87 mL/kWh and 1.69 mL/kW...

  8. Coherent Microwave Scattering Model of Marsh Grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xueyang; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we developed an electromagnetic scattering model to analyze radar scattering from tall-grass-covered lands such as wetlands and marshes. The model adopts the generalized iterative extended boundary condition method (GIEBCM) algorithm, previously developed for buried cylindrical media such as vegetation roots, to simulate the scattering from the grass layer. The major challenge of applying GIEBCM to tall grass is the extremely time-consuming iteration among the large number of short subcylinders building up the grass. To overcome this issue, we extended the GIEBCM to multilevel GIEBCM, or M-GIEBCM, in which we first use GIEBCM to calculate a T matrix (transition matrix) database of "straws" with various lengths, thicknesses, orientations, curvatures, and dielectric properties; we then construct the grass with a group of straws from the database and apply GIEBCM again to calculate the T matrix of the overall grass scene. The grass T matrix is transferred to S matrix (scattering matrix) and combined with the ground S matrix, which is computed using the stabilized extended boundary condition method, to obtain the total scattering. In this article, we will demonstrate the capability of the model by simulating scattering from scenes with different grass densities, different grass structures, different grass water contents, and different ground moisture contents. This model will help with radar experiment design and image interpretation for marshland and wetland observations.

  9. Formulas of components of citronella oil against mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wey-Shin; Yen, Jui-Hung; Wang, Yei-Shung

    2013-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is an epidemic vector of several diseases such as dengue fever and yellow fever. Several pesticides are used to control the mosquito population. Because of their frequent use, some mosquitoes have developed resistance. In this study, we used the Y-tube olfactometer to test essential oils of Cymbopogon species and screened specific formulas of components as repellents against Ae. aegypti. At 400 μL, the extracted oil of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus) and myrcene produced a low-active response by inhibiting mosquito host-seeking activity. Citronella grass, lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), citral and myrcene also produced a low-treatment response to repellents, for more potential to affect host-seeking behavior. Furthermore, the mixture of citral, myrcene, and citronellal oil (C:M:Ci = 6:4:1) greatly affected and inhibited host-seeking behavior (76% active response; 26% treatment response with 40 μL; 42.5%, 18% with 400 μL; and 19%, 23% with 1000 μL). As compared with the result for N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET; 44%, 22% with 400 μL), adjusting the composition formulas of citronella oil had a synergistic effect, for more effective repellent against Ae. aegypti.

  10. Checklist of Serengeti Ecosystem Grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emma Victoria; Elia Ntandu, John; Ficinski, Paweł; Vorontsova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We present the first taxonomic checklist of the Poaceae species of the Serengeti, Tanzania. A review of the literature and herbarium specimens recorded 200 species of grasses, in line with similar studies in other parts of East Africa. The checklist is supported by a total of 939 herbarium collections. Full georeferenced collection data is made available alongside a summary checklist in pdf format. More than a quarter of the species are known from a single collection highlighting the need for further research, especially concerning the rare species and their distribution.

  11. Checklist of Serengeti Ecosystem Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficinski, Paweł; Vorontsova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present the first taxonomic checklist of the Poaceae species of the Serengeti, Tanzania. A review of the literature and herbarium specimens recorded 200 species of grasses, in line with similar studies in other parts of East Africa. The checklist is supported by a total of 939 herbarium collections. Full georeferenced collection data is made available alongside a summary checklist in pdf format. More than a quarter of the species are known from a single collection highlighting the need for further research, especially concerning the rare species and their distribution. PMID:27226761

  12. Influência do intervalo entre cortes sobre a produção de biomassa de duas espécies de capim limão Influence of the interval between cuts on biomass yield of two lemon grass species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André May

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a influência do intervalo entre cortes na produção de massa seca da parte aérea de duas espécies de capim limão. O experimento foi realizado no Instituto Agronômico, em Campinas-SP, 04 de junho/05 a 28 de agosto/06. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi em blocos ao acaso, com três repetições, com os tratamentos em esquema fatorial 2 x 4, sendo duas espécies (C. citratus e C. flexuosus e quatro intervalos entre cortes (40; 60; 80 e 100 dias. Para C. flexuosus, maiores intervalos entre cortes proporcionaram maior massa seca acumulada ao longo do ciclo de cultivo, partindo de 329,04 para 704,16 g planta-1 de massa seca acumulada da parte aérea, para intervalos entre cortes de 40 e 100 dias, respectivamente. A espécie C. citratus apresentou resposta linear decrescente da massa seca acumulada da parte aérea quanto maior o intervalo entre cortes utilizado, produzindo 238,68 g planta-1 utilizando intervalo entre cortes de 40 dias.The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the interval between cuts on the dry mass yield of the aerial part of two lemon grass species. The experiment was conducted at Agronomical Institute (IAC, in Campinas - SP, from June 4th, 2005 through August 28th, 2006. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomized block design, with three replications, and the treatments in a 2 x 4 factorial design, corresponding two species (C. citratus and C. flexuosus and four intervals between cuts (40; 60; 80 and 100 days. For C. flexuosus, longer intervals between cuts generated more dry mass accumulated throughout the cultivation cycle, beginning on 329,04 to 704,16 g plant-1 of accumulated dry mass of the aerial part, for intervals between cuts of 40 and 100 days, respectively. The C. citratus species showed a decrease in its linear response for the accumulated dry mass of the aerial part the longer the interval between cuts was, yielding 238,68 g plant-1 for a 40 day interval between

  13. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included...... the suitability of SQ grass SLIT-tablet for patients with clinically relevant symptoms to multiple Pooideae grass species, single-season efficacy, safety, adherence, coseasonal initiation, and cost-effectiveness. The data from the long-term SQ grass SLIT-tablet clinical trial that evaluated a clinical effect 2...

  14. Effects of citronella oil (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor) on Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) midgut and fat body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cts; Wanderley-Teixeira, V; Cunha, F M; Oliveira, J V; Dutra, K A; Navarro, Dma Ferraz; Teixeira, Aac

    2017-12-05

    The armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is the principal pest of corn in Brazil. Control is achieved primarily by synthetic insecticides, which cause problems for the agro-ecosystem. Alternative methods of control are under investigation and citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) essential oil appears to be a promising agent. We investigated the effects of citronella oil using histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. The midgut of larvae treated with citronella exhibited altered epithelium including cytoplasmic protrusions, columnar cell extrusion, pyknotic nuclei, and increased periodic acid-Schiff positive granules. Regenerative cells in the epithelium of the midgut increased in number, which facilitated subsequent regeneration of this tissue. After exposure to citronella, trophocytes, the principal cell type of the fat body, possessed enlarged vacuoles and mitotic bodies, and contained reduced amounts of glycogen, lipid, and protein. Citronella oil caused morphological changes of the midgut and reduction of stored resources in the fat body, which may adversely affect insect reproduction and survival.

  15. Efficacy of leaf extracts from some higher plants against sclerotium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Clausena anisata, Cymbopogon citratus, Hyptis suaveolens, Ocimum basilicum, and Ocimum gratissimum for their ability to control the growth of S. rolfsii and to establish the required doses of their extracts. Three concentrations, 5 %, 10 % ...

  16. Effect of the purification of antidermatophytic proteins from Nigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antidermatophytic activities of proteins which are extracted from four plant species (Carum carvi, Cymbopogon citratus, Moringa oleifera, and Nigella sativa) on four zoophilic dermatophytes (Microsporum canis, Microsporum equinum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton verrucosum) were evaluated in this ...

  17. Bioenergy production from roadside grass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Ane Katharina Paarup; Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2014-01-01

    .5–3.0% of the present national energy production based on biogas. The estimated values for the energy return on invested energy (EROEI) was found to range from 2.17 to 2.88. The measured contents of heavy metals in the roadside vegetation was seen not to exceed the legislative levels for what can be applied......This paper presents a study of the feasibility of utilising roadside vegetation for biogas production in Denmark. The potential biomass yield, methane yields, and the energy balances of using roadside grass for biogas production was investigated based on spatial analysis. The results show...... that the potential annual yield of biomass obtainable from roadside verges varies widely depending on the local conditions. The net energy gain (NEG) from harvest, collection, transport, storage and digestion of roadside vegetation was estimated to range from 60,126–121,476 GJ, corresponding to 1...

  18. Comparison study of moisture content, colour properties and essential oil compounds extracted by hydrodistillation and supercritical fluid extraction between stem and leaves of lemongrass (Cymbopogun citratus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaruddin, Shazlin; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Haiyee, Zaibunnisa Abdul

    2018-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the properties of moisture content, colour and essential oil compounds between stem and leaves of lemongrass (Cymbopogun citratus). The essential oil was extracted using two different methods which are hydrodistillation and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). There was no significant difference of moisture content between stem and leaves of lemongrass. The lightness (L) and yellowness (+b) values of the stems were significantly higher (pleaves. The highest yield of essential oil was obtained by extraction using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) in leaves (˜ 0.7%) by treatment at 1700psi and 50°C. The main compound of extracted essential oil was citral (geranial and neral).

  19. Grass leaves as potential hominin dietary resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Oliver C C; Koppa, Abigale; Henry, Amanda G; Leichliter, Jennifer N; Codron, Daryl; Codron, Jacqueline; Lambert, Joanna E; Sponheimer, Matt

    2018-04-01

    Discussions about early hominin diets have generally excluded grass leaves as a staple food resource, despite their ubiquity in most early hominin habitats. In particular, stable carbon isotope studies have shown a prevalent C 4 component in the diets of most taxa, and grass leaves are the single most abundant C 4 resource in African savannas. Grass leaves are typically portrayed as having little nutritional value (e.g., low in protein and high in fiber) for hominins lacking specialized digestive systems. It has also been argued that they present mechanical challenges (i.e., high toughness) for hominins with bunodont dentition. Here, we compare the nutritional and mechanical properties of grass leaves with the plants growing alongside them in African savanna habitats. We also compare grass leaves to the leaves consumed by other hominoids and demonstrate that many, though by no means all, compare favorably with the nutritional and mechanical properties of known primate foods. Our data reveal that grass leaves exhibit tremendous variation and suggest that future reconstructions of hominin dietary ecology take a more nuanced approach when considering grass leaves as a potential hominin dietary resource. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Preparation, Characterization, and Pharmacological Activity of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor (Poaceae) Leaf Essential Oil of β-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Priscila L.; Araújo, Adriano A. S.; Quintans, Jullyana S. S.; Oliveira, Makson G. B.; Brito, Renan G.; Serafini, Mairim R.; Menezes, Paula P.; Santos, Marcio R. V.; Alves, Pericles B.; de Lucca Júnior, Waldecy; Blank, Arie F.; La Rocca, Viviana; Almeida, Reinaldo N.; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the orofacial antinociceptive effect of the Cymbopogon winterianus essential oil (LEO) complexed in ?-cyclodextrin (LEO-CD) and to assess the possible involvement of the central nervous system (CNS). The LEO was extracted, chromatographed, and complexed in ?-cyclodextrin. The complex was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry derivative (TG/DTG). Male Swiss mice (2-3 months) were treated with LEO-CD (50?200?mg/kg,?p.o.), vehi...

  1. X meeting utenti GRASS e GFOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marucci

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available 10th meeting of GRASS & GFOSS users The 10th Italian Congress of GRASS GIS and Geospatial Free and Open Source Software (GFOSS was held on the26 and 27 Feb in Cagliari. Highlights included updates on major GFOSS projects (GRASS, QGIS, the presentation of new projects (SpatiaLite and the public release of a free 3D visualization application suitable for distribution over the internet (RATMAN. Many users and developers connected to forge new business relationships and share new ideas.

  2. X meeting utenti GRASS e GFOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marucci

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available 10th meeting of GRASS & GFOSS usersThe 10th Italian Congress of GRASS GIS and Geospatial Free and Open Source Software (GFOSS was held on the26 and 27 Feb in Cagliari. Highlights included updates on major GFOSS projects (GRASS, QGIS, the presentation of new projects (SpatiaLite and the public release of a free 3D visualization application suitable for distribution over the internet (RATMAN. Many users and developers connected to forge new business relationships and share new ideas.

  3. Perrenial Grasses for Sustainable European Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    benefits, a reduction of nitrate leaching equivalent to 23,000 tonnes N annually was estimated. This is approximately the reduction required by the WFD for Denmark. Even though much more organic matter will be mobilized for biorefining, soil carbon levels are estimated to be largely unchanged...... production into grass production. Grasses and legumes have higher contents of protein with better quality (high lysine and methionine contents) than grain and seed crops. Thus, substituting imported soya bean protein with protein extracted from perennial grasses is an interesting option....

  4. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  5. Grass survey of the Itremo Massif records endemic central highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty species are endemic to the central highlands, and a further 1 4 species are restricted to Madagascar. Five ecological groups of grasses were identified in the Itremo Massif: shade species in gallery forests, open wet area species, fire grasses, anthropogenic disturbance associated grasses and rock-dwelling grasses.

  6. Underwater Grass Comeback Helps Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fortified Susquehanna Flats, the largest bed of underwater grasses in the Chesapeake Bay, seems able to withstand a major weather punch. Its resilience is contributing to an overall increase in the Bay’s submerged aquatic vegetation.

  7. Karl Konrad Grass jumalainimeste uurijana / Alar Laats

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laats, Alar

    2006-01-01

    Karl Konrad Grass oli 19. sajandil Dorpati keiserliku ülikooli usuteaduskonna Uue Testamendi õppejõud, kes tegeles hobi korras idakristluse (vene sektid) uurimisega. Tema peateoseks on uurimus "Die russischen Sekten". Ettekanne konverentsil 15.-16. aprill 2005. a.

  8. Tree-grass interactions in savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Savannas occur where trees and grasses interact to create a biome that is neither grassland nor forest. Woody and gramineous plants interact by many mechanisms, some negative (competition) and some positive (facilitation). The strength and sign...

  9. Pampas Grass - Orange Co. [ds351

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset provides the known distribution of pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana) in southern Orange County. The surveys were conducted from May to June, 2007 and...

  10. In vitro effect of seven essential oils on the reproduction of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pazinato

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The acaricidal effect of seven essential oils was examined in vitro against the cattle tick (Rhipicephalus microplus. Engorged female ticks were manually collected in farms of Southern Brazil and placed into petri dishes (n = 10 in order to test the following oils: juniper (Juniperus communis, palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii, cedar (Cedrus atlantica, lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus, ginger (Zingiber officinale, geranium (Pelargonium graveolens and bergamot (Citrus aurantium var bergamia at concentrations of 1%, 5%, and 10% each. A control group was used to validate the tests containing Triton X-100 only. Treatment effectiveness was measured considering inhibition of tick oviposition (partial or total, egg’s weight, and hatchability. C. martinii, C. citratus and C. atlantica essential oils showed efficacy higher than 99% at all concentrations tested. In addition, J. communis, Z. officinale, P. graveolens, and C. aurantium var bergamia oils showed efficiency ranging from 73% to 95%, depending on the concentration tested, where higher concentrations showed greater efficacy. It was concluded that essential oils can affect tick reproduction in vitro by inhibiting oviposition and hatchability.

  11. Elephant grass as forage for ruminant animals

    OpenAIRE

    Rusdy, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The shortage of feed, particularly during the dry season is one of the major factor limiting productivity of livestock in the tropics. Napier or elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.) shows a great potential to alleviate the problem because it is drought resistant and has high dry matter yield potential. As an attempt to generate information useful for improving the utilization of the grass, its potential and limitation are described. Its chemical composition and nutritive value as rela...

  12. Afforestation of degraded grass land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basappa, B.

    1983-01-01

    The suitability of 11 species was tested for planting on degraded land at Kogilemane in Belur Taluk, Karnataka. The soil was alkaline with no humus, litter or topsoil. The original vegetation was grass with the stemless palm Phoenix acaulis, still present at 600 plants per acre. Seedlings 4-6 months old and raised in polythene bags were planted in pits in July 1981; Bambusa vulgaris was planted as 8-month-old cuttings. No fertilizer was applied. The most successful species after the first season was Acacia auriculiformis. Satisfactory survival and growth were also obtained with Cassia siamea, Peltoforum ferruginum, Leucaena leucocephala (although this was later heavily damaged by wild rabbits) and Toona ciliata. The bamboo survived well but there was no culm formation during the experiment. In 1982 only 3 of the species were tested: A. auriculiformis, L. leucocephala (because of its fast growth rate) and Casuarina equisetifolia (which performed badly in 1981 but is suited to alkaline soils). All 3 species performed satisfactorily.

  13. Genetic compatibility determines endophyte-grass combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Saikkonen

    Full Text Available Even highly mutually beneficial microbial-plant interactions, such as mycorrhizal- and rhizobial-plant exchanges, involve selfishness, cheating and power-struggles between the partners, which depending on prevailing selective pressures, lead to a continuum of interactions from antagonistic to mutualistic. Using manipulated grass-endophyte combinations in a five year common garden experiment, we show that grass genotypes and genetic mismatches constrain genetic combinations between the vertically (via host seeds transmitted endophytes and the out-crossing host, thereby reducing infections in established grass populations. Infections were lost in both grass tillers and seedlings in F(1 and F(2 generations, respectively. Experimental plants were collected as seeds from two different environments, i.e., meadows and nearby riverbanks. Endophyte-related benefits to the host included an increased number of inflorescences, but only in meadow plants and not until the last growing season of the experiment. Our results illustrate the importance of genetic host specificity and trans-generational maternal effects on the genetic structure of a host population, which act as destabilizing forces in endophyte-grass symbioses. We propose that (1 genetic mismatches may act as a buffering mechanism against highly competitive endophyte-grass genotype combinations threatening the biodiversity of grassland communities and (2 these mismatches should be acknowledged, particularly in breeding programmes aimed at harnessing systemic and heritable endophytes to improve the agriculturally valuable characteristics of cultivars.

  14. Madagascar's grasses and grasslands: anthropogenic or natural?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Guillaume; Forest, Félix; Malakasi, Panagiota; Moat, Justin; Clayton, W. Derek; Ficinski, Paweł; Savva, George M.; Nanjarisoa, Olinirina P.; Razanatsoa, Jacqueline; Randriatsara, Fetra O.; Kimeu, John M.; Luke, W. R. Quentin; Kayombo, Canisius; Linder, H. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Grasses, by their high productivity even under very low pCO2, their ability to survive repeated burning and to tolerate long dry seasons, have transformed the terrestrial biomes in the Neogene and Quaternary. The expansion of grasslands at the cost of biodiverse forest biomes in Madagascar is often postulated as a consequence of the Holocene settlement of the island by humans. However, we show that the Malagasy grass flora has many indications of being ancient with a long local evolutionary history, much predating the Holocene arrival of humans. First, the level of endemism in the Madagascar grass flora is well above the global average for large islands. Second, a survey of many of the more diverse areas indicates that there is a very high spatial and ecological turnover in the grass flora, indicating a high degree of niche specialization. We also find some evidence that there are both recently disturbed and natural stable grasslands: phylogenetic community assembly indicates that recently severely disturbed grasslands are phylogenetically clustered, whereas more undisturbed grasslands tend to be phylogenetically more evenly distributed. From this evidence, it is likely that grass communities existed in Madagascar long before human arrival and so were determined by climate, natural grazing and other natural factors. Humans introduced zebu cattle farming and increased fire frequency, and may have triggered an expansion of the grasslands. Grasses probably played the same role in the modification of the Malagasy environments as elsewhere in the tropics. PMID:26791612

  15. Treatment with grass allergen peptides improves symptoms of grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Anne K; Frankish, Charles W; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Armstrong, Kristen; Steacy, Lisa; Larché, Mark; Hafner, Roderick P

    2017-08-01

    Synthetic peptide immunoregulatory epitopes are a new class of immunotherapy to treat allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). Grass allergen peptides, comprising 7 synthetic T-cell epitopes derived from Cyn d 1, Lol p 5, Dac g 5, Hol l 5, and Phl p 5, is investigated for treatment of grass pollen-induced ARC. We sought to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of intradermally administered grass allergen peptides. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated 3 regimens of grass allergen peptides versus placebo in patients with grass pollen-induced allergy (18-65 years). After a 4-day baseline challenge to rye grass in the environmental exposure unit (EEU), subjects were randomized to receive grass allergen peptides at 6 nmol at 2-week intervals for a total of 8 doses (8x6Q2W), grass allergen peptides at 12 nmol at 4-week intervals for a total of 4 doses (4x12Q4W), or grass allergen peptides at 12 nmol at 2-week intervals for a total of 8 doses (8x12Q2W) or placebo and treated before the grass pollen season. The primary efficacy end point was change from baseline in total rhinoconjunctivitis symptom score across days 2 to 4 of a 4-day posttreatment challenge (PTC) in the EEU after the grass pollen season. Secondary efficacy end points and safety were also assessed. Two hundred eighty-two subjects were randomized. Significantly greater improvement (reduction of total rhinoconjunctivitis symptom score from baseline to PTC) occurred across days 2 to 4 with grass allergen peptide 8x6Q2W versus placebo (-5.4 vs -3.8, respectively; P = .0346). Greater improvement at PTC also occurred for grass allergen peptide 8x6Q2W versus placebo (P = .0403) in patients with more symptomatic ARC. No safety signals were detected. Grass allergen peptide 8x6Q2W significantly improved ARC symptoms after rye grass allergen challenge in an EEU with an acceptable safety profile. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  16. Different techniques to study rumen fermentation characteristics of maturing grass and grass silage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cone, J.W.; Gelder, van A.H.; Soliman, I.A.; Visser, de H.; Vuuren, van A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Grass samples were harvested during the 1993 growing season after a precut on April 27, 1993 and were stored frozen or left to ensile in 30-L buckets. Effects on chemical composition and fermentation kinetics of the maturation of the grass and of ensiling were investigated. Chemical composition and

  17. Determinants of flammability in savanna grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kimberley J; Ripley, Brad S; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Belcher, Claire M; Lehmann, Caroline E R; Thomas, Gavin H; Osborne, Colin P

    2016-01-01

    Tropical grasses fuel the majority of fires on Earth. In fire-prone landscapes, enhanced flammability may be adaptive for grasses via the maintenance of an open canopy and an increase in spatiotemporal opportunities for recruitment and regeneration. In addition, by burning intensely but briefly, high flammability may protect resprouting buds from lethal temperatures. Despite these potential benefits of high flammability to fire-prone grasses, variation in flammability among grass species, and how trait differences underpin this variation, remains unknown.By burning leaves and plant parts, we experimentally determined how five plant traits (biomass quantity, biomass density, biomass moisture content, leaf surface-area-to-volume ratio and leaf effective heat of combustion) combined to determine the three components of flammability (ignitability, sustainability and combustibility) at the leaf and plant scales in 25 grass species of fire-prone South African grasslands at a time of peak fire occurrence. The influence of evolutionary history on flammability was assessed based on a phylogeny built here for the study species.Grass species differed significantly in all components of flammability. Accounting for evolutionary history helped to explain patterns in leaf-scale combustibility and sustainability. The five measured plant traits predicted components of flammability, particularly leaf ignitability and plant combustibility in which 70% and 58% of variation, respectively, could be explained by a combination of the traits. Total above-ground biomass was a key driver of combustibility and sustainability with high biomass species burning more intensely and for longer, and producing the highest predicted fire spread rates. Moisture content was the main influence on ignitability, where species with higher moisture contents took longer to ignite and once alight burnt at a slower rate. Biomass density, leaf surface-area-to-volume ratio and leaf effective heat of combustion

  18. Lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus essential oil demonstrated anti-inflammatory effect in pre-inflamed human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesheng Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus essential oil (LEO, which has citral as its main component, has exhibited anti-inflammatory effect in both animal and human cells. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of a commercially available LEO in pre-inflamed human dermal fibroblasts. We first studied the impact of LEO on 17 protein biomarkers that are critically associated with inflammation and tissue remodeling. LEO significantly inhibited production of the inflammatory biomarkers vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10, interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG; decreased levels of the tissue remodeling biomarkers collagen-I and III, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1; and inhibited the immunomodulatory biomarker macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. Furthermore, we studied the impact of LEO on genome-wide gene expression profiles. LEO significantly modulated global gene expression and robustly impacted signaling pathways, many of which are critical for inflammation and tissue remodeling processes. This study provides the first evidence of the anti-inflammatory activity of LEO in human skin cells and indicates that it is a good therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory conditions of the skin.

  19. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Cymbopogon nardus citronella essential oil against systemic bacteria of aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lee Seong; Wee, Wendy

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Cymbopogon nardus citronella essential oil against Edwardsiella spp. (n = 21), Vibrio spp. (n = 6), Aeromonas spp. (n = 2), Escherichia coli (n = 2), Salmonella spp. (n = 2), Flavobacterium spp. (n = 1), Pseudomonas spp. (n = 1) and Streptococcus spp. (n = 1) isolated from internal organs of aquatic animals. Due to the ban of antibiotics for aquaculture use, this study was carried out to evaluate the potential of citronella essential oil as alternative to commercial antibiotic use against systemic bacteria in cultured aquatic animals. The essential oil of C. nardus was prepared by using the steam distillation method and the chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the essential oil tested against bacterial isolates from various aquatic animals and ATCC type strains were determined using two-fold broth micro dilution method with kanamycin and eugenol as positive controls. A total of 22 chemical compounds were detected in C. nardus essential oil with 6-octenal, 3, 7-dimethyl- or citronellal representing the major compounds (29.6%). The MIC values of the citronella oil ranged from 0.244 µg/ml to 0.977 µg/ml when tested against the bacterial isolates. The results of the present study revealed the potential of C. nardus essential oil as alternative to commercial antibiotics for aquaculture use.

  20. An Insight Into Structure, Function, and Expression Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase of Cymbopogon winterianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Patar, Lochana; Modi, Mahendra K; Sen, Priyabrata

    2017-01-01

    Citronella ( Cymbopogon winterianus ) is one of the richest sources of high-value isoprenoid aromatic compounds used as flavour, fragrance, and therapeutic elements. These isoprenoid compounds are synthesized by 2 independent pathways: mevalonate pathway and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway. Evidence suggests that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is a rate-controlling enzyme for the synthesis of variety of isoprenoids. This study reports the isolation, characterization, and tissue-specific expression analysis of HMGR from citronella. The modelled HMGR is a class I type of HMGR enzyme with 3-domain architecture. The active site comprises a cofactor (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) and the substrate-binding motifs. The real-time and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results revealed equal expression level in both leaf sheath and root tissue. The results from our study shall be a valuable resource for future molecular intervention to alter the metabolic flux towards improvement of key active ingredient in this important medicinal plant.

  1. Fumigant Antifungal Activity of Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oils and Citronellal against Three Fungal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Wagner de S. Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus essential oils samples were analyzed by GC and GC-MS and their qualitative and quantitative compositions established. The main component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus was citronellal, at 61.78% and 36.6%, respectively. The essential oils and citronellal were tested for their fumigant antifungal activity against Pyricularia (Magnaporthe grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ranged from 100 to 200 ppm for the essential oils and 25 to 50 mg·mL−1 for citronellal. The contact assay using the essential oils and citronellal showed growth inhibition of the three fungal species. However, a concentration of 1.47 mg·mL−1 only reduced the inhibition of Aspergillus growth to 90% at 14 days of exposure. For the fumigant assay, 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23 mg·mL−1 of essential oils and citronellal drastically affected growth of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and C. musae. Harmful effects on the sporulation and germination of the three fungi were seen, and there was complete inhibition at 0.15 mg·mL−1 with both oils and citronellal. This showed that the crude component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus markedly suppressed spore production, germination, and growth inhibition of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae.

  2. Fumigant antifungal activity of Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus essential oils and citronellal against three fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Raimundo Wagner de S; Ootani, Marcio A; Ascencio, Sérgio Donizeti; Ferreira, Talita P S; Dos Santos, Manoel M; dos Santos, Gil R

    2014-01-01

    Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus essential oils samples were analyzed by GC and GC-MS and their qualitative and quantitative compositions established. The main component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus was citronellal, at 61.78% and 36.6%, respectively. The essential oils and citronellal were tested for their fumigant antifungal activity against Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranged from 100 to 200 ppm for the essential oils and 25 to 50 mg · mL(-1) for citronellal. The contact assay using the essential oils and citronellal showed growth inhibition of the three fungal species. However, a concentration of 1.47 mg · mL(-1) only reduced the inhibition of Aspergillus growth to 90% at 14 days of exposure. For the fumigant assay, 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23 mg · mL(-1) of essential oils and citronellal drastically affected growth of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and C. musae. Harmful effects on the sporulation and germination of the three fungi were seen, and there was complete inhibition at 0.15 mg · mL(-1) with both oils and citronellal. This showed that the crude component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus markedly suppressed spore production, germination, and growth inhibition of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae.

  3. Role of carbohydrate metabolism in grass tetany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.K.; Madsen, F.C.; Lentz, D.E.; Hansard, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical hypomagnesemia is confined primarily to beef cattle in the United States but also occurs in dairy cattle in other countries, probably due to different management practices. During periods when grass tetany is likely, early vegetative temperate zone grasses are usually low in total readily available carbohydrates and magnesium but high in potassium and nitrogen. The tetany syndrome may include hypoglycemia and ketosis, suggesting an imbalance in intermediary energy metabolism. Many enzyme systems critical to cellular metabolism, including those which hydrolyze and transfer phosphate groups, are activated by Mg. Thus, by inference, Mg is required for normal glucose utilization, fat, protein, nucleic acid and coenzyme synthesis, muscle contraction, methyl group transfer, and sulfate, acetate, and formate activation. Numerous clinical and experimental studies suggest an intimate relationship between metabolism of Mg and that of carbohydrate, glucagon, and insulin. The objective is to review this literature and suggest ways in which these relationships might contribute to a chain of events leading to grass tetany.

  4. Grass Biomethane for Agriculture and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korres, N.E.; Thamsiriroj, T.; Smith, B.

    2011-01-01

    Many factors enforce the intensification of grassland utilization which is associated with significant environmental impacts subjected to various legislative constraints. Nevertheless, the need for diversification in agricultural production and the sustainability in energy within the European Union...... have advanced the role of grassland as a renewable source of energy in grass biomethane production with various environmental and socio-economic benefits. It is underlined that the essential question whether the gaseous biofuel meets the EU sustainability criteria of 60% greenhouse gas emission savings...... by 2020 can be met since savings up to 89.4% under various scenarios can be achieved. Grass biomethane production compared to other liquid biofuels either when these are produced by indigenous of imported feedstocks is very promising. Grass biomethane, given the mature and well known technology...

  5. Grass pollen immunotherapy: where are we now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würtzen, Peter A; Gupta, Shashank; Brand, Stephanie; Andersen, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    During allergen immunotherapy (AIT), the allergic patient is exposed to the disease-inducing antigens (allergens) in order to induce clinical and immunological tolerance and obtain disease modification. Large trials of grass AIT with highly standardized subcutaneous and sublingual tablet vaccines have been conducted to document the clinical effect. Induction of blocking antibodies as well as changes in the balance between T-cell phenotypes, including induction of regulatory T-cell subtypes, have been demonstrated for both treatment types. These observations increase the understanding of the immunological mechanism behind the clinical effect and may make it possible to use the immunological changes as biomarkers of clinical effect. The current review describes the recent mechanistic findings for subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy/tablet treatment and discusses how the observed immunological changes translate into a scientific foundation for the observed clinical effects of grass pollen immunotherapy and lead to new treatment strategies for grass AIT.

  6. Biogas and Methane Yield from Rye Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vítěz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production in the Czech Republic has expanded substantially, including marginal regions for maize cultivation. Therefore, there are increasingly sought materials that could partially replace maize silage, as a basic feedstock, while secure both biogas production and its quality.Two samples of rye grass (Lolium multiflorum var. westerwoldicum silage with different solids content 21% and 15% were measured for biogas and methane yield. Rye grass silage with solid content of 15% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.431 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.249 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter. Rye grass silage with solid content 21% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.654 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.399 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter.

  7. Cesium-137 in grass from Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.; Manolopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Ioannidou, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2005-01-01

    Grass ecosystem was monitored for 137 Cs, a relatively long-lived radionuclide, for about 16 years since the Chernobyl reactor accident occurred on April 26, 1986. Cesium-137 in grass gramineae or poaceae the species, ranged from 122.9 Bq kg -1 (September 4, 1986) to 5.8 mBq kg -1 (October 16, 2001) that is a range of five orders of magnitude. It was observed that there was a trend of decreasing 137 Cs with time reflecting a removal half-time of 40 months (3 1/3 years), which is the ecological half-life, T ec of 137 Cs in grassland

  8. Clover-grass as an energy crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Breeding of clover grass on fallow areas as a resource for methane generation has several important advantages. It does not require any additional nitrogen fertilizer as it can fix the atmospheric nitrogen.Herbicides are unnecessary as most weeds are one-year plants, while clover is perennial. From methane generation data for clover-grass the gross energy generation has been calculated to 11.08 MJ per kg dry matter. Net energy generation (with account for electric power) is calculated to 14.00 MJ/kg dry matter. (EG)

  9. Distinct physiological responses underlie defoliation tolerance in African lawn and bunch grasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, T.M.; Kumordzi, B.B.; Fokkema, W.; Valls Fox, H.; Olff, H.

    Premise of research. African grass communities are dominated by two distinct functional types: tall, caespitose bunch grasses and short, spreading lawn grasses. Functional type coexistence has been explained by differences in defoliation tolerance, because lawn grasses occur in intensively grazed

  10. Modelling of excess noise attnuation by grass and forest | Onuu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , guinea grass (panicum maximum) and forest which comprises iroko (milicia ezcelea) and white afara (terminalia superba) trees in the ratio of 2:1 approximately. Excess noise attenuation spectra have been plotted for the grass and forest for ...

  11. Viabilidade de sementes de feijão caupi após o tratamento com óleo essencial de citronela (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt)

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier,M.V.A.; Oliveira,C.R.F.; Brito,S.S.S.; Matos,C.H.C.; Pinto,M.A.D.S.C.

    2012-01-01

    O tratamento de sementes com óleos essenciais é um método alternativo que auxilia o manejo integrado de pragas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência do tratamento de sementes de feijão Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. com o óleo essencial de citronela (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt). Foi avaliado o efeito do óleo essencial de C. winterianus sobre V. unguiculata nas dosagens 20 μL, 15 μL, 10 μL, 5 μL e testemunha. A qualidade fisiológica das sementes foi determina...

  12. Influência de cinco temperaturas de secagem no rendimento e composição do óleo essencial de citronela (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt)

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, S. F R [UNESP; Ming, L. C. [UNESP; Marques, M. O M [UNESP

    2000-01-01

    The Influence of Drying Temperatures on the Yield Composition of Citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt) essential oil. The studies were carried out to establish more precise parameters for citronella (C. winterianus Jowitt) post-harvest, and to optimize drying time and essential oil quantitative/qualitative yield. Five treatments were designed (30°C, 40°C, 50°C, 60°C and 70°C), with 14 repetitions of the drying process and 12 of the essential oil extraction. Drying at 60°C gave the best r...

  13. Óleos essenciais de Cymbopogon nardus, Cinnamomum zeylanicum e Zingiber officinale: composição, atividades antioxidante e antibacteriana Essential oils of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Cymbopogon nardus and Zingiber officinale: composition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Aparecida Andrade

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste estudo caracterizar quimicamente e avaliar as atividades antioxidante e antibacteriana dos óleos essenciais de citronela (Cymbopogon nardus, canela (Cinnamomum zeylanicum e gengibre (Zingiber officinale. A obtenção do óleo essencial foi realizada utilizando a técnica de hidrodestilação por meio do aparelho de Clevenger modificado e a identificação e quantificação dos constituintes pelas análises em CG/EM e CG-DIC. A avaliação da atividade antibacteriana foi realizada por meio da técnica difusão cavidade em ágar, utilizando os microrganismos Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117, Escherichia coli ATCC 11229, Salmonella Cholerasuis ATCC 6539 e Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442. A atividade antioxidante foi avaliada utilizando sistema β-caroteno/ácido linoléico e o método de seqüestro de radicais DPPH. Nas análises cromatográficas, os constituintes majoritários encontrados no óleo essencial de C. nardus foram citronelal (47,12%, geraniol (18,56% e citronelol (11,07%, no óleo essencial de C. zeylanicum foram identificados (E- cinamaldeído (77,72%, acetato de (E-cinamila (5,99% e o monoterpenóide 1,8-cineol (4,66% e, para Z. officinale os majoritários foram geranial (25,06%, neral (16,47%, 1,8-cineol (10,98%, geraniol (8,51%, acetato de geranila (4,19% e o canfeno (4,30%. Os óleos essenciais apresentaram atividade antibacteriana tanto para bactérias Gram-negativas como para bactérias Gram-positivas, sendo que o óleo essencial de C. zeylanicum foi o mais eficiente. A atividade antioxidante foi evidenciada pelo teste β-caroteno/ácido linoléico, respectivamente, para C. nardus, seguido de Z. officinale e C. zeylanicum, e pelo teste do DPPH foi observada apenas para C. nardus.The aims of this study were to chemically characterize and to evaluate the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the citronella (Cymbopogon nardus, cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum and ginger

  14. Names of Southern African grasses: Name changes and additional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main reasons for changes in botanical names are briefly reviewed, with examples from the lists. At this time, about 1040 grass species and subspecific taxa are recognized in the subcontinent. Keywords: botanical research; botanical research institute; botany; grass; grasses; identification; name change; nomenclature; ...

  15. Germination of Themeda triandra (Kangaroo grass) as affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low rainfall in range areas restricts germination, growth and development of majority of range grasses. However, germination and establishment potential of forage grasses vary and depends on environmental conditions. Themeda triandra is an excellent known grass to grow under different environmental conditions.

  16. A new grass frog from Namibia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new species of grass frog of the genus Ptychadena is described from northern Namibia. Although superficially similar to Ptychadena schilJukorum and Ptychadsna mossambica. the new species differs In advenisemen1 call, and erlernal charaders. An examination of a series of published sonagrams indicates.

  17. Grass Pollen Pollution from Biofuels Farming

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ratajová, A.; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Kolář, L.; Kužel, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2013), s. 199-203 ISSN 2151-321X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : grass pollen pollution * biofuel s farming * temperate climate * PK-fertilization * N-fertilization * phenolic Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.556, year: 2013

  18. Notes on Alien Bromus Grasses in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jer Jung

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bromus carinatus Hook. & Arn., Bromus hordeaceus L., Bromus pubescens Muhl. ex Willd. and Bromus secalinus L. were recently found at middle elevations of southern and central Taiwan, respectively. We present taxonomic treatments, distribution map, and line-drawings of these introduced alien brome grasses.

  19. MoDest GrassUp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil

    2010-01-01

    The Technology The technology is one of a kind, as there is no such mathematical model estimating animal feed uptake available today. The estimation of grass uptake, is based on real time wireless sensor data, cow merit and climate data. Relevant cow behaviour data (such as location, movement vel...

  20. Grass Biomethane for Agriculture and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korres, N.E.; Thamsiriroj, T.; Smith, B.

    2011-01-01

    have advanced the role of grassland as a renewable source of energy in grass biomethane production with various environmental and socio-economic benefits. It is underlined that the essential question whether the gaseous biofuel meets the EU sustainability criteria of 60% greenhouse gas emission savings...

  1. Effects of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of Trichophyton mentagrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillipe de Oliveira Pereira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Trichophyton mentagrophytes is a fungus causative agent of dermatophytosis, affecting humans worldwide. This has driven the search for products for the treatment of these infections. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activity of the Cymbopogon winterianus essential oil against T. mentagrophytes. The antifungal tests consisted of antifungal screening, determination of MIC and MFC, analysis of the essential oil's effects on mycelial growth, germination of fungal spores, fungal viability, morphogenesis, cell wall (test with sorbitol and cell membrane (cell leakage test of T. mentagrophytes. Upon screening, the oil inhibited all strains, with zones of growth inhibition of 24-28 mm in diameter. The MIC was 312 μg/mL and CFM was 2500 μg/mL for almost all the strains tested. There were morphological changes in the conidia group, form and pigmentation of hyphae. The antifungal action of the product does not involve the cell wall and its action may involve the fungal plasma membrane. It is concluded that C. winterianus essential oil constitutes a potential antifungal product, especially for the treatment of dermatophytosis.Trichophyton mentagrophytes é um fungo causador de dermatofitoses, afetando humanos em todo o mundo. Isto direciona a busca de produtos para o tratamento destas infecções. Assim, este estudo teve por objetivo investigar a atividade antifúngica do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon winterianus contra T. mentagrophytes. Os ensaios antifúngicos foram constituídos do screening antifúngico, da determinação CIM e CFM, da análise dos efeitos do óleo essencial no crescimento micelial, na germinação dos esporos, na viabilidade fúngica, na morfogênese, na parede celular (ensaio com sorbitol e na membrana celular (ensaio de lise celular de T. mentagrophytes. No screening, o óleo inibiu todas as cepas, com zonas de inibição de crescimento de 24-28 mm de diâmetro. A CIM foi de 312 μg/mL e a CFM

  2. Chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil and methanol extract of the Egyptian lemongrass Cymbopogon proximus Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim, Samy A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of the essential oil (Eo and methanol extract from a unique, Egyptian endemic plant, Cymbopogon proximus STAPF. The chemical composition of a hydrodistilled Eo of C. proximus was analyzed by a GC and GC/MS system. A total of 19 constituents representing 95.47% of the oil were identified: piperitone (72.44%, elemol (9.43%, α - eudesmol (4.34%, limonene (2.45% and β- eudesmol (1.26% were the main components comprising 88.92% of the oil. The antimicrobial test results showed that the Eo of C. proximus strongly inhibited the growth of the test bacteria studied, except for yeast species while the methanol extract had moderate antibacterial, but no anti-candida activity. Bacillus cereus and Salmonella choleraesuis were proven to be the most susceptible against Eo. The exposure time of Eo for complete inhibition of cell viability of B. cereus and S. choleraesuis were found to be 5 % at 10 min and 1% at 10 min, respectively. The antioxidative potential of the samples was evaluated using methods of inhibition of the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH system. The methanol extract was able to reduce the stable free radical DPPH with an IC50 of 48.66±3.1 μg/ml. The results presented here may suggest that the Eo and extracts of C. proximus possess antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and therefore, can be used as natural preservative ingredients in food and/or pharmaceuticals.El presente estudio fue llevado a cabo para evaluar las propiedades antioxidantes y antimicrobianas in vitro del aceite esencial (Eo y extractos de metanol de una genuina y endémica planta egipcia, Cymbopogon proximus Stapf. La composición química de un hidrodestilado Eo de C. proximus fue analizado por GC y GC/MS. Un total de 19 constituyentes representando el 95.47% del aceite fueron identificados; piperitona (72.44%, elemol (9.43%, α-eudesmol (4.34%, limoneno

  3. Efeito do óleo de capim limão (Cymbopogon flexuosus Stapf no controle do carrapato dos bovinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Agnolin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa foi conduzida com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito in vitro e in vivo do óleo essencial de capim limão (Cymbopogon flexuosus Stapf sobre o carrapato dos bovinos [Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus]. Na experimentação in vitro foi utilizado o grupo controle negativo e oito concentrações do óleo de capim-limão (0,5; 1; 2; 5; 10; 20; 50; 100%, em fêmeas ingurgitadas do carrapato. A eficácia de controle foi de 0; 20; 39; 99,5; 100; 100; 100; 100 e 100%, respectivamente. Para a experimentação in vivo foram constituídos três grupos (controle negativo, óleo de capim limão a 2,0% - nível estimado mediante análise de regressão, correspondendo a 95% de eficácia de controle do carrapato da pesquisa in vitro e amitraz a 0,025%, com dezoito vacas da raça Holandesa. Antes (média dos dias -3, -2, -1 e após a aplicação do produto (1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14 e 21 dias, foram contadas fêmeas ingurgitadas do carrapato. A eficácia de controle foi de 0; 54 e 74,5%, respectivamente, 21dias após o tratamento. Após a aplicação dos tratamentos (controle negativo x tratamento fitoterápico, foram avaliadas as variáveis fisiológicas: frequência cardíaca, respiratória, temperatura do globo ocular e temperatura da pele; os resultados foram similares entre os tratamentos.

  4. Effect of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi Essential Oils on the Growth and Mycotoxins Production by Aspergillus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemeda, Negero; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; Asrat, Daniel; Debella, Asfaw

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth, and mycotoxin production. In vitro antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activities of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi essential oils were carried out on toxigenic strains of Aspergillus species. Plant materials were hydrodistilled for 4-5 h in Clevenger apparatus. 0.25 μL/mL, 0.5 μL/mL, 1 μL/mL, 2 μL/mL, and 4 μL/mL concentrations of each essential oil were prepared in 0.1% Tween 80 (V/V). T. ammi oil showed highest antifungal activity. Absolute mycelial inhibition was recorded at 1 μL/mL by essential oils of T. ammi. The oil also showed complete inhibition of spore germination at a concentration of 2 μL/mL. In addition, T. ammi oil showed significant antiaflatoxigenic potency by totally inhibiting toxin production from A. niger and A. flavus at 0.5 and 0.75 μL/mL, respectively. C. martinii, F. vulgare, and T. ammi oils as antifungals were found superior over synthetic preservative. Moreover, a concentration of 5336.297 μL/kg body weight was recorded for LC50 on mice indicating the low mammalian toxicity. In conclusion, the essential oils from T. ammi can be a potential source of safe natural food preservative for food commodities contamination by Aspergillus species.

  5. Effect of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi Essential Oils on the Growth and Mycotoxins Production by Aspergillus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negero Gemeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth, and mycotoxin production. In vitro antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activities of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi essential oils were carried out on toxigenic strains of Aspergillus species. Plant materials were hydrodistilled for 4-5 h in Clevenger apparatus. 0.25 μL/mL, 0.5 μL/mL, 1 μL/mL, 2 μL/mL, and 4 μL/mL concentrations of each essential oil were prepared in 0.1% Tween 80 (V/V. T. ammi oil showed highest antifungal activity. Absolute mycelial inhibition was recorded at 1 μL/mL by essential oils of T. ammi. The oil also showed complete inhibition of spore germination at a concentration of 2 μL/mL. In addition, T. ammi oil showed significant antiaflatoxigenic potency by totally inhibiting toxin production from A. niger and A. flavus at 0.5 and 0.75 μL/mL, respectively. C. martinii, F. vulgare, and T. ammi oils as antifungals were found superior over synthetic preservative. Moreover, a concentration of 5336.297 μL/kg body weight was recorded for LC50 on mice indicating the low mammalian toxicity. In conclusion, the essential oils from T. ammi can be a potential source of safe natural food preservative for food commodities contamination by Aspergillus species.

  6. Growth inhibition and morphological alterations of Trichophyton rubrum induced by essential oil from Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillipe de Oliveira Pereira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Trichophyton rubrum is one of the most common fungi causer of dermatophytosis, mycosis that affect humans and animals around the world. Researches aiming new products with antifungal activity become necessary to overcome difficulties on treatment of these infections. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of essential oil from Cymbopogon winterianus against the dermatophyte T. rubrum. The antifungal screening was performed by solid medium diffusion method with 16 T. rubrum strains, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum fungicide concentration (MFC were determined using the microdilution method. The effects on mycelial dry weight and morphology were also observed. Screening showed essential oil in natura inhibited all the tested strains, with inhibition zones between 24-28 mm diameter. MIC50 and MIC90 values of the essential oil were 312 µg/mL for nearly all the essayed strains (93.75 % while the MFC50 and MFC90 values were about eight times higher than MIC for all tested strains. All tested essential oil concentrations managed to inhibit strongly the mycelium development. Main morphological changes on the fungal strains observed under light microscopy, which were provided by the essential oil include loss of conidiation, alterations concerning form and pigmentation of hyphae. In the oil presence, colonies showed folds, cream color and slightly darker than the control, pigment production was absent on the reverse and with evident folds. It is concluded that C. winterianus essential oil showed activity against T. rubrum. Therefore, it could be known as potential antifungal compound especially for protection against dermatophytosis.

  7. Growth Inhibition and Morphological Alterations of Trichophyton Rubrum Induced by Essential oil from Cymbopogon Winterianus Jowitt Ex Bor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; Alves Wanderley, Paulo; Cavalcanti Viana, Fernando Antônio; Baltazar de Lima, Rita; Barbosa de Sousa, Frederico; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2011-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is one of the most common fungi causer of dermatophytosis, mycosis that affect humans and animals around the world. Researches aiming new products with antifungal activity become necessary to overcome difficulties on treatment of these infections. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of essential oil from Cymbopogon winterianus against the dermatophyte T. rubrum. The antifungal screening was performed by solid medium diffusion method with 16 T. rubrum strains, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicide concentration (MFC) were determined using the microdilution method. The effects on mycelial dry weight and morphology were also observed. Screening showed essential oil in natura inhibited all the tested strains, with inhibition zones between 24-28 mm diameter. MIC50 and MIC90 values of the essential oil were 312 μg/mL for nearly all the essayed strains (93.75 %) while the MFC50 and MFC90 values were about eight times higher than MIC for all tested strains. All tested essential oil concentrations managed to inhibit strongly the mycelium development. Main morphological changes on the fungal strains observed under light microscopy, which were provided by the essential oil include loss of conidiation, alterations concerning form and pigmentation of hyphae. In the oil presence, colonies showed folds, cream color and slightly darker than the control, pigment production was absent on the reverse and with evident folds. It is concluded that C. winterianus essential oil showed activity against T. rubrum. Therefore, it could be known as potential antifungal compound especially for protection against dermatophytosis.

  8. Growth Inhibition and Morphological Alterations of Trichophyton Rubrum Induced by Essential oil from Cymbopogon Winterianus Jowitt Ex Bor

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Pereira, Fillipe; Alves Wanderley, Paulo; Cavalcanti Viana, Fernando Antônio; Baltazar de Lima, Rita; Barbosa de Sousa, Frederico; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2011-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is one of the most common fungi causer of dermatophytosis, mycosis that affect humans and animals around the world. Researches aiming new products with antifungal activity become necessary to overcome difficulties on treatment of these infections. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of essential oil from Cymbopogon winterianus against the dermatophyte T. rubrum. The antifungal screening was performed by solid medium diffusion method with 16 T. rubrum strains, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicide concentration (MFC) were determined using the microdilution method. The effects on mycelial dry weight and morphology were also observed. Screening showed essential oil in natura inhibited all the tested strains, with inhibition zones between 24-28 mm diameter. MIC50 and MIC90 values of the essential oil were 312 μg/mL for nearly all the essayed strains (93.75 %) while the MFC50 and MFC90 values were about eight times higher than MIC for all tested strains. All tested essential oil concentrations managed to inhibit strongly the mycelium development. Main morphological changes on the fungal strains observed under light microscopy, which were provided by the essential oil include loss of conidiation, alterations concerning form and pigmentation of hyphae. In the oil presence, colonies showed folds, cream color and slightly darker than the control, pigment production was absent on the reverse and with evident folds. It is concluded that C. winterianus essential oil showed activity against T. rubrum. Therefore, it could be known as potential antifungal compound especially for protection against dermatophytosis. PMID:24031626

  9. Determinação da qualidade microbiológica e físico-química de chás de Cymbopogon citratus (D.C Stapf (capim-limão = Evaluation of the microbiological and physical-chemical qualities of lemongrass tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Carneiro Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Em função do grande volume de produção e comercialização do capim-limão, estima-se que uma contaminação microbiológica deste produto possa representar importante risco para a saúde pública. Esta pesquisa visou avaliar marcas de chá de capimlimão, em relação às qualidades microbiológica e físico-química, tendo como base alegislação brasileira do Ministério da Saúde. Nenhuma das amostras apresentou Salmonella sp., porém em 50% delas, houve presença de coliformes a 35ºC. Em três amostras, evidenciaram-se coliformes a 45ºC, com presença de Escherichia coli em uma destas. 81,25%das amostras apresentaram bolores e leveduras, porém sem relação direta com os teores de umidade observados. Dentre os fungos presentes, identificou-se Aspergillus niger, no entanto sem produção de aflatoxinas. Todos infusos analisados negativaram a contaminação evidenciada nos testes com o produto seco. Os resultados indicaram possíveis falhas nos procedimentos pós-colheita e de comercialização. A implementação do Sistema APPCC (HACCP poderia substancialmente minimizar esta contaminação.Considering the great volume of lemongrass production andcommercialization, it is estimated that a potential microbiological contamination of this product could represent an important hazard to public health. This study was performed to evaluate different brands of lemongrass tea, regarding their microbiological and physicalchemical quality, based on the legislation of the Brazilian Health Ministry. No traces of Salmonella sp. were found, but in 50% of samples, the presence of coliforms was detected at 35ºC. Three samples presented coliforms at 45ºC, with Escherichia coli found in one of them. 81.25% of samples presented molds and yeasts. Among the fungi present, Aspergillus niger was identified, but aflatoxins were absent. None of the infusions analyzed presented the contamination evidenced in the dry product. The results obtained may be indicative of failure in procedures of postharvest and commercialization. The implementation of a hazard analysis and critical control point system (HACCP could reduce this contamination substantially.

  10. Abundance and diaspore weight in rare and common prairie grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Deborah

    1978-01-01

    Abundance (g/m 2 ) and diaspore weight are positively correlated in seven species of perennial grasses that occur in prairies. The rare grasses (10.0 g/m 2 ) have heavy dispersal units (2.23 to 2.80 mg). This result is the first reported differentiating trait between related rare and common organisms occurring in same habitat.Three hypotheses that explain this phenomenon are compared; the third most likely holds. First, rare grasses may be rare because their small seeds are less successful in establishment than those of common grasses. Second, if the persistence of small populations is marginal, rare grasses may devote less energy (or other currency) to seed production. Third, rare grasses may be colonizers of spatially and temporally rare microsites appropriate for growth and thus have seeds adapted for longer distance dispersal than those of common grasses. This last hypothesis suggests a new pathway for the evolution of weeds.

  11. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient ( b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass

  12. ANATOMIC STRUCTURE OF CAMPANULA ROTUNDIFOLIA L. GRASS

    OpenAIRE

    V. N. Bubenchikova; E. A. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    The article present results of the study for a anatomic structure of Campanula rotundifolia grass from Campanulaceae family. Despite its dispersion and application in folk medicine, there are no data about its anatomic structure, therefore to estimate the indices of authenticity and quality of raw materials it is necessary to develop microdiagnostical features in the first place, which could help introducing of thisplant in a medical practice. The purpose of this work is to study anatomical s...

  13. Factors influencing seed germination in Cerrado grasses

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Rosana Marta; Pilon, Natashi Aparecida Lima; Durigan, Giselda

    2016-01-01

    Few studies address the ecology of herbs of Cerrado grasslands, which are ecosystems where the long dry season, high temperatures, insolation, fire and invasive grasses greatly influencing germination and the establishment of plants. We assessed germination of 13 species of Poaceae from Cerrado grasslands under nursery conditions or in germination chambers, the latter with i) recently collected seeds and seeds after six months storage, ii) under constant and alternating temperatures, and iii)...

  14. Invasive warm-season grasses reduce mycorrhizal root colonization and biomass production of native prairie grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gail W T; Hickman, Karen R; Williamson, Melinda M

    2012-07-01

    Soil organisms play important roles in regulating ecosystem-level processes and the association of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi with a plant species can be a central force shaping plant species' ecology. Understanding how mycorrhizal associations are affected by plant invasions may be a critical aspect of the conservation and restoration of native ecosystems. We examined the competitive ability of old world bluestem, a non-native grass (Caucasian bluestem [Bothriochloa bladhii]), and the influence of B. bladhii competition on AM root colonization of native warm-season prairie grasses (Andropogon gerardii or Schizachyrium scoparium), using a substitutive design greenhouse competition experiment. Competition by the non-native resulted in significantly reduced biomass production and AM colonization of the native grasses. To assess plant-soil feedbacks of B. bladhii and Bothriochloa ischaemum, we conducted a second greenhouse study which examined soil alterations indirectly by assessing biomass production and AM colonization of native warm-season grasses planted into soil collected beneath Bothriochloa spp. This study was conducted using soil from four replicate prairie sites throughout Kansas and Oklahoma, USA. Our results indicate that a major mechanism in plant growth suppression following invasion by Bothriochloa spp. is the alteration in soil microbial communities. Plant growth was tightly correlated with AM root colonization demonstrating that mycorrhizae play an important role in the invasion of these systems by Bothriochloa spp. and indicating that the restoration of native AM fungal communities may be a fundamental consideration for the successful establishment of native grasses into invaded sites.

  15. Peanut cake concentrations in massai grass silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano S. Lima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This experiment was conducted to evaluate the best concentration of peanut cake in the ensiling of massai grass of the chemical-bromatological composition, fermentative characteristics, forage value rate, ingestion estimates, and digestibility of dry matter in the silage. Materials and methods. The experiment was carried out at the Experimental Farm of São Gonçalo dos Campos at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil. The treatments consisted of massai grass that was cut at 40 days and dehydrated, in addition to 0%, 8%, 16%, and 24% peanut cake in the fresh matter and treatment without cake. The material was compressed in experimental silos (7 liter that were opened after 76 days. Results. The addition of 8-24% peanut cake improved the silage’s chemical-bromatological parameters, increased the dry matter and non-fiber carbohydrates and reduced the fibrous components. There was a linear increase in the estimated values of digestibility and the ingestion of dry matter depending on the levels of peanut cake in the silage. There was an improvement in the fermentative characteristics, with a quadratic effect positive for levels of ammoniacal nitrogen. The forage value rate increased linearly with the inclusion of peanut cake. Conclusions. The inclusion of up to 24% peanut cake during ensiling of massai grass increases the nutritive value of silage and improves fermentation characteristics.

  16. INDUCING RESISTANCE IN COTTON AGAINST COLLETOTRICHUM GOSSYPII VAR. CEPHALOSPORIOIDES WITH ESSENTIAL OILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Santos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the potential of essential oils of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis, baccharis (Baccharis trimera, lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus, basil (Ocimum basilicum and eucalyptus (Corymbia citriodora in inducing resistance in cotton plants against C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides. The inductive effect of the essential oils was evaluated in plants growing in pots in the environment, which were treated with 1% essential oil at 47 days of age. 24 hours after elicitor treatment the plants were inoculated with a suspension of 1.5 x 105 conidia mL-1 of C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides. Five evaluations were performed disease and calculated the area under the disease progress curve. All essential oils showed potential for inducing resistance against cotton C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides.

  17. Treatment of grass pollen allergy: focus on a standardized grass allergen extract - Grazax®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Moisés; Brandt, Tove

    2008-12-01

    Immunotherapy is the only treatment for allergy that has the potential to alter the natural course of the disease. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for grass pollen-induced rhino-conjunctivitis has been developed to make immunotherapy available to a broader group of allergic patients. In the largest clinical programme ever conducted with allergen-specific immunotherapy, over 1,700 adults and 260 children have been exposed to Grazax(®). Grazax is formulated as an oral lyophilisate (tablet) for sublingual administration, containing 75,000 SQ-T standardized allergen extract of grass pollen from Phleum pratense. Grazax is indicated for treatment of grass pollen-induced rhinitis and conjunctivitis in adult patients with clinically relevant symptoms and diagnosed with a positive skin prick test and/or specific IgE test to grass pollen. In phase I trials doses from 2,500 to 1,000,000 SQ-T were tested. All doses were well tolerated and 75,000 SQ-T, with approximately 15 mug major allergen protein, was chosen as the optimal dose. Three phase III trials are ongoing, one being a long-term trial. Results from GT-08 trial first and second treatment years showed a reduction of 30% and 36%, respectively, in daily rhino-conjunctivitis symptom scores and a reduction of 38% and 46% of daily rhino-conjunctivitis medication scores compared with placebo over the entire grass pollen season. Subjects treated with Grazax also had an increased number of well days and improved quality of life, and more subjects experienced excellent rhino-conjunctivitis control. The most common adverse events related to Grazax are local reactions, such as pruritus, edema mouth, ear pruritus, throat irritation, and sneezing. We conclude that Grazax is efficacious and safe for treatment of rhino-conjunctivitis due to grass pollen allergy.

  18. Studies on the influence of combustion bowl modification for the operation of Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel based diesel blends in a DI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhinesh, B.; Annamalai, M.; Lalvani, Isaac JoshuaRamesh; Annamalai, K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel biofuel, Cymbopogon flexuosus is used as an alternative energy source. • C20-D80 + 20 ppm profile stayed close to diesel fuel with BB. • Three different combustion bowl CB1, CB2, and CB3 were considered. • Resulting in higher thermal efficiency and lower HC, CO, emission. • Reduction of oxides of nitrogen and smoke emission for C20-D80 + 20 ppm and CB2. - Abstract: The aim of this experimental work is to figure out the optimized the combustion bowl geometry on a constant speed diesel engine for its efficient functioning with a novel biofuel. The novel biofuel considered for this research work was Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel. To improve the performance level, 20% Cymbopogon flexuosus biofuel was blended with 80% of diesel fuel (C20-D80) and to further reduce the emission magnitude, 20 ppm of cerium oxide was added to the blended fuel (C20-D80 + 20 ppm). For this study four different combustion bowls were designed based on the keen literature survey. They were hemispherical combustion bowl (BB), shallow depth re-entrant combustion bowl (CB1), Toroidal re-entrant combustion bowl (CB2), Toroidal combustion bowl (CB3). Based on the experimental evaluation, the results have been discussed for low load and full load conditions for better understanding. Regarding the fuel modification, C20-D80 + 20 ppm resulted in better engine characteristics owing to combined effect of the oxygen molecule bearing fuel and superior thermal stability and activation energy of the cerium oxide nanoparticle. Of the various bowls considered for the tests, the combustion bowl CB2 showed superior performance and emission reduction compared with its competitors CB1, CB2, and BB. It could have ascribed to the better mixing rate, gain of swirl velocity and the turbulence level of the bowl. CB2 resulted in higher BTE and lower BSEC of 4.1% and 12.02% in low and full load conditions for C20-D80 + 20 ppm. Emission reduction observed was 17% of HC, 43.66% of CO and

  19. The importance of cross-reactivity in grass pollen allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the data obtained from in vivo and in vitro testing in Serbia, a significant number of patients have allergic symptoms caused by grass pollen. We examined the protein composition of grass pollens (Dactylis glomerata, Lolium perenne and Phleum pratense and cross-reactivity in patients allergic to grass pollen from our region. The grass pollen allergen extract was characterized by SDS-PAGE, while cross-reactivity of single grass pollens was revealed by immunoblot analysis. A high degree of cross-reactivity was demonstrated for all three single pollens in the sera of allergic patients compared to the grass pollen extract mixture. Confirmation of the existence of cross-reactivity between different antigenic sources facilitates the use of monovalent vaccines, which are easier to standardize and at the same time prevent further sensitization of patients and reduces adverse reactions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172049 i br. 172024

  20. Rye-grass as an energy crop using biogas technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-15

    The viability of using rye-grass in the UK as a wet energy crop was investigated in this project. The harvesting of rye-grass, the operation of pilot-scale digesters fed with cut rye-grass, and the operation of a biogas plant are described. Use of the digestate as a fertilizer for the grass was examined and the need for added farm manure or slurry to enrich the nutrient content of the grass and produce better yields is noted. Details are given of the digester design and the design of a commercial-scale biogas plant able to take a variety of liquid and solid feeds. Energy balance, the economics of the commercial design, the ensiling of the grass, and methane yields are considered.

  1. Determining the regional potential for a grass biomethane industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, Beatrice M.; Smyth, Henry; Murphy, Jerry D.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We identified assessment criteria for determining the regional potential for grass biomethane. → Grass biomethane is distributed via the natural gas grid. → The criteria include: land use; grass yields; gas grid coverage; availability of co-substrates. → The county with the highest potential can fuel 50% of cars or supply 130% of domestic gas consumption. - Abstract: Grass biogas/biomethane has been put forward as a renewable energy solution and it has been shown to perform well in terms of energy balance, greenhouse gas emissions and policy constraints. Biofuel and energy crop solutions are country-specific and grass biomethane has strong potential in countries with temperate climates and a high proportion of grassland, such as Ireland. For a grass biomethane industry to develop in a country, suitable regions (i.e. those with the highest potential) must be identified. In this paper, factors specifically related to the assessment of the potential of a grass biogas/biomethane industry are identified and analysed. The potential for grass biogas and grass biomethane is determined on a county-by-county basis using multi-criteria decision analysis. Values are assigned to each county and ratings and weightings applied to determine the overall county potential. The potential for grass biomethane with co-digestion of slaughter waste (belly grass) is also determined. The county with the highest potential (Limerick) is analysed in detail and is shown to have ready potential for production of gaseous biofuel to meet either 50% of the vehicle fleet or 130% of the domestic natural gas demand, through 25 facilities at a scale of ca. 30 kt yr -1 of feedstock. The assessment factors developed in this paper can be used in other resource studies into grass biomethane or other energy crops.

  2. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND YIELDS OF GRASSES GROWN IN SALINE CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Purbajanti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to know effects of saline condition to crop physiology, growth andforages yield. A factorial completed random design was used in this study. The first factor was type ofgrass, these were king grass (Pennisetum hybrid, napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum, panicum grass(Panicum maximum, setaria grass (Setaria sphacelata and star grass (Cynodon plectostachyus. Thesecond factor was salt solution (NaCl with concentration 0, 100, 200 and 300 mM. Parameters of thisexperiment were the percentage of chlorophyll, rate of photosynthesis, number of tiller, biomass and drymatter yield. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and followed by Duncan’s multiple range testwhen there were significant effects of the treatment. Panicum grass had the highest chlorophyll content(1.85 mg/g of leaf. Photosynthesis rate of setaria grass was the lowest. The increasing of NaClconcentration up to 300 mM NaCl reduced chlorophyll content, rate of photosynthesis, tiller number,biomass yield and dry matter yield. Responses of leaf area, biomass and dry matter yield to salinitywere linear for king, napier, panicum and setaria grasses. In tar grass, the response of leaf area andbiomass ware linear, but those of dry matter yield was quadratic. The response of tiller number tosalinity was linear for all species.

  3. ANATOMIC STRUCTURE OF CAMPANULA ROTUNDIFOLIA L. GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Bubenchikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article present results of the study for a anatomic structure of Campanula rotundifolia grass from Campanulaceae family. Despite its dispersion and application in folk medicine, there are no data about its anatomic structure, therefore to estimate the indices of authenticity and quality of raw materials it is necessary to develop microdiagnostical features in the first place, which could help introducing of thisplant in a medical practice. The purpose of this work is to study anatomical structureof Campanula rotundifolia grass to determine its diagnostic features. Methods. Thestudy for anatomic structure was carried out in accordance with the requirements of State Pharmacopoeia, edition XIII. Micromed laboratory microscope with digital adjutage was used to create microphotoes, Photoshop CC was used for their processing. Result. We have established that stalk epidermis is prosenchymal, slightly winding with straight of splayed end cells. After study for the epidermis cells we established that upper epidermis cells had straight walls and are slightly winding. The cells of lower epidermishave more winding walls with prolong wrinkled cuticule. Presence of simple one-cell, thin wall, rough papillose hair on leaf and stalk epidermis. Cells of epidermis in fauces of corolla are prosenchymal, with winding walls, straight or winding walls in a cup. Papillary excrescences can be found along the cup edges. Stomatal apparatus is anomocytic. Conclusion. As the result of the study we have carried out the research for Campanula rotundifolia grass anatomic structure, and determined microdiagnostic features for determination of raw materials authenticity, which included presence of simple, one-cell, thin-walled, rough papillose hair on both epidermises of a leaf, along the veins, leaf edge, and stalk epidermis, as well as the presence of epidermis cells with papillary excrescences along the edges of leaves and cups. Intercellular canals are situatedalong the

  4. [Effectiveness of aqueous extracts of aromatic and medicinal plants against tomato grey mould in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmi, Manal; Aourach, Mohammed; El Boukari, Mohammed; Barrijal, Said; Essalmani, Haiat

    2017-08-01

    Grey mould is a major disease threatening the Moroccan tomato; this disease is often controlled by fungicides. However, the latter are a real danger to human health and environment. Thus, this study is part of the research of harmless alternatives such extracts of aromatic and medicinal plants (Lavandula officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Cymbopogon citratus, and Melissa officinalis). In this study, the extracts of four medicinal and aromatic plants were tested for their antifungal potency in vitro and in vivo in order to select the most effective. The results show that, in vitro, the Lavandula officinalis, Thymus vulgaris and Cymbopogon citratus aqueous extracts all possess significant antifungal activity, whereas Melissa officinalis shows the least effective. Also in vivo only the aqueous extract of Cymbopogon citratus proves most effective against B. cinerea on tomato fruit. The test of the plants confirms that aqueous extracts of Cymbopogon citratus and Thymus vulgaris are most effective, while the aqueous extracts of Melissa officinalis and Lavandula officinalis always seem to be the least effective. Therefore, the aqueous extracts of Cymbopogon citratus and Thymus vulgaris are the most envisaged for the biological control of grey mould. Copyright © 2017 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Prospects for Hybrid Breeding in Bioenergy Grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguirre, Andrea Arias; Studer, Bruno; Frei, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    , we address crucial topics to implement hybrid breeding, such as the availability and development of heterotic groups, as well as biological mechanisms for hybridization control such as self-incompatibility (SI) and male sterility (MS). Finally, we present potential hybrid breeding schemes based on SI...... of different hybrid breeding schemes to optimally exploit heterosis for biomass yield in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), two perennial model grass species for bioenergy production. Starting with a careful evaluation of current population and synthetic breeding methods...

  6. Upgrated fuel from reed canary grass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    Results described in this presentation are from a large EU-project - Development of a new crop production system based on delayed harvesting and system for its combined processing to chemical pulp and biofuel powder. This is a project to develop the use of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaris Arundinaceae) both for pulp industry and energy production. The main contractor of the project is Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (coordinator), task coordinators are United Milling Systems A/S from Denmark, and Jaakko Poeyry Oy and VTT Energy from Finland In addition, there are partners from several countries participating in the project

  7. Grass-on-grass competition along a catenal gradient in mesic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three aboveground treatments (full light competition, no light competition and clipping to simulate grazing), and two belowground treatments (full belowground competition and belowground competition excluded by a root tube), were used. On all soil depths the three grass species differed in mean mass, with E. racemosa ...

  8. Nutritional value of cabbage and kikuyu grass as food for grass carp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weighing). Fish were fed once a-day. The feed refusal was measured daily by siphoning out the debris on the bottom of the aquaria which was collected on a sieve .... raising grass carp without the need for supplementary feeding. Cabbage is widely produced on both a subsis- tence and commercial scale by local farmers.

  9. Treatment of grass pollen allergy: focus on a standardized grass allergen extract – Grazax®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Calderón

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Moisés Calderón1, Tove Brandt21Section of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Royal Brompton Hospital, Imperial College, NHLI, London, UK; 2Group Clinical Development, ALK-Abelló A/S, Hørsholm, DenmarkAbstract: Immunotherapy is the only treatment for allergy that has the potential to alter the natural course of the disease. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT for grass pollen-induced rhino-conjunctivitis has been developed to make immunotherapy available to a broader group of allergic patients. In the largest clinical programme ever conducted with allergen-specific immunotherapy, over 1,700 adults and 260 children have been exposed to Grazax®. Grazax is formulated as an oral lyophilisate (tablet for sublingual administration, containing 75,000 SQ-T standardized allergen extract of grass pollen from Phleum pratense. Grazax is indicated for treatment of grass pollen-induced rhinitis and conjunctivitis in adult patients with clinically relevant symptoms and diagnosed with a positive skin prick test and/or specific IgE test to grass pollen. In phase I trials doses from 2,500 to 1,000,000 SQ-T were tested. All doses were well tolerated and 75,000 SQ-T, with approximately 15 µg major allergen protein, was chosen as the optimal dose. Three phase III trials are ongoing, one being a long-term trial. Results from GT-08 trial first and second treatment years showed a reduction of 30% and 36%, respectively, in daily rhino-conjunctivitis symptom scores and a reduction of 38% and 46% of daily rhinoconjunctivitis medication scores compared with placebo over the entire grass pollen season. Subjects treated with Grazax also had an increased number of well days and improved quality of life, and more subjects experienced excellent rhino-conjunctivitis control. The most common adverse events related to Grazax are local reactions, such as pruritus, edema mouth, ear pruritus, throat irritation, and sneezing. We conclude that Grazax is efficacious and safe for treatment

  10. Environ: E00715 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00715 Citronella oil (Ceylon) Essential oil ... Cymbopogon nardus [TAX:549175] ... Poac...eae Cymbopogon nardus fresh grasses Obtained by steam distillation Major component: Citronellal [CPD:C17384] CAS: 8000-29-1

  11. Factors influencing seed germination in Cerrado grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Marta Kolb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Few studies address the ecology of herbs of Cerrado grasslands, which are ecosystems where the long dry season, high temperatures, insolation, fire and invasive grasses greatly influencing germination and the establishment of plants. We assessed germination of 13 species of Poaceae from Cerrado grasslands under nursery conditions or in germination chambers, the latter with i recently collected seeds and seeds after six months storage, ii under constant and alternating temperatures, and iii in the presence and absence of light. Germinability, mean germination time (MGT and required light were quantified to elucidate factors involved in successful germination. Germinability was low for most grasses, probably because of low seed viability. For most species, germinability and MGT were not altered by seed storage. Germination percentages were higher at alternating temperatures and in the presence of light, factors that are more similar to natural environmental situations compared with constant temperature or the absence of light. Our findings indicate that alternating temperatures and light incidence are key factors for germination of species of Poaceae. The maintenance of these environmental factors, which are crucial for the conservation of Cerrado grasslands, depends on appropriate management interventions, such as fire management and the control of biological invasion.

  12. Genetic modification of wetland grasses for phytoremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czako, M.; Liang Dali; Marton, L. [Dept. of Biological Sciences, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Feng Xianzhong; He Yuke [National Lab. of Plant Molecular Genetics, Shanghai Inst. of Plant Physiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, SH (China)

    2005-04-01

    Wetland grasses and grass-like monocots are very important natural remediators of pollutants. Their genetic improvement is an important task because introduction of key transgenes can dramatically improve their remediation potential. Tissue culture is prerequisite for genetic manipulation, and methods are reported here for in vitro culture and micropropagation of a number of wetland plants of various ecological requirements such as salt marsh, brackish water, riverbanks, and various zones of lakes and ponds, and bogs. The monocots represent numerous genera in various families such as Poaceae, Cyperaceae, Juncaceae, and Typhaceae. The reported species are in various stages of micropropagation and Arundo donax is scaled for mass propagation for selecting elite lines for pytoremediation. Transfer of key genes for mercury phytoremediation into the salt marsh cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) is also reported here. All but one transgenic lines contained both the organomercurial lyase (merB) and mercuric reductase (merA) sequences showing that co-introduction into Spartina of two genes from separate Agrobacterium strains is possible. (orig.)

  13. Elephant grass clones for silage production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rerisson José Cipriano dos Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ensiling warm-season grasses often requires wilting due to their high moisture content, and the presence of low-soluble sugars in these grasses usually demands the use of additives during the ensiling process. This study evaluated the bromatological composition of the fodder and silage from five Pennisetum sp. clones (IPA HV 241, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.114, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.37, Elephant B, and Mott. The contents of 20 Polyvinyl chloride (PVC silos, which were opened after 90 days of storage, were used for the bromatological analysis and the evaluation of the pH, nitrogen, ammonia, buffer capacity, soluble carbohydrates, and fermentation coefficients. The effluent losses, gases and dry matter recovery were also calculated. Although differences were observed among the clones (p < 0.05 for the concentrations of dry matter, insoluble nitrogen in acid detergents, insoluble nitrogen in neutral detergents, soluble carbohydrates, fermentation coefficients, and in vitro digestibility in the forage before ensiling, no differences were observed for most of these variables after ensiling. All of the clones were efficient in the fermentation process. The IPA/UFRPE TAIWAN A-146 2.37 clone, however, presented a higher dry matter concentration and the best fermentation coefficient, resulting in a better silage quality, compared to the other clones.

  14. From pasture grass to cattle milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Susumu

    1979-01-01

    Iodine-131 is one of the important fission products since it is selectively accumulated in the thyroid gland of man. The transfer of this isotope from contaminated grass to cows' milk is therefore of particular importance since milk is a major constituent of the diet especially for infants. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the transfer rate of this isotope from grass to milk of lactuating cows and its distribution in milk. It is said that the orally administered iodide is rapidly absorbed through the rumen wall and excreted mainly to urine. The absorbed iodine is accumulated highly in the thyroid gland and the considerable amount is secreted to milk. Garner et al. showed that about 5% of a dose of 131 I was found in the milk within 7 days. The extremes were 1.43 to 16.4%. Present author obtained that 18 - 30% of the dosed 131 I was secreted into milk within 7 days, indicating somewhat higher transfer rate than that of Garner et al. It was reported that more than 90% of 131 I was found in milk serum in the ionic form. The countermeasures for diminishing 131 I in milk were also presented. (author)

  15. Grass defoliation affecting survival and growth of seedlings of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two experiments were conducted, one in the field and the other in the greenhouse, to investigate the effects of the intensity and frequency of grass defoliation on the survival and growth of Acacia karroo seedlings. In the greenhouse, seedlings growing with heavily clipped grasses had higher biomass production than those ...

  16. Defoliation effects of perennial grasses – continuing confusion | DL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although an adequate knowledge of growth patterns and defoliation effects in perennial grasses is a prerequisite for the rational use of veld and pastures for animal production, our knowledge of this subject is far from adequate. The results of various physiological and clipping studies on tropical and sub-tropical grasses are ...

  17. Invasive grasses change landscape structure and fire behavior in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa M. Ellsworth; Creighton M. Litton; Alexander P. Dale; Tomoaki Miura

    2014-01-01

    How does potential fire behavior differ in grass-invaded non-native forests vs open grasslands? How has land cover changed from 1950–2011 along two grassland/forest ecotones in Hawaii with repeated fires? A study on non-native forest with invasive grass understory and invasive grassland (Megathyrsus maximus) ecosystems on Oahu, Hawaii, USA was...

  18. Variation in important pasture grasses. II. Cytogenetic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation in important pasture grasses. II. Cytogenetic and reproductive variation. Spies J.J., Gibbs Russell G.E.. Abstract. The chromosome numbers and reproductive variation of seven important pasture grasses from South Africa are compared. This comparison indicates that all these species form polyploid complexes, ...

  19. Home destruction examination: Grass Valley Fire, Lake Arrowhead, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack D. Cohen; Richard D. Stratton

    2008-01-01

    The Grass Valley Fire started October 22, 2007 at approximately 0508, one-mile west of Lake Arrowhead in the San Bernardino Mountains. Fuel and weather conditions were extreme due to drought, dry Santa Ana winds, and chaparral and conifer vegetation on steep terrain. The fire proceeded south through the Grass Valley drainage one-mile before impacting an area of dense...

  20. Grass seeding as a control for roadbank erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.G. Wollum

    1962-01-01

    Grass, seeded on a steep roadcut in western Oregon, reduced erosion but caused increased surface runoff during a 3-year period of observation. These results were obtained at H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest from a study designed to measure effectiveness of grass in controlling soil erosion from exposed roadbanks. Additional measurements for varying soil types will be...

  1. Potentials of agricultural waste and grasses in pulp and papermaking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potentials of some agricultural waste and grasses were investigated. Potassium hydroxide from wood ash was used as alkali for pulping. Results from visopan Microscope showed that banana stalk has the highest fibre length of 2.60 mm and Bahaman grass has the least fibre length of 0.85 mm. Runkel Ratio (RK) for ...

  2. Structural traits of elephant grass ( Pennisetum purpureum Schum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the forage potential of elephant grass, controlling canopy structure during grazing has limited its use in pasture. This study was conducted to determine the effect of grazing frequency and post-grazing height on canopy structural characteristics of elephant grass genotypes. The treatments consisted of the factorial ...

  3. Effect of Bamboo ( Bambusa valgaris ) and Elephant grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant potential of bamboo and elephant grass leaf extracts were evaluated in cooked and raw broiler meat stored under refrigeration at 3±20C. To a separate 350g of minced broiler meat, 1.5% bamboo leaf extract (BLE) or elephant grass extract (EGE) was added. There was a negative control without additive while a ...

  4. Agricultural field reclamation utilizing native grass crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Cure

    2013-01-01

    Developing a method of agricultural field reclamation to native grasses in the Lower San Pedro Watershed could prove to be a valuable tool for educational and practical purposes. Agricultural field reclamation utilizing native grass crop production will address water table depletion, soil degradation and the economic viability of the communities within the watershed....

  5. Effect of grass species on NDF ruminal degradability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uzivatel

    Abstract. The objective of this study was to compare the ruminal degradability of neutral detergent fibre (NDF) .... Felina were evaluated in the present study. The grass was harvested from the primary growth of monocultured grasses on 19 and 26 May of 2004 and 27 May and 10 ...... Nutritional Ecology of the Ruminant.

  6. Does fire maintain symbiotic, fungal endophyte infections in native grasses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. H. Faeth; S. M.  Haase; S. S. Sackett; T. J. Sullivan; R. H.  Remington; C. E.  Hamilton

    2002-01-01

    Systemic endophytic fungi in agronomic and turf grasses are well known for conferring increased resistance to herbivores and to abiotic stresses, such as drought, and increasing competitive abilities. Many native grasses also harbor high frequencies of the asexual and vertically-transmitted endophyte, Neotyphodium. In Festuca arizonica...

  7. MACRO NUTRIENTS UPTAKE OF FORAGE GRASSES AT DIFFERENT SALINITY STRESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kusmiyati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The high concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl in saline soils has negative effects on the growth ofmost plants. The experiment was designed to evaluate macro nutrient uptake (Nitrogen, Phosphorus andPotassium of forage grasses at different NaCl concentrations in growth media. The experiment wasconducted in a greenhouse at Forage Crops Laboratory of Animal Agriculture Faculty, Diponegoro University.Split plot design was used to arrange the experiment. The main plot was forage grasses (Elephant grass(Pennisetum purpureum and King grass (Pennisetum hybrida. The sub plot was NaCl concentrationin growth media (0, 150, and 300 mM. The nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K uptake in shootand root of plant were measured. The result indicated increasing NaCl concentration in growth mediasignificantly decreased the N, P and K uptake in root and shoot of the elephant grass and king grass. Thepercentage reduction percentage of N, P and K uptake at 150 mM and 300 mM were high in elephant grassand king grass. It can be concluded that based on nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium uptake, elephantgrass and king grass are not tolerant to strong and very strong saline soil.

  8. No positive feedback between fire and a nonnative perennial grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika L. Geiger; Guy R. McPherson

    2005-01-01

    Semi-desert grasslands flank the “Sky Island” mountains in southern Arizona and Northern Mexico. Many of these grasslands are dominated by nonnative grasses, which potentially alter native biotic communities. One specific concern is the potential for a predicted feedback between nonnative grasses and fire. In a large-scale experiment in southern Arizona we investigated...

  9. Impact of the invader Ipomoea hildebrandtii on grass biomass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The invasive coloniser Ipomoea hildebrandtii aggravates the problem of inadequate grass forage in Kajiado district, Kenya. To test its impact on grass biomass, nitrogen (N) mineralisation and seedling establishment, grazing and coloniser density were controlled using experimental exclosures and weeding treatments ...

  10. Response of higveld grass species to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty-one populations in twenty-two species of highveld grasses were grown in pots of soil fertilized with solutions for comparing ammonium and nitrate nutrition. Cotton, tomato, cereal crops and pasture grasses were included for comparison. Roots and shoots were harvested separately, weighed and analysed for major ...

  11. Grass species composition, yield and quality under and outside tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-year study was conducted in lightly grazed areas of Matopos Research Station, Zimbabwe, to evaluate the impact of widely spaced trees on understorey grass composition, yield and quality. The study trees were Terminalia sericea and Acacia karroo. Ordination techniques using grass density and biomass as indices ...

  12. Lessons learned in managing alfalfa-grass mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass-alfalfa mixtures have a number of benefits that make them attractive to producers. However, they can be problematic to establish and maintain. Research programs have made progress in understanding the benefits and challenges of alfalfa-grass mixtures. Mixtures may have greater winter survival ...

  13. Energy metabolism of dairy cows fed on grass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinenberg, M.H.; Honing, Y. van der; Agnew, R.E.; Yan, T.; Vuuren, A.M. van; Valk, H.

    2002-01-01

    Production performance of grass-fed dairy cows is often lower than expected from the estimated energy supply. To explain the overestimation of the energy content of grass for dairy cows, data from energy balance trials from three different laboratories (Wageningen, Lelystad and Hillsborough) were

  14. allergenicity and cross- reactivity of buffalo grass (stenotaphrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grassland and savannah constitute important biomes in southern Africa, and a long surruner period, high temperatures and wind are major factors contributing to the production of large amounts of anemophilous grass pollen for most of the year. Grass pollen was reported by David Ordmanl to be the major aero-allergen.

  15. Analysis of Some Heavy Metals in Grass ( Paspalum Orbiculare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increased deposition of trace metals from vehicle exhausts on plants has raised concerns about the risks of the quality of food consumed by humans since the heavy metals emitted through the exhaust by vehicles can enter food chain through deposition on grass grazed by animals. Grass (Paspalum Orbiculare) and ...

  16. Identification of grazed grasses using epidermal characters | R ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of anatomical features of the abaxial epidermis of grasses is discussed for the identification of fragments of epidermis present in samples of rumen. The reliability of this technique, and the variation of the epidermal characters in two widely distributed species of grass, is given. A "Key" to identity certain genera of ...

  17. The influence of the application of grass herbicides on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reports on a trial which was conducted over a period of three seasons in which the advantages of the removal of grass weeds from dryland lucerne and medic pastures determined. Two herbicide treatments, an unsprayed control and a grass herbicide treatment were compared for three seasons. Illustrates with graphs and ...

  18. Research note: Calibrating a disc pastures meter to estimate grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sampling with more than 100 readings is not, however, recommended owing to the poor reward (precision) per unit of sampling effort. Keywords: coastal forest; disc meter; fire management; fuel load; grass; grasses; herbage mass; pastures; precision; regression model; sample size; south africa; standing crop; thornveld; ...

  19. Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

  20. Establishing native warm season grasses on Eastern Kentucky strip mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T.G.; Larkin, J.L.; Arnett, M.B. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Forestry

    1998-12-31

    The authors evaluated various methods of establishing native warm season grasses on two reclaimed Eastern Kentucky mines from 1994--1997. Most current reclamation practices incorporate the use of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and other cool-season grasses/legumes that provide little wildlife habitats. The use of native warm season grasses will likely improve wildlife habitat on reclaimed strip mines. Objectives of this study were to compare the feasibility of establishing these grasses during fall, winter, or spring using a native rangeland seeder or hydroseeding; a fertilizer application at planting; or cold-moist stratification prior to hydroseeding. Vegetative cover, bare ground, species richness, and biomass samples were collected at the end of each growing season. Native warm season grass plantings had higher plant species richness compared to cool-season reclamation mixtures. There was no difference in establishment of native warm season grasses as a result of fertilization or seeding technique. Winter native warm season grass plantings were failures and cold-moist stratification did not increase plant establishment during any season. As a result of a drought during 1997, both cool-season and warm season plantings were failures. Cool-season reclamation mixtures had significantly more vegetative cover and biomass compared to native warm season grass mixtures and the native warm season grass plantings did not meet vegetative cover requirements for bond release. Forbs and legumes that established well included pale purple coneflower (Echinacea pallida), lance-leaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata), round-headed lespedeza (Lespedeza capitata), partridge pea (Cassia fasiculata), black-eyed susan (Rudbeckia hirta), butterfly milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), and bergamot (Monarda fistulosa). Results from two demonstration plots next to research plots indicate it is possible to establish native warm season grasses on Eastern Kentucky strip mines for wildlife habitat.

  1. Establishing native warm season grasses on Eastern Kentucky strip mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.G.; Larkin, J.L.; Arnett, M.B.

    1998-01-01

    The authors evaluated various methods of establishing native warm season grasses on two reclaimed Eastern Kentucky mines from 1994--1997. Most current reclamation practices incorporate the use of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and other cool-season grasses/legumes that provide little wildlife habitats. The use of native warm season grasses will likely improve wildlife habitat on reclaimed strip mines. Objectives of this study were to compare the feasibility of establishing these grasses during fall, winter, or spring using a native rangeland seeder or hydroseeding; a fertilizer application at planting; or cold-moist stratification prior to hydroseeding. Vegetative cover, bare ground, species richness, and biomass samples were collected at the end of each growing season. Native warm season grass plantings had higher plant species richness compared to cool-season reclamation mixtures. There was no difference in establishment of native warm season grasses as a result of fertilization or seeding technique. Winter native warm season grass plantings were failures and cold-moist stratification did not increase plant establishment during any season. As a result of a drought during 1997, both cool-season and warm season plantings were failures. Cool-season reclamation mixtures had significantly more vegetative cover and biomass compared to native warm season grass mixtures and the native warm season grass plantings did not meet vegetative cover requirements for bond release. Forbs and legumes that established well included pale purple coneflower (Echinacea pallida), lance-leaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata), round-headed lespedeza (Lespedeza capitata), partridge pea (Cassia fasiculata), black-eyed susan (Rudbeckia hirta), butterfly milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), and bergamot (Monarda fistulosa). Results from two demonstration plots next to research plots indicate it is possible to establish native warm season grasses on Eastern Kentucky strip mines for wildlife habitat

  2. Established native perennial grasses out-compete an invasive annual grass regardless of soil water and nutrient availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher M. McGlone; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Thomas E. Kolb; Ty Nietupsky

    2012-01-01

    Competition and resource availability influence invasions into native perennial grasslands by nonnative annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum. In two greenhouse experiments we examined the influence of competition, water availability, and elevated nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability on growth and reproduction of the invasive annual grass B. tectorum and two...

  3. Pyricularia pennisetigena and P. zingibericola from invasive grasses infect signal grass, barley and wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Teodora de Assis Reges

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species from the Pyricularia genus are associated with blast disease in plants from the Poaceae family, causing losses in economically important crops such as rice, oat, rye, barley, wheat and triticale. This study aimed at characterizing the pathogenicity spectrum of P. pennisetigena and P. zingibericola to signal grass, barley and wheat, as well as comparing them with those from the species P. grisea and P. oryzae pathotype Triticum, which occur widely in the Brazilian agroecosystem. Twenty isolates of Pyricularia spp. were obtained from infected leaf samples of invasive plant species from wheat fields. The isolates classification into distinct Pyricularia species was done using molecular phylogeny based on actin and calmodulin genes. Pyricularia pennisetigena and P. zingibericola inoculated on plant leaves, at a concentration adjusted to 105 conidia mL-1, were pathogenic to signal grass, barley and wheat, with varying levels of aggressiveness.

  4. Caracterização química e efeito inibitório de óleos essenciais sobre o crescimento de Staphylococcus aureus e Escherichia coli Chemical ckaracterization and inhibitory effect of essential oils on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcilene de Abreu Pereira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito inibitório dos óleos essenciais de Cymbopogon citratus (capim-limão, Origanum vulgare (orégano e Syzygium aromaticum (cravo-da-índia; os experimentos foram realizados com as bactérias Staphylococcus aureus e Escherichia coli, importantes patógenos causadores de contaminações em queijos e outros alimentos. Para quantificação e identificação dos constituintes químicos dos óleos, utilizou-se um cromatógrafo gasoso acoplado a um espectrômetro de massa. Os resultados dos testes in vitro, os óleos essenciais de C. citratus, O. vulgare e S. aromaticum promoveram efeito inibitório sobre as bactérias S. aureus e E. coli, porém o S. aromaticum apresentou melhor formação de halo de inibição nas menores concentrações. Para o efeito sinergístico dos óleos sobre as bactérias não foram observadas diferenças quando comparados com o efeito individual dos mesmos. Foi possível verificar que os óleos possuem efeito inibitório sobre os microrganismos estudados, sendo, portanto uma alternativa no controle microbiológico de alimentos.With the aim of evaluating the inhinibitory effect of the Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass, Origanun vulgare (oregano and Syzygium aromaticum (clove, experiments were performed in laboratories, with the Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli bacteria, important pathogenics which contaminate cheese and other foods. For the oil chemical constitutions quantification and identification, the gas chromatography attached mass spectrometry to a was used. In the results in vitro test, the C. citratus, O. vulgare and S. aromaticum essential oils presented antimicrobian activity over S. aureus and E. coli bacteria, however, S. aromaticum presented better formation of inhibition halo in smaller concentrations. For the oil synergetic effect over bacteria and fungi, no significant difference was noticed when compared to their own individual effect. It was possible to verify that the

  5. Treatment of grass pollen allergy: focus on a standardized grass allergen extract – Grazax®

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón, Moisés

    2008-01-01

    Moisés Calderón1, Tove Brandt21Section of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Royal Brompton Hospital, Imperial College, NHLI, London, UK; 2Group Clinical Development, ALK-Abelló A/S, Hørsholm, DenmarkAbstract: Immunotherapy is the only treatment for allergy that has the potential to alter the natural course of the disease. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for grass pollen-induced rhino-conjunctivitis has been developed to make immunotherapy available t...

  6. Treatment of grass pollen allergy: focus on a standardized grass allergen extract ? Grazax ?

    OpenAIRE

    Calder?n, Mois?s; Brandt, Tove

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapy is the only treatment for allergy that has the potential to alter the natural course of the disease. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for grass pollen-induced rhino-conjunctivitis has been developed to make immunotherapy available to a broader group of allergic patients. In the largest clinical programme ever conducted with allergen-specific immunotherapy, over 1,700 adults and 260 children have been exposed to Grazax?. Grazax is formulated as an oral lyophilisate (tablet) for su...

  7. Juice-extracted grass pellets and sodium bicarbonate for cows in midlactation fed timothy grass silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Hernandez, J R; Brisson, G J; Girard, V

    1994-12-01

    Eighteen midlactation Holstein cows, averaging 80 to 125 d of lactation, were used in a trial of switchback design to evaluate two timothy silages, wilted or direct-cut and treated with formic acid, and three treatments, control, NaHCO3 added at 2% of DM, or juice-extracted grass pellets replacing 30% silage DM. Cows fed direct-cut silage that had been treated with formic acid consumed more DM (19.8 vs. 18.6 kg/d) than those fed wilted silage. The DMI was also increased with NaHCO3 and grass pellet treatments. However, NaHCO3 reduced digestibility of most nutrients without affecting pH of rumen fluid or degradation of DM and NDF. Compared with wilted silage, direct-cut silage that had been treated with formic acid contained more degradable NDF (86 vs. 84.5%). Milk yield (24.9 vs. 23.6 kg/d) was higher for cows fed direct-cut than wilted silage, but 4% FCM yield remained unchanged. Addition of NaHCO3 tended to increase yields of milk and 4% FCM. Treatments did not affect milk composition. Serum urea N was higher for cows fed the direct-cut silage than for cows fed wilted silage. Silage type had more impact on feed intake and performance than did NaHCO3 or juice-extracted grass pellets.

  8. Epichloë grass endophytes in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Miia; Saikkonen, Kari; Helander, Marjo; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Wäli, Piippa R

    2016-02-03

    There is an urgent need to create new solutions for sustainable agricultural practices that circumvent the heavy use of fertilizers and pesticides and increase the resilience of agricultural systems to environmental change. Beneficial microbial symbionts of plants are expected to play an important role in integrated pest management schemes over the coming decades. Epichloë endophytes, symbiotic fungi of many grass species, can protect plants against several stressors, and could therefore help to increase the productivity of forage grasses and the hardiness of turf grasses while reducing the use of synthetic pesticides. Indeed, Epichloë endophytes have successfully been developed and commercialized for agricultural use in the USA, Australia and New Zealand. Many of the host grass species originate from Europe, which is a biodiversity hotspot for both grasses and endophytes. However, intentional use of endophyte-enhanced grasses in Europe is virtually non-existent. We suggest that the diversity of European Epichloë endophytes and their host grasses should be exploited for the development of sustainable agricultural, horticultural and landscaping practices, and potentially for bioremediation and bioenergy purposes, and for environmental improvement.

  9. The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semere, T.; Slater, F.

    2005-07-01

    The ecological impact on local wildlife of biomass plantations of three different species of grasses has been monitored in the years 2002 to 2004 inclusive at farms in Herefordshire UK. Two of the grasses were not native to Britain. Wildlife monitored included ground flora, beetles, insects, birds, small mammals, butterflies, bees and hoverflies. The results provide a baseline of biodiversity data from biomass farms in England, although due to poor crop growth, the data from the switch-grass plantation was incomplete. The surveys were carried out by Cardiff University supported financially by the DTI.

  10. The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semere, T.; Slater, F.

    2005-01-01

    The ecological impact on local wildlife of biomass plantations of three different species of grasses has been monitored in the years 2002 to 2004 inclusive at farms in Herefordshire UK. Two of the grasses were not native to Britain. Wildlife monitored included ground flora, beetles, insects, birds, small mammals, butterflies, bees and hoverflies. The results provide a baseline of biodiversity data from biomass farms in England, although due to poor crop growth, the data from the switch-grass plantation was incomplete. The surveys were carried out by Cardiff University supported financially by the DTI

  11. Acquisition of Forgaging Skills by Lambs Eating Grass or Shrub

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Enrique R.

    1988-01-01

    I studied the acquisition of foraging skills by lambs eating shrub or grass in three experiments. The general approach was to isolate those skills involved in prehending forage from those related to the acceptance of novel foods. Treatment lambs received 15 times more exposure to grass or shrub than did control lambs. Lambs were tested in 2.5 x 2.5 meter monocultures of shrub or grass 5 min/d, on two separate occasions. Height, bulk density and spatial arrangement of plant material were contr...

  12. Effect of level of lactic acid bacteria inoculant from fermented grass extract on fermentation quality of king grass silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A Antaribaba

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ensiling is a method of preserving moist forage based on natural fermentation where lactic acid bacteria (LAB ferment water soluble carbohydrate into organic acids mainly lactic acid under anaerobic condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of king grass (Pennisetum purpureophoides ensiled with addition of LAB prepared from fermented grass extract (LBFG. Four treatment were (G0 king grass without additive; (G1 king grass with 2% (v/w of LBFG; (G2 king grass with 3% (v/w of LBFG; (G3 king grass with 4% (v/w of LBFG. Ensiling was conducted in bottle silos of 225 g capacity at room temperatures (27.0 ± 0.20C for 30 days. The results showed that crude protein content in silage G1, G2 and G3 were relatively higher than that in silage G0. The pH value, butyric acid, total VFA and NH3-N concentrations decreased linearly with increasing level of LBFG addition, while lactic acid concentration increased linearly with LBFG addition. It was concluded that addition of 3% (v/w of LBFG resulting a better fermentation quality of king grass silage than 2% and 4% (v/w of LBFG.

  13. Efeito moluscicida do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt (Poaceae sobre Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817 e Biomphalaria tenagophila(D’Orbigny, 1835

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. COSTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO O uso das substâncias moluscicidas convencionais no controle de planorbídeos vetores constitui-se uma importante ferramenta no combate da fasciolose hepática e esquistossomose. Sendo, portanto, de extrema relevância para a pecuária e para os serviços de Vigilância Epidemiológica. Por outro lado, a seleção de caramujos resistentes a tais substâncias e sua baixa seletividade estimulam a busca por novas substâncias. Neste sentido, o presente trabalho foi desenvolvido para avaliar o efeito do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon winterianusJowitt sobre Lymnaea columella e Biomphalaria tenagophila, hospedeiros intermediários de Fasciola hepatica e esquistossomose mansônica, respectivamente. O óleo essencial foi extraído a partir de folhas frescas utilizando o sistema Clevenger. A análise qualitativa foi realizada por meio de cromatografia gasosa acoplada a espectrometria de massas (CG/EM e a quantificação dos constituintes presentes no óleo foi determinada por cromatografia gasosa acoplada ao detector de ionização de chama (CG/DIC. O efeito moluscicida foi avaliado utilizando seis moluscos de cada espécie e o óleo essencial de C. winterianus nas concentrações finais de 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80 e 100 ppm. A análise por cromatografia gasosa do óleo essencial possibilitou a identificação dos componentes majoritários geraniol (28,62%, citronelal (23,62% e citronelol (17,10%. Os valores de DL100 e DL50para os moluscos das espécies L. columella e B. tenagophila foram, respectivamente, 60 e 40 ppm; 80 ppm e 60 ppm. O óleo de Cymbopogon winterianus demonstrou-se uma alternativa promissora para o controle dos moluscos, sendo a espécie L. columella mais sensível ao mesmo.

  14. Brassinosteroid Mediated Cell Wall Remodeling in Grasses under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, plants, being sessile, cannot escape from exposure to severe abiotic stresses such as extreme temperature and water deficit. The dynamic structure of plant cell wall enables them to undergo compensatory changes, as well as maintain physical strength, with changing environments. Plant hormones known as brassinosteroids (BRs play a key role in determining cell wall expansion during stress responses. Cell wall deposition differs between grasses (Poaceae and dicots. Grass species include many important food, fiber, and biofuel crops. In this article, we focus on recent advances in BR-regulated cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling in response to stresses, comparing our understanding of the mechanisms in grass species with those in the more studied dicots. A more comprehensive understanding of BR-mediated changes in cell wall integrity in grass species will benefit the development of genetic tools to improve crop productivity, fiber quality and plant biomass recalcitrance.

  15. Seasonal variation in diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Orby, P.V.; Skjoth, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profile within the Danish city of Aarhus was shown to change in a systematic manner as the pollen season progressed. Although diurnal grass pollen profiles can differ greatly from day-to-day, it is common practice to establish...... the time of day when peak concentrations are most likely to occur using seasonally averaged diurnal profiles. Atmospheric pollen loads are highly dependent upon emissions, and different species of grass are known to flower and emit pollen at different times of the day and during different periods...... of the pollen season. Pollen concentrations are also influenced by meteorological factors - directly through those parameters that govern pollen dispersion and transport, and indirectly through the weather-driven flowering process. We found that three different profiles dominated the grass pollen season...

  16. Variation in important pasture grasses: I. Morphological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Language: English. Keywords: cenchrus ciliaris; cynodon dactylon; digitaria eriantha; distribution; ecotypes; environmental conditions; eragrostis curvula; geographical distribution; Geography; grasses; heteropogon contortus; morphological variation; Morphology; natal; northern cape; orange free state; pasture; pasture ...

  17. Nitrogen availability from composts for humid region perennial grass and legume-grass forage production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, D H; Voroney, R P; Warman, P R

    2004-01-01

    Perennial forages may be ideally suited for fertilization with slow N release amendments such as composts, but difficulties in predicting N supply from composts have limited their routine use in forage production. A field study was conducted to compare the yield and protein content of a binary legume-grass forage mixture and a grass monocrop cut twice annually, when fertilized with diverse composts. In all three years from 1998-2000, timothy (Phleum pratense L.)-red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and timothy swards were fertilized with ammonium nitrate (AN) at up to 150 and 300 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively. Organic amendments, applied at up to 600 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) in the first two years only, included composts derived from crop residue (CSC), dairy manure (DMC), or sewage sludge (SSLC), plus liquid dairy manure (DM). Treatments DM at 150 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and CSC at 600 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) produced cumulative timothy yields matching those obtained for inorganic fertilizer. Apparent nitrogen recovery (ANR) ranged from 0.65% (SSLC) to 15.1% (DMC) for composts, compared with 29.4% (DM) and 36.5% (AN). The legume component (approximately 30%) of the binary mixture acted as an effective "N buffer" maintaining forage yield and protein content consistently higher, and within a narrower range, across all treatments. Integrating compost utilization into livestock systems that use legume-grass mixtures may reduce the risk of large excesses or deficits of N, moderate against potential losses in crop yield and quality, and by accommodating lower application rates of composts, reduce soil P and K accumulation.

  18. Sonoran Desert ecosystem transformation by a C4 grass without the grass/fire cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Aaryn D.; Betancourt, Julio; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Marsh, Stuart E.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Biological invasions facilitate ecosystem transformation by altering the structure and function, diversity, dominance and disturbance regimes. A classic case is the grass–fire cycle in which grass invasion increases the frequency, scale and/or intensity of wildfires and promotes the continued invasion of invasive grasses. Despite wide acceptance of the grass–fire cycle, questions linger about the relative roles that interspecific plant competition and fire play in ecosystem transformations. Location Sonoran Desert Arizona Upland of the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, USA. Methods We measured species cover, density and saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) size structure along gradients of Pennisetum ciliare invasion at 10 unburned/ungrazed P. ciliare patches. Regression models quantified differences in diversity, cover and density with respect to P. ciliare cover, and residence time and a Fisher's exact test detected demographic changes in saguaro populations. Because P. ciliare may have initially invaded locations that were both more invasible and less diverse, we ran analyses with and without the plots in which initial infestations were located. Results Richness and diversity decreased with P. ciliare cover as did cover and density of most dominant species. Richness and diversity declined with increasing time since invasion, suggesting an ongoing transformation. The proportion of old-to-young Carnegiea gigantea was significantly lower in plots with dominant P. ciliare cover. Main conclusions Rich desert scrub (15–25 species per plot) was transformed into depauperate grassland (2–5 species per plot) within 20 years following P. ciliare invasion without changes to the fire regime. While the onset of a grass–fire cycle may drive ecosystem change in the later stages and larger scales of grass invasions of arid lands, competition by P. ciliare can drive small-scale transformations earlier in the invasion. Linking competition-induced transformation rates with

  19. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: An annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    This bibliography and associated literature synthesis (Melcher and Skagen, 2005) was developed for the Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV). The PLJV sought compilation and annotation of the literature on grass buffers for protecting playas from runoff containing sediments, nutrients, pesticides, and other contaminants. In addition, PLJV sought information regarding the extent to which buffers may attenuate the precipitation runoff needed to fill playas, and avian use of buffers. We emphasize grass buffers, but we also provide information on other buffer types.

  20. The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Grasses in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinaporn Wongwatanapaiboon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The grasses in Thailand were analyzed for the potentiality as the alternative energy crops for cellulosic ethanol production by biological process. The average percentage composition of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in the samples of 18 types of grasses from various provinces was determined as 31.85–38.51, 31.13–42.61, and 3.10–5.64, respectively. The samples were initially pretreated with alkaline peroxide followed by enzymatic hydrolysis to investigate the enzymatic saccharification. The total reducing sugars in most grasses ranging from 500–600 mg/g grasses (70–80% yield were obtained. Subsequently, 11 types of grasses were selected as feedstocks for the ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF. The enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were utilized for hydrolysis and the yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis, were applied for cofermentation at 35°C for 7 days. From the results, the highest yield of ethanol, 1.14 g/L or 0.14 g/g substrate equivalent to 32.72% of the theoretical values was obtained from Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass. When the yields of dry matter were included in the calculations, Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass gave the yield of ethanol at 1,091.84 L/ha/year, whereas the leaves of dwarf napier grass showed the maximum yield of 2,720.55 L/ha/year (0.98 g/L or 0.12 g/g substrate equivalent to 30.60% of the theoretical values.

  1. The potential of cellulosic ethanol production from grasses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwatanapaiboon, Jinaporn; Kangvansaichol, Kunn; Burapatana, Vorakan; Inochanon, Ratanavalee; Winayanuwattikun, Pakorn; Yongvanich, Tikamporn; Chulalaksananukul, Warawut

    2012-01-01

    The grasses in Thailand were analyzed for the potentiality as the alternative energy crops for cellulosic ethanol production by biological process. The average percentage composition of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in the samples of 18 types of grasses from various provinces was determined as 31.85-38.51, 31.13-42.61, and 3.10-5.64, respectively. The samples were initially pretreated with alkaline peroxide followed by enzymatic hydrolysis to investigate the enzymatic saccharification. The total reducing sugars in most grasses ranging from 500-600 mg/g grasses (70-80% yield) were obtained. Subsequently, 11 types of grasses were selected as feedstocks for the ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF). The enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were utilized for hydrolysis and the yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis, were applied for cofermentation at 35 °C for 7 days. From the results, the highest yield of ethanol, 1.14 g/L or 0.14 g/g substrate equivalent to 32.72% of the theoretical values was obtained from Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass. When the yields of dry matter were included in the calculations, Sri Lanka ecotype vetiver grass gave the yield of ethanol at 1,091.84 L/ha/year, whereas the leaves of dwarf napier grass showed the maximum yield of 2,720.55 L/ha/year (0.98 g/L or 0.12 g/g substrate equivalent to 30.60% of the theoretical values).

  2. A novel method to characterize silica bodies in grasses

    OpenAIRE

    Dabney, Clemon; Ostergaard, Jason; Watkins, Eric; Chen, Changbin

    2016-01-01

    Background The deposition of silicon into epidermal cells of grass species is thought to be an important mechanism that plants use as a defense against pests and environmental stresses. There are a number of techniques available to study the size, density and distribution pattern of silica bodies in grass leaves. However, none of those techniques can provide a high-throughput analysis, especially for a great number of samples. Results We developed a method utilizing the autofluorescence of si...

  3. KARTAWINATA et al: Grass communities on Oahu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    " "

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available For the windward group, there was a significant correlation (TableV only between the amount of rainfall and the order of the plots on theX-axis. It has been shown in the ordination diagram (Fig. 4 that threecommunity types can be recognized, the Rhynchelytrum repens, Melinisminutiflora and Andropogon virginicus community types. The relationshipbetween the change of the grass dominance and the rainfall gradient alongthe X- axis is shown in Fig. 9. In this diagram the X-axis was dividedinto ten segments: 0.0 — 9.9; 10.0 — 19.9; 20.0 — 29.9; 30.0 — 39.9;40.0 — 49.9; 50.0 — 59.9; 60.0 — 69.9; 70.0 — 79.9; 80.0 — 89.9 and90.0 — 100.0. The intervals 20.0 — 39.9 and 50.0 — 69.9 were consideredas individual units because there was only one plot in the intervals20.0 — 29.9 and 50.0 — 59.9, respectively.

  4. Biomass of elephant grass and leucaena for bioenergy production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Sales

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomass production of elephant grass and leucaena in Paraná state, Brazil, for the generation of renewable energy. Two field studies were conducted in the municipality of Ibiporã (23° S, 51° 01?W. In the first study, the dry matter accumulation curves were calculated, with sampling at 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 days after cultivation. The second study was conducted in a randomized complete block design with split plots. The total aboveground biomass production of elephant grass and leucaena was estimated in the main plot. Cutting times of 60 and 120 days after cultivation were evaluated in the subplots. The productivity of dry matter (kg.ha-1 was estimated using the biomass data. In addition, the potential production of energy from the burning of elephant grass biomass, and the potential production of total aboveground biomass and energy of elephant grass (in Paraná was estimated using an agrometeorological model. Elephant grass can be potentially used as an alternative energy source. Leucaena has slow initial growth, and it must therefore be evaluated over a longer period in order to determine its potential. Simulation analyses of the capability of power generation, conducted based on the annual dry matter production, revealed that elephant grass could be an important source of renewable energy in the state of Paraná.

  5. Synergism of Wild Grass and Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacteria in Petroleum Biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuni Gofar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of plants and microbes utilization for remediation measure of pollutant contaminated soil is the newest development in term of petroleum waste management technique. The research objective was to obtain wild grass types and hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria which are capable to synergize in decreasing petroleum concentration within petroleum contaminated soil. This research was conducted in a factorial by using a randomized completely block design. The first factor was wild grass type which were without plant, Tridax procumbens grass and Lepironia mucronata grass. The second factor was hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria type which were without bacterium, single bacterium of Alcaligenes faecalis, single bacterium of Pseudomonas alcaligenes, and mixed bacteria of Alcaligenes faecalis with P. alcaligenes. The results showed that mixed bacteria (A. faecalis and P. alcaligenes were capable to increase the crown and roots dry weights of these two grasses and bacteria population, decreased percentage of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon and had better pH value than that of single bacterium. The highest TPH decrease with magnitude of 70.1% was obtained on the treatment of L. mucronata grass in combination with mixed bacteria.

  6. Biochemical parameters of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) treated with citronella oil (Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor) and its influence on reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Thalita Dos Santos; Wanderley-Teixeira, Valéria; Cunha, Franklin Magliano da; Oliveira, José Vargas de; Dutra, Kamilla de Andrade; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Teixeira, Álvaro Aguiar Coelho

    2016-05-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda is the principal corn pest in Brazil. Searches for new control methods that minimize the adverse effects of synthetic insecticides have initiated a resurgence of the use of botanical insecticides. Citronella oil (a product of Cymbopogon winterianus) is an effective repellent and insecticide. Thus, biochemical profile changes in oil-treated larvae and its influence on reproduction were assessed. Corn leaves dipped in a 50mg/mL concentration were offered to third instar larvae for 24h and assessed in sixth instar to estimate protein, lipid, sugar, and glycogen levels. Adult testes and ovarioles were collected for histological and histochemical analysis 24h after emergence. Number of eggs and hatching rate were also measured. Oil-treated larvae showed an increase in glycogen and a decrease in protein, lipid, and totals sugar content. Control testes exhibited connective tissue lining and cysts with abundant spermatozoids. However, intense peripheral vacuolation and neutral carbohydrates reduction occurred in oil-treated individuals. Control ovarioles showed normal morphologic characteristics. On the other hand, oil-treatment ovarioles showed follicular cell stratification and removal, reduced nurse cell development, reduced yolk quantity, a thinner conjunctiva sheath, and a reduction in proteins and neutral carbohydrates. Eggs derived from oil-treated pairs were unviable. Therefore, sub-lethal doses of citronella oil alters the biochemical profile of S. frugiperda larvae, causing damage to their reproductive histophysiology and results in diminished reproduction or reproductive failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Preparation, Characterization, and Pharmacological Activity of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor (Poaceae) Leaf Essential Oil of β-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Priscila L; Araújo, Adriano A S; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Oliveira, Makson G B; Brito, Renan G; Serafini, Mairim R; Menezes, Paula P; Santos, Marcio R V; Alves, Pericles B; de Lucca Júnior, Waldecy; Blank, Arie F; La Rocca, Viviana; Almeida, Reinaldo N; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the orofacial antinociceptive effect of the Cymbopogon winterianus essential oil (LEO) complexed in β-cyclodextrin (LEO-CD) and to assess the possible involvement of the central nervous system (CNS). The LEO was extracted, chromatographed, and complexed in β-cyclodextrin. The complex was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry derivative (TG/DTG). Male Swiss mice (2-3 months) were treated with LEO-CD (50-200 mg/kg, p.o.), vehicle (distilled water, p.o.), or standard drug (i.p.) and subjected to the orofacial nociception formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced. After the formalin test, the animals were perfused and the brains subjected to immunofluorescence for Fos. The rota-rod test (7 rpm/min) was carried out. Geraniol (37.57%) was the main compound of LEO. DSC and TG/DTG proved the complexation. The orofacial nociceptive behavior was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced. The number of Fos-positive cells was significantly changed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (p < 0.01), locus coeruleus (p < 0.001), trigeminal nucleus (p < 0.05), and trigeminal thalamic tract (p < 0.05). LEO-CD did not cause changes in motor coordination in the rota-rod test. Thus, our results suggested that LEO-CD has an orofacial antinociceptive profile, probably mediated by the activation of the CNS without changing the motor coordination.

  8. Preparation, Characterization, and Pharmacological Activity of Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt ex Bor (Poaceae Leaf Essential Oil of β-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila L. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the orofacial antinociceptive effect of the Cymbopogon winterianus essential oil (LEO complexed in β-cyclodextrin (LEO-CD and to assess the possible involvement of the central nervous system (CNS. The LEO was extracted, chromatographed, and complexed in β-cyclodextrin. The complex was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetry derivative (TG/DTG. Male Swiss mice (2-3 months were treated with LEO-CD (50–200 mg/kg, p.o., vehicle (distilled water, p.o., or standard drug (i.p. and subjected to the orofacial nociception formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced. After the formalin test, the animals were perfused and the brains subjected to immunofluorescence for Fos. The rota-rod test (7 rpm/min was carried out. Geraniol (37.57% was the main compound of LEO. DSC and TG/DTG proved the complexation. The orofacial nociceptive behavior was significantly (p<0.05 reduced. The number of Fos-positive cells was significantly changed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (p<0.01, locus coeruleus (p<0.001, trigeminal nucleus (p<0.05, and trigeminal thalamic tract (p<0.05. LEO-CD did not cause changes in motor coordination in the rota-rod test. Thus, our results suggested that LEO-CD has an orofacial antinociceptive profile, probably mediated by the activation of the CNS without changing the motor coordination.

  9. Post-treatment efficacy of discontinuous treatment with 300IR 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet in adults with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didier, A; Malling, H-J; Worm, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Sustained efficacy over three pollen seasons of pre- and co-seasonal treatment with 300IR 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet has been demonstrated in adults with moderate-severe grass pollen-associated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis....

  10. Serodiagnosis of grass carp reovirus infection in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella by a novel Western blot technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongxing; Jiang, Yousheng; Lu, Liqun

    2013-12-01

    Frequent outbreaks of grass carp hemorrhagic disease, caused by grass carp reovirus (GCRV) infection, pose as serious threats to the production of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. Although various nucleic acids-based diagnostic methods have been shown effective, lack of commercial monoclonal antibody against grass carp IgM has impeded the development of any reliable immunoassays in detection of GCRV infection. The present study describes the preparation and screening of monoclonal antibodies against the constant region of grass carp IgM protein, and the development of a Western blot (WB) protocol for the specific detection of antibodies against outer capsid VP7 protein of GCRV that serves as antibody-capture antigen in the immunoassay. In comparison to a conventional RT-PCR method, validity of the WB is further demonstrated by testing on clinical fish serum samples collected from a grass carp farm in Jiangxi Province during disease pandemic in 2011. In conclusion, the WB technique established in this study could be employed for specific serodiagnosis of GCRV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary Results of Clover and Grass Coverage and Total Dry Matter Estimation in Clover-Grass Crops Using Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders K. Mortensen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The clover-grass ratio is an important factor in composing feed ratios for livestock. Cameras in the field allow the user to estimate the clover-grass ratio using image analysis; however, current methods assume the total dry matter is known. This paper presents the preliminary results of an image analysis method for non-destructively estimating the total dry matter of clover-grass. The presented method includes three steps: (1 classification of image illumination using a histogram of the difference in excess green and excess red; (2 segmentation of clover and grass using edge detection and morphology; and (3 estimation of total dry matter using grass coverage derived from the segmentation and climate parameters. The method was developed and evaluated on images captured in a clover-grass plot experiment during the spring growing season. The preliminary results are promising and show a high correlation between the image-based total dry matter estimate and the harvested dry matter ( R 2 = 0.93 with an RMSE of 210 kg ha − 1 .

  12. Upgraded fuel from reed canary grass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiskanen, V.P.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of RCG for commercial utilization depends primarily on its applicability for pulp production and its use in energy production will be based on the residue that will be available after extracting the pulp fraction of the RCG. Roughly 20 ..30% of the material will be available for energy production purposes. However, the percentage may be higher/lower depending on the quality standards of the pulp fiber material. The harvesting period has a significant effect on the fuel characteristics of RCG. For instance the contents of N, S, Cl, K are clearly lower if the RCG is harvested in the spring (delayed) instead of summer/autumn. These elements affect significantly overall emission formation and ash behaviour and its melting temperature. The combustion related research in this project has been focused on the spring-harvested RCG. The project aims to evaluate the feasibility of delayed harvested RCG for energy production. In order to reach this goal, the following combustion methods will be tested and studied: combustion of pelletized RCG; gasification; combustion of pulverized RCG. In addition, pelletizing, reactivity and NO conversion of pulverized RCG will be studied. The research described here is a part of `Reed Canary Grass` project (in AIR programme). The contractors of the project are Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (coordinator), United Milling Systems from Denmark, Jaakko Poeyry Oy and VTT Energy. In addition, there are partners from several countries participating in the project. The project has been divided in five tasks, VTT Energy being responsible for combustion related task `Upgraded fuel` that includes the research topics discussed in this paper

  13. GRASS GIS: The first Open Source Temporal GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbert, Sören; Leppelt, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    GRASS GIS is a full featured, general purpose Open Source geographic information system (GIS) with raster, 3D raster and vector processing support[1]. Recently, time was introduced as a new dimension that transformed GRASS GIS into the first Open Source temporal GIS with comprehensive spatio-temporal analysis, processing and visualization capabilities[2]. New spatio-temporal data types were introduced in GRASS GIS version 7, to manage raster, 3D raster and vector time series. These new data types are called space time datasets. They are designed to efficiently handle hundreds of thousands of time stamped raster, 3D raster and vector map layers of any size. Time stamps can be defined as time intervals or time instances in Gregorian calendar time or relative time. Space time datasets are simplifying the processing and analysis of large time series in GRASS GIS, since these new data types are used as input and output parameter in temporal modules. The handling of space time datasets is therefore equal to the handling of raster, 3D raster and vector map layers in GRASS GIS. A new dedicated Python library, the GRASS GIS Temporal Framework, was designed to implement the spatio-temporal data types and their management. The framework provides the functionality to efficiently handle hundreds of thousands of time stamped map layers and their spatio-temporal topological relations. The framework supports reasoning based on the temporal granularity of space time datasets as well as their temporal topology. It was designed in conjunction with the PyGRASS [3] library to support parallel processing of large datasets, that has a long tradition in GRASS GIS [4,5]. We will present a subset of more than 40 temporal modules that were implemented based on the GRASS GIS Temporal Framework, PyGRASS and the GRASS GIS Python scripting library. These modules provide a comprehensive temporal GIS tool set. The functionality range from space time dataset and time stamped map layer management

  14. How much gas can we get from grass?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizami, A.S.; Orozco, A.; Groom, E.; Dieterich, B.; Murphy, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We highlight the various results for biomethane potential that may be obtained from the same grass silage. ► The results indicated that methane potential varied from 350 to 493 L CH 4 kg −1 VS added for three different BMP procedures. ► We compare two distinct digestion systems using the same grass. ► A two stage wet system achieved 451 L CH 4 kg −1 VS added over a 50 day retention period. ► A two phase system achieved 341 L CH 4 kg −1 VS added at a 30 day retention time. -- Abstract: Grass biomethane has been shown to be a sustainable gaseous transport biofuel, with a good energy balance, and significant potential for economic viability. Of issue for the designer is the variation in characteristics of the grass depending on location of source, time of cut and species. Further confusion arises from the biomethane potential tests (BMP) which have a tendency to give varying results. This paper has dual ambitions. One of these is to highlight the various results for biomethane potential that may be obtained from the same grass silage. The results indicated that methane potential from the same grass silage varied from 350 to 493 L CH 4 kg −1 VS added for three different BMP procedures. The second ambition is to attempt to compare two distinct digestion systems again using the same grass: a two stage continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR); and a sequentially fed leach bed reactor connected to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (SLBR–UASB). The two engineered systems were designed, fabricated, commissioned and operated at small pilot scale until stable optimal operating conditions were reached. The CSTR system achieved 451 L CH 4 kg −1 VS added over a 50 day retention period. The SLBR–UASB achieved 341 L CH 4 kg −1 VS added at a 30 day retention time.

  15. Natural geo-composites for grassing of eroded and degraded lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroumov Victor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Original, natural grass geocomposites (sods were developed on the basis of combination from unstuffy, needle-drive textile material, geo-net and soil-manure-peat or peat with grass cover from grass mixtures. The natural grass geocomposites have the next priorities: quickly grassing and reinforcing of eroded and degraded terrains; large uniformity and compactness of grass cove; long exploiting period; grassing of terrains with big slopes where the mechanization is difficult to use; the articles are with low mass, small thickness and high stability; they limit the growing of weed. The natural grass geocomposites are intend for control of soil erosion and reconstruction of natural landshaft. They can to reinforce ditches, grass collectors, side of the road slopes, as well as lay out lawn, parks, stadiums, ski racing tourist's beauty spot, etc.

  16. Results from the 5-year SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet asthma prevention (GAP) trial in children with grass pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Petersen, Thomas H; Piotrowska, Teresa; Laursen, Mette K; Andersen, Jens S; Sørensen, Helle F; Klink, Rabih

    2018-02-01

    Allergy immunotherapy targets the immunological cause of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma and has the potential to alter the natural course of allergic disease. The primary objective was to investigate the effect of the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet compared with placebo on the risk of developing asthma. A total of 812 children (5-12 years), with a clinically relevant history of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and no medical history or signs of asthma, were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, comprising 3 years of treatment and 2 years of follow-up. There was no difference in time to onset of asthma, defined by prespecified asthma criteria relying on documented reversible impairment of lung function (primary endpoint). Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet significantly reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms or using asthma medication at the end of trial (odds ratio = 0.66, P year posttreatment follow-up, and during the entire 5-year trial period. Also, grass allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms were 22% to 30% reduced (P years). At the end of the trial, the use of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis pharmacotherapy was significantly less (27% relative difference to placebo, P < .001). Total IgE, grass pollen-specific IgE, and skin prick test reactivity to grass pollen were all reduced compared to placebo. Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms and using asthma medication, and had a positive, long-term clinical effect on rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication use but did not show an effect on the time to onset of asthma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel method to characterize silica bodies in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Clemon; Ostergaard, Jason; Watkins, Eric; Chen, Changbin

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of silicon into epidermal cells of grass species is thought to be an important mechanism that plants use as a defense against pests and environmental stresses. There are a number of techniques available to study the size, density and distribution pattern of silica bodies in grass leaves. However, none of those techniques can provide a high-throughput analysis, especially for a great number of samples. We developed a method utilizing the autofluorescence of silica bodies to investigate their size and distribution, along with the number of carbon inclusions within the silica bodies of perennial grass species Koeleria macrantha. Fluorescence images were analyzed by image software Adobe Photoshop CS5 or ImageJ that remarkably facilitated the quantification of silica bodies in the dry ash. We observed three types of silica bodies or silica body related mineral structures. Silica bodies were detected on both abaxial and adaxial epidermis of K. macrantha leaves, although their sizes, density, and distribution patterns were different. No auto-fluorescence was detected from carbon inclusions. The combination of fluorescence microscopy and image processing software displayed efficient utilization in the identification and quantification of silica bodies in K. macrantha leaf tissues, which should applicable to biological, ecological and geological studies of grasses including forage, turf grasses and cereal crops.

  18. Ensilage of tropical grasses mixed with legumes and molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandraatmadja, M; Norton, B W; Mac Rae, I C

    1994-01-01

    The effects of adding two legumes, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala, cv. Cunningham, and molasses on the fermentation characteristics of silages made from two tropical grasses (Pangola grass, Digitaria decumbens, and Setaria sphacelata cv. Kazungula) were investigated. Pangola grass silages contained significantly higher contents of water-soluble carbohydrates and lactic acid than did setaria silages after 100 days fermentation, but there were no significant differences between the two silages in populations of lactic acid bacteria and contents of total N and NH3-N. Addition of either species of legume had no significant effect on fermentation acids and NH3-N contents, and numbers of lactic acid bacteria. Addition of both legumes reduced NH3-N production in the silages by 59% after 5 days' fermentation. Numbers of lactic acid bacteria were not significantly affected by the different treatments. Enterococcus faecalis represented 60% of the lactic acid bacteria isolated from the treated herbages prior to ensiling. By 100 days of fermentation, only lactobacilli were isolated: 82% homo-fermenters and 18% hetero-fermenters. Lactobacillus mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum was found only in the silage supplemented with 33% (w/w) legume. It was concluded that the low quality of tropical grasses used as feeds for ruminants may be significantly improved by ensiling these grasses with small amounts of molasses and with high-protein tree leaves.

  19. Grass meristems II: inflorescence architecture, flower development and meristem fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Wakana; Pautler, Michael; Jackson, David; Hirano, Hiro-Yuki

    2013-03-01

    Plant development depends on the activity of various types of meristems that generate organs such as leaves and floral organs throughout the life cycle. Grass species produce complex inflorescences and unique flowers. The grass inflorescence is composed of different types of branches, including a specialized branch called a spikelet. The spikelet is a special unit of the inflorescence and forms one to several florets, depending on the species. In the floret, floral organs such as perianth organs, carpels and stamens are formed. In Arabidopsis, because the inflorescence meristem (IM) forms the floral meristems (FMs) directly on its flanks, the change of meristem fate is relatively simple. In contrast, in grasses, different types of meristem, such as the IM, the branch meristem (BM), the spikelet pair meristem (SPM) in some grasses, the spikelet meristem (SM) and the FM, are responsible for the elaboration of their complex inflorescences and flowers. Therefore, sequential changes of meristem fate are required, and a number of genes involved in the specification of the fate of each meristem have been identified. In this review, we focus on the following issues concerning the fate of the reproductive meristems in two grass species, maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa): (i) meristem regulation during inflorescence development; (ii) specification and fate change of the BM and the SM; (iii) determinacy of the FM; and (iv) communication between the meristem and lateral organs.

  20. Designing hybrid grass genomes to control runoff generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, C.; Binley, A.; Humphreys, M.; King, I. P.; O'Donovan, S.; Papadopoulos, A.; Turner, L. B.; Watts, C.; Whalley, W. R.; Haygarth, P.

    2010-12-01

    Sustainable management of water in landscapes requires balancing demands of agricultural production whilst moderating downstream effects like flooding. Pasture comprises 69% of global agricultural areas and is essential for producing food and fibre alongside environmental goods and services. Thus there is a need to breed forage grasses that deliver multiple benefits through increased levels of productivity whilst moderating fluxes of water. Here we show that a novel grass hybrid that combines the entire genomes of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne - the grass of choice for Europe’s forage agriculture) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis) has a significant role in flood prevention. Field plot experiments established differences in runoff generation with the hybrid cultivar reducing runoff by 50% compared to perennial ryegrass cultivar, and by 35% compared to a meadow fescue cultivar (34 events over two years, replicated randomized-block design, statistically significant differences). This important research outcome was the result of a project that combined plant genetics, soil physics and plot scale hydrology to identify novel grass genotypes that can reduce runoff from grassland systems. Through a coordinated series of experiments examining effects from the gene to plot scale, we have identified that the rapid growth and then turnover of roots in the L. perenne x F. pratensis hybrid is likely to be a key mechanism in reducing runoff generation. More broadly this is an exciting first step to realizing the potential to design grass genomes to achieve both food production, and to deliver flood control, a key ecosystem service.

  1. Productivity and nutritional quality of Flechinha grass ( Echinolaena inflexa , native grass of Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Rocha e Silveira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Due to scarce nutritional data, this study assessed the productivity and nutritional value of Echinolaena inflexa (EI grass, native to the Cerrado biome. It was compared to B. brizantha (BB, one of the most cultivated grasses in Brazil, during a whole year (rainy; RS and dry season; DS. Sampling was held in accordance with pasture management (entry / exit height; 50 / 5cm and 80 / 25cm for EI and BB, respectively. Dry matter production (DMP, crude protein (CP, neutral and acid detergent fiber (NDF; ADF, hemicellulose (HCEL, PB insoluble neutral and acid detergent (PIDN; PIDA, total and non-fibrous carbohydrates (TC; NFC, ether extract (EE, and mineral matter (MM, and in vitro fermentation kinetics and DM degradability (DMD were evaluated. A completely randomized design (season as a fixed term and average treatment compared by Tukey post test were applied. EI produced 38.5% of the DMP of BB. A higher CP (75.3; 73.5 in the RS and DS, PIDA (12.5; 8.7, PIDN (47.1; 40.1, NDF (714.4; 749.5 and ADF (396.0; 419.0 were obtained by EI in relation to BB (CP (60.3; 33.5, PIDA (6.0; 3.5, PIDN (21.4; 10.8, NDF (673.0; 675.1 and ADF (335.5; 351.4 during the RS and DS, respectively (g kg-1 DM. In vitro data were directly associated with chemical composition, resulting in lower DMD of EI compared to BB. EI showed productive similarity (DMP during RS and DS (939.3; 809.8kg DM respectively. Although EI showed greater nutritional stability (CP between seasons, 17% of CP was linked to ADF and therefore, not available for rumen microorganisms.

  2. Ensiling as pretreatment of grass for lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambye-Jensen, Morten

    an efficient production of ethanol. Lastly, the conversion of xylan was extremely low in both grass and grass silage. Optimization of the enzymatic saccharification of grass was attempted through improvement of the hemicellulase content in the enzyme blend. However, neither additional xylanases (Cellic HTec2......Development of sound technologies of biomass conversion will be increasingly important for many years to come as planetary bounderies drive the development towards a biobased society. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is, in this regard, an essential technology. Current pretreatment methods...... method with low cost and low energy requirements, plus brings about multiple advantages with regards to agricultural management. However, the pretreatment effect of ensiling, and the overall effects for further conversion are limited. In this study, ensiling was evaluated as a method of pretreatment...

  3. Lemon grass oil for improvement of oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruckmani Rajesvari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemon grass essential oil has been used for decades to treat respiratory infections, sinusitis, bladder infections, high cholesterol, digestive problem, varicose veins and also for regeneration of connective tissue. It has anti spasmodic, anti-pyretic, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-septic, insect repellent, sedative, vasodilator and flavoring properties. In china, it has been used traditionally as a remedy for stomach and liver diseases and also to treat rheumatism. Since lemon grass oil possess various pharmacological actions, it is also quite useful in dentistry. Hence, the objective of this article is to highlight various uses of lemon grass oil in the dental field and in the medical field in order to aid the professionals for future research.

  4. Proliferating effect of radiolytically depolymerized carrageenan on physiological attributes, plant water relation parameters, essential oil production and active constituents of Cymbopogon flexuosus Steud. under drought stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minu Singh

    Full Text Available Carrageenan has been proved as potent growth promoting substance in its depolymerized form. However, relatively little is known about its role in counteracting the adverse effects of drought stress on plants. In a pot experiment, lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus Steud., grown under different water stress regimes [(100% field capacity (FC, 80% FC and 60% FC], was sprayed with 40, 80 and 120 mg L-1 of gamma irradiated carrageenan (ICA. Foliar application of ICA mitigated the harmful effects of drought stress to various extents and improved the biochemical characteristics, quality attributes and active constituents (citral and geraniol of lemongrass significantly. Among the applied treatments, ICA-80 mg L-1 proved the best in alleviating detrimental effects of drought. However, drought stress (80 and 60% FC, irrespective of the growth stages, had an adverse impact on most of the studied attributes. Generally, 60% FC proved more deleterious than 80% FC. At 80% FC, application of ICA-80 mg L-1 elevated the essential oil (EO content by 18.9 and 25%, citral content by 7.33 and 8.19% and geraniol content by 9.2 and 8.9% at 90 and 120 days after planting (DAP, respectively, as compared to the deionized-water (DW spray treatment (80% FC+ DW. Whereas, at 60% FC, foliar application of 80 mg L-1 ICA significantly augmented the EO content by 15.4 and 17.8% and active constituents viz. citral and geraniol, by 5.01 and 5.62% and by 6.06 and 5.61% at 90 and 120 DAP, respectively, as compared to the control (water-spray treatment.

  5. Applicability of citronella oil (Cymbopogon winteratus) for the prevention of mosquito-borne diseases in the rural area of Tikapur, far-western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajo, Ma Easter Joy; Song, Soon-Bong; Bajgai, Johny; Kim, Young-Je; Kim, Pan-Suk; Ahn, Dong-Won; Khanal, Narendra; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are a serious global problem, particularly in tropical and sub-tropical countries such as Nepal. Citronella oil is a natural mosquito repellent as well as a local fragrance in Nepal, which is accessible at very low cost because citronella plants are widely cultivated in rural areas of the Terai belt in Nepal. This study was conducted using a real-life randomized controlled pilot trial to confirm the effectiveness and applicability of locally-produced citronella oil as a mosquito repellent for the prevention of mosquito-borne diseases in Nepal. A repellency activity test was performed with 100% citronella oil (Cymbopogon winteratus) from April to May 2013 in the Tikapur Municipality of the Kailali district, Nepal. The test was divided into two trials: an indoor exposure (IE) test (N=101) and an outdoor exposure (OE) test (N=140) from 5.00 pm to 7.00 pm. Each trial contained an experimental citronella oil-applied group and a non-applied (control) group. The outcome measures were the protective effect of citronella oil against mosquitoes, the number of mosquito bites, the repellency percentage, the smell satisfaction and the irritation level. Experimental group had a significant protective effect against mosquito bites in IE (96.5%, n=57) and OE (95.7%, n=70) tests compared to the control group in IE (29.5%, n=44) and OE (28.6%, n=70) tests (experimental vs control groups, pcitronella oil can be employed as an easily-available, affordable and effective alternative mosquito repellent to prevent mosquito-borne diseases in rural areas such as Tikapur, Nepal.

  6. Novel insights into structure-function mechanism and tissue-specific expression profiling of full-length dxr gene from Cymbopogon winterianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Dehury, Budheswar; Phukon, Munmi; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    The 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR; EC1.1.1.267), an NADPH-dependent reductase, plays a pivotal role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP), in the conversion of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) into MEP. The sheath and leaf of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) accumulates large amount of terpenes and sesquiterpenes with proven medicinal value and economic uses. Thus, sequencing of full length dxr gene and its characterization seems to be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering to alter the flux of isoprenoid active ingredients in plants. In this study, full length DXR from citronella was characterized through in silico and tissue-specific expression studies to explain its structure-function mechanism, mode of cofactor recognition and differential expression. The modelled DXR has a three-domain architecture and its active site comprised of a cofactor (NADPH) binding pocket and the substrate-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that DXR model retained most of its secondary structure during 10 ns simulation in aqueous solution. The modelled DXR superimposes well with its closest structural homolog but subtle variations in the charge distribution over the cofactor recognition site were noticed. Molecular docking study revealed critical residues aiding tight anchoring NADPH within the active pocket of DXR. Tissue-specific differential expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR in various tissues of citronella plant revealed distinct differential expression of DXR. To our knowledge, this is the first ever report on DXR from the important medicinal plant citronella and further characterization of this gene will open up better avenues for metabolic engineering of secondary metabolite pathway genes from medicinal plants in the near future.

  7. Novel insights into structure–function mechanism and tissue-specific expression profiling of full-length dxr gene from Cymbopogon winterianus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Dehury, Budheswar; Phukon, Munmi; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    The 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR; EC1.1.1.267), an NADPH-dependent reductase, plays a pivotal role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP), in the conversion of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) into MEP. The sheath and leaf of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) accumulates large amount of terpenes and sesquiterpenes with proven medicinal value and economic uses. Thus, sequencing of full length dxr gene and its characterization seems to be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering to alter the flux of isoprenoid active ingredients in plants. In this study, full length DXR from citronella was characterized through in silico and tissue-specific expression studies to explain its structure–function mechanism, mode of cofactor recognition and differential expression. The modelled DXR has a three-domain architecture and its active site comprised of a cofactor (NADPH) binding pocket and the substrate-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that DXR model retained most of its secondary structure during 10 ns simulation in aqueous solution. The modelled DXR superimposes well with its closest structural homolog but subtle variations in the charge distribution over the cofactor recognition site were noticed. Molecular docking study revealed critical residues aiding tight anchoring NADPH within the active pocket of DXR. Tissue-specific differential expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR in various tissues of citronella plant revealed distinct differential expression of DXR. To our knowledge, this is the first ever report on DXR from the important medicinal plant citronella and further characterization of this gene will open up better avenues for metabolic engineering of secondary metabolite pathway genes from medicinal plants in the near future. PMID:25941629

  8. Variations of Roughness Coefficients with Flow Depth of Grassed Swale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaffa, N.; Ahmad, N. A.; Razi, M. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Grassed swales are the best management practice (BMP), which has been widely used to reduce the peak flow, reduce water pollution through vegetated filtration, and improve the groundwater recharge. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) is using the approach of grassed swales recommended by the Department of Irrigation and Drainage Malaysia (DID) for reducing the risk of flooding and controlling the water pollution. This paper investigates the variations of roughness coefficients with the flow depth of grassed swales in the campus of UTHM. Fieldwork was carried out on the grassed swale to collect the hydraulic data, which including the levelling work, measuring the flow depth and flow velocity of the swale. The flow depth of swale was taken at three points divided along the width of swale and the flow velocity is captured three times at each of the point. The variations of roughness coefficients of grassed swales are presented in Manning's equation, and the results reveal that the n value increases with the increasing of flow depth. Manning's coefficient value found in this study is in the range of 0.110 to 0.756, which are higher than the value proposed by the Urban Stormwater Management Manual for Malaysia (MSMA). The relationships of flow depth and velocity at each section of the swale are portrayed in graphs, which show that the velocity increases with the decreasing of flow depth. The outcomes of this study can be concluded that the variation of Manning's coefficient value is influenced by the swale profile, flow depth, flow velocity, and as well as the vegetation used in the grassed swale concerned.

  9. Avaliação do teor e composição do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon nardus (L. em diferentes épocas de colheita Evaluation of content and composition of the essential oil of Cymbopogon nardus (L. in different harvest times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Guilhon de Castro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou analisar o teor e a composição do óleo essencial do Cymbopogon nardus, em cinco épocas de colheita no Estado do Tocantins. As colheitas foram realizadas em cinco épocas em intervalos regulares de 28 dias, sendo a primeira aos 56 dias e a última aos 168 dias após transplante. A extração do óleo essencial foi realizada por hidrodestilação e a identificação dos componentes por CG e CG/EM. Os maiores teores de óleo essencial foram obtidos na segunda época de colheita (1,10% e na última época de colheita (1,07%. Foram identificados vinte e três compostos químicos no óleo essencial. Os monoterpenos identificados foram: limoneno, linalol, isopulegol, citronelal, citronelol, neral, geraniol, acetato de citronelol e acetato de geraniol. Os sesquiterpenos identificados foram: beta-elemeno, germacreno, alfa-muroleno, gama-cadineno, delta-cadineno, elemol, germacreno D-4-OL, óxido de cariofileno, tau-cadinol, beta-eudesmol e alfa-eudesmol. Os compostos majoritários do óleo essencial foram o citronelol, o geraniol e o elemol.This study aimed to analyze the content and the composition of the essential oil of Cymbopogon nardus in five harvest times in Tocantins State. Five harvesting were carried out in regular space of 28 days, the first in 56 days and the last in 168 days after transplanting. The essential oil was obtained by hydro distillation and the identification of the oil components by GC and GC/MS. The highest contents of the essential oil were obtained in the second harvest time (1.15% and in the last harvest time (1.07%. Twenty three chemical compounds were identified in the essential oil. The monoterpenes identified were: limonene, linalool, isopulegol, citronellal, citronellol, neral, geraniol, citronellol acetate and geraniol acetate. The sesquiterpenes identified were: beta-elemene, germacrene, alpha-muurolene, gamma-cadinene, delta-cadinene, elemol, germacrene D-4-OL, caryophyllene oxide, tau

  10. Growth and use of energy grasses as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    This summary outlines the main conclusions of the project which aims to provide information on the growth, yields, and combustion characteristics of Miscanthus, switchgrass, Spartina, rye, and reed canary grass. Details are given of the small-plot trials of the non-wood biomass fuels, the planting, pests and diseases, the falling over of crops, the time of harvest, moisture content, yields, combustion trials, fuel and ash characterisation, and costs/income. Tables are provided illustrating the cumulative yield, the costs of the different species of energy grasses, and the annual mean gross margins over 5, 10, 15, and 20 years.

  11. Determination of 90Sr in grass and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajo, S.; Keil, R.

    1994-10-01

    A radiochemical method for the determination of 90 Sr in non-contaminated grass and soil is presented. The method is based on the leaching of 90 Sr from the mineralized samples followed by liquid-liquid extraction of 90 Y, its short lived daughter, by tributylphosphate and precipitation of Y-oxalate, which is counted in a low-level proportional counter. Based on dried samples of 30 g of soil and 100 g of grass the limit of detection is about 0.1 Bq/kg for both materials. (author) figs., tabs., 43 refs

  12. Results from the 5-year SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet asthma prevention (GAP) trial in children with grass pollen allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Petersen, Thomas H; Piotrowska, Teresa

    2018-01-01

    compared with placebo on the risk of developing asthma. METHODS: A total of 812 children (5-12 years), with a clinically relevant history of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and no medical history or signs of asthma, were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial......, comprising 3 years of treatment and 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS: There was no difference in time to onset of asthma, defined by prespecified asthma criteria relying on documented reversible impairment of lung function (primary endpoint). Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet...... significantly reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms or using asthma medication at the end of trial (odds ratio = 0.66, P year posttreatment follow-up, and during the entire 5-year trial period. Also, grass allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms were 22% to 30% reduced (P

  13. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques for grass nutrient estimations in savannah ecosystems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available at various scales such as local, regional and global scale. Traditional field techniques to measure grass nutrient concentration have been reported to be laborious and time consuming. Remote sensing techniques provide opportunity to map grass nutrient...

  14. Determinação da qualidade microbiológica e físico-química de chás de Cymbopogon citratus (D.C Stapf (capim-limão - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i1.4396 Evaluation of the microbiological and physical-chemical qualities of lemongrass tea - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i1.4396

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rejane Bonato Negrelle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Em função do grande volume de produção e comercialização do capim-limão, estima-se que uma contaminação microbiológica deste produto possa representar importante risco para a saúde pública. Esta pesquisa visou avaliar marcas de chá de capim-limão, em relação às qualidades microbiológica e físico-química, tendo como base a legislação brasileira do Ministério da Saúde. Nenhuma das amostras apresentou Salmonella sp, porém em 50% delas, houve presença de coliformes a 35ºC. Em três amostras, evidenciaram-se coliformes a 45ºC, com presença de Escherichia coli em uma destas. 81,25% das amostras apresentaram bolores e leveduras, porém sem relação direta com os teores de umidade observados. Dentre os fungos presentes, identificou-se Aspergillus niger, no entanto sem produção de aflatoxinas. Todos infusos analisados negativaram a contaminação evidenciada nos testes com o produto seco. Os resultados indicaram possíveis falhas nos procedimentos pós-colheita e de comercialização. A implementação do Sistema APPCC (HACCP poderia substancialmente minimizar esta contaminação.Considering the great volume of lemongrass production and commercialization, it is estimated that a potential microbiological contamination of this product could represent an important hazard to public health. This study was performed to evaluate different brands of lemongrass tea, regarding their microbiological and physical-chemical quality, based on the legislation of the Brazilian Health Ministry. No traces of Salmonella sp were found, but in 50% of samples, the presence of coliforms was detected at 35ºC. Three samples presented coliforms at 45ºC, with Escherichia coli found in one of them. 81.25% of samples presented molds and yeasts. Among the fungi present, Aspergillus niger was identified, but aflatoxins were absent. None of the infusions analyzed presented the contamination evidenced in the dry product. The results obtained may be indicative of failure in procedures of postharvest and commercialization. The implementation of a hazard analysis and critical control point system (HACCP could reduce this contamination substantially.

  15. Development of Alternative Overtopping-Resistant Sea Defences, Phase 2 : Elaboration of Smart Grass Reinforcement Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; Van Gerven, K.A.J.; Van der Meer, J.W.; Van Heereveld, M.A.; Akkerman, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the present report, a Smart Grass Reinforcement for overtopping resistant sea defences is elaborated on a theoretical basis, within the framework of ComCoast, Work Package 3 (WP3). The smart grass revetment concept aims at strengthening the present grass revetments at the crests and inners slopes

  16. Tensile fracture properties of seven tropical grasses at different phenological stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.A.A.; Scheper, J.A.; Benvenutti, M.A.; Gordon, I.J.; Poppi, D.P.; Elgersma, A.

    2011-01-01

    The intake of forage grasses by grazing ruminants is closely related to the mechanical fracture properties of grasses. The relationship between the tensile fracture properties of grasses and foraging behaviour is of particular importance in tropical reproductive swards composed of both stems and

  17. Role of ammonia and biogenic amines in intake of grass silage by ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van M.

    1997-01-01

    In Northern- and Western-Europe, grass silage is a major component in winter feeding rations for ruminants. The intake of ensiled grass is often lower than the intake of hay or the fresh grass of similar digestibility. This intake depression is attributed to the fermentation products

  18. Effect of fire intensity on the grass and bush components of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results provide valuable guidelines for the use of fire in controlling bush encroachment. Keywords: Bush; Bush encroachment; Eastern Cape; effect of fire; Fire; Fire intensity; fire regime; Grass; grass sward; grasses; recovery; Savanna; south africa; Thornveld; Vegetation recovery; Veld burning. Journal of the Grassland ...

  19. A review on foggage in the central grass veld with special reference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is clear from these results that Smuts finger grass can play an important role during the winter period as animal feed. Keywords: afrikaans; animal production; digitaria eriantha; foggage; grasses; grazing capacity; literature review; management; semi-arid regions; smuts fingergrass; tropical grass; western transvaal ...

  20. Impact on Clover-Grass Yield from Wheel Load and Tyre Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn

    2009-01-01

    Traffic intensities have been shown to have a negative influence on the yield of grass and clover. A full scale grass-clover field trial was established to estimate the effect on clover-grass yields as a function of different wheel loads and tire pressures. The trial comprised 16 different traffi...

  1. Reduction in clover-grass yield caused by different traffic intensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Kristensen, Kristian

    Different traffic intensities have been shown to have a negative influence on the yield of grass and clover. A full scale grass-clover field trial was established to estimate the effect on clover-grass yields as a function of different wheel loads and tire pressures. The trial comprised 16 differ...

  2. Genetic variability and relationship between MT-1 elephant grass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    College of Agriculture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, People's Republic of China. Abstract. Genetic variability and relationships among elephant grass cultivars were estimated by the SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism) assay. A total of 60 individuals collected from five cultivars in ...

  3. Identification of Radical Scavengers in Sweet Grass (Hierochloe odorata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pukalskas, A.; Beek, van T.A.; Venskutonis, R.P.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Veldhuizen, van A.; Groot, de Æ.

    2002-01-01

    Extracts from aerial parts of sweet grass (Hierochloe odorata) were active DPPH free radical scavengers, The active compounds were detected in extract fractions using HPLC with on-line radical scavenging detection. After multistep fractionation of the extract, two new natural products possessing

  4. The potential of C4 grasses for cellulosic biofuel production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijde, van der R.T.; Alvim Kamei, C.L.; Torres Salvador, A.F.; Vermerris, W.; Dolstra, O.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of biorefinery technologies enabling plant biomass to be processed into biofuel, many researchers set out to study and improve candidate biomass crops. Many of these candidates are C4 grasses, characterized by a high productivity and resource use efficiency. In this review the

  5. INTAKE AND DIGESTIBILITY OF LOW QUALITY RHODES GRASS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted at Bunda College, Malawi, to determine the effect of magadi (a sodium sesquicarbonate- Na2CO3, NaHCO3.2H2O) treated forages on their intake and digestibility and growth of sheep. Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana Kunth), Cedrela (Toona ciliata, M. Roem) and Sesbania [Sesbania sesban ...

  6. International Education in Japan: Response of the Grass-Eaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Walter

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the reasons why a majority of Japanese university students are not interested in study-abroad, international-education type programs. A general consensus in Japan is that disinterest in studying abroad is reflective of the values held by many Japanese young people, often referred to as the "grass-eating"…

  7. Assessment of some macromineral concentration of a grass/ legume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The assessment of macromineral concentration of Panicum/Stylosanthes mixtures was carried out at the Cattle Production Venture, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, in Southwest Nigeria. The study aimed to determine the concentration of some macromineral elements in the grass/legume pasture grazed by the ...

  8. Grass species selection patterns on rotationally-grazed Dohne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herbaceous species preference was studied during autumn and winter periods of occupation, on rotationally-grazed Dohne Sourveld, at four different stocking rates. Reports on species selection by cattle and sheep grazing together. Illustrates with graphsLanguage: English. Keywords: Grass species; Herbage availibility; ...

  9. Carcass mass gains of steers grazing star grass, with different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carcass mass gains of steers grazing dryland Cynodon aethiopicus cv. No. 2 Star grass pastures during the growing season were determined for each of 16 treatments comprising four levels of nitrogen fertilisation in combination with four overlapping sets of stocking rates. The treatments were repeated over four growing ...

  10. Environmental control of flowering in tropical - subtropical grasses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical-subtropical grasses have shown a wide range of response to photoperiod. Some of the response patterns which they exhibit are extremely complex and often seem unrelated to the conditions to which the plants are adapted. However, there is an increasing realisation of the possible role of factors of the ...

  11. Short Communication: Habitat preferences of twenty-three grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some grass species occur more frequently in certain habitats than in others, but uncertainty as to exactly which factors are responsible for this phenomenon exist. Species composition as well as habitat data were collected from plots situated on the mild slopes of the study area, and the data were analysed by means of a ...

  12. A new grass frog from Namibia | Channing | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new species of grass frog of lhe genus Ptychadena is described from northern Namibia. Although superficially similar to Ptychadena schillukorum and Ptychadena mossambica, the new species differs In advertisement call, and external characters. An examination of a series of published sonagrams indicates that ...

  13. Grass-roots approach: developing qualified nuclear personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power plants experiencing personnel recruitment problems are trying a grass-roots approach to increase the manpower pool. The Philadelphia Electric Co. and the Toledo Edison Co. are working with local educational institutions to offer nuclear-technology training specific to the needs of nuclear plants. The utilities' investment covers much of the cost of instruction as well as continued training for employees

  14. Book Review: Grasses and Grazers of Botswana and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: Grasses and Grazers of Botswana and the Surrounding Savanna. Book Author: Veronica Roodt. 2015, Struik Publishers, PO Box 1144, Cape Town 8001, South Africa. 344 pages, softcover. ISBN 978-1-775-84115-9. Price R290.00 ...

  15. On the seed production of tropical grasses in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman, J.G.

    1973-01-01

    The small amount of viable seed that can be harvested from tropical ley grasses such as Chloris gayana, Setaria sphacelata and Panicum spp. is largely due to the wide range in maturity between different heads and in maturity between seeds in any head. Ripe seed is also liable

  16. Evapotranspiration and water use efficiency of different grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evapotranspiration (Et) and water use efficiency (WUE) were determined for each of seven grass species during the 1986/87 seasons. The highest and lowest mean daily Et of 2, 39 and 1, 66 mm were recorded respectively for Themeda triandra and Sporobolus fimbriatus. Between species, the average Et for the two ...

  17. Soil water use by Ceanothus velutinus and two grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Lopushinsky; G.O. Klock

    1990-01-01

    Seasonal trends of soil water content in plots of snowbrush (Ceanothus velutinus Dougl.), orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata L), and pinegrass (Calamagrostis rubes- cens Buckl.) and in bare plots were measured on a burned-over forest watershed in north-central Washington. A comparison of soil water contents at depths of 12, 24,...

  18. January 1977 The punctated grass-mouse, Lemniscomys striatus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STRIATUS IN THE RUWENZORI NATIONAL PARK, UGANDA (RODENTIA: MURIDAE). B R NEAL-. Department of Zoology, University of Southampton. Accepted: January 1977. ABSTRACT. A total of 730 puncta ted grass-mice was dissected to study their biology. Breeding occurred during the rains and ceased during the ...

  19. Preemergence herbicides on weed control in elephant grass pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Magno Brighenti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum. is an important forage crop that has been proposed as a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. However, weed interference is a major factor limiting elephant grass production. Field experiments were conducted in 2014 and 2015 to evaluate preemergence herbicides for selective weed control in an elephant grass pasture. Herbicide treatments included atrazine + S-metolachlor, atrazine + simazine, ametryn, ethoxysulfuron, S-metolachlor, diuron + hexazinone, sulfentrazone, imazethapyr, and atrazine at label use rates. Weedy and weed-free treatments were included. Atrazine + S-metolachlor, atrazine + simazine, ametryn, ethoxysulfuron, S-metolachlor, sulfentrazone, and atrazine did not cause phytotoxicity on elephantgrass 35 days after treatment (DAT. However, diuron + hexazinone and imazethapyr were the most phytotoxic on elephantgrass, resulting in 81 and 70% phytotoxicity in 2014, and 7 and 6% phytotoxicity in 2015 respectively 35 DAT. All treatments provided effective weed control (>81% with the exception of ethoxysulfuron (0 and 11% in 2014 and 2015, respectively, and atrazine (59% in 2014. These results show that atrazine + S-metolachlor, atrazine + simazine, ametryn, ethoxysulfuron, S-metolachlor, sulfentrazone, and atrazine were selectives when applied in preemergence in elephant grass pasture.

  20. Digestion and nitrogen metabolism of grass fed dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuuren, van A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, young, highly digestible grass was considered an ideal feed for dairy cows. However, research during the last decades has shown that the nutrient supply of grazing animals is insufficient for milk productions above c. 29 kg per day. Experiments in England and New Zealand

  1. Reduced-input overseeding of cool-season grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overseeding cool-season grasses into dormant or nearly dormant warm-season pasture can increase total year-round forage production. Reduced input sowing methods and minimal ground preparation prior to overseeding are of interest for cost-reduction, but there is concern that any cost savings may be o...

  2. Hygrothermal Properties and Performance of Sea Grass Insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Marlene Stenberg Hagen; Laursen, Theresa Back; Rode, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    In the attempt to obtain knowledge of the hygrothermal properties of sea grass as thermal insulation, experiments have been carried out in the laboratory to determine the thermal conductivity, sorption properties and the water vapour permeability of the material. In order to investigate...

  3. Ensiling of elephant grass with soybean hulls or rice bran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    India Joelma Gatass Monteiro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal was to evaluate the chemical composition and fermentation pattern of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum. cv. Roxo silage with different levels of soybean hulls or rice bran. Two trials were conducted, comprising of a completely randomized design, with four replicates each. Treatments consisted on the addition of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% of soybean hulls or rice bran to unwilted green elephant grass forage. Large PVC silos were used adopting a density of 600 kg of green mass m-3. The silos were opened 40 days after ensiling. The results revealed that the inclusion of 10% soybean hulls increased elephant grass forage dry matter (DM content to 31%, but did not alter the water soluble carbohydrate (WSC content or buffering capacity. The resultant silages exhibited good fermentation patterns in terms of pH (less than 3.97 and NH3-N (4.07% total N levels. The inclusion of rice bran increased both DM and WSC content in the forage, improving the fermentation pattern of silages (P < 0.05. This too was verified by a pH lower than 3.92 and a maximum NH3-N of 4.23% of the total N. The inclusion of 10% rice bran to the elephant grass improved the nutritional value of the forage to be ensiled and, hence, of the produced silage.

  4. Survey of domestication process of grass cutter ( Thryonomys ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reflecting that grass cutters domestication in southwestern Nigeria is possible if only, social infrastructures such as constant electricity supply, pipe borne water and good network of roads, incentives like pups, feed and funds are provided by concerned authorities. These may arouse the interest of prospective farmers to ...

  5. Is the grazing tolerance of mesic decreaser and increaser grasses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth response of two decreasers, three Increaser II grasses, and an Increaser III species to frequent, severe defoliation under three levels of competition from neighbours and two levels of soil nutrients was examined in a pot trial. The effects of competition and especially nutrients markedly modified the defoliation ...

  6. Detecting bacterial endophytes in tropical grasses of the Brachiaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant-growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria include a diverse group of soil bacteria thought to stimulate plant growth by various mechanisms. Brachiaria forage grasses, of African origin, are perennials that often grow under low-input conditions and are likely to harbour unique populations of PGP bacteria. Three bacterial strains ...

  7. Effect of machinery wheel load on grass yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Effect of machinery wheel load on grass   Ole Green1, Rasmus N. Jørgensen2, Kristian Kristensen3, René Gislum3, Dionysis Bochtis1, & Claus G. Sørensen1   1University of Aarhus, Dept. of Agricultural Engineering 2University of Southern Denmark, Inst. of Chemical Eng., Biotechnology and Environmental...

  8. Book Review: Identification Guide to Southern African Grasses: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Title: Identification Guide to Southern African Grasses: an Identification Manual with Keys, Descriptions and Distributions. Book Authors: L Fish, A.C. Machau, M.J. Moeaha & M.T. Nembudani. 2015, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Private Bag X101, Silverton 0184, South Africa 798 pages, hardcover

  9. The radioactivity in some grasses in the environment of nuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The radioactivity in some grasses in the environment of nuclear research facilities located within the Oau Ile-Ife, Nigeria. MK Akinloye, JB Olomo. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Physics Vol. 17 (Supplement) 2005: pp. 219-225. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  10. Follow the Grass: a Smart Material Interactive Pervasive Display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minuto, A.; Huisman, Gijs; Nijholt, Antinus; Herrlich, Marc; Malaka, Rainer; Masuch, Maic

    2012-01-01

    Smart materials offer new possibilities for creating engaging and interesting forms of interaction and ways of displaying information in a material way. In this paper we describe Follow the Grass, a concept of an interactive pervasive display for public spaces. The display will be built up out of a

  11. Senescence, dormancy and tillering in perennial C4 grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perennial, temperate, C4 warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass and miscanthus have been tabbed as sources of herbaceous biomass for the production of green fuels and chemicals based on a number of positive agronomic traits. Although there is important literature on the management of these specie...

  12. Adaptation of a decreaser and an increaser grass species to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grasses have developed through natural selection to deter, escape and tolerate herbivory, and to escape and tolerate fire. In the semi-arid grassveld of the Eastern Cape, the species Themeda triandra and Sporobolus fimbriatus have been classified as Decreaser and Increaser II plants respectively. Both species have ...

  13. Grasses grazed by springbok and sheep | R. | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grazing habits were determined by analysis of rumina from slaughtered springbok and sheep where springbok grazed together with Merino sheep in False Upper Karoo and together with Dorper sheep in Kalahari Thornveld. Results show that in both veld types, grass constituted about 39 percent of the dry mass intake of ...

  14. Have grass carp driven declines in macrophyte occurrence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Vaal River, South Africa, historically had a rich diversity of native submerged macrophytes with at least 13 species from 5 families recorded. ... in the populations of invasive alien grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella Cuvier & Valenciennes (Cyprinidae) in the river, where populations have been a concern since 2005.

  15. Evaluation of concentrate, grass and legume combinations on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-10-16

    Oct 16, 2006 ... reduction in dietary protein intake of rabbits in the latter stages of growth where rabbits are raised up to 2.5-2.8 kg live weight. This study was designed therefore to evaluate the utilization of combinations of concentrate, grass and legume forages on performance and nutrient digestibility of grower rabbits.

  16. Performance of Sahiwal and Friesian heifers fed on napier grass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of Sahiwal and Friesian heifers fed on napier grass supplemented with ... In the tropics, the majority of dairy cattle depend on low quality natural pastures and crop residues. (Preston & Leng ... level is below the. ARC (1980) recommended dietary CP levels for growing heifers of 10 to 12 g.kg- DM CP and as a.

  17. Genetic variability and relationship between MT-1 elephant grass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic variability and relationships among elephant grass cultivars were estimated by the SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism) assay. A total of 60 individuals collected from five cultivars in China were analysed. Sixty-two selected primer combinations generated 1395 bands, with an average of 22.5 per ...

  18. Grass plants crop water consumption model in urban parks located ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... Grass plants crop water consumption model in urban parks located in three different ... The result of calculations, using the climate data of July, value of the province of Antalya were. ETo=7,10464 mm/day, for Ankara .... method is recommended by Food and Agriculture. Organisation (FAO) (Allen et al., ...

  19. Translocation of radioactive paraquat in some veld grasses | TD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In two pot experiments radioactive paraquat was applied to certain important veld grasses (Experiment I-Aristida junciformis, Themeda triandra, Elyonuris argenteus, Andropogon filifolius, Eragrostis curvula; Experiment II-A. junciformis, E. argenteus) to determine the extent of translocation at a young stage of growth with ...

  20. Snakes in the Grass: Weaving Success for Everyone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Janet L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes "Snakes in the Grass," a weaving project used with special needs students. Discusses the preliminary skill-building activities used, the process for creating the students' individual snakes, and the preparation and process for how the students wove the snakes. (CMK)

  1. Productivity of irrigated gamba grass ( Andropogon Gayanus Kunth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Productivity of irrigated gamba grass ( Andropogon Gayanus Kunth ) as influenced by flood irrigation and compost manure levels in zaria. ... A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of varying levels of irrigation volume, irrigation frequency and compost manure application on growth components, forage yield ...

  2. Insecticidal activity of citronella grass essential oil on Frankliniella schultzei and Myzus persicae Atividade inseticida do óleo essencial de capim-citronela sobre Frankliniella schultzei e Myzus persicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Fontes Pinheiro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The thrips, Frankliniella schultzei, and green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, cause direct damage to plants of economic importance and transmit phytoviruses, causing large economic losses. Chemical constituents of essential oils present a wide range of biological activities. The aim of this work was to evaluate insecticidal activity of essential oil from citronella grass, Cymbopogon winterianus, on F. schultzei and M. persicae. This essential oil was obtained by steam distillation and components were identified by GC/FID and GC/MS. A Potter spray tower was used to spray insects with the essential oil. The major constituents are geraniol (28.62%, citronellal (23.62% and citronellol (17.10%. Essential oil of C. winterianus at 1% (w v-1 causes mortality in F. schultzei and M. persicae at 34.3% and 96.9%, respectively. The LC50 value for M. persicae was 0.36% and LC90 0.66%. Thus, citronella grass essential oil at 1% (w v-1 is more toxic to M. persicae than F. schultzei. This essential oil shows promise for developing pesticides to manage M. persicae.O tripes, Frankliniella schultzei, e o pulgão-verde, Myzus persicae, além de causarem danos diretos a plantas de importância econômica, também são importantes transmissores de fitoviroses, acarretando grandes perdas econômicas. Os constituintes químicos dos óleos essenciais têm sido cada vez mais estudados, pois apresentam uma ampla gama de atividades biológicas. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar a atividade inseticida do óleo essencial de capim-citronela, Cymbopogon winterianus, sobre F. schultzei e M. persicae. O óleo essencial foi obtido por hidrodestilação e a identificação dos seus componentes foi realizada por CG/DIC e CG/EM. Uma torre de Potter foi utilizada para pulverizar os insetos com óleo essencial. Os componentes majoritários encontrados são geraniol (28,62%, citronelal (23,62% e citronelol (17,10%. O óleo essencial de C. winterianus a 1% (m v-1 causa mortalidade de F

  3. Grasses as invasive plants in South Africa revisited: Patterns, pathways and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Visser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many countries around the world, the most damaging invasive plant species are grasses. However, the status of grass invasions in South Africa has not been documented recently. Objectives: To update Sue Milton’s 2004 review of grasses as invasive alien plants in South Africa, provide the first detailed species level inventory of alien grasses in South Africa and assess the invasion dynamics and management of the group. Method: We compiled the most comprehensive inventory of alien grasses in South Africa to date using recorded occurrences of alien grasses in the country from various literature and database sources. Using historical literature, we reviewed past efforts to introduce alien grasses into South Africa. We sourced information on the origins, uses, distributions and minimum residence times to investigate pathways and patterns of spatial extent. We identified alien grasses in South Africa that are having environmental and economic impacts and determined whether management options have been identified, and legislation created, for these species. Results: There are at least 256 alien grass species in the country, 37 of which have become invasive. Alien grass species richness increased most dramatically from the late 1800s to about 1940. Alien grass species that are not naturalised or invasive have much shorter residence times than those that have naturalised or become invasive. Most grasses were probably introduced for forage purposes, and a large number of alien grass species were trialled at pasture research stations. A large number of alien grass species in South Africa are of Eurasian origin, although more recent introductions include species from elsewhere in Africa and from Australasia. Alien grasses are most prevalent in the south-west of the country, and the Fynbos Biome has the most alien grasses and the most widespread species. We identified 11 species that have recorded environmental and economic impacts in the

  4. The potential of C4 grasses for cellulosic biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eWeijde

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of biorefinery technologies enabling plant biomass to be processed into biofuel, many researchers set out to study and improve candidate biomass crops. Many of these candidates are C4 grasses, characterized by a high productivity and resource use efficiency. In this review the potential of five C4 grasses as lignocellulose feedstock for biofuel production is discussed. These include three important field crops - maize, sugarcane and sorghum - and two undomesticated perennial energy grasses - miscanthus and switchgrass. Although all these grasses are high yielding, they produce different products. While miscanthus and switchgrass are exploited exclusively for lignocellulosic biomass, maize, sorghum and sugarcane are dual-purpose crops. It is unlikely that all the prerequisites for the sustainable and economic production of biomass for a global cellulosic biofuel industry will be fulfilled by a single crop. High and stable yields of lignocellulose are required in diverse environments worldwide, to sustain a year-round production of biofuel. A high resource use efficiency is indispensable to allow cultivation with minimal inputs of nutrients and water and the exploitation of marginal soils for biomass production. Finally, the lignocellulose composition of the feedstock should be optimized to allow its efficient conversion into biofuel and other by-products. Breeding for these objectives should encompass diverse crops, to meet the demands of local biorefineries and provide adaptability to different environments. Collectively, these C4 grasses are likely to play a central role in the supply of lignocellulose for the cellulosic ethanol industry. Moreover, as these species are evolutionary closely related, advances in each of these crops will expedite improvements in the other crops. This review aims to provide an overview of their potential, prospects and research needs as lignocellulose feedstocks for the commercial production of

  5. Phenology of perennial native grass below-ground axillary buds in the northern mixed-grass prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetative reproduction from belowground bud banks is the primary driver of grassland systems. Despite the importance of vegetative reproduction, the timing of belowground bud recruitment is unknown for most dominant, perennial native grasses as is the relationship between bud development and envir...

  6. The Influence of Grass Species Composition on Fishpond Dikes on Soil Infiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroslava Novotná; Barbora Badalíková

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of water into the soil was monitored from 2012 to 2015 in two fishpond dikes of three different variants of grass species composition: variant 1 – grass mix for extensively dry conditions, variant 2 – heavy duty grass mix, variant 3 – grass mix for intensively moist areas. The monitored grass vegetation was mowed twice a year. The Rohatec pond is situated in Jindřichův Hradec district, in terms of texture its dike is made of sandy soil. The Horní Šatlava pond in Hodonín district ...

  7. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ashenafi, A. Vol 9, No 3 (2006) - Articles Antimicrobial Effects of Trachyspermum ammi and Cymbopogon citratus Essential Oil Topical Formulations on Pathogenic Fung Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1026-552X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 165 ... Vol 9, No 3 (2006), Antimicrobial Effects of Trachyspermum ammi and Cymbopogon citratus Essential Oil Topical Formulations on Pathogenic Fung, Abstract PDF. T Shimelis, U Kelbessa, T Ashenif, G Negero, A Ashenafi, L Hirut. Vol 7, No 1 (2004), Antinociceptive and anti-Inflammatory effects of the ...

  9. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Vol 9 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial Effects of Trachyspermum ammi and Cymbopogon citratus Essential Oil Topical Formulations on Pathogenic Fung · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T Shimelis, U Kelbessa, T Ashenif, G Negero, A Ashenafi, L Hirut, 62-66.

  10. Efficacy of some essential oils in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of orally administered Cymbopogon citratus, Zingiber officinale and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils (EOs) in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Methods: Three experiments were conducted with 48 Swiss mice each. The animals were inoculated with 2 x 106 metacyclic ...

  11. Inhibition of Growth of Fungi Isolated From Deteriorating Melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of extracts of Punica granatum and Cymbopogon citratus on Aspergillus nivale, Rhizopus stolonifer , Mucor mucido and Aspergillus fumigatus isolated from deteriorating melon seed using radial growth technique. Phytochemical screening revealed that extracts the plants ...

  12. Comparative study of root, stalk and leaf essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The root, stalk and leaf essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus grown in Kaduna, North Central Nigeria were extracted separately by hydrodistillation and characterized by GC-MS. The chemical composition analysis by GC-MS of the oils allowed the identification of 34, 26 and 16 compounds respectively. In the three oils, the ...

  13. Effect of plant essential oils on Ralstonia solanacearum race 4 causing bacterial wilt of edible ginger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini), lemongrass (C. citratus) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) oils were investigated for their effects on Ralstonia solanacearum race 4, and their potential use as bio-fumigants for treating pathogen- infested edible ginger (Zingiber officinale R.) fields. Three conce...

  14. Study of the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work aimed to study the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters of Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae) from Senegal. The plants were collected in two different localities, Dakar and. Kaolack. The extracts were obtained by steam distillation from both fresh and dried plants and analyses carried.

  15. Study of the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work aimed to study the chemical composition of essential oils and floral waters of Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae) from Senegal. The plants were collected in two different localities, Dakar and Kaolack. The extracts were obtained by steam distillation from both fresh and dried plants and analyses carried ...

  16. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    egyptian hak

    Abstract. Powders and extracts prepared from Capsicum frutescens, Cymbopogon citratus, Moringa oleifera, Anacardium occidentale were tested for their insecticidal potential against Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella. The powder of C. frutescens had the highest mortality rate of. 100% after 2 days of application at ...

  17. Inhibition of Growth of Fungi Isolated From Deteriorating Melon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Abstract. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of extracts of Punica granatum and. Cymbopogon citratus on Aspergillus nivale, Rhizopus stolonifer , Mucor mucido and. Aspergillus fumigatus isolated from deteriorating melon seed using radial growth technique. Phytochemical screening revealed that extracts the ...

  18. In vitro screening of selected essential oils from medicinal plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enteric methane production lowers the efficiency of feed utilization in ruminants and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions which are responsible for global climate change. This study examined the effects of nine essential oils (EO) from Citrus aurantifolia, Cymbopogon citratus, Eucalyptus citriodora, Laurus nobilis, ...

  19. issues related to methane emission from enteric fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JACQUES

    2016-03-23

    Mar 23, 2016 ... Enteric methane production lowers the efficiency of feed utilization in ruminants and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions which are responsible for global climate change. This study examined the effects of nine essential oils (EO) from Citrus aurantifolia, Cymbopogon citratus, Eucalyptus citriodora,.

  20. Allelopathic potential of Polypogon monspeliensis L. against two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-28

    Dec 28, 2011 ... effects of Cymbopogon citratus volatile and its chemical components. Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao., 16:763-767. Maciel CDG, Correa MR, Alves E, Negrisoli E, Velini ED, Rodrigues JD,. Ono EO, Boaro CSF (2003). Influencia do manejo de palhada de capim-braquiária (Brachiaria decumbens) sobre o ...

  1. Indigenous Tea Production From Calyces Of Hibiscus Sabdariffa L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out on the possibility of producing an acceptable indigenous tea from a commonly available indigenous raw material, Hibiscus sabdariffa L. The said tea was blended with ground dried leaves of Cymbopogon citratus and ground dried peels of Citrus limon. The commonly consumed commercial green ...

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 391 ... Vol 3, No 1 (2001):, Effect of Losartan on cerebral blood flow and its autoregulation in spontaneously hypertensive rats before and after brain .... Vol 15, No 1 (2013), Formulation and Sensory Evaluation of Herb Tea from Moringa oleifera, Hibiscus sabdariffa and Cymbopogon citratus, Abstract. I Oduro ...

  3. Efficacy of aqueous leaf extracts of negro coffee ( Cassia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-year rain-fed field trials to evaluate the efficacy of aqueous leaf extracts of Cassia occidentalis and Cymbopogon citratus at different levels in the management of nematode pests of okra was conducted. The levels of treatments used were 25, 50, 75 and 100 %, where 0% served as control. The experimental design ...

  4. Nigerian Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 21 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of Growth of Fungi Isolated From Deteriorating Melon Seed By Extracts of Punica Granatum and Cymbopogon Citratus · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A Banso, A.G Jiya, 60-64 ...

  5. Insecticidal activity of four medicinal plant powders and extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Powders and extracts prepared from Capsicum frutescens, Cymbopogon citratus, Moringa oleifera, Anacardium occidentale were tested for their insecticidal potential against Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella. The powder of C. frutescens had the highest mortality rate of 100% after 2 days of application at all tested ...

  6. Diet Affects Muscle Quality and Growth Traits of Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus: A Comparison Between Grass and Artificial Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Zhao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fish muscle, the main edible parts with high protein level and low fat level, is consumed worldwide. Diet contributes greatly to fish growth performance and muscle quality. In order to elucidate the correlation between diet and muscle quality, the same batch of juvenile grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus were divided into two groups and fed with either grass (Lolium perenne, Euphrasia pectinata and Sorghum sudanense or artificial feed, respectively. However, the different two diets didn't result in significant differences in all the detected water quality parameters (e.g., Tm, pH, DO, NH3/NH4+-N, NO3--N, NO2-, TN, TP, and TOC between the two experimental groups. After a 4-month culture period, various indexes and expression of myogenic regulatory factor (MRFs and their related genes were tested. The weight gain of the fish fed with artificial feed (AFG was nearly 40% higher than the fish fed with grass (GFG. Significantly higher alkaline phosphatase, total cholestrol, high density cholestrol and total protein were detected in GFG as compared to AFG. GFG also showed increased hardness, resilience and shear force in texture profile analysis, with significantly bigger and compact muscle fibers in histologic slices. The fat accumulation was most serious in the abdomen muscle of AFG. Additionally, the expression levels of MyoG, MyoD, IGF-1, and MSTNs were higher, whereas Myf-5, MRF4, and IGF-2 were lower in most positional muscles of GFG as compared to AFG. Overall, these results suggested that feeding grass could promote muscle growth and development by stimulating muscle fiber hypertrophy, as well as significantly enhance the expression of CoL1As. Feeding C. idellus with grass could also improve flesh quality by improving muscle characteristics, enhancing the production of collagen, meanthile, reducing fat accumulation and moisture in muscle, but at the cost of a slower growth.

  7. Bud-bank and tiller dynamics of co-occurring C3 caespitose grasses in mixed-grass prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Jacqueline P; Hartnett, David C

    2015-09-01

    Tiller recruitment from the belowground bud bank of caespitose grasses influences their ability to monopolize local resources and, hence, their genet fitness. Differences in bud production and outgrowth among tiller types within a genet and among species may explain co-occurrence of caespitose grasses. This study aimed to characterize genet bud-bank and tiller production and dynamics in two co-occurring species and compare their vegetative reproductive strategies. Bud-bank and tiller dynamics of Hesperostipa comata and Nassella viridula, dominant C3 caespitose grasses in the northern mixed-grass prairie of North America, were assessed throughout an annual cycle. The two species showed similar strategies, maintaining polycyclic tillers and thus creating mixed-age genet bud banks comprising multiple bud cohorts produced in different years. Vegetative tillers produced the majority of buds, whereas flowering tillers contributed little to the bud bank. Buds lived for at least 2 yr and were maintained in multiple developmental stages throughout the year. Because bud longevity rarely exceeded tiller longevity, tiller longevity drove turnover within the bud bank. Tiller population dynamics, more than bud production per tiller, determined the differential contribution of tiller types to the bud bank. Nassella viridula had higher bud production per tiller, a consistent annual tiller recruitment density, and greater longevity of buds on senesced and flowering tillers than H. comata. Co-occurring C3 caespitose grasses had similar bud-bank and tiller dynamics contributing to genet persistence but differed in bud characteristics that could affect genet longevity and species coexistence. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  8. Microbiological Quality of Panicum maximum Grass Silage with Addition of Lactobacillus sp. as Starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarsih, S.; Sulistiyanto, B.; Utama, C. S.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate microbiological quality of Panicum maximum grass silage with addition Lactobacillus sp as starter. The completely randomized design was been used on this research with 4 treaments and 3 replications. The treatments were P0 ( Panicum maximum grass silage without addition Lactobacillus sp ), P1 ( Panicum maximum grass silage with 2% addition Lactobacillus sp), P2 (Panicum maximum grass silage with 4% addition Lactobacillus sp) and P3 (Panicum maximum grass silage with 6% addition Lactobacillus sp).The parameters were microbial populations of Panicum maximum grass silage (total lactic acid bacteria, total bacteria, total fungi, and Coliform bacteria. The data obtained were analyzed variance (ANOVA) and further tests performed Duncan’s Multiple Areas. The population of lactic acid bacteria was higher (PMicrobiological quality of Panicum maximum grass silage with addition Lactobacillus sp was better than no addition Lactobacillus sp.

  9. Anaerobic Codigestion of Grass and Sewage Sludge: Laboratory Experiments and Feasibility Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Taira; Wang, Feng; Sakurai, Kensuke; Tsumori, Jun; Minamiyama, Mizuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Grass is drawing attention for its high potential for biogas production. Anaerobic digesters in wastewater treatment plants can be used for producing biogas by processing grass without having to invest in the construction of new treatment facilities. Batch and continuous digestion experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of codigestion of sewage sludge and grass. The focus was on a thermophilic condition, starting-up from existing mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge only. The batch and continuous experiments used two different sewage sludges. Results demonstrated a methane generation of approximately 0.2 normal liter-methane/g volatile solids-grass. The addition of grass did not affect the ammonia concentration and improved the dewaterability of the digested sludge. The start-up performance from mesophilic digested sewage sludge to thermophilic codigestion with grass was confirmed. A feasibility analysis demonstrated that codigestion is applicable in terms of energy recovery and greenhouse gas emission, depending on the transport distance of grass.

  10. Living with artificial grass: a knowledge update. Part 1: Basic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, I M; Skovron, M L; Agel, J

    1990-01-01

    Part I of this two part study reviews the development and characteristics of artificial grass, and the influence of this surface on the American football player. Artificial grass was initially developed to provide city children with increased play space and thus enable them to maintain a fitness level equal to their peers in more rural locales. Today, artificial grass fields allow for increased use when field availability is limited, or for a grass substitute where grass will not grow. However, epidemiologic studies suggest that there is an increased risk of lower extremity injury to the football athlete playing on an artificial grass field. By reviewing available studies, a knowledge base can be formed that can serve to direct future investigations concerning the influence of artificial grass surfaces and injury and, ultimately, how that influence can be affected.

  11. Research on screening of suitable forage grasses in coastal saline - alkaline soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaoyu; Han, Xin; Song, Qianhong; Yang, Xu; Zhou, Qingyun

    2017-11-01

    The screening of salt-tolerant plants can provide suitable tree species for the afforestation of coastal salinity and maintain biodiversity and ecological stability. The research was based on the study of seven grasses, such as high fescue, the bermuda grass, the thyme, the rye grass, the precocious grass, the third leaf, and the red three leaves. Each pasture was planted in three different kinds of soil, such as salt alkali soil, salt alkali soil + ecological bag and non-saline alkali soil. The effect of salt alkali soil on germinating time, germination rate and grass growth was analyzed. The effects of ecological bag on soil salt and the growth and germination of grass was also analyzed in order to provide the reference basis for the widespread and systematic selection of salt-tolerant plants, with the grass being selected for the suitable ecological bag.

  12. Feeding Dairy Cows to Increase Performance on Rhodes Grass Ley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irungu, K.R.G.; Mbugua, P.N.

    1999-01-01

    Majority of dairy farmers in Kenya produce milk from cows fed on roughage. The cow performance follows seasonal variability in quality and quantity of roughage. The objective of the current study was to increase cow performance and maintain productivity of a rhodes grass (chloris gayana) ley. Twenty-four Freisian cows in their second to third lactation were strip grazed on fertilized irrigated Rhodes grass at a stocking rate of 0.034 ha per cow. Four dietary groups of six cows were allocated to one of our diets. one group got no dairy meal while the other three groups were supplemented at a 1kg of dairy meal per 10, 5 and 2.5 kg of 4% fat corrected milk dairy. this amount to 0, 386, 750 and 1542 kg dairy meal (89.4%, DM, 93.7 OM, 16.8, CP and CF) during the lactation. during the 43 - week lactation, records on pasture nutrient yield, nutrient intake, milk yield, liveweight, reproduction and subsequent calf birth weight were collected. The Rhodes grass ley produced 20.7 (ranging from 16.7 to 28.7) t of dry matter (DM) per hectare and cows harvested 16.0 (12.0 to 24.0) t during the 43 weeks.The Rhodes grass contained 32.1, 87.7, 10.8, and 32.3% DM, organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP) and crude fiber (CF) respectively. Mean stubble of 4.7 (3.9 to 6.0) t DM per hectare was left at pasture. Feeding dairy meals significantly increased (P 0.05) affect batter fat content (3.78 to 3.96%). It maintained (P > 0.05) cow liveweight and increased (P < 0.05) calf birth weight from 32.7 to 37.2 kg. Feeding dairy meal did not affect oestrus cycling. Extreme supplementation, 1542 kg dairy meal, decreased (P < 0.05) fertility. Insemination per conception and calving interval increased (P < 0.05) from 1.5 to 3.5 and 522 days. The findings in the current study show that pasture yield can be increased by over 590% dry matter from 3.5 t obtained from natural pasture containing Kikuyu and Star grasses. The Rhodes grass yield can be increased to 232% of national average yield of 1300

  13. Chemical composition and photosynthetically active radiation of forage grasses under irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilane Aparecida da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to estimate the photosynthetically active radiation of tropical forage grasses in ten cutting dates, under irrigation. The following treatments were used: Brachiaria decumbens grass (Brachiaria decumbens cultivar Basilisk, Marandu grass (Brachiaria brizantha cultivar Marandu, Xaraes grass (Brachiaria brizantha, cultivar Xaraes, Mombaça grass (Panicum maximum cultivar Mombaça, Tanzania grass (Panicum maximum, cultivar Tanzania and Tifton 85 grass (Cynodon spp cultivar Tifton 85. The weather parameters were collected by an automatic meteorological station installed in the location and used for irrigation management. The experiment was arranged in a split-plot completely randomized block design, considering the grasses as plots and cutting seasons as subplots, with four replications in a 6 × 10 factorial arrangement, six grasses and ten cutting seasons. The results indicated increased use of photosynthetically active radiation in the wet season, in relation to the dry-wet season transition. Basilisk presented the highest values of photosynthetically active radiation (1,648.9 mE. The variables studied were affected by photosynthetically active radiation. The grass cultivars presented different light interceptions. The values of 87; 90; 90; 88; 92 and 77% were found for grass cultivars Basilisk, Marandu, Mombaça, Tanzania, Xaraes and Tifton 85, respectively. Differences were observed in forage accumulation rates for the grass plants studied. The grasses with the best productive performance were Brachiaria decumbens cultivar Basilisk and B. brizantha cultivar Xaraes. The highest values of crude protein and neutral detergent fiber were observed for Tifton 85. The use of photosynthetically active radiation was different among the grasses evaluated. There is a positive association between photosynthetically active radiation and dry matter production. Besides, photosynthetically active radiation indirectly affects crude protein

  14. Estimating the content of clover and grass in the sward using a consumer camera and image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anders Krogh; Karstoft, Henrik; Søegaard, Karen

    the dry matter ratio of clover and grass in clover grass fields from sparse close up images. First, the light conditions is determined, which is used for selecting model parameters to estimate the coverage of both clover and grass. Next, the clover and grass coverage are transformed to give the dry matter...

  15. The determination of radionuclides in grass ecosystem samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Schelenz, R.; Perkins, R.W.

    1987-07-01

    The radioactive debris cloud from the Chernobyl reactor accident resulted in some deposition over essentially all of the Northern Hemisphere. Shortly after the accident invitations were sent out by the IAEA to Member States to collect grass samples according to specific instructions so that the ratio of the various radionuclides in the fallout debris could be established over a wide area of Europe. In response to this request, 20 grass samples were provided by Member States. To establish a protocol for analysis of these valuable samples and to recommend a protocol for future sample collection, a Consultants Meeting was called by the IAEA for 23-25 September 1986. This document contains the considerations and recommendations of the consultants

  16. Do urban canyons influence street level grass pollen concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Ole; Gerorge Peel, Robert; Kennedy, Roy

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiological studies, outdoor exposure to pollen is typically estimated using rooftop monitoring station data, whilst exposure overwhelmingly occurs at street level. In this study the relationship between street level and roof level grass pollen concentrations was investigated for city centre...... street canyon environments in Aarhus, Denmark, and London, UK, during the grass pollen seasons of 2010 and 2011 respectively. For the period mid-day to late evening, street level concentrations in both cities tended to be lower than roof-level concentrations, though this difference was found...... source distribution. In the London study, an increase in relative humidity was linked to a significant decrease in street/roof level concentration ratio, and a possible causative mechanism involving moisture mediated pollen grain buoyancy is proposed. Relationships with the other weather variables were...

  17. Grass production and decomposition in Southern Guinea savanna, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohiagu, C E; Wood, T G

    1979-01-01

    Annual grass production in ungrazed plots was 2,731 kg ha -1 , litter production was 1,619 kg ha -1 and decomposition was 1,789 kg ha -1 . In grazed plots the corresponding figures were 3,157 kg ha -1 , 1,440 kg ha -1 , and 1,475 kg ha -1 respectively; cattle consumed 1,405 kg ha -1 . Litter disappearance was greatest in the dry season: 1,226 kg ha -1 (69% of the annual total) disappearing in the 4 months of December to March in the ungrazed plots, largely due to consumption (790 kg ha -1 in December to March) by fungus-growing termites (Macrotermitinae). A positive linear relationship was found between maximum grass biomass and annual rainfall in West Africa.

  18. Study of "napier grass" delignification for production of cellulosic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Morandim-Giannetti, Andreia; Albuquerque, Tiago Santos; de Carvalho, Renata Kobal Campos; Araújo, Ramires Menezes Silva; Magnabosco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-30

    Recently, much research on the evaluation of new cellulose sources has been developed. In this context, a promising source is "napier grass", which contains 30.40% lignin, 36.34% cellulose, and 34.12% hemicellulose. In this work, conditions for the delignification of "napier grass" in the laboratory were studied by using calcium oxide (CaO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The best pulping conditions were 9.00% CaO for a period of 2.73 h, which resulted in 74.99% delignification and 66.58% cellulose. The best conditions for the bleaching process were pH 12 and hydrogen peroxide at concentration of 4.2% for 6h, at a temperature of 40 °C, which gave 90.98% delignification and 99.21% cellulose. The analyses were performed by using weight percent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. South Dakota rangelands: More than a sea of grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Robert Gartner; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1996-01-01

    Presettlement explorers described the region’s landscape as a “sea of grass.” Yet, this “sea” was quite varied, and included a wealth of less obvious forested communities. Both physiographic and climatic gradients across the state of South Dakota contributed to the development of variable vegetation types of South Dakota. The diverse flora truly identifies the state as...

  20. Convex relationships in ecosystems containing mixtures of trees and grass

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Convex Relationships in Ecosystems Containing Mixtures of Trees and Grass R.J. Scholes Environmental and Resource Economics; Dec 2003; 26, 4; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 559 Reproduced... with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further...

  1. Defoliation height and potassium fertilization of Mulato II grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Avelino Cabral

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A pot trial in greenhouse conditions was carried out to identify at which defoliation height Mulato II grass (Urochloa hibrida cv. Mulato II should be managed and to determine whether potassium fertilization is necessary in soil with high potassium content. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse in a randomized block design with six treatments and five replications. Treatments consisted of a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement, with three defoliation heights (50, 65, and 80 cm and with or without potassium maintenance fertilization. The production characteristics and chemical composition of the forage plant were evaluated. There was no interaction effect between defoliation height and fertilization with or without potassium on any of the analyzed variables, except for mineral content in Mulato II grass. The tillers and leaves number, shoot dry matter, leaf+sheath, root system, and residue were influenced by defoliation heights and potassium fertilization, except for the leaf blades and root dry matter, leaf blade/stem+sheath ratio, and leaves number, which were not influenced by potassium fertilization. Higher shoot dry matter was observed at the heights of 65 and 80 cm; however, comparing these two heights, leaf + sheath dry matter was lower at 65 cm. Regarding the grass’s chemical composition, there was an increase in neutral and acid detergent fiber and indigestible neutral detergent fiber contents as the defoliation height increased, which resulted in lower production of potentially digestible dry matter, which can compromise the potential use of the forage by animals. Among evaluated treatments, Mulato II grass defoliation is recommended for a maximum height of 65 cm. Potassium fertilization increases the yield and the potentially digestible dry matter content of Mulato II grass, even when cultivated in soil with high potassium content.

  2. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  3. THE PREVALENCE OF LERNAEID ECTOPARASITES IN GRASS CARP (CTENOPHARYNGODON IDELLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. TASAWAR, S. ZAFAR, M. H. LASHARI AND C. S. HAYAT1

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of lernaeid ectoparasites in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella. For this purpose, 597 fishes (Ctenopharyngodon idella were examined for lernaeid ectoparasites at a private fish farm located in Multan, Pakistan. Four species of the genus Lernaea i.e. L. cyprinacea, L. polymorpha, L. oryzophila, and L. lophiara were recorded. It was observed that L. polymorpha had the highest (P20 cm.

  4. Scented grasses in Norway?identity and uses

    OpenAIRE

    Alm, Torbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Published version. Source at http://doi.org/10.1186/s13002-015-0070-y. Background: Some grass species are richer in coumarin and thus more sweetly scented than others. These have been eagerly sought after in parts of Norway, but the tradition has been weakly documented, both in terms of the species collected, their vernacular names, and uses. Methods: Based on literature data and a substantial body of information collected during my own ethnobotanical field work, artefacts and ...

  5. Terpenes in lamb fat to trace animal grass feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Priolo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Several efforts have been done in the last years to trace grass feeding directly in the herbivore products and different methods, based on carotenoid pigments (Priolo et al., 2002; Prache et al., 2003 have been proposed. Some volatile compounds, such as 2,3-octanedione or 3-methylindole (skatole have been indicated as excellent indicators of pasture diets (Young et al., 1997...

  6. Stable Isotope Mapping of Alaskan Grasses and Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, A. L.; Wooller, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    The spatial variation of isotope signatures in organic material is a useful forensic tool, particularly when applied to the task of tracking the production and distribution of plant-derived illicit drugs. In order to identify the likely grow-locations of drugs such as marijuana from unknown locations (i.e., confiscated during trafficking), base isotope maps are needed that include measurements of plants from known grow-locations. This task is logistically challenging in remote, large regions such as Alaska. We are therefore investigating the potential of supplementing our base (marijuana) isotope maps with data derived from other plants from known locations and with greater spatial coverage in Alaska. These currently include >150 samples of modern C3 grasses (Poaceae) as well as marijuana samples (n = 18) from known grow-locations across the state. We conducted oxygen, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses of marijuana and grasses (Poaceae). Poaceae samples were obtained from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Museum of the North herbarium collection, originally collected by field botanists from around Alaska. Results indicate that the oxygen isotopic composition of these grasses range from 10‰ to 30‰, and broadly mirror the spatial pattern of water isotopes in Alaska. Our marijuana samples were confiscated around the state of Alaska and supplied to us by the UAF Police Department. δ13C, δ15N and δ18O values exhibit geographic patterns similar to the modern grasses, but carbon and nitrogen isotopes of some marijuana plants appear to be influenced by additional factors related to indoor growing conditions (supplementary CO2 sources and the application of organic fertilizer). As well as providing a potential forensic resource, our Poaceae isotope maps could serve additional value by providing resources for studying ecosystem nutrient cycling, for tracing natural ecological processes (i.e., animal migration and food web dynamics) and providing

  7. Production of tropical forage grasses under different shading levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Eduardo Torres

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the forage production of three tropical forage grasses under different shading levels. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse at Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, University Unit of Aquidauana (UEMS/UUA, in a soil classified as Ultisol sandy loam texture. The treatments consisted of three grasses species combinations (B. brizantha cv. Marandu, B. decumbens cv. Basilisck and Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania, submitted to four shading levels (0, 30, 50 and 75%, arranged in a completely randomized blocks design in a factorial 3 x 4, with eight replications. After harvest, the plants were separated into shoot and roots for determination of shoot fresh mass (SFM, shoot dry mass (SDM and roots dry mass production. After analysis of variance, the qualitative factor was subjected to comparison of averages by Tukey’s test, and the quantitative factor to analysis of polynomial regression, being interactions appropriately unfolded. It was verified that B. decumbens, by its linearly increasing production of forage and less decrease of root formation, is the most recommended for shading conditions compared to grasses Tanzania and Marandu.

  8. Fruit agribusiness waste as an additive in elephant grass silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Cardoso de Azevedo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential use of fruticulture waste as an additive in elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum cultivar Napier silage at different densities, defining the effect of fermentative quality, microbiological characteristics and bromatological composition. The experimental design was completely randomized with four replications in a 4 x 3 factorial scheme, comprising a control, banana waste (BW, mango waste (MW, and passion fruit waste (PFW at three densities (400, 500 and 600 kg green matter [GM] m-3. The effect of ensiling density was greatest in the exclusively elephant grass silage, where a compaction of 600 kg GM m-3 contributed to improvements in fermentation and microbiological processes. The addition of banana waste to the elephant grass silage promoted improvements only in bromatological composition, raising the dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, and non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC content and reducing fiber components (neutral detergent fiber [NDFap] and acid detergent fiber [ADFap] corrected for ash and protein, but the addition of banana waste did not favor the fermentative or microbiological processes. The addition of passion fruit and mango by-products promoted increased DM and favored the fermentative, microbiological, and bromatological silage processes, regardless of density.

  9. Additives in ensiling palisade grass managed under grazing intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Barros Macedo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of summer forage excess represents a management strategy to meet animals' needs for dry matter in the shortage period, but has been poorly studied. Silage can be used for this purpose. This study analyzed the production of palisade grass silage from pasture subjected to different grazing intensities with and without additive, determining losses by gases and effluents and chemical composition of silage. The experiment was a 4 x 3 factorial completely randomized design, with four replications. The factors were: 1st – herbage allowance of 5% (5 kg dry matter 100 kg-1 of animal weight day-1, 10, 15 and 20%. The pasture was managed under rotational stocking with 35-day grazing cycles (7 days of occupation and 28 days of rest and 2nd - additives: a control; b citrus pulp pellets; c biological inoculant for grass silage. The forage of palisade grass harvested from pastures subjected to low-intensity grazing showed quantitative and qualitative characteristics for ensiling. However, high humidity and low fermentable carbohydrate require the use of additive, favor the fermentation process and increase the nutritional quality of silage.

  10. Green grasses as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Vinoth; Manoharan, Subbaiah; Sharafali, A.; Anandan, Sambandam; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophylls, the major pigments presented in plants are responsible for the process of photosynthesis. The working principle of dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is analogous to natural photosynthesis in light-harvesting and charge separation. In a similar way, natural dyes extracted from three types of grasses viz. Hierochloe Odorata (HO), Torulinium Odoratum (TO) and Dactyloctenium Aegyptium (DA) were used as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to characterize the dyes. The electron transport mechanism and internal resistance of the DSSCs were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The performance of the cells fabricated with the grass extract shows comparable efficiencies with the reported natural dyes. Among the three types of grasses, the DSSC fabricated with the dye extracted from Hierochloe Odorata (HO) exhibited the maximum efficiency. LC-MS investigations indicated that the dominant pigment present in HO dye was pheophytin a (Pheo a).

  11. Tolerable Time-Varying Overflow on Grass-Covered Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Hughes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Engineers require estimates of tolerable overtopping limits for grass-covered levees, dikes, and embankments that might experience steady overflow. Realistic tolerance estimates can be used for both resilient design and risk assessment. A simple framework is developed for estimating tolerable overtopping on grass-covered slopes caused by slowly-varying (in time overtopping discharge (e.g., events like storm surges or river flood waves. The framework adapts the well-known Hewlett curves of tolerable limiting velocity as a function of overflow duration. It has been hypothesized that the form of the Hewlett curves suggests that the grass erosion process is governed by the flow work on the slope above a critical threshold velocity (referred to as excess work, and the tolerable erosional limit is reached when the cumulative excess work exceeds a given value determined from the time-dependent Hewlett curves. The cumulative excess work is expressed in terms of overflow discharge above a critical discharge that slowly varies in time, similar to a discharge hydrograph. The methodology is easily applied using forecast storm surge hydrographs at specific locations where wave action is minimal. For preliminary planning purposes, when storm surge hydrographs are unavailable, hypothetical equations for the water level and overflow discharge hydrographs are proposed in terms of the values at maximum overflow and the total duration of overflow. An example application is given to illustrate use of the methodology.

  12. Responses of three grass species to creosote during phytoremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiaodong; El-Alawi, Yousef; Penrose, Donna M.; Glick, Bernard R.; Greenberg, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    Phytoremediation of creosote-contaminated soil was monitored in the presence of Tall fescue, Kentucky blue grass, or Wild rye. For all three grass species, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were evaluated for plant growth promotion and protection of plants from contaminant toxicity. A number of parameters were monitored including plant tissue water content, root growth, plant chlorophyll content and the chlorophyll a/b ratio. The observed physiological data indicate that some plants mitigated the toxic effects of contaminants. In addition, in agreement with our previous experiments reported in the accompanying paper (Huang, X.-D., El-Alawi, Y., Penrose, D.M., Glick, B.R., Greenberg, B.M., 2004. A multi-process phytoremediation system for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil. Environ. Poll. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2003.09.031), PGPR were able to greatly enhance phytoremediation. PGPR accelerated plant growth, especially roots, in heavily contaminated soils, diminishing the toxic effects of contaminants to plants. Thus, the increased root biomass in PGPR-treated plants led to more effective remediation. - Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria enhanced growth and remediation of three grass species

  13. Development of a sublingual allergy vaccine for grass pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Frati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Franco Frati1,2, Silvia Scurati1, Paola Puccinelli1, Marie David3, Cecile Hilaire4, Maurizio Capecce4, Francesco Marcucci2, Cristoforo Incorvaia51Medical and Scientific Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 2University Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties and Public Health, Perugia, Italy; 3Laboratoire Stallergenes, Antony, France; 4Marketing Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 5Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit, ICP Hospital, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Grass pollen is a very common cause of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The only treatment targeting the underlying causes of allergy is immunotherapy (IT. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT has been introduced to solve the problem of systemic reactions to subcutaneous IT (SCIT. This article evaluates the characteristics of the allergen extract, Staloral, in terms of practical administration, effectiveness, safety, and mechanism of action. Efficacy data were obtained from double-blind, placebo-controlled studies using Staloral in patients sensitized to grass pollen, while practical administration, cost-effectiveness, and mechanism of action data were provided by well designed studies. The efficacy and safety of Staloral, as demonstrated by review of published studies which used doses up to 1125 times those administered with SCIT, shows that this allergen extract has optimal characteristics for treating patients with seasonal allergies due to grass pollens. The main mechanism of action is the interaction between dendritic cells of the oral mucosa and the subsequent tolerance induced in T-cells.Keywords: allergen extracts, high-dose, efficacy, safety, sublingual immunotherapy

  14. Green grasses as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Vinoth; Manoharan, Subbaiah; Sharafali, A; Anandan, Sambandam; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-25

    Chlorophylls, the major pigments presented in plants are responsible for the process of photosynthesis. The working principle of dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is analogous to natural photosynthesis in light-harvesting and charge separation. In a similar way, natural dyes extracted from three types of grasses viz. Hierochloe Odorata (HO), Torulinium Odoratum (TO) and Dactyloctenium Aegyptium (DA) were used as light harvesters in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used to characterize the dyes. The electron transport mechanism and internal resistance of the DSSCs were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The performance of the cells fabricated with the grass extract shows comparable efficiencies with the reported natural dyes. Among the three types of grasses, the DSSC fabricated with the dye extracted from Hierochloe Odorata (HO) exhibited the maximum efficiency. LC-MS investigations indicated that the dominant pigment present in HO dye was pheophytin a (Pheo a). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Group 5 allergens of timothy grass (Phl p 5) bear cross-reacting T cell epitopes with group 1 allergens of rye grass (Lol p 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W D; Karamfilov, T; Bufe, A; Fahlbush, B; Wolf, I; Jäger, L

    1996-04-01

    Selected human T cell clones reactive with group 5 allergens of timothy grass (Phl p 5) were cross-stimulated in specific proliferation assays with group 1 allergens of rye grass (Lol p 1). Such interspecies cross-reactivities result obviously from structural motifs presented on defined Phl p 5 fragments as shown with recombinant Phl p 5 products.

  16. The combined effect of fertiliser nitrogen and phosphorus on herbage yield and change in soil nutrients of a grass/clover and grass-only sward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schils, R.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The combined effect of reduced nitrogen ( N ) and phosphorus ( P ) application on the production of grass- only and grass/ clover swards was studied in a five- year cutting experiment on a marine clay soil, established on newly sown swards. Furthermore, changes in soil N, P and carbon ( C ) were

  17. Estudo da atividade antifúngica da associação do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon Winterianus Jowitt (Citronela) com antifúngicos sintéticos sobre espécies de Aspergillus

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Danilo Batista Martins

    2010-01-01

    Esta pesquisa se propôs a estudar as propriedades antifúngicas do óleo essencial de Cymbopogon winterianus Jowitt associado a antifúngicos sintéticos contra cepas de Aspergillus. Os parâmetros utilizados para esse fim se basearam na determinação da Concentração Inibitória Mínima, Índice de Concentração Inibitória Fracionada (método de associação Checkerboard), bem como na curva de morte microbiana. A anfotericina B e o fluconazol, antifúngicos sintéticos de uso consagrado,...

  18. Allelopathic activity of medicinal plant essential oils on seed germination and vigor of lettuce achenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Alvarenga Santos Fraga de Miranda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, essential oils have gained commercial interest in the agricultural area, mainly for their allelopathic, insecticidal, antifungal, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and, also for their natural compounds, which have generally displayed low toxicity, relatively low cost and rapid degradation in the environment. Medicinal plants have emerged as potential suppliers of essential oils because of their ethnopharmacological utility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the allelopathic potential of essential oils extracted from fresh leaves of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus, wild basil (Ocimum gratissimum L. and sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. with regard to their major constituents (citral, eugenol and cineol, respectively in different application forms (direct contact and the effect of volatile constituents on the germination and vigor of lettuce seeds (cultivar Regina SF 3500. The effects of the oils and their major components were evaluated with regard to the variables: first germination count, total germination, GVI (germination velocity index, seedling dry weight and average lengths of shoots and lettuce roots. The essential oils from lemon grass and basil displayed allelopathic potentials on seed germination and vigor of lettuce achenes that can be assigned to their respective major constituents citral and eugenol. On the other hand, the allelopathic effect of the essential oil from basil was a consequence of the combined effect of all the components, regardless the application method.

  19. Microbial load and stability of some phyto chemical compounds of selected Sudanese medicinal plant materials as affected by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musa, H. A. A.; Ahmed, E. E. A.; Osman, G. A. M.; Ali, H. A.; Muller, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation treatment on seeds of pepper cress (lepidium sativum L), seeds of black mustard (brassica nigra L.Koch), leaves of lemon grass (cymbopogon citratus), and calyces of roselle (hibiscus sabdariffa L), pods of senna (cassia senna L) and pods prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica L.). The radiation processing was carried out at dose levels of 0, 5, 10. 15 kGy. The irradiated and control samples were analyzed for microbial load, tannins and total phenol content as well as DPPH scavenging activity. The results indicated that gamma radiation treatment significantly reduced microbial load and showed that the total microbial load decreased linearly with absorbed radiation dose. They, also, indicated maximum reduction in tannin content in lemon grass, prickly acacia and roselle. On the other hand, irradiation with 15 kGy increased the tannin and phenol contents in black mustard, pepper cress and senna and reduced the phenol content of roselle and prickly acacia. The results also revealed that gamma irradiation resulted in significant decrease of DPPH radical scavenging activity of the different studied methanolic extracts with exception of pepper cress seeds.(Author)

  20. Spesies Tumbuhan Penyusun Vegetasi Lantai di Wilayah Restorasi Taman Nasional Gunung Merapi di Ngablak, Magelang, Jawa Tengah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo Purnomo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation restoration by Mount Merapi National Park (TNGM in Ngablak, Magelang, Central Java need the floristic data composition of understory vegetation. The objectives of this research were to identify and to determine the importance values of each plants species that composed of that restoration area. Sample collections were conducted using survey method for their morphological characters as voucher specimens that were used for species identification. Vegetation analysis was conducted using the quadratic method; shrubs (5x5 m2, grasses and herbs (1x1 m2, and importance values were analysed using relative frequencies and densities. The result shows that understory vegetation on the restoration area in Ngablak was composed of 60 seed plant species from 18 plant families. There were 7 plant families that dominate the region; Papilionaceae (13 species, Asteraceae (11, Poaceae (Grasses (10, Cyperaceae (Sedges (5, Amaranthaceae (3, Mimosaceae (3 and Commelinaceae (3. Plants species that have important value more than 25% in this restoration area were Cymbopogon citratus (sereh, Mimosa pudica (Putri malu, Gomphrena serrata (Bunga kancing, Pannisetum purpureum (Rumput gajah, Ageratum conyzoides (Wedusan, dan Euphatorium inulifolium (kirinyuh. The external factors that influence the growth of the understory vegetation are pH of soil and soil moisture.

  1. Facilitation or competition? Tree effects on grass biomass across a precipitation gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, Aristides; Kunin, William E; Cameron, Tom C; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Savanna ecosystems are dominated by two distinct plant life forms, grasses and trees, but the interactions between them are poorly understood. Here, we quantified the effects of isolated savanna trees on grass biomass as a function of distance from the base of the tree and tree height, across a precipitation gradient in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results suggest that mean annual precipitation (MAP) mediates the nature of tree-grass interactions in these ecosystems, with the impact of trees on grass biomass shifting qualitatively between 550 and 737 mm MAP. Tree effects on grass biomass were facilitative in drier sites (MAP≤550 mm), with higher grass biomass observed beneath tree canopies than outside. In contrast, at the wettest site (MAP = 737 mm), grass biomass did not differ significantly beneath and outside tree canopies. Within this overall precipitation-driven pattern, tree height had positive effect on sub-canopy grass biomass at some sites, but these effects were weak and not consistent across the rainfall gradient. For a more synthetic understanding of tree-grass interactions in savannas, future studies should focus on isolating the different mechanisms by which trees influence grass biomass, both positively and negatively, and elucidate how their relative strengths change over broad environmental gradients.

  2. Facilitation or competition? Tree effects on grass biomass across a precipitation gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristides Moustakas

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems are dominated by two distinct plant life forms, grasses and trees, but the interactions between them are poorly understood. Here, we quantified the effects of isolated savanna trees on grass biomass as a function of distance from the base of the tree and tree height, across a precipitation gradient in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results suggest that mean annual precipitation (MAP mediates the nature of tree-grass interactions in these ecosystems, with the impact of trees on grass biomass shifting qualitatively between 550 and 737 mm MAP. Tree effects on grass biomass were facilitative in drier sites (MAP≤550 mm, with higher grass biomass observed beneath tree canopies than outside. In contrast, at the wettest site (MAP = 737 mm, grass biomass did not differ significantly beneath and outside tree canopies. Within this overall precipitation-driven pattern, tree height had positive effect on sub-canopy grass biomass at some sites, but these effects were weak and not consistent across the rainfall gradient. For a more synthetic understanding of tree-grass interactions in savannas, future studies should focus on isolating the different mechanisms by which trees influence grass biomass, both positively and negatively, and elucidate how their relative strengths change over broad environmental gradients.

  3. Spatiotemporal Variation in the Environmental Controls of C4-Grass Origin and Ecology: Insights from Grass-Pollen δ13C Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. M.; Urban, M.; Hu, F.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the environmental factors controlling the origin and shifting abundance of C4 grasses in Earth's history is useful for projecting the response of C4-grass dominated grasslands to future environmental change. Unfortunately, grass pollen is typically morphologically indistinct, making palynological analysis a blunt tool for studying C4-grasses in the paleorecord. δ13C of individual grass-pollen grains using a spooling wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis, SPIRAL) overcomes this challenge and the potential biases of δ13C data from other substrates (e.g. leaf waxes). To assess the presence and relative abundance of C3- and C4-grass pollen in samples of unknown composition, we developed a hierarchical Bayesian model, trained with ~1,900 δ13C values from pollen grains of 31 grass species. Surface-sediment data from Africa, Australia, and North America demonstrate the reliability of this technique for quantifying C4-grass abundance on the landscape. To investigate the timing and control of the origin of C4-grasses we analyzed samples from the Oligocene-Miocene from Europe and from the Eocene from North America. Results indicate that C4 grasses appeared on the landscape of southwest Europe no later than the early Oligocene, implying that low atmospheric pCO2 may not have been the main driver and/or precondition for the development of C4 photosynthesis in the grass family. In contrast, we found no evidence for C4 grasses in the southeast United States before pCO2 fell. In application of SPIRAL to the late Quaternary, we found that shifts in pCO2 and moisture balance exerted key controls on the relative abundance of C3 and C4 grasses in Africa and Australia. Overall, our results imply that as in the past, future changes in the C3/C4 composition of grass-dominated ecosystems will likely exhibit striking spatiotemporal variability as a result of differing combinations of

  4. Initial success of native grasses is contingent on multiple interactions among exotic grass competition, temporal priority, rainfall and site effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Truman P; Zefferman, Emily P; Vaughn, Kurt J; Fick, Stephen

    2014-12-05

    Ecological communities are increasingly being recognized as the products of contemporary drivers and historical legacies that are both biotic and abiotic. In an attempt to unravel multiple layers of ecological contingency, we manipulated (i) competition with exotic annual grasses, (ii) the timing of this competition (temporal priority in arrival/seeding times) and (iii) watering (simulated rainfall) in a restoration-style planting of native perennial grasses. In addition, we replicated this experiment simultaneously at three sites in north-central California. Native perennial grasses had 73-99 % less cover when planted with exotic annuals than when planted alone, but this reduction was greatly ameliorated by planting the natives 2 weeks prior to the exotics. In a drought year, irrigation significantly reduced benefits of early planting so that these benefits resembled those observed in a non-drought year. There were significant differences across the three sites (site effects and interactions) in (i) overall native cover, (ii) the response of natives to competition, (iii) the strength of the temporal priority effect and (iv) the degree to which supplemental watering reduced priority effects. These results reveal the strong multi-layered contingency that underlies even relatively simple communities. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  5. Reductions in native grass biomass associated with drought facilitates the invasion of an exotic grass into a model grassland system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Anthony; Sloane, Daniel R; Leishman, Michelle R

    2016-05-01

    The invasion success of exotic plant species is often dependent on resource availability. Aspects of climate change such as rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and extreme climatic events will directly and indirectly alter resource availability in ecological communities. Understanding how these climate change-associated changes in resource availability will interact with one another to influence the invasion success of exotic plant species is complex. The aim of the study was to assess the establishment success of an invasive exotic species in response to climate change-associated changes in resource availability (CO2 levels and soil water availability) as a result of extreme drought. We grew grassland mesocosms consisting of four co-occurring native grass species common to the Cumberland Plain Woodland of western Sydney, Australia, under ambient and elevated CO2 levels and subjected them to an extreme drought treatment. We then added seeds of a highly invasive C3 grass, Ehrharta erecta, and assessed its establishment success (biomass production and reproductive output). We found that reduced biomass production of the native grasses in response to the extreme drought treatment enhanced the establishment success of E. erecta by creating resource pulses in light and space. Surprisingly, CO2 level did not affect the establishment success of E. erecta. Our results suggest that the invasion risk of grasslands in the future may be coupled to soil water availability and the subsequent response of resident native vegetation therefore making it strongly context- dependent.

  6. Alley cropping of legumes with grasses as forages : Effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia on the growth and biomass production of forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Yuhaeni

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A study to evaluate the effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium on the growth and biomass production of forages in an alley cropping system was conducted in two different agroclimatical zones i.e. Bogor, located at 500 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 3,112 nun/year and Sukabumi located at 900 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 1,402 mm/year . Both locations have low N, P, and K content and the soil is classified as acidic. The experimental design used was a split plot design with 3 replicates . The main plots were different grass species i.e. king grass (Pennisetum purpureum x P. typhoides and elephant grass (P. purpureum. The sub plots were the row spacing of gliricidia at 2, 3, 4, 6 m (1 hedgerows and 4 m (2 hedgerows. The results indicated that the growth and biomass production of grasses were significantly affected (P<0 .05 by the treatments in Bogor. The highest biomass productions was obtained from the 2 m row spacing which gave the highest dry matter production of grasses (1 .65 kg/hill and gliricidia (0 .086 kg/tree . In Sukabumi the growth and biomass production of grasses and gliricidia were also significantly affected by the treatments . The highest dry matter production was obtained with 2 m row spacing (dry matter of grasses and gliricidia were 1 .12 kg/hill and 0 .026 kg/tree, respectively . The result further indicated that biomass production of forages increased with the increase in gliricidia population. The alley cropping system wich is suitable for Bogor was the 2 m row spacing of gliricidia intercropped with either king or elephant grass and for Sukabumi 2 and 4 m (2 rows of gliricidia row spacing intercropped with king or elephant grass .

  7. Composição e fungitoxicidade do óleo essencial de capim citronela em função da adubação orgânica Composition and fungitoxicity of essential oil of citronella grass as affected by organic fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronice Alves Veloso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência da adubação orgânica sobre o teor e a composição do óleo essencial de capim citronela (Cymbopogon nardus, bem como a fungitoxicidade desse óleo ao crescimento micelial dos fungos Didymella bryoniae, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides e Amphobotrys ricini. A extração do óleo essencial foi realizada por hidrodestilação, a partir de plantas cultivadas em quatro doses de adubação orgânica (0, 3, 6 e 9 kg de esterco bovino curtido por cova, e a identificação dos constituintes químicos foi conduzida por cromatografia gasosa/espectrometria de massas. Para avaliar a inibição do crescimento micelial, o experimento foi instalado no delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em arranjo fatorial. Foram testadas sete alíquotas do óleo essencial (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 e 30 µL, em cinco épocas de avaliação, com quatro repetições. O teor de óleo essencial do capim citronela não foi afetado pela adubação orgânica, e o óleo essencial do capim citronela apresentou 24 compostos químicos, entre estes monoterpenos e sesquiterpenos, com maior concentração dos compostos citronelal, β-citronelol, geraniol e elemol. O óleo essencial do capim citronela apresenta maior efeito de inibição a Amphobotrys ricini, em comparação aos fungos Didymella bryoniae e Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of organic fertilization on the content and composition of the essential oil of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus, as well as to assess the fungitoxicity of this oil to the mycelial growth of the fungi Didymella bryoniae, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Amphobotrys ricini. The extraction of the essential oil was done by hydrodistillation in plants cultivated with four doses of organic fertilizer (0, 3, 6, and 9 kg matured cattle manure per hole, and the identification of the chemical compounds was done by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. To

  8. Biotechnological application of sustainable biogas production through dry anaerobic digestion of Napier grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussadee, Natthawud; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Cheunbarn, Tapana

    2017-05-01

    Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), represents an interesting substrate for biogas production. The research project evaluated biogas potential production from dry anaerobic digestion of Napier grass using batch experiment. To enhance the biogas production from ensiled Napier grass, thermal and alkaline pre-treatments were performed in batch mode. Alkali hydrolysis of Napier grass was performed prior to batch dry anaerobic digestion at three different mild concentrations of sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The study results confirmed that NaOH pretreated sample produced high yield of biogas than untreated (raw) and hot water pretreated samples. Napier grass was used as the mono-substrate. The biogas composition of carbon dioxide (30.10%), methane (63.50%) and 5 ppm of H 2 S was estimated from the biogas. Therefore, fast-growing, high-yielding and organic matter-enriched of Napier grass was promising energy crop for biogas production.

  9. Effects of feeding dairy cows different legume-grass silages on milk phytoestrogen concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höjer, A; Adler, S; Purup, Stig

    2012-01-01

    interval of legume-grass silage on phytoestrogen intake and milk phytoestrogen concentrations. In one experiment, 15 Swedish Red dairy cows were fed 2- or 3-cut red clover-grass silage, or 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage. In a second experiment, 16 Norwegian Red dairy cows were fed short-term ley...... silage with red clover or long-term ley silage with white clover, and the effects of supplementation with α-tocopherol were also tested. High concentrations of formononetin and biochanin A were found in all silage mixtures with red clover. The milk concentration of equol was highest for cows on the 2-cut....... Concentrations of secoisolariciresinol and matairesinol were higher in 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass and long-term ley silage mixtures, those with legume species other than red clover, and the highest grass proportions. The 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage diet also resulted in higher enterolactone...

  10. Fungitoxidade in vitro de extratos vegetais sobre Exserohilum turcicum (Pass Leonard & Suggs In vitro fungitoxicity of plant extracts on Exserohilum turcicum (Pass Leonard & Suggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R Scapin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A helmintosporiose, causada pelo fungo Exserohilum turcicum, é uma das principais doenças do milho-pipoca cultivado no Brasil. Devido às características da cultura, como porte da planta, extensão da área de plantio e rentabilidade econômica, o emprego de resistência genética e controle químico têm sido as principais formas de controle da doença. O emprego de agrotóxicos na agricultura tem levado riscos à saúde humana e freqüentes danos ao meio ambiente. Assim, na busca de métodos alternativos para o controle da helmintosporiose foi avaliado o efeito fungitóxico dos extratos vegetais das plantas Achillea milefollium (mil-folhas, Cymbopogon citratus (capim-limão, Artemisia camphorata (cânfora e Rosmarinus officinalis (alecrim no crescimento micelial de E. turcicum, em dois meios de cultura (BDA - batata-dextrose-ágar; e LCH - lactose caseína hidrolisada. Os extratos de alecrim e cânfora foram os que apresentaram maior inibição do crescimento micelial nos dois meios de cultura, enquanto que os extratos de mil-folhas e capim limão estimularam o crescimento micelial em meio LCH.Helminthosporiose is caused by the fungus Exserohilum turcicum and represents one of the main diseases in popcorn grown in Brazil. Due to its characteristics, such as plant size, planting area extension and economic profitability, the use of genetic resistance and chemical control has constituted the main procedure against such disease. The use of pesticides in agriculture has resulted in risks to the human health and frequent damages to the environment. Thus, the fungitoxic effect of plant extracts of Achillea millefolium (yarrow, Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass, Artemisia camphorata (camphor and Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary on the mycelial growth of E. turcicum was evaluated by using two culture media (PDA - potato dextrose agar, and LCH - lactose-casein hydrolysate in order to set alternative methods for controlling helminthosporiose. Rosemary

  11. Faecal particle-size distribution from ewes fed grass silages harvested at different stages of maturity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalali, Alireza; Nørgaard, Peder; Nadeau, E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of maturity stage of grass at harvest on particle size in faeces from ewes fed grass silage ad libitum. Eighteen pregnant Swedish ewes bearing two foetuses were given one of three treatments as their only feed. The treatments were early (ECS...... pore size. The proportions of particles in the B, C, D, S and O fractions were affected by cutting time of the silaage (P ewes fed grass silages....

  12. Evaluation of molecular basis of cross reactivity between rye and Bermuda grass pollen allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ruby; Bhalla, Prem L; Singh, Mohan B

    2009-12-01

    Allergenic cross reactivity between the members of the Pooids (Lolium perenne, Phleum pratense, and Poa pratensis) and Chloridoids (Cynodon dactylon and Paspalum notatum) is well established. Studies using crude extracts in the past have demonstrated limited cross reactivity between the Pooids and the Chloridoids suggesting separate diagnosis and therapy. However, little is known regarding the molecular basis for the limited cross reactivity observed between the 2 groups of grasses. The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the molecular basis of cross allergenicity between the major allergens from rye and Bermuda grass pollens. Immunoblot inhibition tests were carried out to determine the specificity of the proteins involved in cross reactivity. Crude pollen extract and bacterially expressed and purified recombinant Lol p 1and Lol p 5 from rye grass were subjected to cross inhibition experiments with crude and purified recombinant Cyn d 1 from Bermuda grass using sera from patients allergic to rye grass pollen. The immunoblot inhibition studies revealed a high degree of cross inhibition between the group 1 allergens. In contrast, a complete lack of inhibition was observed between Bermuda grass group 1 allergen rCyn d 1, and rye grass group 5 allergen rLol p 5. Crude rye grass extract strongly inhibited IgE reactivity to Bermuda grass, whereas crude Bermuda grass pollen extract showed a weaker inhibition. Our data suggests that a possible explanation for the limited cross reactivity between the Pooids and Chloridoids may, in part, be due to the absence of group 5 allergen from Chloridoid grasses. This approach of using purified proteins may be applied to better characterize the cross allergenicity patterns between different grass pollen allergens.

  13. Facilitation or Competition? Tree Effects on Grass Biomass across a Precipitation Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Moustakas, Aristides; Kunin, William E.; Cameron, Tom C.; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Savanna ecosystems are dominated by two distinct plant life forms, grasses and trees, but the interactions between them are poorly understood. Here, we quantified the effects of isolated savanna trees on grass biomass as a function of distance from the base of the tree and tree height, across a precipitation gradient in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results suggest that mean annual precipitation (MAP) mediates the nature of tree-grass interactions in these ecosystems, with the i...

  14. Effect of castor cake and elephant grass composting on edaphic fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Scoriza,Rafael Nogueira; Bianchi,Miriam de Oliveira; Correia,Maria Elizabeth Fernandes; Leal,Marco Antonio de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Elephant grass and castor cake when combined can make a promising organic fertilizer. However, castor cake contains potentially toxic chemicals, such as ricin and ricinine. To test potential effects of these chemicals, compost piles of elephant grass ( Pennisetum purpureum Schum.) with castor cake were prepared with different C:N ratios (T1 = 40, T2 = 30, T3 = 20; T4 = 30 [control, elephant grass + crotalaria]) to evaluate colonization by edaphic fauna and any suppressive effects of...

  15. Structural Characterization of Silica Particles Extracted from Grass Stenotaphrum secundatum: Biotransformation via Annelids

    OpenAIRE

    Espíndola-Gonzalez, A.; Fuentes-Ramirez, R.; Martínez-Hernández, A. L.; Castaño, V. M.; Velasco-Santos, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study shows the structural characterization of silica particles extracted from Stenotaphrum secundatum (St. Augustine) grass using an annelid-based biotransformation process. This bioprocess starts when St. Augustine grass is turned into humus by vermicompost, and then goes through calcination and acid treatment to obtain silica particles. To determine the effect of the bioprocess, silica particles without biotransformation were extracted directly from the sample of grass. The characteri...

  16. Acute toxic effects of endosulfan sulfate on three life stages of grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Peter B; Chung, Katy W; Venturella, John J; Shaddrick, Brian; Fulton, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the toxicity of endosulfan sulfate, the primary degradation product of the insecticide endosulfan, was determined in three life stages of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio). After 96 h exposure to endosulfan sulfate, the grass shrimp adult LC50 was 0.86 microg/L (95% CI 0.56-1.31), the grass shrimp larvae LC50 was 1.64 microg/L (95% CI 1.09-2.47) and the grass shrimp embryo LC50 was 45.85 microg/L (95% CI 23.72-88.61 microg/L). This was compared to the previously published grass shrimp 96-h LC50s for endosulfan. The toxicity of the two compounds was similar for the grass shrimp life stages with adults more sensitive than larvae and embryos. The presence of sediment in 24h endosulfan sulfate-exposures raised LC50s for both adult and larval grass shrimp but not significantly. The USEPA expected environmental concentrations (EEC) for total endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate and the calculations of risk quotients (RQ) based on the more sensitive adult grass shrimp 96-h LC50 clearly show that environmental concentrations equal to acute EECs would prove detrimental to grass shrimp or other similarly sensitive aquatic organisms. These results indicate that given the persistence and toxicity of endosulfan sulfate, future risk assessments should consider the toxicity potential of the parent compound as well as this degradation product.

  17. Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge with shredded grass from public green spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Taira; Arai, Sayuri; Okamoto, Seiichiro; Uchida, Tsutomu

    2013-02-01

    Adding greenery from public spaces to the co-digestion process with sewage sludge was evaluated by shredding experiments and laboratory-scale batch and continuous mesophilic anaerobic fermentation experiments. The ratio of the shredded grass with 20mm or less in length by a commercially available shredder was 93%. The methane production was around 0.2NL/gVS-grass in the batch experiment. The continuous experiment fed with sewage sludge and shredded grass was stably operated for 81days. The average methane production was 0.09NL/gVS-grass when the TS ratio of the sewage sludge and the grass was 10:1. This value was smaller than those of other reports using grass silage, but the grass species in this study were not managed, and the collected grass was just shredded and not ensiled before feeding to the reactor for simple operation. The addition of grass to a digester can improve the carbon/nitrogen ratio, methane production and dewaterability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ensiling and hydrothermal pretreatment of grass: Consequences for enzymatic biomass conversion and total monosaccharide yields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambye-Jensen, Morten; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Didion, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Ensiling may act as a pretreatment of fresh grass biomass and increase the enzymatic conversion of structural carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, ensiling does not provide sufficient severity to be a standalone pretreatment method. Here, ensiling of grass is combined with hydrothermal...... treatment (HTT) with the aim of improving the enzymatic biomass convertibility and decrease the required temperature of the HTT. Results: Grass silage (Festulolium Hykor) was hydrothermally treated at temperatures of 170, 180, and 190°C for 10 minutes. Relative to HTT treated dry grass, ensiling increased...

  19. Canopy growth and density of Wyoming big sagebrush sown with cool-season perennial grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hild, A.L.; Schuman, G.E.; Vicklund, L.E.; Williams, M.I. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

    2006-07-15

    Post-mining revegetation efforts often require grass seeding and mulch applications to stabilize the soils at the same time as shrub seeding, creating intraspecific competition between seeded shrubs and grasses that is not well understood. In 1999, we initiated a study at the Belle Ayr Coal Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, to evaluate the influence of grass competition on establishment and growth of Wyoming big sagebrush. Combinations of three sagebrush seeding rates (1, 2, and 4 kg pls ha{sup -1}) and seven cool-season perennial grass mixture seeding rates (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 14 kg pls ha{sup -1}) were seeded during winter 1998-1999. Shrub density and grass cover were assessed from 1999 to 2004. We monitored sagebrush canopy size in 2001, 2002, and 2004. All sagebrush seeding rates provided shrub densities (>=) 1 shrub m {sup -1} after six growing seasons. Grass production (>=) 75 g m{sup -2} was achieved by seeding grasses at 6 to 8 kg pls ha{sup -1}). Canopy growth of individual sagebrush plants was least in the heaviest grass seeding rate. Reduced grass seeding rates can aid in achieving Wyoming big sagebrush density standards and enhance shrub canopy growth.

  20. Use of ionizing radiation in grass breeding. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indruch, I.; Svetlik, V.; Ligocki, J.

    1980-01-01

    Two subspecies of F. rubra occurring in natural localities of north-east Moravia (CSSR) in the Beskydy Mts. were used. In Festuca rubra L. ssp. genuina grandiflora (Hack.) 2n=8x=56, F. rubra represented a model species used for testing the effects of both acute and chronic gamma irradiation. In Festuca rubra L. ssp. vulgaris (Gaud.) Hay 2n=6x=42, new breeding was realized with success. The effects on important features of grasses were identical in both cases. The extension of combining abilities is especially important because it allows the production of forms less frequent in natural populations. (author)

  1. Electricity-assisted production of caproic acid from grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Way Cern; Andersen, Stephen; Vervaeren, Han; Rabaey, Korneel

    2017-01-01

    Medium chain carboxylic acids, such as caproic acid, are conventionally produced from food materials. Caproic acid can be produced through fermentation by the reverse β-oxidation of lactic acid, generated from low value lignocellulosic biomass. In situ extraction of caproic acid can be achieved by membrane electrolysis coupled to the fermentation process, allowing recovery by phase separation. Grass was fermented to lactic acid in a leach-bed-type reactor, which was then further converted to caproic acid in a secondary fermenter. The lactic acid concentration was 9.36 ± 0.95 g L -1 over a 33-day semi-continuous operation, and converted to caproic acid at pH 5.5-6.2, with a concentration of 4.09 ± 0.54 g L -1 during stable production. The caproic acid product stream was extracted in its anionic form, concentrated and converted to caproic acid by membrane electrolysis, resulting in a >70 wt% purity solution. In a parallel test exploring the upper limits of production rate through cell retention, we achieved the highest reported caproic acid production rate to date from a lignocellulosic biomass (grass, via a coupled process), at 0.99 ± 0.02 g L -1  h -1 . The fermenting microbiome (mainly consisting of Clostridium IV and Lactobacillus ) was capable of producing a maximum caproic acid concentration of 10.92 ± 0.62 g L -1 at pH 5.5, at the border of maximum solubility of protonated caproic acid. Grass can be utilized as a substrate to produce caproic acid. The biological intermediary steps were enhanced by separating the steps to focus on the lactic acid intermediary. Notably, the pipeline was almost completely powered through electrical inputs, and thus could potentially be driven from sustainable energy without need for chemical input.Graphical abstractMicrobial and electrochemical production of lactic acid, caproic acid and decane from grass.

  2. Supplements to the Grasses (Poaceae in Taiwan (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jer Jung

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cynodon nlemfuensis Vanderyst has recently become naturalized in low elevations of Taiwan, and Tripsacum dactyloides (L. L. established its population in low elevations, central Taiwan. The occurrence of Eragrostis cumingii Steud. in lowlands and low elevations in Taiwan was confirmed. We describe these three grasses new to the flora of Taiwan. Besides, we provide a key to species of Cynodon in Taiwan, and the treatment of C. arcuatus J. Presl ex C. Presl, as the synonym of C. radiatus Roth ex Roemer & Schultes.

  3. Identification of radical scavengers in sweet grass (Hierochloe odorata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukalskas, Audrius; van Beek, Teris A; Venskutonis, Rimantas P; Linssen, Jozef P H; van Veldhuizen, Albertus; de Groot, Aede

    2002-05-08

    Extracts from aerial parts of sweet grass (Hierochloe odorata) were active DPPH free radical scavengers. The active compounds were detected in extract fractions using HPLC with on-line radical scavenging detection. After multistep fractionation of the extract, two new natural products possessing radical scavenging activity were isolated, and their structures were elucidated by NMR and MS. They were identified as 5,8-dihydroxybenzopyranone and 5-hydroxy-8-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-benzopyranone. Activities of the compounds isolated were tested by DPPH and ABTS free radical scavenging assays, and compared with the known natural antioxidant rosmarinic acid and Trolox.

  4. Molecular Physiology of Root System Architecture in Model Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, K.; Ahkami, A. H.; Anderton, C.; Veličković, D.; Myers, G. L.; Chrisler, W.; Lindenmaier, R.; Fang, Y.; Yabusaki, S.; Rosnow, J. J.; Farris, Y.; Khan, N. E.; Bernstein, H. C.; Jansson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Unraveling the molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in responses of Root System Architecture (RSA) to abiotic stresses and shifts in microbiome structure is critical to understand and engineer plant-microbe-soil interactions in the rhizosphere. In this study, accessions of Brachypodium distachyon Bd21 (C3 model grass) and Setaria viridis A10.1 (C4 model grass) were grown in phytotron chambers under current and elevated CO2 levels. Detailed growth stage-based phenotypic analysis revealed different above- and below-ground morphological and physiological responses in C3 and C4 grasses to enhanced CO2 levels. Based on our preliminary results and by screening values of total biomass, water use efficiency, root to shoot ratio, RSA parameters and net assimilation rates, we postulated a three-phase physiological mechanism, i.e. RootPlus, BiomassPlus and YieldPlus phases, for grass growth under elevated CO2 conditions. Moreover, this comprehensive set of morphological and process-based observations are currently in use to develop, test, and calibrate biophysical whole-plant models and in particular to simulate leaf-level photosynthesis at various developmental stages of C3 and C4 using the model BioCro. To further link the observed phenotypic traits at the organismal level to tissue and molecular levels, and to spatially resolve the origin and fate of key metabolites involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism in different root sections, we complement root phenotypic observations with spatial metabolomics data using mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods. Focusing on plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere, six bacterial strains with plant growth promoting features are currently in use in both gel-based and soil systems to screen root growth and development in Brachypodium. Using confocal microscopy, GFP-tagged bacterial systems are utilized to study the initiation of different root types of RSA, including primary root (PR), coleoptile node axile root (CNR

  5. Men are grass: Bateson, Erickson, utilization and metaphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Andrew E

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between metaphor and the practice of utilization in therapy and hypnosis can be seen as dependent on metaphor's role in structuring experience. The work of Gregory Bateson and others is used to illustrate how metaphor functions. Bateson's comparison of two forms of syllogistic logic provides a background for distinguishing between the experiential effects of metaphor in contrast to the categorical thinking inherent in simile and analogy. Clinical examples are given to demonstrate how utilization is structured by metaphor, particularly as Bateson has described it in his analysis of the Syllogism in Grass.

  6. Effect of grasses on herbicide fate in the soil column: infiltration of runoff, movement, and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Jason B; Coats, Joel R

    2004-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate if the presence of grass or the type of grass influences the environmental fate of herbicides within a soil column. Intact soil columns were planted with either smooth brome, big bluestem, tall fescue, switchgrass, or a mixture of prairie grasses or were left unvegetated. Artificial runoff containing atrazine, metolachlor, and pendimethalin was applied to the columns and allowed to infiltrate, and the resulting leachate was collected at the bottom of the soil column. This process was repeated on day 7 with herbicide-fortified runoff and on days 14 and 21 with water only. Following the leaching experiments, soil from the columns was fortified with either [14C]atrazine or [14C]metolachlor to measure pesticide degradation potential. The mean time necessary for infiltration of the artificial runoff decreased from 7.5 h for unvegetated to 3.4 h for grassed soil columns, and the type of grass did not have a significant effect. Neither the type of grass nor the presence of grass caused a significant change in the total amount of herbicide that leached through the columns. However, the presence of some grasses did decrease the amount of herbicide that leached in the final two events (i.e., additions not fortified with herbicide). Fescue was the least effective, reducing the amount of leached atrazine and metolachlor by 13% and 33% respectively, and mixed prairie grass was most effective, with reductions of 43% and 44%, respectively. In addition, atrazine and metolachlor degraded more rapidly in soil vegetated by some grasses. Mixed prairie grass had the greatest effect, increasing atrazine mineralization by 260% and formation of metolachlor-bound residue by 760%.

  7. Persistence of Overseeded Cool-Season Grasses in Bermudagrass Turf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Serensits

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cool-season grass species are commonly overseeded into bermudagrass turf for winter color. When the overseeded grass persists beyond the spring; however, it becomes a weed. The ability of perennial ryegrass, Italian (annual ryegrass, intermediate ryegrass, and hybrid bluegrass to persist in bermudagrass one year after seeding was determined. Perennial ryegrass, intermediate ryegrass, and Italian ryegrass produced acceptable ground cover in the spring after fall seeding. Hybrid bluegrass did not establish well, resulting in unacceptable cover. Perennial ryegrass generally persisted the most one year after seeding, either because of summer survival of plants or because of new germination the following fall. Plant counts one year after seeding were greater in the higher seeding rate treatment compared to the lower seeding treatment rate of perennial ryegrass, suggesting new germination had occurred. Plant counts one year after seeding plots with intermediate ryegrass or Italian ryegrass were attributed primarily to latent germination and not summer survival. Applications of foramsulfuron generally did not prevent overseeded species stand one year after seeding, supporting the conclusion of new germination. Although quality is less with intermediate ryegrass compared to perennial ryegrass, it transitions out easier than perennial ryegrass, resulting in fewer surviving plants one year later.

  8. TIME REDUCTION FOR SURINAM GRASS SEED GERMINATION TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Aquino Tomaz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe period for the germination test of Surinam grass seeds established by the Rules for Seeds Testing is 28 days, considered too lengthy by producers, venders, and seed analysis laboratories. So, the objective of this research was to evaluate the possibility of reducing the time for the germination test of Surinam grass seeds and to establish a method for dormancy breaking and the ideal temperature. Ten seed lots were submitted to the following treatments to overcome seed dormancy: control; substrate moistening with 0.2% KNO3; and scarification with sulfuric acid (98% 36 N for 15 minutes. After the treatments, the lots were submitted to seed water content, germination and tetrazolium tests. During the germination test, conducted with four replicates of 100 seeds per treatment for 28 days, two conditions of alternating temperatures (20-35 °C and 15-35 °C with 8 hours of light were tested. Attempting to determine the test end date, daily counts of the number of normal seedlings were made and for each lot, treatment, and temperature, a growth curve for the evaluation of germination was adjusted. The segmented regression model parameter estimations were calculated for each treatment. The germination test of Braquiaria decumbensseeds may be evaluated in 12 days after sowing using alternating temperatures of 20-35 °C and without any treatment to overcome dormancy.

  9. Absence of mammals and the evolution of New Zealand grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Alexandre; Humphreys, Aelys M; Lee, William G; Linder, H Peter

    2011-03-07

    Anthropogenic alteration of biotic distributions and disturbance regimes has dramatically changed the evolutionary context for the differentiation of species traits. Some of the most striking examples in recent centuries have been on islands where flightless birds, which evolved in the absence of mammalian carnivores, have been decimated following the widespread introduction of exotic predators. Until now, no equivalent case has been reported for plants. Here, we make use of robust analytical tools and an exceptionally well-sampled molecular phylogeny to show that a majority of New Zealand danthonioid grasses (Poaceae) may have adapted to the relaxed vertebrate herbivore pressure during the late Cenozoic through the development of a distinctive and unusual habit: abscission of old leaves. This feature occurs in only about 3 per cent of the world's roughly 11,000 grass species and has been empirically shown to increase plant productivity but to reduce protection against mammal grazing. This result suggests that release from a selective pressure can lead to species radiations. This seemingly anachronistic adaptation may represent an overlooked factor contributing to the severe decline in the geographical extent and species diversity of New Zealand's indigenous grasslands following the introduction of herbivorous terrestrial mammals in the 19th century.

  10. The Sorghum bicolor genome and the diversification of grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Andrew H.; Bowers, John E.; Bruggmann, Remy; dubchak, Inna; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hellsten, Uffe; Mitros, Therese; Poliakov, Alexander; Schmutz, Jeremy; Spannagl, Manuel; Tang, Haibo; Wang, Xiyin; Wicker, Thomas; Bharti, Arvind K.; Chapman, Jarrod; Feltus, F. Alex; Gowik, Udo; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lyons, Eric; Maher, Christopher A.; Martis, Mihaela; Marechania, Apurva; Otillar, Robert P.; Penning, Bryan W.; Salamov, Asaf. A.; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Lifang; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Freeling, Michael; Gingle, Alan R.; hash, C. Thomas; Keller, Beat; Klein, Patricia; Kresovich, Stephen; McCann, Maureen C.; Ming, Ray; Peterson, Daniel G.; ur-Rahman, Mehboob-; Ware, Doreen; Westhoff, Peter; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Messing, Joachim; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2008-08-20

    Sorghum, an African grass related to sugar cane and maize, is grown for food, feed, fibre and fuel. We present an initial analysis of the approx730-megabase Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench genome, placing approx98percent of genes in their chromosomal context using whole-genome shotgun sequence validated by genetic, physical and syntenic information. Genetic recombination is largely confined to about one-third of the sorghum genome with gene order and density similar to those of rice. Retrotransposon accumulation in recombinationally recalcitrant heterochromatin explains the approx75percent larger genome size of sorghum compared with rice. Although gene and repetitive DNA distributions have been preserved since palaeopolyploidization approx70 million years ago, most duplicated gene sets lost one member before the sorghum rice divergence. Concerted evolution makes one duplicated chromosomal segment appear to be only a few million years old. About 24percent of genes are grass-specific and 7percent are sorghum-specific. Recent gene and microRNA duplications may contribute to sorghum's drought tolerance.

  11. Report on the grass ecosystem project: results for 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R.W.; Baron, Y.; Bernard, J.

    1989-01-01

    Shortly after the Chernobyl accident, some 20 grass samples were collected over a wide area of Europe by a carefully prescribed protocol. The samples were dried, homogenized, and distributed by the IAEA to Member States who had expressed an interest in participating in their analysis. Thirteen radionuclides were measured in these samples, and the range in activity ratios for some radionuclides was over a hundredfold. This variability appears to be associated with particulate versus vaporized radionuclide releases from the reactor core, and/or the physicochemical nature of the radionuclide source term at the time of the release. The radionuclide concentrations observed by the various laboratories generally indicated good analytical consistency, and the few cases where consistency does not seem to hold may possibly be attributed to inhomogeneity of aliquots (hot particles) of the grass samples. The wide geographic coverage of this sampling programme, together with multiple laboratory analyses, provides a data resource which should be valuable for comparing and understanding the nature of Chernobyl fallout which was deposited at selected sites throughout Europe. (author). Figs and tabs

  12. Biogas from grass silage - Measurements and modeling with ADM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Konrad; Lübken, Manfred; Gehring, Tito; Wichern, Marc; Horn, Harald

    2010-11-01

    Mono fermentation of grass silage without the addition of manure was performed over a period of 345days under mesophilic conditions (38 degrees C). A simulation study based on the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) was done in order to show its applicability to lignocellulosic biomass. Therefore, the influent was fractioned by established fodder analysis (Weender analysis and van Soest method). ADM1 was modified with a separate compound of inert decay products similar to the approach of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). Furthermore, a function, which described the influence of solids on the process of hydrolysis, has been integrated to reproduce reliable ammonium concentrations. The model was calibrated by using the modified Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient to evaluate simulation quality. It was possible to fit observed data by changing only hydrogen inhibition constants and the maximum acetate uptake rate. The extended ADM1 model showed good agreement with measurements and was suitable for modeling anaerobic digestion of grass silage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple genetic pathways for seed shattering in the grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanlong; Gill, Bikram S

    2006-10-01

    Shattering is an essential seed dispersal mechanism in wild species. It is believed that independent mutations at orthologous loci led to convergent domestication of cereal crops. To investigate genetic relationships of Triticeae shattering genes with those of other grasses, we mapped spike-, barrel- (B-type), and wedge-type (W-type) spikelet disarticulation genes in wheat and its wild relatives. The Br1 gene for W-type disarticulation was mapped to a region delimited by Xpsr598 and Xpsr1196 on the short arm of chromosomes 3A in Triticum timopheevii and 3S in Aegilops speltoides. The spike- and W-type disarticulation genes are allelic at Br1 in Ae. speltoides. The B-type disarticulation gene, designated as Br2, was mapped to an interval of 4.4 cM between Xmwg2013 and Xpsr170 on the long arm of chromosome 3D in Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of common wheat. Therefore, B- and W-type disarticulations are governed by two different orthologous loci on group-3 chromosomes. Based on map position, orthologs of Br1 and Br2 were not detected in barley, maize, rice, and sorghum, indicating multiple genetic pathways for shattering in grasses. The implications of the mapping results are discussed with regard to the evolution of polyploid wheat and domestication of cereals.

  14. GERMINATION OF GRASSES DUE TO INOCULATION DIAZOTROPHIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. A. Moreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The germination of forage grasses suffers from numbness and a natural tendency to low quality. The use of microorganisms inoculated in seeds with the purpose of increasing and meet the demand of some nutrient has been shown to be efficient, but the role of the microorganism in germination and rate of force is still unknown. Therefore the goal as study was to evaluate the germination rate of seeds of three cultivars of Brachiaria brizantha CV. Marandu, b., b. brizantha CV. Xaraés and b. humidícola cv Tupi and a cultivar of millet, P. hybrid cv Massai depending on the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense diazotrofic inoculation (nitrogen-fixing. Germination test was used in seed dispersal to assess the effect of first count (VPC in the treatments with and without inoculation. It was done also conducted further tests of electrical conductivity, weight of thousand seeds and water content. The delineation used was randomized entirely (DIC and the statistical analysis carried out through the analysis of variance and comparison of means using the Tukey test, the 5% probability. Massai grass seeds have the highest rate of force of first count in both treatments. Inoculation of bacterium Azospirillum brasilense did not affect the values of force of first count on seeds of the cultivars Marandu, Xaraés, Tupi and Massai. The seeds of the massai have higher germination speed relative the other cultivars evaluated when inoculated.

  15. Disaggregating tree and grass phenology in tropical savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang

    Savannas are mixed tree-grass systems and as one of the world's largest biomes represent an important component of the Earth system affecting water and energy balances, carbon sequestration and biodiversity as well as supporting large human populations. Savanna vegetation structure and its distribution, however, may change because of major anthropogenic disturbances from climate change, wildfire, agriculture, and livestock production. The overstory and understory may have different water use strategies, different nutrient requirements and have different responses to fire and climate variation. The accurate measurement of the spatial distribution and structure of the overstory and understory are essential for understanding the savanna ecosystem. This project developed a workflow for separating the dynamics of the overstory and understory fractional cover in savannas at the continental scale (Australia, South America, and Africa). Previous studies have successfully separated the phenology of Australian savanna vegetation into persistent and seasonal greenness using time series decomposition, and into fractions of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and bare soil (BS) using linear unmixing. This study combined these methods to separate the understory and overstory signal in both the green and senescent phenological stages using remotely sensed imagery from the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor. The methods and parameters were adjusted based on the vegetation variation. The workflow was first tested at the Australian site. Here the PV estimates for overstory and understory showed best performance, however NPV estimates exhibited spatial variation in validation relationships. At the South American site (Cerrado), an additional method based on frequency unmixing was developed to separate green vegetation components with similar phenology. When the decomposition and frequency methods were compared, the frequency

  16. Effects of species diversity on seasonal variation in herbage yield and nutritive value of seven binary grass-legume mixtures and pure grass under cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgersma, Anjo; Søegaard, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Intensively managed sown temperate grasslands are generally of low species diversity, although swards based on grass-legume mixtures may have superior productivity and herbage quality than grass-only swards. We conducted a cutting experiment over two years to test the effect of species composition...... and diversity on herbage yield, contents of N, neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD). Perennial ryegrass (PR, Lolium perenne) was sown alone and with each of four forage legumes: red clover (RC, Trifolium pratense), lucerne (LU, Medicago sativa), birdsfoot trefoil (BT...... and IVOMD lowest in LU, followed by BT and the clovers. The highest N content was in WC. Among grasses, PR and HR had lower NDF contents and a higher IVOMD than MF; the highest N content was in PR. The grass component of mixtures had less effect than the legume component on herbage yield and quality...

  17. Spatial and temporal variability of guinea grass (Megathyrsus maximus) fuel loads and moisture on Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa M. Ellsworth; Creighton M. Litton; Andrew D. Taylor; J. Boone Kauffman

    2013-01-01

    Frequent wildfires in tropical landscapes dominated by non-native invasive grasses threaten surrounding ecosystems and developed areas. To better manage fire, accurate estimates of the spatial and temporal variability in fuels are urgently needed. We quantified the spatial variability in live and dead fine fuel loads and moistures at four guinea grass (...

  18. Selective logging and fire as drivers of alien grass invasion in a Bolivian tropical dry forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, J.W.; Mostacedo, B.; Peña-Claros, M.; Putz, F.E.

    2009-01-01

    Logging is an integral component of most conceptual models that relate human land-use and climate change to tropical deforestation via positive-feedbacks involving fire. Given that grass invasions can substantially alter fire regimes, we studied grass distributions in a tropical dry forest 1-5 yr

  19. Sod-seeding to modify coastal bermuda grass on reclaimed lignite overburden in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skousen, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the ability of nine low-maintenance species to establish and persist with Coastal bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) established on reclaimed lignite overburden; to evaluate the establishment and persistence of seventeen low-maintenance species seeded in overburden with no vegetation cover; and to examine seeding mixtures and rates for establishing low-maintenance species into three cover types (bermuda grass, oats, (Avena fatua L.) and no cover). Seventeen low-maintenance species established and persisted in overburden without fertilization during years of low precipitation. Several seeded grasses showed sufficient stand development in monoculture for erosion control. Most of the other seeded species were slower in establishment, yet persisted on the site and promoted multiple use of the reclaimed area. Recommended seeding rates were generally adequate for seedling establishment in oat, bermuda grass, and no vegetation cover types. Sod-seeding into bermuda grass resulted in higher seedling densities than those in oats and no cover because of stored moisture beneath the sod during bermuda grass dormancy. Using /sup 15/N-labelled fertilizer, Coastal bermuda grass demonstrated the ability to rapidly recovery applied N. Maximilian sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani Schrad.) was suppressed by Coastal bermuda grass in mixture at all fertilizer N rates.

  20. Thermally treated grass fibers as colonizable substrate for beneficial bacterial inoculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonova, R.; Postma, J; Ketelaars, J.; van Elsas, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how thermally treated (i.e., torrefied) grass, a new prospective ingredient of potting soils, is colonized by microorganisms. Torrefied grass fibers (TGF) represent a specific colonizable niche, which is potentially useful to establish a beneficial microbial community that