WorldWideScience

Sample records for grass buffer effects

  1. Modelling the effectiveness of grass buffer strips in managing muddy floods under a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Donal; Vandaele, Karel; Boardman, John; Meneely, John; Crossley, Laura H.

    2016-10-01

    Muddy floods occur when rainfall generates runoff on agricultural land, detaching and transporting sediment into the surrounding natural and built environment. In the Belgian Loess Belt, muddy floods occur regularly and lead to considerable economic costs associated with damage to property and infrastructure. Mitigation measures designed to manage the problem have been tested in a pilot area within Flanders and were found to be cost-effective within three years. This study assesses whether these mitigation measures will remain effective under a changing climate. To test this, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model was used to examine muddy flooding diagnostics (precipitation, runoff, soil loss and sediment yield) for a case study hillslope in Flanders where grass buffer strips are currently used as a mitigation measure. The model was run for present day conditions and then under 33 future site-specific climate scenarios. These future scenarios were generated from three earth system models driven by four representative concentration pathways and downscaled using quantile mapping and the weather generator CLIGEN. Results reveal that under the majority of future scenarios, muddy flooding diagnostics are projected to increase, mostly as a consequence of large scale precipitation events rather than mean changes. The magnitude of muddy flood events for a given return period is also generally projected to increase. These findings indicate that present day mitigation measures may have a reduced capacity to manage muddy flooding given the changes imposed by a warming climate with an enhanced hydrological cycle. Revisions to the design of existing mitigation measures within existing policy frameworks are considered the most effective way to account for the impacts of climate change in future mitigation planning.

  2. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: An annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    This bibliography and associated literature synthesis (Melcher and Skagen, 2005) was developed for the Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV). The PLJV sought compilation and annotation of the literature on grass buffers for protecting playas from runoff containing sediments, nutrients, pesticides, and other contaminants. In addition, PLJV sought information regarding the extent to which buffers may attenuate the precipitation runoff needed to fill playas, and avian use of buffers. We emphasize grass buffers, but we also provide information on other buffer types.

  3. Grass buffers for playas in agricultural landscapes: A literature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Cynthia P.; Skagen, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    We summarize current knowledge about grass buffers for protecting small, isolated wetlands in agricultural contexts, including information relevant to protecting playas from runoff containing sediments, nutrients, pesticides, and other contaminants, and information on how buffers may affect densities and productivity of grassland birds. Land-uses surrounding the approximately 60,000 playas within the Playa Lakes Region (PLR), including intensive agriculture, feedlots, and oil extraction, can contribute to severe degradation of playas. Farming and grazing can lead to significant sedimentation in nearby playas, eliminating their ability to hold water, support the region’s biodiversity, or adequately recharge aquifers. Contaminants further degrade habitats and threaten the water quality of underlying aquifers, including the Ogallala Aquifer.

  4. Imidacloprid sorption and transport in cropland, grass buffer and riparian buffer soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkowski, Laura E.; Goyne, Keith W.; Anderson, Stephen H.; Lerch, Robert N.; Allen, Craig R.; Snow, Daniel D.

    2018-01-01

    An understanding of neonicotinoid sorption and transport in soil is critical for determining and mitigating environmental risk associated with the most widely used class of insecticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate mobility and transport of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid (ICD) in soils collected from cropland, grass vegetative buffer strip (VBS), and riparian VBS soils. Soils were collected at six randomly chosen sites within grids that encompassed all three land uses. Single-point equilibrium batch sorption experiments were conducted using radio-labeled (14C) ICD to determine solid–solution partition coefficients (Kd). Column experiments were conducted using soils collected from the three vegetation treatments at one site by packing soil into glass columns. Water flow was characterized by applying Br− as a nonreactive tracer. A single pulse of 14C-ICD was then applied, and ICD leaching was monitored for up to 45 d. Bromide and ICD breakthrough curves for each column were simulated using CXTFIT and HYDRUS-1D models. Sorption results indicated that ICD sorbs more strongly to riparian VBS (Kd = 22.6 L kg−1) than crop (Kd = 11.3 L kg−1) soils. Soil organic C was the strongest predictor of ICD sorption (p < 0.0001). The column transport study found mean peak concentrations of ICD at 5.83, 10.84, and 23.8 pore volumes for crop, grass VBS, and riparian VBS soils, respectively. HYDRUS-1D results indicated that the two-site, one-rate linear reversible model best described results of the breakthrough curves, indicating the complexity of ICD sorption and demonstrating its mobility in soil. Greater sorption and longer retention by the grass and riparian VBS soils than the cropland soil suggests that VBS may be a viable means to mitigate ICD loss from agroecosystems, thereby preventing ICD transport into surface water, groundwater, or drinking water resources.

  5. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross compliance standards Rational management of set aside, Grass strips to control soil erosion and Vegetation buffers along watercourses on surface animal diversity and biological quality of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Biaggini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Landscape simplification and loss of natural and semi-natural habitats are the major causes of biodiversity decrease in agricultural landscapes. In order to mitigate the effects of intensive agricultural management the Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies in Italy has included the agronomic measures Rational management of set aside, Grass strips to control soil erosion and Vegetation buffers along watercourses in the decree on cross compliance. In this paper we review the results of a field research performed in Central Italy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the above mentioned GAEC standards for animal diversity enhancement. Using different animal groups as indicators, superficial Arthropod fauna and Herpetofauna, we found striking differences in the biodiversity levels of areas characterized by the application or by the lack of GAEC standards, with the latter being characterized by a significatively impoverished fauna. In particular, the set aside area and the buffer of riparian vegetation resulted of primary importance to allow higher biodiversity levels. Also the analysis of the biological quality of the soil, as assessed through the QBS-ar index based on edaphic micro-Arthropod fauna, indicated a higher quality of semi-natural habitats with respect to arable lands.

  6. Environmental Modeling, The Buffer Priority layers for Phosphorus / Sediment) Removal identify priority forest/grass buffer opportunities by subwatershed. Land use, hydrology, soil, and landscape characteristics were analyzed to rank buffer opportunities with high P/sed removal., Published in 2014, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Environmental Modeling dataset current as of 2014. The Buffer Priority layers for Phosphorus / Sediment) Removal identify priority forest/grass buffer opportunities...

  7. Veterinary antibiotic sorption and transport through agroforestry buffer, grass buffer and cropland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterinary antibiotics (VAs), such as sulfamethazine (SMZ) are released into the environment by application of manure to agricultural fields. Understanding the fate and transport of VAs is important for assessing and mitigating possible environmental hazards. To study the effects of dissolved organi...

  8. Effects of Terrestrial Buffer Zones on Amphibians on Golf Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglis, Holly J.; Boone, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians. PMID:22761833

  9. Environmental Modeling, The Buffer Priority layers for Nitrogen Removal identify priority forest/grass buffer sites by subwatershed. Land use, hydrology, soil, and landscape characteristics were analyzed to rank opportunities with high nitrogen removal potential., Published in 2014, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Environmental Modeling dataset current as of 2014. The Buffer Priority layers for Nitrogen Removal identify priority forest/grass buffer sites by subwatershed. Land...

  10. The buffer effect in neutral electrolyte supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane Vindt, Steffen; Skou, Eivind M.

    2016-01-01

    The observation that double-layer capacitors based on neutral aqueous electrolytes can have significantly wider usable potential windows than those based on acidic or alkaline electrolytes is studied. This effect is explained by a local pH change taking place at the electrode surfaces, leading...... potassium nitrate as the electrolyte and potassium phosphates as the buffer system....

  11. Provisioning of nestling Dickcissels in native warm-season grass field buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K.L.; Riffell, Samuel K.; Burger, L. Wes; Vilella, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    We used video cameras in 2008–2009 to record provisioning activities at Dickcissel (Spiza americana) nests in and around Conservation Reserve Program field buffers in north-central Mississippi, USA. We simultaneously observed foraging flight distances of parents. Provisioning rate (P  =  0.412), biomass (P  =  0.161), and foraging distance (P  =  0.159) did not increase with nestling age. Parents delivered larger items to meet demand associated with older nestlings (P  =  0.010–0.001). This suggests energetic costs of changes in prey selection were less than costs of increasing the number or distance of provisioning trips. Presence of male helpers increased provisioning rate (P nestling food resources similar to surrounding habitats. Use of continuous video monitoring of nest activity allows well-concealed activities including provisioning and male helping to be directly observed and better quantified.

  12. Defoliation effects of perennial grasses – continuing confusion | DL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although an adequate knowledge of growth patterns and defoliation effects in perennial grasses is a prerequisite for the rational use of veld and pastures for animal production, our knowledge of this subject is far from adequate. The results of various physiological and clipping studies on tropical and sub-tropical grasses are ...

  13. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dousset, S., E-mail: sylvie.dousset@limos.uhp-nancy.f [Nancy-Universite, CNRS, LIMOS, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Thevenot, M. [Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, Geosystemes, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Schrack, D. [INRA-SAD ASTER, 88500 Mirecourt (France); AFSSA, Laboratoire d' Etudes et de Recherches en Hydrologie, 54000 Nancy (France); Gouy, V.; Carluer, N. [UR Milieux Aquatiques, Ecologie et Pollution, Cemagref, 69336 Lyon Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  14. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, S.; Thevenot, M.; Schrack, D.; Gouy, V.; Carluer, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  15. Stream water responses to timber harvest: Riparian buffer width effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Vegetated riparian buffers are critical for protecting aquatic and terrestrial processes and habitats in southern Appalachian ecosystems. In this case study, we examined the effect of riparian buffer width on stream water quality following upland forest management activities in four headwater catchments. Three riparian buffer widths were delineated prior to cutting; 0m...

  16. Apex simulation: environmental benefits of agroforestry and grass buffers for corn-soybean watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Policy Environmental Extender (APEX) model is used to simulate the effects of vegetative filter strips on runoff and pollutant loadings from agricultural watersheds. A long-term paired watershed study under corn (Zea mays L-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation with agroforestr...

  17. APEX simulation: environmental benefits of agroforestry and grass buffers on corn-soybean watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Policy Environmental Extender (APEX) model has the ability to simulate the effects of vegetative filter strips on runoff and pollutant loadings from agricultural watersheds. The objectives of this study were to calibrate and validate the APEX model for three adjacent watersheds and...

  18. Effect of machinery wheel load on grass yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Effect of machinery wheel load on grass   Ole Green1, Rasmus N. Jørgensen2, Kristian Kristensen3, René Gislum3, Dionysis Bochtis1, & Claus G. Sørensen1   1University of Aarhus, Dept. of Agricultural Engineering 2University of Southern Denmark, Inst. of Chemical Eng., Biotechnology and Environmental...... 3University of Aarhus, Dept. of Genetics and Biotechnology   Corresponding author: Ole Green Address & e-mail: Research Centre Foulum, Blichers Allé 20, 8830 Tjele. Ole.Green@agrsci.dk     Abstract   Different traffic intensities have been shown to have a negative influence on the yield of grass...... and clover. A full scale grass-clover field trial was established to estimate the effect on clover-grass yields as a function of different wheel loads and tire pressures. The trial comprised 16 different traffic intensities with 35 replicates and 1 traffic free treatment with 245 replicates, totalling 17...

  19. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousset, S; Thévenot, M; Schrack, D; Gouy, V; Carluer, N

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of node buffer and capacity on network traffic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Xiang; Ding Jian-Xun; Hu Mao-Bin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the optimization of network traffic by considering the effects of node buffer ability and capacity. Two node buffer settings are considered. The node capacity is considered to be proportional to its buffer ability. The node effects on network traffic systems are studied with the shortest path protocol and an extension of the optimal routing [Phys. Rev. E 74 046106 (2006)]. In the diagrams of flux—density relationships, it is shown that a nodes buffer ability and capacity have profound effects on the network traffic

  1. Moisture Buffer Effect and its Impact on Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mingjie; Qin, Menghao; Chen, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    The moisture buffer effect of building materials may have great influence on indoor hygrothermal environment. In order to characterize the moisture buffering ability of materials, the basic concept of moisture buffer value (MBV) is adopted. Firstly, a theoretical correction factor is introduced...... in this paper. The moisture uptake/release by hygroscopic materials can be calculated with the factor and the basic MBV. Furthermore, the validation of the correction factor is carried out. The impact of moisture buffering on indoor environment is assessed by using numerical simulations. The results show...

  2. Effect of Buffer Bow Structure in Ship-Ship Collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yasuhira; Endo, Hisayoshi; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2008-01-01

    tankers, the introduction of buffer bulbous bows has been proposed. Relatively soft buffer bows absorb part of the kinetic energy of the striking ship before penetrating the inner hull of the struck vessel. The purpose of the present paper is to verify the effectiveness of a prototype buffer bulbous bow......) and the forward velocity of the struck ship on the collapse mode of the bow of the striking vessel are investigated. Collapse modes, contact forces and energy absorption capabilities of the buffer bows are compared with those of conventional bows....

  3. Effects of riparian buffers on hydrology of northern seasonal ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall K. Kolka; Brian J. Palik; Daniel P. Tersteeg; James C. Bell

    2011-01-01

    Although seasonal ponds are common in northern, glaciated, forested landscapes, forest management guidelines are generally lacking for these systems. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of riparian buffer type on seasonal pond hydrology following harvest of the adjacent upland forest. A replicated block design consisting of four buffer treatments...

  4. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of buffer width, vegetation, and season

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  5. Indirect effects of an invasive annual grass on seed fates of two native perennial grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Susan E; Merrill, Katherine T; Allen, Phil S; Beckstead, Julie; Norte, Anna S

    2014-04-01

    Invasive plants exhibit both direct and indirect negative effects on recruitment of natives following invasion. We examined indirect effects of the invader Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) on seed fates of two native grass species, Elymus elymoides and Pseudoroegneria spicata, by removing B. tectorum and by adding inoculum of the shared seed pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda in factorial experiments at xeric and mesic field sites. We also included a supplemental watering treatment to increase emergence and also the potential for pathogen escape. We recorded emergence and survival of native seedlings and also determined the fate of unemerged seeds. At the xeric site, Pyrenophora-caused mortality was high (34%), and effects of other pathogens and failed emergence of germinants were smaller. Cheatgrass removal negatively affected both emergence (35 vs. 25%) and spring survival (69 vs. 42%). Pyrenophora-caused seed mortality increased with inoculum augmentation for both species (22 vs. 47% overall), but emergence was negatively impacted only for P. spicata (20 vs. 34%). At the mesic site, Pyrenophora-caused mortality was low (6%). Cheatgrass removal doubled emergence (26 vs. 14%). Seed mortality increased significantly with inoculum augmentation for P. spicata (12 vs. 5%) but not E. elymoides, while emergence was not significantly affected in either species. A large fraction of seeds produced germinants that failed to emerge (37%), while another large fraction (35%) was killed by other pathogens. We conclude that facilitation by cheatgrass at the xeric site but interference at the mesic site was probably mediated through litter effects that could be ameliorative or suppressive. Apparent competition between cheatgrass and native grasses could occur through Pyrenophora, especially in a xeric environment, but effects were weak or absent at emergence. This was probably because Pyrenophora attacks the same slow-germinating fraction that is subject to pre-emergence mortality from

  6. A THEORETICAL DISCUSSION OF THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF BUFFER STOCKS AND BUFFER FUNDS

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Phil

    1988-01-01

    It has been established that the absence of risk markets justifies market intervention in principle. The form of intervention that has been discussed most widely in the literature is the buffer stock. This paper points out that other forms of intervention, specifically buffer funds, are likely to perform better. The analysis shows that buffer funds are likely to outperform buffer stocks because they address market failure more directly. A sub-theme developed in this paper is that since buffer...

  7. Effects of buffer thickness on ATW blanket performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Sik

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) system, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using an 840 MWt LBE cooled ATW design, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performances have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performances have been estimated by a series of calculations using MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance change are studied by investigating the low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. As the irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. The results show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable

  8. Effects of buffer thickness on ATW blanket performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W. S.; Mercatali, L.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for liquid metal cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using 840 MWt liquid metal cooled ATW designs, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performance have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performance parameters have been estimated by a series of calculations using the MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance variation are studied by investigating the low-energy ( and lt; 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. For investigating irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. Results for the liquid-metal-cooled designs show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable. Investigation of the impact of the proton beam energy on the target and buffer design shows that for a given blanket power level, a lower beam energy (0.6 GeV versus 1 GeV) results in a higher irradiation damage to the beam window. This trend occurs because of the increase in the beam intensity required to maintain the power level

  9. Effects of Buffer Thickness on ATW Blanket Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.S.; Mercatali, L.; Taiwo, T.A.; Hill, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for liquid metal cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using 840 MWt liquid metal cooled ATW designs, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performance have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performance parameters have been estimated by a series of calculations using the MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance variation are studied by investigating the low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. For investigating irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. Results for the liquid-metal-cooled designs show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable. Investigation of the impact of the proton beam energy on the target and buffer design shows that for a given blanket power level, a lower beam energy (0.6 GeV versus 1 GeV) results in a higher irradiation damage to the beam window. This trend occurs because of the increase in the beam intensity required to maintain the power level. (authors)

  10. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian Morten

    2012-01-01

    Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received littl...

  11. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PRETREATMENT ON PYROLYSIS CHARACTERISTICS OF NAPIER GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISAH YAKUB MOHAMMED

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Effect of non-catalytic aqueous pretretment on pyrolysis characteristics of Napier grass was investigated using thermogravimetric analyser. Increasing pretreatment severity (0.0-2.0 improved pyrolysis process. The residual mass at the end of pyrolysis for the pretreated sample was about 50% less compared to the untreated sample. Kinetics of the process was evaluated using order based model and both pretreated and untreated samples followed first order reaction. The activation energy of the pretreated samples was similar and higher than that of the raw sample which was attributed to faster rate of decomposition due removal of hetromaterials (ash, extractives and some hemicellulose in the pretreatment stage. Finally, this pretreatment method has demonstrated effectiveness for the removal of pyrolysis retardants and will improve the quantity and quality of bio-oil yield.

  12. EFFECT OF MULCH AND MIXED CROPPING GRASS - LEGUME AT SALINE SOIL ON GROWTH, FORAGE YIELD AND NUTRITIONAL QUALITY OF GUINEA GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kusmiyati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to evaluate the effect of mulch and mixed cropping grass – legume atsaline soil on growth, forage yield and nutritional quality of guinea grass. Saline soil used in thisresearch was classified into strongly saline soil with low soil fertility. The research was arrranged inrandomized complete block design with 3 blocks. The treatments were : M1 = guinea grassmonoculture, without mulch; M2 = guinea grass monoculture, 3 ton/ha mulch; M3 = guinea grassmonoculture, 6 ton/ha mulch, M4 = mixed cropping grass with Sesbania grandiflora, without mulch;M5 = mixed cropping grass with Sesbania grandiflora, 3 ton/ha mulch; M6 = mixed cropping grass withSesbania grandiflora, 6 ton/ha mulch. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, then followed byDuncan's Multiple Range Test. The highest soil moisture content was achieved at mixed cropping grasslegumewith 6 ton/ha of mulch. The effect of mulch at saline soil significantly increased plant growth,forage yield and nutritional quality of guinea grass. Application of 3 ton/ha mulch increased plantgrowth, forage yield and nutritional quality of guinea grass. Plant growth, forage yield and nutritionalquality of guinea grass were not affected by monoculture or mixed cropping with Sesbania at saline soil.

  13. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Mian Umer; Mahmud, Hisham Khaled Ben; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H 3 PO 4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid. (paper)

  14. Effect of grass species on NDF ruminal degradability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uzivatel

    Abstract. The objective of this study was to compare the ruminal degradability of neutral detergent fibre (NDF) .... Felina were evaluated in the present study. The grass was harvested from the primary growth of monocultured grasses on 19 and 26 May of 2004 and 27 May and 10 ...... Nutritional Ecology of the Ruminant.

  15. The combined effect of fertiliser nitrogen and phosphorus on herbage yield and change in soil nutrients of a grass/clover and grass-only sward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schils, R.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The combined effect of reduced nitrogen ( N ) and phosphorus ( P ) application on the production of grass- only and grass/ clover swards was studied in a five- year cutting experiment on a marine clay soil, established on newly sown swards. Furthermore, changes in soil N, P and carbon ( C ) were

  16. The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semere, T; Slater, F

    2005-07-01

    The ecological impact on local wildlife of biomass plantations of three different species of grasses has been monitored in the years 2002 to 2004 inclusive at farms in Herefordshire UK. Two of the grasses were not native to Britain. Wildlife monitored included ground flora, beetles, insects, birds, small mammals, butterflies, bees and hoverflies. The results provide a baseline of biodiversity data from biomass farms in England, although due to poor crop growth, the data from the switch-grass plantation was incomplete. The surveys were carried out by Cardiff University supported financially by the DTI.

  17. The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semere, T.; Slater, F.

    2005-01-01

    The ecological impact on local wildlife of biomass plantations of three different species of grasses has been monitored in the years 2002 to 2004 inclusive at farms in Herefordshire UK. Two of the grasses were not native to Britain. Wildlife monitored included ground flora, beetles, insects, birds, small mammals, butterflies, bees and hoverflies. The results provide a baseline of biodiversity data from biomass farms in England, although due to poor crop growth, the data from the switch-grass plantation was incomplete. The surveys were carried out by Cardiff University supported financially by the DTI

  18. Effects of soil microorganisms on uptake of 89Sr by ryegrass and bahia grass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Weiliang; Liu Kexing

    2006-01-01

    In present study, 60 Co γ-rays was used to irradiate soil with doses of 3.0 kGy and 25.0 kGy, respectively, to discriminate between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and other soil microorganisms, while soil without irradiation was used as control to study the effects of soil microorganisms on uptake of 89 Sr by ryegrass and bahia grass. The results showed that the AM infection rates in ryegrass and bahia grass were 48.0% and 28.0% in the control soil, respectively which indicated that both grass species were prone to forming AM symbiosis with AM fungi. Although AM fungi and other soil microorganisms had no significant effect on above ground biomass in ryegrass and bahia grass, both AM fungi and other soil microorganisms decreased the uptake of 89 Sr in the two grass species, though to a more or less extant. (authors)

  19. Surface runoff water quality in a managed three zone riparian buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, Richard; Sheridan, Joseph M

    2005-01-01

    Managed riparian forest buffers are an important conservation practice but there are little data on the water quality effects of buffer management. We measured surface runoff volumes and nutrient concentrations and loads in a riparian buffer system consisting of (moving down slope from the field) a grass strip, a managed forest, and an unmanaged forest. The managed forest consisted of sections of clear-cut, thinned, and mature forest. The mature forest had significantly lower flow-weighted concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total Kjeldahl N (TKN), sediment TKN, total N (nitrate + TKN), dissolved molybdate reactive P (DMRP), total P, and chloride. The average buffer represented the conditions along a stream reach with a buffer system in different stages of growth. Compared with the field output, flow-weighted concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, DMRP, and total P decreased significantly within the buffer and flow-weighted concentrations of TKN, total N, and chloride increased significantly within the buffer. All loads decreased significantly from the field to the middle of the buffer, but most loads increased from the middle of the buffer to the sampling point nearest the stream because surface runoff volume increased near the stream. The largest percentage reduction of the incoming nutrient load (at least 65% for all nutrient forms) took place in the grass buffer zone because of the large decrease (68%) in flow. The average buffer reduced loadings for all nutrient species, from 27% for TKN to 63% for sediment P. The managed forest and grass buffer combined was an effective buffer system.

  20. Effect of toasting field beans and of grass-clover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Lisbeth; Vestergaard, Jannie Steensig; Fretté, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The effect of toasting field beans and of grass-clover: maize silage ratio on milk production, milk composition and the sensory quality of the milk was investigated in a 2   2 factorial experiment. Toasting of field beans resulted in lower milk contents of both fat (44.2 versus 46.1 g/kg, P = 0.......02) and protein (33.5 versus 34.2 g/kg, P = 0.008), whereas milk production, urea and somatic cell contents were unaffected compared with the untreated field beans. Increasing the proportion of maize silage (from 9 to 21% of DM) in the ration decreased the content of urea in milk (P = 0.002), whereas milk......-β-carotene (P = 0.04) and β-carotene (P = 0.05). Toasting of field beans compared with untreated field beans did not affect the milk content of carotenoids and had only small effects on fatty acid composition. Regarding the sensory quality, the four treatments resulted in milk being characterized...

  1. Alley cropping of legumes with grasses as forages : Effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia on the growth and biomass production of forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Yuhaeni

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A study to evaluate the effect of different grass species and row spacing of gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium on the growth and biomass production of forages in an alley cropping system was conducted in two different agroclimatical zones i.e. Bogor, located at 500 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 3,112 nun/year and Sukabumi located at 900 m a .s .l . with an average annual rainfall of 1,402 mm/year . Both locations have low N, P, and K content and the soil is classified as acidic. The experimental design used was a split plot design with 3 replicates . The main plots were different grass species i.e. king grass (Pennisetum purpureum x P. typhoides and elephant grass (P. purpureum. The sub plots were the row spacing of gliricidia at 2, 3, 4, 6 m (1 hedgerows and 4 m (2 hedgerows. The results indicated that the growth and biomass production of grasses were significantly affected (P<0 .05 by the treatments in Bogor. The highest biomass productions was obtained from the 2 m row spacing which gave the highest dry matter production of grasses (1 .65 kg/hill and gliricidia (0 .086 kg/tree . In Sukabumi the growth and biomass production of grasses and gliricidia were also significantly affected by the treatments . The highest dry matter production was obtained with 2 m row spacing (dry matter of grasses and gliricidia were 1 .12 kg/hill and 0 .026 kg/tree, respectively . The result further indicated that biomass production of forages increased with the increase in gliricidia population. The alley cropping system wich is suitable for Bogor was the 2 m row spacing of gliricidia intercropped with either king or elephant grass and for Sukabumi 2 and 4 m (2 rows of gliricidia row spacing intercropped with king or elephant grass .

  2. The effect of respiration buffer composition on mitochondrial metabolism and function

    OpenAIRE

    Wollenman, Lucas C.; Vander Ploeg, Matthew R.; Miller, Mackinzie L.; Zhang, Yizhu; Bazil, Jason N.

    2017-01-01

    Functional studies on isolated mitochondria critically rely on the right choice of respiration buffer. Differences in buffer composition can lead to dramatically different respiration rates leading to difficulties in comparing prior studies. The ideal buffer facilities high ADP-stimulated respiratory rates and minimizes substrate transport effects so that the ability to distinguish between various treatments and conditions is maximal. In this study, we analyzed a variety of respiration buffer...

  3. Effects of conventional and grass-feeding systems on the nutrient composition of beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leheska, J M; Thompson, L D; Howe, J C; Hentges, E; Boyce, J; Brooks, J C; Shriver, B; Hoover, L; Miller, M F

    2008-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the nutrient composition of grass-fed beef in the United States for inclusion in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, and to compare the fatty acid composition of grass-fed and conventionally fed (control) beef. Ground beef (GB) and strip steaks (SS) were collected on 3 separate occasions from 15 grass-fed beef producers that represented 13 different states, whereas control beef samples were collected from 3 regions (Ohio, South Dakota, and Texas) of the United States on 3 separate occasions. Concentrations of minerals, choline, vitamin B(12), and thiamine were determined for grass-fed beef samples. Grass-fed GB samples had less Mg, P, and K (P < 0.05), and more Na, Zn, and vitamin B(12) (P < 0.05) than SS samples. Fat color, marbling, and pH were assessed for grass-fed and control SS. Subjective evaluation of the SS indicated that grass-fed beef had fat that was more yellow in color than control beef. Percentages of total fat, total cholesterol, and fatty acids along with trans fatty acids and CLA were determined for grass-fed and control SS and GB. Grass-fed SS had less total fat than control SS (P = 0.001), but both grass-fed and control SS were considered lean, because their total fat content was 4.3% or less. For both GB and SS, grass-fed beef had significantly less (P = 0.001 and P = 0.023, respectively) content of MUFA and a greater content of SFA, n-3 fatty acids, CLA, and trans-vaccenic acid than did the control samples. Concentrations of PUFA, trans fatty acids, n-6 fatty acids, and cholesterol did not differ between grass-fed and control ground beef. Trans-vaccenic acid (trans-11 18:1) made up the greatest concentration of the total trans fats in grass-fed beef, whereas CLA accounted for approximately 15% of the total trans fats. Although the fatty acid composition of grass-fed and conventionally fed beef was different, conclusions on the possible effects of these differences on human

  4. Effect of Vetiver Grass on Reduction of Soil Salinity and Some Minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Noshadi; Hosein Valizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Soil salinity is one of the major limitations of agriculture in the warm and dry regions. Soil sodification also damages soil structure and reduce soil permeability. Therefore, control of soil salinity and sodium is very important. Vetiver grass has unique characteristics that can be useful in phytoremediation. Materials and Methods: This research was conducted to investigate the effects of irrigation with different salinities on vetiver grass and the effects of this plant o...

  5. Effects of rye grass coverage on soil loss from loess slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuequn Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vegetative coverage is commonly used to reduce urban slope soil erosion. Laboratory experimental study on soil erosion under grass covered slopes is conventionally time and space consuming. In this study, a new method is suggested to study the influences of vegetation coverage on soil erosion from a sloped loess surface under three slope gradients of 5°, 15°, and 25°; four rye grass coverages of 0%, 25%, 50%, and 75%; and three rainfall intensities of 60, 90, and 120 mm/h with a silt-loamy loess soil. Rye grasses were planted in the field with the studied soil before being transplanted into a laboratory flume. Grass was allowed to resume growth for a period before the rain simulation experiment. Results showed that the grass cover reduced soil erosion by 63.90% to 92.75% and sediment transport rate by 80.59% to 96.17% under different slope gradients and rainfall intensities. The sediment concentration/sediment transport rate from bare slope was significantly higher than from a grass-covered slope. The sediment concentration/transport rate from grass-covered slopes decreased linearly with grass coverage and increased with rainfall intensity. The sediment concentration/transport rate from the bare slope increased as a power function of slope and reached the maximum value at the gradient of about 25°, whereas that from grass-covered slope increased linearly and at much lower levels. The results of this study can be used to estimate the effect of vegetation on soil erosion from loess slopes.

  6. Effect of Two Oil Dispersants on Larval Grass Shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, P.; Key, P. B.; Chung, K. W.; DeLorenzo, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The study focused on the effects that two oil dispersants, Corexit® EC9500A and Finasol® OSR52, have on the development of larval grass shrimp, (Palaemonetes pugio). The hypothesis was that Finasol would have a greater effect on larval grass shrimp development than Corexit. The experiment was conducted using 300 grass shrimp larvae that were 24 hours old. Each larva was exposed individually. In total, five sub-lethal concentrations were tested for each dispersant (control, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0,10.0 mg/L). The larvae were exposed for five days then transferred to clean seawater until metamorphosis into the juvenile stage. Key data measurements recorded included number of days to become juveniles, number of instars, length, dry weight, and mortality. Data from exposed shrimp was compared to the results of the control for each dispersant concentration. Corexit and Finasol exposure treatments of 5 mg/L and 10 mg/L showed significantly higher values for number of days and number of instars to reach juvenile status than values obtained from unexposed, control shrimp. Overall, mortality was higher in the Finasol treatments but the two dispersants did not respond significantly different from one another. Future studies are needed to determine the long term effects of dispersant exposure on all grass shrimp life stages and how any dispersant exposure impacts grass shrimp populations. Grass shrimp serve as excellent toxicity indicators of estuaries, and further studies will help to develop better oil spill mitigation techniques.

  7. Effects of buffer ionization in protein transition volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung; Heerklotz, Heiko; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2010-05-01

    Protein denaturation events are generally associated with a change in the state of ionization of abnormally titrating groups and, therefore, are coupled with changes in buffer ionization/neutralization equilibria. Consequently, buffer ionization should influence the measured change in volume accompanying protein denaturation. Changes in volume accompanying protein denaturation reflect the differential packing and hydration of polypeptide chains in their native and denatured conformations while also describing the pressure stability of proteins. A characteristic feature of conformational transitions of globular proteins is a near zero change in volume that is comparable in magnitude with the volume of ionization of biologically relevant buffers. Thus, the impact of buffer ionization on the volume of protein denaturation could be very significant with the potential to affect not only its magnitude but also its sign. To investigate this point quantitatively, we performed pressure perturbation calorimetric (PPC) studies of lysozyme and ribonuclease A at pH 3.0 in four buffers differing in their ionization volumes. Our results identify buffer ionization as an important determinant of protein transition volume that needs to be carefully taken into account. We emphasize that the importance of our results is not limited to PPC measurements but is more general and applies to all volumetric investigations, in particular, extending to the derivation of the pressure-temperature phase diagram of protein stability.

  8. Ultra-short-course booster is effective in recurrent grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, O; Lang, S; Pieper-Fürst, U; Astvatsatourov, A; Gerich, F; Klimek, L; Kramer, M F; Reydelet, Y; Shah-Hosseini, K; Mösges, R

    2018-01-01

    A relevant proportion of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) patients experience recurrent symptoms after successfully completing allergen immunotherapy (AIT). This prospective, controlled, noninterventional study used internationally standardized instruments to determine the clinical effects of a preseasonal, ultra-short-course booster AIT on clinical outcome parameters. This two-arm study included patients aged ≥12 years with recurrent grass pollen-induced seasonal AR who had completed a successful course of any grass pollen AIT at least 5 years before enrolment. Overall, 56 patients received one preseasonal short-course booster AIT using tyrosine-absorbed grass pollen allergoids containing the adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL ® ); 51 control patients received symptomatic medication. The combined symptom and medication score (CSMS) was recorded in the (peak) grass pollen season. Furthermore, concomitant (antiallergic) medication use, the patients' state of health, Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniRQLQ) results and safety/tolerability of the treatment were assessed. The CSMS in the peak grass pollen season was significantly lower in the booster AIT group (Δ=38.4%, Pallergoids containing the adjuvant MPL ® effectively prevents re-occurrence of symptoms in patients with grass pollen-induced ARC. © 2017 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Salivary buffer effect in relation to late pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, M; Pienihäkkinen, K

    2000-02-01

    We studied the salivary pH, buffer effect (BE), and flow rates of unstimulated and paraffin-stimulated saliva of 8 women in their late pregnancy and postpartum. Salivary samples were collected about 1 month prior to and about 2 months after delivery. In non-pregnant control women, two paraffin-stimulated salivary samples were collected 1 month apart. The salivary BE increased significantly from late pregnancy to postpartum without exception. The increase was 2.04 +/- 1.17 pH units (P pH) to 6.82 +/- 1.01 (final pH). This change was not due to variation in salivary flow rates, since both unstimulated and paraffin-stimulated flow rates remained unchanged. In control women the difference between the 2 BE measurements was only 0.13 +/- 0.47 pH units on average. We concluded that women with high postpartum BE values may have moderate or even low BE values in late pregnancy. In control women, individual variation was found to be low in all variables studied.

  10. The effect of Cr buffer layer thickness on voltage generation of thin-film thermoelectric modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoshiri, Mizue; Mikami, Masashi; Ozaki, Kimihiro

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Cr buffer layer thickness on the open-circuit voltage generated by thin-film thermoelectric modules of Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 (p-type) and Bi 2 Te 2.7 Se 0.3 (n-type) materials was investigated. A Cr buffer layer, whose thickness generally needs to be optimized to improve adhesion depending on the substrate surface condition, such as roughness, was deposited between thermoelectric thin films and glass substrates. When the Cr buffer layer was 1 nm thick, the Seebeck coefficients and electrical conductivity of 1 µm thermoelectric thin films with the buffer layers were approximately equal to those of the thermoelectric films without the buffer layers. When the thickness of the Cr buffer layer was 1 µm, the same as the thermoelectric films, the Seebeck coefficients of the bilayer films were reduced by an electrical current flowing inside the Cr buffer layer and the generation of Cr 2 Te 3 . The open-circuit voltage of the thin-film thermoelectric modules decreased with an increase in the thickness of the Cr buffer layer, which was primarily induced by the electrical current flow. The reduction caused by the Cr 2 Te 3 generation was less than 10% of the total voltage generation of the modules without the Cr buffer layers. The voltage generation of thin-film thermoelectric modules could be controlled by the Cr buffer layer thickness. (paper)

  11. Mixing less palatable grasses with urea, molasses and effective microorganisms and its effect on chemical composition and digestibility in goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:- A study was carried out at National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad to find out impacts of supplementation of low palatable grasses with urea, molasses and Effective Microorganisms (EM) on chemical composition and digestibility in goats. Heteropogon contortus (HC), Chrysopogon aucheri(CA), sorghum halpense (SH) and Desmostachya bipinnata (DB) were used and the combinations were grass + 4% molasses, grass + 4% urea, grass + 4% urea + 4% molasses, grass + 4% urea + 1:100 EM, grass + 1:100 EM + 4% molasses, grass +1:100 EM + 4% molasses + 4% urea. Proximate analysis of samples was carried out. Crude protein content of mixtures improved as compared with sole grasses. Digestibility of HC supplemented with urea, molasses and EM in various combinations was also studied in growing goats. The highest digestibility of DM in goats was recorded in HC + 4% urea + 4% molasses treatment (85.51%) followed by HC + 4% urea (78.57%) and HC + 4% urea + 4% molasses + 1:100 EM (78.00%). (author)

  12. Numerical Study on the Effect of Buffer Bow Structure in Ship-to-ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yasuhira; Endo, Hisayoshi; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    2005-01-01

    tankers, the introduction of buffer bulbous bows has been proposed. Relatively soft buffer bows absorb part of the kinetic energy of the striking ship before penetrating the inner hull of the struck vessel. The purpose of the present paper is to verify the effectiveness of a prototype buffer bulbous bow......) and the forward velocity of the struck ship on the collapse mode of the bow of the striking vessel are investigated. Collapse modes, contact forces and energy absorption capabilities of the buffer bows are compared with those of conventional bows....

  13. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah, Anas M; Turner, Michael R; Mager, Donald E; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-03-01

    The subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after s.c. administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyperosmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as the animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and O-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) on the plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after s.c. administration. An increase was observed in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, compared with isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to the improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph nodes in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatics, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05% in isotonic buffer to 13% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. The data suggest that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option for improving s.c. bioavailability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Effects of urban grass coverage on rainfall-induced runoff in Xi'an loess region in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, laboratory rainfall simulation experiments were conducted to investigate the regulatory effects of grass coverage on rainfall-runoff processes. A total of 80 grass blocks planted with well-grown manilagrass, together with their root systems, were sampled from an eastern suburban area of Xi'an City in the northwest arid area of China and sent to a laboratory for rainfall simulation experiments. The runoff and infiltration processes of a slope with different grass coverage ratios and vegetation patterns were analyzed. The results show that the runoff coefficient decreases with the increase of the grass coverage ratio, and the influence of grass coverage on the reduction of runoff shows a high degree of spatial variation. At a constant grass coverage ratio, as the area of grass coverage moves downward, the runoff coefficient, total runoff, and flood peak discharge gradually decrease, and the flood peak occurs later. With the increase of the grass coverage ratio, the flood peak discharge gradually decreases, and the flood peak occurs later as well. In conclusion, a high grass coverage ratio with the area of grass coverage located at the lower part of the slope will lead to satisfactory regulatory effects on rainfall-induced runoff.

  15. Effects of grazing management and buffer strips on metal runoff from pastures fertilized with poultry litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal runoff from fields fertilized with poultry litter may pose a threat to aquatic systems. Buffer strips have been added to fields to reduce nutrients and solids runoff. However, scant information exists on the effects of buffer strips combined with grazing management strategies on metal runoff f...

  16. Effects of buffer composition and dilution on nanowire field-effect biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloret, Noémie; Frederiksen, Rune S; Møller, Thor C; Rieben, Nathalie I; Martinez, Karen L; Upadhyay, Shivendra; Nygård, Jesper; De Vico, Luca; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    Nanowire-based field-effect transistors (FETs) can be used as ultra-sensitive and label-free biosensors for detecting protein–protein interactions. A way to increase the performance of such sensors is to dilute the sensing buffer drastically. However, we show here that this can have an important effect on the function of the proteins. Moreover, it is demonstrated that this dilution significantly affects the pH stability of the sensing buffer, which consequently impacts the charge of the protein and thus the response and signal-to-noise ratio in the sensing experiments. Three model systems are investigated experimentally to illustrate the impact on ligand–protein and protein–protein interactions. Simulations are performed to illustrate the effect on the performance of the sensors. Combining various parameters, the current study provides a means for evaluating and selecting the most appropriate buffer composition for bioFET measurements. (paper)

  17. Effect of grass silage chop length on chewing activity and digestibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garmo, T.H.; Randby, Å.T.; Eknæs, M.

    2008-01-01

    Round bale grass silage harvested early (D-value 757 g kg-1 DM) or at a normal (D-value 696 g kg-1 DM) time was used to study the effect of harvesting time, chop length and their interaction on chewing activity and digestibility by dairy cows. Six early lactating Norwegian Red cows were used in a 6...... due to reduced ET, CT = 45, 41 and 39 min kg-1 DM for rations with long, coarsely and finely chopped silage, respectively. Grass silage chop length did not influence diet digestibility, but there was a significant effect of harvesting time on digestibility. No interaction between harvesting time...

  18. Effect of salinity level on TSH and thyroid hormones of grass carp, Ctenophayngodon idella

    OpenAIRE

    Peyghan, Rahim; Enayati, Ala; Sabzevarizadeh, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (T3, T4) have marked effect on body metabolism and in controlling osmoregulation activity in fish. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of water salinity changes on thyroid hormones level and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of grass carp. For this purpose 120 grass carp were divided randomly in to four groups (10 fish in each group and three replicates per treatment). Three groups were held in three different salinities at concentrations of 4, 8 and 12 g L-1. T...

  19. Genetic compatibility determines endophyte-grass combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Saikkonen

    Full Text Available Even highly mutually beneficial microbial-plant interactions, such as mycorrhizal- and rhizobial-plant exchanges, involve selfishness, cheating and power-struggles between the partners, which depending on prevailing selective pressures, lead to a continuum of interactions from antagonistic to mutualistic. Using manipulated grass-endophyte combinations in a five year common garden experiment, we show that grass genotypes and genetic mismatches constrain genetic combinations between the vertically (via host seeds transmitted endophytes and the out-crossing host, thereby reducing infections in established grass populations. Infections were lost in both grass tillers and seedlings in F(1 and F(2 generations, respectively. Experimental plants were collected as seeds from two different environments, i.e., meadows and nearby riverbanks. Endophyte-related benefits to the host included an increased number of inflorescences, but only in meadow plants and not until the last growing season of the experiment. Our results illustrate the importance of genetic host specificity and trans-generational maternal effects on the genetic structure of a host population, which act as destabilizing forces in endophyte-grass symbioses. We propose that (1 genetic mismatches may act as a buffering mechanism against highly competitive endophyte-grass genotype combinations threatening the biodiversity of grassland communities and (2 these mismatches should be acknowledged, particularly in breeding programmes aimed at harnessing systemic and heritable endophytes to improve the agriculturally valuable characteristics of cultivars.

  20. Effect of a cathode buffer layer on the stability of organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Danbei; Zeng, Wenjin; Chen, Shilin; Su, Xiaodan; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    We present the effect of a cathode buffer layer on the performance and stability of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) based on a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Six kinds of cathode buffer layers, i.e. lithium fluoride, sodium chloride, NaCl/Mg, tris-(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminum, bathocuproine and 1,3,5-tris(2-N-phenylbenzimidazolyl)benzene, were inserted between the photoactive layer and an Al cathode, which played a dominant role in the device’s performance. Devices with the cathode buffer layers above exhibited improved performance. The degradation of these devices with encapsulation was further investigated in an inert atmosphere. The results indicated that devices with inorganic cathode buffer layers exhibited better stability than those with organic cathode buffer layers. (paper)

  1. Buffer layer annealing effects on the magnetization reversal process in Pd/Co/Pd systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassatoui, A.; Belhi, R.; Vogel, J.; Abdelmoula, K.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of annealing the buffer layer on the magnetization reversal behavior in Pd/Co/Pd thin films using magneto-optical Kerr microscopy. It was found that annealing the buffer layer at 150 °C for 1 h decreases the coercivity and increases the saturation magnetization and the effective magnetic anisotropy constant. This study also shows that the annealing induces a change of the magnetization reversal from a mixed nucleation and domain wall propagation process to one dominated by domain wall propagation. This result demonstrates that the main effect of annealing the buffer layer is to decrease the domain wall pinning in the Co layer, favoring the domain wall propagation mode. - Highlights: • The buffer layer surface morphology changes upon annealing of the buffer layer. • The coercivity decreases while the saturation magnetization and the effective anisotropy increase with the annealing of the buffer layer. • The reversal process changes from a mixed nucleation and domain wall propagation process to one dominated by domain wall propagation when annealing the buffer layer.

  2. Effects of field-grown genetically modified Zoysia grass on bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Eok; Yang, Sang-Hwan; Bae, Tae-Woong; Kang, Hong-Gyu; Lim, Pyung-Ok; Lee, Hyo-Yeon

    2011-04-01

    Herbicide-tolerant Zoysia grass has been previously developed through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We investigated the effects of genetically modified (GM) Zoysia grass and the associated herbicide application on bacterial community structure by using culture-independent approaches. To assess the possible horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of transgenic DNA to soil microorganisms, total soil DNAs were amplified by PCR with two primer sets for the bar and hpt genes, which were introduced into the GM Zoysia grass by a callus-type transformation. The transgenic genes were not detected from the total genomic DNAs extracted from 1.5 g of each rhizosphere soils of GM and non-GM Zoysia grasses. The structures and diversities of the bacterial communities in rhizosphere soils of GM and non-GM Zoysia grasses were investigated by constructing 16S rDNA clone libraries. Classifier, provided in the RDP II, assigned 100 clones in the 16S rRNA gene sequences library into 11 bacterial phyla. The most abundant phyla in both clone libraries were Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria. The bacterial diversity of the GM clone library was lower than that of the non- GM library. The former contained four phyla, whereas the latter had seven phyla. Phylogenetic trees were constructed to confirm these results. Phylogenetic analyses of the two clone libraries revealed considerable difference from each other. The significance of difference between clone libraries was examined with LIBSHUFF statistics. LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two clone libraries differed significantly (P〈0.025), suggesting alterations in the composition of the microbial community associated with GM Zoysia grass.

  3. Assessment of grass root effects on soil piping in sandy soils using the pinhole test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatek-Jakiel, Anita; Vannoppen, Wouter; Poesen, Jean

    2017-10-01

    Soil piping is an important land degradation process that occurs in a wide range of environments. Despite an increasing number of studies on this type of subsurface erosion, the impact of vegetation on piping erosion is still unclear. It can be hypothesized that vegetation, and in particular plant roots, may reduce piping susceptibility of soils because roots of vegetation also control concentrated flow erosion rates or shallow mass movements. Therefore, this paper aims to assess the impact of grass roots on piping erosion susceptibility of a sandy soil. The pinhole test was used as it provides quantitative data on pipeflow discharge, sediment concentration and sediment discharge. Tests were conducted at different hydraulic heads (i.e., 50 mm, 180 mm, 380 mm and 1020 mm). Results showed that the hydraulic head was positively correlated with pipeflow discharge, sediment concentration and sediment discharge, while the presence of grass roots (expressed as root density) was negatively correlated with these pipeflow characteristics. Smaller sediment concentrations and sediment discharges were observed in root-permeated samples compared to root-free samples. When root density exceeds 0.5 kg m- 3, piping erosion rates decreased by 50% compared to root-free soil samples. Moreover, if grass roots are present, the positive correlation between hydraulic head and both sediment discharge and sediment concentration is less pronounced, demonstrating that grass roots become more effective in reducing piping erosion rates at larger hydraulic heads. Overall, this study demonstrates that grass roots are quite efficient in reducing piping erosion rates in sandy soils, even at high hydraulic head (> 1 m). As such, grass roots may therefore be used to efficiently control piping erosion rates in topsoils.

  4. Interacting effects of grass height and herbivores on the establishment of an encroaching savanna shrub

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenah, N.; Munkert, H.; Gerhardt, K.; Olff, H.

    2009-01-01

    Shrub encroachment is a widely observed problem in Southern African savannas. Although the effects of herbivory and grass height on woody species recruitment have been studied individually, little information exists about how these factors interact. In this study seeds and seedlings of the

  5. Effects of the weed density on grass yield of Alfalfa ( Medicago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, in which the effects of different row spacing applications on weed density and on grass yield of Medicago sativa L. were investigated, was carried out in Van-Turkey from 2006 - 2008. Randomized blocks design was adopted with three replications. Row spacing applications of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 cm were ...

  6. Simulating the effects of grassland management and grass ensiling on methane emission from lactating cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bannink, A.; Smits, M.C.J.; Kebreab, E.; Mills, J.A.N.; Ellis, J.L.; Klop, A.; France, J.; Dijkstra, J.

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic, mechanistic model of enteric fermentation was used to investigate the effect of type and quality of grass forage, dry matter intake (DMI) and proportion of concentrates in dietary dry matter (DM) on variation in methane (CH4) emission from enteric fermentation in dairy cows. The model

  7. Effect of giant rat's tail grass ( Sporobolus pyramidalis p.beauv ) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of giant rat's tail grass ( Sporobolus pyramidalis p.beauv ) on Total Petroleum ... the use of plants, have been adopted for the remediation of the affected soils. ... Residual TPH and heavy metals (chromium, Cr and lead, Pb) were ...

  8. Buffer salt effects in off-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marák, Jozef; Stanová, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the impact of buffer salts/matrix effects on the signal in direct injection MS with an electrospray interface (DI-ESI-MS) following pITP fractionation of the sample was studied. A range of buffers frequently used in CE analyses (pH 3-10) was prepared containing 10, 50, and 90% v/v of ACN, respectively. The sets of calibration solutions of cetirizine (an antihistaminic drug with an amphiprotic character) within a 0.05-2.0 mg/L concentration range were prepared in different buffers. The greatest enhancements in the MS signal (in terms of change in the slope of the calibration line) were obtained for the beta-alanine buffer (pH 3.5) in positive ionization and for the borate buffer (pH 9.2) in negative ionization, respectively. The procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of buserelin (a peptidic drug). The slope of the calibration line for solutions containing the beta-alanine buffer with 50% of ACN was 4 times higher than for water or urine, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the buffer salt/matrix effects in an offline combination of pITP and DI-ESI-MS can also play a positive role, as they can enhance the signal in MS. A similar influence of the above effects can also be presumed in the CE techniques combined on-line with ESI-MS.

  9. Effect of buffer thickness on the retardation of radionuclide release from the high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kang, Chul Hyung; Han, Kyung Won

    2000-12-01

    The radionuclide release from buffer in the high-level waste repository to the surrounding host rock was assessed, and the effect of the radial buffer thickness on the release rate was analyzed. The total release rates decrease sharply with increasing radial buffer thickness up to 0.25 m, and decrease moderately at the buffer thickness between 0.25 m and 0.5 m. But increasing the radial buffer thickness beyond 0.5 m has little effect in reducing radionuclide release. Therefore a radial buffer thickness between 0.25 m and 0.5 m is sufficient based on the viewpoint of radionuclide retention

  10. Effect of a cement buffer on spent fuel dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennecart, Thierry; Cachoir, Christelle; Lemmens, Karel; Gielen, Ben; Vercauter, Regina

    2012-01-01

    The Belgian agency for radioactive waste has selected the super-container design with an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) buffer as the reference design for geological disposal of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Spent Fuel (SF) in the Boom Clay formation. In the super-container design, the canisters of HLW or SF will be enclosed by a 30 mm thick carbon steel overpack and a 700 mm thick concrete buffer. The overpack will prevent contact with the (cementitious) pore water during the thermal phase. On the other hand, once the overpack will be locally perforated, the high pH of the incoming water may have an impact on the lifetime of the waste. Most published data and national programs are related to clayey backfill materials, and few studies are reported in alkaline media. Hence, a set of experiments was conducted to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel (UO 2 dissolution rate and UO 2 solubility) in such an environment. The objective was to estimate the spent fuel dissolution rate in super-container conditions for use in preliminary performance assessment calculations

  11. Effects of nitrogen fertilisation rate and maturity of grass silage on methane emission by lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Hatew, B.; Podesta, S.C.; Klop, G.; Gastelen, van S.; Laar, van H.; Dijkstra, J.; Bannink, A.

    2016-01-01

    Grass silage is typically fed to dairy cows in temperate regions. However, in vivo information on methane (CH4) emission from grass silage of varying quality is limited. We evaluated the effect of two rates of nitrogen (N) fertilisation of grassland (low fertilisation (LF), 65 kg of N/ha; and high

  12. Grass mulching effect on infiltration, surface runoff and soil loss of three agricultural soils in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekalu, K O; Olorunfemi, I A; Osunbitan, J A

    2007-03-01

    Mulching the soil surface with a layer of plant residue is an effective method of conserving water and soil because it reduces surface runoff, increases infiltration of water into the soil and retard soil erosion. The effectiveness of using elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) as mulching material was evaluated in the laboratory using a rainfall simulator set at rainfall intensities typical of the tropics. Six soil samples, two from each of the three major soil series representing the main agricultural soils in South Western Nigeria were collected, placed on three different slopes, and mulched with different rates of the grass. The surface runoff, soil loss, and apparent cumulative infiltration were then measured under each condition. The results with elephant grass compared favorably with results from previous experiments using rice straw. Runoff and soil loss decreased with the amount of mulch used and increased with slope. Surface runoff, infiltration and soil loss had high correlations (R = 0.90, 0.89, and 0.86, respectively) with slope and mulch cover using surface response analysis. The mean surface runoff was correlated negatively with sand content, while mean soil loss was correlated positively with colloidal content (clay and organic matter) of the soil. Infiltration was increased and soil loss was reduced greatly with the highest cover. Mulching the soils with elephant grass residue may benefit late cropping (second cropping) by increasing stored soil water for use during dry weather and help to reduce erosion on sloping land.

  13. Effectiveness of narrow grass hedges in reducing atrazine runoff under different slope gradient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghai; Li, Cui; Chen, Chao; Chen, Jie; Zheng, Ruilun; Que, Xiaoe

    2018-03-01

    Atrazine is frequently detected in surface runoff and poses a potential threat to the environment. Grass hedges may minimize runoff loss of atrazine from crop fields. Therefore, the effectiveness of two grass hedges (Melilotus albus and Pennisetum alopecuroides) in controlling atrazine runoff was investigated using simulated rainfall on lands at different slope gradients (15 and 20%) in northern China. Results showed that a storm (40 mm in 1 h), occurring 4 h after atrazine application, caused a loss of 3% of the applied amount. Atrazine loss under 20% slope was significantly greater than that under 15% slope in control plots. Atrazine exports associated with the water fraction accounted for the majority of total loss. Pennisetum hedges were more efficient in controlling atrazine loss with runoff compared to Melilotus hedges. No significant difference in the capacity of grass hedges to reduce atrazine exports was observed between 15 and 20% slopes. These findings suggest grass hedges are effective in minimizing atrazine runoff in northern China, and Pennisetum hedges should be preferentially used on sloping croplands in similar climatic regions.

  14. Riparian forest buffers mitigate the effects of deforestation on fish assemblages in tropical headwater streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, Christopher M; Kennedy, Brian P

    2009-03-01

    Riparian forest buffers may play a critical role in moderating the impacts of deforestation on tropical stream ecosystems, but very few studies have examined the ecological effects of riparian buffers in the tropics. To test the hypothesis that riparian forest buffers can reduce the impacts of deforestation on tropical stream biota, we sampled fish assemblages in lowland headwater streams in southeastern Costa Rica representing three different treatments: (1) forested reference stream reaches, (2) stream reaches adjacent to pasture with a riparian forest buffer averaging at least 15 m in width on each bank, and (3) stream reaches adjacent to pasture without a riparian forest buffer. Land cover upstream from the study reaches was dominated by forest at all of the sites, allowing us to isolate the reach-scale effects of the three study treatments. Fish density was significantly higher in pasture reaches than in forest and forest buffer reaches, mostly due to an increase in herbivore-detritivores, but fish biomass did not differ among reach types. Fish species richness was also higher in pasture reaches than in forested reference reaches, while forest buffer reaches were intermediate. Overall, the taxonomic and trophic structure of fish assemblages in forest and forest buffer reaches was very similar, while assemblages in pasture reaches were quite distinct. These patterns were persistent across three sampling periods during our 15-month study. Differences in stream ecosystem conditions between pasture reaches and forested sites, including higher stream temperatures, reduced fruit and seed inputs, and a trend toward increased periphyton abundance, appeared to favor fish species normally found in larger streams and facilitate a native invasion process. Forest buffer reaches, in contrast, had stream temperatures and allochthonous inputs more similar to forested streams. Our results illustrate the importance of riparian areas to stream ecosystem integrity in the tropics

  15. Preliminary Study on the Damping Effect of a Lateral Damping Buffer under a Debris Flow Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the impact of debris flows on structures and exploring the feasibility of applying energy dissipation devices or shock isolators to reduce the damage caused by debris flows can make great contribution to the design of disaster prevention structures. In this paper, we propose a new type of device, a lateral damping buffer, to reduce the vulnerability of building structures to debris flows. This lateral damping buffer has two mechanisms of damage mitigation: when debris flows impact on a building, it acts as a buffer, and when the structure vibrates due to the impact, it acts as a shock absorber, which can reduce the maximum acceleration response and subsequent vibration respectively. To study the effectiveness of such a lateral damping buffer, an impact test is conducted, which mainly involves a lateral damping buffer attached to a two-degree-of-freedom structure under a simulated debris flow load. To enable the numerical study, the equation of motion of the structure along with the lateral damping buffer is derived. A subsequent parametric study is performed to optimize the lateral damping buffer. Finally, a practical design procedure is also provided.

  16. Ocean acidification buffering effects of seagrass in Tampa Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Kimberly K.; Moyer, Ryan P.; Moore, Christopher; Tomasko, David A.; Smiley, Nathan A.; Torres-Garcia, Legna; Powell, Christina E.; Chappel, Amanda R.; Bociu, Ioana; Smiley, Nathan; Torres-Garcia, Legna M.; Powell, Christina E.; Chappel, Amanda R.; Bociu, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has identified ocean acidification as a critical threat to marine and estuarine species in ocean and coastal ecosystems around the world. However, seagrasses are projected to benefit from elevated atmospheric pCO2, are capable of increasing seawater pH and carbonate mineral saturation states through photosynthesis, and may help buffer against the chemical impacts of ocean acidification. Additionally, dissolution of carbonate sediments may also provide a mechanism for buffering seawater pH. Long-term water quality monitoring data from the Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County indicates that seawater pH has risen since the 1980‘s as seagrass beds have continued to recover since that time. We examined the role of seagrass beds in maintaining and elevating pH and carbonate mineral saturation state in northern and southern Tampa Bay where the percent of carbonate sediments is low (40%), respectively. Basic water quality and carbonate system parameters (including pH, total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, partial pressure of CO2, and carbonate mineral saturation state) were measured over diurnal time periods along transects (50-100 m) including dense and sparse Thalassia testudinum. seagrass beds, deep edge seagrass, and adjacent bare sand bottom. Seagrass density and productivity, sediment composition and hydrodynamic parameters were also measured, concurrently. Results indicate that seagrass beds locally elevate pH by up to 0.5 pH unit and double carbonate mineral saturation states relative to bare sand habitats. Thus, seagrass beds in Tampa Bay may provide refuge for marine organisms from the impacts of ocean acidification.

  17. Leverage Between the Buffering Effect and the Bystander Effect in Social Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Ping; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined encouraged and inhibited social feedback behaviors based on the theories of the buffering effect and the bystander effect. A system program was used to collect personal data and social feedback from a Facebook data set to test the research model. The results revealed that the buffering effect induced a positive relationship between social network size and feedback gained from friends when people's social network size was under a certain cognitive constraint. For people with a social network size that exceeds this cognitive constraint, the bystander effect may occur, in which having more friends may inhibit social feedback. In this study, two social psychological theories were applied to explain social feedback behavior on Facebook, and it was determined that social network size and social feedback exhibited no consistent linear relationship.

  18. Effects of processing phases on the quality of massai grass seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Faria de Melo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Massai grass is an important tropical forage grass. The harvested seeds upon being received by the company, are found to be contaminated with impurities which are removable by processing machines. This procedure is necessary to produce seeds of a quality level within standards established for commercialization and sowing purposes. The objective of this project was to evaluate the effects of processing phases on the physical and physiological quality of massai grass (Panicum maximum x P. infestum, cv. Massai seeds for commercialization purposes. Seeds were sampled before processing and after leaving the air and screen machine (upper and intermediary screens and bottom; first gravity table (drift, upper and intermediate spouts; treating machine; and second gravity table (upper, intermediate, and lower spouts. Seeds were evaluated as to water content, physical (purity and 1,000 seeds weight and physiological quality (germination, first count of germination, seedling vigor classification, accelerated aging, seedling emergence in the field, speed of emergence index, and primary root length, shoot length. Massai grass seeds had their physical and physiological qualities improved when they were processed by an air and screen machine and a gravity table. Seeds from the intermediate discharge spout of the first gravity table, after going through the air and screen machine, are those of with highest physiological potential. The seeds of this species do not need to be processed to fit the germination and purity standards when the national market is the goal.

  19. Long term effects of ash fertilization of reed canary grass; Laangtidseffekter av askgoedsling vid roerflensodling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmborg, Cecilia; Lindvall, Eva

    2011-03-15

    harvest. The main component of the ash is silica and silica concentrations are higher when reed canary grass is grown on clay soil than on peat soil. In an earlier project within the department of agricultural research for northern Sweden, SLU Umea, reed canary grass growing on peat soil was fertilized with ash from cocombustion of reed canary grass and sorted municipal waste. This ash was beneficial for the growth of the grass and did not give increased heavy metal contents. However the experiment only lasted two years so no conclusions could be drawn about long-term effects. Crop yields and elemental composition of the crop: The yields varied very much from year to year. The first two production years, 2004 and 2005 the yield was at expected levels, 6000-7000 kg dry matter per ha and year. After that, 2006-2009 the yields have been lower than expected, 1500 - 4000 kg dry matter per ha and year. The reason for this is not known, but it could be related to climate or pests. There were no significant differences in yield between the treatments. Samples from each plot from the last harvest and stored samples from 2004 were analyzed for nutrient and heavy metal content. There were only minor significant differences between the treatments: The ash and the potassium and calcium concentrations 2009 in grass from treatment A, ash from co-combustion of reed canary grass and waste, was slightly higher than in the NPK fertilized control. The magnesium concentration in 2009 was slightly higher in grass fertilized with reed canary grass ash than in the control grass. Element balances and soil concentrations of elements: Because of the low yield levels the amounts of P and K applied were much higher than the removal with harvests (Table 2). This resulted in an increase in plant available P and K in the top soil between 2003 and 2008 (Table 3). However, in the subsoil there was a decrease especially in plant available P. The only significant differences in soil nutrients between the

  20. Effect of a New Local Anesthetic Buffering Device on Pain Reduction During Nerve Block lnjections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-10

    the anticipation of pain associated with dental care is a significant deterrent in seeking treatment. With the advent of modern local anesthesia ...eliminate pain from dental injection to include: application of topical anesthesia , tissue pressure/vibration, cold application, and buffering of the local ...anesthetic solution. In dentistry , the effect of buffering local anesthetic solutions was first studied by Gros and Laewen in 1910 and then by

  1. Interactive effects of plant-available soil silicon and herbivory on competition between two grass species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzov, Mihail; Reidinger, Stefan; Hartley, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The herbivore defence system of true grasses (Poaceae) is predominantly based on silicon that is taken up from the soil and deposited in the leaves in the form of abrasive phytoliths. Silicon uptake mechanisms can be both passive and active, with the latter suggesting that there is an energetic cost to silicon uptake. This study assessed the effects of plant-available soil silicon and herbivory on the competitive interactions between the grasses Poa annua, a species that has previously been reported to accumulate only small amounts of silicon, and Lolium perenne, a high silicon accumulator. Methods Plants were grown in mono- and mixed cultures under greenhouse conditions. Plant-available soil silicon levels were manipulated by adding silicon to the soil in the form of sodium silicate. Subsets of mixed culture pots were exposed to above-ground herbivory by desert locusts (Schistocerca gregaria). Key Results In the absence of herbivory, silicon addition increased biomass of P. annua but decreased biomass of L. perenne. Silicon addition increased foliar silicon concentrations of both grass species >4-fold. Under low soil-silicon availability the herbivores removed more leaf biomass from L. perenne than from P. annua, whereas under high silicon availability the reverse was true. Consequently, herbivory shifted the competitive balance between the two grass species, with the outcome depending on the availability of soil silicon. Conclusions It is concluded that a complex interplay between herbivore abundance, growth–defence trade-offs and the availability of soil silicon in the grasses' local environment affects the outcome of inter-specific competition, and so has the potential to impact on plant community structure. PMID:21868406

  2. Detrimental and neutral effects of a wild grass-fungal endophyte symbiotum on insect preference and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Stephen L; Hu, Jinguo; Stewart, Alan V; Wang, Bingrui; Elberson, Leslie R

    2011-01-01

    Seed-borne Epichloë/Neotyphodium Glenn, Bacon, Hanlin (Ascomycota: Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) fungal endophytes in temperate grasses can provide protection against insect attack with the degree of host resistance related to the grass-endophyte symbiotum and the insect species involved in an interaction. Few experimental studies with wild grass-endophyte symbiota, compared to endophyte-infected agricultural grasses, have tested for anti-insect benefits, let alone for resistance against more than one insect species. This study quantified the preference and performance of the bird cherry oat-aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), two important pests of forage and cereal grasses, on Neotyphodium-infected (E+) and uninfected (E-) plants of the wild grass Alpine timothy, Phleum alpinum L. (Poales: Poaceae). The experiments tested for both constitutive and wound-induced resistance in E+ plants to characterize possible plasticity of defense responses by a wild E+ grass. The aphid, R. padi preferred E- over E+ test plants in choice experiments and E+ undamaged test plants constitutively expressed antibiosis resistance to this aphid by suppressing population growth. Prior damage of E+ test plants did not induce higher levels of resistance to R. padi. By contrast, the beetle, O. melanopus showed no preference for E+ or E- test plants and endophyte infection did not adversely affect the survival and development of larvae. These results extend the phenomenon of variable effects of E+ wild grasses on the preference and performance of phytophagous insects. The wild grass- Neotyphodium symbiotum in this study broadens the number of wild E+ grasses available for expanded explorations into the effects of endophyte metabolites on insect herbivory.

  3. Effects of species diversity on seasonal variation in herbage yield and nutritive value of seven binary grass-legume mixtures and pure grass under cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgersma, Anjo; Søegaard, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Intensively managed sown temperate grasslands are generally of low species diversity, although swards based on grass-legume mixtures may have superior productivity and herbage quality than grass-only swards. We conducted a cutting experiment over two years to test the effect of species composition...... and diversity on herbage yield, contents of N, neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD). Perennial ryegrass (PR, Lolium perenne) was sown alone and with each of four forage legumes: red clover (RC, Trifolium pratense), lucerne (LU, Medicago sativa), birdsfoot trefoil (BT......, Lotus corniculatus) and white clover (WC, Trifolium repens); WC was also sown with hybrid ryegrass (HR, Lolium × boucheanum), meadow fescue (MF, Festuca pratensis) and timothy (TI, Phleum pratense). Herbage productivity was lowest in pure PR followed by PR/BT, and highest in PR/RC; this mixture had...

  4. Effects of logging on macroinvertebrates in streams with and without buffer strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, J D; Erman, D C; Roby, K B

    1980-01-01

    The impact of logging with and without buffer strip protection on stream macroinvertebrates was examined through comparisons of community structure in commercially logged and control watersheds throughout northern California. A nonparametric test of community dissimilarities within matched blocks of two control and one or two treated stations showed significant (P < 0.05) logging effects on unprotected streams when Euclidean distance and mutual information were used as dissimilarity indices, but not when chord distance was used. Shannon diversity in unprotected streams was lower (P < 0.01) than in control (unlogged) streams; densities of total macroinvertebrate fauna and of Chironomidae, Baetis, and Nemoura were higher in unprotected streams than in controls (P <0.05). Streams with narrow buffer strips (<30 m) showed significant effects by the Euclidean distance test, but diversity varied widely and was not significantly different from that in either unprotected or control streams than in controls (P < 0.05). Macroinvertebrate communities in streams with wide buffers (greater than or equal to 30m) could not be distinguished from those of controls by either Euclidean distance or diversity; however, diversity in wide-buffered streams was significantly greater than in streams without buffer strips, indicating effective protection from logging effects.

  5. Effect of ponderosa pine needle litter on grass seedling survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt R. McConnell; Justin G. Smith

    1971-01-01

    Hard fescue survival rates were followed for 6 years on four different pine needle treatment plots. Needle litter had a significant effect on initial survival of fescue seedlings, but subsequent losses undoubtedly resulted from the interaction of many factors.

  6. A review of vegetated buffers and a meta-analysis of their mitigation efficacy in reducing nonpoint source pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuyang; Liu, Xingmei; Zhang, Minghua; Dahlgren, Randy A; Eitzel, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Vegetated buffers are a well-studied and widely used agricultural management practice for reducing nonpoint-source pollution. A wealth of literature provides experimental data on their mitigation efficacy. This paper aggregated many of these results and performed a meta-analysis to quantify the relationships between pollutant removal efficacy and buffer width, buffer slope, soil type, and vegetation type. Theoretical models for removal efficacy (Y) vs. buffer width (w) were derived and tested against data from the surveyed literature using statistical analyses. A model of the form Y = K x (1-e(-bxw)), (0 pollutant removal, where K reflects the maximum removal efficacy of the buffer and b reflects its probability to remove any single particle of pollutant in a unit distance. Buffer width alone explains 37, 60, 44, and 35% of the total variance in removal efficacy for sediment, pesticides, N, and P, respectively. Buffer slope was linearly associated with sediment removal efficacy either positively (when slope 10%). Buffers composed of trees have higher N and P removal efficacy than buffers composed of grasses or mixtures of grasses and trees. Soil drainage type did not show a significant effect on pollutant removal efficacy. Based on our analysis, a 30-m buffer under favorable slope conditions (approximately 10%) removes more than 85% of all the studied pollutants. These models predicting optimal buffer width/slope can be instrumental in the design, implementation, and modeling of vegetated buffers for treating agricultural runoff.

  7. Effect of Tris-acetate buffer on endotoxin removal from human-like collagen used biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Huizhi; Fan, Daidi; Deng, Jianjun; Zhu, Chenghui; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Xiaoxuan

    2014-01-01

    Protein preparation, which has active ingredients designated for the use of biomaterials and therapeutical protein, is obtained by genetic engineering, but products of genetic engineering are often contaminated by endotoxins. Because endotoxin is a ubiquitous and potent proinflammatory agent, endotoxin removal or depletion from protein is essential for researching any biomaterials. In this study, we have used Tris-acetate (TA) buffer of neutral pH value to evaluate endotoxins absorbed on the Pierce high-capacity endotoxin removal resin. The effects of TA buffer on pH, ionic strength, incubation time as well as human-like collagen (HLC) concentration on eliminating endotoxins are investigated. In the present experiments, we design an optimal method for TA buffer to remove endotoxin from recombinant collagen and use a chromogenic tachypleus amebocyte lysate (TAL) test kit to measure the endotoxin level of HLC. The present results show that, the endotoxins of HLC is dropped to 8.3 EU/ml at 25 mM TA buffer (pH 7.8) with 150 mM NaCl when setting incubation time at 6 h, and HLC recovery is about 96%. Under this experimental condition, it is proved to exhibit high efficiencies of both endotoxin removal and collagen recovery. The structure of treated HLC was explored by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), demonstrating that the property and structure of HLC treated by TA buffer are maintained. Compared to the most widely used endotoxin removal method, Triton X-114 extraction, using TA buffer can obtain the non-toxic HLC without extra treatment for removing the toxic substances in Triton X-114. In addition, the present study aims at establishing a foundation for further work in laboratory animal science and providing a foundation for medical grade biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: The processes of endotoxins adsorbed from HLC. - Highlights: • TA buffer is a mild buffer system for endotoxins removal of HLC. • TA buffer may facilitate endotoxins adsorbed on the

  8. Cyclical Effects of Bank Capital Buffers with Imperfect Credit Markets: international evidence

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Fonseca; F. González; L. Pereira da Silva

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the cyclical effects of bank capital buffers using an international sample of 2,361 banks from 92 countries over the 1990-2007 period. We find that capital buffers reduce the bank credit supply but – through what could be “monitoring or signaling effects” – have also an expansionary effect on economic activity by reducing lending and deposit rate spreads. This influence on lending and deposit rate spreads is more pronunced in developing countries and during downturns. The ...

  9. The primacy of perceiving: emotion recognition buffers negative effects of emotional labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, M.N.; Rohrmann, S.; de Pater, I.E.; Beersma, B.

    2011-01-01

    There is ample empirical evidence for negative effects of emotional labor (surface acting and deep acting) on workers' well-being. This study analyzed to what extent workers' ability to recognize others' emotions may buffer these effects. In a 4-week study with 85 nurses and police officers, emotion

  10. The Primacy of Perceiving: Emotion Recognition Buffers Negative Effects of Emotional Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; Rohrmann, Sonja; De Pater, Irene E.; Beersma, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    There is ample empirical evidence for negative effects of emotional labor (surface acting and deep acting) on workers' well-being. This study analyzed to what extent workers' ability to recognize others' emotions may buffer these effects. In a 4-week study with 85 nurses and police officers, emotion recognition moderated the relationship between…

  11. Neighborhood-Specific and General Social Support: Which Buffers the Effect of Neighborhood Disorder on Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joongbaeck; Ross, Catherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Is neighborhood-specific social support the most effective type of social support for buffering the effect of neighborhood disorder on depression? Matching theory suggests that it is. The authors extend the research on neighborhood disorder and adult depression by showing that individuals who have higher levels of both general and…

  12. Factors influencing the grass carp gut microbiome and its effect on metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jiajia; Yan, Qingyun; Yu, Yuhe; Zhang, Tanglin

    2014-03-01

    Gut microbiota have attracted extensive attention recently because of their important role in host metabolism, immunity and health maintenance. The present study focused on factors affecting the gut microbiome of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and further explored the potential effect of the gut microbiome on metabolism. Totally, 43.39 Gb of screened metagenomic sequences obtained from 24 gut samples were fully analysed. We detected 1228 phylotypes (116 Archaea and 1112 Bacteria), most of which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Fusobacteria. Totally, 41335 of the detected open reading frames (ORFs) were matched to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism was the main matched pathway deduced from the annotated ORFs. Redundancy analysis based on the phylogenetic composition and gene composition of the gut microbiome indicated that gut fullness and feeding (i.e. ryegrass vs. commercial feed, and pond-cultured vs. wild) were significantly related to the gut microbiome. Moreover, many biosynthesis and metabolism pathways of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids were significantly enhanced by the gut microbiome in ryegrass-fed grass carp. These findings suggest that the metabolic role played by the gut microbiome in grass carp can be affected by feeding. These findings contribute to the field of fish gut microbial ecology and also provide a basis for follow-up functional studies. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of inclusion of citrus pulp inxaraés grass silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júnior Issamu Yasuoka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of inclusion of different levels of pelleted citrus pulp (PCP on the quality of xaraés grass silage. Xaraés grass was ensiled at 54 days of growth with 0, 10, 20 and 30% PCP and divided into 20 experimental silos (five repetitions/treatment. A completely randomized design was adopted. The silos were opened after 67 days for the determination of dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF, pH, and titratable acidity of the silages. The inclusion of PCP did not influence DM content, but reduced CP content. NDF and ADF content decreased with the addition of citrus pulp. Regarding pH, a significant difference was only observed for the inclusion of 30% PCP. Titratable acidity in the silage was lower in the absence of PCP (0% compared to the treatment with 30% (P<0.05. The inclusion of 30% PCP in xaraés grass silage is indicated since it improves the quality of the fibrous fraction, while maintaining acceptable pH values.

  14. Effects of gravel mulch on emergence of galleta grass seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, V.K.; Medrano, J.C.; Stanley, C.; Walo, M.D.

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office, Technology Development and Program Management Division, has identified the need to clean up several sites on the Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range contaminated with surface plutonium. An important objective of the project identified as the Plutonium In Soils Integrated Demonstration is to develop technologies to stabilize and restore the disturbed sites after decontamination. Revegetation of these contaminated sites will be difficult due to their location in the arid Mojave and Great Basin Deserts. The major factors which will affect successful plant establishment and growth at these sites are limited and sporadic precipitation, limited soil water, extreme air and soil temperatures, limited topsoil, and herbivory . Research has shown that providing microsites for seed via mulching can aid in plant emergence and establishment. Since many of the soils at the sites slated for plutonium decontamination have a large percentage of gravel in the upper 10 cm of soil, the use of gravel as mulch could provide microsites for seed and stabilize soils during subsequent revegetation of the sites. In July 1992, EG ampersand G/EM Environmental Sciences Department initiated a greenhouse study to examine the possible benefits of gravel mulch. The specific objectives of this greenhouse study were to: (1) determine the effects seedling emergence and soil water, and (2) determine effects of irrigation rates on seedling emergence for gravel mulches and other conventional seedbed preparation techniques. A secondary objective was to determine the depth of gravel mulch that was optimal for seedling emergence. Results from this greenhouse study will assist in formulating specific reclamation plans for sites chosen for cleanup

  15. Mechanistic modeling & effectiveness of buffer strips for pesticide regulatory frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetative Filter Strips (VFS) have been used as an effective conservation practice in agricultural areas for controlling and mitigate the effect of sediment, nutrients and pesticides loads into water bodies. In addition to the agricultural sector, another important use of VFS for controlling plague...

  16. Effect of a data buffer on the recorded distribution of time intervals for random events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, J C [Polytechnic of North London (UK)

    1976-03-15

    The use of a data buffer enables the distribution of the time intervals between events to be studied for times less than the recording system dead-time but the usual negative exponential distribution for random events has to be modified. The theory for this effect is developed for an n-stage buffer followed by an asynchronous recorder. Results are evaluated for the values of n from 1 to 5. In the language of queueing theory the system studied is of type M/D/1/n+1, i.e. with constant service time and a finite number of places.

  17. The effective stress concept in saturated sand-clay buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, J.; Oswell, J.M.; Gray, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed on mixtures of sand and bentonite, to investigate whether the behavior of the mixture can be expressed in terms of effective stresses, defined as the tensor difference between externally applied total stresses and pore water pressures measured outside the cell. Within acceptable bounds of experimental error, the tests show that effective stress can be used to describe consolidation and shear behaviour. However, because part of the effective stress in the clay is derived from net interparticle repulsive (unit) forces seated in diffuse double layers around aggregations of bentonite particles, the applicability of the concept has at this stage been restricted to conditions of constant volume (or possibly constant straining rate), constant chemistry, and constant temperature

  18. Long-term effects of grazing management and buffer strips on soil erosion from pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    High grazing pressure can lead to soil erosion in pastures by compacting soil and increasing runoff and sediment delivery to waterways. Limited information exists on the effects of grazing management and best management practices (BMPs), such as buffer strips, on soil erosion from pastures. The obje...

  19. Thinning and riparian buffer configuration effects on down wood abundance in headwater streams in coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian Ares; Deanna H. Olson; Klaus J. Puettmann

    2013-01-01

    Down wood is associated with the function, structure, and diversity of riparian systems. Considerable knowledge has been generated regarding down wood stocks and dynamics in temperate forests, but there are few studies on effects of silvicultural practices and riparian buffer design on down wood, particularly in headwater streams. We analyzed interactive eff ects of...

  20. Effects of buffer strips and grazing management on soil loss from pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intensive grazing pressure can cause soil erosion from pastures causing increased sediment loading to aquatic systems. The objectives of this work were to determine the long-term effects of grazing management and buffer strips on soil erosion from pastures fertilized with broiler litter. Field stud...

  1. Minority Adolescents in Ethnically Diverse Schools: Perceptions of Equal Treatment Buffer Threat Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysu, Gülseli; Celeste, Laura; Brown, Rupert; Verschueren, Karine; Phalet, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Can perceptions of equal treatment buffer the negative effects of threat on the school success of minority students? Focusing on minority adolescents from Turkish and Moroccan heritage in Belgium (M[subscript age] = 14.5; N = 735 in 47 ethnically diverse schools), multilevel mediated moderation analyses showed: (a) perceived discrimination at…

  2. Identifying Riparian Buffer Effects on Stream 1 Nitrogen in Southeastern Coastal Plain Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian areas have long demonstrated their ability to attenuate nutrients and sediments from agricultural runoff at the field scale; however, to inform effective nutrient management choices, the impact of riparian buffers on water quality services must be assessed at watershed s...

  3. Preliminary studies on allelopatic effect of some woody plants on seed germination of rye-grass and tall fescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arouiee, H; Nazdar, T; Mousavi, A

    2010-11-01

    In order to investigation of allelopathic effects of some ornamental trees on seed germination of rye-grass (Lolium prenne) and tall fescue (Festuca arundinaceae), this experiment was conducted in a randomized complete block design with 3 replicates at the laboratory of Horticultural Sciences Department of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, during 2008. In this research, we studied the effect of aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of Afghanistan pine (Pinus eldarica), arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica), black locust (Robinia psedue acacia) and box elder (Acer negundo) leaves that prepared in 1:5 ratio on seed germination percent and rate for two grasses. The results showed that all extracts decreased statistically seed germination in compared to control treatment. The highest germination percentage and germination rate of tested grass detected in control treatment. Hydro-alcoholic extracts of all woody plants (15, 30%) were completely inhibited seed germination of rye-grass and tall fescue. Also aqueous extract of arizona cypress was completely inhibited seed germination of tall fescue and had more inhibitory activity than other aqueous extracts on rye-grass. Between aqueous extracts, the highest and lowest seed germination of rye-grass was found in Afghanistan pine and arizona cypress, respectively.

  4. Effect of Tris-acetate buffer on endotoxin removal from human-like collagen used biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huizhi; Fan, Daidi; Deng, Jianjun; Zhu, Chenghui; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Xiaoxuan

    2014-09-01

    Protein preparation, which has active ingredients designated for the use of biomaterials and therapeutical protein, is obtained by genetic engineering, but products of genetic engineering are often contaminated by endotoxins. Because endotoxin is a ubiquitous and potent proinflammatory agent, endotoxin removal or depletion from protein is essential for researching any biomaterials. In this study, we have used Tris-acetate (TA) buffer of neutral pH value to evaluate endotoxins absorbed on the Pierce high-capacity endotoxin removal resin. The effects of TA buffer on pH, ionic strength, incubation time as well as human-like collagen (HLC) concentration on eliminating endotoxins are investigated. In the present experiments, we design an optimal method for TA buffer to remove endotoxin from recombinant collagen and use a chromogenic tachypleus amebocyte lysate (TAL) test kit to measure the endotoxin level of HLC. The present results show that, the endotoxins of HLC is dropped to 8.3EU/ml at 25 mM TA buffer (pH7.8) with 150 mM NaCl when setting incubation time at 6h, and HLC recovery is about 96%. Under this experimental condition, it is proved to exhibit high efficiencies of both endotoxin removal and collagen recovery. The structure of treated HLC was explored by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), demonstrating that the property and structure of HLC treated by TA buffer are maintained. Compared to the most widely used endotoxin removal method, Triton X-114 extraction, using TA buffer can obtain the non-toxic HLC without extra treatment for removing the toxic substances in Triton X-114. In addition, the present study aims at establishing a foundation for further work in laboratory animal science and providing a foundation for medical grade biomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of salinity level on TSH and thyroid hormones of grass carp, Ctenophayngodon idella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Peyghan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (T3, T4 have marked effect on body metabolism and in controlling osmoregulation activity in fish. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of water salinity changes on thyroid hormones level and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH of grass carp. For this purpose 120 grass carp were divided randomly in to four groups (10 fish in each group and three replicates per treatment. Three groups were held in three different salinities at concentrations of 4, 8 and 12 g L-1. The fourth group was reared in fresh water and considered as control. After three weeks blood samples were collected from the caudal peduncle vein. Then serum was separated and serum thyroid hormones and TSH were measured by LISA on Microwell plates. Our results indicated that the average of T3 levels in 4, 8 and 12 g L-1 groups were 0.43 ± 0.11, 0.22 ± 0.04 and 0.21 ± 0.04 μg dL-1, respectively. T3 levels in all experimental groups were significantly lower than those of control group (p 0.05. The level of TSH in salinities of 4 and 8 g L-1 groups was significantly higher than that of control group (p < 0.05. The results showed that increasing water salinity can have significant effect on thyroid activity by decreasing T3 and increasing T4 level in serum of grass carp in experimental condition.

  6. Effect of sand versus grass training surfaces during an 8-week pre-season conditioning programme in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Martyn John; Dawson, Brian; Arnot, Mark Alexander; Pinnington, Hugh; Landers, Grant; Peeling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the use of sand and grass training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme in well-trained female team sport athletes (n = 24). Performance testing was conducted pre- and post-training and included measures of leg strength and balance, vertical jump, agility, 20 m speed, repeat speed (8 × 20 m every 20 s), as well as running economy and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Heart rate (HR), training load (rating of perceived exertion (RPE) × duration), movement patterns and perceptual measures were monitored throughout each training session. Participants completed 2 × 1 h conditioning sessions per week on sand (SAND) or grass (GRASS) surfaces, incorporating interval training, sprint and agility drills, and small-sided games. Results showed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) HR and training load in the SAND versus GRASS group throughout each week of training, plus some moderate effect sizes to suggest lower perceptual ratings of soreness and fatigue on SAND. Significantly greater (P < 0.05) improvements in VO2max were measured for SAND compared to GRASS. These results suggest that substituting sand for grass training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme can significantly increase the relative exercise intensity and training load, subsequently leading to superior improvements in aerobic fitness.

  7. The effect of the MgO buffer layer thickness on magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/Cr/MgO buffer/MgO(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozioł-Rachwał, Anna, E-mail: a.koziolrachwal@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Spintronics Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Nozaki, Takayuki; Zayets, Vadym; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Spintronics Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshishige [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Spintronics Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2016-08-28

    The relationship between the magnetic properties and MgO buffer layer thickness d was studied in epitaxial MgO/Fe(t)/Cr/MgO(d) layers grown on MgO(001) substrate in which the Fe thickness t ranged from 0.4 nm to 1.1 nm. For 0.4 nm ≤ t ≤ 0.7 nm, a non-monotonic coercivity dependence on the MgO buffer thickness was shown by perpendicular magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometry. For thicker Fe films, an increase in the buffer layer thickness resulted in a spin reorientation transition from perpendicular to the in-plane magnetization direction. Possible origins of these unusual behaviors were discussed in terms of the suppression of carbon contamination at the Fe surface and changes in the magnetoelastic anisotropy in the system. These results illustrate a method to control magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/Cr/MgO(d) via an appropriate choice of MgO buffer layer thickness d.

  8. Development of new techniques of using irradiation in the genetic improvement of warm season grasses, the assessment of their genetic and cytogenetic effects and biomass production from grass. Annual progress report, November 1, 1979 to October 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.W.; Hanna, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    New techniques are described for using irradiation and chemical mutagens in the genetic improvement of several warm season grasses. Genetic and cytogenetic effects of these treatments are also being studied

  9. Can positive social exchanges buffer the detrimental effects of negative social exchanges? Age and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Katherine L; Windsor, Tim D; Pearson, Elissa L; Crisp, Dimity A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from existing research exploring whether positive social exchanges can help to offset (or 'buffer' against) the harmful effects of negative social exchanges on mental health have been inconsistent. This could be because the existing research is characterized by different approaches to studying various contexts of 'cross-domain' and 'within-domain' buffering, and/or because the nature of buffering effects varies according to sociodemographic characteristics that underlie different aspects of social network structure and function. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the buffering effects of global perceptions of positive exchanges on the link between global negative exchanges and mental health varied as a function of age and gender. We used a series of regressions in a sample of 556 Australian older adults (ages 55-94) to test for three-way interactions among gender, positive social exchanges, and negative social exchanges, as well as age and positive and negative social exchanges, in predicting mental health, controlling for years of education, partner status, and physical functioning. We found that positive exchanges buffered against negative exchanges for younger old adults, but not for older old adults, and for women, but not for men. Our findings are interpreted in light of research on individual differences in coping responses and interpersonal goals among late middle-aged and older adults. Our findings are in line with gerontological theories (e.g., socioemotional selectivity theory), and imply that an intervention aimed at using positive social exchanges as a means of coping with negative social exchanges might be more successful among particular populations (i.e., women, 'younger' old adults). Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Model analysis of riparian buffer effectiveness for reducing nutrient inputs to streams in agricultural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKane, R. B.; M, S.; F, P.; Kwiatkowski, B. L.; Rastetter, E. B.

    2006-12-01

    Federal and state agencies responsible for protecting water quality rely mainly on statistically-based methods to assess and manage risks to the nation's streams, lakes and estuaries. Although statistical approaches provide valuable information on current trends in water quality, process-based simulation models are essential for understanding and forecasting how changes in human activities across complex landscapes impact the transport of nutrients and contaminants to surface waters. To address this need, we developed a broadly applicable, process-based watershed simulator that links a spatially-explicit hydrologic model and a terrestrial biogeochemistry model (MEL). See Stieglitz et al. and Pan et al., this meeting, for details on the design and verification of this simulator. Here we apply the watershed simulator to a generalized agricultural setting to demonstrate its potential for informing policy and management decisions concerning water quality. This demonstration specifically explores the effectiveness of riparian buffers for reducing the transport of nitrogenous fertilizers from agricultural fields to streams. The interaction of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes represented in our simulator allows several important questions to be addressed. (1) For a range of upland fertilization rates, to what extent do riparian buffers reduce nitrogen inputs to streams? (2) How does buffer effectiveness change over time as the plant-soil system approaches N-saturation? (3) How can buffers be managed to increase their effectiveness, e.g., through periodic harvest and replanting? The model results illustrate that, while the answers to these questions depend to some extent on site factors (climatic regime, soil properties and vegetation type), in all cases riparian buffers have a limited capacity to reduce nitrogen inputs to streams where fertilization rates approach those typically used for intensive agriculture (e.g., 200 kg N per ha per year for corn in the U

  11. Effects of feeding dairy cows different legume-grass silages on milk phytoestrogen concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höjer, A; Adler, S; Purup, Stig

    2012-01-01

    interval of legume-grass silage on phytoestrogen intake and milk phytoestrogen concentrations. In one experiment, 15 Swedish Red dairy cows were fed 2- or 3-cut red clover-grass silage, or 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage. In a second experiment, 16 Norwegian Red dairy cows were fed short-term ley...... red clover-grass silage diet (1,494μg/kg of milk). Because of the metabolism of biochanin A, genistein, and prunetin, their concentrations in milk and the apparent recovery were low. Coumestrol was detected in only short-term and long-term ley silage mixtures, and its milk concentration was low....... Concentrations of secoisolariciresinol and matairesinol were higher in 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass and long-term ley silage mixtures, those with legume species other than red clover, and the highest grass proportions. The 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage diet also resulted in higher enterolactone...

  12. Soil amendment effects on the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum L. and facilitation of its growth by the native perennial grass Hilaria jamesii (Torr.) Benth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Sherrod, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were undertaken to identify soil factors that curtail growth of the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass) without significantly inhibiting growth of native perennial grasses (here represented by Hilaria jamesii [Torr.] Benth). We grew B. tectorum and H. jamesii alone (monoculture pots) and together (combination pots) in soil treatments that manipulated levels of soil phosphorus, potassium, and sodium. Hilaria jamesii showed no decline when its aboveground biomass in any of the applied treatments was compared to the control in either the monoculture or combination pots. Monoculture pots of B. tectorum showed a decline in aboveground biomass with the addition of Na2HPO4 and K2HPO4. Interestingly, in pots where H. jamesii was present, the negative effect of these treatments was ameliorated. Whereas the presence of B. tectorum generally decreased the aboveground biomass of H. jamesii (comparing aboveground biomass in monoculture versus combination pots), the presence of H. jamesii resulted in an enhancement of B. tectorum aboveground biomass by up to 900%. We hypothesize that B. tectorum was able to obtain resources from H. jamesii, an action that benefited B. tectorum while generally harming H. jamesii. Possible ways resources may be gained by B. tectorum from native perennial grasses include (1) B. tectorum is protected from salt stress by native plants or associated soil biota; (2) when B. tectorum is grown with H. jamesii, the native soil biota is altered in a way that favors B. tectorum growth, including B. tectorum tapping into the mycorrhizal network of native plants and obtaining resources from them; (3) B. tectorum can take advantage of root exudates from native plants, including water and nutrients released by natives via hydraulic redistribution; and (4) B. tectorum is able to utilize some combination of the above mechanisms. In summary, land managers may find adding soil treatments can temporarily suppress B. tectorum

  13. Effects of fatigue and environment on residual strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fatigue, moisture conditioning, and heating on the residual tension strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels were evaluated using specimens made with T300/5208 graphite epoxy in a 16-ply quasi-isotropic layup, with two different buffer strip materials, Kevlar-49 or S-glass. It was found that, for panels subjected to fatigue loading, the residual strengths were not significantly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panels by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results, but increased the residual strengths of the Kevlar-49 buffer strip panels slightly. For both buffer strip materials, the heat increased the residual strengths of the buffer strip panels slightly over the ambient results.

  14. Perceived discrimination and health among Puerto Rican and Mexican Americans: buffering effect of the Lazo matrimonial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Ah; Ferraro, Kenneth F

    2009-06-01

    An emerging body of research shows that perceived discrimination adversely influences the mental health of minority populations, but is it also deleterious to physical health? If yes, can marriage buffer the effect of perceived discrimination on physical health? We address these questions with data from Puerto Rican and Mexican American residents of Chicago. Multivariate regression analyses reveal that perceived discrimination is associated with more physical health problems for both Puerto Rican and Mexican Americans. In addition, an interaction effect between marital status and perceived discrimination was observed: married Mexican Americans with higher perceived discrimination had fewer physical health problems than their unmarried counterparts even after adjusting for differential effects of marriage by nativity. The findings reveal that perceived discrimination is detrimental to the physical health of both Puerto Rican and Mexican Americans, but that the stress-buffering effect of marriage on physical health exists for Mexican Americans only.

  15. Cytotoxic effects and apoptosis induction of enrofloxacin in hepatic cell line of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Cui, Yanting; Brown, Paul B; Ge, Xianping; Xie, Jun; Xu, Pao

    2015-12-01

    We determined the effect of enrofloxacin on the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) and apoptosis in the hepatic cell line of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). Cultured cells were treated with different concentrations of enrofloxacin (12.5-200 ug/mL) for 24 h. We found that the cytotoxic effect of enrofloxacin was mediated by apoptosis, and that this apoptosis occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The doses of 50,100 and 200 μg/mL enrofloxacin increased the LDH release and MDA concentration, induced cell apoptosis and reduced the ΔΨm compared to the control. The highest dose of 200 ug/mL enrofloxacin also significantly induced apoptosis accompanied by ΔΨm disruption and ROS generation and significantly reduced T-AOC and increased MDA concentration compared to the control. Our results suggest that the dose of 200 ug/mL enrofloxacin exerts its cytotoxic effect and produced ROS via apoptosis by affecting the mitochondria of the hepatic cells of grass carp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The acid-base effects of continuous hemofiltration with lactate or bicarbonate buffered replacement fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, H K; Uchino, S; Bellomo, R

    2003-06-01

    To evaluate, quantify and compare the effects of continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) with lactate or bicarbonate-buffered replacement fluids on acid-base balance. Randomized double crossover study. Intensive Care Unit of Tertiary Medical Center. Eight patients with severe acute renal failure. Random allocation to either 2 hours of isovolemic lactate-buffered (treatment A) CVVH or 2 hours of bicarbonate-buffered (treatment B) CVVH with cross over and with same procedure repeated the following day (double cross over). Timed collections of arterial blood and ultrafiltrate (UF), measurement of blood and UF gases and lactate concentrations and calculation of buffer-base mass balance. At baseline, both groups of patients had a similar, slight metabolic alkalosis (pH: 7.45 vs. 7.45; BE 3.9 mEq/L for treatment A and 4.0 for treatment B) and a serum bicarbonate of 28.1 mmol/L for treatment A vs. 28.3 mmol/L for treatment B; all NS. This alkalosis was present despite slight hyperlactatemia in both groups (A: 2.4 mmol/L vs. B 2.8 mmol/; NS). Within 60 minutes of treatment, however, treatment A led to a significantly higher lactate concentration (3.9 vs 2.5 mmol/L; p = 0.0011), a significantly lower BE (2.3 vs 4.1 mEq/L; p = 0.0019) and a significantly lower bicarbonate concentration (26.7 vs. 28.3 mmol/L; p = 0.0038) in the presence of an unchanged PaCO2. These differences persisted during the study period. The UF of patients receiving treatment A contained more lactate (10.2 vs 2.9 mmol/L; p buffer-base balance of +20.4 mEq/h compared to -2.6 mEq/h for treatment B; p buffered replacement fluids induces iatrogenic hyperlactatemia. Such hyperlactatemia is associated with an acidifying effect despite a positive buffer-base balance.

  17. Toxic and feeding deterrent effects of native aquatic macrophytes on exotic grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph E; Beckmen, Kimberlee B; Johnson, Julie K; Cope, Rhian B; Lawmaster, Todd; Beasley, Val R

    2002-08-01

    Declines of amphibians have been attributed to many factors including habitat degradation. The introduction of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) as a biological agent for aquatic plant control in ponds and lakes managed narrowly for human recreation has likely contributed to amphibian declines through massive plant removal and associated habitat simplification and thus degradation. This research examined the interactions among grass carp and three Midwestern aquatic plants (Jussiaea repens, Ranunculus longirostris, and R. flabellaris) that may be of value in rehabilitation of habitats needed by amphibians. The feeding preference study found that C. idella avoided eating both J. repens and R. longirostris. Ranunculus species studied to date contain a vesicant toxin called ranunculin that is released upon mastication. The study that compared the effects of R. flabellaris, J. repens and a control food administered by tube feeding to C. idella found significant lesions only in the mucosal epithelium of the individuals exposed to R.flabellaris. The avoidance by C. idella of J. repens and R. longirostris in the feeding preference study, and the significant toxicity of R. flabellaris demonstrated by the dosing study, indicate these plants warrant further examination as to their potential effectiveness in aquatic amphibian habitat rehabilitation.

  18. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) Polymer as Amphibious Buffer Layer for Graphene Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Jianjun; Huo, Shuai; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuecan; Chen, Tangshen; Wu, Wei; Xu, Jingxia

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the scattering and trapping effects, the interfaces of dielectric/graphene or substrate/graphene can tailor the performance of field-effect transistor (FET). In this letter, the polymer of benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as an amphibious buffer layer and located at between the layers of substrate and graphene and between the layers of dielectric and graphene. Interestingly, with the help of nonpolar and hydrophobic BCB buffer layer, the large-scale top-gated, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene transistors was prepared on Si/SiO2 substrate, its cutoff frequency (fT) and the maximum cutoff frequency (fmax) of the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) can be reached at 12 GHz and 11 GHz, respectively.

  19. The stress-buffering effects of hope on changes in adjustment to caregiving in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Sindia; Pakenham, Kenneth I

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the direct and stress-buffering effects of global hope and its components (agency and pathways) on changes in adjustment to multiple sclerosis caregiving over 12 months. A total of 140 carers and their care-recipients completed questionnaires at Time 1 and 12 months later, Time 2. Focal predictors were stress, hope, agency and pathways, and the adjustment outcomes were anxiety, depression, positive affect, positive states of mind and life satisfaction. Results showed that as predicted, greater hope was associated with better adjustment after controlling for the effects of initial adjustment and caregiving and care-recipient illness variables. No stress-buffering effects of hope emerged. Regarding hope components, only the agency dimension emerged as a significant predictor of adjustment. Findings highlight hope as an important protective resource for coping with multiple sclerosis caregiving and underscore the role of agency thinking in this process. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Effect of Ultrastructure on Changes of Textural Characteristics between Crisp Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon Idellus C.Et V) and Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon Idellus) Inducing Heating Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Ling; Yang, Xian-Qing; Li, Lai-Hao; Hao, Shu-Xian; Wang, Jin-Xu; Huang, Hui; Wei, Ya; Wu, Yan-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The research studies the ultrastructure effect on texture of crisp grass carp (CGC) and grass carp (GC) fillets inducing heating for 15, 25, and 40 min with boiling water. After heating, the hardness, fracturability, springiness, chewiness, resilience, and cohesiveness of CGC were higher than that of raw CGC, whereas the all textural characteristics of heating GC were lower obviously than that of raw GC. The hardness, fracturability, springiness, chewiness, resilience, and cohesiveness of CGC for heating 15 min were higher by 6.3%, 9.0%, 27.0%, 71.8%, 9.4%, and 23.9%, respectively, than that of raw CGC (RCGC). The hardness increasing of CGC flesh with the extension of heating time related closely to more coagulating connective tissue in interstitial spaces, especially relating to smaller muscle fiber diameter and denser muscle fiber density. The more and larger spaces between fiber and fiber with the extension of heating time results in the decrease of cohesiveness and resilience of CGC flesh. For chewiness, the stronger chewiness of cooked CGC associated with more detachment of myofiber-myocommata and fiber-fiber. Overall, the results show that the changes of texture characteristics of CGC fillet with extension of heating time correlates positively with the ultrastructure. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Resource Availability Alters Biodiversity Effects in Experimental Grass-Forb Mixtures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrun Siebenkäs

    Full Text Available Numerous experiments, mostly performed in particular environments, have shown positive diversity-productivity relationships. Although the complementary use of resources is discussed as an important mechanism explaining diversity effects, less is known about how resource availability controls the strength of diversity effects and how this response depends on the functional composition of plant communities. We studied aboveground biomass production in experimental monocultures, two- and four-species mixtures assembled from two independent pools of four perennial grassland species, each representing two functional groups (grasses, forbs and two growth statures (small, tall, and exposed to different combinations of light and nutrient availability. On average, shade led to a decrease in aboveground biomass production of 24% while fertilization increased biomass production by 36%. Mixtures were on average more productive than expected from their monocultures (relative yield total, RYT>1 and showed positive net diversity effects (NE: +34% biomass increase; mixture minus mean monoculture biomass. Both trait-independent complementarity effects (TICE: +21% and dominance effects (DE: +12% positively contributed to net diversity effects, while trait-dependent complementarity effects were minor (TDCE: +1%. Shading did not alter diversity effects and overyielding. Fertilization decreased RYT and the proportion of biomass gain through TICE and TDCE, while DE increased. Diversity effects did not increase with species richness and were independent of functional group or growth stature composition. Trait-based analyses showed that the dominance of species with root and leaf traits related to resource conservation increased TICE. Traits indicating the tolerance of shade showed positive relationships with TDCE. Large DE were associated with the dominance of species with tall growth and low diversity in leaf nitrogen concentrations. Our field experiment shows that

  2. Enhanced dispersion and removal of ammonia emitted from a poultry house with a vegetative environmental buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetative environmental buffers (VEBs), composed of tolerant trees, shrubs, and tall grasses, can be used to control and reduce the transport of ammonia (NH3) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs). However, the effectiveness of VEBs has not been quantitated. Here, we measure the dispersio...

  3. Effect of Cu buffer layer on magnetic anisotropy of cobalt thin films deposited on MgO(001 substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Sheraz Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt thin films with 5 nm thickness were prepared on single-crystal MgO (001 substrates with different thickness Cu buffer (0 nm, 5 nm, 10 nm, 20 nm. The structure, magnetic properties and transport behaviors were investigated by employing low-energy-electron-diffraction (LEED, magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR. By comparing the magnetic properties of the sample as-deposited (without Cu buffer layer one with those having the buffer Cu, we found that the magnetic anisotropy was extremely affected by the Cu buffer layer. The magnetic anisotropy of the as-deposited, without buffer layer, sample shows the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA. We found that the symmetry of the magnetic anisotropy is changed from UMA to four-fold when the thickness of the Cu buffer layer reaches to 20 nm. Meanwhile, the coercivity increased from 49 Oe (without buffer layer to 300 Oe (with 20 nm Cu buffer, in the easy axis direction, as the thickness of the buffer layer increases. Moreover, the magnitudes of various magnetic anisotropy constants were determined from torque curves on the basis of AMR results. These results support the phenomenon shown in the MOKE.

  4. Corrosion in low dielectric constant Si-O based thin films: Buffer concentration effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, F. W.; Lane, M. W.; Gates, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Organosilicate glass (OSG) is often used as an interlayer dielectric (ILD) in high performance integrated circuits. OSG is a brittle material and prone to stress-corrosion cracking reminiscent of that observed in bulk glasses. Of particular concern are chemical-mechanical planarization techniques and wet cleans involving solvents commonly encountered in microelectronics fabrication where the organosilicate film is exposed to aqueous environments. Previous work has focused on the effect of pH, surfactant, and peroxide concentration on the subcritical crack growth of these films. However, little or no attention has focused on the effect of the conjugate acid/base concentration in a buffer. Accordingly, this work examines the “strength” of the buffer solution in both acidic and basic environments. The concentration of the buffer components is varied keeping the ratio of acid/base and therefore pH constant. In addition, the pH was varied by altering the acid/base ratio to ascertain any additional effect of pH. Corrosion tests were conducted with double-cantilever beam fracture mechanics specimens and fracture paths were verified with ATR-FTIR. Shifts in the threshold fracture energy, the lowest energy required for bond rupture in the given environment, G TH , were found to shift to lower values as the concentration of the base in the buffer increased. This effect was found to be much larger than the effect of the hydroxide ion concentration in unbuffered solutions. The results are rationalized in terms of the salient chemical bond breaking process occurring at the crack tip and modeled in terms of the chemical potential of the reactive species

  5. Investigation of CeO2 Buffer Layer Effects on the Voltage Response of YBCO Transition-Edge Bolometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohajeri, Roya; Nazifi, Rana; Wulff, Anders Christian

    2016-01-01

    The effect on the thermal parameters of superconducting transition-edge bolometers produced on a single crystalline SrTiO3 (STO) substrate with and without a CeO2 buffer layer was investigated. Metal-organic deposition was used to deposit the 20-nm CeO2 buffer layer, whereas RF magnetron sputtering...

  6. The Influence of Discrimination on Inmigrant Adolescents' Depressive Symptoms: What Buffers its Detrimental Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cristini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the link between perceived discrimination, depressive symptoms, cultural identity and social support at school reported by immigrant adolescents. Participants were 214 mostly male, immigrant adolescents in grades 9 through 13 of high schools in two small cities in northern Italy. Results showed that discrimination has a significant detrimental effect on psychological well-being of foreign-born adolescents. Additionally, the current study outlined that the only protective factor for depressive symptoms, among the analyzed variables concerning cultural identity and school social support, was social support from teachers. None of the analyzed moderators buffered the relationship between discrimination and depressive symptoms reported by immigrant adolescents. These results have implications for preventive interventions for immigrant adolescents and suggest a protective role for teachers. Future research should detect strategies to reduce discrimination and prejudice toward immigrant adolescents and detect factors that may buffer detrimental effects of discrimination on psychological well-being.

  7. Positive Neighborhood Norms Buffer Ethnic Diversity Effects on Neighborhood Dissatisfaction, Perceived Neighborhood Disadvantage, and Moving Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, Jasper; Asbrock, Frank; Roets, Arne; Kauff, Mathias

    2018-05-01

    Positive neighborhood norms, such as strong local networks, are critical to people's satisfaction with, perceived disadvantage of, and intentions to stay in their neighborhood. At the same time, local ethnic diversity is said to be detrimental for these community outcomes. Integrating both frameworks, we tested whether the negative consequences of diversity occur even when perceived social norms are positive. Study 1 ( N = 1,760 German adults) showed that perceptions of positive neighborhood norms buffered against the effects of perceived diversity on moving intentions via neighborhood satisfaction and perceived neighborhood disadvantage. Study 2 ( N = 993 Dutch adults) replicated and extended this moderated mediation model using other characteristics of diversity (i.e., objective and estimated minority proportions). Multilevel analyses again revealed consistent buffering effects of positive neighborhood norms. Our findings are discussed in light of the ongoing public and political debate concerning diversity and social and communal life.

  8. The effect of ammonium ferric hexacyanoferrate on reducing radiocaesium transfer from grass silage to sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. PAASIKALLIO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to examine the effect of ammonium ferric hexacyanoferrate (AFCF on the transfer of radiocaesium from grass silage to the tissues of male lambs. During ensiling, a formic acid based additive and AFCF were sprayed on grass contaminated with 134Cs and the mixture was allowed to incubate for 45 days. A dose of 21 mg AFCF d-1, fed to sheep offered contaminated silage for fourteen days, reduced 134Cs transfer to muscle by 45% compared to that of control sheep. An equivalent dose of AFCF administered in a capsule reduced transfer by only 3%. In another experiment, AFCF intake of 50, 100 and 150 mg d-1 for ten days reduced 134Cs transfer to sheep muscle by 75, 82 and 86%, respectively. In control lambs, of average live weight 38 and 47 kg, the feed to muscle 134Cs transfer coefficient averaged 0.15 d kg-1, but equilibrium between tissue and feed 134Cs had probably not been reached due to the short feeding period. Increasing doses of AFCF from 0 to 150 mg d-1 increased the faecal/urinary 134Cs ratio from 2 to 42.;

  9. The Effect of Soil Type and Moisture Content on Head Impacts on Natural Grass Athletic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyley Dickson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies are warranted to evaluate head injury criterion (HIC on athletic fields to determine baseline numbers and compare those findings to current critical thresholds for impact attenuation. A two year (2016 and 2017 study was conducted on University of Tennessee athletic fields (Knoxville, TN, USA to determine the effect of soil type (cohesive soil, United States Golf Association sand specifications and grass species (Poa pratensis and Cynodon dactylon × C. transvaalensis on HIC. Additionally soil moisture conditions monitored were: dry (0.06–0.16 m3/m3, acceptable (0.17–0.29 m3/m3, and wet (0.30–0.40 m3/m3. A linear relationship (r = 0.91 was identified between drop height (0.5–2.9 M and HIC value (35-1423 HIC on granular root zones of both grass types. However, HIC on cohesive soil is a function of soil water content in addition to drop height. These results demonstrate to aid in head injury prevention on cohesive soil athletic fields the HIC can be lowered by managing soil water content.

  10. Agroforestry buffers for nonpoint source pollution reductions from agricultural watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udawatta, Ranjith P; Garrett, Harold E; Kallenbach, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention and demand for the adoption of agroforestry practices throughout the world, rigorous long-term scientific studies confirming environmental benefits from the use of agroforestry practices are limited. The objective was to examine nonpoint-source pollution (NPSP) reduction as influenced by agroforestry buffers in watersheds under grazing and row crop management. The grazing study consists of six watersheds in the Central Mississippi Valley wooded slopes and the row crop study site consists of three watersheds in a paired watershed design in Central Claypan areas. Runoff water samples were analyzed for sediment, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) for the 2004 to 2008 period. Results indicate that agroforestry and grass buffers on grazed and row crop management sites significantly reduce runoff, sediment, TN, and TP losses to streams. Buffers in association with grazing and row crop management reduced runoff by 49 and 19%, respectively, during the study period as compared with respective control treatments. Average sediment loss for grazing and row crop management systems was 13.8 and 17.9 kg ha yr, respectively. On average, grass and agroforestry buffers reduced sediment, TN, and TP losses by 32, 42, and 46% compared with the control treatments. Buffers were more effective in the grazing management practice than row crop management practice. These differences could in part be attributed to the differences in soils, management, and landscape features. Results from this study strongly indicate that agroforestry and grass buffers can be designed to improve water quality while minimizing the amount of land taken out of production. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

  11. Effects of γ-irradiation and cooking on vitamins B6 and B12 in grass prawns (Penaeus monodon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau, L.-B.; Liew, M.-S.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of radiation doses, irradiation temperature and a combined treatment of irradiation and cooking on the vitamin B 6 and B 12 contents of grass prawns have been studied. Grass prawns were irradiated at refrigerated (4 o C) or frozen (-20 o C) temperatures with different doses. A domestic cooling procedure was followed after irradiation. The changes in vitamins B 6 and B 12 of both raw and cooked grass prawns were evaluated. Results showed no significant changes of vitamin B 6 and B 12 in grass prawns with a radiation dose up to 7 kGy at either 4 o C or -20 o C. Irradiation at 4 o C caused more destruction of vitamin B 12 but not vitamin B 6 than did irradiation at -20 o C in grass prawns. There was significant destruction of both vitamins B 6 and B 12 in unirradiated samples during cooking. The introduction of the irradiation process before cooking had no effect on either vitamin. These results indicate that the loss of vitamins B 6 and B 12 in the combined treatments was caused mainly by thermal destruction. (author)

  12. Daycare Center Attendance Buffers the Effects of Maternal Authoritarian Parenting Style on Physical Aggression in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, José M.; Braza, Paloma; Carreras, Rosario; Braza, Francisco; Azurmendi, Aitziber; Pascual-Sagastizábal, Eider; Cardas, Jaione; Sánchez-Martín, José R.

    2017-01-01

    A maternal authoritarian style has been related to the development of physical aggression during childhood and later future social problems; however, not too many studies have detected other than individual or family factors that may buffer this maternal effect. This work examines whether daycare center attendance may moderate the relationships between a mother authoritarian style and physical aggression. The study sample was 72 (40 girls) kindergarten children from Spain. Parents were asked ...

  13. The Buffering Effect of Mindfulness on Abusive Supervision and Creative Performance: A Social Cognitive Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xiaoming; Liu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Our research draws upon social cognitive theory and incorporates a regulatory approach to investigate why and when abusive supervision influences employee creative performance. The analyses of data from multiple time points and multiple sources reveal that abusive supervision hampers employee self-efficacy at work, which in turn impairs employee creative performance. Further, employee mindfulness buffers the negative effects of abusive supervision on employee self-efficacy at work as well as ...

  14. Effects of mercury on survival and development of the larval grass shrimp Palaemonetes vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shealy, M.H. Jr.; Sandifer, P.A.

    1975-11-10

    Effects of 7 concentrations of mercury from 0.0 (control) to 0.056 ppM on survival and development of the larval grass shrimp Palaemonetes vulgaris (Say) were investigated. A concentration of 0.056 ppM Hg was toxic to all larvae within 24 h, but below a threshold level (less than or equal to 0.0056 ppM) no lethal effect occurred within 48 h. Feeding appeared to increase slightly the resistance of P. vulgaris larvae to mercury, and 48-h median tolerance limits for fed and unfed larvae were 0.0156 and 0.0100 ppM, respectively. Delayed effects of 48-h exposure to sublethal mercury concentrations which appeared in later post-exposure rearing of the larvae included reduced survival to the postlarval stage, delayed molting, extended development time, increased numbers of larval instars, and morphological deformities.

  15. Using fractional order method to generalize strengthening generating operator buffer operator and weakening buffer operator

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, L.; Liu, S.; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    Traditional integer order buffer operator is extended to fractional order buffer operator, the corresponding relationship between the weakening buffer operator and the strengthening buffer operator is revealed. Fractional order buffer operator not only can generalize the weakening buffer operator and the strengthening buffer operator, but also realize tiny adjustment of buffer effect. The effectiveness of GM(1,1) with the fractional order buffer operator is validated by six cases.

  16. The stress-buffering effects of functional social support on ambulatory blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Kimberly S; Uchino, Bert N; Birmingham, Wendy; Carlisle, McKenzie; Smith, Timothy W; Light, Kathleen C

    2014-11-01

    Social support is a reliable predictor of cardiovascular health. According to the buffering hypothesis, stress is 1 mechanism by which support is able to affect physiological processes. However, most of the experimental evidence for the hypothesis comes from laboratory studies. Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) protocols examine participants in their natural environment, where they are more likely to encounter personally relevant real-world stressors. Furthermore, prior work shows that examining support by its specific functional components reveals additional independent links to health. The current study aimed to examine the stress-buffering effects of functional social support on ABP. One hundred eighty-eight participants completed a 1-day ABP assessment along with measures of functional social support and both global perceived stress and momentary stress at time of reading. RESULTS indicated main effects for both stress measures. Global support, emotional, tangible, and informational support only moderated the effects of momentary stress, but not global stress, in predicting ABP. Informational support was the most consistent stress-buffering predictor of ABP, predicting both ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The predicted values in ABP for informational support achieved health-relevant differences, emphasizing the value of examining functional support beyond global support alone. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Tile Drainage Density Reduces Groundwater Travel Times and Compromises Riparian Buffer Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F; Isenhart, Thomas M; Schultz, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Strategies to reduce nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) pollution delivered to streams often seek to increase groundwater residence time to achieve measureable results, yet the effects of tile drainage on residence time have not been well documented. In this study, we used a geographic information system groundwater travel time model to quantify the effects of artificial subsurface drainage on groundwater travel times in the 7443-ha Bear Creek watershed in north-central Iowa. Our objectives were to evaluate how mean groundwater travel times changed with increasing drainage intensity and to assess how tile drainage density reduces groundwater contributions to riparian buffers. Results indicate that mean groundwater travel times are reduced with increasing degrees of tile drainage. Mean groundwater travel times decreased from 5.6 to 1.1 yr, with drainage densities ranging from 0.005 m (7.6 mi) to 0.04 m (62 mi), respectively. Model simulations indicate that mean travel times with tile drainage are more than 150 times faster than those that existed before settlement. With intensive drainage, less than 2% of the groundwater in the basin appears to flow through a perennial stream buffer, thereby reducing the effectiveness of this practice to reduce stream nitrate loads. Hence, strategies, such as reconnecting tile drainage to buffers, are promising because they increase groundwater residence times in tile-drained watersheds. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Acute toxic effects of endosulfan sulfate on three life stages of grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Peter B; Chung, Katy W; Venturella, John J; Shaddrick, Brian; Fulton, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the toxicity of endosulfan sulfate, the primary degradation product of the insecticide endosulfan, was determined in three life stages of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio). After 96 h exposure to endosulfan sulfate, the grass shrimp adult LC50 was 0.86 microg/L (95% CI 0.56-1.31), the grass shrimp larvae LC50 was 1.64 microg/L (95% CI 1.09-2.47) and the grass shrimp embryo LC50 was 45.85 microg/L (95% CI 23.72-88.61 microg/L). This was compared to the previously published grass shrimp 96-h LC50s for endosulfan. The toxicity of the two compounds was similar for the grass shrimp life stages with adults more sensitive than larvae and embryos. The presence of sediment in 24h endosulfan sulfate-exposures raised LC50s for both adult and larval grass shrimp but not significantly. The USEPA expected environmental concentrations (EEC) for total endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate and the calculations of risk quotients (RQ) based on the more sensitive adult grass shrimp 96-h LC50 clearly show that environmental concentrations equal to acute EECs would prove detrimental to grass shrimp or other similarly sensitive aquatic organisms. These results indicate that given the persistence and toxicity of endosulfan sulfate, future risk assessments should consider the toxicity potential of the parent compound as well as this degradation product.

  19. Evaluation of buffer zone effectiveness in mitigating the risks associated with agricultural runoff in Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A M; Julien, G; Ernst, W R; Cook, A; Doe, K G; Jackman, P M

    2011-02-01

    To minimize the risk posed by runoff from row crops, Prince Edward Island introduced buffer legislation in 2000. The legislation mandates 10-m and 20-m buffers, respectively, for moderate sloped (i.e. 5%) agricultural fields that border streams. Since 2001, Environment Canada has been evaluating the effectiveness of various buffer widths on operational farms in reducing toxicity and contaminant concentrations in runoff. Sample collectors, placed in 44 fields at the field edge (0m), 10m and at distances out to 30m, collected overland flow following rainfall-induced runoff events. Samples were collected within 24 hours of an event and analysed for seven pesticides (endosulfan, chlorothalonil, carbofuran, linuron, metribuzin, metalaxyl, mancozeb), water quality parameters and Daphnia magna toxicity. The 10-m buffer required for moderate sloped fields was effective at reducing contaminant concentrations but not always to less than lethal concentrations to Daphnia magna. Limited data beyond 10m for fields of both slope types precluded making recommendations on a suitable buffer width for shallow sloped fields and evaluating the effectiveness of 20-m buffers for steep sloped fields. When paired data were combined and statistically tested for all fields, the studied pesticides underwent a 52-98% and 68-100% reduction in aqueous and particulate concentrations within 10m and 30m, respectively. In addition, by 10m, soluble phosphorus, nitrate-nitrogen and total suspended solids were reduced by 34%, 38% and 64%, respectively. Results suggest buffer zones on operational farms are capable of achieving contaminant reductions comparable to those reported for controlled experiments. Inconsistent siting of sample collectors beyond 10m limited the evaluation of the effects of field slope and buffer width on buffer effectiveness on working farms. Future studies on buffer efficiency on operational farms should focus on building the data set beyond 10m and evaluating load reductions

  20. EFFECT OF FLY ASHES AND SEWAGE SLUDGE ON Fe, Mn, Al, Si AND Co UPTAKE BY GRASS MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Antonkiewicz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of sewage sludge for environmental management of fly ashes landfill site affects chemical composition of plants. The aim of the present investigations was learning the effect of growing doses of municipal sewage sludge on the yield and uptake of Fe, Mn, Al, Si and Co by grass mixture used for environmental management of fly ashes landfill. The experimental design comprised of 5 objects differing by a dose of municipal sewage sludge supplied per 1 hectare: I. control, II. 25 t d.m., III. 50 t d.m., IV. 75 t d.m. and V. 100 t d.m. Application of sewage sludge resulted in the increase in yield. The content of analyzed elements in the grass mixture depended significantly on sewage sludge dose. Increasing doses of sewage sludge caused marked increase in Mn and Co contents, while they decreased Fe, Al and Si contents in the grass mixture. It was found that growing doses of sewage sludge caused an improvement of Fe to Mn ratio value in the grass mixture. Assessing the element content in the grass mixture in the view of forage value, it was found that Fe and Mn content did not meet the optimal value. Si content in plants was below the optimal value.

  1. Effect of buffer at nanoscale molecular recognition interfaces - electrostatic binding of biological polyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Ana C; Laurini, Erik; Vieira, Vânia M P; Pricl, Sabrina; Smith, David K

    2017-10-19

    We investigate the impact of an over-looked component on molecular recognition in water-buffer. The binding of a cationic dye to biological polyanion heparin is shown by isothermal calorimetry to depend on buffer (Tris-HCl > HEPES > PBS). The heparin binding of self-assembled multivalent (SAMul) cationic micelles is even more buffer dependent. Multivalent electrostatic molecular recognition is buffer dependent as a result of competitive interactions between the cationic binding interface and anions present in the buffer.

  2. The Buffer Effect of Therapy Dog Exposure on Stress Reactivity in Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J. Fiocco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress is an insidious health risk that is commonly reported among university students. While research suggests that dog exposure may facilitate recovery from a stress response, little is known about the buffer effect of dog exposure on the stress response to a future stressor. This study examined whether interaction with a therapy dog could reduce the strength of the physiological stress response when exposed to a subsequent stressor. Sixty-one university students were randomly assigned to either a therapy dog (TD, n = 31 or a no-dog control (C, n = 30 group. The stress response was measured by electrodermal activity (EDA in response to the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT. Participants also completed questionnaires that assessed pet attitude, general stress levels, and affect. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs showed that increase in EDA was significantly more pronounced in the C group than in the TD group (p < 0.01. Pet attitudes did not modulate the buffer effect of therapy dog exposure. Results suggest that therapy dog exposure may buffer the stress response in university students, which has implications for the promotion of a viable stress management program on university campuses.

  3. Post-harvest treatments in smooth-stalked meadow grass (Poa pratensis L.) - effect on carbohydrates and tiller development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Birte

    2007-01-01

    Temperate grass species require a period of short days/low temperature to respond to flower induction stimuli. The same environmental conditions stimulate the increase in carbohydrate concentration in aboveground biomass and the accumulation of reserve carbohydrates in the basal plant parts....... The present investigation was initiated to investigate the effect of post-harvest treatments on dry matter production in autumn, carbohydrate content, the number of reproductive tillers and seed yield in a turf-type cultivar ‘Conni' of smooth-stalked meadow grass. The results show that post-harvest treatments...... harvest and all residues removed. The results from plant samples in autumn indicate that decreasing aboveground biomass production leads to a higher carbohydrate concentration which may stimulate the reproductive development in smooth-stalked meadow grass....

  4. Soil modification by invasive plants: Effects on native and invasive species of mixed-grass prairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, N.R.; Larson, D.L.; Huerd, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive plants are capable of modifying attributes of soil to facilitate further invasion by conspecifics and other invasive species. We assessed this capability in three important plant invaders of grasslands in the Great Plains region of North America: leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum). In a glasshouse, these three invasives or a group of native species were grown separately through three cycles of growth and soil conditioning in both steam-pasteurized and non-pasteurized soils, after which we assessed seedling growth in these soils. Two of the three invasive species, Bromus and Agropyron, exhibited significant self-facilitation via soil modification. Bromus and Agropyron also had significant facilitative effects on other invasives via soil modification, while Euphorbia had significant antagonistic effects on the other invasives. Both Agropyron and Euphorbia consistently suppressed growth of two of three native forbs, while three native grasses were generally less affected. Almost all intra- and interspecific effects of invasive soil conditioning were dependent upon presence of soil biota from field sites where these species were successful invaders. Overall, these results suggest that that invasive modification of soil microbiota can facilitate plant invasion directly or via 'cross-facilitation' of other invasive species, and moreover has potential to impede restoration of native communities after removal of an invasive species. However, certain native species that are relatively insensitive to altered soil biota (as we observed in the case of the forb Linum lewisii and the native grasses), may be valuable as 'nurse'species in restoration efforts. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Effects of grass-clover management and cover crops on nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide emissions in a stockless organic crop rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brozyna, Michal Adam; Petersen, Søren O; Chirinda, Ngoni

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) supply in stockless organic farming may be improved through use of grass-clover for anaerobic digestion, producing biogas and digested manure for use as fertilizer in the crop rotation. We studied the effects of grass-clover management on N cycling, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions...... in the rotation (spring barley, potato and winter wheat); actual digestion of grass-clover cuttings was not possible, instead digested pig manure was used as substitute for digested grass-clover. Nitrous oxide fluxes were monitored between April 2008 and May 2009. In general, application of digested manure had...

  6. Thermochemical modeling of nuclear fuel and the effects of oxygen potential buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loukusa, Henri, E-mail: henri.loukusa@vtt.fi; Ikonen, Timo; Valtavirta, Ville; Tulkki, Ville

    2016-12-01

    The elemental and chemical composition of nuclear fuel pellets are key factors influencing the material properties of the pellets. The oxidation state of the fuel is one of the most important chemical properties influencing the material properties of the fuel, and it can only be determined with the knowledge of the chemical composition. A measure of the oxidation state is the oxygen chemical potential of the fuel. It can be buffered by redox pairs, such as the well-known Mo/MoO{sub 2} pair. In this work, the elemental composition of the fuel is obtained from a burnup calculation and the temperature and pressure calculated with a fuel performance code. An estimate of the oxygen potential of fuel is calculated with Gibbs energy minimization. The results are compared against experimental data from the literature. The significance of the UMoO{sub 6} compound and its buffering effect on the oxygen potential is emphasized. - Highlights: • A Gibbs energy minimization routine has been developed for nuclear fuel modeling. • The initial stoichiometry affects the development of the oxygen potential of fuel. • UMoO{sub 6} is found to buffer the oxygen potential of nuclear fuel.

  7. Demographic buffering: titrating the effects of birth rate and imperfect immunity on epidemic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Sinead E; Pitzer, Virginia E; Viboud, Cécile; Metcalf, C Jessica E; Bjørnstad, Ottar N; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2015-03-06

    Host demography can alter the dynamics of infectious disease. In the case of perfectly immunizing infections, observations of strong sensitivity to demographic variation have been mechanistically explained through analysis of the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model that assumes lifelong immunity following recovery from infection. When imperfect immunity is incorporated into this framework via the susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible (SIRS) model, with individuals regaining full susceptibility following recovery, we show that rapid loss of immunity is predicted to buffer populations against the effects of demographic change. However, this buffering is contrary to the dependence on demography recently observed for partially immunizing infections such as rotavirus and respiratory syncytial virus. We show that this discrepancy arises from a key simplification embedded in the SIR(S) framework, namely that the potential for differential immune responses to repeat exposures is ignored. We explore the minimum additional immunological information that must be included to reflect the range of observed dependencies on demography. We show that including partial protection and lower transmission following primary infection is sufficient to capture more realistic reduced levels of buffering, in addition to changes in epidemic timing, across a range of partially and fully immunizing infections. Furthermore, our results identify key variables in this relationship, including R0.

  8. Effect of microwave freeze drying on quality and energy supply in drying of barley grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaohuang; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Zhong, Qifeng; Wang, Zhushang

    2018-03-01

    Young barley grass leaves are well-known for containing the antioxidant substances flavonoid and chlorophyll. However, low product quality and energy efficiency exist with respect to the dehydration of barley grass leaves. To improve energy supply and the quality of barley grass, microwave heating instead of contact heat was applied for the freeze drying of barley grass at a pilot scale at 1, 1.5 and 2 W g -1 , respectively; After drying, energy supply and quality parameters of color, moisture content, chlorophyll, flavonoids, odors of dried barley grass were determined to evaluate the feasibility of the study. Microwave freeze drying (MFD) allowed a low energy supply and high contents of chlorophyll and flavonoids. A lightness value of 60.0, a green value of -11.5 and an energy supply of 0.61 kW h -1  g -1 were observed in 1.5 W g -1 MFD; whereas drying time (7 h) decreased by 42% compared to contact heating. Maximum content of flavonoid and chlorophyll was 11.7 and 12.8 g kg -1 barley grass. Microwave heating leads to an odor change larger than that for contact heating observed for the freeze drying of barley grass. MFD retains chlorophyll and flavonoids, as well as colors and odors of samples, and also decreases energy consumption in the freeze drying of barley grass. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Effect of high-sugar grasses on methane emissions simulated using a dynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    St-Pierre, J.L.; Dijkstra, J.; France, J.; Parsons, A.J.; Edwards, G.R.; Rasmussen, S.; Kebreab, E.; Bannink, A.

    2012-01-01

    High-sugar grass varieties have received considerable attention for their potential ability to decrease N excretion in cattle. However, feeding high-sugar grasses alters the pattern of rumen fermentation, and no in vivo studies to date have examined this strategy with respect to another

  10. Effect of short-duration overnight cattle kraaling on grass production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... grass species, such as Urochloa mosambicensis and Panicum maximum, were more abundant in abandoned kraal sites than the surrounding vegetation. We conclude that shortduration overnight cattle kraaling improves grass quality and biomass. Keywords: biomass, crude protein, diversity, fibre, nutrient hotspots ...

  11. Effect of reed canary grass cultivation on greenhouse gas emission from peat soil at controlled rewetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of bioenergy crops in rewetted peatland (paludiculture) is considered as a possible land use option to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, bioenergy crops like reed canary grass (RCG) can have a complex influence on GHG fluxes. Here we determined the effect of RCG...... and bare soil were measured at weekly to fortnightly intervals with static chamber techniques for a period of 1 year. Cultivation of RCG increased both ER and CH4 emissions, but decreased the N2O emissions. The presence of RCG gave rise to 69, 75 and 85% of total ER at −20, −10 and 0 cm GWL, respectively...... from ER were obviously the dominant RCG-derived GHG flux, but above-ground biomass yields, and preliminary measurements of gross photosynthetic production, showed that ER could be more than balanced due to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by RCG. Our results support that RCG cultivation could be a good...

  12. The evaluation of the effects of buffer thickness and dry density on radionuclides migration in engineered barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Fujitaka; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Makino, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko

    2000-01-01

    The evaluation of the effects of buffer thickness and dry density, one of the buffer design, on radionuclides migration behavior is important from the viewpoint of performance assessment since they have relation to radionuclides migration retardation. It is also considered to help investigation of buffer design that satisfy both safety and economy to condition of the disposal site, which may be required with development of disposal project in the future. Therefore we have performed a sensitivity analysis used buffer thickness and dry density as parameter and considered their combination in this report. Based on this, we have evaluated the effects of buffer thickness and dry density on radionuclides migration in engineered barrier system. And, we have considered about radionuclides migration retardation quality of the buffer which is based on the design (relationship between thickness and dry density) set in the second progress report on research and development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. In results, the maximum release rates from the engineered barrier system for the nuclides which have high distribution coefficients and short half lives are sensitive to changes in buffer thickness and dry density. And, using dose converted from the nuclide release rates from the engineered barrier system as a convenient index, it is almost shown that the maximum of total dose is less than 10 μ Sv/y in the cases which buffer thickness and dry density are based on the buffer design set in the second progress report on research and development for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan. These can be used as an information when design of buffer thickness and dry density is set by synthetically judgement of balance of safety and economy. (author)

  13. Evaluation of the toxic effect of peracetic acid on grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupani, Latifeh; Stara, Alzbeta; Velisek, Josef; Zuskova, Eliska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the effect of peracetic acid (PAA) on haematotological and biochemical indices, antioxidant status, micronucleus induction and histopathological alterations of liver and gill in grass carp. Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) juveniles were exposed to therapeutic concentrations (1, and 3 mg x l(-1)) of PAA for a period of 10 days. Selected haematotological indices--the erythrocyte count (RBC), haematocrit (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and leukocyte count (WBC), and biochemical indices--glucose (Glu), total protein (TP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatine kinase (CK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were evaluated in plasma. Activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR), as well as levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were assessed in gill and liver. Micronucleus frequency in peripheral erythrocytes was counted in control and experimental fish. Histological examinations of gill and liver were performed. No significant differences were found in haematological parameters measured. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) alterations in the activities of AST, CK and LDH were found in treated fish compared to control groups. Fish exposed to 1 mg x l(-1) of PAA showed significantly lower (p < 0.05) SOD activity in liver and gill while catalase activity indicated a significant decrease (p < 0.05) only in gill tissue. Other significant changes were observed in GR activity in gill in both PAA exposed groups, while GR activity in liver remained unchanged. There was no significant difference in the count of micronuclei between control and exposed fish. Haemorrhage, fusion of primary lamellae, degeneration of secondary lamellae, some clubbing on primary and secondary lamellae tips, and lifting of epithelial cells were found in

  14. The effect of Orobanche crenata infection severity in faba bean, field pea, and grass pea productivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Fernandez-Aparicio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Broomrape weeds (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp. are root holoparasites that feed off a wide range of important crops. Among them, Orobanche crenata attacks legumes complicating their inclusion in cropping systems along the Mediterranean area and West Asia. The detrimental effect of broomrape parasitism in crop yield can reach up to 100% depending on infection severity and the broomrape-crop association. This work provides field data of the consequences of O. crenata infection severity in three legume crops i.e. faba bean, field pea and grass pea. Regression functions modelled productivity losses and revealed trends in dry matter allocation in relation to infection severity. The host species differentially limits parasitic sink strength indicating different levels of broomrape tolerance at equivalent infection severities. Reductions in host aboveground biomass were observed starting at low infection severity and half maximal inhibitory performance was predicted as 4.5, 8.2 and 1.5 parasites per faba bean, field pea and grass pea plant, respectively. Reductions in host biomass occurred in both vegetative and reproductive organs, the latter resulting more affected. The proportion of resources allocated within the parasite was concomitant to reduction of host seed yield indicating that parasite growth and host reproduction compete directly for resources within a host plant. However, the parasitic sink activity does not fully explain the total host biomass reduction because combined biomass of host-parasite complex was lower than the biomass of uninfected plants. In grass pea, the seed yield was negligible at severities higher than 4 parasites per plant. In contrast, faba bean and field pea sustained low but significant seed production at the highest infection severity. Data on seed yield and seed number indicated that the sensitivity of field pea to O. crenata limited the production of grain yield by reducing seed number but maintaining seed size

  15. The Effect of Orobanche crenata Infection Severity in Faba Bean, Field Pea, and Grass Pea Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Flores, Fernando; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Broomrape weeds ( Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) are root holoparasites that feed off a wide range of important crops. Among them, Orobanche crenata attacks legumes complicating their inclusion in cropping systems along the Mediterranean area and West Asia. The detrimental effect of broomrape parasitism in crop yield can reach up to 100% depending on infection severity and the broomrape-crop association. This work provides field data of the consequences of O. crenata infection severity in three legume crops, i.e., faba bean, field pea, and grass pea. Regression functions modeled productivity losses and revealed trends in dry matter allocation in relation to infection severity. The host species differentially limits parasitic sink strength indicating different levels of broomrape tolerance at equivalent infection severities. Reductions in host aboveground biomass were observed starting at low infection severity and half maximal inhibitory performance was predicted as 4.5, 8.2, and 1.5 parasites per faba bean, field pea, and grass pea plant, respectively. Reductions in host biomass occurred in both vegetative and reproductive organs, the latter resulting more affected. The increase of resources allocated within the parasite was concomitant to reduction of host seed yield indicating that parasite growth and host reproduction compete directly for resources within a host plant. However, the parasitic sink activity does not fully explain the total host biomass reduction because combined biomass of host-parasite complex was lower than the biomass of uninfected plants. In grass pea, the seed yield was negligible at severities higher than four parasites per plant. In contrast, faba bean and field pea sustained low but significant seed production at the highest infection severity. Data on seed yield and seed number indicated that the sensitivity of field pea to O. crenata limited the production of grain yield by reducing seed number but maintaining seed size. In contrast

  16. Immunomodulatory Effects of a Bioactive Compound Isolated from Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the Grass Carp Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated effects of compound kaempferol 3-a-L-(4-O-acetylrhamnopyranoside-7-a-L-rhamnopyranoside (SA isolated from Dryopteris crassirhizoma during immune-related gene expression in Ctenopharyngodon idella head kidney macrophages (CIHKM. The expression of immune-related genes (IL-1β, TNF-α, MyD88, and Mx1 were investigated using real-time PCR at 2 h, 8 h, 12 h, and 24 h after incubation with 1, 10, and 50 μg mL−1 of SA. Furthermore, fish were injected intraperitoneally with 100 μL of SA, and immune parameters such as lysozyme activity, complement C3, SOD, phagocytic activity, and IgM level were examined at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after injection. The differential expression of cytokines was observed after exposure to SA. IL-1β genes displayed significant expression at 2 and 8 h after exposure to 1–10 μg mL−1 of SA. SA also induced gene expression of cytokines such as MyD88, Mx1, and TNF-α. Furthermore, enhanced immune parameters in grass carp confirmed the immunomodulatory activity of SA. Interestingly, this compound has no toxic effect on CIHKM cells as tested by MTT assay. In addition, fish immunised with 10 μg mL−1 of SA exhibited maximum resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila infection. These results suggest that SA has the potential to stimulate immune responses in grass carp.

  17. Double Effect and Black Revenge in Lessing’s The Grass Is Singing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Lalbakhsh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A white woman’s murder by a black man, as depicted in Doris Lessing’s The Grass IS Singing, incorporates the revengeful act of an abandonment-neurotic black servant against a white female master with tactile delirium in the course of a paradoxical relationship of love and hate. The final homicide and the consequent act of surrender by Moses, the murderer, convey his paradoxical attitude toward his white master-beloved. This attitude begins with hatred, intensifies with mutual affection, and ends in murder. Focusing on the interracial revenge that takes place in the novel under study, the authors of this paper argue that Moses’ motivation in killing Mary originates from the ambivalence of his state of living under colonization and his learnings in Christianity, struggling with the Double-Effect Reasoning inaugurated by and in defense of black honor or negritude. As such, Moses’ sense of guilt and his subsequent surrender are the consequences of traditional and colonial internalization of sin, already present in him as a native of his revenge or honor-based society, influenced by Lobengula’s rule in which the criminal submits to punishment willingly, as well as missionary teachings. Through an interdisciplinary link between the Double-Effect Reasoning and the psychoanalytical perspective to the black problem promoted by Frantz Fanon, The Grass Is Singing thus seems to exempt Moses in his crime against the white race, represented by Mary, as well as to justify Moses self-surrender in defense of negritude and black honor.

  18. The Buffering Effect of Mindfulness on Abusive Supervision and Creative Performance: A Social Cognitive Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoming; Liu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Our research draws upon social cognitive theory and incorporates a regulatory approach to investigate why and when abusive supervision influences employee creative performance. The analyses of data from multiple time points and multiple sources reveal that abusive supervision hampers employee self-efficacy at work, which in turn impairs employee creative performance. Further, employee mindfulness buffers the negative effects of abusive supervision on employee self-efficacy at work as well as the indirect effects of abusive supervision on employee creative performance. Our findings have implications for both theory and practice. Limitations and directions for future research are also discussed.

  19. The Buffering Effect of Mindfulness on Abusive Supervision and Creative Performance: A Social Cognitive Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Our research draws upon social cognitive theory and incorporates a regulatory approach to investigate why and when abusive supervision influences employee creative performance. The analyses of data from multiple time points and multiple sources reveal that abusive supervision hampers employee self-efficacy at work, which in turn impairs employee creative performance. Further, employee mindfulness buffers the negative effects of abusive supervision on employee self-efficacy at work as well as the indirect effects of abusive supervision on employee creative performance. Our findings have implications for both theory and practice. Limitations and directions for future research are also discussed.

  20. Does good leadership buffer effects of high emotional demands at work on risk of antidepressant treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Hanson, Linda L Magnusson; Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Emotionally demanding work has been associated with increased risk of common mental disorders. Because emotional demands may not be preventable in certain occupations, the identification of workplace factors that can modify this association is vital. This article examines whether effects of emoti...... of emotional demands on antidepressant treatment, as an indicator of common mental disorders, are buffered by good leadership.......Emotionally demanding work has been associated with increased risk of common mental disorders. Because emotional demands may not be preventable in certain occupations, the identification of workplace factors that can modify this association is vital. This article examines whether effects...

  1. Effects of an invasive grass on the demography of the Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis: Implications for cacti conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sandoval, Julissa; Meléndez-Ackerman, Elvia

    2012-05-01

    The impact of exotic species around the world is among the primary threats to the conservation and management of rare and endangered species. In this work we asked whether or not the presence of the African grass Megathyrsus maximus on Mona Island was associated with negative impacts on the demography of the endangered Caribbean cactus Harrisia portoricensis. To address this question we performed field observations where we compared demographic data collected at un-manipulated areas invaded by Megathyrsus with un-manipulated areas non-invaded by this exotic grass. Additionally, demographic data were also collected in areas in which we removed the exotic grass biomass using two alternative treatments: complete and partial grass removal. Results demonstrated that the presence of Megathyrsus has negative effects on demographic parameters of Harrisia at various stages throughout its life cycle. In general, the survival, growth, and reproduction of Harrisia plants were depressed under the presence of Megathyrsus. Growth and survival of seedlings and juveniles of Harrisia were more impacted by the presence of Megathyrsus than adult performance and seedling recruitment only occurred in areas with grass absence. Our combined results suggest that modifications of the micro-environment by the presence of Megathyrsus may add an additional level of vulnerability to the persistence of Harrisia, and as such this factor must be considered when designing conservation strategies for this endangered species. This study highlights the need for a greater emphasis on understanding the interactions between invasive grass species and native cacti, and the importance of such information in designing conservation strategies for cacti species elsewhere.

  2. Near-Term Effects of Repeated-Thinning with Riparian Buffers on Headwater Stream Vertebrates and Habitats in Oregon, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna H. Olson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of a second-thinning harvest with alternative riparian buffer management approaches on headwater stream habitats and associated vertebrates in western Oregon, USA. Our analyses showed that stream reaches were generally distinguished primarily by average width and depth, along with the percentage of the dry reach length, and secondarily, by the volume of down wood. In the first year post-harvest, we observed no effects of buffer treatment on stream habitat attributes after moderate levels of thinning. One of two “thin-through” riparian treatments showed stronger trends for enlarged stream channels, likely due to harvest disturbances. The effects of buffer treatments on salamanders varied among species and with habitat structure. Densities of Plethodon dunni and Rhyacotriton species increased post-harvest in the moderate-density thinning with no-entry buffers in wider streams with more pools and narrower streams with more down wood, respectively. However, Rhyacotriton densities decreased along streams with the narrowest buffer, 6 m, and P. dunni and Dicamptodon tenebrosus densities decreased in thin-through buffers. Our study supports the use of a 15-m or wider buffer to retain sensitive headwater stream amphibians.

  3. The effects of forest residual debris disposal on perennial grass emergence, growth, and survival in a ponderosa pine ecotone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darin J. Law; Peter F. Kolb

    2007-01-01

    Soil surface conditions can have profound effects on plant seedling emergence and subsequent seedling survival. To test the hypothesis that different soil-surface treatments with logging residue affect range grass seedling emergence and survival, 6 alternative forest-residual treatments were established in the summer of 1998 following thinning of mature trees from...

  4. Energetic Materials Effects on Essential Soil Processes: Decomposition of Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata) Litter in Soil Contaminated with Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    availabilities of their respective food sources (bacteria and fungi ), were also unaffected-or-increasing in soil with CL-20 treatments. This is...ENERGETIC MATERIALS EFFECTS ON ESSENTIAL SOIL PROCESSES: DECOMPOSITION OF ORCHARD...GRASS (DACTYLIS GLOMERATA) LITTER IN SOIL CONTAMINATED WITH ENERGETIC MATERIALS ECBC-TR-1199 Roman G. Kuperman Ronald T. Checkai Michael Simini

  5. Effect of blood glucose level on acute stress response of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danli; Wu, Yubo; Huang, Di; Ren, Xing; Wang, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Stress has a considerable impact on welfare and productivity of fish, and blood glucose level of fish may be a factor modulating stress response. This study evaluated the effect of blood glucose level and handling on acute stress response of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. Fish were intraperitoneally injected with glucose at 0, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg g -1 body mass (BM) and then were exposed to handling for 5 min. Glucose injection resulted in increase of plasma glucose level and liver glycogen content and decrease of plasma lactate level. Handling resulted in increase of plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, and lactate and plasma lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and decrease of liver glycogen content. At 1 h post-stress, the plasma cortisol level was lower in the stressed fish injected with glucose at 0.5 mg g -1 BM than the stressed fish injected with glucose at 0, 0.2, and 1.0 mg g -1 BM. No significant differences were found in the activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and pyruvate kinase (PK) in the liver between the stressed and unstressed fish, regardless of the dose of glucose injection. At 1 h post-stress, the liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity was higher in the fish without glucose injection than in the fish injected with glucose. This study reveals that blood glucose level can affect stress response of grass carp by modulating cortisol release and glucose homeostasis through glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  6. The Effect of Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil on Growth and Development of Perennial Grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żurek G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of agricultural land in Poland by heavy metals is not a general problem but is limited to industrial areas. In regions of long history of industrial emission, of elevated levels of lead, cadmium, zinc and other ions during coal and ore mining and processing, as for example in Silesia, about 10 % of agricultural land may be characterized by exceeded maximum residue limits for Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni and Zn ions. Since the maintenance of agricultural areas in those regions is important from an ecological standpoint, the alternative farming activities are needed. Perennial grass biomass production for energy purposes is currently the best solution for majority of agricultural areas not suitable for food production in Poland. Along with increasing knowledge on separation and utilization of heavy metals (HM during and after biomass processing, phytoremediation of polluted soils will become important and valuable. To detect the effect of soil HM ions concentration on growth and development of selected, tall growing and high biomass yielding perennial grass cultivars, the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were registered. The elevated content of Pb, Cd and Zn ions in soil influenced on decrease of: minimal (Fo, maximal (Fm and variable (Fv fluorescence level as well as on total complementary area on a diagram of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction curve (Area. Based on detected parameters it was concluded, that the high level of HM ions in soils negatively affected the efficiency of photosynthesis. Therefore, plant growth, as well as development of generative shoots and finally the biomass yield were reduced in some cultivars. Among tested cultivars different reaction for HM ions in polluted soil were noted: from only slightly modified parameters of photosynthesis and unreduced yield (Elytrigia elongata cv. Bamar and Arrhenatherum elatius cv. Wiwena to significantly reduced Fo, Fv, Fm and biomass yield (Bromus carinathus cv. Broma and Bromus

  7. The power of exercise: buffering the effect of chronic stress on telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Puterman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic psychological stress is associated with detrimental effects on physical health, and may operate in part through accelerated cell aging, as indexed by shorter telomeres at the ends of chromosomes. However, not all people under stress have distinctly short telomeres, and we examined whether exercise can serve a stress-buffering function. We predicted that chronic stress would be related to short telomere length (TL in sedentary individuals, whereas in those who exercise, stress would not have measurable effects on telomere shortening.63 healthy post-menopausal women underwent a fasting morning blood draw for whole blood TL analysis by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. Participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen et al., 1983, and for three successive days reported daily minutes of vigorous activity. Participants were categorized into two groups-sedentary and active (those getting Centers for Disease Control-recommended daily amount of activity. The likelihood of having short versus long telomeres was calculated as a function of stress and exercise group, covarying age, BMI and education. Logistic regression analyses revealed a significant moderating effect of exercise. As predicted, among non-exercisers a one unit increase in the Perceived Stress Scale was related to a 15-fold increase in the odds of having short telomeres (p<.05, whereas in exercisers, perceived stress appears to be unrelated to TL (B = -.59, SE = .78, p = .45.Vigorous physical activity appears to protect those experiencing high stress by buffering its relationship with TL. We propose pathways through which physical activity acts to buffer stress effects.

  8. The Effect of Different levels of Soil Moisture on Visual Quality, Morphological and Physiological Characteristics of Three Native Grass Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ramin mahdavi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the last three decades, turfgrass breeders have put significant effort into breeding and developing turf species that have good drought resistance. As water conservation becomes an important issue, an interest is increasing in identifying grasses that require less water. Lack of water resources is most problems to increasing urban green spaces. Plants with good drought resistance are those that are able to survive stress by means of drought avoidance, drought tolerance at leaf water potentials, or both. The efficient use of water is made possible by understanding the effects of soil moisture water on crop development and yield. Drought affects the visual quality, growth rate and evapotranspiration. Researchers reported that turfgrass subjected to drought conditions for short periods could sustain a fairly good appearance by soil moisture about half of its consumptive use whenever soil moisture level falls to near permanent wilting point. Drought stress caused decrease in RWC and visual quality of many grass cultivars. In drought conditions resistance grass showed increase in proline content on their leaves. Therefore the use of native grasses with high-strength instead of imported grass with low-resistance is one way to increase landscape areas and reduce costs. The purpose of this study was to be compared native grasses with commercial grass cultivar “Super sport”. Materials and Methods: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of soil moisture stress levels included 85% (control, 65% and 45% of field capacity on native species Brumos tomentellus, Festuca rubra and F. arundinacea and commercial cultivars Super sport (control under greenhouse conditions. Plants were cultured in PVC containers measuring 9 cm in diameter and 60 cm deep. Soil was mixture of 70% loam soil, 20% pit mass and 10% sand. Greenhouse air temperature was maintained between 22 and 28 centigrade degree. All plants were maintained under

  9. Effect of application timing and grass height on the nitrogen fertilizer replacement value of cattle slurry applied with a trailing-shoe application system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalor, S.T.J.; Schroder, J.J.; Lantinga, E.A.; Schulte, R.P.O.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using a trailing-shoe system to apply cattle slurry, under different conditions of grass height (low [LG]: freshly cut sward [4–5 cm height] vs. high [HG]: application delayed by 7–19 d and applied to taller grass sward [4–11 cm] height) and month of application

  10. Effects of buffers and pH on in vitro binding of 67Ga by L1210 leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickson, J.D.; Webb, J.; Gams, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of sodium nitrate and a series of buffers on in vitro 67 Ga binding to L1210 leukemic cells at pH 6.8 +- 0.2 and 37 0 at concentrations of 10 -7 to 10 -2 M has been investigated. The relative ability of these agents to inhibit cellular incorporation of 67 Ga is given. Inhibition probably results from formation of gallium(III) complexes which are either impermeable to the tumor membrane or which compete with intracellular receptor complexes. However, direct interaction of buffers with the cell membrane or with gallium(III) receptors, as well as effects of buffers on cellular metabolism, have not been excluded. A monotonic decrease in the cellular incorporation of 67 Ga occurs between pH 6.2 and 7.8 in the presence of the inert buffer, 10 -2 M morpholinopropane sulfonic acid. (U.S.)

  11. Study on the reduction and hysteresis effect of soil nitrogen pollution by Alfalfa in channel buffer bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yixia; Xue, Lianqing; Zhang, Zhanyu; Li, Dongying

    2018-01-01

    Based on the simulation experiments of solute transport in channel buffer bank and pot experiments, this study analyzed the transport of nitrogen pollution from farmland drains along the South-North Water Transfer east route project; and compared the nitrogen transport rule and purification effect of alfalfa in channel buffer bank soil under situations of bare land and alfalfa mulching. The results showed that: (1) soil nitrogen content decreased gradually with the width increase of channel buffer bank by the soil adsorption and decomposition; (2) the migration rates of nitrogen were 0.06 g·kg-1 by the alfalfa mulching; (3) the removed rates of nitrogen from the soil were 0.088 g·kg-1 by cutting alfalfa; (4) the residual nitrogen of soil with alfalfa was 10% of the bare land. Alfalfa in channel buffer bank had obvious reduction and hysteresis effect to soil nitrogen pollution.

  12. Effects of buffer layer annealing temperature on the structural and optical properties of hydrothermal grown ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.Q.; Kim, C.R.; Lee, J.Y.; Heo, J.H.; Shin, C.M. [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, H., E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, J.H. [Major of Nano Semiconductor, Korea Maritime University, 1 Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-Ku, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.C. [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Korea Maritime University, 1 Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-Ku, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Son, C.S. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Silla University, Gwaebeop-dong, Sasang-gu, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.J. [Department of Nano Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, W.G. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, 861-1 Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, S.T. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Zhao, J.L. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, X.W. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2009-02-01

    ZnO was deposited on bare Si(1 0 0), as-deposited, and annealed ZnO/Si(1 0 0) substrates by hydrothermal synthesis. The effects of a ZnO buffer layer and its thermal annealing on the properties of the ZnO deposited by hydrothermal synthesis were studied. The grain size and root mean square (RMS) roughness values of the ZnO buffer layer increased after thermal annealing of the buffer layer. The effect of buffer layer annealing temperature on the structural and optical properties was investigated by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Hydrothermal grown ZnO deposited on ZnO/Si(1 0 0) annealed at 750 deg. C with the concentration of 0.3 M exhibits the best structural and optical properties.

  13. The effectiveness of module with critical thinking approach on hydrolysis and buffer materials in chemistry learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuswowati, M.; Purwanti, E.

    2018-03-01

    The research aims is to find out the effectiveness of critical thinking approach in Chemistry learning especially on hydrolysis and buffer materials. The level of its effectiveness was viewed from the students’ learning outcomes including knowledge, attitude and skill domains. The data were collected through validation sheets, questionnaires and tests, which were then analyzed by using descriptive quantitative method. The first step conducted was validating the module that was going to be used in the learning processes. The students’ learning outcome on knowledge domain was very good, viewed from the classical attainment by 88.63% with N-gain 0.718 with high criteria. It was also viewed from the students’ criticality level in solving the given problems. The result of the study revealed that more than 75% of the students obtained critical and very critical criteria in solving the given problems. The students’ attitudes and skills values were viewed through observation sheets during the learning processes. The result of the observation stated that more than 75% of the students showed good and very good attitudes and skills values. Based on the data, it could be concluded that the module with critical thinking approach was effective to be used on hydrolysis and buffer materials.

  14. Psychosocial safety climate buffers effects of job demands on depression and positive organizational behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Garry B; Dollard, Maureen F; Winefield, Anthony H; Dormann, Christian; Bakker, Arnold B

    2013-01-01

    In a general population sample of 2343 Australian workers from a wide ranging employment demographic, we extended research testing the buffering role of psychosocial safety climate (PSC) as a macro-level resource within the health impairment process of the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model. Moderated structural equation modeling was used to test PSC as a moderator between emotional and psychological job demands and worker depression compared with control and social support as alternative moderators. We also tested PSC as a moderator between depression and positive organizational behaviors (POB; engagement and job satisfaction) compared with control and social support as moderators. As expected we found PSC moderated the effects of job demands on depression and further moderated the effects of depression on POB with fit to the data that was as good as control and social support as moderators. This study has shown that PSC is a macro-level resource and safety signal for workers acting to reduce demand-induced depression. We conclude that organizations need to focus on the development of a robust PSC that will operate to buffer the effects of workplace psychosocial hazards and to build environments conducive to worker psychological health and positive organizational behaviors.

  15. Drought effects on composition and yield for corn stover, mixed grasses, and Miscanthus as bioenergy feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Emerson; Amber Hoover; Allison Ray; Jeffrey Lacey; Marnie Cortez; Courtney Payne; Doug Karlen; Stuart Birrell; David Laird; Robert Kallenbach; Josh Egenolf; Matthew Sousek; Thomas Voigt

    2014-11-01

    Drought conditions in 2012 were some of the most severe reported in the United States. It is necessary to explore the effects of drought on the quality attributes of current and potential bioenergy feedstocks. Compositional analysis data for corn stover, Miscanthus, and CRP grasses from one or more locations for years 2010 (normal precipitation levels) and 2012 (a known severe drought year nationally) was collected. Results & discussion: The general trend for samples that experienced drought was an increase in extractives and a decrease in structural sugars and lignin. The TEY yields were calculated to determine the drought effects on ethanol production. All three feedstocks had a decrease of 12-14% in TEY when only decreases of carbohydrate content was analyzed. When looking at the compounded effect of both carbohydrate content and the decreases in dry matter loss for each feedstock there was a TEY decrease of 25%-59%. Conclusion: Drought had a significant impact on the quality of all three bioenergy crops. In all cases where drought was experienced both the quality of the feedstock and the yield decreased. These drought induced effects could have significant economic impacts on biorefineries.

  16. The effects of energy grass plantations on biodiversity. 2nd annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semere, T.; Slater, F.

    2004-07-01

    This report, which covers the year 2003 growing season, is the second annual report about a project to investigate the ecological impact on biodiversity of plantations of biomass grass crops grown in Hertfordshire in the UK. Wildlife monitoring was carried out at five field sites growing the perennial rhizomatous grass crops Miscanthus, reed canary grass and switch grass. The report covers the findings from wildlife surveys for the 2003 season, the final results from the invertebrate identification from the 2002 season, data entry from the 2002 and 2003 seasons, and the continued invertebrate identification during the 2003 season. Butterfly assessments and an evaluation of crop characteristics such as plant height, plant/stem density and biomass yield were also performed. Results are presented with respect to crop field characteristics, pests and diseases, ground flora, ground beetles, birds, small mammals, butterflies and epigeal invertebrates. Plans for the next growing season are outlined.

  17. Cost effectiveness analysis of immunotherapy in patients with grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhout, K Y; Verheggen, B G; Schreder, C H; Augustin, M

    2012-01-01

    An economic evaluation was conducted to assess the outcomes and costs as well as cost-effectiveness of the following grass-pollen immunotherapies: OA (Oralair; Stallergenes S.A., Antony, France) vs GRZ (Grazax; ALK-Abelló, Hørsholm, Denmark), and ALD (Alk Depot SQ; ALK-Abelló) (immunotherapy agents alongside symptomatic medication) and symptomatic treatment alone for grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. The costs and outcomes of 3-year treatment were assessed for a period of 9 years using a Markov model. Treatment efficacy was estimated using an indirect comparison of available clinical trials with placebo as a common comparator. Estimates for immunotherapy discontinuation, occurrence of asthma, health state utilities, drug costs, resource use, and healthcare costs were derived from published sources. The analysis was conducted from the insurant's perspective including public and private health insurance payments and co-payments by insurants. Outcomes were reported as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and symptom-free days. The uncertainty around incremental model results was tested by means of extensive deterministic univariate and probabilistic multivariate sensitivity analyses. In the base case analysis the model predicted a cost-utility ratio of OA vs symptomatic treatment of €14,728 per QALY; incremental costs were €1356 (95%CI: €1230; €1484) and incremental QALYs 0.092 (95%CI: 0.052; 0.140). OA was the dominant strategy compared to GRZ and ALD, with estimated incremental costs of -€1142 (95%CI: -€1255; -€1038) and -€54 (95%CI: -€188; €85) and incremental QALYs of 0.015 (95%CI: -0.025; 0.056) and 0.027 (95%CI: -0.022; 0.075), respectively. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of €20,000, the probability of OA being the most cost-effective treatment was predicted to be 79%. Univariate sensitivity analyses show that incremental outcomes were moderately sensitive to changes in efficacy estimates. The main study limitation was the

  18. Effects of ethylene on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity in Bermuda grass under low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-04-01

    The phytohormone ethylene has been reported to mediate plant response to cold stress. However, it is still debated whether the effect of ethylene on plant response to cold stress is negative or positive. The objective of the present study was to explore the role of ethylene in the cold resistance of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.). Under control (warm) condition, there was no obvious effect of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) or the antagonist Ag(+) of ethylene signaling on electrolyte leakage (EL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Under cold stress conditions, ACC-treated plant leaves had a greater level of EL and MDA than the untreated leaves. However, the EL and MDA values were lower in the Ag(+) regime versus the untreated. In addition, after 3 days of cold treatment, ACC remarkably reduced the content of soluble protein and also altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Under control (warm) condition, there was no significant effect of ACC on the performance of photosystem II (PS II) as monitored by chlorophyll α fluorescence transients. However, under cold stress, ACC inhibited the performance of PS II. Under cold condition, ACC remarkably reduced the performance index for energy conservation from excitation to the reduction of intersystem electron acceptors (PI(ABS)), the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP0), the quantum yield of electron transport flux from Q(A) to Q(B) (φE0), and the efficiency/probability of electron transport (ΨE0). Simultaneously, ACC increased the values of specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) and dissipation (DI0/RC) after 3 days of cold treatment. Additionally, under cold condition, exogenous ACC altered the expressions of several related genes implicated in the induction of cold tolerance (LEA, SOD, POD-1 and CBF1, EIN3-1, and EIN3-2). The present study thus suggests that ethylene affects the cold tolerance of Bermuda grass by impacting the antioxidant system

  19. Riparian buffer zones as pesticide filters of no-till crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Terencio R; Bortolozo, F R; Hansel, F A; Rasera, K; Ferreira, M T

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have pointed to the potential benefits of riparian vegetation as buffer zones for agricultural and industrial pollutants harmful to aquatic ecosystems. However, other studies have called into question its use as an ecological filter, questioning the widths and conditions for which they are effective as a filter. In this work, we have investigated the buffering capacity of the riparian one to retain pesticides in the water-saturated zone, on 27 sites composed by riparian buffer zones with different vegetation structure (woody, shrubs, or grass vegetation) and width (12, 36, and 60 m). Five pesticides were analyzed. The effectiveness of the filtering was largely influenced by the width and vegetation type of the buffer zone. In general, decreasing pesticide removal followed in this order wood > shrubs > grass. The 60 m woody buffer zone was the most effective in the removal of all the pesticides. Only atrazine was detected in this case (0.3 μg L(-1)). Furthermore, a linear correlation (R (2) > 0.97) was observed in their removal for all compounds and buffer zones studied. Thus, preserving the woody vegetation in the riparian zone is important for watershed management and groundwater quality in the no-tillage system in temperate climate.

  20. Effects of buffer layer temperature on the magnetic properties of NdFeB thin film magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.B.; Cho, S.H.; Kim, H.T.; Ryu, K.S.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, K.H.; Kapustin, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of the buffer layer temperature (T b ) on the magnetic properties and microstructure of [Mo/NdFeB/Mo]-type thin films have been investigated. The Mo-buffer layer with low T b is composed of fine grains while that with high T b has coarse grains. The subsequent NdFeB layer also grows with fine or coarse grains following the buffer layer structure. The NdFeB layer grown on a low T b buffer shows high coercivity and strong perpendicular anisotropy. The best magnetic properties of i H c =1.01 MA/m (12.7 kOe), B r =1.31 T (13.1 kG) and BH max =329 kJ/m 3 (41.4 MGOe) were obtained from the film with T b =400 deg. C

  1. The protective effects of taurine on acute ammonia toxicity in grass carp Ctenopharynodon idellus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaodan; Li, Ming; Yuan, Lixia; Song, Meize; Ren, Qianyan; Shi, Ge; Meng, Fanxing; Wang, Rixin

    2016-09-01

    The four experimental groups were carried out to test the response of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella to ammonia toxicity and taurine: group 1 was injected with NaCl, group 2 was injected with ammonium acetate, group 3 was injected with ammonium acetate and taurine, and group 4 was injected taurine. Fish in group 2 had the highest ammonia content in the liver and brain, and alanine, arginine, glutamine, glutamate and glycine contents in liver. Brain alanine and glutamate of fish in group 2 were significantly higher than those of fish in group 1. Malondialdehyde content of fish in group 2 was the highest, but superoxide dismutase and glutathione activities were the lowest. Although fish in group 2 had the lowest red cell count and hemoglobin, the highest alkaline phosphatase, complement C3, C4 and total immunoglobulin contents appeared in this group. In addition, superoxide dismutase and glutathione activities, red cell count and hemoglobin of fish in group 3 were significantly higher than those of fish in group 2, but malondialdehyde content is the opposite. This study indicates that ammonia exerts its toxic effects by interfering with amino acid transport, inducing reactive oxygen species generation and malondialdehyde accumulation, leading to blood deterioration and over-activation of immune response. The exogenous taurine could mitigate the adverse effect of high ammonia level on fish physiological disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Aluminum elution and precipitation in glass vials: effect of pH and buffer species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Toru; Miyajima, Makoto; Wakiyama, Naoki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic extractables from glass vials may cause particle formation in the drug solution. In this study, the ability of eluting Al ion from borosilicate glass vials, and tendencies of precipitation containing Al were investigated using various pHs of phosphate, citrate, acetate and histidine buffer. Through heating, all of the buffers showed that Si and Al were eluted from glass vials in ratios almost the same as the composition of borosilicate glass, and the amounts of Al and Si from various buffer solutions at pH 7 were in the following order: citrate > phosphate > acetate > histidine. In addition, during storage after heating, the Al concentration at certain pHs of phosphate and acetate buffer solution decreased, suggesting the formation of particles containing Al. In citrate buffer, Al did not decrease in spite of the high elution amount. Considering that the solubility profile of aluminum oxide and the Al eluting profile of borosilicate glass were different, it is speculated that Al ion may be forced to leach into the buffer solution according to Si elution on the surface of glass vials. When Al ions were added to the buffer solutions, phosphate, acetate and histidine buffer showed a decrease of Al concentration during storage at a neutral range of pHs, indicating the formation of particles containing Al. In conclusion, it is suggested that phosphate buffer solution has higher possibility of forming particles containing Al than other buffer solutions.

  3. Modified band alignment effect in ZnO/Cu2O heterojunction solar cells via Cs2O buffer insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Kiryung; Lee, Dongyoon; Kim, Seunghwan; Seo, Hyungtak

    2018-02-01

    The effects of a complex buffer layer of cesium oxide (Cs2O) on the photocurrent response in oxide heterojunction solar cells (HSCs) were investigated. A p-n junction oxide HSC was fabricated using p-type copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) and n-type zinc oxide (ZnO); the buffer layer was inserted between the Cu2O and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO). Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were performed to characterize the electronic band structures of cells, both with and without this buffer layer. In conjunction with the measured band electronic structures, the significantly improved visible-range photocurrent spectra of the buffer-inserted HSC were analyzed in-depth. As a result, the 1 sun power conversion efficiency was increased by about three times by the insertion of buffer layer. The physicochemical origin of the photocurrent enhancement was mainly ascribed to the increased photocarrier density in the buffer layer and modified valence band offset to promote the effective hole transfer at the interface to FTO on the band-alignment model.

  4. Silicon alleviates deleterious effects of high salinity on the halophytic grass Spartina densiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Andrades-Moreno, Luis; Davy, Anthony J

    2013-02-01

    The non-essential element silicon is known to improve plant fitness by alleviating the effects of biotic and abiotic stresses, particularly in crops. However, its possible role in the exceptional tolerance of halophytes to salinity has not been investigated. This study reports the effect of Si supply on the salinity tolerance of the halophytic grass Spartina densiflora; plants were treated with NaCl (0-680 mM), with or without silicon addition of 500 μM, in a glasshouse experiment. Plant responses were examined using growth analysis, combined with measurements of gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. In addition, tissue concentrations of aluminium, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus and silicon were determined. Although high salinity decreased growth, this effect was alleviated by treatment with Si. Improved growth was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate (A), and greater water-use efficiency (WUE). Enhanced A at high salinity could be explained by beneficial effects of Si on the photochemical apparatus, and on chlorophyll concentrations. Ameliorative effects of Si were correlated with reduced sodium uptake, which was unrelated to a reduction in the transpiration rate, since Si-supplemented plants had higher stomatal conductances (G(s)). These plants also had higher tissue concentrations of essential nutrients, suggesting that Si had a positive effect on the mineral nutrient balance in salt-stressed plants. Si appears to play a significant role in salinity tolerance even in a halophyte, which has other, specific salt-tolerance mechanisms, through diverse protective effects on the photosynthetic apparatus, water-use efficiency and mineral nutrient balance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of a bus seat buffer to mitigate frontal crash effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisławek, Sebastian; Dziewulski, Paweł; Sławiński, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    The paper considers the problem of coach occupant safety during crash events. The authors present a simple low-cost seat buffer concept which may mitigate the effects of frontal impact. The method of computer simulation was chosen to solve the problem efficiently. The Finite Element Method (FEM) implemented in the LS-DYNA commercial code was used. The testing procedure was based on European Commission regulations, under which vehicles move at a defined speed. Simulations have shown that seat occupants suffer serious trauma during a crash, with the head experiencing relatively high acceleration, thus resulting in an HIC36 of 1490. The installation of a protective buffer mounted on the upper part of the seat reduced the HIC36 to only 510. However, in its current form it does not meet the requirements of the regulations. Further modifications to the overlay shape and structure are essential in order to better improve the deceleration of passengers' bodies. Moreover, a detailed model of seats and their anchorage should be taken into account. A more flexible structure should provide more positive and more accurate results.

  6. Daycare Center Attendance Buffers the Effects of Maternal Authoritarian Parenting Style on Physical Aggression in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, José M; Braza, Paloma; Carreras, Rosario; Braza, Francisco; Azurmendi, Aitziber; Pascual-Sagastizábal, Eider; Cardas, Jaione; Sánchez-Martín, José R

    2017-01-01

    A maternal authoritarian style has been related to the development of physical aggression during childhood and later future social problems; however, not too many studies have detected other than individual or family factors that may buffer this maternal effect. This work examines whether daycare center attendance may moderate the relationships between a mother authoritarian style and physical aggression. The study sample was 72 (40 girls) kindergarten children from Spain. Parents were asked to complete two questionnaires focused on individual family characteristics and parenting styles. At age 5, children physical aggression was assessed by direct observation at playtime; aggression scores at 6 was obtained by a peer-rated questionnaire. A least squared multiple regression was performed after controlling for children's level of physical aggression at 5, child sex and siblings. A positive contribution of maternal authoritarian style on physical aggression was detected. Daycare center attendance appears to attenuate the effect of the mother's authoritarian style on physical aggression, only in boys.

  7. Effect of Buffers on Aqueous Solute-Exclusion Zones around Ion-Exchange Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian-ming; Wexler, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Interaction between charged surfaces in aqueous solution is a fundamental feature of colloid science. Theoretically, surface potential falls to half its value at a distance equal to a Debye length, which is typically on the order of tens to hundreds of nanometers. This potential prevents colloids from aggregating. On the other hand, long-range surface effects have been frequently reported. Here we report additional long-range effects. We find that charged latex particles in buffer solutions are uniformly excluded from several-hundred-micron-thick shells surrounding ion-exchange beads. Exclusion is observed whether the beads are charged similarly or oppositely to the particles. Hence, electrostatic interactions between bead and microsphere do not cause particle exclusion. Rather, exclusion may be the consequence of water molecules re-orienting to produce a more ordered structure, which then excludes the particles. PMID:19185312

  8. Grass genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; SanMiguel, Phillip; Chen, Mingsheng; Tikhonov, Alexander; Francki, Michael; Avramova, Zoya

    1998-01-01

    For the most part, studies of grass genome structure have been limited to the generation of whole-genome genetic maps or the fine structure and sequence analysis of single genes or gene clusters. We have investigated large contiguous segments of the genomes of maize, sorghum, and rice, primarily focusing on intergenic spaces. Our data indicate that much (>50%) of the maize genome is composed of interspersed repetitive DNAs, primarily nested retrotransposons that in...

  9. Ingestional and transgenerational effects of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the pale grass blue butterfly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Wataru; Hiyama, Atsuki; Nohara, Chiyo; Sakauchi, Ko; Otaki, Joji M.

    2015-01-01

    One important public concern in Japan is the potential health effects on animals and humans that live in the Tohoku-Kanto districts associated with the ingestion of foods contaminated with artificial radionuclides from the collapsed Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. Additionally, transgenerational or heritable effects of radiation exposure are also important public concerns because these effects could cause long-term changes in animal and human populations. Here, we concisely review our findings and implications related to the ingestional and transgenerational effects of radiation exposure on the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, which coexists with humans. The butterfly larval ingestion of contaminated leaves found in areas of human habitation, even at low doses, resulted in morphological abnormalities and death for some individuals, whereas other individuals were not affected, at least morphologically. This variable sensitivity serves as a basis for the adaptive evolution of radiation resistance. The distribution of abnormality and mortality rates from low to high doses fits well with a Weibull function model or a power function model. The offspring generated by morphologically normal individuals that consumed contaminated leaves exhibited high mortality rates when fed contaminated leaves; importantly, low mortality rates were restored when they were fed non-contaminated leaves. Our field monitoring over 3 years (2011–2013) indicated that abnormality and mortality rates peaked primarily in the fall of 2011 and decreased afterwards to normal levels. These findings indicate high impacts of early exposure and transgenerationally accumulated radiation effects over a specific period; however, the population regained normality relatively quickly after ∼15 generations within 3 years

  10. Effect of a Bacterial Grass Culture on the Plant Growth and Disease Control in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Seong Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the plant growth-promoting and biocontrol potential of a grass culture with Paenibacillus ehimensis KWN8 on tomato. For this experiment, treatments of a chemical fertilizer (F, a bacterial grass culture (G, a 1/3 volume of G plus 2/3 F (GF, and F plus a synthetic fungicide (FSf were applied to tomato leaves and roots. The result showed that the severity of Alternariasolani and Botrytiscinerea symptoms were significantly reduced after the application of the bacterial grass culture (G and GF and FSf. In addition, root mortality in G and GF was lower compared to F. Tomato plants treated with G or GF had better vegetative growth and yield compared to F. Application of G affected the fungal and bacterial populations in the soil. In conclusion, treatment with a bacterial grass culture decreased disease severity and increased tomato growth parameters. However, there were no statistically significant correlations between disease occurrence and tomato yields. This experiment presents the possibility to manage diseases of tomato in an environmentally friendly manner and to also increase the yield of tomato by using a grass culture broth containing P. ehimensis KWN38.

  11. Effects of water inflow into a deposition hole - Influence of pellets type and of buffer block manufacturing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Jense, Viktor [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    During the installation of buffer and canister in a deposition hole a number of different problems can arise. The problems are mainly connected to water flow from fractures in the rock into the deposition hole. According to the reference design for the KBS-3V concept, the buffer is protected with a special sheet made of rubber during the installation phase. This protection sheet will at some stage be removed and the outer gap between the buffer blocks and the rock surface will be filled with bentonite pellets. The interaction of buffer blocks and pellets have previously been investigated. The focuses of those studies were the following processes: 1. Erosion. Erosion of bentonite from the deposition hole up into the tunnel backfill material. This process will continue until a tunnel plug has been installed and the backfill is saturated. 2. Heave. Early wetting of the pellets filling may cause a heave of the buffer blocks into the backfill that will decrease the density of the buffer. The laboratory tests presented in this study are complementing previous investigations by focusing on how the choice of manufacturing process for the bentonite blocks (isostatic or uniaxial compaction) and pellets (roller compaction or extrusion) are affecting erosion and the heaving effect.

  12. Effects of water inflow into a deposition hole - Influence of pellets type and of buffer block manufacturing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Jense, Viktor

    2012-10-01

    During the installation of buffer and canister in a deposition hole a number of different problems can arise. The problems are mainly connected to water flow from fractures in the rock into the deposition hole. According to the reference design for the KBS-3V concept, the buffer is protected with a special sheet made of rubber during the installation phase. This protection sheet will at some stage be removed and the outer gap between the buffer blocks and the rock surface will be filled with bentonite pellets. The interaction of buffer blocks and pellets have previously been investigated. The focuses of those studies were the following processes: 1. Erosion. Erosion of bentonite from the deposition hole up into the tunnel backfill material. This process will continue until a tunnel plug has been installed and the backfill is saturated. 2. Heave. Early wetting of the pellets filling may cause a heave of the buffer blocks into the backfill that will decrease the density of the buffer. The laboratory tests presented in this study are complementing previous investigations by focusing on how the choice of manufacturing process for the bentonite blocks (isostatic or uniaxial compaction) and pellets (roller compaction or extrusion) are affecting erosion and the heaving effect

  13. The stress-buffering effect of acute exercise: Evidence for HPA axis negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschucke, Elisabeth; Renneberg, Babette; Dimeo, Fernando; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    According to the cross-stressor adaptation hypothesis, physically trained individuals show lower physiological and psychological responses to stressors other than exercise, e.g. psychosocial stress. Reduced stress reactivity may constitute a mechanism of action for the beneficial effects of exercise in maintaining mental health. With regard to neural and psychoneuroendocrine stress responses, the acute stress-buffering effects of exercise have not been investigated yet. A sample of highly trained (HT) and sedentary (SED) young men was randomized to either exercise on a treadmill at moderate intensity (60-70% VO2max; AER) for 30 min, or to perform 30 min of "placebo" exercise (PLAC). 90 min later, an fMRI experiment was conducted using an adapted version of the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST). The subjective and psychoneuroendocrine (cortisol and α-amylase) changes induced by the exercise intervention and the MIST were assessed, as well as neural activations during the MIST. Finally, associations between the different stress responses were analysed. Participants of the AER group showed a significantly reduced cortisol response to the MIST, which was inversely related to the previous exercise-induced α-amylase and cortisol fluctuations. With regard to the sustained BOLD signal, we found higher bilateral hippocampus (Hipp) activity and lower prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity in the AER group. Participants with a higher aerobic fitness showed lower cortisol responses to the MIST. As the Hipp and PFC are brain structures prominently involved in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, these findings indicate that the acute stress-buffering effect of exercise relies on negative feedback mechanisms. Positive affective changes after exercise appear as important moderators largely accounting for the effects related to physical fitness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. With a little help from my assistant: buffering the negative effects of emotional dissonance on dentist performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Alma M; Hakanen, Jari J; Perhoniemi, Riku; Salanova, Marisa

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that dentist' interpersonal resources (good cooperation with one's assistant) together with their personal resources (optimism) buffer the negative effects of emotional dissonance (a demand that occurs when there is a difference between felt and displayed emotions) on job performance (in-role and extra-role performance) over time. We carried out Hierarchical Regression Modeling on a sample of 1954 Finnish dentists who participated in a two-wave 4-year longitudinal study. Results showed that good cooperation with dental assistants buffered the negative effects of emotional dissonance on both in-role and extra-role performance among the dentists in the long term. However, unexpectedly, dentists' high optimism did not buffer their in-role nor extra-role performance over time under conditions of experiencing high emotional dissonance. We conclude that interpersonal job resources such as good cooperation with one's colleagues may buffer the negative effect of emotional dissonance on dentists' job performance even in the long term, whereas the role of personal resources (e.g., optimism) may be less important for maintaining high job performance under conditions of emotional dissonance. The study novelties include the test of the negative effects of emotional dissonance on long-term performance in dentistry and the identification of the job rather than personal resources as the buffers against the negative effects of emotional dissonance on long-term performance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Investigations on THM effects in buffer, EDZ and argillaceous host rock. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobmann, M.; Breustedt, M.; Li, S.; Polster, M.; Schirmer, S.

    2013-11-15

    In the Federal Republic of Germany the final disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in clay formations is investigated as an alternative to the reference concept in a salt formation. The main concern when switching to a clay host rock is the high amount of heat released from the canisters into the clay rock over a long period of time. It is still an open question to what extent the host rock formation is affected by the released heat and if this is a threat to safety. The released heat from the canisters is a load on the whole barrier system, which consists of the geotechnical barriers (buffer and plugs) and the geological barrier. The temperature has a direct impact on the buffer, the excavative damaged zone (EDZ) and the surrounding host rock. The buffer has specific thermo-physical properties that significantly influence the temperature evolution in the near field so that a temperature load on the buffer is of special concern. Thus, with regard to thermal criteria, the buffer plays a significant role for the design of the emplacement fields. An open question is whether the use of admixtures could enhance the thermo-physical properties so that the heat release into the host rock would be more efficient. Due to the permanent heat release and the continuous emplacement of additional canisters, the in-situ stress state in the vicinity of the emplacement boreholes continuously varies during the operational period and beyond. It is an open question how the EDZ of emplacement boreholes evolves in the long term with regard to its fissure system and mainly its permeability. A closure of the EDZ and a corresponding decrease in its permeability are necessary to enhance the tightness of the barrier system, especially to avoid a preferential pathway through the EDZ around the openings. The host rock has specific properties that are necessary to ensure a safe enclosure of the waste. A change in the host rock temperature may change these properties irreversibly. This is

  16. Prevailing negative soil biota effect and no evidence for local adaptation in a widespread Eurasian grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Wagner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil biota effects are increasingly accepted as an important driver of the abundance and distribution of plants. While biogeographical studies on alien invasive plant species have indicated coevolution with soil biota in their native distribution range, it is unknown whether adaptation to soil biota varies among populations within the native distribution range. The question of local adaptation between plants and their soil biota has important implications for conservation of biodiversity and may justify the use of seed material from local provenances in restoration campaigns.We studied soil biota effects in ten populations of the steppe grass Stipa capillata from two distinct regions, Europe and Asia. We tested for local adaptation at two different scales, both within (ca. 10-80 km and between (ca. 3300 km regions, using a reciprocal inoculation experiment in the greenhouse for nine months. Generally, negative soil biota effects were consistent. However, we did not find evidence for local adaptation: both within and between regions, growth of plants in their 'home soil' was not significantly larger relative to that in soil from other, more distant, populations.Our study suggests that negative soil biota effects can prevail in different parts of a plant species' range. Absence of local adaptation points to the possibility of similar rhizosphere biota composition across populations and regions, sufficient gene flow to prevent coevolution, selection in favor of plasticity, or functional redundancy among different soil biota. From the point of view of plant--soil biota interactions, our findings indicate that the current practice of using seeds exclusively from local provenances in ecosystem restoration campaigns may not be justified.

  17. Effect of Vetiver Grass on Reduction of Soil Salinity and Some Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Noshadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil salinity is one of the major limitations of agriculture in the warm and dry regions. Soil sodification also damages soil structure and reduce soil permeability. Therefore, control of soil salinity and sodium is very important. Vetiver grass has unique characteristics that can be useful in phytoremediation. Materials and Methods: This research was conducted to investigate the effects of irrigation with different salinities on vetiver grass and the effects of this plant on the control of soil salinity and soil reclamation.The experimental design was randomized complete block design. Irrigation water salinities were 0.68(blank, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 dS/m, respectively, which artificially were constructed using sodium chloride and calcium chloride. At first, vetiver was transplanted and then moved to the farm. The amount of soil moisture was measured by the neutron probe. Irrigation depth was applied to refill soil water deficit up to field capacity. To evaluate the soil salinity in above salinity treatments, soil was sampled in each plot from 0-30, 30-60 and 60-90 cm depths and for each layer, electrical conductivity of saturated extract (ECe, sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations was measured .To measure the sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations in the leaves and roots of vetiver plant, samples were dried in oven. The dried samples were powdered and passed through the sieve (No. 200 and they were reduced to ash in 250 ◦C. 5 ml HCl was added to one gram of the ash, and after passing through filter paper, the volume of sample was brought to 50 ml by boiled distilled water. After preparing plant samples, the sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations were measured by Flame Photometer. Reults and discussion: The results showed that the vetiver grass was able to decrease soil salinity at different salinity levels except highest water salinity (10 dS/m and prevented salt accumulation in the soil. However, in the

  18. Effects on the equine colon ecosystem of grass silage and haylage diets after an abrupt change from hay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, S; Julliand, V; Lindberg, J E; Bertilsson, J; Jansson, A

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of an abrupt change from grass hay (81% DM) to grass silage (36% DM) or grass haylage (55% DM), fed at similar DM intakes, and to compare the effects of silage and haylage on the composition and activities of the colon microflora. The forages were from the same swath harvested on the same day. Four adult colon-fistulated geldings were randomly assigned to diets in a crossover design. The study started with a preperiod when all 4 horses received the hay diet, followed by an abrupt feed change to the haylage diet for 2 horses and the silage diet for 2 horses. All 4 horses then had a new second preperiod of hay, followed by an abrupt feed change to the opposite haylage and silage diet. The periods were 21 d long, and the forage-only diets were supplemented with minerals and salt. The abrupt feed changes were made at 0800 h. Colon samples were taken before the abrupt feed change, 4 and 28 h after the feed change, and 8, 15, and 21 d after the feed change, all at 1200 h. Colon bacterial counts, VFA, pH, and DM concentrations were unchanged throughout the first 28 h after the abrupt feed change from hay to haylage and silage. Also, fecal pH and DM concentrations were unchanged during the first 28 h. During the weekly observations, colon lactobacilli counts increased (P = 0.023) in horses receiving the silage diet and were greater than on the haylage diet at 21 d. Streptococci counts decreased (P = 0.046) in horses receiving the haylage diet and were less than on the silage diet at 15 and 21 d. Total VFA concentrations and colon and fecal pH did not differ between diets and were unchanged throughout the weekly observations. The DM concentration of colon digesta and feces decreased (P = 0.030 and 0.049, respectively) on both diets during the weekly observations. The results suggest that in horses fed at the maintenance level of energy intake, an abrupt feed change from grass hay to grass silage or grass haylage from

  19. Does social support buffer the effects of occupational stress on sleep quality among paramedics? A daily diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pow, Jessie; King, David B; Stephenson, Ellen; DeLongis, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Given evidence suggesting a detrimental effect of occupational stress on sleep, it is important to identify protective factors that may ameliorate this effect. We followed 87 paramedics upon waking and after work over 1 week using a daily diary methodology. Multilevel modeling was used to examine whether the detrimental effects of daily occupational stress on sleep quality were buffered by perceived social support availability. Paramedics who reported more support availability tended to report better quality sleep over the week. Additionally, perceived support availability buffered postworkday sleep from average occupational stress and days of especially high occupational stress. Perceived support availability also buffered off-workday sleep from the cumulative amount of occupational stress experienced over the previous workweek. Those with low levels of support displayed poor sleep quality in the face of high occupational stress; those high in support did not show significant effects of occupational stress on sleep. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Dependent vs. independent juvenile survival: contrasting drivers of variation and the buffering effect of parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybala, Kristen E; Gardali, Thomas; Eadie, John M

    2013-07-01

    Juvenile survival is often found to be more sensitive than adult survival to variation in environmental conditions, and variation in juvenile survival can have significant impacts on population growth rates and viability. Therefore, understanding the population-level effects of environmental changes requires understanding the effects on juvenile survival. We hypothesized that parental care will buffer the survival of dependent juveniles from variation in environmental conditions, while the survival of independent juveniles will respond more strongly to environmental variation and, in turn, drive the overall variation in annual juvenile survival. We tested this parental-care hypothesis using a 30-year mark-recapture data set to model the survival of juvenile Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia) during the dependent and independent stages. We examined the effects of weather, density, and cohort mean fledge date and body mass on annual variation in survival during the first 12 weeks after fledging, as well as effects of individual fledge date and body mass on individual variation in survival. The primary driver of annual variation in juvenile survival was precipitation during the previous rainy season, consistent with an effect on food availability, which had a strong positive effect on the survival of independent juveniles, but no effect on dependent juveniles. We also found strong support for effects of body mass and fledge date on individual survival probability, including striking differences in the effect of fledge date by stage. Our results provided evidence that different mechanisms influence juvenile survival during each stage of fledgling development, and that parental care buffers the survival of dependent juveniles from variation in environmental conditions. Consequently, variation in juvenile survival was driven by independent juveniles, not dependent juveniles, and studies focused only on survival during the dependent stage may not be able to detect the

  1. The effect of essential oils on microbial composition and quality of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) fillets during chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhan; Liu, Xiaochang; Jia, Shiliang; Zhang, Longteng; Luo, Yongkang

    2018-02-02

    Antimicrobial and antioxidant effects of essential oils (oregano, thyme, and star anise) on microbial composition and quality of grass carp fillets were investigated. Essential oils treatment was found to be effective in inhibiting microbial growth, delaying lipid oxidation, and retarding the increase of TVB-N, putrescine, hypoxanthine, and K-value. Based on sensory analysis, shelf-life of grass carp fillets was 6days for control and 8days for treatment groups. Among the essential oils, oregano essential oil exhibited the highest antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. GC-MS analysis of essential oils components revealed that carvacrol (88.64%) was the major component of oregano essential oil. According to the results of high-throughput sequencing, Aeromonas, Glutamicibacter, and Aequorivita were the predominant microbiota in fresh control samples. However, oregano essential oil decreased the relative abundance of Aeromonas, while thyme and star anise essential oils decreased the relative abundance of Glutamicibacter and Aequorivita in fresh treated samples. The microbial composition of both control and treatment groups became less diverse as storage time increased. Aeromonas and Pseudomonas were dominant in spoiled samples and contributed to fish spoilage. Compared to the control, essential oils effectively inhibited the growth of Aeromonas and Shewanella in grass carp fillets during chilled storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Competition between endoparasitic nematodes and effect on biomass of Ammophila arenaria (marram grass) as affected by timing of inoculation and plant age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, E.P.; Duyts, H.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of intra- and interspecific competition on the abundance of endoparasitic nematodes and assessed the consequences for biomass production of the natural dune grass Ammophila arenaria. Pratylenchus penetrans was limited by intraspecific competition and it suppressed the

  3. Effect of boundary conditions on thermohydraulic behavior of clay buffer used in nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arul Peter, A.; Murugesan, K.; Mamidi, Ganesh; Sharma, Umesh Kumar; Sharma, D. Akanshu; Arora, Puneet

    2010-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy is increasing dramatically in the world due to the fast depletion of fossil fuels, and hence the nuclear waste disposal and its short and long-term effects are of considerable importance. One of the options considered for nuclear waste disposal is underground nuclear waste repository facility. In this underground nuclear waste disposal system the waste filled canisters are placed in the rock surrounded by an engineered clay barrier and the whole system is buried in the geological formation, which serves as the natural or geological barrier. The important characteristic of the clay barrier is that it should not open up for radiation though it is continuously subjected to heat loading from the canisters. The heat and moisture transport mechanisms through the clay barrier plays an important role in deciding its mechanical strength. Clay behaves as an unsaturated porous material when it is used as a buffer material in nuclear waste facility. The governing equations for heat and moisture transfer through unsaturated porous media are coupled and nonlinear and hence they have to be solved using numerical solution technique. This paper reports the results of a numerical study on heat and moisture transport through a buffer layer made of clay as used in nuclear waste repository. Galerkin's weighted residual finite element method has been employed for the solution of the non-linear coupled governing equations used to represent the heat and moisture transport through unsaturated clay material. A detailed computational procedure has been established for the solution of the non-linear governing equations using Newton-Raphson technique. Initially the code has been validated with available experimental results. Then numerical simulation results were obtained for heat and moisture variations within the buffer material for Dirichlet temperature boundary conditions in the range, 50 deg C 2 2 , with an aim to simulate the boundary conditions which the clay

  4. Effects of riparian buffer width on wood loading in headwater streams after repeated forest thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia I. Burton; Deanna H. Olson; Klaus J. Puettmann

    2016-01-01

    Forested riparian buffer zones are used in conjunction with upland forest management, in part, to provide for the recruitment for large wood to streams. Small headwater streams account for the majority of stream networks in many forested regions. Yet, our understanding of how riparian buffer width influences wood dynamics in headwater streams is relatively less...

  5. A Review of Effectiveness of Vegetative Buffers on Sediment Trapping in Agricultural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been growing recognition of the importance of riparian buffers between agricultural fields and waterbodies. Riparian buffers play an important role in mitigating the impacts of land use activities on water quality and aquatic ecosystems. However, eval...

  6. Simulating long-term effectiveness and efficiency of management scenarios for an invasive grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Holcombe, Tracy R.; Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Frid, Leonardo; Olsson, Aaryn D.

    2015-01-01

    Resource managers are often faced with trade-offs in allocating limited resources to manage plant invasions. These decisions must often be made with uncertainty about the location of infestations, their rate of spread and effectiveness of management actions. Landscape level simulation tools such as state-and-transition simulation models (STSMs) can be used to evaluate the potential long term consequences of alternative management strategies and help identify those strategies that make efficient use of resources. We analyzed alternative management scenarios for African buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare syn. Cenchrus ciliaris) at Ironwood Forest National Monument, Arizona using a spatially explicit STSM implemented in the Tool for Exploratory Landscape Scenario Analyses (TELSA). Buffelgrass is an invasive grass that is spreading rapidly in the Sonoran Desert, affecting multiple habitats and jurisdictions. This invasion is creating a novel fire risk and transforming natural ecosystems. The model used in this application incorporates buffelgrass dispersal and establishment and management actions and effectiveness including inventory, treatment and post-treatment maintenance. We simulated 11 alternative scenarios developed in consultation with buffelgrass managers and other stakeholders. The scenarios vary according to the total budget allocated for management and the allocation of that budget between different kinds of management actions. Scenario results suggest that to achieve an actual reduction and stabilization of buffelgrass populations, management unconstrained by fiscal restrictions and across all jurisdictions and private lands is required; without broad and aggressive management, buffelgrass populations are expected to increase over time. However, results also suggest that large upfront investments can achieve control results that require relatively minimal spending in the future. Investing the necessary funds upfront to control the invasion results in the most

  7. Simulating long-term effectiveness and efficiency of management scenarios for an invasive grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S. Jarnevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Resource managers are often faced with trade-offs in allocating limited resources to manage plant invasions. These decisions must often be made with uncertainty about the location of infestations, their rate of spread and effectiveness of management actions. Landscape level simulation tools such as state-and-transition simulation models (STSMs can be used to evaluate the potential long term consequences of alternative management strategies and help identify those strategies that make efficient use of resources. We analyzed alternative management scenarios for African buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare syn. Cenchrus ciliaris at Ironwood Forest National Monument, Arizona using a spatially explicit STSM implemented in the Tool for Exploratory Landscape Scenario Analyses (TELSA. Buffelgrass is an invasive grass that is spreading rapidly in the Sonoran Desert, affecting multiple habitats and jurisdictions. This invasion is creating a novel fire risk and transforming natural ecosystems. The model used in this application incorporates buffelgrass dispersal and establishment and management actions and effectiveness including inventory, treatment and post-treatment maintenance. We simulated 11 alternative scenarios developed in consultation with buffelgrass managers and other stakeholders. The scenarios vary according to the total budget allocated for management and the allocation of that budget between different kinds of management actions. Scenario results suggest that to achieve an actual reduction and stabilization of buffelgrass populations, management unconstrained by fiscal restrictions and across all jurisdictions and private lands is required; without broad and aggressive management, buffelgrass populations are expected to increase over time. However, results also suggest that large upfront investments can achieve control results that require relatively minimal spending in the future. Investing the necessary funds upfront to control the invasion

  8. Buffer-Mediated Effects of Clearcutting on In-Pool Amphibian Productivity: Can Aquatic Processes Compensate for Terrestrial Habitat Disturbance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S. Veysey Powell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resource extraction and wildlife conservation are often perceived as incompatible. For wetland-dependent amphibians, forested buffers may mitigate timber-harvest impacts, but little empirical research has focused on buffers around lentic habitats. We conducted a landscape experiment to examine how spotted salamander and wood frog reproductive output (i.e., eggmass and metamorph production respond to clearcutting mediated by buffers of different widths (i.e., uncut, 30 m buffer, 100 m buffer at ephemeral pools in an industrial forest. We found complex interactions between buffer treatment and reproductive output, which were strongly mediated by hydroperiod. Overall, reproductive output was most sensitive at 30 m-buffer pools and for salamanders, but responses diverged across productivity metrics even within these categories. Notably, for both cut treatments over time, while salamander eggmass abundance decreased, metamorph productivity (i.e., snout-vent length [SVL] and abundance tended to increase. For example, average metamorph SVLs were predicted to lengthen between 0.2 and 0.4 mm per year post-cut. Additionally, typical relationships between reproductive output and hydroperiod (as indicated by the reference treatment were disrupted for both species in both cut treatments. For example, long-hydroperiod pools produced more salamander metamorphs than short-hydroperiod pools in both the reference and 30 m-buffer treatments, but the rate of increase was lower in the 30 m-buffer treatment such that a long-hydroperiod pool in the reference treatment was predicted to produce, on average, 24 more metamorphs than a similar pool in the 30 m-buffer treatment. From a conservation perspective, our results highlight the importance of evaluating both terrestrial and aquatic responses to terrestrial habitat disturbance, since responses may be reinforcing (i.e., exert similarly positive or negative effects, with the potential for amplification in the

  9. Laboratory tests to determine the effect of Olkiluoto bounding brine water on buffer performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martikainen, J.; Schatz, T.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents a set of results from laboratory studies on the effect of bounding brine water exposure on buffer performance. In order to evaluate the effect of bounding brine water exposure on compacted bentonite buffer performance a series of experiments were conducted using swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity measurements as follows: Direct exposure measurements were performed on MX-80 bentonite samples encompassing a range of dry density values from 1334 to 1585 kg/m 3 . These samples were saturated directly with a 70 g/L solution composed of calcium and sodium chloride at a Ca 2+ /Na + mass ratio of 3:2. Direct exposure measurements were performed on IBECO RWC samples encompassing a range of dry density values from 1314 to 1564 kg/m 3 . These samples were saturated directly with a 68.45 g/L solution composed of calcium and sodium chloride at a Ca 2+ /Na + mass ratio of 3.2:2. A set of MX-80 and IBECO RWC samples encompassing a range of dry density values from 1018 to 1607 kg/m 3 were initially saturated with tap water followed by (indirect) exposure to a 68.45 g/L solution composed of calcium and sodium chloride at a Ca 2+ /Na + mass ratio of 3.2:2. Sample swelling pressures were continuously monitored and hydraulic conductivity measurements were performed at each constant swelling pressure condition. In some cases, exchangeable cation analyses were performed. The specific test results are summarized as follows: All of the measured swelling pressure values upon exposure to bounding brine water were lower than the corresponding values after saturation with tap water. The relative swelling pressure decrease for the IBECO RWC samples was approximately half of the corresponding decrease for the MX-80 samples. On exposure to bounding brine water, hydraulic conductivity values were increased at the lowest densities, for both the MX-80 and IBECO samples, while at higher densities hydraulic conductivity values were essentially equivalent, for both the

  10. The stress-buffering effects of hope on adjustment to multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Sindia; Pakenham, Kenneth I

    2014-12-01

    Hope is an important resource for coping with chronic illness; however, the role of hope in adjusting to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been neglected, and the mechanisms by which hope exerts beneficial impacts are not well understood. This study aims to examine the direct and stress-moderating effects of dispositional hope and its components (agency and pathways) on adjustment to MS. A total of 296 people with MS completed questionnaires at time 1 at 12 months later and time 2. Focal predictors were stress, hope, agency and pathways, and the adjustment outcomes were anxiety, depression, positive affect, positive states of mind and life satisfaction. Results of regression analyses showed that as predicted, greater hope was associated with better adjustment after controlling for the effects of time 1 adjustment and relevant demographics and illness variables. However, these direct effects of hope were subsumed by stress-buffering effects. Regarding the hope components, the beneficial impacts of agency emerged via a direct effects mechanism, whereas the effects of pathways were evidenced via a moderating mechanism. Findings highlight hope as an important protective coping resource for coping with MS and accentuate the roles of both agency and pathways thinking and their different modes of influence in this process.

  11. Effect of nitrogen fertilization on the protein quality of timothy grass and silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Syrjälä-Qvist

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy grass given N fertilizer at the rates of 40, 80 and 120 kg N/ha was preserved in 3 glass-fibre silos of 0.4 m3. The crude protein content of DM in the grass increased with the increase of N fertilization as follows: N40 14.8 %, N80 18.4 % and N120 22.1 %, but the proportion of true protein in crude protein decreased: N40 82 %, N80 78 % and N120 76 %. The proportion of watersoluble N in the total N in the grass was: N40 27 %, N80 30 % and N120 33 %. The higher was the N fertilization level, the more rapidly was the protein of the grass degraded in the rumen. The amino acid profile of the protein was similar at all the N fertilization levels. The quality of all the silages was good. The NH3-N fraction of total N was 2.8—3.9 % and the proportion of water-soluble N in total N was 51—55 %, In silage the decrease during ensiling in the proportion of true protein in crude protein and the increase in the proportion of water-soluble N in total N were smaller than in the other silages. The rumen degradability of protein during the first two hours was also lowest in this silage.

  12. Simulating the effect of conditioning on the drying of cut grass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzi, de F.; Bosma, A.H.; Stanghellini, C.

    1996-01-01

    Field wilting and drying of hay is an important agricultural process upon which the quality of material subsequently conserved is dependent. The research described here aims at translating the biophysical processes that affect field drying of grass into parameters sets to be used for decision

  13. Histopathological study on the effect of rice herbicides on grass carp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodan idella) fingerlings were exposed to rice herbicides butachlor 1.5 kg ha-1, oxyfluorfen 0.25 kg ha-1 and thiobencarb 1.5 kg ha-1, 12 days after their application in the respective fields. To observe the impact of herbicides on the histopathology of the fish, the fingerlings were collected from the ...

  14. The effect of different phosphate ion concentrations and ph of the phosphate buffer on lipase bioproduction by rhizopus oligosporus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, I.; Ali, S.; Awan, U.F.; Javed, W.; Mirza, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the present investigation, we report the effect of phosphate ion concentration and different ph of the phosphate buffer (as diluent) on lipase bioproduction by Rhizopus oligosporus. For this purpose, solid state fermentation was employed. Different agricultural by-products such as wheat bran, rice husk, almond meal, soybean meal and sunflower meal were used as substrate. The maximum lipase activity (72.60 U/g) was observed with the almond meal. Addition of phosphate ions (K/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/) influenced the lipase production. The ph of the phosphate buffer (7.0) was found to be effective for higher yield of lipase. (author)

  15. Negative effects of pesticides on wild bee communities can be buffered by landscape context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mia G; Blitzer, E J; Gibbs, Jason; Losey, John E; Danforth, Bryan N

    2015-06-22

    Wild bee communities provide underappreciated but critical agricultural pollination services. Given predicted global shortages in pollination services, managing agroecosystems to support thriving wild bee communities is, therefore, central to ensuring sustainable food production. Benefits of natural (including semi-natural) habitat for wild bee abundance and diversity on farms are well documented. By contrast, few studies have examined toxicity of pesticides on wild bees, let alone effects of farm-level pesticide exposure on entire bee communities. Whether beneficial natural areas could mediate effects of harmful pesticides on wild bees is also unknown. Here, we assess the effect of conventional pesticide use on the wild bee community visiting apple (Malus domestica) within a gradient of percentage natural area in the landscape. Wild bee community abundance and species richness decreased linearly with increasing pesticide use in orchards one year after application; however, pesticide effects on wild bees were buffered by increasing proportion of natural habitat in the surrounding landscape. A significant contribution of fungicides to observed pesticide effects suggests deleterious properties of a class of pesticides that was, until recently, considered benign to bees. Our results demonstrate extended benefits of natural areas for wild pollinators and highlight the importance of considering the landscape context when weighing up the costs of pest management on crop pollination services. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Alien plant invasion in mixed-grass prairie: Effects of vegetation type and anthropogenic disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D.L.; Anderson, P.J.; Newton, W.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of alien plant species to invade a region depends not only on attributes of the plant, but on characteristics of the habitat being invaded. Here, we examine characteristics that may influence the success of alien plant invasion in mixed-grass prairie at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, in western North Dakota, USA. The park consists of two geographically separate units with similar vegetation types and management history, which allowed us to examine the effects of native vegetation type, anthropogenic disturbance, and the separate park units on the invasion of native plant communities by alien plant species common to counties surrounding both park units. If matters of chance related to availability of propagules and transient establishment opportunities determine the success of invasion, park unit and anthropogenic disturbance should better explain the variation in alien plant frequency. If invasibility is more strongly related to biotic or physical characteristics of the native plant communities, models of alien plant occurrence should include vegetation type as an explanatory variable. We examined >1300 transects across all vegetation types in both units of the park. Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) indicated that the fully parameterized model, including the interaction among vegetation type, disturbance, and park unit, best described the distribution of both total number of alien plants per transect and frequency of alien plants on transects where they occurred. Although all vegetation types were invaded by alien plants, mesic communities had both greater numbers and higher frequencies of alien plants than did drier communities. A strong element of stochasticity, reflected in differences in frequencies of individual species between the two park units, suggests that prediction of risk of invasion will always involve uncertainty. In addition, despite well-documented associations between anthropogenic disturbance and alien plant invasion, five of

  17. The effect of geographical and climatic properties on grass pollen and Phl p 5 allergen release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, Şenol; Şahin, Aydan Acar; Sarışahin, Tuğba; Şahin, Serap; Kaplan, Ayşe; Pınar, Nur Münevver

    2018-04-01

    The Poaceae family, including grasses, comprises several cosmopolitan and allergenic species. The aim of this study was to determine the correlations between Poaceae pollen and Phl p 5 allergen concentrations in two cities with different geographical and climatic properties in Turkey. Pollen were collected from Burkard traps in Ankara and Zonguldak. Phl p 5 sampling was carried out between March and October in both 2015 and 2016 using a BGI900 Cascade High Volume Air Sampler (900 L/min.). The concentrations of Phl p 5 were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. The annual sum of Poaceae pollen (pollen index) during 2015-2016 was 5454 in Ankara and 4142 in Zonguldak. The total Phl p 5 concentration was 1309 pg/m3 in Zonguldak, whereas it was 8181 pg/m3 in Ankara over 2 years. About 90% of the allergen was found in the fraction with particulate matter (PM) > 10 μm in both cities. It was found that the main meteorological parameter which affected pollen and Phl p 5 was temperature in both stations. Rainfall was also found to be important for Zonguldak, due to its climatic and geographic properties. Lastly, we suggest that the primary wind direction, which is from the south of Zonguldak, could have a `drift effect' for allergens because of the airborne pollen concentrations and the dates on which the allergen is released into the atmosphere. The wind direction may be an important factor in the distribution of allergen and pollen grains in stations, especially those with a hilly topography.

  18. Effect of tropical browse leaves supplementation on rumen enzymes of sheep and goats fed Dichanthium annulatum grass-based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sultan; Kundu, S S

    2010-08-01

    In a switch-over experiment, eight male animals, four each of sheep and goats of local breeds with mean body weight of 26. 8 +/- 2.0 and 30.0 +/- 2.1 kg, were fed Dichanthium annulatum (DA) grass and four browse species viz. Helictris isora, Securengia virosa, Leucaena leucocephala (LL) and Hardwickia binnata (HB) in four feeding trials to assess their supplementary effect on activity of rumen enzymes. The sheep and goats were offered DA grass with individual browse in 75:25 and 50:50 proportions, respectively, for more than 3 months during each feeding trial, and rumen liquor samples were collected twice at 0 and 4 h post feeding after 60 and 90 days of feeding. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymes were determined in the bacteria and protozoa fractions of rumen liquor, while cellulase enzyme activity was measured in mixed rumen liquor. LL and HB had the highest and lowest contents of CP, while fibre contents were lower in early than later browse leaves. Supplementation of browse leaves significantly (P goats on all DA grass-browse-supplemented diets except DA-HB (42.8 units/mg protein), where activity was significantly (P Goat exhibited higher activities of GOT and GPT than sheep in both bacteria and protozoa fraction of rumen liquor, while cellulase activity was similar between the animal species on the grass-browse leaves diets. Results indicate that browse leaves supplementation affect the enzyme activities of sheep and goats rumen, while the goats rumen liquor had higher activities of GOT, GPT and GDH enzyme than sheep.

  19. Effects of Supplementing Napier Grass With Graded Levels of Desmodium on Intake and Rumen Fermentation of Steers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariuki, J.N.; Muia, J.M.K.; Gitau, G.K.; Gachuri, C.K.; Tamminga, S.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of greenleaf desmodium ( Desmodium Detortum) on organic matter (OM) intake and rumen fermentation of steers fed on Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum). four Sahiwal steers (live-weight 437+/- 21 kg) were offered ad libitum four diets constituted from Napier grass and desmodium hay in a 4*4 latin square. The proportion of Desmodium in the diet on DM basis were 0% (D1), 15% (D2), 25% (D3), and 35% (D4) respectively.The OM intake increased significantly (P < 0.05) with the level of desmodium supplement (6.1, 6.4, 7.6 and 8.3). Rumen ammonia (NH3-N) also increased with increased level of supplementation (138, 162, 198, 237 mg 1-1). rumen pH increased slightly with increasing levels of legume in diet. Feeding desmodium significantly improved (P < 0.05) total volatile acids (VFA). The result indicated that supplementing a basal diet of Napier grass with desmodium increased rumen NH3-N, VFA levels which subsequently led to enhanced digestion and intake

  20. Effect of Trinexapac-Ethyl and Traffic Stress on Physiological and Morphological Characteristics of Wheat Grass(Agropyron desertorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Sheikh Mohamadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of trinexapac ethyl concentrations (0, 250 and 500 g/h and traffic stress (traffic and non traffic treatments on wheat grass physiological and morphological traits, an experiment was conducted on research farm of Isfahan University of Technology in 2011 - 2012 as factorial in completely randomized designs with three replications. The studied traits involved plant height and plant density, shoot dry weight and fresh weights, tillering, chlorophyll level, roots and shoot dissolved carbohydrates. Results showed that Trinexapac ethyl reduced plant height, fresh weight and dry weight of cut parts significantly. Application of 250 and 500 g/h Trinexapac ethyl decreased plant height by 21.23 percent and 31.85 percent respectively. Application of Trinexapac ethyl improved plant height, tillering and chlorophyll level. In contrast, chlorophyll level was decreased substantially under traffic treatment and this treatment did not affect wheat grass density and tillering significantly. Under 500 g/h Trinexapac ethyl treatment, tillering was increased by 36 percent compared with under control condition one. Results showed that Trinexapac ethyl application and traffic increased dissolved carbohydrates of root and shoot significantly. As a result, it was found that wheat grass is a traffic resistant plant and it seems that the use of Trinexapac ethyl increases plant resistance to traffic stress

  1. Effects of Streptococcus bovis Isolated from Bovine Rumen on the Fermentation Characteristics and Nutritive Value of Tanzania Grass Silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson de Moura Zanine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Streptococcus bovis on the fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of Tanzania grass silage. Tanzania grass was chopped and left untreated (U or treated with Streptococcus bovis JB1 at 1 × 106 colony-forming units per gram (cfu/g of fresh forage or Streptococcus bovis HC5 at 1 × 106 cfu/g of fresh forage and packed into sixtuplicate laboratory silos. The largest number of enterobacteria, molds and yeast (M&Y occurred in untreated silages and the smallest populations of enterobacteria and M&Y and the largest numbers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, at 9.81 and 9.87 log cfu/g, were observed in Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5, respectively (P<0.05. Silages treated with JB1 and HC5 had lower (P<0.05 silage pHs and concentrations of ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N than untreated silages. The application of Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5 resulted in fewer losses through gases and effluents (P<0.05, which resulted in greater dry matter recovery (DMR and crude protein recovery (CPR (P<0.05. Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5 improved the fermentative profile and increased the concentration of crude protein and DMR and CPR in Tanzania grass silage.

  2. The effect of ginger and garlic addition during cooking on the volatile profile of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) soup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Lin; Tu, Zong-Cai; Zhang, Lu; Sha, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Hui; Pang, Juan-Juan; Tang, Ping-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Ginger and garlic have long been used in Asian countries to enhance the flavor and to neutralize any unpleasant odors present in fish soup. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in the amount of volatile components present in fish soup compared to boiled water solutions of ginger and garlic. The fish soup was prepared by boiling oil-fried grass carp ( Ctenopharyngodon idella ) with or without ginger and/or garlic. Generally, boiling garlic and ginger in water led to a decrease in the amount of the principal volatile constituents of these spices, together with the formation of some new volatiles such as pentanal, hexanal, and nonanal. The results showed that 16 terpenes present in raw ginger, predominantly camphene, β -phellandrene, β -citral, α -zingiberene, and ( E )-neral, were detected in fish soup with added ginger and thus remained in the solution even after boiling. Similarly, 2-propen-1-ol and three sulfur compounds (allyl sulfide, diallyl disulfide, and diallyl trisulfide) present in raw garlic, were present in trace amounts in the boiled garlic solution, but were present in considerably larger amounts in the boiled fish solution with garlic or garlic plus ginger. In conclusion, the effect of adding spices on the volatile profile of grass carp soup can be attributed to the dissolution of flavor volatiles mainly derived from raw spices into the solution, with few additional volatiles being formed during boiling. In addition, boiling previously fried grass carp with spices led to enhanced volatile levels compared to boiled spice solutions.

  3. Effect of mixing low palatable grasses of heteropogon contortus with ipil ipil leaves on digestibility in goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M.; Qamar, I.A.; Babar, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted at the National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad, Pakistan during 2012 to find out the effect of mixing low palatable grasses of Heteropogon contortus (HC), with tree leaves of Leucaena leucocephala (Ipil ipil, II) in the ratio of 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, along with sole species on their digestibility in small ruminants. Goats fed II/sub 100%/, HC/sub 25%/ II/sub 75%/, HC/sub 50%/ II/sub 50%/, HC/sub 75%/ II/sub 25%/ and HC/sub 100%/ had similar dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and crude fibre (CF) consumption among all the treatments. The digestibility percentage of dry matter intake (DMI) varied among the treatments ranging from 68.25% to 41.66%. Mixtures of low palatable grass and Ipil ipil were in general more digestible with more than 65% dry matter digestibility. The lowest digestibility of dry matter (41.66%) was observed in HC/sub 100%/. A similar trend was noted for CP digestibility. However, reverse trend was observed in digestibility of CF where highest digestibility was recorded in HC100% and lowest in II100%. It can be concluded that grass and ipil ipil leaf mixture are better regarding forage quality and nutrient digestibility and can be recommended as animal feed. (author)

  4. Controlling coaching and athlete thriving in elite adolescent netballers: The buffering effect of athletes' mental toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Daniel F; Stamatis, Andreas; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2017-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the association between controlling coach behaviours and athlete experiences of thriving and test the buffering effect of mental toughness on this relation. A cross-sectional survey. In total, 232 female netballers aged 11 to 17 years (14.97+1.52) with between 1 and 15 years of experience in their sport (7.50+2.28) completed measures of controlling coach interpersonal style, mental toughness and thriving. Latent moderated structural models indicated that (i) controlling coach behaviours were inversely related with experiences of vitality and learning; (ii) mental toughness was positively associated with psychological experiences of both dimensions of thriving; and (iii) mental toughness moderated the effect of coach's controlling interpersonal style on learning but not vitality experiences, such that the effect was weaker for individuals who reported higher levels of mental toughness. This study extends past work and theory to show that mental toughness may enable athletes to counteract the potentially deleterious effect of controlling coach interpersonal styles. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the greenhouse effect gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) in grass land and in the grass breeding. Greenhouse effect gases prairies. report of the first part of the project December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussana, J.F.

    2002-12-01

    In the framework of the Kyoto protocol on the greenhouse effect gases reduction, many ecosystems as the prairies can play a main role for the carbon sequestration in soils. The conservation of french prairies and their management adaptation could allow the possibility of carbon sequestration in the soils but also could generate emissions of CO 2 and CH 4 (by the breeding animals on grass) and N 2 O (by the soils). This project aims to establish a detailed evaluation of the contribution of the french prairies to the the greenhouse effect gases flux and evaluate the possibilities of reduction of the emissions by adaptation of breeding systems. (A.L.B.)

  6. Phosphorus effect on the uptake, translocation and accumulation of the 14C-urea in orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panak, H.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, J.; Akademia Rolniczo-Technicza, Olsztyn

    1981-01-01

    The effect of different phosphorus supplies on the uptake, translocation and accumulation of 14 C-urea by orchard grass was investigated. Phosphorus starvation inhibits the uptake, translocation and accumulation of the carbon of urea similarly to the nitrogen of urea. As compared with the uptake process the reduction of the accumulation is much more effected by the inhibition of the carbon translocation from roots to the aboveground parts. Lack of phosphorus also decreases the incorporation of the 14 C of urea into high-molecular compounds. The effect of phosphorus deficit on the accumulation of 14 C-urea increases with time of starvation. (orig.)

  7. Stress-buffering Effect of Coping Strategies on Interrole Conflict among Family Caregivers of People with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Hiroshi; Furuta, Nobuo; Kono, Mitsue; Kabeya, Mayumi

    2017-08-23

    To examine the stress-buffering effect of coping strategies on the adverse effects of interrole conflict on the mental health of employed family caregivers, and clarify the moderating role of attentional control on this stress-buffering effect. Data were drawn from a two-wave longitudinal online survey of employed Japanese family caregivers of people with dementia (263 males, 116 females; age 51.54 ± 9.07 years). We assessed interrole conflict, coping strategies, attentional control, mental health variables (psychological strain and quality of life), and confounding factors. Hierarchical regression analyses controlled for sociodemographic factors found formal support seeking had a stress-buffering effect for strain- and behavior-based caregiving interfering with work (CIW) only on psychological strain, and was moderated by attentional control. Single slope analysis showed higher CIW was related to higher psychological strain in those with greater use of formal support seeking and lower attentional control, but not in those with higher attentional control. Greater use of formal support seeking weakens the adverse effects of strain- and behavior-based CIW on psychological strain in people with high attentional control. Attentional control is a key factor in the stress-buffering effect of formal support seeking on strain- and behavior-based CIW.

  8. Scoping calculation of nuclides migration in engineering barrier system for effect of volume expansion due to overpack corrosion and intrusion of the buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshita, Takashi; Ishihara, Yoshinao; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Ohi, Takao; Nakajima, Kunihiko

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion of the carbon steel overpack leads to a volume expansion since the specific gravity of corrosion products is smaller than carbon steel. The buffer material is compressed due to the corrosive swelling, reducing its thickness and porosity. On the other hand, buffer material may be extruded into fractures of the surrounding rock and this may lead to a deterioration of the planned functions of the buffer, including retardation of nuclides migration and colloid filtration. In this study, the sensitivity analyses for the effect of volume expansion and intrusion of the buffer material on nuclide migration in the engineering barrier system are carried out. The sensitivity analyses were performed on the decrease in the thickness of the buffer material in the radial direction caused by the corrosive swelling, and the change in the porosity and dry density of the buffer caused by both compacting due to corrosive swelling and intrusion of buffer material. As results, it was found the maximum release rates of relatively shorter half-life nuclides from the outside of the buffer material decreased for taking into account of a volume expansion due to overpack corrosion. On the other hand, the maximum release rates increased when the intrusion of buffer material was also taking into account. It was, however, the maximum release rates of longer half-life nuclides, such as Cs-137 and Np-237, were insensitive to the change of buffer material thickness, and porosity and dry density of buffer. (author)

  9. Effects of feeding level and NDF content of grass-clover silages on chewing activity, fecal particle size and NDF digestibility in dairy heifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Anne-Katrine Skovsted; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Nørgaard, Peder

    2014-01-01

    intake (PRumination time per kg DM intake (Pcontents (Prumination with greater...... NDF content (Prumination time increased with greater NDF content (Pcontent (P...The objective of this study was to assess effects of feed intake and NDF content of highly digestible grass-clover silage on chewing behavior, fecal particle size distribution and apparent digestibility in restrictively fed heifers. Four grass-clover silages (Lolium perenne, Trifolium pratense...

  10. Pathway to neural resilience: Self-esteem buffers against deleterious effects of poverty on the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Zhang, Lin; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hong, Yingyi; Cheon, Bobby; Liu, Jia

    2016-11-01

    Human neuroimaging studies have shown that people living in poverty tend to suffer hippocampal atrophy, which leads to impaired memory and learning throughout life. However, behavioral studies demonstrate that poor people with high self-esteem are often exempt from the deleterious effect of poverty and instead possess a happy and successful life. Here we investigated whether high self-esteem can buffer against the deleterious effects of poverty, as indicated by low subjective socioeconomic status (SSS), on the hippocampal gray matter volume (GMV) in a large cohort of young participants (N = 280). As expected, findings revealed that although low (vs. high) SSS was linked with a smaller hippocampal GMV, the deleterious effect of low SSS on hippocampal GMV was alleviated when the participants have high self-esteem. Commonality analyses further confirmed this observation. The current study suggests that positive psychological resources such as self-esteem may provide protection for the hippocampal atrophy in adversity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3757-3766, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Social support buffers the effect of interpersonal life stress on suicidal ideation and self-injury during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, D M; Perlman, G; Davila, J; Kotov, R; Klein, D N

    2017-04-01

    The effect of life stress on suicidal symptoms during adolescence is well documented. Stressful life events can trigger suicidality, but most adolescents are resilient and it is unclear which factors protect against the deleterious impact of stress. Social support is thought to be one such factor. Therefore, we investigated the buffering effect of specific sources of social support (parental and peer) on life stress (interpersonal and non-interpersonal) in predicting suicidal symptoms during adolescence. In order to test the specificity of this stress buffering, we also examined it with regard to dysphoric mood. Data come from the Adolescent Development of Emotions and Personality Traits (ADEPT) Project, a cohort of 550 adolescent females aged 13.5-15.5 recruited from Long Island. Self-reported social support, suicidality, and dysphoria were assessed at baseline and suicidality and dysphoria were assessed again at 9-month follow-up. Life stress was assessed by interview at the follow-up. High levels of parental support protected adolescent girls from developing suicidal symptoms following a stressor. This effect was less pronounced for peer support. Also, social support did not buffer the pathogenic effects of non-interpersonal stress. Finally, social support did not buffer the effect of life stress on dysphoric symptoms. Altogether, our results highlight a distinct developmental pathway for the development of suicidal symptoms involving parental support that differs from the development of dysphoria, and signifies the importance and specificity of social support in protecting against suicidality in adolescent girls.

  12. Spatial Characterization of Riparian Buffer Effects on Sediment Loads from Watershed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding all watershed systems and their interactions is a complex, but critical, undertaking when developing practices designed to reduce topsoil loss and chemical/nutrient transport from agricultural fields. The presence of riparian buffer vegetation in agricultural lands...

  13. Effects of Anodic Buffer Layer in Top-Illuminated Organic Solar Cell with Silver Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Lung Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient ITO-free top-illuminated organic photovoltaic (TOPV based on small molecular planar heterojunction was achieved by spinning a buffer layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS, on the Ag-AgOx anode. The PEDOT:PSS thin film separates the active layer far from the Ag anode to prevent metal quenching and redistributes the strong internal optical field toward dissociated interface. The thickness and morphology of this anodic buffer layer are the key factors in determining device performances. The uniform buffer layer contributes a large short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage, benefiting the final power conversion efficiency (PCE. The TOPV device with an optimal PEDOT:PSS thickness of about 30 nm on Ag-AgOx anode exhibits the maximum PCE of 1.49%. It appreciates a 1.37-fold enhancement in PCE over that of TOPV device without buffer layer.

  14. Side Effect of Good's Buffers on Optical Properties of Gold Nanoparticle Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Wagner, Michal; Undall-Behrend Christiansen, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    spectroscopy. Distinct absorption features at ca. 290 and 360 nm and fluorescence emission in the 408-484 nm range are observed in filtered AuNP-free solutions. Electrochemical oxidation of these buffers generates similar optical properties, suggesting that the degradation products of the buffers contribute...... to the optical properties of AuNP solutions. This work indicates deeper evaluation of fluorescence signals based on metal NPs or NCs is needed....

  15. Effect of Tylenchorhynchus robustoides on Growth of Buffalo Grass and Western Wheatgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolik, J D

    1982-10-01

    Tylenchorhynchus robustoides reduced (P = 0.05) growth of Agropyron smithii (western wheatgrass) at soil temperatures of 20, 25, 30, and 35 C. Growth reduction increased with increasing soil temperatures. Highest populations of T. robustoides were recovered at 25 and 30 C. Clipping weights of Buchloe dactyloides (buffalo grass) were reduced at 25 and 30 C; however, root/crown weights were reduced at 15, 20, 30, and 35 C in nematode infested vs. noninfested soil. Reproduction of T. robustoides was greater at 25, 30, and 35 C than at 20 C on B. dactyloides. In a greenhouse study, T. robustoides reduced clipping and root/crown weights of both grasses 24-64%.

  16. Behavior and nutritional condition buffer a large-bodied endotherm against direct and indirect effects of climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan A. Long; R. Terry Bowyer; Warren P. Porter; Paul Mathewson; Kevin L. Monteith; John G. Kie

    2014-01-01

    Temporal changes in net energy balance of animals strongly influence fitness; consequently, natural selection should favor behaviors that increase net energy balance by buffering individuals against negative effects of environmental variation. The relative importance of behavioral responses to climate-induced variation in costs vs. supplies of energy, however, is...

  17. The effect of isochoric freezing on mammalian cells in an extracellular phosphate buffered solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, J; Rubinsky, B

    2018-04-20

    Isochoric (constant volume) freezing has been recently suggested as a new method for cell and organ preservation. As a first step in studying the effect of isochoric freezing on mammalian cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCK), were frozen in an isochoric system, in a simple extracellular phosphate buffered solution to -10 °C (96.5 MPa), - 15 °C (162 MPa) and -20 °C (205 MPa) for 60 and 120 min. Cell membrane integrity and cell metabolism were studied with a Live/Dead cell vitality assay and flow cytometry. We found that cell survival decreases with an increase in pressure (lower temperatures) and time of exposure. For example, 60% of cells survived 60 min at - 10 °C and only 18% survived 120 min at this temperature. Negligible survival was measured at - 20 °C. This study may serve as the baseline towards further research on techniques to optimize the effects of isochoric freezing on living biological matter. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I-V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson-Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  19. Buffering effect of money priming on negative emotions—An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingguo; Hu, Yue; Pei, Guanxiong; Xiang, Ting

    2015-10-08

    Recent studies have accumulated evidences that merely reminding people of money could lead to behavioral changes including alleviating both physical pain and social distress. However, the underlying neural mechanism regarding such pain-buffering effect of money is not clear. In this paper, we applied event-related potentials (ERP) to investigate the neural effect of money reminders on induced negative emotions. Subjects were first primed of money images and subsequently viewing unpleasant pictures, while EEG was recorded. Behavioral results suggested a reduced sensitivity to unpleasant pictures after participants being reminded of money. ERP data showed that money priming, compared to neutral priming, generated a larger N2 in frontal and posterior areas, reflecting an endogenous mental conflict and the recruitment of attention resources, and a smaller late positive potential (LPP) in parietal and occipital regions, indicating a regulating process of negative emotions. Additionally, how brain responded to money and neutral stimuli were also examined, indexed by "N170-P2" complex. This study provided additional neurophysiological evidences to support previous behavioral researches on money priming and discussed the two separated neural dynamic stages involved in emotion regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Trait Positive Affect Buffers the Effects of Acute Stress on Skin Barrier Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Theodore F.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Pressman, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examines the role of self-reported trait positive affect (PA) on skin barrier recovery after skin disruption, and whether the role of trait PA in wound healing is consistent with the direct effects model or the stress-buffering model of PA and health. Design Sixty healthy participants (mean age 22.7 ± 3.9 years) completed a self-report measure of trait positive and negative affect, underwent a “tape-stripping” procedure that disrupts normal skin barrier function, and were randomly assigned to a Stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or No Stress (reading task) condition. Main Outcome Measures Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 hr after skin disruption. Results Multilevel modeling indicated that greater trait PA was related to faster skin barrier recovery (p < .05). The effects of PA on skin barrier recovery were independent of levels of trait NA. Conclusion These findings suggest that trait PA may influence skin barrier recovery following a brief stressor. In addition, these results provide additional evidence that trait PA can positively impact objective health outcomes. PMID:19450044

  1. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A.T.; Lu, X.Y.; Rimmer, R.A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I–V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson–Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  2. The effect of nitrogen addition on biomass production and competition in three expansive tall grasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Petr; Tůma, I.; Fiala, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 170, NOV 2012 (2012), s. 211-216 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0556; GA MZe QJ1220007; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : aboveground biomass * aggressivity * crowding coefficient * Nitrogen * tall grasses Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EF - Botanics (BU-J) Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  3. Effect of Tylenchorhynchus robustoides on Growth of Buffalo Grass and Western Wheatgrass

    OpenAIRE

    Smolik, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Tylenchorhynchus robustoides reduced (P = 0.05) growth of Agropyron smithii (western wheatgrass) at soil temperatures of 20, 25, 30, and 35 C. Growth reduction increased with increasing soil temperatures. Highest populations of T. robustoides were recovered at 25 and 30 C. Clipping weights of Buchloe dactyloides (buffalo grass) were reduced at 25 and 30 C; however, root/crown weights were reduced at 15, 20, 30, and 35 C in nematode infested vs. noninfested soil. Reproduction of T. robustoides...

  4. Determination of buffering capacity of selected fermented feedstuffs and the effect of dietary acid-base status on ruminal fluid pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Bujňák

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the buffering capacity of some fermented feedstuffs and the effect of dietary acid-base status on ruminal fluid pH. The first experiment was performed with different types (n = 24 of wet and dry fermented feedstuffs to determine the buffering capacity and buffer value index. The buffer value index of wet corn silages was more negative than for dry corn silages account on acid loss during drying. In the second experiment, the effects of different concentrations of lactic acid on base-buffering capacity, buffer value index and indicators of fermentation process were studied in two groups of corn silages (n = 21. Two groups of analyzed values were compared using unpaired t-test. Differences among the groups in base-buffering capacity (P P P > 0.05 correlation was found between ruminal pH and dietary buffer value index. These results confirmed that dietary acid-base status alone is not adequate as a predictor of the need for buffers in the diet of lactating cows. It is the first report about using of buffering capacity determination methods for evaluation of feedstuffs and dietary acid-base status in dairy cows.

  5. Effects of ultrasonic pretreatments on quality, energy consumption and sterilization of barley grass in freeze drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaohuang; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Zhong, Qifeng; Wang, Zhushang

    2018-01-01

    Barley grass is a plant resource for rehabilitation therapy. Its processing requires retaining nutrition well for rehabilitation cure of consumers. To meet the aim as well as low energy consumption and microbiological safety of products, ultrasonic treatments (UT) were applied to bathing materials at different power levels (10, 30, 45, 60W/L) for 10mins. After treatments, the bathed barley grass (100g) was freeze-dried under vacuum -0.09MPa with fixed power of 2W/g. Parameters of color, microbial colony, energy consumption, glass transition temperature, moisture content, water activity, taste substances, contents of flavonoid and chlorophyll were determined after drying. In contrast with no treatment case, UT (45W/L) decreased drying time by 14% and decreased energy consumption by 19%; UT (60W/L) decreased total microbial colonies by 33%. Also, UT (30W/L) yielded contents of flavonoid (9.2/kg) and chlorophyll (10.5g/kg) of dried sample; UT power (10W/L) yielded the highest L ∗ (51.5) and the lowest a ∗ (-9.3) value. Simultaneously, UT leads to a higher glass transition temperature (Tg), lower water activity and produces less sourness and bitterness of dried products. Ultra-sonication is an alternative to improve quality, flavor and energy consumption of barley grass in freeze drying. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Litter Controls Earthworm-Mediated Carbon and Nitrogen Transformations in Soil from Temperate Riparian Buffers

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Kernecker; Joann K. Whalen; Robert L. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient cycling in riparian buffers is partly influenced by decomposition of crop, grass, and native tree species litter. Nonnative earthworms in riparian soils in southern Quebec are expected to speed the processes of litter decomposition and nitrogen (N) mineralization, increasing carbon (C) and N losses in gaseous forms or via leachate. A 5-month microcosm experiment evaluated the effect of Aporrectodea turgida on the decomposition of 3 litter types (deciduous leaves, reed canarygrass, an...

  7. Effect of Mg doping in ZnO buffer layer on ZnO thin film devices for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Pushpa; Chakrabarti, P.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin films have been grown on p-silicon (Si) substrate using magnesium doped ZnO (Mg: ZnO) buffer layer by radio-frequency (RF) sputtering method. In this paper, we have optimized the concentration of Mg (0-5 atomic percent (at. %)) ZnO buffer layer to examine its effect on ZnO thin film based devices for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The crystalline nature, morphology and topography of the surface of the thin film have been characterized. The optical as well as electrical properties of the active ZnO film can be tailored by varying the concentration of Mg in the buffer layer. The crystallite size in the active ZnO thin film was found to increase with the Mg concentration in the buffer layer in the range of 0-3 at. % and subsequently decrease with increasing Mg atom concentration in the ZnO. The same was verified by the surface morphology and topography studies carried out with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic electron microscopy (AFM) respectively. The reflectance in the visible region was measured to be less than 80% and found to decrease with increase in Mg concentration from 0 to 3 at. % in the buffer region. The optical bandgap was initially found to increase from 3.02 eV to 3.74 eV by increasing the Mg content from 0 to 3 at. % but subsequently decreases and drops down to 3.43 eV for a concentration of 5 at. %. The study of an Au:Pd/ZnO Schottky diode reveals that for optimum doping of the buffer layer the device exhibits superior rectifying behavior. The barrier height, ideality factor, rectification ratio, reverse saturation current and series resistance of the Schottky diode were extracted from the measured current voltage (I-V) characteristics.

  8. The effect of ochre applied to buffer zones on soluble phosphorus retention during combined surface and subsurface flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibiandehkordi, R.; Quinton, J.; Surridge, B.

    2012-12-01

    Despite invention of a wide range of mitigating measures, diffuse phosphorus (P) pollution from agricultural lands still remains a major threat to the water resources. Thus, reducing P inputs along with improving the effectiveness of current best management practices (BMPs) is necessary to avoid eutrophication. Buffer zones are considered to be among the BMPs to control diffuse P pollution. However, these features are less effective in controlling soluble P loss with a retention range of -71 to +95% which is generally governed by the process of infiltration. Moreover, the soil in buffer strip system can be saturated over a course of time thereby enriching surface and subsurface runoff with soluble P. The aim of this study is to evaluate effectiveness of ochre applied to buffer strips in reducing the loss of soluble P during coupled surface and subsurface flow conditions. Batch experiments showed a maximum P retention capacity of 17.2 g kg-1 for ochre collected from a mine water treatment plant in Capehouse, UK without any risk of P desorption or releasing trace elements to the environment. The preliminarily results of flume experiments confirms the suitability of ochre to be used as a soil amendment in conjunction with buffer strips for tackling soluble P loss.

  9. Tree-grass interactions on an East African savanna : the effects of facilitation, competition, and hydraulic lift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, F.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords: Rangelands, Semi-arid areas, stable isotopes, Acacia, C 4- grasses, plant nutrients, soil nutrients, soil water, plant water relations

    Savanna trees can either increase or decrease the productivity of understorey grasses. Trees reduce grass

  10. The Buffer Effect of Therapy Dog Exposure on Stress Reactivity in Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Alexandra J; Hunse, Anastasia M

    2017-06-30

    Stress is an insidious health risk that is commonly reported among university students. While research suggests that dog exposure may facilitate recovery from a stress response, little is known about the buffer effect of dog exposure on the stress response to a future stressor. This study examined whether interaction with a therapy dog could reduce the strength of the physiological stress response when exposed to a subsequent stressor. Sixty-one university students were randomly assigned to either a therapy dog (TD, n = 31) or a no-dog control (C, n = 30) group. The stress response was measured by electrodermal activity (EDA) in response to the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). Participants also completed questionnaires that assessed pet attitude, general stress levels, and affect. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) showed that increase in EDA was significantly more pronounced in the C group than in the TD group ( p stress response in university students, which has implications for the promotion of a viable stress management program on university campuses.

  11. Buffers Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramette, Richard W.

    1998-11-01

    In 1989 JCE Software published The Acid-Base Package: A Collection of Useful Programs for Proton Transfer Systems (Ramette, R. W. J. Chem. Educ. Software 1989, 2B No. 2). This DOS program has been fully upgraded by the same author to the world of Windows 95. Buffers Plus takes advantage of a modern user interface and offers many new options not possible in the original version.

  12. Buffer fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadzhanzade, A Kh; Dedusanko, G Ya; Dinaburg, L S; Markov, Yu M; Rasizade, Ya N; Rozov, V N; Sherstnev, N M

    1979-08-30

    A drilling fluid is suggested for separating the drilling and plugging fluids which contains as the base increased solution of polyacrylamide and additive. In order to increase the viscoelastic properties of the liquid with simultaneous decrease in the periods of its fabrication, the solution contains as an additive dry bentonite clay. In cases of the use of a buffer fluid under conditions of negative temperatures, it is necessary to add to it table salt or ethylene glycol.

  13. Do social relationships buffer the effects of widowhood? A prospective study of adaptation to the loss of a spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusic, Ivana; Lucas, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    The idea that strong social relationships can buffer the negative effects of stress on well-being has received much attention in existing literature. However, previous studies have used less than ideal research designs to test this hypothesis, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding the buffering effects of social support. In this study, we examined the buffering hypothesis in the context of reaction and adaptation to widowhood in three large longitudinal datasets. We tested whether social relationships moderated reaction and adaptation to widowhood in samples of people who experienced loss of a spouse from three longitudinal datasets of nationally representative samples from Germany (N = 1,195), Great Britain (N = 562), and Australia (N = 298). We found no evidence that social relationships established before widowhood buffered either reaction or adaptation to the death of one's spouse. Similarly, social relationships that were in place during the first year of widowhood did not help widows and widowers recover from this difficult event. Social relationships acquired prior to widowhood, or those available in early stages of widowhood, do not appear to explain individual differences in adaptation to loss. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Use of food waste as fish feeds: effects of prebiotic fibers (inulin and mannanoligosaccharide) on growth and non-specific immunity of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Wing Y; Cheng, Zhang; Choi, Wai M; Lun, Clare H I; Man, Yu B; Wong, James T F; Chen, Xun W; Lau, Stanley C K; Wong, Ming H

    2015-11-01

    The effects of inulin and mannanoligosaccharide (MOS) on the growth performance and non-specific immunity of grass carp were studied. Two doses of prebiotic fiber with 0.2 or 2% of the fibers are being mixed into fish feed pellets. Fish growth as well as selected non-specific immune parameters of grass carp were tested in a feeding trial, which lasted for 8 weeks. Fish was fed at 2.5% body mass per day. INU02, INU2, and MOS2 significantly improved relative weight gain, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio, and food conversion ratio of grass carp fed with food waste-based diet. In terms of non-specific immune response, grass carp showed significant improvement in all three tested parameters (total serum immunoglobin, bactericidal activity, and anti-protease activity). Adding 2% of inulin (INU2) into food waste diets seemed to be more preferable than other supplemented experimental diets (INU02, MOS02, MOS2), as it could promote growth of grass carp as well as improving the non-specific immune systems of grass carp.

  15. The effect of metal-buffer bilayer drain/source electrodes on the operational stability of the organic field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi-Alavijeh, H.R.; Ehsani, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated experimentally the effect of different drain/source (D/S) electrodes and charge injection buffer layers on the electrical properties and operational stability of a stilbene organic field effect transistor (OFET). The results show that the organic buffer layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) considerably improves the electrical properties of the transistors, but has a negligible effect on their temporal behavior. On the other hand, inorganic metal-oxide buffer layer of molybdenum oxide (MoO 3 ) drastically changes both the electrical properties and operational stability. The functionalities of this metal-oxide tightly depend on the properties of the D/S metallic electrodes. OFETs with Al/MoO 3 as the bilayer D/S electrodes have the best electrical properties: field effect mobility μ eff = 0.32 cm 2 V −1 s −1 and threshold voltage V TH = − 5 V and the transistors with Ag/MoO 3 have the longest operational stability. It was concluded that the chemical stability of the metal/metal-oxide or metal/organic interfaces of the bilayer D/S electrodes determine the operational stability of the OFETs. - Highlights: • The effect of buffer layers on the performance of the stilbene OFETs has been investigated. • Inorganic buffer layer improved the electrical and temporal behaviors simultaneously. • Organic buffer layer only changes the electrical properties. • Chemical stability of the interfaces determines the operational stability of the transistor

  16. Trophic availability buffers the detrimental effects of clogging in an alpine stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doretto, Alberto; Bona, Francesca; Piano, Elena; Zanin, Ilaria; Eandi, Anna Chiara; Fenoglio, Stefano

    2017-08-15

    Clogging, the streambed colmation by fine sediments, is an important widespread source of impact affecting freshwaters. Alterations in stream morphology and hydrology, added to the effects of global climate change, are responsible for this phenomenon, that is particularly pernicious in mountainous lotic systems naturally characterized by coarse substrates. Among the studies investigating this issue some were descriptive, while others used artificial substrates to compare ongoing fine sediment accumulation and macroinvertebrate assemblage recruitment. Other studies used from the outset artificial substrates arranged with different levels of clogging. Our study fits into this line, but adding an innovative element simulating different availability of coarse particulate organic matter, i.e. the main trophic input in low-order, mountainous stream. To investigate how clogging and CPOM can influence macroinvertebrate communities, we placed 135 artificial substrates in the upper Po river (NW Italy). We set up a three way factorial design with three different levels of sedimentation and terrestrial leaf material. Artificial substrates were removed on three different dates. Benthic invertebrates were identified and classified according to their bio-ecological traits. We also measured macroinvertebrate dry mass and CPOM degradation in the different trap types. Our findings show that clogging acts as a selective filter influencing taxa richness, density, functional composition and biomass of benthic assemblage. Moreover, fine sediments affect the energetic dynamics in the river ecosystem, decreasing the mass loss rate of terrestrial leaves. Interestingly, our results clearly demonstrate that high availability of CPOM can buffer the negative effect of clogging, suggesting that an adequate input of allochthonous organic matter may lessen the impact of fine sediment deposition. Because land use transformation and removal of wooded riparian areas increase clogging and

  17. Interaction between rock, bentonite buffer and canister. FEM calculations of some mechanical effects on the canister in different disposal concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, L.

    1992-07-01

    An important task of the buffer of highly compacted bentonite is to offer a mechanical protection to the canister. This role has been investigated by a number of finite element calculations using the complex elasto plastic material models for the bentonite that have been developed on the basis of laboratory tests and adapted to the code ABAQUS. The following main functions and scenarios have been investigated for some different canister types and repository concepts: - The effect of the water and swelling pressure, - The effect of a rock shear perpendicular to the canister axis, - The effect of creep in the copper after a rock shear displacement, - The thermomechanical effects when an initially saturated buffer is used

  18. The Effect of the Type of Hemodialysis Buffer on the QTc Interval in Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Hekmat

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying the sources of variation in QTc measurementsis important for preventing arrhythmias during and afterhemodialysis. The present study was designed to determine thecorrelation between the type of hemodialysis buffer and thechanges in QTc interval in patients on chronic hemodialysis.Methods: Fifty-nine patients on chronic hemodialysis whoreferred in winter 2007 to hemodialysis centers of Ghaem andHashemi Nejad hospitals, in Mashhad, Iran, were divided intotwo groups according to their last dialysate buffer: acetate orbicarbonate. Electrocardiography, arterial blood gas parameters,serum K+, Na+, ionized calcium, and albumin levels weremeasured prior to and after hemodialysis in all patients.Results: All arterial blood gas parameters and serum electrolytesconcentrations were increased except K+ levels that weresignificantly decreased with hemodialysis. PCO2 and QTc intervalswere slightly increased in all patients, however thisincrease was not statistically significant. We found that thetype of dialysate affected the QTc interval, HCO3, base excess,base excess of extra cellular fluid, and base bufferchanges with no effect on ionized calcium, pH, PCO2, andserum albumin concentration. QTc interval was prolonged byusing bicarbonate and shortened by using acetate dialysatebuffer. We found no correlation between the variations of QTcinterval and serum electrolytes or arterial blood gas parametersin either group.Conclusion: Bicarbonate buffer use in hemodialysis prolongedQTc interval and acetate buffer shortened it. This effectis independent of serum electrolytes and pH changes duringhemodialysis. The effect of bicarbonate buffer is probablydue to more tolerability of ultra filtration, more effectiveedema reduction and augmented body electro-conductivity.

  19. Effect of pH, buffer concentration and buffer composition on the absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaey, C.J. de; Schurgers, N.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat was investigated using buffer solutions of different pH (3.0–9.2), composition and concentration. The technique used, encloses luminal perfusion of an intestinal loop with collection of the blood draining the perfused loop, which

  20. The buffering-out effect and phase separation in aqueous solutions of EPPS buffer with 1-propanol, 2-propanol, or 2-methyl-2-propanol at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, Mohamed; Teng, Han-Lan; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Buffering-out is a new liquid–liquid phase separation containing biological buffer. ► EPPS buffer-induced phase separation of aqueous solutions of aliphatic alcohols. ► Phase diagrams of EPPS + water + 1-propanol/2-propanol/2-methyl-2-propanol are studied. ► EPPS breaks the 1-propanol + water and 2-methyl-2-propanol + water azeotropes. ► The (liquid + liquid) equilibria can be well correlated by the NRTL model. - Abstract: Buffering-out is a new liquid–liquid phase separation phenomenon observed in mixtures containing a buffer as a mass separating agent. The (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) and (solid + liquid + liquid) equilibrium (SLLE) data were measured for the ternary systems {3-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]propanesulfonic acid (EPPS) buffer + 1-propanol, 2-propanol, or 2-methyl-2-propanol + water} at T = 298.15 K under atmospheric pressure. The phase boundary data were fitted to an empirical equation relating to the concentrations of organic solvent and buffer. The effective excluded volume (EEV) values of EPPS were obtained from the phase boundary data. The phase-separation abilities of the investigated aliphatic alcohols were discussed. The reliability of the experimental tie-lines was satisfactorily confirmed by the Othmer–Tobias correlation. The experimental tie-lines data for the ternary systems have been correlated using the NRTL activity coefficient model. The separation of these aliphatic alcohols from their azeotropic aqueous mixtures is of particular interest to industrial process. The addition of the EPPS as an auxiliary agent breaks the (1-propanol + water) and (2-methyl-2-propanol + water) azeotropes. The possibility of using the new phase separation systems in the extraction process is demonstrated by using different dyestuffs.

  1. Secure Infant-Mother Attachment Buffers the Effect of Early-Life Stress on Age of Menarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Sooyeon; Simpson, Jeffry A; Griskevicius, Vladas; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; Schlomer, Gabriel L; Belsky, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Prior research indicates that being reared in stressful environments is associated with earlier onset of menarche in girls. In this research, we examined (a) whether these effects are driven by exposure to certain dimensions of stress (harshness or unpredictability) during the first 5 years of life and (b) whether the negative effects of stress on the timing of menarche are buffered by secure infant-mother attachment. Results revealed that (a) exposure to greater harshness (but not unpredictability) during the first 5 years of life predicted earlier menarche and (b) secure infant-mother attachment buffered girls from this effect of harsh environments. By connecting attachment research to its evolutionary foundations, these results illuminate how environmental stressors and relationships early in life jointly affect pubertal timing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Effects of repository environment on diffusion behavior of radionuclides in buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, Tamotsu; Sato, Seichi

    2004-03-01

    Compacted bentonite is considered as a candidate buffer material in the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. An important function of the compacted bentonite is to retard the transport of radionuclides from waste forms to the surrounding host rock after degradation of an overpack. Therefore, diffusion behavior of radionuclides in the compacted bentonite has been extensively studied by many researchers for the performance assessments of the geological disposal. However, diffusion mechanism of radionuclides in the bentonite cannot be fully understood, and most experimental data have been obtained at room temperature for the bentonite saturated with low salinity water, which would disagree often with real repository conditions. In this study, therefore, apparent diffusion coefficients were determined at various diffusion temperatures for chloride ions in Na-montmorillonite samples saturated with NaCl solution of high salinity. Activation energies for the apparent diffusion were also obtained from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients at different salinity. As the salinity increased, the apparent diffusion coefficients of chloride ions in montmorillonite were found to increase slightly. On the other hand, the activation energies for the chloride diffusion were found to be almost constant (approximately 12 kJ mol -1 ) and less than that in free water (17.4 kJ mol -1 ). Effects of salinity on diffusion behavior of radionuclides in montmorillonite were discussed from the viewpoints of microstructure of montmorillonite and distribution of ions in the montmorillonite. As a result, the diffusion behavior of sodium ions could be explained by the changes of the predominant diffusion process among pore water diffusion, surface diffusion, and interlayer diffusion that could be caused by the increase of salinity. (author)

  3. The Job Demands-Resources model: Further evidence for the buffering effect of personal resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime A. Tremblay

    2011-05-01

    Research purpose: Using the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R model as a theoretical framework, the present study examined the role of compassion satisfaction, conceptualised as a personal resource, in buffering the relationship between job demands and job strain. Motivation for the study: Accordingly, four demanding aspects of the job (i.e. role overload, insufficiency, ambiguity and conflict and one personal resource (i.e. compassion satisfaction were used to test the central hypothesis that the interaction between (high job demands and (low personal resources produces the highest levels of anxiety and depression as indicators of job strain. Research design, approach and method: Hypotheses were tested amongst 122 military chaplains. Main findings: Results showed that compassion satisfaction partially moderated the relationship between job demands and job strain. More specifically, when compassion satisfaction was high, the effect of role overload on job strain was significantly reduced. However, the relationships between the other three role stressors and job strain were not offset by compassion satisfaction. Practical/managerial implications: The theoretical and practical implications of these findings for the JD-R model are discussed. Contribution/value-add: Despite the limitations of this study, the present findings still have important implications for future research and practice. Our findings highlight the fact that the empowerment of employees’ personal resources, as outlined in the JD-R model, may not only be of value for employees to thrive, but may also be particularly beneficial in terms of compassion satisfaction being viewed as a protective factor to adverse working conditions.

  4. Effect of Dietary Palm oil Fatty Acids and Buffer on Physiological Performance of Cows During The Transition Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teama, F.E.I.; Osman, S.F.; El-Tarabany, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the physiological effect of supplemental palm oil fatty acids- Ca salt and buffer on some biochemical and hormonal levels, milk yield and composition for high yielding Holstein Friesian cows during transition period. Thirty six Holstein Friesian cows, aged 53±1.4 months and 739±19.86 kg body weight, were used. The cows were randomly divided into three groups; 12 cows each, control group, the second group received 4% calcium salt palm oil fatty acid (Ca-POFA) and the third group received Ca-POFA + buffer ( 0.5% sodium bicarbonate) for three weeks before and after parturition (transition period). Blood samples were collected at 21, 14, 7 and 2 days before and 2, 7, 14 and 21 days after parturition to assess total protein, albumin, globulin, glucose, cholesterol, creatinine, total lipids and total cholesterol in addition to cortisol and progesterone hormones. Milk yield were recorded for each animal and samples were taken after parturition at different intervals (7, 14 and 21 days) to assess milk composition. Significant decreases in total protein, globulin, total lipids, cortisol and progesterone levels in post-partum cows compared to pre-partum were improved after Ca-POFA + buffer supplementation. On the other hand, increased levels of serum albumin, cholesterol and creatinine were recorded in post-partum period which returned to the normal level as shown in albumin only after treatment with Ca-POFA + buffer. A continuous increase in cholesterol and creatinine levels was observed as a result of supplementation of Ca-POFA + buffer (0.5% sodium bicarbonate). Significant improvements in milk yield, 4% FCM and GE were determined after Ca-POFA + buffer supplementation whereas non-significant changes were recorded in total solids, fat, protein and ash content of milk. In the present study, supplementation of cows in transition period with Ca-POFA + buffer (0.5% sodium bicarbonate) can improve the levels of some blood components

  5. Effects of a large scale nitrogen and phosphorous fertilization on the ecosystem functioning of a Mediterranean tree-grass ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliavacca, Mirco; El Madany, Tarek; Perez-Priego, Oscar; Carrara, Arnaud; Hammer, Tiana; Henkel, Kathin; Kolle, Olaf; Luo, Yunpeng; Moreno, Gerardo; Morris, Kendalynn; Nair, Richard; Schrumpf, Marion; Wutzler, Thomas; Reichstein, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have shown how human induced N/P imbalances affect essential ecosystem processes, and might be particularly important in water-limited ecosystems. In this contribution we will present results from an ecosystem scale nutrient manipulation experiment on a Mediterranean tree-grass ecosystem (Majadas del Tietar, Spain). Specifically, we will show how ecosystem functioning (e.g. light use efficiency, water use efficiency - WUE, albedo) changes as consequence of N and NP fertilization. A cluster of eddy covariance (EC) flux towers has been set up beside a long-term EC site (Control site) to measured high temporal resolution C and water fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere. The sites were selected in a way to have similar pre-treatment conditions. Two out of three EC footprint areas (18 Ha) were fertilized with N and NP at the beginning of 2015 and 2016. To interpret the variations in C and water fluxes measured with the EC systems we monitored spatial and temporal variations in phenology, plant traits, species richness, and tree transpiration by using sap-flow meters, digital repeat photography, as well as soil sampling. The results show a consistent increase ( 15% compared to the Control site) in net ecosystem production (NEP) observed both in the N and the NP treatments. An increase of evapotranspiration (ET) of about 15% and 10% is observed in the N and NP site, respectively, indicating an increase of WUE in the NP treatment. The partitioning of the NEP into its gross components, the gross primary production (GPP) and the total ecosystem respiration (TER), show that the fertilization stimulated more GPP rather than TER, increasing therefore the capability of the ecosystem to act as carbon sink. The effects of fertilization are pronounced in spring and autumn and negligible in summer. This indicates that grass reacted much more than trees to N and NP addition. An increase of greenness and also an earlier green-up of grass in the N and NP sites

  6. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  7. Effect of Coating Parameters of the Buffer Layer on the Shape Ratio of TRISO-Coated Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIm, Weon Ju; Park, Jong Hoon; Park, Ji Yeon; Lee, Young Woo; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    Fuel for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) consists of TRISO-coated particles. Fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) has been applied to fabricate the TRISO-coated fuel particles. The TRISO particles consist of UO 2 microspheres coated with layers of porous pyrolytic carbon (PyC), inner dense PyC (IPyC), SiC, and outer dense PyC (OPyC). The porous PyC coating layer, called the buffer layer, attenuates fission recoils and provides void volume for gaseous fission products and carbon monoxide. The buffer layer, which has the highest coating rate among the coating layers, shows the largest variation of the coating thickness within a particle and a batch. This could be the most plausible source of an asphericity in the TRISO particles. The aspherical particles are expected to have an inferior fuel performance. Miller et al. have predicted that a larger stress is developed within the coating layers and thus the failure probability increases in the particles with high aspect ratios. Therefore, the shape of the TRISO-coated particles should be controlled properly and has been one of the important inspection items for the quality control of the fabrication process. In this paper, we investigated the effect of coating parameters of the buffer layer on the shape of the TRISO particles. The flow rate of coating gas and the coating temperature were varied to control the buffer layer. The asphericity of the TRISO-coated particles was evaluated for the various coating conditions of the buffer layer, but at constant coating parameters for the IPyC/SiC/OPyC layers

  8. Mass variation effect of teki grass (cyperus rotundus) composite against tensile strength and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq Yanhar, Muhammad; Haris Nasution, A.

    2018-05-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine the tensile strength using ASTM D638 - 02a type IVB and density of teki grass (Cyperus rotundus) composite. The production process is carried out by mass variation of 2 gr, 3 gr, and 4 gr. Hand lay-up method with three repetitions is applied. Teki grass is chosen because it is easy to find and has some advantages biodegradable, harmless to health, available in large quantities, and cost-efficient. The test result showed the largest tensile strength is 21,61 MPa at 2-gram mass fiber. Fiber addition to 3 gram and 4-gram cause tensile strength decreases to 18,51 MPa and 11,65 MPa. It happens because the fibers are random and spread in all directions, so many fibers are undirectional with the tensile force. Beside that fibers addition made matrix volume reduced and a bond between fiber and matrix decreases, finally make fiber unable to hold the tensile force properly. It is recommended to use another type of ASTM D638 - 02a which has a larger narrow section like type I (13 mm) and type III (19mm) so specimens are not broken when removed from the mold, and there isn’t any decrease in tensile strength.Density test showed that fiber mass does not significantly affect the density.

  9. Responses of C4 grasses to atmospheric CO2 enrichment : I. Effect of irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionit, Nasser; Patterson, David T

    1984-12-01

    The growth and photosynethetic responses to atmospheric CO 2 enrichment of 4 species of C 4 grasses grown at two levels of irradiance were studied. We sought to determine whether CO 2 enrichment would yield proportionally greater growth enhancement in the C 4 grasses when they were grown at low irradiance than when grown at high irradiance. The species studied were Echinochloa crusgalli, Digitaria sanguinalis, Eleusine indica, and Setaria faberi. Plants were grown in controlled environment chambers at 350, 675 and 1,000 μl 1 -1 CO 2 and 1,000 or 150 μmol m -2 s -1 photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). An increase in CO 2 concentration and PPFD significantly affected net photosynthesis and total biomass production of all plants. Plants grown at low PPFD had significantly lower rates of photosynthesis, produced less biomass, and had reduced responses to increases in CO 2 . Plants grown in CO 2 -enriched atmosphere had lower photosynthetic capacity relative to the low CO 2 grown plants when exposed to lower CO 2 concentration at the time of measurement, but had greater rate of photosynthesis when exposed to increasing PPFD. The light level under which the plants were growing did not influence the CO 2 compensation point for photosynthesis.

  10. The Effect of Kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus) on the Performance of Dairy Cattle fed on Kenaf and Napier grass (Pennisetum Purpereum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang'ara, J.N.N.; Kariuki, I.W.; KIruiro, E.M.; Ngugi, F.K.; Mwangi, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Studies at PRC-Embu in 1996, indicated Kenaf to be a fast growing crop under low moisture condition. As a forage, it yielded between 2300-11300 kg ha -1 DM in AEZ LM3 and LM4, respectively. It could thus, supplement the Napier grass as a fodder for dairy cattle in the marginal and low potential areas which have perennial shortage of quality forage for dairy cattle. Trials were thus conducted to evaluate the effect supplementing Kenaf silage to Napier grass on growth and milk production of dairy cattle. First atrial using dairy calves was set to determine the effect of Kenaf silage fed at three different levels namely 0%, 50% and 100%. A second was also set using lactating dairy cattle fed with Napier at three levels of Kenaf silage viz. 50%, 25% and 0%. Results indicated that, the dry matter intake of Kenaf silage alone (3.28 kg day -1 ) was lower than a combination of Kenaf silage and Napier (3.93 kg day -1 ) and that of Napier alone (4.08 kg day -1 ). also a combination of 50:50 Napier and Kenaf silage gave a better animal performance than either Napier or Kenaf silage alone. It was concluded that, Kenaf silage is a good supplement for Napier in Marginal and low potential dairy zones of Kenaf silage

  11. Effects of thinning on transpiration by riparian buffer trees in response to advection and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advective energy occurring in edge environments may increase tree water use. In humid agricultural landscapes, advection-enhanced transpiration in riparian buffers may provide hydrologic regulation; however, research in humid environments is lacking. The objectives of this study were to determine ho...

  12. Effects of Reusing Gel Electrophoresis and Electrotransfer Buffers on Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heda, Ghanshyam D; Omotola, Oluwabukola B; Heda, Rajiv P; Avery, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    SDS-PAGE and Western blotting are 2 of the most commonly used biochemical methods for protein analysis. Proteins are electrophoretically separated based on their MWs by SDS-PAGE and then electrotransferred to a solid membrane surface for subsequent protein-specific analysis by immunoblotting, a procedure commonly known as Western blotting. Both of these procedures use a salt-based buffer, with the latter procedure consisting of methanol as an additive known for its toxicity. Previous reports present a contradictory view in favor or against reusing electrotransfer buffer, also known as Towbin's transfer buffer (TTB), with an aim to reduce the toxic waste. In this report, we present a detailed analysis of not only reusing TTB but also gel electrophoresis buffer (EB) on proteins of low to high MW range. Our results suggest that EB can be reused for at least 5 times without compromising the electrophoretic separation of mixture of proteins in an MW standard, BSA, and crude cell lysates. Additionally, reuse of EB did not affect the quality of subsequent Western blots. Successive reuse of TTB, on the other hand, diminished the signal of proteins of different MWs in a protein standard and a high MW membrane protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in Western blotting.

  13. When the Going Gets Tough: Direct, Buffering and Indirect Effects of Social Support on Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaki, Georgia; DeLongis, Anita; Frey, Daniela; Short, Kathy; Woehrle, Trish

    2010-01-01

    We examined the role of social support in turnover intention among new teachers. First, we tested and found evidence for a direct negative relationship between social support and turnover intention. Second, we tested the social support buffer hypothesis, and found that teachers with higher social support had lower turnover intention in the face of…

  14. Perceived Discrimination among African American Adolescents and Allostatic Load: A Longitudinal Analysis with Buffering Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H.; Lei, Man-Kit; Chae, David H.; Yu, Tianyi; Kogan, Steven M.; Beach, Steven R. H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the prospective relations of perceived racial discrimination with allostatic load (AL), along with a possible buffer of the association. A sample of 331 African Americans in the rural South provided assessments of perceived discrimination from ages 16 to 18 years. When youth were 18 years, caregivers reported…

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the effect of buffer pressure on well output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobrushko, A T

    1980-01-01

    In the examples of the Pashninskiy and the Usinskiy fields of the Komi ASSR, a method is presented for determining the possible increase in output of a gusher well on decrease in the buffer pressure. A quantitative evaluation of this increase is presented. The essence of the method is construction of a nomogram for characteristics of a gusher lifter and indicator diagrams of the wells combined in one figure. Mutual intersection of the characteristics and diagrams corresponds to the steady-state operating mode of the bed-well system. Cases are examined of productivity 10, 25, 50 and 100 m/sup 3//day of the MPa for the Pashninskiy and 25, 50, 102 and 200 m/sup 3//day of the MPa for the Usinskiy fields. Despite the broad range of well productivity, and also the significant difference in fields according to gushing conditions, increase of the well output for 0.1 MPa of decrease in buffer pressure differs little. In the interval of buffer pressures 2.00.5 MPa, the specific increase of output from decrease in buffer pressure is very significant and is 7-10 m/sup 3//day. The findings convincingly proved the expediency of using systems of oil and gas recovery at new fields with possibly low pressure in the pipelines.

  16. Simulation studies on the effect of a buffer layer on the external ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    parameters of hydrogenated amorphous silicon p–i–n solar cells ... of a buffer layer in between the p- and i-layers of the p–i–n solar cell on the external parameters such as dark .... H 1988 Photovoltaic specialist conference, in Conference re-.

  17. Effects of microstructure of clay on diffusion behavior of radionuclides in buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hiroshi; Sato, Seichi; Kozaki, Tamotsu

    2001-03-01

    Diffusion behavior of radionuclides in compacted bentonite plays an important role in the performance assessment of bentonite buffer material in geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Microstructure of bentonite is considered to be one of the key parameters to affect on the diffusion behavior. In this study, therefore, two kinds of montmorillonite (major clay mineral of bentonite) with different particle sizes were prepared, and characterized with several methods. In addition, the apparent and effective diffusion coefficients of HTO, Cl - , and Cs + were determined using the montmorillonite samples with different particle sizes and dry densities. In the sample characterization, the specific surface areas of montmorillonite samples with different particle sizes were determined by the BET and the EGME methods, and the particle size distributions of each sample were analyzed by laser diffraction/scattering particle size analysis. Microstructure of the samples was also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The BET method gave a higher specific surface area of the fine grained sample than of the coarse sample, while the EGME method gave same values for both samples. The laser diffraction/scattering particle size analysis using ethanol as a dispersion medium gave different particle size distributions, but when the samples were dispersed in water with Na 6 (PO 3 ) 6 , the particle size distributions were similar. These findings indicate that the montmorillonite layers, which compose the montmorillonite particles, have the same size, even if the particle sizes of the samples are different. In the diffusion experiments, it was found that the apparent diffusion coefficients of HTO and Cl - for the fine grained sample were higher than for the coarse grained sample at two dry densities, 1.0 and 1.8 Mg m -3 , while the opposite particle size effect was observed for Cs + ions. These findings cannot be explained by changes

  18. Toxic effects of Cu2+ on growth, nutrition, root morphology, and distribution of Cu in roots of Sabi grass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopittke, P.M.; Asher, C.J.; Blamey, F.P.C.; Menzies, N.W.

    2009-01-01

    Sabi grass (Urochloa mosambicensis (Hack.) Dandy) (a C4 species of Poaceae) is commonly used to revegetate disturbed sites in low-rainfall environments, but comparatively little is known regarding copper (Cu) toxicity in this species. A dilute nutrient solution culture experiment was conducted for 10 d to examine the effects of elevated Cu 2+ activities ({Cu 2+ }) on the growth of Sabi grass. Growth was inhibited by high Cu in solution, with a 50% reduction in the relative fresh mass occurring at 1.0 μM {Cu 2+ } for the roots and 1.2 μM {Cu 2+ } for the shoots. In solutions containing 1.2-1.9 μM {Cu 2+ }, many of the roots ruptured due to the tearing and separation of the rhizodermis and outer cortex from the underlying tissues. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that Cu-rich deposits were found to accumulate predominantly within vacuoles. Due to limited translocation of Cu from the roots to the shoots, phytotoxicity is likely to be more of a problem in remediation of Cu-toxic sites than is Cu toxicity of fauna consuming the above-ground biomass.

  19. Prevalence, geographic distribution, and fitness effects of Microphallus turgidus (trematoda: Microphallidae) in grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) from coastal Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pung, Oscar J; Khan, Ritindra N; Vives, Stephen P; Walker, Casey B

    2002-02-01

    Grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio Holthuis and P. vilgaris (Say), were collected at 11 localities along the coast of Georgia and surveyed for digenetic trematode metacercariae. The effect of trematode infection on grass shrimp fitness was also examined. Microphallus turgidas (Leigh) was the only trematode observed. The prevalence of metacercarial cysts of this parasite in P. pugio (75%) was higher than in P. vulgaris (24%), as were the mean intensity, abundance, and population density (no. cysts/cm host body length) of the parasite. Infected shrimp were found at every collection locality and parasite prevalence and density were greatest in P. pugio from higher salinity localities (> or = 20 parts per thousand [ppt]). There was no relation between host body size and parasite density in P. vulgaris, and parasite density increased with host body size in P. pugio, suggesting that the parasite does not affect host survival. There was no relation between parasite density and shrimp egg mass, but nonovigerous female P. pugio were more heavily infected than ovigerous ones. In addition, 1 metacercaria of M. turgidus in each of 2 specimens of P. vulgaris was parasitized by the haplosporidian Urosporidium crescens De Turk. This represents a new shrimp host record for this hyperparasite.

  20. Effect of petroleum on decomposition of shrub-grass litters in soil in Northern Shaanxi of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxi; Liu, Zengwen; Yu, Qi; Luc, Nhu Trung; Bing, Yuanhao; Zhu, Bochao; Wang, Wenxuan

    2015-07-01

    The impacts of petroleum contamination on the litter decomposition of shrub-grass land would directly influence nutrient cycling, and the stability and function of ecosystem. Ten common shrub and grass species from Yujiaping oil deposits were studied. Litters from these species were placed into litterbags and buried in petroleum-contaminated soil with 3 levels of contamination (slight, moderate and serious pollution with petroleum concentrations of 15, 30 and 45 g/kg, respectively). A decomposition experiment was then conducted in the lab to investigate the impacts of petroleum contamination on litter decomposition rates. Slight pollution did not inhibit the decomposition of any litters and significantly promoted the litter decomposition of Hippophae rhamnoides, Caragana korshinskii, Amorpha fruticosa, Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa, Periploca sepium, Medicago sativa and Bothriochloa ischaemum. Moderate pollution significantly inhibited litter decomposition of M. sativa, Coronilla varia, Artemisia vestita and Trrifolium repens and significantly promoted the litter decomposition of C. korshinskii, Z. jujuba var. spinosa and P. sepium. Serious pollution significantly inhibited the litter decomposition of H. rhamnoides, A. fruticosa, B. ischaemum and A. vestita and significantly promoted the litter decomposition of Z. jujuba var. spinosa, P. sepium and M. sativa. In addition, the impacts of petroleum contamination did not exhibit a uniform increase or decrease as petroleum concentration increased. Inhibitory effects of petroleum on litter decomposition may hinder the substance cycling and result in the degradation of plant communities in contaminated areas. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Buffer design 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvankoski, M.

    2013-08-01

    Posiva's spent nuclear fuel disposal is based on the KBS-3V concept and on the characteristics of the Olkiluoto site. In this concept single canisters containing spent nuclear fuel surrounded by a bentonite buffer are emplaced in individual vertical boreholes drilled in the floor of deposition tunnels in bedrock at about 420 m depth below ground level. Disk type bentonite blocks are installed at the bottom of the hole and on the top of the disposal canister. Ring type bentonite blocks surround the canisters. This report describes the detailed design of the buffer for a KBS-3V repository. The report presents the design basis, the reference design, and summarises the performance analyses carried out for the design. This report addresses aspects concerning the manufacture, quality control, mechanical strength, chemical resistance, thermal dimensioning, handling of buffer components and material ageing phenomena including the effect of radiation. Interaction of buffer and other engineered barriers are included in the study. The long-term evolution of the repository and its effective drivers are considered if they have an impact on the buffer performance but operational safety aspects are also included because they may affect long-term safety. (orig.)

  2. Ensiling as biological pretreatment of grass (Festulolium Hykor): The effect of composition, dry matter, and inocula on cellulose convertibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambye-Jensen, Morten; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Didion, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Grass biomass is a prospective type of lignocellulosic biomass for bioenergy and fuel production, but the low dry matter in grass at harvest calls for new pretreatment strategies for cellulosic conversion. In this study, ensiling was tested as a biological pretreatment method of the high yielding...... grass variety Festulolium Hykor. The biomass was harvested in four cuts over a growing season. Three important factors of ensiling: biomass composition, dry matter (DM) at ensiling, and inoculation of lactic acid bacteria, were assessed in relation to subsequent enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis....... The organic acid profile after ensiling was dependant on the composition of the grass and the DM, rather than on the inocula. High levels of organic acids, notably lactic acid, produced during ensiling improved enzymatic cellulose convertibility in the grass biomass. Ensiling of less mature grass gave higher...

  3. Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from reed canary grass in paludiculture: effect of groundwater level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Audet, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    below the soil surface. Gross primary production (GPP) was estimated from the above ground biomass yield. Results The mean dry biomass yield across all water table treatments was 6 Mg ha−1 with no significant differences between the treatments. Raising the GWL to the surface decreased both the net...... of peatlands grown with reed canary grass (RCG) and rewetted to various extents. Methods Gas fluxes of CO2, methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured with a static chamber technique for 10 months from mesocosms sown with RCG and manipulated to ground water levels (GWL) of 0, −10, −20, −30 and −40 cm...... The results showed that a reduction in total GHG emission can be achieved without losing the productivity of newly established RCG when GWL is maintained close to the surface. Further studies should address the practical constrains and long-term productivity of RCG cultivation in rewetted peatlands....

  4. Buffer layer dependence of magnetoresistance effects in Co2Fe0.4Mn0.6Si/MgO/Co50Fe50 tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingling; Kubota, Takahide; Takahashi, Shigeki; Kawato, Yoshiaki; Sonobe, Yoshiaki; Takanashi, Koki

    2018-05-01

    Buffer layer dependence of tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects was investigated in Co2Fe0.4Mn0.6Si (CFMS)/MgO/Co50Fe50 magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Pd, Ru and Cr were selected for the buffer layer materials, and MTJs with three different CFMS thicknesses (30, 5, and 0.8 nm) were fabricated. A maximum TMR ratio of 136% was observed in the Ru buffer layer sample with a 30-nm-thick CFMS layer. TMR ratios drastically degraded for the CFMS thickness of 0.8 nm, and the values were 26% for Cr buffer layer and less than 1% for Pd and Ru buffer layers. From the annealing temperature dependence of the TMR ratios, amounts of interdiffusion and effects from the lattice mismatch were discussed.

  5. Stability amidst turmoil: Grit buffers the effects of negative life events on suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Dan V; Young, Kevin C; Kleiman, Evan M

    2015-08-30

    The goal of the current study is to examine the role of grit as a resilience factor that reduces the risk for suicidal ideation conferred by negative life events. Participants (N=209) completed measures of negative life events and grit at baseline and a measure of suicidal ideation at follow-up four weeks later. Poisson regression analyses found that higher levels of grit buffered the relationship between negative life events and suicidal ideation such that negative life events only predicted suicidal ideation if grit was low. These results suggest that high grit can abate the increased suicidal ideation associated with negative life events. Aside from absolute levels of suicidal ideation, being able to predict or buffer dramatic shifts in suicidal ideation can be a useful diagnostic tool during interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Attentional Control Buffers the Effect of Public Speaking Anxiety on Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher R; Fazio, Russell H; Vasey, Michael W

    2012-09-01

    We explored dispositional differences in the ability to self-regulate attentional processes in the domain of public speaking. Participants first completed measures of speech anxiety and attentional control. In a second session, participants prepared and performed a short speech. Fear of public speaking negatively impacted performance only for those low in attentional control. Thus, attentional control appears to act as a buffer that facilitates successful self-regulation despite performance anxiety.

  7. Acanthamoeba encystment: multifactorial effects of buffers, biocides, and demulcents present in contact lens care solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs CJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher J Kovacs, Shawn C Lynch, Marjorie J Rah, Kimberly A Millard, Timothy W Morris Bausch & Lomb Incorporated, Rochester, NY, USA Purpose: To determine whether agents which are purportedly capable of inducing encystment of Acanthamoeba can recapitulate the signal when tested in differing formulations. Methods: In accordance with the International Standard ISO 19045, Acanthamoeba castellanii ATCC 50370 trophozoites were cultured in antibiotic-free axenic medium, treated with test solutions, and encystment rates plus viability were measured via bright field and fluorescent microscopy. Test solutions included phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, borate-buffered saline, biguanide- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-based biocides, propylene glycol (PG and povidone (POV ophthalmic demulcents, and one-step H2O2-based contact lens disinfection systems. Results: Only PBS solutions with 0.25 ppm polyaminopropyl biguanide (PAPB and increasing concentrations of PG and POV stimulated A. castellanii encystment in a dose-dependent manner, whereas PBS solutions containing 3% H2O2 and increasing concentrations of PG and POV did not stimulate encystment. Borate-buffered saline and PBS/citrate solutions containing PG also did not stimulate encystment. In addition, no encystment was observed after 24 hours, 7 days, or 14 days of exposures of trophozoites to one-step H2O2 contact lens disinfection products or related solutions. Conclusion: The lack of any encystment observed when trophozoites were treated with existing or new one-step H2O2 contact lens care products, as well as when trophozoites were exposed to various related test solutions, confirms that Acanthamoeba encystment is a complex process which depends upon simultaneous contributions of multiple factors including buffers, biocides, and demulcents. Keywords: propylene glycol, contact lens care system, hydrogen peroxide disinfecting solution

  8. Simple deterministic model of the hydraulic buffer effect in septic tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Forquet, N.; Dufresne, M.

    2015-01-01

    Septic tanks are widely used in on-site wastewater treatment systems. In addition to anaerobic pre-treatment, hydraulic buffering is one of the roles attributed to septic tanks. However there is still no tool for assessing it, especially in dynamic conditions. For gravity fed system, it could help both researchers and system designers. This technical note reports a simple mechanistic model based on the assumption of flow transition between the septic tank and the outflow pipe. The only parame...

  9. Dynamics and mitigation of six pesticides in a "Wet" forest buffer zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeport, Elodie; Richard, Benjamin; Chaumont, Cédric; Margoum, Christelle; Liger, Lucie; Gril, Jean-Joël; Tournebize, Julien

    2014-04-01

    Pesticide pollution is one of the main current threats on water quality. This paper presents the potential and functioning principles of a "Wet" forest buffer zone for reducing concentrations and loads of glyphosate, isoproturon, metazachlor, azoxystrobin, epoxiconazole, and cyproconazole. A tracer injection experiment was conducted in the field in a forest buffer zone at Bray (France). A fine time-scale sampling enabled to illustrate that interactions between pesticides and forest buffer substrates (soil and organic-rich litter layer), had a retarding effect on molecule transfer. Low concentrations were observed for all pesticides at the forest buffer outlet thus demonstrating the efficiency of "Wet" forest buffer zone for pesticide dissipation. Pesticide masses injected in the forest buffer inlet directly determined concentration peaks observed at the outlet. Rapid and partially reversible adsorption was likely the major process affecting pesticide transfer for short retention times (a few hours to a few days). Remobilization of metazachlor, isoproturon, desmethylisoproturon, and AMPA was observed when non-contaminated water flows passed through the forest buffer. Our data suggest that pesticide sorption properties alone could not explain the complex reaction mechanisms that affected pesticide transfer in the forest buffer. Nevertheless, the thick layer of organic matter litter on the top of the forest soil was a key parameter, which enhanced partially reversible sorption of pesticide, thus retarded their transfer, decreased concentration peaks, and likely increased degradation of the pesticides. Consequently, to limit pesticide pollution transported by surface water, the use of already existing forest areas as buffer zones should be equally considered as the most commonly implemented grass buffer strips.

  10. The potential effects of pH and buffering capacity on dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Barry M

    2007-01-01

    Soft drink pH (initial pH) has been shown to be a causative factor--but not necessarily the primary initiating factor--of dental erosion. The titratable acidity or buffering capacity has been acknowledged as playing a significant role in the etiology of these lesions. This in vitro study sought to evaluate five different soft drinks (Coca-Cola Classic, Diet Coke, Gatorade sports drink, Red Bull high-energy drink, Starbucks Frappucino coffee drink) and tap water (control) in terms of initial pH and buffering capacity. Initial pH was measured in triplicate for the six beverages. The buffering capacity of each beverage was assessed by measuring the weight (in grams) of 0.10 M sodium hydroxide necessary for titration to pH levels of 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, and 8.3. Coca-Cola Classic produced the lowest mean pH, while Starbucks Frappucino produced the highest pH of any of the drinks except for tap water. Based on statistical analysis using ANOVA and Fisher's post hoc tests at a P Starbucks Frappucino.

  11. Effect of buffer general acid-base catalysis on the stereoselectivity of ester and thioester H/D exchange in D2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrig, Jerry R; Reiter, Nicholas J; Kirk, Randy; Zawadski, Michelle R; Lamarre-Vincent, Nathan

    2011-04-06

    As part of a comprehensive investigation on the stereochemistry of base-catalyzed 1,2-elimination and H/D exchange reactions of carbonyl compounds, we have found that the stereoselectivity of H/D exchange of 3-hydroxybutyryl N-acetylcysteamine (3) in D(2)O is strongly influenced by the presence of buffers. This buffer effect is also operative with a simple acyclic ester, ethyl 3-methoxybutanoate (7). Buffers whose general-acid components are cyclic tertiary ammonium ions are particularly effective in changing the stereoselectivity. (2)H NMR analysis showed that without buffer, H/D exchange of 3 produces 81-82% of the 2R*, 3R* diastereomer of 2-deuterio 3 (the anti product). In the presence of 0.33 M 3-quinuclidinone buffer, only 44% of the 2R*, 3R* diastereomer was formed. With ester 7, the stereoselectivity went from 93-94% in DO(-)/D(2)O to 60% in the presence of buffer. Phosphate buffer, as well as others, also showed substantial effects. The results are put into the context of what is known about the mechanism of H/D exchange of esters and thioesters, and the relevance of the buffer effect on the mechanism of the enoyl-CoA hydratase reaction is discussed. It is likely that hydrogen bonding in the enolate-buffer acid encounter complex is an important stereochemical determinant in producing a greater amount of the 2R*, 3S* diastereomer (the syn product). Studies that involve the protonation of enolate anions in D(2)O need to include the buffer general acid in any understanding of the stereoselectivity. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included...... the suitability of SQ grass SLIT-tablet for patients with clinically relevant symptoms to multiple Pooideae grass species, single-season efficacy, safety, adherence, coseasonal initiation, and cost-effectiveness. The data from the long-term SQ grass SLIT-tablet clinical trial that evaluated a clinical effect 2...

  13. Effects of yeast culture supplement on digestion of nutrients and rumen fermentation in cattle fed on grass silage barley diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Huhtanen

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of including yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae plus growth medium; 5 x 106 organisms/g on the digestion of dietary constituents in the rumen and total digestive tract were studied in a pair of monozygote twin bulls. The animals were fitted with cannulae in the rumen and in the proximal duodenum. A diet of grass silage, barley and rapeseed meal (445, 445 and 90 g/kg total dry matter (DM was fed, with and without addition of 10 g per day of yeast culture (YC, in two treatment sequences. The addition of YC had no effect on the mean values of rumen pH, ammonia N concentration or molar proportions of volatile fatty acids. Also, the postprandial changes in rumen fermentation pattern were similar when the diet did and did not contain the YC supplement. The peak concentration of lactic acid 1 h after feeding tended to be higher in cattle receiving the YC diet (13.9 v 6.0 mmol/l. Apparent digestibility of organic matter (OM (mean 0.780 and the proportion of OM digestion occurring in the rumen (mean 0.603 were not affected by YC. Likewise, there was no effect on rumen or total digestion of cell wall carbohydrates, and the results for the degradation of hay DM in the rumen and for particle-associated carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activities indicated that YC had no effect on the rumen environment that could affect fibre digestion. Supplemental yeast did not affect the rate of microbial N synthesis (28.0 and 28.6 g/kg OM apparently digested in the rumen. The results indicate that the addition of YC to the diet is not likely to improve the efficiency of digestion and fermentation in the rumen of cattle given a diet based on grass silage and barley.

  14. Buffer choice and effects of sample composition examined by experiment planning methods for determination of molybdenum by atomic absorption with a flame atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zav'yalkov, P.I.; Danishehvskii, A.L.; Rakita, R.A.; Yakshinskii, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors use orthogonal experiment planning to define the optimum form of buffer and to establish the effects of sample composition since there are high levels of cation and anion interference in the atomic-absorption determination of molybdenum. A spectroscopic buffer has been identified (HCLO 4 + NH 4 Cl mixture), which eliminates the interference from the elements tested and improves the analytical characteristics in determining molybdenum. A model has been formulated enabling one to estimate the buffer performance and the effects of the components on the determination of molybdenum. The model enables one to forecast the expected order of the effect without performing additional experiments

  15. Effects of soil water content and grass recycling on N2O emission in an urban lawn under laboratory incubation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataningtyas, Dilin Rahayu; Morita, Shunsuke; Hatano, Ryusuke

    2017-12-01

    In the context of global warming, the increase of N2O gas production from the agricultural area has gained enhancing concern due to N2O is a potent greenhouse gas and an ozone depleted substance. While adding clipping grass has been accepted to replace N-fertilizer input in urban law management its effect on soil gas emission still questionable. A laboratory incubation study had been conducted to evaluate the effect of soil water content and grass recycling on greenhouse gas emission from an urban lawn. The soil samples were taken from Yurigahara Park, Sapporo, Hokkaido Japan. The 17 days at 25°C incubation study was started after adjusting soil water content to 35% and 50% with and without adding the clipping grass on soil surfaces. Greenhouse gas emissions were higher with the addition of grass, however, for NO and N2O considerably higher in 35% than 50% water content. The denitrification process was responsible for the N2O increase in this action. Soil chemical and microbial properties, pH, WEOC, NO3--N, NH4+-N and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) as well as N-grass content were also measured to know their correlation with N2O emission. The fine-scale heterogeneity occurred in the soil has impact on the variability of soil chemical properties that influenced the N2O emission. In the other hand, the effect of grass recycling appeared to increased soil N-inorganic contents and stimulated the N-gaseous concentration.

  16. Effects of the annealing duration of the ZnO buffer layer on structural and optical properties of ZnO rods grown by a hydrothermal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, C.M.; Lee, J.Y.; Heo, J.H.; Park, J.H.; Kim, C.R. [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, H., E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, J.H. [Major of Nano Semiconductor, Korea Maritime University, 1 Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-Ku, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Son, C.S. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Silla University, Gwaebeop-dong, Sasang-gu, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.J. [Department of Nano Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, S.T. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Zhao, J.L. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, X.W. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2009-07-30

    In this study, the effects of the annealing duration of a zinc oxide (ZnO) buffer layer on structural and optical properties of ZnO rods grown by a hydrothermal process are discussed. A ZnO buffer layer was deposited on p-type Si (1 1 1) substrates by the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. After that, ZnO rods were grown on the ZnO-buffer/Si (1 1 1) substrate by a hydrothermal process. In order to determine the optimum annealing duration of the buffer layer for the growth of ZnO rods, durations ranging from 0.5 to 30 min were tried. The morphology and crystal structure of the ZnO/ZnO-buffer/Si (1 1 1) were measured by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical properties were investigated by photoluminescence (PL) measurement.

  17. Buffer strip effect on terbuthylazine, desethyl-terbuthylazine and S-metolachlor runoff from maize fields in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Marco; Vidotto, Francesco; Piano, Serenella; Negre, Michèle; Ferrero, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of a 6 m wide vegetative buffer strip for reducing runoff of S-metolachlor, terbuthylazine and desethyl-terbuthylazine was studied in 2007-2008 in Northern Italy. Two cultivated fields, with and without the buffer strip, were compared. Residues of the chemicals were investigated in runoff water collected after runoff events and their dissipation in the soil was studied. The highest concentration of the chemicals in water occurred in samples collected from the unbuffered field at the first runoff events. Losses of terbuthylazine and S-metolachlor in runoff waters were particularly high in 2007 (2.6% and 0.9% of the amount applied, respectively). Soil half-life of terbuthylazine and S-metolachlor ranged between 12.1 and 8.9 days and 16 and 7 days, respectively. The presence of desethyl-terbuthylazine was related to parent compound degradation. The buffer strip allowed an important reduction of chemical content in water (> 90%), in particular during the first runoff events.

  18. Effects of a copper-tolerant grass (Agrostis capillaris) on the ecosystem of a copper-contaminated arable soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boon, G.T. [State Univ. Groningen (Netherlands); Bouwman, L.A.; Bloem, J.; Roemkens, P.F.A.M. [Research Inst. for Agrobiology and Soil Fertility, Haren (Netherlands)

    1998-10-01

    To test how a dysfunctioning ecosystem of a severely metal-polluted soil responds to renewed plant growth, a pot experiment was conducted with soil from an experimental arable field with pH and copper gradients imposed 13 years ago. In this experiment, four pH/copper combinations from this field were either planted with a pH- and copper-resistant grass cultivar or remained fallow. During a 10-week period, the dynamics of the microbial activity and of the abundances of bacteria, protozoa. and nematodes were measured, as were the dynamics of several chemical soil parameters. After 13 years of copper, which had resulted in severely reduced crop growth, no effects were observed on bacterial numbers, respiration, or protozoan numbers, but bacterial growth was strongly reduced in the low pH plots, and even more so in low pH plots enriched with copper. Of the organisms, only nematodes were negatively affected under conditions of high copper load at low pH. In these plots, numbers belonging to all feeding categories were strongly reduced. Planting of a copper-tolerant grass variety, Agrostis capillaris L. var. Parys Mountain, resulted within 10 weeks in faster bacterial growth and more protozoa and bacterivorous nematodes in comparison with fallow controls; these effects were markedly strongest in the acidic, copper-enriched soils. During incubation, fungivorous nematodes increased in all treatments, in fallow and in planted pots and in the pots with high-copper, low-pH soil. The results of this experiment suggest that introduction of plant growth is one of the major causes of increased biological activity in acidic contaminated soils. Planting such soils with metal-tolerant plant species can reestablish the necessary food base to support soil organism growth, and this can lead to numerous positive effects, reversing the loss of soil functions due to the high copper levels under acidic conditions.

  19. Adverse postresuscitation myocardial effects elicited by buffer-induced alkalemia ameliorated by NHE-1 inhibition in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Lorissa; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai; Mason, Thomas G; Kraut, Jeffrey A; Gazmuri, Raúl J

    2016-11-01

    Major myocardial abnormalities occur during cardiac arrest and resuscitation including intracellular acidosis-partly caused by CO 2 accumulation-and activation of the Na + -H + exchanger isoform-1 (NHE-1). We hypothesized that a favorable interaction may result from NHE-1 inhibition during cardiac resuscitation followed by administration of a CO 2 -consuming buffer upon return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Ventricular fibrillation was electrically induced in 24 male rats and left untreated for 8 min followed by defibrillation after 8 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Rats were randomized 1:1:1 to the NHE-1 inhibitor zoniporide or vehicle during CPR and disodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate buffer or normal saline (30 ml/kg) after ROSC. Survival at 240 min declined from 100% with Zoniporide/Saline to 50% with Zoniporide/Buffer and 25% with Vehicle/Buffer (P = 0.004), explained by worsening postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction. Marked alkalemia occurred after buffer administration along with lactatemia that was maximal after Vehicle/Buffer, attenuated by Zoniporide/Buffer, and minimal with Zoniporide/Saline [13.3 ± 4.8 (SD), 9.2 ± 4.6, and 2.7 ± 1.0 mmol/l; P ≤ 0.001]. We attributed the intense postresuscitation lactatemia to enhanced glycolysis consequent to severe buffer-induced alkalemia transmitted intracellularly by an active NHE-1. We attributed the worsened postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction also to severe alkalemia intensifying Na + entry via NHE-1 with consequent Ca 2+ overload injuring mitochondria, evidenced by increased plasma cytochrome c Both buffer-induced effects were ameliorated by zoniporide. Accordingly, buffer-induced alkalemia after ROSC worsened myocardial function and survival, likely through enhancing NHE-1 activity. Zoniporide attenuated these effects and uncovered a complex postresuscitation acid-base physiology whereby blood pH drives NHE-1 activity and compromises mitochondrial function and integrity along

  20. Nutritional Value And Yield of Kallar Grass (Leptochloa Fusca Linn) Hay and Its Effect on Reproductive Performance of Awassi Ewes Using Progesterone Radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M R..; Zarkawi, M.; Khalifa, K.

    2007-01-01

    Nutritional value of Kallar grass (Leptochloa fusca Linn) hay (whole plant), a salt-tolerant plant, was estimated by determinning its composition (ash, crude protein CP, crude fibre CF, ether extract EE, neutral-detergent fiber NDF, acid-detergent fiber ADF, acid-detergent lignin ADL); and the in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD), metabolizable energy (ME), net energy of lactation (NEL) and gross energy (GE). Moreover, dry matter, energy and protein yields per hectar were also estimated. The effects of feeding Kallar grass hay to pregnant Awassi ewes on reproductive performance, serum progesterone changes using radioimmunoassay, and on birth and weaning weights of lambs born were also determined. Experimental ewes received daily 300 g of Kallar grass hay in addition to lentil straw and concentrates to cover their nutritional requirements. The results indicated that the nutritive components of Kallar grass were (g kg -1 dry matter): ash 96, CP 93, CF 290, EE 21, NDF 755, ADF 416 and ADL 94. IVOMD was 49.3%, and energy values (MJ kg -1 dry matter) were: GE 26.88, ME 6.41 and NEL 3.02. Dry matter and crude protein yields of Kallar grass hay were 7875 and 732 kg ha -1 , respectively, and the energy produced (MJ ha -1 ) was: GE 211680, ME 50479 and NEL 23783. Kallar grass had no effects on the reproductive performance of pregnant Awassi ewes duration, of pregnancy (150.1 ± 2.2 days), progesterone patterns, birth (4.7±1.0 kg) or on weaning weights (22.7 ± ≤ 5.5 kg) of lambs.

  1. Effects of Microphallus turgidus (Trematoda: Microphallidae) on the predation, behavior, and swimming stamina of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Alyssa K; Pung, Oscar J

    2004-06-01

    The effect of the trematode Microphallus turgidus on its second intermediate host, the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was tested. To do so, we measured the susceptibility of infected and uninfected shrimp to predation by the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus. Shrimp behavior was compared in the presence and absence of a fish predator, and the swimming stamina and backthrust escape responses of infected and uninfected shrimp were measured. Infected shrimp were more likely to be eaten by a predator than uninfected shrimp, had lower swimming stamina, and spent more time swimming and less time motionless in the presence of a predator. There was no difference between backthrust distances traveled in response to a stimulus by either infected or uninfected shrimp. Thus, M. turgidus may increase the predation of P. pugio in the wild, possibly by affecting the swimming stamina and predator avoidance responses of the shrimp.

  2. Effects of grazing strategy on limiting nitrate leaching in grazed grass-clover pastures on coarse sandy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen; Søegaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    -term mean. The experiment was initiated in a 4-yr-old grass-clover sward in south Denmark. Three treatments were as follows grazing only (G), spring cut followed by grazing (CG) and both spring and autumn cuts with summer grazing (CGC). Nitrate leaching was calculated by extracting water isolates from 80 cm......Urinations of ruminants on grazed pastures increase the risk of nitrate leaching. The study investigated the effect of reducing the length of the grazing season on nitrate leaching from a coarse sandy, irrigated soil during 2006–2007 and 2007–2008. In both years, precipitation was above the long...... depth using ceramic suction cups. Because of considerable variation in measured nitrate concentrations, the 32 installed suction cups per treatment were insufficient to reveal differences between treatments. However, weighted nitrate leaching estimations for G, CG and CGC showed estimated mean nitrate N...

  3. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on survival and growth of perennial grasses in lignite overburden in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, C.A.; Davies, F.T.

    1988-12-01

    Seedlings of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum) were inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi (Glomus fasciculatum and Gigaspora margarita) in a containerized system and transplanted into lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas, U.S.A. After three growing seasons without cultural inputs, plants inoculated with VAM fungi had greater survival percentages, basal diameters, and above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Inoculated plants had higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Root colonization percentages of inoculated plants remained fairly stable while noninoculated plants showed low levels of colonization over the 3-year study period. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae enhanced the survival and growth of the 3 grass species by making effective use of limited resources in the lignite overburden. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Deprotonation effect of tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile buffer gas dopant in ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Maestre, Roberto; Meza-Morelos, Dairo; Wu, Ching

    2016-06-15

    When dopants are introduced into the buffer gas of an ion mobility spectrometer, spectra are simplified due to charge competition. We used electrospray ionization to inject tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile (F, 2-furonitrile or 2-furancarbonitrile) as a buffer gas dopant into an ion mobility spectrometer coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Density functional theory was used for theoretical calculations of dopant-ion interaction energies and proton affinities, using the hybrid functional X3LYP/6-311++(d,p) with the Gaussian 09 program that accounts for the basis set superposition error; analytes structures and theoretical calculations with Gaussian were used to explain the behavior of the analytes upon interaction with F. When F was used as a dopant at concentrations below 1.5 mmol m(-3) in the buffer gas, ions were not observed for α-amino acids due to charge competition with the dopant; this deprotonation capability arises from the production of a dimer with a high formation energy that stabilized the positive charge and created steric hindrance that deterred the equilibrium with analyte ions. F could not completely strip other compounds of their charge because they either showed steric hindrance at the charge site that deterred the approach of the dopant (2,4-lutidine, and DTBP), formed intramolecular bonds that stabilized the positive charge (atenolol), had high proton affinity (2,4-lutidine, DTBP, valinol and atenolol), or were inherently ionic (tetraalkylammonium ions). This selective deprotonation suggests the use of F to simplify spectra of complex mixtures in ion mobility and mass spectrometry in metabolomics, proteomics and other studies that generate complex spectra with thousands of peaks. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Short-term measures for runoff water control on sloping land (temporary ditches and grass strips in controlling soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The agronomic measures made obligatory by the cross-compliance Standard Temporary measures for runoff water control on sloping land included in the Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies (MiPAAF decree on cross compliance until 2008, and by Standard 1.1 Creation of temporary ditches for the prevention of soil erosion in the 2009 decree, certainly appear to be useful for the control of soil erosion and runoff. The efficacy of temporary drainage ditches and of grass strips in controlling runoff and erosion has been demonstrated in trials conducted in field test plots in Italy. When level temporary drainage ditches are correctly built, namely with an inclination of not more than 2.5% in relation to the maximum hillslope gradient, they allow the suspended sediment eroded upstream to settle in the ditches, retaining the material carried away on the slope and, as a result, reducing the quantity of sediment delivered to the hydrographic network. In particular, among all the results, the erosion and runoff data in a trial conducted in Guiglia (Modena showed that in corn plots, temporary drainage ditches reduced soil erosion by 94%, from 14.4 Mg ha-1 year-1 (above the limit established by the NRCS-USDA of 11.2 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 0.8 Mg ha-1 year-1 (within the NRCS limit and also within the more restrictive limit established by the OECD of 6.0 Mg ha-1 year-1. With respect to the grass buffer strips the most significant research was carried out in Volterra. This research demonstrated their efficacy in reducing erosion from 8.15 Mg ha-1 to 1.6 Mg ha-1, which is approximately 5 times less than the erosion observed on bare soil. The effectiveness of temporary drainage ditches was also assessed through the application of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE erosion model to 60 areas under the control of the Agency for Agricultural Payments (AGEA in 2009, comparing the risk of erosion in these sample areas by simulating the presence and

  6. Effects of Grazing Management in Brachiaria grass-forage Peanut Pastures on Canopy Structure and Forage Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, F K; Oliveira, M D B L; Homem, B G C; Boddey, R M; Bernardes, T F; Gionbelli, M P; Lara, M A S; Casagrande, D R

    2018-06-13

    Maintenance of mixed grass-legume pastures for stand longevity and improved animal utilization is a challenge in warm-season climates. The goal of this study was to assess grazing management on stand persistence, forage intake, and N balance of beef heifers grazing mixed pastures of Brachiaria brizantha and Arachis pintoi. A two-year experiment was carried out in Brazil, where four grazing management were assessed: rest period interrupted at 90%, 95%, and 100% of light interception (LI) and a fixed rest period of 42 days (90LI, 95LI, 100LI, and 42D, respectively). The LI were taken at 50 points at ground level and at five points above the canopy for each paddock using a canopy analyzer. For all treatments, the post-grazing stubble height was 15 cm. Botanical composition and canopy structure characteristics such as canopy height, forage mass, and vertical distribution of the morphological composition were evaluated pre-and post-grazing. Forage chemical composition, intake, and microbial synthesis were also determined. A randomized complete block design was used, considering the season of the year as a repeated measure over time. Grazing management and season were considered fixed, while block and year were considered random effects. In the summer, legume mass accounted for 19% of the canopy at 100LI, which was less than other treatments (a mean of 30%). The 100LI treatment had a greater grass stem mass compared with other treatments. In terms of vertical distribution for 100LI, 38.6% of the stem mass was above the stubble height, greater than the 5.7% for other treatments. The canopy structure limited neutral detergent fiber intake (P = 0.007) at 100LI (1.02% of BW/d), whereas 42D, 90LI, and 95LI treatments had NDF intake close to 1.2% of BW/d. The intake of digestible organic matter (OM; P = 0.007) and the ratio of crude protein/digestible OM (P < 0.001) were less at 100LI in relation to the other treatments. The production of microbial N (P < 0.001) and efficiency

  7. Soil microorganisms alleviate the allelochemical effects of a thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Bodil K

    2011-01-01

    Plant allelochemicals released into the soil can significantly impact the performance of associated plant species thereby affecting their competitive ability. Soil microbes can potentially affect the interaction between plant and plant chemicals by degrading the allelochemicals. However, most often plant-plant chemical interactions are studied using filter paper bioassays examining the pair-wise interaction between a plant and a plant chemical, not taking into account the potential role of soil microorganisms. To explore if the allelopathic effects on a grass by the common thyme monoterpene "carvacrol" are affected by soil microorganisms. Seedlings of the grass Agrostis capillaris originating from 3 different thyme sites were raised in the greenhouse. Seedlings were grown under four different soil treatments in a 2*2 fully factorial experiment. The monoterpene carvacrol was either added to standard greenhouse soil or left out, and soil was either sterilized (no soil microorganisms) or not (soil microorganisms present in soil). The presence of carvacrol in the soil strongly increased mortality of Agrostis plants, and this increase was highest on sterile soil. Plant biomass was reduced on soil amended with carvacrol, but only when the soil was also sterilized. Plants originating from sites where thyme produces essential oils containing mostly carvacrol had higher survival on soil treated with that monoterpene than plants originating from a site where thyme produced different types of terpenes, suggesting an adaptive response to the locally occurring terpene. The study shows that presence of soil microorganisms can alleviate the negative effect of a common thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated plant species, emphasizing the role of soil microbes in modulating plant-plant chemical interactions.

  8. Soil microorganisms alleviate the allelochemical effects of a thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated grass species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil K Ehlers

    Full Text Available Plant allelochemicals released into the soil can significantly impact the performance of associated plant species thereby affecting their competitive ability. Soil microbes can potentially affect the interaction between plant and plant chemicals by degrading the allelochemicals. However, most often plant-plant chemical interactions are studied using filter paper bioassays examining the pair-wise interaction between a plant and a plant chemical, not taking into account the potential role of soil microorganisms.To explore if the allelopathic effects on a grass by the common thyme monoterpene "carvacrol" are affected by soil microorganisms. Seedlings of the grass Agrostis capillaris originating from 3 different thyme sites were raised in the greenhouse. Seedlings were grown under four different soil treatments in a 2*2 fully factorial experiment. The monoterpene carvacrol was either added to standard greenhouse soil or left out, and soil was either sterilized (no soil microorganisms or not (soil microorganisms present in soil. The presence of carvacrol in the soil strongly increased mortality of Agrostis plants, and this increase was highest on sterile soil. Plant biomass was reduced on soil amended with carvacrol, but only when the soil was also sterilized. Plants originating from sites where thyme produces essential oils containing mostly carvacrol had higher survival on soil treated with that monoterpene than plants originating from a site where thyme produced different types of terpenes, suggesting an adaptive response to the locally occurring terpene.The study shows that presence of soil microorganisms can alleviate the negative effect of a common thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated plant species, emphasizing the role of soil microbes in modulating plant-plant chemical interactions.

  9. Soil Microorganisms Alleviate the Allelochemical Effects of a Thyme Monoterpene on the Performance of an Associated Grass Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Bodil K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant allelochemicals released into the soil can significantly impact the performance of associated plant species thereby affecting their competitive ability. Soil microbes can potentially affect the interaction between plant and plant chemicals by degrading the allelochemicals. However, most often plant-plant chemical interactions are studied using filter paper bioassays examining the pair-wise interaction between a plant and a plant chemical, not taking into account the potential role of soil microorganisms. Methodology/Principal findings To explore if the allelopathic effects on a grass by the common thyme monoterpene “carvacrol” are affected by soil microorganisms. Seedlings of the grass Agrostis capillaris originating from 3 different thyme sites were raised in the greenhouse. Seedlings were grown under four different soil treatments in a 2*2 fully factorial experiment. The monoterpene carvacrol was either added to standard greenhouse soil or left out, and soil was either sterilized (no soil microorganisms) or not (soil microorganisms present in soil). The presence of carvacrol in the soil strongly increased mortality of Agrostis plants, and this increase was highest on sterile soil. Plant biomass was reduced on soil amended with carvacrol, but only when the soil was also sterilized. Plants originating from sites where thyme produces essential oils containing mostly carvacrol had higher survival on soil treated with that monoterpene than plants originating from a site where thyme produced different types of terpenes, suggesting an adaptive response to the locally occurring terpene. Conclusions/Significance The study shows that presence of soil microorganisms can alleviate the negative effect of a common thyme monoterpene on the performance of an associated plant species, emphasizing the role of soil microbes in modulating plant-plant chemical interactions. PMID:22125596

  10. Lignocellulosic Fermentation of Wild Grass Employing Recombinant Hydrolytic Enzymes and Fermentative Microbes with Effective Bioethanol Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saprativ P. Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF studies of steam exploded and alkali pretreated different leafy biomass were accomplished by recombinant Clostridium thermocellum hydrolytic enzymes and fermentative microbes for bioethanol production. The recombinant C. thermocellum GH5 cellulase and GH43 hemicellulase genes expressed in Escherichia coli cells were grown in repetitive batch mode, with the aim of enhancing the cell biomass production and enzyme activity. In batch mode, the cell biomass (A600 nm of E. coli cells and enzyme activities of GH5 cellulase and GH43 hemicellulase were 1.4 and 1.6 with 2.8 and 2.2 U·mg−1, which were augmented to 2.8 and 2.9 with 5.6 and 3.8 U·mg−1 in repetitive batch mode, respectively. Steam exploded wild grass (Achnatherum hymenoides provided the best ethanol titres as compared to other biomasses. Mixed enzyme (GH5 cellulase, GH43 hemicellulase mixed culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida shehatae system gave 2-fold higher ethanol titre than single enzyme (GH5 cellulase single culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae system employing 1% (w/v pretreated substrate. 5% (w/v substrate gave 11.2 g·L−1 of ethanol at shake flask level which on scaling up to 2 L bioreactor resulted in 23 g·L−1 ethanol. 91.6% (v/v ethanol was recovered by rotary evaporator with 21.2% purification efficiency.

  11. Effects on Environmental and Socioeconomic Sustainability of Producing Ethanol from Perennial Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, V. H.; Parish, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    Using perennial grasses to produce ethanol can enhance progress toward sustainability. A suite of 35 environmental and socioeconomic sustainability indicators was considered in a holistic sustainability assessment of a five-year switchgrass-to-ethanol production experiment centered on a demonstration-scale biorefinery in Vonore, Tennessee. By combining field measurements, literature review and expert opinion, the team was able to rate 28 of the 35 recommended sustainability indicators. The team combined these ratings within a multi-attribute decision support system tool and used this information to compare the sustainability of producing 2118 hectares of no-till switchgrass relative to two alternative business-as-usual scenarios of unmanaged pasture and tilled corn production. The results suggest that East Tennessee switchgrass production improves environmental quality overall and can be beneficial to the counties surrounding the biorefinery in terms of dollars earned and jobs created. The timing of switchgrass production also provides an opportunity to use inactive equipment and laborers. By incorporating a landscape design approach, the opportunities, constraints and most reasonable paths forward for growing bioenergy feedstock in specific context can be assessed in a way that adapts and improves local practices. Lessons learned from this case study are being incorporated into sustainability assessments of corn stover in Iowa and a variety of bioenergy feedstocks in diverse settings. The overall goal is to develop sound management practices that can address the multiple and sometimes competing demands of stakeholders.

  12. Biodiesel from lemon and lemon grass oil and its effect on engine performance and exhaust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhivagar, R.; Sundararaj, S.; Vignesh, V. R.

    2018-03-01

    In the present scenario many developing countries are depending on oil producing nations for their fuel resources. Due to demand and scarcity of the fuel, there has been a huge increase in fuel prices. The vehicular population is also continuously increasing and becoming a great menace to peoples. This paper aims to provide an alternate solution for petroleum based fuels. It suggests that biodiesel produced from lemon and lemon grass oil can be used as an alternative fuel. This work investigates the thermal performance of four stroke diesel engine using blends of biodiesel and diesel as a fuel. Performance parameters like brake thermal efficiency, mechanical efficiency and specific fuel consumption were measured at different loads for diesel and various combination of biofuel (L10, L20, and L30). The maximum brake thermal efficiency obtained is about 26.12%for L20 which is slightly higher than that of diesel (24.91%). Engine experimental results showed that exhaust emissions including CO2 and HC were reduced by 6% and 5% for L20 mixture of biodiesel whereas CO emission was as same as diesel. However, there was increase in NOxby 26% to the diesel fuel.

  13. The effects of seed ingestion by livestock, dung fertilization, trampling, grass competition and fire on seedling establishment of two woody plant species

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tjelele, J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available the objectives of an agricultural enterprise. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of gut passage (goats, cattle), dung (nutrients), fire, grass competition and trampling on establishment of A. nilotica and D. cinerea seedlings. Germination...

  14. Effect of stage of maturity of grass at harvest on intake, chewing activity and distribution of particle size in faeces from pregnant ewes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalali, Alireza; Nørgaard, Peder; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of stage of maturity at harvest on the intake of grass silage, eating and ruminating activity and the distribution of faecal particle size in ewes during late pregnancy. A total of 18 Swedish Finull × Dorset 85 ± 8 kg (mean ± s.d.) ewes bearing t...

  15. Effects of prescribed burning and litter type on litter decomposition and nutrient release in mixed-grass prairie in Eastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire can affect litter decomposition and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Here, we examined the effect of summer fire and three litter types on litter decomposition and litter C and N dynamics in a northern mixed-grass prairie over a 24 month period starting ca. 14 months after fire. Over all...

  16. The evolutionary capacitor HSP90 buffers the regulatory effects of mammalian endogenous retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Barbara; Hansen, Erik C; Yoveva, Aneliya; Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Hussong, Rebecca; Sawarkar, Ritwick

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how genotypes are linked to phenotypes is important in biomedical and evolutionary studies. The chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) buffers genetic variation by stabilizing proteins with variant sequences, thereby uncoupling phenotypes from genotypes. Here we report an unexpected role of HSP90 in buffering cis-regulatory variation affecting gene expression. By using the tripartite-motif-containing 28 (TRIM28; also known as KAP1)-mediated epigenetic pathway, HSP90 represses the regulatory influence of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) on neighboring genes that are critical for mouse development. Our data based on natural variations in the mouse genome show that genes respond to HSP90 inhibition in a manner dependent on their genomic location with regard to strain-specific ERV-insertion sites. The evolutionary-capacitor function of HSP90 may thus have facilitated the exaptation of ERVs as key modifiers of gene expression and morphological diversification. Our findings add a new regulatory layer through which HSP90 uncouples phenotypic outcomes from individual genotypes.

  17. DNA turnover in buffer-held Escherichia coli and its effect on repair of UV damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, M.S.; Wang, T.C.V.; Patrick, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    Continuous DNA degradation and resynthesis, without a net change in cellular DNA content, were observed in buffer-held, non-irradiated E. coli B/r. This constant DNA turnover probably involves most of the genome and reflects random sites of DNA repair due to the polA-dependent excision-resynthesis repair pathway. Under these non-growth conditions it appears that at any given time there is a minimum of one repair site per 6.5 x 10 6 daltons DNA, each of which is at least 160 nucleotides long. While the amount of DNA degradation is not influenced by prior exposure to UV radiation, the synthetic activity decreases with increasing UV fluence. It is suggested that when sites of DNA turnover occur opposite to cyclobutyl dipyrimidines in UV-irradiated cells, repair of the latter damage can be prevented. This implies that both beneficial and deleterious processes take place in irradiated buffer-held cells, and that cell survival depends on the delicate balance between DNA turnover and repair of UV-damage. Based on these findings, a model is proposed to explain the limit repair observed during post-irradiation liquid-holding and to account for the large difference in cell survival between irradiation at low fluence rates (fluence-rate dependent recovery) and at high fluence rates followed by liquid-holding (liquid-holding recovery). (author)

  18. Buffering effects of safe, supportive, and nurturing relationships among women with childhood histories of maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffee, S R; Takizawa, R; Arseneault, L

    2017-11-01

    Adults who were victims of childhood maltreatment tend to have poorer health compared with adults who did not experience abuse. However, many are in good health. We tested whether safe, supportive, and nurturing relationships buffer women with a history of childhood maltreatment from poor health outcomes in later life. Participants included women from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study who were involved in an intimate relationship at some point by the time their twin children were 10 years old. Women were initially interviewed in 1999-2000 (mean age = 33 years) and 2, 5, and 7 years later. They reported on their physical and mental health, and their health-risk behaviours. Compared with women who did not experience abuse in childhood, women with histories of maltreatment were at elevated risk for mental, physical, and health-risk behaviours, including major depressive disorder, sleep, and substance use problems. Cumulatively, safe, supportive, and nurturing relationships characterized by a lack of violence, emotional intimacy, and social support buffered women with a history of maltreatment from poor health outcomes. Our findings emphasize that negative social determinants of health - such as a childhood history of maltreatment - confer risk for psychopathology and other physical health problems. If, however, a woman's current social circumstances are sufficiently positive, they can promote good health, particularly in the face of past adversity.

  19. Review of supercontainer copper shell-bentonite interactions and possible effects on buffer performance for the KBS-3H design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Wersin, P.

    2014-03-01

    A review is presented of the possible impact of the corrosion of a copper supercontainer shell on the performance of the bentonite buffer. The review is presented in two parts; first an assessment of the likely corrosion behaviour of the copper shell, including an assessment of the amount and speciation of copper corrosion products, and, second an assessment of the possible interactions of these copper corrosion products with the bentonite and the consequences for the buffer performance. The corrosion behaviour of oxygen-free copper in compacted bentonite is reviewed, including the effects of a possible lower-density region at the buffer-rock interface initially. Corrosion occurs under both aerobic conditions, due to the initial O 2 trapped in the bentonite and O 2 in the air or water-filled gap at the buffer/rock interface, and anaerobic conditions, due to sulphide present in the groundwater and that possibly produced by microbial activity in the bentonite. The reaction mechanism, the nature of the dissolved and precipitated corrosion products, and the evolution of the corrosion behaviour with time are discussed with reference to groundwater conditions at both Olkiluoto and Forsmark. Various interactions between the copper corrosion products (Cu(II) and Cu(I) species) and bentonite are considered, including diffusion and sorption and the incorporation of Cu into the bentonite. The available literature information on these processes is first reviewed and then this knowledge is used to predict the likely behaviour in a KBS-3H-style repository. Based on the information currently available, it is concluded that the corrosion of a copper supercontainer shell will only affect the bentonite within a distance of a few cm of the original location of the shell. Eventually, the copper shell will corrode to form an insoluble precipitate layer of Cu 2 S approximately 2-3 times the volume of the original shell. Bentonite within a few cm of this layer of precipitate may also

  20. Effectiveness of the cross-compliance standard 5.2 'buffer strips' on protecting freshwater against diffuse nitrogen pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Gumiero

    2016-02-01

    .2 of Cross-compliance, located in different areas and climate contexts, were monitored for a period of two years. It was done in order to quantify their effectiveness in removing dissolved inorganic nitrogen conveyed through sub- surface flow from field crops with different cultural practices. Except for two case studies (sites: Lodi and Metaponto in all monitored systems has been confirmed an outflow, permanent or temporary, through the buffer systems, with flow rates ranging from 919 to 8590 m3y-1 every 100 meters of buffer stip. The differences in flow rate were mainly due to different sizes of agricultural basins related to buffer systems, which in the case studies ranging from 3.6 to 33.3%. Based on the mass balance, was found percentages of applied inorganic nitrogen, flowing from cultivated fields to the buffer systems, varied between 1.6 and 29.4%. In most of the sites was estimated nitrogen reduction between inlet and outlet of BS, with percentages ranging from 33 to 61.9%. The exceptions were the systems with groundwater that: or have no interaction with the rhizosphere (deep flow or not crossing the buffer zone. Low percentages of removal shall be justified by the young stage of the monitored sites, being in many cases recently converted to buffer strip. This study confirms the extreme variability of these systems efficiency and the key role of hydrology drives its effectiveness.

  1. Effectiveness of the cross-compliance Standard 5.2 'buffer strips' on protecting freshwater against diffuse nitrogen pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Gumiero

    2016-02-01

    .2 of Cross-compliance, located in different areas and climate contexts, were monitored for a period of two years. It was done in order to quantify their effectiveness in removing dissolved inorganic nitrogen conveyed through sub- surface flow from field crops with different cultural practices. Except for two case studies (sites: Lodi and Metaponto in all monitored systems has been confirmed an outflow, permanent or temporary, through the buffer systems, with flow rates ranging from 919 to 8590 m3y-1 every 100 meters of buffer stip. The differences in flow rate were mainly due to different sizes of agricultural basins related to buffer systems, which in the case studies ranging from 3.6 to 33.3%. Based on the mass balance, was found percentages of applied inorganic nitrogen, flowing from cultivated fields to the buffer systems, varied between 1.6 and 29.4%. In most of the sites was estimated nitrogen reduction between inlet and outlet of BS, with percentages ranging from 33 to 61.9%. The exceptions were the systems with groundwater that: or have no interaction with the rhizosphere (deep flow or not crossing the buffer zone. Low percentages of removal shall be justified by the young stage of the monitored sites, being in many cases recently converted to buffer strip. This study confirms the extreme variability of these systems efficiency and the key role of hydrology drives its effectiveness.

  2. Effect of bicarbonate and lactate buffer on glucose and lactate metabolism during hemodiafiltration in patients with multiple organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Marc-Daniel; Revelly, Jean-Pierre; Tappy, Luc; Berger, Mette M; Schaller, Marie-Denise; Cayeux, Marie-Christine; Martinez, Alexandre; Chioléro, René-Louis

    2004-06-01

    To compare the effects of sodium bicarbonate and lactate for continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) in critically ill patients. Prospective crossed-over controlled trial in the surgical and medical ICUs of a university hospital. Eight patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) requiring CVVHDF. Each patient received the two buffers in a randomized sequence over two consecutive days. The following variables were determined: acid-base parameters, lactate production and utilization ((13)C lactate infusion), glucose turnover (6,6(2)H(2)-glucose), gas exchange (indirect calorimetry). No side effect was observed during lactate administration. Baseline arterial acid-base variables were equal with the two buffers. Arterial lactate (2.9 versus 1.5 mmol/l), glycemia (+18%) and glucose turnover (+23%) were higher in the lactate period. Bicarbonate and glucose losses in CVVHDF were substantial, but not lactate elimination. Infusing (13)C lactate increased plasma lactate levels equally with the two buffers. Lactate clearance (7.8+/-0.8 vs 7.5+/-0.8 ml/kg per min in the bicarbonate and lactate periods) and endogenous production rates (14.0+/-2.6 vs 13.6+/-2.6 mmol/kg per min) were similar. (13)C lactate was used as a metabolic substrate, as shown by (13)CO(2) excretion. Glycemia and metabolic rate increased significantly and similarly during the two periods during lactate infusion. Lactate was rapidly cleared from the blood of critically ill patients without acute liver failure requiring CVVHDF, being transformed into glucose or oxidized. Lactate did not exert undesirable effects, except moderate hyperglycemia, and achieved comparable effects on acid-base balance to bicarbonate.

  3. Analysis of the effect of vibrations on the bentonite buffer in the canister hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Martin; Hakami, Hossein; Ekneligoda, Thushan

    2009-09-01

    During the construction of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rock, blasting activities in certain deposition tunnels will occur at the same time as the deposition of canisters containing the waste is going on in another adjacent access tunnel. In fact, the deposition consists of several stages after the drilling of the deposition hole. The most vulnerable stage from a vibration point of view is when the bentonite buffer is placed in the deposition hole but the canister has not been placed yet. During this stage, a hollow column of bentonite blocks remains free to vibrate inside the deposition hole. The goal of this study was to investigate the displacement of the bentonite blocks when exposed to the highest vibration level that can be expected during the drill and blast operations. In order to investigate this, a three dimensional model in 3DEC, capable of capturing the dynamic behaviour of the bentonite buffer was set up. To define the vibration levels, which serve as input data for the 3DEC model, an extensive analysis of the recorded vibrations from the TASQ - tunnel was carried out. For this purpose, an upper expected vibration limit was defined. This was done outgoing from the fact that the planned charging for the construction of the geological repository will lie in the interval 2 to 4 kg. Furthermore, at the first stage for this study, it was decided that the vibration should be conservatively evaluated for 30 m distance. Using these data, it was concluded that the maximum vibration level that can be expected will be approximately 60 mm/s. After simplifying the vibration signal, a sinusoidal wave with the amplitude 60 mm/s was applied at the bottom of the column and it was assumed that the vibrations only affect the bentonite buffer in one direction (horizontal direction). From this simulation, it was concluded that hardly any displacements occurred. However, when applying the same sinusoidal wave both in the horizontal and the

  4. A common-garden study of resource-island effects on a native and an exotic, annual grass after fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Amber N.; Germino, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant-soil variation related to perennial-plant resource islands (coppices) interspersed with relatively bare interspaces is a major source of heterogeneity in desert rangelands. Our objective was to determine how native and exotic grasses vary on coppice mounds and interspaces (microsites) in unburned and burned sites and underlying factors that contribute to the variation in sagebrush-steppe rangelands of the Idaho National Lab, where interspaces typically have abiotic crusts. We asked how the exotic cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) and native bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata [Pursh] A. Löve) were distributed among the microsites and measured their abundances in three replicate wildfires and nearby unburned areas. We conducted a common-garden study in which soil cores from each burned microsite type were planted with seed of either species to determine microsite effects on establishment and growth of native and exotic grasses. We assessed soil physical properties in the common-garden study to determine the intrinsic properties of each microsite surface and the retention of microsite soil differences following transfer of soils to the garden, to plant growth, and to wetting/drying cycles. In the field study, only bluebunch wheatgrass density was greater on coppice mounds than interspaces, in both unburned and burned areas. In the common-garden experiment, there were microsite differences in soil physical properties, particularly in crust hardness and its relationship to moisture, but soil properties were unaffected by plant growth. Also in the experiment, both species had equal densities yet greater dry mass production on coppice-mound soils compared to interspace soils, suggesting microsite differences in growth but not establishment (likely related to crust weakening resulting from watering). Coppice-interspace patterning and specifically native-herb recovery on coppices is likely important for postfire resistance of this rangeland to cheatgrass.

  5. Buffer mass test - Buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.

    1982-08-01

    Commercial Na bentonite (MX-80) is the clay component of the buffer material in the heater holes as well of the tunnel backfill. Important characteristics are the clay content, liquid limit, X-ray diffraction pattern, water content, and degree of granulation. The ballast material consists of quartz-rich sand and feldspar-rich filler. The preparation of highly compacted bentonite for the near-field isolation of the canister was made by using isostatic compaction technique. The resulting dense bentonite core was cut into regularly shaped blocks which were arranged around each heater and lowered as one unit - heavily instrumented - in the respective deposition holes. For three of the six holes a narrow slot was left open between the bentonite stack and the rock; for the remaining ones a wider slot was chosen with a fill of soft bentonite powder. Both arrangements are expected to yield an ultimate bulk density which is sufficiently high to fulfil the requirement of a negligible permeability and a sufficient swelling pressure as well as heat conductivity, which are the essential parameters. The tunnel backfill, which consists of a mixture of suitably graded ballast material and MX-80 powder, has a considerably lower swelling pressure and heat conductivity, and a higher permeability, all these parameters still within the requirements of the KBS 2 concept. The various zones with different bentonite/sand ratios and the technique to apply them are described in the final part of the report. (Author)

  6. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Anomalous Hall effect suppression in anatase Co:TiO2 by the insertion of an interfacial TiO2 buffer layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Y.J.; de Jong, Machiel Pieter; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Kim, Y.; Brock, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    We present the effect of introducing a TiO2 buffer layer at the SrTiO3 /Co:TiO2 interface on the magnetic and structural properties of anatase Co:TiO2 1.4 at. % Co. Inserting the buffer layer leads to suppression of the room-temperature anomalous Hall effect, accompanied by a reduced density of Co

  8. Effect of lime, N, P, and K amendments to surface-mined coal spoils on yield and chemical composition of common Bermuda grass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebelhar, M W; Barnhisel, R I; Akin, G W; Powell, J L

    1982-12-01

    Common Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon, L. Pers.) was used as an alternative to cool-season grasses such as tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) on acid sandstone surface-mine spoils in western Kentucky. Lime, N, P, and K fertilizer amendments were evaluated as to their effects in promoting Bermuda grass growth and development. The applied lime was effective in raising the pH from 3.4 to 4.6, 5.7, and 6.3 for the 18, 36 and 72 metric ton/ha treatments, respectively, over a 17-month period. Nitrogen was found to affect Bermuda grass production significantly and severe deficiency symptoms were observed where N was not applied. Dry matter yields increased significantly with each additional increment of N applied. Although the application of P and K increased the concentration of these ions in the plant tissues, the main influence of P and K was to increase the plants' resistance to winter killing; little effect on total dry matter production was observed. 19 references.

  9. Cybercrime Victimization and Subjective Well-Being: An Examination of the Buffering Effect Hypothesis Among Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakinen, Markus; Keipi, Teo; Räsänen, Pekka; Oksanen, Atte

    2018-02-01

    The wealth of beneficial tools for online interaction, consumption, and access to others also bring new risks for harmful experiences online. This study examines the association between cybercrime victimization and subjective well-being (SWB) and, based on the buffering effect hypothesis, tests the assumption of the protective function of social belonging in cybercrime victimization. Cross-national data from the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Finland (N = 3,557; Internet users aged 15-30 years; 49.85 percent female) were analyzed using descriptive statistics and main and moderation effect models. Results show that cybercrime victimization has a negative association with SWB after adjusting for a number of confounding factors. This association concerns both general cybercrime victimization and subcategories such as victimization to offensive cybercrime and cyberfraud. In line with the buffering effect hypothesis, social belonging to offline groups was shown to moderate the negative association between SWB and cybercrime victimization. The same effect was not found in the social belonging to online groups. Overall, the study indicates that, analogously to crime victimization in the offline context, cybercrime is a harmful experience whose negative effects mainly concern those users who have weak social ties offline to aid in coping with such stressors.

  10. The effect of soybean curd waste supplementation on water buffalo ration offered local grass a basal diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abidin, Z.; Hendratno, C.; Suharyono; Bahaudin, R.

    1988-01-01

    A trial has been conducted to determine the optimal level of soybean curd waste supplementation on growing water buffalo offered local grass as a basal diet. Four ration given to water buffalo were assigned in 4 x 4 latin square design consisting of local grass +0.25% soybean curd waste (A), local grass +0.50% soybean curd waste (B), local grass + 0% soybean curd waste (C), and local grass +0.75% soybean curd waste (D). The result indicated that total intake (P<0.01), dry matter digestibility (P<0.01) and liveweight gain (P<0.025) were significantly increased by the supplementation. However, the grass intake were relatively constant for all rations. N-amonia concentration and volatile fatty acids production in the rumen liquor were significantly increased (P<0.01). Total protozol counts and rumen pH were not significantly different among the four rations, however there was a strong tendency (P<0.1) that protozol counts will be decreased due to soybean curd waste supplementation. Estimation of microbial protein synthesis in the rumen by radiophosphorous (32-P) assay indicated that soybean curd waste supplementation significantly influeced (P<0.05) the protein synthesis in the rumen. This experiment concluded that : a). soybean curd waste could stimulate he growing water buffaloes offered local grass and b). the optimal level of soybean curd waste supplementation were ranged between 0.50 - 0.75% of body weight. (authors). 15 refs, 3 tabs

  11. Development of new techniques of using irradiation in the genetic improvement of warm season grasses and an assessment of the genetic and cytogenetic effects. Annual report, August 1, 1976--October 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.W.; Hanna, W.W.

    1977-08-01

    New techniques of using irradiation in the genetic improvement of several warm season grasses are described. The economic value of radiation induced plant mutants and the genetic and cytogenetic effects of these treatments are discussed. Alterations in protein quality in pearl millet grain and improved varieties of Bermuda grass following radiation treatment are reported

  12. Does it take a village to raise a child?: The buffering effect of relationships with relatives for parental life satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Mikucka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strong relationships with relatives may alleviate the consequences of stressful experiences,but the evidence documenting such 'buffering effect' during parenthood is scarce. Objective: This paper investigated the buffering effect of relationships with relatives during parenthoodin Switzerland. We tested whether relationships with relatives (network size, frequencyof contact, and availability of practical and emotional support were activated inresponse to parenthood, and if people who had stronger relationships with their relativesexperienced more positive trajectories of life satisfaction during parenthood. Methods: We used Swiss Household Panel data for the years 2000-2011, and fixed effect regressionmodels. Results: The birth of a first child was associated with an increase in mothers' contact with nonresidentrelatives. Moreover, parents with at least two children who had better accessto support from relatives experienced more increase and less decline in life satisfactionduring parenthood than parents who had less access to relatives' support. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the support of relatives is a resource for parents having twoor more children and that it improves the experience of parenthood even in a relativelywealthy society. Contribution: This is the first paper which demonstrates that relationships with relatives are a source of heterogeneity of the effect of parenthood on life satisfaction. Moreover, it shows that weak relationships with relatives may lower life satisfaction of parents and limit fertility, especially at higher parities.

  13. Buffering effect of positive parent-child relationships on adolescent risk taking: A longitudinal neuroimaging investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Fuligni, Andrew J.; Galvan, Adriana; Telzer, Eva H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is marked by a steep increase in risk-taking behavior. The serious consequences of such heightened risk taking raise the importance of identifying protective factors. Despite its dynamic change during adolescence, family relationships remain a key source of influence for teenagers. Using a longitudinal fMRI approach, we scanned 23 adolescents twice across a 1.5-year period to examine how changes in parent-child relationships contribute to changes in adolescent risk taking over time via changes in adolescents’ neural reactivity to rewards. Results indicate that although parent-child relationships are not associated with adolescent risk taking concurrently, increases in positive parent-child relationships contribute to declines in adolescent risk taking. This process is mediated by longitudinal decreases in ventral striatum activation to rewards during risk taking. Findings highlight the neural pathways through which improvements in positive parent-child relationships serve to buffer longitudinal increases in adolescent risk taking. PMID:26342184

  14. The effects of ZnO buffer layers on the properties of phosphorus doped ZnO thin films grown on sapphire by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K-W; Lugo, F J; Lee, J H; Norton, D P

    2012-01-01

    The properties of phosphorus doped ZnO thin films grown on sapphire by pulsed laser deposition were examined, specifically focusing on the effects of undoped ZnO buffer layers. In particular, buffer layers were grown under different conditions; the transport properties of as-deposited and rapid thermal annealed ZnO:P films were then examined. As-deposited films showed n-type conductivity. After rapid thermal annealing, the film on buffer layer grown at a low temperature showed the conversion of carrier type to p-type for specific growth conditions while the films deposited on buffer layer grown at a high temperature remained n-type regardless of growth condition. The films deposited on buffer layer grown at a low temperature showed higher resistivity and more significant change of the transport properties upon rapid thermal annealing. These results suggest that more dopants are incorporated in films with higher defect density. This is consistent with high resolution x-ray diffraction results for phosphorus doped ZnO films on different buffer layers. In addition, the microstructure of phosphorus doped ZnO films is substantially affected by the buffer layer.

  15. Low night temperature effect on photosynthate translocation of two C4 grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, C; Strain, B R; Goeschl, J D

    1985-10-01

    Translocation of assimilates in plants of Echinochloa crus-galli, from Quebec and Mississippi, and of Eleusine indica from Mississippi was monitored, before and after night chilling, using radioactive tracing with the short-life isotope 11 C. Plants were grown at 28°/22°C (day/night temperatures) under either 350 or 675 μl·l -1 CO 2 . Low night temperature reduced translocation mainly by increasing the turn-over times of the export pool. E. crus-galli plants from Mississippi were the most susceptible to chilling; translocation being completely inhibited by exposure for one night to 7°C at 350 μl·l -1 CO 2 . Overall, plants from Quebec were the most tolerant to chilling-stress. For plants of all three populations, growth under CO 2 enrichment resulted in higher 11 C activity in the leaf phloem. High CO 2 concentrations also seemed to buffer the transport system against chilling injuries.

  16. Effect of buffer and antioxidant on stability of a mercaptopurine suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Romanick, Marcel; Desai, Sunil; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2008-03-01

    The stability of standard and modified mercaptopurine suspensions when stored at room temperature and under refrigerated conditions to test the feasibility of increasing shelf life was studied. A 50-mg/mL mercaptopurine suspension was compounded by adding simple syrup, cherry syrup, and sterile water for irrigation to triturated mercaptopurine tablets for the initial reference formulation. Three additional formulations were prepared by adding an antioxidant (ascorbic acid 10 mg), a buffer (sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate 500 mg), and a combination of antioxidant and buffer to the reference formulation. Each compounded batch was divided into two parts and stored in amber bottles at room temperature (19-23 degrees C) or under refrigerated conditions (4-8 degrees C). Analysis through high-performance liquid chromatography determined mercaptopurine levels after three and seven days and weekly thereafter for at least two weeks after shelf life was reached under specified storage conditions. Solutions with at least 93% of the original mercaptopurine concentration and with no observable sign of aggregation or cake formation were considered stable. The reference suspension of mercaptopurine showed an acceptable physical and chemical stability of up to 5 weeks when stored at room temperature. The addition of ascorbic acid extended the shelf life of the compounded suspension to 11 weeks. However, the addition of sodium phosphate monobasic did not improve the stability of mercaptopurine in the suspension. The results showed a higher stability for all formulations after storage at room temperature compared with those stored in a refrigerator. A standard oral suspension of mercaptopurine contained an acceptable drug concentration for up to 5 weeks when stored at room temperature. The addition of ascorbic acid at a concentration of 0.1% w/v to the standard formulation increased the suspension's shelf life at room temperature to 11 weeks.

  17. Effect of heating and pore water salinity on the swelling characteristics of bentonite buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawan, Sarita; Rao, M. Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    increased from monovalent to divalent cation. For samples prepared with distilled water and inundated with simulated groundwater solutions, the swell potential reduced up to 50% for sample inundated with less saline granitic groundwater and up to 62% for sample inundated with moderately saline groundwater. For the samples prepared with salt solutions and were heated, the reduction in swell potential ranged from 30-42% compared with bentonite sand sample mixed with distilled water and without any heating. Comparing swell potentials of samples heated for similar conditions, the samples prepared with 1000 ppm Na and 1000 ppm K swelled little less (3.5-3.8%) then sample prepared with distilled water. The exchange of adsorbed cation on bentonite to K and heating did not cause collapse of montmorillonite layers. The samples prepared with 1000 ppm Ca and 1000 ppm Mg swelled to 12-20% less than distilled water sample. Presence of divalent cations in pore water and exchangeable cation positions, leads to substantial reduction in swelling ability of bentonite. For the samples prepared with distilled water and heated, and then inundated with simulated ground water solutions, the reduction in swell potential ranged from 11-47% with respect to samples mixed and inundated with distilled water and heated for similar conditions. High swelling ability is the one of the most characteristic property of bentonite and must be retained over a span of several thousand years to fulfill its role as a containment barrier successfully. The results show that heating of compacted bentonite sand mix samples to temperature 50-80 deg. C which is the temperature range expected to prevail in the bentonite buffer in repository for a long time leads to significant reduction in its swelling ability. Increasing the pore water salinity of bentonite with salts of monovalent (Na, K) and divalent cations (Ca, Mg) has the effect of reducing the swelling ability but to different degrees. The inundation of bentonite

  18. Urban Runoff: Model Ordinances for Aquatic Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic Buffers serve as natural boundaries between local waterways and existing development. The model and example ordinaces below provide suggested language or technical guidance designed to create the most effective stream buffer zones possible.

  19. Dispositional Affect Moderates the Stress-Buffering Effect of Social Support on Risk for Developing the Common Cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki Deverts, Denise; Cohen, Sheldon; Doyle, William J

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to examine whether trait positive and negative affect (PA, NA) moderate the stress-buffering effect of perceived social support on risk for developing a cold subsequent to being exposed to a virus that causes mild upper respiratory illness. Analyses were based on archival data from 694 healthy adults (M age  = 31.0 years, SD = 10.7 years; 49.0% female; 64.6% Caucasian). Perceived social support and perceived stress were assessed by self-report questionnaire and trait affect by aggregating responses to daily mood items administered by telephone interview across several days. Subsequently, participants were exposed to a virus that causes the common cold and monitored for 5 days for clinical illness (infection + objective signs of illness). Two 3-way interactions emerged-Support × Stress × PA and Support × Stress × NA. The nature of these effects was such that among persons with high trait PA or low trait NA, greater social support attenuated the risk of developing a cold when under high but not low perceived stress; this stress-buffering effect did not emerge among persons with low trait PA or high trait NA. Dispositional affect might be used to identify individuals who may be most responsive to social support and support-based interventions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Urban green spaces' effectiveness as a psychological buffer for the negative health impact of noise pollution: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhambov, Angel Mario; Dimitrova, Donka Dimitrova

    2014-01-01

    Noise pollution is one of the four major pollutions in the world. Little evidence exists about the actual preventive benefits of psychological noise attenuation by urban green spaces, especially from the perspective of environmental medicine and, to the best of our knowledge, there is not a systematic analysis on this topic. The aim of this review was to systematically evaluate whether there is conclusive scientific evidence for the effectiveness of urban green spaces as a psychological buffer for the negative impact of noise pollution on human health and to promote an evidence-based approach toward this still growing environmental hazard. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for experimental and epidemiological studies published before June 04, 2013 in English and Spanish. Data was independently extracted in two step process by the authors. Due to the heterogeneity of the included studies qualitative assessment was performed. We found moderate evidence that the presence of vegetation can generally reduce the negative perception of noise (supported with an electroencephalogram test in one of the experimental studies; consistent with the data from two epidemiological studies; one experiment found no effect and one was inconclusive about the positive effect). This review fills a gap in the literature and could help researchers further clarify the proper implementation of urban green spaces as a psychological buffer in areas with population exposed to chronic noise pollution.

  1. guinea grass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-07

    May 7, 2014 ... of metals in P. maximum tissues decreased in the order root > stem > foliage. ... effect clean up by phytoremediation is a function of the plant type and ... the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity (EC) may ... metals were measured weekly according to the method of Onianwa ..... Plant Cell Physiol.

  2. Fire and nitrogen effects on Purple Threeawn (Aristida purpurea)abundance in northern mixed-grass prairie old fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purple threeawn (Aristida purpurea Nutt. varieties) is a native grass capable of increasing on rangelands, forming near monocultures, and creating a stable state. Productive rangelands throughout the Great Plains and Intermountain West have experienced increases in purple threeawn abundance, reduci...

  3. Is All Urban Green Space the Same? A Comparison of the Health Benefits of Trees and Grass in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Colleen E; Clougherty, Jane E; Shmool, Jessie L C; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2017-11-18

    Living near vegetation, often called "green space" or "greenness", has been associated with numerous health benefits. We hypothesized that the two key components of urban vegetation, trees and grass, may differentially affect health. We estimated the association between near-residence trees, grass, and total vegetation (from the 2010 High Resolution Land Cover dataset for New York City (NYC)) with self-reported health from a survey of NYC adults (n = 1281). We found higher reporting of "very good" or "excellent" health for respondents with the highest, compared to the lowest, quartiles of tree (RR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.06-1.44) but not grass density (relative risk (RR) = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.86-1.17) within 1000 m buffers, adjusting for pertinent confounders. Significant positive associations between trees and self-reported health remained after adjustment for grass, whereas associations with grass remained non-significant. Adjustment for air pollutants increased beneficial associations between trees and self-reported health; adjustment for parks only partially attenuated these effects. Results were null or negative using a 300 m buffer. Findings imply that higher exposure to vegetation, particularly trees outside of parks, may be associated with better health. If replicated, this may suggest that urban street tree planting may improve population health.

  4. Effect of Additives and Fuel Blending on Emissions and Ash-Related Problems from Small-Scale Combustion of Reed Canary Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Fournel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural producers are interested in using biomass available on farms to substitute fossil fuels for heat production. However, energy crops like reed canary grass contain high nitrogen (N, sulfur (S, potassium (K and other ash-forming elements which lead to increased emissions of gases and particulate matter (PM and ash-related operational problems (e.g., melting during combustion. To address these problematic behaviors, reed canary grass was blended with wood (50 wt% and fuel additives (3 wt% such as aluminum silicates (sewage sludge, calcium (limestone and sulfur (lignosulfonate based additives. When burned in a top-feed pellet boiler (29 kW, the four blends resulted in a 17%–29% decrease of PM concentrations compared to pure reed canary grass probably because of a reduction of K release to flue gas. Nitrogen oxides (NOx and sulfur dioxide (SO2 emissions varied according to fuel N and S contents. This explains the lower NOx and SO2 levels obtained with wood based products and the higher SO2 generation with the grass/lignosulfonate blend. The proportion of clinkers found in combustion ash was greatly lessened (27%–98% with the use of additives, except for lignosulfonate. The positive effects of some additives may allow agricultural fuels to become viable alternatives.

  5. Mechanisms of buffer therapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kate M; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Cornnell, Heather H; Ribeiro, Maria C; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Many studies have shown that the acidity of solid tumors contributes to local invasion and metastasis. Oral pH buffers can specifically neutralize the acidic pH of tumors and reduce the incidence of local invasion and metastatic formation in multiple murine models. However, this effect is not universal as we have previously observed that metastasis is not inhibited by buffers in some tumor models, regardless of buffer used. B16-F10 (murine melanoma), LL/2 (murine lung) and HCT116 (human colon) tumors are resistant to treatment with lysine buffer therapy, whereas metastasis is potently inhibited by lysine buffers in MDA-MB-231 (human breast) and PC3M (human prostate) tumors. In the current work, we confirmed that sensitive cells utilized a pH-dependent mechanism for successful metastasis supported by a highly glycolytic phenotype that acidifies the local tumor microenvironment resulting in morphological changes. In contrast, buffer-resistant cell lines exhibited a pH-independent metastatic mechanism involving constitutive secretion of matrix degrading proteases without elevated glycolysis. These results have identified two distinct mechanisms of experimental metastasis, one of which is pH-dependent (buffer therapy sensitive cells) and one which is pH-independent (buffer therapy resistant cells). Further characterization of these models has potential for therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of bovine serum albumin on the functionality and structure of catanionic surfactant at air–buffer interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, Kajari; Bhattacharya, Subhash C.; Moulik, Satya P.; Panda, Amiya K.

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the solvent spread monolayer of a catanionic surfactant, octadecyltrimethylammonium dodecylsulfate, (C 18 TA + DS − ) at the air–buffer interface was investigated by measuring the surface pressure with time and change in surface area. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was used as reference. Kinetics of BSA desorption from the interface to the buffer subphase, that of C 18 TA + DS − and DPPC through their interaction with BSA, were also studied at different BSA concentrations (in the subphase) and surface pressures. Surface pressure (π)–area (A) isotherms (at pH = 5.4, μ = 0.01, T = 298 K) revealed that the coacervate/DPPC monolayer becomes expanded in the presence of BSA at low π while their protein bound species are released into the subphase at high π. Film morphology, studied by epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), reveals that the sizes of the domains of both DPPC and coacervate decrease in the presence of BSA. Presence of BSA in the coacervate and DPPC monolayer was supported from AFM data analysis. Highlights: ► Effect of BSA on the functionality and structure of C 18 TA + DS − /DPPC at the air–buffer interface was studied. ► BSA molecules coadsorb at lower surface pressure, while they abstract amphiphiles at higher surface pressure into the bulk. ► Kinetic studies of adsorption/desorption of BSA at/from the interface were performed. ► Organized amphiphiles are perturbed in the presence of BSA.

  7. Effect of short-term alkaline intervention on the performance of buffer-free single-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Ren, Yueping; Li, Xiufen; Wang, Xinhua

    2017-06-01

    Anolyte acidification is a drawback restricting the electricity generation performance of the buffer-free microbial fuel cells (MFC). In this paper, a small amount of alkali-treated anion exchange resin (AER) was placed in front of the anode in the KCl mediated single-chamber MFC to slowly release hydroxyl ions (OH - ) and neutralize the H + ions that are generated by the anodic reaction in two running cycles. This short-term alkaline intervention to the KCl anolyte has promoted the proliferation of electroactive Geobacter sp. and enhanced the self-buffering capacity of the KCl-AER-MFC. The pH of the KCl anolyte in the KCl-AER-MFC increased and became more stable in each running cycle compared with that of the KCl-MFC after the short-term alkaline intervention. The maximum power density (P max ) of the KCl-AER-MFC increased from 307.5mW·m -2 to 542.8mW·m -2 , slightly lower than that of the PBS-MFC (640.7mW·m -2 ). The coulombic efficiency (CE) of the KCl-AER-MFC increased from 54.1% to 61.2% which is already very close to that of the PBS-MFC (61.9%). The results in this paper indicate that short-term alkaline intervention to the anolyte is an effective strategy to further promote the performance of buffer-free MFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detrimental and Neutral Effects of a Wild Grass-Fungal Endophyte Symbiotum on Insect Preference and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Stephen L.; Hu, Jinguo; Stewart, Alan V.; Wang, Bingrui; Elberson, Leslie R.

    2011-01-01

    Seed-borne Epichloë/Neotyphodium Glenn, Bacon, Hanlin (Ascomycota: Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) fungal endophytes in temperate grasses can provide protection against insect attack with the degree of host resistance related to the grass—endophyte symbiotum and the insect species involved in an interaction. Few experimental studies with wild grass—endophyte symbiota, compared to endophyte-infected agricultural grasses, have tested for anti-insect benefits, let alone for resistance against more...

  9. Kinetics of bacterial potentiometric titrations: the effect of equilibration time on buffering capacity of Pantoea agglomerans suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2011-07-15

    Several recent studies have made use of continuous acid-base titration data to describe the surface chemistry of bacterial cells as a basis for accurately modelling metal adsorption to bacteria and other biomaterials of potential industrial importance. These studies do not share a common protocol; rather they titrate in different pH ranges and they use different stability criteria to define equilibration time during titration. In the present study we investigate the kinetics of bacterial titrations and test the effect they have on the derivation of functional group concentrations and acidity constants. We titrated suspensions of Pantoea agglomerans by varying the equilibration time between successive titrant additions until stability of 0.1 or 0.001 mV s(-1) was attained. We show that under longer equilibration times, titration results are less reproducible and suspensions exhibit marginally higher buffering. Fluorescence images suggest that cell lysis is not responsible for these effects. Rather, high DOC values and titration reversibility hysterisis after long equilibration times suggest that variability in buffering is due to the presence of bacterial exudates, as demonstrated by titrating supernatants separated from suspensions of different equilibration times. It is recommended that an optimal equilibration time is always determined with variable stability control and preliminary reversibility titration experiments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Toxicity and physiological effects of brominated flame retardant PBDE-47 on two life stages of grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Peter B; Chung, Katy W; Hoguet, Jennifer; Shaddrix, Brian; Fulton, Michael H

    2008-07-25

    This study examined the effects of a polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) compound, PBDE-47, on adult and larval stages of the estuarine grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio). The 96-h LC50 test resulted in an estimate of 23.60 microg/L (95% confidence interval=14.51-38.37 microg/L) for larval shrimp. Adult shrimp had a higher 96-h LC50 of 78.07 microg/L (95% CI=65.1-93.63 microg/L). Four physiological biomarkers glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPx), cholesterol (CHL) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were then assessed to study the sublethal effects of PBDE-47 exposure. GSH, LPx and AChE levels in both adults and larvae were not affected by PBDE-47 at concentrations up to 50 microg/L for 96 h. CHL levels were elevated in adults and larvae at the lowest exposure concentrations tested, but significant differences were found only in adult exposures. Effects associated with PBDE-47 aqueous exposures were observed at levels well above those reported in the environment.

  11. Effects of TiO{sub 2} buffer layer on the photoelectrochemical properties of TiO{sub 2} Nano rods grown by modified chemical bath deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae-hyun; Ha, Jin-wook; Ryu, Hyukhyun [Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Jae [Dong-Eui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we grew TiO{sub 2} nano rods on TiO{sub 2}-film buffered FTO substrate using modified chemical bath deposition (M-CBD). The TiO{sub 2} buffer layer was grown by spin coating method with different RPM (revolutions per minute) values and deposition cycles. We investigated the effects of the RPM values and the deposition cycles on the morphological, structural and photoelectrochemical properties of TiO{sub 2} nano rods. In this work, we have also found that the morphological and structural properties of TiO{sub 2} nano rods affected the photoelectrochemical properties of TiO{sub 2} nano rods. And the maximum photocurrent density of 0.34 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.6V (vs.SCE) was obtained from the buffer layer deposition process condition of 4,000 RPM and two-times buffer layer depositions.

  12. Effect of a gate buffer layer on the performance of a 4H-SiC Schottky barrier field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xianjun; Yang Yintang; Chai Changchun; Duan Baoxing; Song Kun; Chen Bin

    2012-01-01

    A lower doped layer is inserted between the gate and channel layer and its effect on the performance of a 4H-SiC Schottky barrier field-effect transistor (MESFET) is investigated. The dependences of the drain current and small signal parameters on this inserted gate-buffer layer are obtained by solving one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) Poisson's equations. The drain current and small signal parameters of the 4H-SiC MESFET with a gate-buffer layer thickness of 0.15 μm are calculated and the breakdown characteristics are simulated. The results show that the current is increased by increasing the thickness of the gate-buffer layer; the breakdown voltage is 160 V, compared with 125 V for the conventional 4H-SiC MESFET; the cutoff frequency is 27 GHz, which is higher than 20 GHz of the conventional structure due to the lower doped gate-buffer layer. (semiconductor devices)

  13. Stress spillover, African Americans' couple and health outcomes, and the stress-buffering effect of family-centered prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Allen W; Beach, Steven R H; Bryant, Chalandra M; Lavner, Justin A; Brody, Gene H

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated (a) the stress spillover pathways linking contextual stressors, changes in couple relationship functioning and depressive symptoms, and changes in individuals' physical health, and (b) the stress-buffering effect of participation in an efficacious, family centered prevention program designed to protect couples from the deleterious effects of stressors. The sample consisted of 346 rural African American couples (63% married) who participated in a randomized controlled trial of the Protecting Strong African American Families (ProSAAF) program. Participants were assessed at three time points across 17 months. Results examining stress spillover within the control group indicated that elevated current, but not prior, financial hardship was associated with decreased effective communication, relationship satisfaction, and relationship confidence as well as increased depressive symptoms; current levels of racial discrimination also predicted greater depressive symptoms. Relationship confidence and relationship satisfaction, but not communication or depressive symptoms, in turn predicted declines in self-reported physical health. Results examining stress-buffering effects suggested that participation in ProSAAF protected individuals' relationship confidence from declines associated with elevated financial hardship. In addition, the indirect effect linking financial hardship to declines in physical health through relationship confidence that emerged among participants in the control group was no longer evident for ProSAAF couples. Results highlight the effect of contextual stressors on African Americans' couple and individual well-being and the potential for the ProSAAF program to provide a constructed resilience resource, protecting couple's confidence in their relationship from the negative effects of financial hardship and, consequently, promoting physical health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Establishment, Growth and Biomass yield of three Grass species on a degraded Ultisol and their effect on soil loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Erosion is a cause for concern; this is because of its effects on the soil used for both agricultural and non-agricultural purposes. Experiments were carried out to check the establishment, growth and biomass field of 3 tropical plants and their effects on soil loss during 2007 planting season. The treatments comprised 3 grasses viz. Azonopus compressus. Panicum maximum and Andropogon gayanus. The grasses were laid our in the field using a randomized complete block design replicated 4 times. Bare soil was used as the control. The parameters tested were plant height, leaf area index, root density, root establishment and the amount of soil loss using erosion pins. The result showed that Andropogon gayanus has an edge over Panicum maximum and Axonopus compressus with reference to plant height, root establishment, root density and leaf area index. Andropogon gayanus had a higher plant height from 3,6,9 and 12WAP with plant heights of 3.30cm, 3.63cm,3.93cm and 4.30cm representing 15.7%, 19.3% and 28.8% respectively. It was followed by P. maximum while A. compressus maintained the lowest plant height from 3,6,9 and 12 WAP with plant height of 2.83cm, 3.05cm, 3.20cm and 3.45cm respectively. In terms of root density, A. compressus did not have much root density which was 0.02t/ha, also at 12WAP, P. maximum did not have much root density which was 0.06t/ha though it was higher than A. compressus. The trend was the same for A. gayanus whose root density was 0.75t/ha. In terms of leaf area index (LAI, it was shown that at 3WAP and 6WAP, A. compressus had the lowest leaf area index of 58.25 and 65.75 respectively. Also at 9WAP and 12WAP A. compressus had 72.28 and 75.08t/ha respectively. At 3WAP and 6WAP P.maximum had a high leaf area index of 66.60 and 77.25 respectively. A. gayanus at 3WAP and 6WAP had 87.73 gayanus at 3WAP and 6WAP had 87.73 and 90.80 for 9WAP and 12WAP respectively. A. compressus protected the soil, reducing soil loss as a total of 9

  15. The buffering effect of family functioning on the psychological consequences of headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Somayyeh; Zandieh, Sara; Dehghani, Mohsen; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariët

    2017-02-01

    The current study aimed to examine whether high family functioning mitigates the association between headache intensity and distress. The sample consisted of 124 patients with chronic or recurrent headache. Patients completed validated questionnaires about headache intensity, family functioning, and distress. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to examine the interaction between headache intensity and family functioning on distress. Headache intensity was positively associated with distress (r = .28, p = .002). As hypothesized, family functioning moderated this association (B = -.01, p = .023). More specifically, the positive association between headache intensity and distress was significant only among patients with lower family functioning (B = .01, p families appear to buffer the distress level in patients; they showed relatively low levels of distress regardless of the severity of their headache. In contrast, patients with dysfunctional families who experienced more pain reported more distress, presumably because they did not receive adequate help and support from these families. This study underlines the importance of a broader perspective on family dynamics in coping with pain.

  16. Polarography of cytochrome c in ammoniacal buffers containing cobalt ions. The effect of the protein conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, V

    1985-12-01

    Catalytic currents yielded by cytochrome c in ammoniacal buffers containing cobalt ions at a dropping mercury electrode (Brdicka's catalytic currents) were investigated by means of direct current, differential pulse, normal pulse (NP) and phase-selective alternating current polarography. It was found that Brdicka's catalytic current of cytochrome c, (the more negative part of Brdicka's double wave, wave B) is influenced by the presence of cytochrome c denaturants in the background solution. The wave B rose with the increasing concentrations of urea and sodium perchlorate, and increased in parallel with absorbance changes at 409 and 695 nm measured for identical cytochrome c solutions. The latter absorbance changes reflect unfolding of cytochrome c molecules in the bulk of solution by these denaturants. The results of NP polarography (a technique working with large potential excursion during the drop lifetime) indicate that in Brdicka's solution cytochrome c could extensively be unfolded due to its adsorption at the mercury electrode, polarized to potentials around that of zero charge.

  17. Perceived parenting stress in the course of postpartum depression: the buffering effect of maternal bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, C; Zietlow, A-L; Müller, M; Dubber, S

    2016-06-01

    Research investigating maternal bonding and parenting stress in the course of postpartum depression is lacking. Aim of the study was to investigate the development and potential mediation of both constructs in the course of postpartum depression. n = 31 mothers with postpartum depression according to DSM-IV and n = 32 healthy controls completed the German version of the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire and the Parenting Stress Index at two measuring times: acute depression (T1) and remission (T2). At T1, the clinical group reported lower bonding and higher parenting stress. Bonding was found to partially mediate the link between maternal diagnosis and parenting stress. Furthermore, the clinical group reported lower bonding and higher parenting stress averaged over both measurement times. However, at T2, the clinical group still differed from the controls even though they improved in bonding and reported less parenting stress. A significant increase of bonding was also observed in the control group. Maternal bonding seems to buffer the negative impact of postpartum depression on parenting stress. The results emphasize the need for interventions focusing on maternal bonding and mother-infant interaction in order to prevent impairment of the mother-child relationship.

  18. Perceived family social support buffers against the effects of exposure to rocket attacks on adolescent depression, aggression, and severe violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Golan; Henrich, Christopher C

    2016-02-01

    The authors compared the protective effects of 3 sources of perceived social support-from family members, friends, and school personnel-on internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adolescents exposed to rocket attacks. Data were based on 362 Israeli adolescents (median age = 14), chronically exposed to rockets from the Gaza Strip, for whom robust effects of exposure on internalizing and externalizing symptoms were reported during the 2009-2010 period (Henrich & Shahar, 2013). New analyses revealed that perceived family social support assessed in 2009 buffered against the effect of exposure to rocket attacks on depression, aggression, and severe violence during 2009-2010. Findings are consistent with a human-ecological perspective exposure to political violence and encourage the employment of family-based preventive interventions in afflicted areas. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Disability and Activity-related Emotion in Later Life: Are Effects Buffered by Intimate Relationship Support and Strain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah; Cornman, Jennifer C; Freedman, Vicki A

    2017-09-01

    We use daily diary data from the Disability and Use of Time supplement to the 2013 Panel Study of Income Dynamics ( n = 1,162) to evaluate (1) the extent to which marital/partner support and strain moderate the effects of disability on five activity-related emotions (happiness, calm, sadness, frustration, worry) and overall negative and positive emotion among older married, cohabiting, and dating persons and (2) whether such patterns differ significantly by gender. Marital support buffers against negative emotions and increases feelings of calm among severely impaired women. By contrast, support intensifies negative emotions and decreases feelings of calm among severely impaired men. Relationship strain also intensifies the effect of severe impairment on men's frustration, sadness, worry, and negative mood but has negligible effects on the negative emotions of men with low impairment and women. Frequent support and criticism may threaten highly impaired older men's sense of autonomy and emotional well-being.

  20. Control of short-channel effects in InAlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors using graded AlGaN buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tiecheng; Zhao, Hongdong; Peng, Xiaocan; Li, Yuhai

    2018-04-01

    A graded AlGaN buffer is designed to realize the p-type buffer by inducing polarization-doping holes. Based on the two-dimensional device simulator, the effect of the graded AlGaN buffer on the direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) performance of short-gate InAlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are investigated, theoretically. Compared to standard HEMT, an enhancement of electron confinement and a good control of short-channel effect (SCEs) are demonstrated in the graded AlGaN buffer HEMT. Accordingly, the pinched-off behavior and the ability of gate modulation are significantly improved. And, no serious SCEs are observed in the graded AlGaN buffer HEMT with an aspect ratio (LG/tch) of about 6.7, much lower than that of the standard HEMT (LG/tch = 13). In addition, for a 70-nm gate length, a peak current gain cutoff frequency (fT) of 171 GHz and power gain cutoff frequency (fmax) of 191 GHz are obtained in the grade buffer HEMT, which are higher than those of the standard one with the same gate length.

  1. The effect of microwave on the interaction of flavour compounds with G-actin from grass carp (Catenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaowei; Yang, Qiuli; Sun, Yangying; Pan, Daodong; Cao, Jinxuan

    2017-09-01

    In order to investigate the influence of non-thermal effects of microwaves on the flavour of fish and meat products, the G-actin of grass carp in ice baths was exposed to different microwave powers (0, 100, 300 or 500 W); the surface hydrophobicity, sulfhydryl contents, secondary structures and adsorption capacity of G-actin to ketones were determined. As microwave power increased from 0 to 300 W, the surface hydrophobicity, total and reactive sulfhydryls increased; α-helix, β-sheet and random coil fractions turned into β-turn fractions. As microwave power increased from 300 to 500 W, however, hydrophobicity and sulfhydryl contents decreased; β-turn and random coil fractions turned into α-helix and β-sheet fractions. The tendencies of adsorbed capacity of ketones were similar to hydrophobicity and sulfhydryl contents. The increased adsorbing of ketones could be attributed to the unfolding of secondary structures by revealing new binding sites, including thiol groups and hydrophobic binding sites. The decreased binding capacity was related to the refolding and aggregation of protein. The results suggested that microwave powers had obvious effects on the flavour retention and proteins structures in muscle foods. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Identification and effect of two flavonoids from root bark of Morus alba against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis in grass carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing-Han; Fu, Yao-Wu; Zhang, Qi-Zhong; Xu, De-Hai; Wang, Bin; Lin, De-Jie

    2015-02-11

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is an important ciliate that parasitizes gills and skin of freshwater fish and causes massive fish mortality. In this study, two flavonoids (kuwanons G and O) with anti-Ich activity were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation from the root bark of Morus alba, an important plant for sericulture. The chemical structures of kuwanons G and O were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. Kuwanons G and O caused 100% mortality of I. multifiliis theronts at the concentration of 2 mg/L and possessed a median effective concentration (EC50) of 0.8 ± 0.04 mg/L against the theronts. In addition, kuwanons G and O significantly reduced the infectivity of I. multifiliis theronts at concentrations of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/L. The median lethal concentrations (LC50) of kuwanons G and O to grass carp were 38.0 ± 0.82 and 26.9 ± 0.51 mg/L, which were approximately 50 and 35 times the EC50 for killing theronts. The results indicate that kuwanons G and O have the potential to become safe and effective drugs to control ichthyophthiriasis.

  3. Effects of the buffering capacity of the soil on the mobilization of heavy metals. Equilibrium and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villen-Guzman, Maria; Paz-Garcia, Juan M; Amaya-Santos, Gema; Rodriguez-Maroto, Jose M; Vereda-Alonso, Carlos; Gomez-Lahoz, Cesar

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the possible pH-buffering processes is of maximum importance for risk assessment and remediation feasibility studies of heavy-metal contaminated soils. This paper presents the results about the effect of the buffering capacity of a polluted soil, rich in carbonates, on the pH and on the leaching evolution of its main contaminant (lead) when a weak acid (acetic acid) or a strong one (nitric acid) are slowly added. In both cases, the behavior of lead dissolution could be predicted using available (scientifically verified freeware) models assuming equilibrium between the solid and the aqueous phase. However, the experimental results indicate that the dissolution of calcium and magnesium carbonates is kinetically controlled. These kinetic limitations affect the overall behavior, and should be considered to understand also the response of the metals under local equilibrium. The well-known BCR sequential extraction procedure was used before- and after-treatment, to fractionate the lead concentration in the soil according to its mobility. The BCR results were also in agreement with the predictions of the equilibrium model. This agreement allows new insights about the information that could be derived from the BCR fractionation analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing Anthropogenic Influence and Edge Effect Influence on Forested Riparian Buffer Spatial Configuration and Structure: An Example Using Lidar Remote Sensing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, L. A.; Chasmer, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Forested riparian buffers (FRB) perform numerous critical ecosystem services. However, globally, FRB spatial configuration and structure have been modified by anthropogenic development resulting in widespread ecological degradation as seen in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. Riparian corridors within developed areas are particularly vulnerable to disturbance given two edges - the naturally occurring stream edge and the matrix edge. Increased edge length predisposes riparian vegetation to "edge effects", characterized by modified physical and environmental conditions at the interface between the forested buffer and the adjacent landuse, or matrix and forest fragment degradation. The magnitude and distance of edge influence may be further influenced by adjacent landuse type and the width of the buffer corridor at any given location. There is a need to quantify riparian buffer spatial configuration and structure over broad geographic extents and within multiple riparian systems in support of ecologically sound management and landuse decisions. This study thus assesses the influence of varying landuse types (agriculture, suburban development and undeveloped) on forested riparian buffer 3-dimensional structure and spatial configuration using high resolution Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data collected within a headwater watershed. Few studies have assessed riparian buffer structure and width contiguously for an entire watershed, an integral component of watershed planning and restoration efforts such as those conducted throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The objectives of the study are to 1) quantify differences in vegetation structure at the stream and matrix influenced riparian buffer edges, compared to the forested interior and 2) assess continuous patterns of changes in vegetation structure throughout the buffer corridor beginning at the matrix edge and ending at the stream within buffers a) of varying width and b) that are adjacent to varying landuse

  5. Development of new techniques of using irradiation in the genetic improvement of warm season grasses, the assessment of their genetic and cytogenetic effects and biomass production from grass. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.W.; Hanna, W.W.

    1979-06-01

    The following topics are discussed: altering protein quantity and quality in pearl millet grain by irradiation and mutation breeding; effect of nitrogen and genotype (male and female) on pearl millet grain; irradiation breeding of sterile triploid turf bermudagrasses; irradiation breeding of sterile Coastcross-1, a forage grass hybrid to increase winterhardiness; heterosis resulting from crossing specific irradiation induced mutants with their normal inbred parent; economic assessment of irradiation induced mutants; use of ethidium bromide to create cytoplasmic male sterile mutants in pearl millet; use of mitomycin and streptomycin to create cytoplasmic male sterile mutants in pearl millet; biomass of napiergrass; evaluation of mutagen induced lignin mutants in sorghum; interspecific transfer of germplasm using gamma radiation; production of homozygous translocation tester stocks; use of radiation to control the reproductive behavior in plants; genetics of radiation induced mutations; response of pearl millet pollen to gamma radiation; and nature of morphological changes in sterile triploid bermudagrass on golf courses

  6. A Markov chain analysis of the effectiveness of drum-buffer-rope material flow management in job shop environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rabbani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The theory of constraints is an approach for production planning and control, which emphasizes on the constraints in the system to increase throughput. The theory of constraints is often referred to as Drum-Buffer-Rope developed originally by Goldratt. Drum-Buffer-Rope uses the drum or constraint to create a schedule based on the finite capacity of the first bottleneck. Because of complexity of the job shop environment, Drum-Buffer-Rope material flow management has very little attention to job shop environment. The objective of this paper is to apply the Drum-Buffer-Rope technique in the job shop environment using a Markov chain analysis to compare traditional method with Drum-Buffer-Rope. Four measurement parameters were considered and the result showed the advantage of Drum-Buffer-Rope approach compared with traditional one.

  7. Experimental studies of the effects of buffered particle dampers attached to a multi-degree-of-freedom system under dynamic loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Lu, Xilin; Lu, Wensheng; Masri, Sami F.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a systematic experimental investigation of the effects of buffered particle dampers attached to a multi-degree-of-freedom (mdof) system under different dynamic loads (free vibration, random excitation as well as real onsite earthquake excitations), and analytical/computational study of such a system. A series of shaking table tests of a three-storey steel frame with the buffered particle damper system are carried out to evaluate the performance and to verify the analysis method. It is shown that buffered particle dampers have good performance in reducing the response of structures under dynamic loads, especially under random excitation case. It can effectively control the fundamental mode of the mdof primary system; however, the control effect for higher modes is variable. It is also shown that, for a specific container geometry, a certain mass ratio leads to more efficient momentum transfer from the primary system to the particles with a better vibration attenuation effect, and that buffered particle dampers have better control effect than the conventional rigid ones. An analytical solution based on the discrete element method is also presented. Comparison between the experimental and computational results shows that reasonably accurate estimates of the response of a primary system can be obtained. Properly designed buffered particle dampers can effectively reduce the response of lightly damped mdof primary system with a small weight penalty, under different dynamic loads.

  8. Buffering effect of parental engagement on the relationship between corporal punishment and children's emotional/behavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lian; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tanaka, Emiko; Watanabe, Taeko; Koeda, Tatsuya; Anme, Tokie

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has established links between corporal punishment and children's developmental problems, but few studies have investigated the moderating effect of positive parenting between corporal punishment and children's developmental difficulties in detail. This study investigated the buffering effect of parental engagement on the association between corporal punishment and children's emotional/behavioral problems. The main caregivers completed the Evaluation of Environmental Stimulation Scale (EES), which is an evaluation of daily parenting behaviors, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), which evaluates children's developmental problems. Corporal punishment was associated with worse emotional and behavioral problems in children, whereas parental engagement in games or sports was associated with fewer emotional symptoms. Similarly, parental engagement in homework or housework significantly moderated the association between corporal punishment and children's behavioral problems. Parental engagement positively moderated the association between parental corporal punishment and children's developmental difficulties. This association varied with child gender. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Enhanced performance of C60 organic field effect transistors using a tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Hong; Cheng Xiaoman; Tian Haijun [Institute of Material Physics, Key Laboratory of Display Material and Photoelectric Devices, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Zhao Geng, E-mail: zheng_033@163.com [School of Science, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2011-09-15

    We have investigated the properties of C60-based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) with a tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) buffer layer inserted between the source/drain electrodes and the active material. The electrical characteristics of OFETs are improved with the insertion of Alq3 film. The peak field effect mobility is increased to 1.28 x 10{sup -2} cm{sup 2}/(V{center_dot}s) and the threshold voltage is decreased to 10 V when the thickness of the Alq3 is 10 nm. The reason for the improved performance of the devices is probably due to the prevention of metal atoms diffusing into the C60 active layer and the reduction of the channel resistance in Alq3 films. (semiconductor devices)

  10. Maintaining hope at the 11th hour: authenticity buffers the effect of limited time perspective on hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William E; Hicks, Joshua A

    2013-12-01

    Four studies tested the hypothesis that limited time perceptions are associated with lower levels of hope, and that this effect is buffered by high levels of authenticity. Study 1 (n = 256) utilized a cross-sectional design in which participants completed dispositional measures of time perspective, hope, and authenticity. Three subsequent studies tested our hypothesis experimentally. In a pilot study (n = 124), participants reported their perceived authenticity, future time perspective (FTP) was manipulated (limited vs. open-ended), and state hope was assessed. Study 2 (n = 156) introduced a new manipulation of FTP, and Study 3 (n = 242) replicated Study 2 with the addition of a neutral control condition. Across all studies, individuals who perceived time as limited reported lower levels of hope relative to those who perceived time as open-ended (or those in a neutral control condition), but, importantly, this effect was attenuated for highly authentic individuals.

  11. Analysis of field-plate effects on buffer-related lag phenomena and current collapse in GaN MESFETs and AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horio, Kazushige; Nakajima, Atsushi; Itagaki, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    A two-dimensional transient analysis of field-plate GaN MESFETs and AlGaN/GaN HEMTs is performed in which a deep donor and a deep acceptor are considered in a semi-insulating buffer layer, and quasi-pulsed current–voltage curves are derived from them. How the existence of a field plate affects buffer-related drain lag, gate lag and current collapse is studied. It is shown that in both MESFET and HEMT, the drain lag is reduced by introducing a field plate because electron injection into the buffer layer is weakened by it, and the buffer-trapping effects are reduced. It is also shown that the field plate could reduce buffer-related current collapse and gate lag in the FETs. The dependence of lag phenomena and current collapse on the field-plate length and on the SiN passivation layer thickness is also studied. The work suggests that in the field-plate structures, there is an optimum thickness of the SiN layer to minimize the buffer-related current collapse and drain lag in GaN MESFETs and AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

  12. Effects of buffer layer on the structural and electrical properties of InAsSb epilayers grown on GaAs(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayavel, P.; Nakamura, S.; Koyama, T.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2006-01-01

    InAsSb ternary epilayers with arsenic composition of 0.5 have been grown on GaAs(001) substrates. Linear-graded and step-graded InAsSb buffer layers with an InSb layer have been used to relax lattice mismatch between the epilayer and substrate. X-ray diffraction results of the epilayers indicate that an enhancement in the peak intensity of the buffer layer samples is due to improved crystalline quality of the epilayers. We find that the growth technique of the buffer layer strongly influences the surface morphology and roughness of the epilayer. Hall effect measurements of the step-graded buffer layer samples show an order of magnitude higher electron mobility than the direct and linear-graded buffer layer samples. These results demonstrate that high crystalline quality and electron mobility of the InAs 0.5 Sb 0.5 ternary epilayers can be achieved by using the step-graded InAsSb buffer layers. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Effect of maturity and conservation of grass/clover on digestibility and rumen pH in heifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, A.S.; Nørgaard, P.; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate effects of maturity and conservation of primary growth grass/clover on apparent digestibility and rumen pH. Two batches of mixed ryegrass, red and white clover harvested in 2009 on May 9 and 25 were conserved as either silage or hay. The forages early silage (ES) and hay...... (EH), and late silage (LS) and hay (LH) had DM contents of 45, 84, 25 and 83%, and NDF contents of 32, 44, 42 and 50% of DM, respectively. Forages were fed as sole feed to four Jersey heifers of 435±30 kg BW in a 4×4 Latin square experiment. Feeding level was 90% of individual ad libitum intake......, divided in two daily meals at 0800 and 1530 h. Potentially digestible NDF (DNDF) was determined after 288 h in situ. Apparent digestibility of OM and NDF was estimated using Cr3O2 as marker. Rumen fluid pH in the medial and ventral rumen was measured with 1 h intervals from 0730 to 1530 h. Data...

  14. Reed canary grass observations of effects on crop stand and fibre quality caused by infestation of Epicalamus phalaridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. HELLQVIST

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A severe infestation of the gall midge Epicalamus phalaridis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidaeoccurred in a field of reed canary grass, Phalaris arundinacea in northern Sweden. The midge species has potential to become a serious pest on Phalaris grown for bioenergy or fibre production. Larvae of the midge feed beneath leaf sheaths and the crop lodges in late summer. Details are given on the biology of the midge. In the infested field, population densities of the midge were very high during three consecutive years. The crop was weakened and the occurrence of weeds increased. The dry matter yields declined markedly and were after three years of midge-attack about 50% of the average yield in the preceding years. The yield dropped comparatively more when the crop was harvested in the spring as opposed to harvest in late autumn and more at a nitrogen fertilisation at 100 kg compared to 200 kg N ha–1 per year. The effect of midge attack on fibre quality was studied. The fibre properties of midge-infested parts of internodes were poor, but as midge-damaged parts are brittle, they could probably be sorted out in a fractionation process. Undamaged parts of infested internodes had the same fibre properties as those from an uninfested crop.;

  15. Grazing management effects on sediment, phosphorus, and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarte, Kirk A; Russell, James R; Kovar, John L; Morrical, Daniel G; Ensley, Steven M; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Cornick, Nancy A; Cho, Yong Il

    2011-01-01

    Erosion and runoff from pastures may lead to degradation of surface water. A 2-yr grazing study was conducted to quantify the effects of grazing management on sediment, phosphorus (P), and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures. Six adjoining 12.1-ha pastures bisected by a stream in central Iowa were divided into three treatments: continuous stocking with unrestricted stream access (CSU), continuous stocking with restricted stream access (CSR), and rotational stocking (RS). Rainfall simulations on stream banks resulted in greater ( CSR pastures. Bovine enterovirus was shed by an average of 24.3% of cows during the study period and was collected in the runoff of 8.3 and 16.7% of runoff simulations on bare sites in CSU pastures in June and October of 2008, respectively, and from 8.3% of runoff simulations on vegetated sites in CSU pastures in April 2009. Fecal pathogens (bovine coronavirus [BCV], bovine rotavirus group A, and O157:H7) shed or detected in runoff were almost nonexistent; only BCV was detected in feces of one cow in August of 2008. Erosion of cut-banks was the greatest contributor of sediment and P loading to the stream; contributions from surface runoff and grazing animals were considerably less and were minimized by grazing management practices that reduced congregation of cattle by pasture streams. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Water type and irrigation time effects on microbial metabolism of a soil cultivated with Bermuda-grass Tifton 85

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Furlan Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the microbial metabolism in Bermuda-grass Tifton 85 areas after potable-water and effluent irrigation treatments. The experiment was carried out in Lins/SP with samples taken in the rainy and dry seasons (2006 after one year and three years of irrigation management, and set up on an entirely randomized block design with four treatments: C (control, without irrigation or fertilization, PW (potable water + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1; TE3 and TE0 (treated effluent + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1 for three years and one year, respectively. The parameters determined were: microbial biomass carbon, microbial activity, and metabolic quotient. Irrigation with wastewater after three years indicated no alteration in soil quality for C and ET3; for PW, a negative impact on soil quality (microbial biomass decrease suggested that water-potable irrigation in Lins is not an adequate option. Microbial activity alterations observed in TE0 characterize a priming effect.

  17. Perennial Grass and Native Wildflowers: A Synergistic Approach to Habitat Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen S. Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Marginal agricultural land provides opportunities to diversify landscapes by producing biomass for biofuel, and through floral provisioning that enhances arthropod-mediated ecosystem service delivery. We examined the effects of local spatial context (adjacent to woodland or agriculture and irrigation (irrigation or no irrigation on wildflower bloom and visitation by arthropods in a biofeedstocks-wildflower habitat buffer design. Twenty habitat buffer plots were established containing a subplot of Napier grass (Pennisetum perpureum Schumach for biofeedstock, three commercial wildflower mix subplots, and a control subplot containing spontaneous weeds. Arthropods and flowers were visually observed in quadrats throughout the season. At the end of the season we measured soil nutrients and harvested Napier biomass. We found irrespective of buffer location or irrigation, pollinators were observed more frequently early in the season and on experimental plots with wildflowers than on weeds in the control plots. Natural enemies showed a tendency for being more common on plots adjacent to a wooded border, and were also more commonly observed early in the season. Herbivore visits were infrequent and not significantly influenced by experimental treatments. Napier grass yields were high and typical of first-year yields reported regionally, and were not affected by location context or irrigation. Our results suggest habitat management designs integrating bioenergy crop and floral resources provide marketable biomass and habitat for beneficial arthropods.

  18. Flood risk reduction and flow buffering as ecosystem services - Part 2: Land use and rainfall intensity effects in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noordwijk, Meine; Tanika, Lisa; Lusiana, Betha

    2017-05-01

    Watersheds buffer the temporal pattern of river flow relative to the temporal pattern of rainfall. This ecosystem service is inherent to geology and climate, but buffering also responds to human use and misuse of the landscape. Buffering can be part of management feedback loops if salient, credible and legitimate indicators are used. The flow persistence parameter Fp in a parsimonious recursive model of river flow (Part 1, van Noordwijk et al., 2017) couples the transmission of extreme rainfall events (1 - Fp), to the annual base-flow fraction of a watershed (Fp). Here we compare Fp estimates from four meso-scale watersheds in Indonesia (Cidanau, Way Besai and Bialo) and Thailand (Mae Chaem), with varying climate, geology and land cover history, at a decadal timescale. The likely response in each of these four to variation in rainfall properties (including the maximum hourly rainfall intensity) and land cover (comparing scenarios with either more or less forest and tree cover than the current situation) was explored through a basic daily water-balance model, GenRiver. This model was calibrated for each site on existing data, before being used for alternative land cover and rainfall parameter settings. In both data and model runs, the wet-season (3-monthly) Fp values were consistently lower than dry-season values for all four sites. Across the four catchments Fp values decreased with increasing annual rainfall, but specific aspects of watersheds, such as the riparian swamp (peat soils) in Cidanau reduced effects of land use change in the upper watershed. Increasing the mean rainfall intensity (at constant monthly totals for rainfall) around the values considered typical for each landscape was predicted to cause a decrease in Fp values by between 0.047 (Bialo) and 0.261 (Mae Chaem). Sensitivity of Fp to changes in land use change plus changes in rainfall intensity depends on other characteristics of the watersheds, and generalisations made on the basis of one or two

  19. The indirect effects of cheatgrass invasion: Grasshopper herbivory on native grasses determined by neighboring cheatgrass abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie Beckstead; Susan E. Meyer; Carol K. Augsperger

    2008-01-01

    Invasion biology has focused on the direct effects of plant invasion and has generally overlooked indirect interactions. Here we link theories of invasion biology and herbivory to explore an indirect effect of one invading species on associational herbivory (the effect of neighboring plants on herbivory) of native species. We studied a Great Basin shadscale (...

  20. Development of new techniques of using irradiation in the genetic improvement of warm season grasses and an assessment of the genetic and cytogenetic effects. Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, W.W.; Burton, G.W.

    1978-05-01

    Progress is reported on plant breeding programs for the genetic improvement of warm season grasses using irradiation as a tool. Data are included from studies on alteration of the protein quantity and quality in pearl millet grain by irradiation and mutation breeding; the effects of nitrogen and genotype on pearl millet grain; the effects of seed size on quality in pearl millet; irradiation breeding of sterile triploid turf Bermuda grasses; irradiation breeding of sterile coastcross-1, a forage grass, to increase winter hardiness; use of irradiation to induce resistance to rust disease; and an economic assessment of irradiation-induced mutants for plant breeding programs

  1. The Effect of Nitrogen-Doped ATO Nanotubes on Radical Multiplication of Buffer Media by Visible Light Photocatalysis Rather UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan-Hung Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of TiO2 in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer has generally been studied in cultured cancer cells in serum-containing RPMI 1640 medium under visible light application rather than ultraviolet (UV light. An ordered channel array of N-doped anodic titanium dioxide (ATO has been successfully made for visible light application. ATO nanotubes in the anatase form with a length of 10 μm are more effective than nanotubes of 1.8 μm in length as a photocatalyst for radical multiplication in buffer solution by generating hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radical anions under UV-A exposure. Only the N-doped ATO is applicable to visible light photocatalysis for radical multiplication in RPMI 1640+1% FBS and acrylamide, a free radical carrier.

  2. Solvent effects of a dimethyldicyanoquinonediimine buffer layer as N-type material on the performance of organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eui Yeol; Oh, Se Young

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, we have fabricated organic photovoltaic cells consisting of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/DMDCNQI/Al using a dip-coating method with various solvent systems. We have investigated solvent effects (such as solubility, viscosity and vapor pressure) in deposition of a thin DMDCNQI buffer layer on the performance of organic photovoltaic cells. The solvent system which had low viscosity and good solubility properties, made a dense and uniform DMDCNQI ultra thin film, resulting in a high performance device. In particular, a prepared organic photovoltaic cell was fabricated using a cosolvent system (methanol:methylenechloride = 3:1) and showed a maximum power conversion efficiency of 4.53%.

  3. Effect of exogenous phytase on feed inositol phosphate hydrolysis in an in vitro rumen fluid buffer system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask-Pedersen, Dorte Niss; Glitsø, Lene Vibe; Skov, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    phytases was most suitable under rumen-like conditions. The feedstuffs were incubated with a mixture of physiological buffer, ruminal fluid, and exogenous phytase at pH 6.2, after which the samples were incubated for different periods. Incubations were stopped using HCl, and the samples were analyzed......, and Phy4 led to an undegraded InsP6 content of 56, 49, 70, and 18%, respectively, when incubated with rapeseed cake for 6 h, indicating that Phy2 and Phy4 were the most effective phytases. However, Phy2 had a higher specific activity than Phy4, as 60% of the original InsP6 content was remaining after 3 h...

  4. The Effect of Different Treatments on Seed Dormancy Breaking of Weed Stalked Bur Grass Tragus racemosus (L. AlI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam reza doraki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stalked Bur Grass (Tragus racemosus L. is an angiosperm annual plant with C4 photosynthesis pathway and stolon. It grows in hot and dry summers. This plant spreaded throughout the world from hot regions of Africa. It is regularly seen in barren lands or in between the generations with sequential initial stages with light-texture soils. Seed dormancy is in fact a physiological phenomenon which is observed in the seeds of most crops, pasture plants, medicinal herbs and weeds. Dormancy allows the plant to guarantee its germination and survival for long years and to survive through adverse environmental conditions through its spatial and temporal spread. Materials and Methods: In order to evaluation dormancy break of Tragus racemosus L. seeds, an experiment was carried out based a Randomized Complete Block Design with four replications in research laboratory of Department of Agriculture, Birjand University during 2013. The initial experiments showed that the seeds of Stalked Bur Grass had initial dormancy and were unable to germinate at normal conditions, so that less than 5% of the seeds germinated. The studied treatments for breaking seeds dormancy included control (seeds disinfection by distilled water, wet chilling at 4°C for 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeds, treatment with H2SO4 at 97% for 20, 40, 60 and 80 seconds, treatment with KNO3 at 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8% for 24 hours and treatment with Gibberellic acid (GA3 at 50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm. In this study, 25 seeds of Stalked Bur Grass were uniformly placed in petri dishes with the diameters of 9 cm on Watmann filter papers and were applied with 5 mL distilled water. The number of germinated seeds was counted on a daily basis for 21 days. In the end, germination percentage and rate was determined. Results and Discussion: The results revealed that the effect of all studied levels of all treatments were significant on germination percentage and rate. The highest germination percentage (76% was

  5. The impact of stress at different life stages on physical health and the buffering effects of maternal sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Allison K; Simpson, Jeffry A; Carlson, Elizabeth A; Englund, Michelle M; Sung, Sooyeon

    2017-01-01

    Many studies indicate that early life stress leads to negative health outcomes in adulthood, and some suggest that high-quality parenting might buffer these effects. Most prior research, however, has relied on cross-sectional retrospective reports of stress and parenting. Our study tests how coder-rated stress and parenting quality assessed at different life stages predict adult health outcomes in a prospective, longitudinal study. Participants were 163 individuals in the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation studied since birth. Physical health was assessed at age 32 with body mass index, self-reports of symptoms and illnesses experienced, and self-ratings of overall physical health. Stress was assessed by coder-rated interviews involving participants or their mothers at 16 time points partitioned into 5 life stages: early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, and at age 32 (when health was assessed). Parenting quality was measured by coder ratings of each mother's provision of sensitive, responsive support at 7 time points between birth and age 13. Early childhood, adolescent, and concurrent stress predicted adult health outcomes at age 32. Early childhood and adolescent stress, and adolescent and concurrent stress, both showed a "dual-risk" pattern, such that experiencing higher stress at both of these life stages predicted the worst health outcomes. Higher maternal sensitivity, however, buffered these deleterious effects. Our prospective data reveal that early childhood and adolescence are important developmental periods during which stress is influential for adult physical health. However, parenting interventions that promote greater sensitivity may help children in high-stress environments avoid negative adult health outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. The impact of stress at different life stages on physical health and the buffering effects of maternal sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Allison K.; Simpson, Jeffry A.; Carlson, Elizabeth A.; Englund, Michelle M.; Sung, Sooyeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many studies indicate that early life stress leads to negative health outcomes in adulthood, and some suggest that high-quality parenting might buffer these effects. Most prior research, however, has relied on cross-sectional retrospective reports of stress and parenting. Our study tests how coder-rated stress and parenting quality assessed at different life stages predict adult health outcomes in a prospective, longitudinal study. Methods Participants were 163 individuals in the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation (MLSRA) studied since birth. Physical health was assessed at age 32 with BMI, self-reports of symptoms and illnesses experienced, and self-ratings overall physical health. Stress was assessed by coder-rated interviews involving participants or their mothers at 16 time-points partitioned into five life stages: early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, and at age 32 (when health was assessed). Parenting quality was measured by coder-ratings of each mother's provision of sensitive, responsive support at 7 time-points between birth and age 13. Results Early childhood, adolescent, and concurrent stress predicted adult health outcomes at age 32. Early childhood and adolescent stress, and adolescent and concurrent stress, both showed a “dual-risk” pattern, such that experiencing higher stress at both of these life stages predicted the worst health outcomes. Higher maternal sensitivity, however, buffered these deleterious effects. Conclusions Our prospective data reveals that early childhood and adolescence are important developmental periods during which stress is influential for adult physical health. However, parenting interventions that promote greater sensitivity may help children in high-stress environments avoid negative adult health outcomes. PMID:27669179

  7. Effect of sulfur levels on four tropical grasses in cerrado soils of mato grosso do sul, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Casagrande, J.; Correa De Souza, O.

    1982-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate responses of four tropical grasses, Melinis minutiflora cv. Cabelo de Negro Hyparrhenia rufa, Brachiaria decumbens australian type and Setaria anceps cv. kazungula to five levels of sulfur (0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 kg/ha) in two cerrado Oxisols and one Entisol. Cuttings were done at 50, 95 and 150 days after plant exposure. Besides dry matter production, visible symptoms of sulfur deficiency were observed. Greater responses were associated with sulfur rates up to 30 kg/ha. Molasses grass and brachiaria were the most responsive species.

  8. Effects of coal combustion residues on survival, antioxidant potential, and genotoxicity resulting from full-lifecycle exposure of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio Holthius)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmick, Danika M.; Mitchelmore, Carys L.; Hopkins, William A.; Rowe, Christopher L.

    2007-01-01

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs), largely derived from coal-fired electrical generation, are rich in numerous trace elements that have the potential to induce sublethal effects including oxidative stress, alterations in antioxidant status and DNA single strand breaks (SSB). CCRs are frequently discharged into natural and man-made aquatic systems. As the effects of CCRs have received relatively little attention in estuarine systems, the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was chosen for this study. Grass shrimp were exposed in the laboratory to CCR-enriched sediments and food over a full life cycle. Survival to metamorphosis was significantly reduced in CCR-exposed larvae (17 ± 4 versus 70 ± 13% in the controls) but not in the juveniles or adults. The COMET assay, a general but sensitive assay for genotoxicity, was used to quantify DNA SSB in the adults. Total antioxidant potential was examined to assess the overall antioxidant scavenging capacity of CCR-exposed and non-exposed adult grass shrimp. Grass shrimp exposed to CCR significantly accumulated selenium and cadmium compared to unexposed shrimp, although an inverse relationship was seen for mercury accumulation. Chronic CCR exposure caused DNA SSB in hepatopancreas cells, as evidenced by the significantly increased percent tail DNA, tail moment, and tail length as compared to reference shrimp. However, no significant difference was observed in total antioxidant potential. Our findings suggest that genotoxicity may be an important mode of toxicity of CCR, and that DNA SSB may serve as a useful biomarker of exposure and effect of this very common, complex waste stream

  9. Effects of coal combustion residues on survival, antioxidant potential, and genotoxicity resulting from full-lifecycle exposure of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio Holthius)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmick, Danika M.; Mitchelmore, Carys L.; Rowe, Christopher L. [University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 1, Williams Street, PO Box 38, Solomons, MD, 20688 (United States); Hopkins, William A. [Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 100 Cheatham Hall, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs), largely derived from coal-fired electrical generation, are rich in numerous trace elements that have the potential to induce sublethal effects including oxidative stress, alterations in antioxidant status and DNA single strand breaks (SSB). CCRs are frequently discharged into natural and man-made aquatic systems. As the effects of CCRs have received relatively little attention in estuarine systems, the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was chosen for this study. Grass shrimp were exposed in the laboratory to CCR-enriched sediments and food over a full life cycle. Survival to metamorphosis was significantly reduced in CCR-exposed larvae (17 {+-} 4 versus 70 {+-} 13% in the controls) but not in the juveniles or adults. The COMET assay, a general but sensitive assay for genotoxicity, was used to quantify DNA SSB in the adults. Total antioxidant potential was examined to assess the overall antioxidant scavenging capacity of CCR-exposed and non-exposed adult grass shrimp. Grass shrimp exposed to CCR significantly accumulated selenium and cadmium compared to unexposed shrimp, although an inverse relationship was seen for mercury accumulation. Chronic CCR exposure caused DNA SSB in hepatopancreas cells, as evidenced by the significantly increased percent tail DNA, tail moment, and tail length as compared to reference shrimp. However, no significant difference was observed in total antioxidant potential. Our findings suggest that genotoxicity may be an important mode of toxicity of CCR, and that DNA SSB may serve as a useful biomarker of exposure and effect of this very common, complex waste stream. (author)

  10. The effect of buffer-layer on the steady-state energy release rate of a tunneling crack in a wind turbine blade joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn; Sørensen, Bent F.; Kildegaard, Casper

    2018-01-01

    propagation of tunneling cracks. However, for wind turbine blade relevant material combinations it is found more effective to reduce the thickness of the adhesive layer since the stiffness mismatch between the existing laminate and the adhesive is already high. The effect of material orthotropy was found......The effect of a buffer-layer on the steady-state energy release rate of a tunneling crack in the adhesive layer of a wind turbine blade joint, loaded in tension, is investigated using a parametric 2D tri-material finite element model. The idea of embedding a buffer-layer in-between the adhesive...... and the basis glass fiber laminate to improve the existing joint design is novel, but the implications hereof need to be addressed.The results show that it is advantageous to embed a buffer-layer near the adhesive with controllable thickness-and stiffness properties in order to improve the joint design against...

  11. Effect of pre-grazing herbage mass on dairy cow performance, grass dry matter production and output from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wims, C M; Delaby, L; Boland, T M; O'Donovan, M

    2014-01-01

    A grazing study was undertaken to examine the effect of maintaining three levels of pre-grazing herbage mass (HM) on dairy cow performance, grass dry matter (DM) production and output from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) pastures. Cows were randomly assigned to one of three pre-grazing HM treatments: 1150 - Low HM (L), 1400 - Medium HM (M) or 2000 kg DM/ha - High HM (H). Herbage accumulation under grazing was lowest (Ppastures required more grass silage supplementation during the grazing season (+73 kg DM/cow) to overcome pasture deficits due to lower pasture growth rates (Ppasture intake, although cows grazing the L pastures had to graze a greater daily area (Ppasture reduces pasture DM production and at a system level may increase the requirement for imported feed.

  12. Different techniques to study rumen fermentation characteristics of maturing grass and grass silage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cone, J.W.; Gelder, van A.H.; Soliman, I.A.; Visser, de H.; Vuuren, van A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Grass samples were harvested during the 1993 growing season after a precut on April 27, 1993 and were stored frozen or left to ensile in 30-L buckets. Effects on chemical composition and fermentation kinetics of the maturation of the grass and of ensiling were investigated. Chemical composition and

  13. Analysis of the soil food web structure under grass and grass clover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Smeding, F.W.; Vries, de F.T.; Bloem, J.

    2006-01-01

    The below ground biodiversity of soil organisms plays an important role in the functioning of the the soil ecosystem, and consequently the above ground plant production. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of grass or grass-clover in combination with fertilisation on the soil

  14. The effect of pineapple waste (Ananas comosus (L. Merr subtitution on mixed basal diet of Elephant grass and calliandra on rumen ecosystem of sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Widiawati

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pineapple waste substitution to mixed basal diet of Elephant grass and calliandra on rumen ecosystem. Pineapple waste was substituted to basal of Elephant grass and calliandra leaves (3:2 at the level of 0% (RA; 10% (RB; 20% (RC; 30% (RD; 40% (RE and 50% (RF. In this experiment 24 Indonesian local male sheep (9-10 months old, 15.3 kg average body weight were used, and were divided into 6 groups of dietary treatment (4 sheep each. Every group was offered one of the experimental diets (RA to RF in a Completely Randomized Design. Pineapple waste was offered gradually for one month until the level of 50% (RF was reached. The animals were adapted to experimental diets for about 14 days prior to the data collection period. Rumen fluids from each animal was taken (5 hours after morning feeding for pH, ammonia concentration; bacteria and protozoa population analysis. The results showed that substitution of pineapple waste up to 30% had no effect on pH, but when the level was increased up to 40 and 50%, the pH (P0.05. Increasing pineapple waste given increased population of amyllolytic bacteria but decreased the population of cellulolytic bacteria. On the Elephant grass and calliandra basal diet with the proportion of 3 : 2, the best substitution of pineapple waste was up to 20%.

  15. TGF-β1 exerts opposing effects on grass carp leukocytes: implication in teleost immunity, receptor signaling and potential self-regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Yang

    Full Text Available In fish immunity, the regulatory role of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 has not been fully characterized. Here we examined the immunoregulatory effects of TGF-β1 in grass carp peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL and head kidney leukocytes (HKL. It is interesting that TGF-β1 consistently stimulated the cell viability and the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Tnfα and Ifnγ and T/B cell markers [Cd4-like (Cd4l, Cd8α, Cd8β and Igμ] in PBL, which contrasted with its inhibitory tone in HKL. Further studies showed that grass carp TGF-β1 type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5, was indispensable for the immunoregulatory effects of TGF-β1 in PBL and HKL. Notably, TGF-β1 persistently attenuated ALK5 expression, whereas immunoneutralization of endogenous grass carp TGF-β1 could increase ALK5 mRNA and protein levels. It is consistent with the observation that TGF-β1 decreased the number of ALK5(+ leukocytes in PBL and HKL, revealing a negative regulation of TGF-β1 signaling at the receptor level. Moreover, transient treatment with TGF-β1 for 24 h was sufficient to induce similar cellular responses compared with the continuous treatment. This indicated a possible mechanism by which TGF-β1 triggered the down-regulation of ALK5 mRNA and protein, leading to the desensitization of grass carp leukocytes toward TGF-β1. Accordingly, our data revealed a dual role of TGF-β1 in teleost immunity in which it can serve as a positive or negative control device and provided additional mechanistic insights as to how TGF-β1 controls its signaling in vertebrate leukocytes.

  16. Perceived ethnic discrimination and depressive symptoms: the buffering effects of ethnic identity, religion and ethnic social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Umar Z; Snijder, Marieke B; de Wit, Matty A S; Schene, Aart H; Stronks, Karien; Kunst, Anton E

    2016-05-01

    Perceived ethnic discrimination (PED) is positively associated with depressive symptoms in ethnic minority groups in Western countries. Psychosocial factors may buffer against the health impact of PED, but evidence is lacking from Europe. We assessed whether ethnic identity, religion, and ethnic social network act as buffers in different ethnic minority groups in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Baseline data were used from the HEalthy Living In a Urban Setting study collected from January 2011 to June 2014. The random sample included 2501 South-Asian Surinamese, 2292 African Surinamese, 1877 Ghanaians, 2626 Turks, and 2484 Moroccans aged 18-70 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. PED was measured with the Everyday Discrimination Scale. Ethnic identity was assessed using the Psychological Acculturation Scale. Practicing religion was determined. Ethnic social network was assessed with the number of same-ethnic friends and amount of leisure time spent with same-ethnic people. PED was positively associated with depressive symptoms in all groups. The association was weaker among (a) those with strong ethnic identity in African Surinamese and Ghanaians, (b) those practicing religion among African Surinamese and Moroccans, (c) those with many same-ethnic friends in South-Asian Surinamese, Ghanaians, and Turks, and (d) those who spend leisure time with same-ethnic people among African Surinamese and Turks. Ethnic identity, religion, and ethnic social network weakened the association between PED and depressive symptoms, but the effects differed by ethnic minority group. These findings suggest that ethnic minority groups employ different resources to cope with PED.

  17. Effects of moisture, elevated temperature, and fatigue loading on the behavior of graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels with center cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fatigue loading combined with moisture and heat on the behavior of graphite epoxy panels with either Kevlar-49 or S-glass buffer strips were studied. Buffer strip panels, that had a slit in the center to represent damage, were moisture conditioned or heated, fatigue loaded, and then tested in tension to measure their residual strength. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading direction and were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with Kevlar-49 epoxy or S-glass epoxy on a 1-for-1 basis. The panels were subjected to a fatigue loading spectrum. One group of panels was preconditioned by soaking in 60 C water to produce a 1 percent weight gain then tested at room temperature. One group was heated to 82 C during the fatigue loading. Another group was moisture conditioned and then tested at 82 C. The residual strengths of the buffer panels were not highly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panel by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results. The moisture conditioning did not have a large effect on the Kevlar-49 panels.

  18. Effect of organic carbon content of the domestic bentonite on the performance of buffer material in a high-level waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kang, Chul Hyung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    The organic carbon content of the domestic bentonite have been measured, and its effects on the performance of buffer are analyzed. The total carbon content and the organic carbon content were in the range of 3160 to 3600 and 2400 to 2800 ppm, respectively. The aqueous phase equilibrium concentrations of total carbon and organic carbon in bentonite-water mixture were in the range of 25 to 50 ppm and 4 to 18 ppm, respectively. The results indicate that the effect of organic matter in the domestic bentonite on the performance of buffer material were insignificant. 33 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  19. Effects of buffer agents on hydrogen adsorption and desorption at/within activated carbon for the negative electrode of aqueous asymmetric supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, Hsiu-Chuan; Wu, Tzu-Ho; Rajkumar, Muniyandi; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • H adsorption causes local pH increase and negatively shifts the double-layer potential window. • The local pH variation at AC/electrolyte interface can be controlled via adding buffer agents. • H adsorption potential on AC in buffer electrolytes follows the Nernstian dependence. • The pseudocapacitive reversibility of H adsorption/desorption at/within AC is too poor. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of adding buffer agents into aqueous electrolytes on the hydrogen adsorption/desorption behaviour at/within activated carbon are systematically investigated for the negative electrode of asymmetric supercapacitors. Due to the poor electrochemical reversibility of hydrogen adsorption/desorption at/within activated carbon, the hydrogen responses at/within activated carbon are not suitable for pseudo-capacitive energy storage of high-performance asymmetric supercapacitor. The electrochemical adsorption of H atoms consumes protons and causes the local pH change at the activated carbon/electrolyte interface, leading to the negative shift in the H adsorption potential when weakly acidic, neutral, and weakly basic electrolytes without buffer agents are employed. The addition of buffer agents into electrolytes significantly improves the rate of proton supply and promotes the rate of hydrogen adsorption at/within AC. Interestingly, the onset potential of significant H adsorption obtained from the buffered electrolytes generally follows the Nernstian dependence, suggesting the Nerstian dependence of H"+/H_a_d_s on AC at all pH values. In order to obtain the energy storage devices with high coulombic and energy efficiencies, the onset potential of significant H adsorption obtained from the electrolyte containing buffer agents is a reliable lower potential limit of the AC-coated negative electrode for aqueous asymmetric supercapacitors.

  20. Effect of Buffered 4% Lidocaine on the Success of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Patients with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Jared; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Fowler, Sara; Beck, Mike

    2015-06-01

    Medical studies have suggested that buffering local anesthetic may increase the ability to achieve anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 4% buffered lidocaine on the anesthetic success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in patients experiencing symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. One hundred emergency patients diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received a conventional IAN block using either 2.8 mL 4% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2.8 mL 4% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine buffered with sodium bicarbonate in a double-blind manner. For the buffered solution, each cartridge was buffered with 8.4% sodium bicarbonate using the OnPharma (Los Gatos, CA) system to produce a final concentration of 0.18 mEq/mL sodium bicarbonate. Fifteen minutes after administration of the IAN block, profound lip numbness was confirmed, and endodontic access was initiated. Success was defined as no or mild pain (≤54 mm on a 170-mm visual analog scale) on access or instrumentation of the root canal. The success rate for the IAN block was 32% for the buffered group and 40% for the nonbuffered group, with no significant difference (P = .4047) between the groups. Injection pain ratings for the IAN block were not significantly (P = .9080) different between the 2 formulations. For mandibular posterior teeth, a 4% buffered lidocaine formulation did not result in a statistically significant increase in the success rate or a decrease in injection pain of the IAN block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Effect of digestibility of grass-clover silage and concentrate to forage ratio on methane emission from dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    and D, respectively. TMR forage DM consisted of 2/3 of one of the respective grass-clover silages and 1/3 maize silage, and concentrate (soya meal and wheat) proportion of DM was 20% (low) or 50% (high). Methane emissions from the cows were measured 20-22 hours in one of four chambers working after...

  2. The effect of ensiling and haymaking on the concentrations of steroidal saponin in two Brachiaria grass species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachiaria (signalgrass) is now the most widely used tropical grass genus in Central and South America. However, Brachiaria spp. can cause hepatogenous photosensitization in livestock. Steroidal saponins, specifically protodioscin, present in Brachiaria spp. may be responsible for liver injury and s...

  3. Effects of molasses grass, Melinis minutiflora volatiles on the foraging behavior of the cereal stemborer parasitoid, Cotesia sesamiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gohole, L.S.; Overholt, W.A.; Khan, Z.R.; Pickett, J.A.; Vet, L.E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Olfactory responses of the cereal stemborer parasitoid Cotesia sesamiae to volatiles emitted by gramineous host and nonhost plants of the stemborers were studied in a Y-tube olfactometer. The host plants were maize (Zea mays) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), while the nonhost plant was molasses grass

  4. Effects of molasses grass, Melinis minutiflora volatiles on the foraging behavior of the cereal stemborer parasitoid, Cotesia sesamiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gohole, L.S.; Overholt, W.A.; Khan, Z.U.; Pickett, J.A.; Vet, L.E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Olfactory responses of the cereal stemborer parasitoid Cotesia sesamiae to volatiles emitted by gramineous host and nonhost plants of the stemborers were studied in a Y-tube olfactometer. The host plants were maize (Zea mays) and sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor), while the nonhost plant was molasses grass

  5. Effect of an Invasive Grass on Ambient Rates of Decomposition and Microbial Community Structure: A Search for Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    In sutu decomposition of above and below ground plant biomass of the native grass species Andropogon glmoeratus (Walt.) B.S.P and exotic Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. (cogongrass) was investigated using litter bags over the course of a 12 month period. The above and below ground biomass of the inv...

  6. Do social relations buffer the effect of neighborhood deprivation on health-related quality of life? Results from the LifeLines Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, Bart; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes; Kibele, Eva U. B.; Smidt, Nynke

    We investigated whether social relations buffer the effect of neighborhood deprivation on mental and physical health-related quality of life. Baseline data from the LifeLines Cohort Study (N=68,111) and a neighborhood deprivation index were used to perform mixed effect linear regression analyses.

  7. Does workplace social capital buffer the effects of job stress? A cross-sectional, multilevel analysis of cigarette smoking among U.S. manufacturing workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Amy L.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Sorensen, Glorian; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; Subramanian, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether workplace social capital buffers the association between job stress and smoking status. Methods As part of the Harvard Cancer Prevention Project’s Healthy Directions-Small Business Study, interviewer-administered questionnaires were completed by 1740 workers and 288 managers in 26 manufacturing firms (84% and 85% response). Social capital was assessed by multiple items measured at the individual-level among workers, and contextual-level among managers. Job stress was operationalized by the demand-control model. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate associations between job stressors and smoking, and test for effect modification by social capital measures. Results Workplace social capital (both summary measures) buffered associations between high job demands and smoking. One compositional item—worker trust in managers—buffered associations between job strain and smoking. Conclusion Workplace social capital may modify the effects of psychosocial working conditions on health behaviors. PMID:20595910

  8. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  9. resistance of napier grass clones to napier grass stunt disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach) is the major livestock fodder under intensive and semi-intensive systems in East Africa. However, the productivity of the grass is constrained by Napier grass Stunt Disease. (NSD). The purpose of this study was to identify Napier grass clones with resistance to NSD.

  10. Resistance of Napier grass clones to Napier grass Stunt Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach) is the major livestock fodder under intensive and semi-intensive systems in East Africa. However, the productivity of the grass is constrained by Napier grass Stunt Disease (NSD). The purpose of this study was to identify Napier grass clones with resistance to NSD.

  11. The effect of hydraulic lift on organic matter decomposition, soil nitrogen cycling, and nitrogen acquisition by a grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Cristina; Kim, John H; Bleby, Timothy M; Jackson, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic lift (HL) is the passive movement of water through plant roots, driven by gradients in water potential. The greater soil-water availability resulting from HL may in principle lead to higher plant nutrient uptake, but the evidence for this hypothesis is not universally supported by current experiments. We grew a grass species common in North America in two-layer pots with three treatments: (1) the lower layer watered, the upper one unwatered (HL), (2) both layers watered (W), and (3) the lower layer watered, the upper one unwatered, but with continuous light 24 h a day to limit HL (no-HL). We inserted ingrowth cores filled with enriched-nitrogen organic matter ((15)N-OM) in the upper layer and tested whether decomposition, mineralization and uptake of (15)N were higher in plants performing HL than in plants without HL. Soils in the upper layer were significantly wetter in the HL treatment than in the no-HL treatment. Decomposition rates were similar in the W and HL treatments and lower in no-HL. On average, the concentration of NH(4)(+)-N in ingrowth cores was highest in the W treatment, and NO(3)(-)-N concentrations were highest in the no-HL treatment, with HL having intermediate values for both, suggesting differential mineralization of organic N among treatments. Aboveground biomass, leaf (15)N contents and the (15)N uptake in aboveground tissues were higher in W and HL than in no-HL, indicating higher nutrient uptake and improved N status of plants performing HL. However, there were no differences in total root nitrogen content or (15)N uptake by roots, indicating that HL affected plant allocation of acquired N to photosynthetic tissues. Our evidence for the role of HL in organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling suggests that HL could have positive effects on plant nutrient dynamics and nutrient turnover.

  12. Alien plant invasion in mixed-grass prairie: effects of vegetation type, stochiasticity, and anthropogenic disturbance in two park units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Diane L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Newton, Wesley E.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of alien plant species to invade a region depends not only on attributes of the plant, but on characteristics of the habitat being invaded. Here, we examine characteristics that may influence the success of alien plant invasion in mixed-grass prairie at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, in western North Dakota, USA. The park consists of two geographically separate units with similar vegetation types and management history, which allowed us to examine the effects of native vegetation type, anthropogenic disturbance, and the separate park units on the invasion of native plant communities by alien plant species common to counties surrounding both park units. If matters of chance related to availability of propagules and transient establishment opportunities determine the success of invasion, park unit and anthropogenic disturbance should better explain the variation in alien plant frequency. If invasibility is more strongly related to biotic or physical characteristics of the native plant communities, models of alien plant occurrence should include vegetation type as an explanatory variable. We examined >1300 transects across all vegetation types in both units of the park. Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) indicated that the fully parameterized model, including the interaction among vegetation type, disturbance, and park unit, best described the distribution of both total number of alien plants per transect and frequency of alien plants on transects where they occurred. Although all vegetation types were invaded by alien plants, mesic communities had both greater numbers and higher frequencies of alien plants than did drier communities. A strong element of stochasticity, reflected in differences in frequencies of individual species between the two park units, suggests that prediction of risk of invasion will always involve uncertainty. In addition, despite well-documented associations between anthropogenic disturbance and alien plant invasion, five of

  13. Effect of liming and fertilizer on mineral content and productivity of Brachiaria Decumbens grass forage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armelin, M.J.A.; Saiki, M.

    2007-01-01

    To restore a degraded pasture of Brachiaria decumbens, located in Sao Carlos - SP, southeastern Brazil, under altitude tropical climate, an experiment was carried out to study the effects of limestone, buried or not buried in the soil, and fertilizer use on mineral content and forage yield, after 3 years of treatment. Limestone and phosphorus were applied once, one month before starting. NK were applied after each cutting, for fertilized plots, four to five times a year. Experimental design was a random block (100 m 2 ), with 6 replications and 4 treatments. Each block received 4 t/ha of limestone, except the control. Forage samples were collected 14 cm above soil surface. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was the analytical method used to determine the mineral contents. Dry matter yield was affected positively with liming when compared with the limestone control, but the effect of limestone use was more pronounced with the concomitant use of NK fertilizer. The contents of Ca, Cs, Fe, La, Mg, Rb, Sc, Sm and Th in forage were negatively affected with the NK use, perhaps due to a dilution effect, while a reverse were observed for K, Cl, perhaps due to input of KCl, besides Br, Mn and Se. It seems that limestone is not a key input to restore degraded tropical pastureland, grown on acid soils, when nitrogen is lacking. INAA allowed the monitoring of some not routine elements that may be under observation to avoid potential plant nutritional disorders in production systems with high limestone and fertilizer use. (author)

  14. Optimism and education buffer the effects of syndemic conditions on HIV status among African American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Ann; Jemmott, John B; Stevens, Robin; Rutledge, Scott Edward; Icard, Larry D

    2014-11-01

    The present study sought to replicate effects of the number of syndemic psychosocial health conditions on sexual risk behavior and HIV infection among a sample of high-risk African American men who have sex with men (MSM) and to identify resilience factors that may buffer these effects. We used baseline data from an HIV risk-reduction trial to examine whether a higher number of syndemic conditions was associated with higher rates of self-reported sexual risk behavior and HIV infection. Using logistic regression models, we tested for interactions between number of syndemic conditions and several potential resilience factors to identify buffering effects. Replicating previous studies, we found significant associations between numbers of syndemic conditions and higher rates of sexual risk behavior and HIV infection. Surprisingly, we also replicated a previous finding (Stall et al., Am J Public Health, 93(6):939-942, 2003) that the effects of syndemic burden on HIV status fell off at the highest levels of syndemic conditions. Among a variety of potential resilience factors, two-optimism and education-buffered the syndemic effect on HIV prevalence. This is, to our knowledge, the first paper to identify resilience factors buffering against syndemic effects among MSM. It also constitutes a significant contribution to the literature regarding prevention among black MSM. These results point to the need to identify HIV-positive black MSM and provide effective treatment for them and to develop interventions addressing both syndemic and resilience factors.

  15. Buffered or under Scrutiny?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klopf, Patricia; Nell, Phillip C.; Puck, Jonas

    – they are to a stronger extent buffered from the external environment than small firms. Thus, this paper adds to previous research by disentangling the complex effects of size on the use of political strategies – a strand of literature which has been characterized by inconsistent findings in the past.......This paper investigates political strategies of MNE subsidiaries operating in emerging markets. Our findings support previous findings of more intense political strategies in the presence of stronger institutional pressures from public and private stakeholders. Furthermore, we hypothesize...

  16. Effects of Thickness of a Low-Temperature Buffer and Impurity Incorporation on the Characteristics of Nitrogen-polar GaN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fann-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu; Feng, Shih-Wei; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2016-12-01

    In this study, effects of the thickness of a low temperature (LT) buffer and impurity incorporation on the characteristics of Nitrogen (N)-polar GaN are investigated. By using either a nitridation or thermal annealing step before the deposition of a LT buffer, three N-polar GaN samples with different thicknesses of LT buffer and different impurity incorporations are prepared. It is found that the sample with the thinnest LT buffer and a nitridation step proves to be the best in terms of a fewer impurity incorporations, strong PL intensity, fast mobility, small biaxial strain, and smooth surface. As the temperature increases at ~10 K, the apparent donor-acceptor-pair band is responsible for the decreasing integral intensity of the band-to-band emission peak. In addition, the thermal annealing of the sapphire substrates may cause more impurity incorporation around the HT-GaN/LT-GaN/sapphire interfacial regions, which in turn may result in a lower carrier mobility, larger biaxial strain, larger bandgap shift, and stronger yellow luminescence. By using a nitridation step, both a thinner LT buffer and less impurity incorporation are beneficial to obtaining a high quality N-polar GaN.

  17. Racial/ethnic variations in the main and buffering effects of ethnic and nonethnic supports on depressive symptoms among five ethnic immigrant groups in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Ho; Noh, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This study examined variations in the main and buffering effects of ethnic and nonethnic social support on depressive symptoms associated with discrimination among five immigrant groups in Toronto. Data were taken from the Toronto Study of Settlement and Health, a cross-sectional survey of adult immigrants from five ethnic communities (Vietnamese, Ethiopian, Iranian, Korean, and Irish) in Toronto. A total of 900 surveys were collected through face-to-face interviews conducted between April and September 2001. Significant ethnic variations were observed in the effects of both ethnic and nonethnic social supports on discrimination-related depressive symptoms. Regarding the main effect, ethnic social support was significantly stronger for Iranian, Ethiopian, and Korean immigrants than for Irish immigrants. The benefits of nonethnic support were stronger for Iranian immigrants compared to the effect found in the Irish sample. With respect to stress-buffering or stress-moderating effects of social support, ethnic support was significant in all ethnic groups, except the Vietnamese group. Nonethnic support aggravated the negative impact of discrimination on depressive symptoms in the Irish group, but exerted a stress-buffering effect in the Iranian group. Overall, social supports received from fellow ethnic group members had significant main effects (suppressing depressive symptoms) and stress-buffering effects and were most pronounced in the minority ethnic immigrant groups of Ethiopians, Koreans, and Iranians. The effects were least evident among the Vietnamese and Irish. Evidence for the stress-suppressing and stress-buffering role of cross-ethnic group supports was unclear, and even inverted among Irish immigrants. Empirical evidence from the current study seems to support the sociocultural similarity hypothesis of social support.

  18. Social Support May Buffer the Effect of Intrafamilial Stressors on Preschool Children's Television Viewing Time in Low-Income Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowski, Janine M.; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Excessive television (TV) viewing in preschool children has been linked to negative outcomes during childhood, including childhood obesity. In a sample of low-income families, this study examined associations between intrafamilial factors and preschool children's TV-viewing time and the moderating effect of social support from nonfamily members on this association. Methods: In 2010, 129 mothers/female guardians of 2- to 5-year-old children enrolled at five Head Start centers in Rensselaer County, New York, completed a self-report survey. The survey assessed child TV-viewing time (including TV, DVDs, and videos) and intrafamilial risk factors, including maternal perceived stress, depressive symptoms, TV viewing, leisure-time physical activity (inactivity), and family functioning. Social support from nonfamily members (nonfamily social support) was also measured and examined as an effect modifier. Results: Children watched TV an average of 160 minutes per day. Moderate depressive symptoms (Personal Health Questionnaire depression scale scores ≥10), higher perceived stress, poorer family functioning, and higher maternal TV-viewing were significantly and independently associated with greater minutes of child TV viewing, controlling for covariates. In all instances, nonfamily social support moderated these associations, such that negative experiences within the family environment were linked with higher child TV-viewing time under conditions of low nonfamily social support, but not high nonfamily support. Conclusions: Social support from nonfamily members may buffer potentially negative effects of intrafamilial factors on preschool children's TV-viewing time. PMID:24168754

  19. Social support may buffer the effect of intrafamilial stressors on preschool children's television viewing time in low-income families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaigang; Jurkowski, Janine M; Davison, Kirsten K

    2013-12-01

    Excessive television (TV) viewing in preschool children has been linked to negative outcomes during childhood, including childhood obesity. In a sample of low-income families, this study examined associations between intrafamilial factors and preschool children's TV-viewing time and the moderating effect of social support from nonfamily members on this association. In 2010, 129 mothers/female guardians of 2- to 5-year-old children enrolled at five Head Start centers in Rensselaer County, New York, completed a self-report survey. The survey assessed child TV-viewing time (including TV, DVDs, and videos) and intrafamilial risk factors, including maternal perceived stress, depressive symptoms, TV viewing, leisure-time physical activity (inactivity), and family functioning. Social support from nonfamily members (nonfamily social support) was also measured and examined as an effect modifier. Children watched TV an average of 160 minutes per day. Moderate depressive symptoms (Personal Health Questionnaire depression scale scores ≥10), higher perceived stress, poorer family functioning, and higher maternal TV-viewing were significantly and independently associated with greater minutes of child TV viewing, controlling for covariates. In all instances, nonfamily social support moderated these associations, such that negative experiences within the family environment were linked with higher child TV-viewing time under conditions of low nonfamily social support, but not high nonfamily support. Social support from nonfamily members may buffer potentially negative effects of intrafamilial factors on preschool children's TV-viewing time.

  20. Effect of buffer thickness on properties of In0.8Ga0.2As/InP with two-step growth technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tiemin; Miao Guoqing; Jin Yixin; Yu Shuzhen; Jiang Hong; Li Zhiming; Song Hang

    2009-01-01

    In 0.8 Ga 0.2 As was grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD) on InP(1 0 0) substrate with two-step growth technique. Effect of buffer thickness on crystalline quality, surface morphology, electrical property and stress of In 0.8 Ga 0.2 As epilayer was analyzed, and properties of the In 0.8 Ga 0.2 As epilayer were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Hall measurements and Raman scattering. The experiments showed that the properties of the In 0.8 Ga 0.2 As epilayer had close relation to the buffer thickness and the optimum buffer thickness was about 100 nm

  1. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Winkler, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

  2. Organic field-effect transistors with surface modification by using a PVK buffer layer on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyung, Gun Woo; Lee, Dong Hyung; Koo, Ja Ryong; Kim, Young Kwan [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hoon [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    We have fabricated pentacene thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a gate dielectric such as crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) (c-PVA), with poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) buffer layer on a polyethersulfone (PES) flexible substrate, and with substrate heating at a temperature below 120 .deg. C, and we demonstrated the possibility of using an organic gate dielectric layer as a potential pentacene TFT with a PVK buffer layer for low-voltage operation on a plastic substrate. We report the excellent electrical properties of organic TFTs with a PVK buffer layer. The PVK buffer layer improves the performance of the devices and reduces the operating voltage of the devices. Our pentacene TFTs can be fabricated with mobilities > 2.54 cm{sup 2}/Vs and on/off current ratios > 7.5E5 and with flexible organic dielectrics and substrates.

  3. Grass Rooting the System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Janice E.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests a taxonomy of the grass roots movement and gives a general descriptive over view of the 60 groups studied with respect to origin, constituency, size, funding, issues, and ideology. (Author/AM)

  4. The stress-buffering effects of a brief dyadic interaction before an acute stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauley, Perry M; Floyd, Kory; Hesse, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have confirmed that affectionate interaction can reduce the effects of stress, whether or not this effect is due more to habituation or the accumulation of affection remains an area of debate. The goal of the present study was to determine how specific acts of affection mitigate the effects of stress. Sixty mixed-sex dyads (half platonic friends and half dating partners) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions, affectionate interaction, quiet rest with the friend/romantic partner present, or separation from the friend/romantic partner, before one of the partners experienced a series of stressful activities. Results revealed that participants in the affection condition experienced the smallest increase in cardiovascular arousal regardless of relationship status. Participants' endocrine responses were more nuanced and depended on both their biological sex and the nature of the relationship with the companion. Given that these systems did not act in concert with one another, results provide mixed evidence for both an accumulation and habituation effect.

  5. Sanctification of Marriage and General Religiousness as Buffers of the Effects of Marital Inequity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaris, Alfred; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2010-01-01

    Theory suggests that relationship inequity will be associated with less marital and personal distress among the more religious, and that this interaction effect will be stronger for women than men. Data are from 178 married couples experiencing the third trimester of pregnancy of their first biological child. Five outcome variables were assessed…

  6. The Presence of a Best Friend Buffers the Effects of Negative Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ryan E.; Santo, Jonathan Bruce; Bukowski, William M.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to examine how the presence of a best friend might serve as protection against the effect of negative experiences on global self-worth and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA axis). A total of 103 English-speaking male (n = 55) and female (n = 48) participants from Grade 5 (M = 10.27 years) and…

  7. Gender bias in beliefs on physical activity: Buffering effects of sport participation among girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to determine effects of child gender on parental and child beliefs and evaluate competitive sport participation as a modifier of child beliefs. Two age-groups of children and parents completed measures on child athletic appearance, competence, importance of physical act...

  8. Assessing the effectiveness of vegetative environmental buffers in mitigating air pollutant emissions from poultry houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 560 million broilers are produced on the Delmarva Peninsula each year. However, emissions from poultry houses have come under intense scrutiny due to the potential human and environmental effects of the released particulate matter (PM), ammonia, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Ammonia an...

  9. Negative effects of pesticides on wild bee communities can be buffered by landscape context

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Mia G.; Blitzer, E. J.; Gibbs, Jason; Losey, John E.; Danforth, Bryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Wild bee communities provide underappreciated but critical agricultural pollination services. Given predicted global shortages in pollination services, managing agroecosystems to support thriving wild bee communities is, therefore, central to ensuring sustainable food production. Benefits of natural (including semi-natural) habitat for wild bee abundance and diversity on farms are well documented. By contrast, few studies have examined toxicity of pesticides on wild bees, let alone effects of...

  10. Sn buffered by shape memory effect of NiTi alloys as high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Renzong; Zhu Min; Wang Hui; Liu Jiangwen; Liuzhang Ouyang; Zou Jin

    2012-01-01

    By applying the shape memory effect of the NiTi alloys to buffer the Sn anodes, we demonstrate a simple approach to overcome a long-standing challenge of Sn anode in the applications of Li-ion batteries – the capacity decay. By supporting the Sn anodes with NiTi shape memory alloys, the large volume change of Sn anodes due to lithiation and delithiation can be effectively accommodated, based on the stress-induced martensitic transformation and superelastic recovery of the NiTi matrix respectively, which leads to a decrease in the internal stress and closing of cracks in Sn anodes. Accordingly, stable cycleability (630 mA h g −1 after 100 cycles at 0.7C) and excellent high-rate capabilities (478 mA h g −1 at 6.7C) were attained with the NiTi/Sn/NiTi film electrode. These shape memory alloys can also combine with other high-capacity metallic anodes, such as Si, Sb, Al, and improve their cycle performance.

  11. Buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi: lowering acidity, elevating lactic acid bacterial population and dextransucrase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Seo Eun; Moon, Jin Seok; Jung, Jee Yun; Kim, Ji-Sun; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Kim, So-Young; Yoon, Hyang Sik; Han, Nam Soo

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates the buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi on total acidity, microbial population, and dextransucrase activity. Calcium chloride or calcium carbonate was added in dongchimi-kimchi, a watery-radish kimchi, and their effects on various biochemical attributes were analyzed. The addition of 0.1% calcium chloride produced a milder decrease in the pH after 24 days of incubation, which allowed the lactic acid bacteria to survive longer than in the control. In particular, the heterofermentative Leuconostoc genus population was 10-fold higher than that in the control. When sucrose and maltose were also added along with the calcium salts, the dextransucrase activity in the kimchi was elevated and a higher concentration of isomaltooligosaccharides was synthesized when compared with the control. Calcium chloride was determined as a better activator compound of dextransucrase than calcium carbonate, probably because of its higher solubility. Therefore, the results of this study confirm the ability of the proposed approach to modulate the kimchi fermentation process and possibly enhance the quality of kimchi based on the addition of dietary calcium salts.

  12. Effect of two phyto hormone producer rhizobacteria on the bermuda grass growth response and tolerance to phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero-Zuniga, A.; Rojas-Contreras, A.; Rodriguez-Dorantes, A.; Montes-Villafan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are free-living bacteria that have the ability to relieve environmental stress in plants, increasing the plant growth potential. Of importance to phytoremediation, PGPR stimulate plant root development and enhance root growth.This study evaluated the growth response and the tolerance to phenanthrene of Bermuda grass: Cynodon dactylon inoculated with two phytohormone producer rhizobacteria: strains II and III, isolated from a contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons. (Author)

  13. Effect of two phyto hormone producer rhizobacteria on the bermuda grass growth response and tolerance to phenanthrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Zuniga, A.; Rojas-Contreras, A.; Rodriguez-Dorantes, A.; Montes-Villafan, S.

    2009-07-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are free-living bacteria that have the ability to relieve environmental stress in plants, increasing the plant growth potential. Of importance to phytoremediation, PGPR stimulate plant root development and enhance root growth.This study evaluated the growth response and the tolerance to phenanthrene of Bermuda grass: Cynodon dactylon inoculated with two phytohormone producer rhizobacteria: strains II and III, isolated from a contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons. (Author)

  14. The membrane stress response buffers lethal effects of lipid disequilibrium by reprogramming the protein homeostasis network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Guillaume; Shui, Guanghou; Kim, Woong; McAlister, Graeme C; Ismail, Nurzian; Gygi, Steven P; Wenk, Markus R; Ng, Davis T W

    2012-10-12

    Lipid composition can differ widely among organelles and even between leaflets of a membrane. Lipid homeostasis is critical because disequilibrium can have disease outcomes. Despite their importance, mechanisms maintaining lipid homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we establish a model system to study the global effects of lipid imbalance. Quantitative lipid profiling was integral to monitor changes to lipid composition and for system validation. Applying global transcriptional and proteomic analyses, a dramatically altered biochemical landscape was revealed from adaptive cells. The resulting composite regulation we term the "membrane stress response" (MSR) confers compensation, not through restoration of lipid composition, but by remodeling the protein homeostasis network. To validate its physiological significance, we analyzed the unfolded protein response (UPR), one facet of the MSR and a key regulator of protein homeostasis. We demonstrate that the UPR maintains protein biogenesis, quality control, and membrane integrity-functions otherwise lethally compromised in lipid dysregulated cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reliability and effect of sodium bicarbonate: buffering and 2000-m rowing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Amelia J; Slater, Gary J; Gore, Christopher J; Dawson, Brian; Burke, Louise M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect and reliability of acute and chronic sodium bicarbonate ingestion for 2000-m rowing ergometer performance (watts) and blood bicarbonate concentration [HCO3-]. In a crossover study, 7 well-trained rowers performed paired 2000-m rowing ergometer trials under 3 double-blinded conditions: (1) 0.3 grams per kilogram of body mass (g/kg BM) acute bicarbonate; (2) 0.5 g/kg BM daily chronic bicarbonate for 3 d; and (3) calcium carbonate placebo, in semi-counterbalanced order. For 2000-m performance and [HCO3-], we examined differences in effects between conditions via pairwise comparisons, with differences interpreted in relation to the likelihood of exceeding smallest worthwhile change thresholds for each variable. We also calculated the within-subject variation (percent typical error). There were only trivial differences in 2000-m performance between placebo (277 ± 60 W), acute bicarbonate (280 ± 65 W) and chronic bicarbonate (282 ± 65 W); however, [HCO3-] was substantially greater after acute bicarbonate, than with chronic loading and placebo. Typical error for 2000-m mean power was 2.1% (90% confidence interval 1.4 to 4.0%) for acute bicarbonate, 3.6% (2.5 to 7.0%) for chronic bicarbonate, and 1.6% (1.1 to 3.0%) for placebo. Postsupplementation [HCO3-] typical error was 7.3% (5.0 to 14.5%) for acute bicarbonate, 2.9% (2.0 to 5.7%) for chronic bicarbonate and 6.0% (1.4 to 11.9%) for placebo. Performance in 2000-m rowing ergometer trials may not substantially improve after acute or chronic bicarbonate loading. However, performances will be reliable with both acute and chronic bicarbonate loading protocols.

  16. Effects of Altered Seasonality of Precipitation on Grass Production and Grasshopper Performance in a Northern Mixed Prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, David H

    2017-06-01

    Climatic changes are leading to differing patterns and timing of precipitation in grassland ecosystems, with the seasonal timing of precipitation affecting plant biomass and plant composition. No previous studies have examined how drought seasonality affects grasshopper performance and the impact of herbivory on vegetation. We modified seasonal patterns of precipitation and grasshopper density in a manipulative experiment to examine if seasonality of drought combined with herbivory affected plant biomass, nitrogen content, and grasshopper performance. Grass biomass was affected by both precipitation and grasshopper density treatments, while nitrogen content of grass was higher with early-season drought. Proportional survival was negatively affected by initial density, while survival was higher with early drought than with full-season drought. Drought timing affected the outcome, with early summer drought increasing grass nitrogen content and grasshopper survival, while season-long and late-season drought did not. The results support arguments that our knowledge of plant responses to seasonal short-term variation in climate is limited and illustrate the importance of experiments manipulating precipitation phenology. The results confirm that understanding the season of drought is critical for predicting grasshopper population dynamics, as extreme early summer drought may be required to strongly affect Melanoplus sanguinipes (F.) performance. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. In-situ injection of potassium hydroxide into briquetted wheat straw and meadow grass - Effect on biomethane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lu; Moset, Veronica; Li, Wanwu; Chen, Chang; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2017-09-01

    Alkaline pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass has been intensively investigated but heavy water usage and environmental pollution from wastewater limits its industrial application. This study presents a pretreatment technique by in-situ injection of potassium hydroxide concentrations ranging from 0.8% to 10% (w/w) into the briquetting process of wheat straw and meadow grass. Results show that the biomethane yield and hydrolysis rate was improved significantly with a higher impact on wheat straw compared to meadow grass. The highest biomethane yield from wheat straw briquettes of 353mL.g -1 VS was obtained with 6.27% (w/w) potassium hydroxide injection, which was 14% higher than from untreated wheat straw. The hydrolysis rates of wheat straw and meadow grass increased from 4.27×10 -2 to 5.32×10 -2 d -1 and 4.19×10 -2 to 6.00×10 -2 d -1 , respectively. The low water usage and no wastewater production make this a promising technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular cloning, expression analysis, and potential food intake attenuation effect of peptide YY in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Shen, Yubang; Pandit, Narayan Prasad; Fu, Jianjun; Li, Da; Li, Jiale

    2013-06-15

    The peptide YY (PYY) is a 36 amino acid peptide involved in the food intake control in vertebrates. We have cloned and characterized a PYY gene from grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idellus. The full-length cDNA encodes a precursor protein of grass carp PYY (gcPYY) that consists of a putative 28-amino acid signal peptide, a 36-amino acid mature peptide, an amidation-proteolytic site, and a 30-amino acid carboxy-terminal extension. The gcPYY gene is comprised of 4 exons interspaced by 3 introns as seen in PYYs from other species. Amino acid alignment and gene structure comparison indicate that the structure of PYY is well preserved throughout vertebrate phylogeny. The tissue distribution and postprandial changes in gcPYY mRNA expression were evaluated by real-time PCR, which showed that the gcPYY is expressed abundantly in the central nervous system, with significantly increased expression following a single meal. During embryogenesis, the presence of gcPYY mRNA was detected in early developing embryos, and high expression levels were observed when most larvae completed their switch from endogenous nourishment to exogenous feeding. Reduced food intake by juveniles during a single meal after giving perpheral injection of gcPYY1-36 suggests a potentially important role of PYY in the food intake attenuation in grass carp. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complex I and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Lindsay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS emission is a critical component in the etiolo-gy of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complex I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rote-none, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study sug-gests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III.

  20. Grasses for energy production: hydrological guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, R.L.

    2003-07-01

    This report provides hydrological guidelines for growers, land and water resource managers, environmental groups and other parties interested in utilising grasses for energy production. The aim of the report is to help interested parties decide if a location is suitable for planting energy grasses by considering whether potential hydrological impacts will have an adverse effect on crop productivity and yield. The guidelines consider: the water use of energy grasses compared with other crops; the factors governing water use; the water requirements for a productive crop; and the likely impacts on the availability and quantity of water. The report points out that there are still gaps in our knowledge of the processes controlling the water use and growth of energy grasses and notes that, in some situations, there will be considerable uncertainty in predictions of water use and the magnitude of the associated hydrological impacts.

  1. Resputtering effect during MgO buffer layer deposition by magnetron sputtering for superconducting coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Shaozhu; Shi, Kai; Deng, Shutong; Han, Zhenghe [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng, Feng, E-mail: feng.feng@sz.tsinghua.edu.cn; Lu, Hongyuan [Division of Advanced Manufacturing, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Qu, Timing; Zhu, Yuping [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Rongxia [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this study, MgO thin films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The film thickness in the deposition area directly facing the target center obviously decreased compared with that in other areas. This reduction in thickness could be attributed to the resputtering effect resulting from bombardment by energetic particles mainly comprising oxygen atoms and negative oxygen ions. The influences of deposition position and sputtering pressure on the deposition rate were investigated. Resputtering altered the orientation of the MgO film from (111) to (001) when the film was deposited on a single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate. The density distribution of energetic particles was calculated on the basis of the measured thicknesses of the MgO films deposited at different positions. The divergence angle of the energetic particle flux was estimated to be approximately 15°. The energetic particle flux might be similar to the assisting ion flux in the ion beam assisted deposition process and could affect the orientation of the MgO film growth.

  2. Preserving Subjective Wellbeing in the Face of Psychopathology: Buffering Effects of Personal Strengths and Resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth H Bos

    Full Text Available Many studies on resilience have shown that people can succeed in preserving mental health after a traumatic event. Less is known about whether and how people can preserve subjective wellbeing in the presence of psychopathology. We examined to what extent psychopathology can co-exist with acceptable levels of subjective wellbeing and which personal strengths and resources moderate the association between psychopathology and wellbeing.Questionnaire data on wellbeing (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life/Happiness Index, psychological symptoms (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, and personal strengths and resources (humor, Humor Style questionnaire; empathy, Empathy Quotient questionnaire; social company; religion; daytime activities, Living situation questionnaire were collected in a population-based internet study (HowNutsAreTheDutch; N = 12,503. Data of the subset of participants who completed the above questionnaires (n = 2411 were used for the present study. Regression analyses were performed to predict wellbeing from symptoms, resources, and their interactions.Satisfactory levels of wellbeing (happiness score 6 or higher were found in a substantial proportion of the participants with psychological symptoms (58% and 30% of those with moderate and severe symptom levels, respectively. The association between symptoms and wellbeing was large and negative (-0.67, P < .001, but less so in persons with high levels of self-defeating humor and in those with a partner and/or pet. Several of the personal strengths and resources had a positive main effect on wellbeing, especially self-enhancing humor, having a partner, and daytime activities.Cultivating personal strengths and resources, like humor, social/animal company, and daily occupations, may help people preserve acceptable levels of wellbeing despite the presence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress.

  3. Buffer or amplifier? Longitudinal effects of social support for functional autonomy/dependence on older adults' chronic pain experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Marta; Bernardes, Sónia F; Goubert, Liesbet; Beyers, Wim

    2017-12-01

    This longitudinal study aimed to investigate (a) the moderating role of formal social support for functional autonomy versus dependence on the relationship between pain intensity and pain-related disability among older adults with chronic pain and (b) the mediating role of pain-related self-efficacy and pain-related fear in this moderation. One hundred and seventy older adults (Mage = 78.0; SD = 8.7) with chronic musculoskeletal pain participated in a 3-month prospective study, with 3 measurement moments. Participants filled out the Formal Social Support for Autonomy and Dependence in Pain Inventory, the Portuguese versions of the Brief Pain Inventory, the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Using structural equation modeling, it was found that perceived promotion of autonomy, at Time 1, moderated the relationship between pain intensity (T1) and pain-related disability (T2); this moderation was fully mediated by pain-related self-efficacy (T2). Perceived promotion of dependence was not a significant moderator. These findings highlight the importance of social support for functional autonomy in buffering the impact of pain intensity on older adults' pain-related disability. Also, they clarify the role of pain-related self-efficacy in this effect. Implications for the development of intervention programs, with formal caregivers, to reduce the impact of chronic pain on older adults' healthy ageing process, are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. In-capillary determination of creatinine with electrophoretically mediated microanalysis: characterization of the effects of reagent zone and buffer conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Philip E; Schildt, Derek C; Strein, Timothy G

    2009-01-02

    Previous work has demonstrated proof-of-concept for carrying out the clinically useful Jaffe reaction between creatinine and picrate within a capillary tube using electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA). Here, it is shown that careful control of reagent plug length as well as concentration and pH of the background electrolyte (BGE) can result in a marked improvement in the sensitivity of this assay. Increasing the length of the picrate reagent zone is shown to give rise to as much as a 3-4-fold enhancement, and increasing the concentration and/or pH of the borate buffer also results in an additional, albeit modest, improvement in sensitivity. Interestingly, borate BGE concentrations approaching 100mM give rise to an unexplained drop in reaction efficiency, an effect which can be avoided by utilizing lower borate concentration with higher pH. The improvements appear to primarily minimize electrodispersion of the picrate reagent, allowing higher picrate concentration in the reaction zone. The same conditions also appear to minimize the electrodispersion of the in-line product as well. With optimized EMMA parameters, the sensitivity of the in-line Jaffe chemistry can be enhanced to an extent that there is no need for the two capillary "high sensitivity" detection system required in previous work. Using optimized conditions, three different human serum samples spanning the expected clinical range of creatinine concentrations were successfully analyzed. Overall, this work illustrates the importance of systematically characterizing the conditions under which EMMA analyses are carried out.

  5. Effect of AQM-Based RLC Buffer Management on the eNB Scheduling Algorithm in LTE Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Kumar Paul

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of the Long-Term Evolution (LTE network and smart-phones, most of today’s internet content is delivered via cellular links. Due to the nature of wireless signal propagation, the capacity of the last hop link can vary within a short period of time. Unfortunately, Transmission Control Protocol (TCP does not perform well in such scenarios, potentially leading to poor Quality of Service (QoS (e.g., end-to-end throughput and delay for the end user. In this work, we have studied the effect of Active Queue Management (AQM based congestion control and intra LTE handover on the performance of different Medium Access Control (MAC schedulers with TCP traffic by ns3 simulation. A proper AQM design in the Radio Link Control (RLC buffer of eNB in the LTE network leads to the avoidance of forced drops and link under-utilization along with robustness to a variety of network traffic-loads. We first demonstrate that the original Random Early Detection (RED linear dropping function cannot cope well with different traffic-load scenarios. Then, we establish a heuristic approach in which different non-linear functions are proposed with one parameter free to define. In our simulations, we demonstrate that the performance of different schedulers can be enhanced via proper dropping function.

  6. Effect of buffer strips and soil texture on runoff losses of flufenacet and isoxaflutole from maize fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Marco; Ferrero, Aldo; Letey, Marilisa; De Palo, Fernando; Vidotto, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The influence of buffer strips and soil texture on runoff of flufenacet and isoxaflutole was studied for two years in Northern Italy. The efficacy of buffer strips was evaluated on six plots characterized by different soil textures; two plots had Riva soil (18.6% sand, 63.1% silt, 18.3% clay) while the remaining four plots had Tetto Frati (TF) soil (37.1% sand, 57% silt, 5.9% clay). Additionally, the width of the buffer strips, constituted of spontaneous vegetation grown after crop sowing, was also compared for their ability to abate runoff waters. Chemical residues in water following runoff events were investigated, as well as their dissipation in the soil. After the first runoff events, concentrations of herbicides in water samples collected from Riva plots were as much as four times lower in waters from TF plots. On average of two growing seasons, the field half-life of flufenacet in the upper soil layer (5 cm) ranged between 8.1 and 12.8 days in Riva soil, 8.5 and 9.3 days in TF soil. Isoxaflutole field half-life was less than 1 day. The buffer strip was very affective by the uniformity of the vegetative cover, particularly, at the beginning of the season. In TF plots, concentration differences were generally due to the presence or absence of the buffer strip, regardless of its width.

  7. Happiness as a Buffer of the Association Between Dependence and Acute Tobacco Abstinence Effects in African American Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liautaud, Madalyn M; Leventhal, Adam M; Pang, Raina D

    2017-09-27

    African-American (AA) smokers are at disproportionate risk of tobacco dependence, utilizing smoking to regulate stress, and poor cessation outcomes. Positive emotional traits may function as coping factors that buffer the extent to which dependence increases vulnerability to adverse responses to acute tobacco abstinence (i.e., tobacco withdrawal). This laboratory study examined subjective happiness (SH; dispositional orientation towards frequent and intense positive affect [PA] and life satisfaction) as a moderator of the relation between tobacco dependence and subjective and behavioral abstinence effects among AA smokers. AA smokers (N=420, 39.0% female) completed self-report measures of tobacco dependence and SH followed by two counterbalanced experimental sessions (non-abstinent vs. 16-hr abstinent) involving self-report measures of composite withdrawal, urge to smoke, and mood, and a behavioral smoking task in which participants could: (a) earn money to delay smoking reinstatement, and (b) subsequently purchase cigarettes to smoke. Tobacco dependence was positively associated with increased abstinence effects in composite withdrawal, urge to smoke, PA, and latency to smoking reinstatement (pssmokers. The current study contributes to a growing body of literature examining the potentially advantageous role of positive emotional traits to smokers. We do so by identifying a relatively understudied psychological construct within tobacco research-subjective happiness-that may suppress the extent to which more severe tobacco dependence increases risk for subjective withdrawal-related distress during acute smoking abstinence in African American smokers. In doing so, the study provides a primer for future targeting of subjective happiness and other positive emotional traits as means to understand and treat acute tobacco abstinence effects among dependent African American smokers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  8. Redox Buffer Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The proper functioning of enzymes in bodily fluids requires that the pH be maintained within rather narrow limits. The first line of defense against large pH fluctuations in such fluids is the passive control provided by the presence of pH buffers. The ability of pH buffers to stabilize the pH is indicated by the buffer value b introduced in 1922 by van Slyke. It is equally important for many enzymes that the redox potential is kept within a narrow range. In that case, stability of the potential is most readily achieved with a redox buffer. In this communication we define the redox buffer strength by analogy with acid-base buffer strength.

  9. Effects of inclusion levels of banana (Musa spp.) peelings on feed degradability and rumen environment of cattle fed basal elephant grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambi-Kasozi, Justine; Sabiiti, Elly Nyambobo; Bareeba, Felix Budara; Sporndly, Eva; Kabi, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The effect of feeding varying banana peeling (BP) levels on rumen environment and feed degradation characteristics was evaluated using three rumen fistulated steers in four treatments. The steers were fed BP at 0, 20, 40, and 60% levels of the daily ration with basal elephant grass (EG) to constitute four diets. Maize bran, cotton seed cake, and Gliricidia sepium were offered to make the diets iso-nitrogenous. The nylon bag technique was used to measure BP and EG dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradabilities at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h. Rumen fluid samples were collected to determine pH and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations. Effective DM, CP, and NDF degradabilities of BP ranged between 574 and 807, 629-802, and 527-689 g/kg, respectively, being lower at higher BP levels. Elephant grass degradability behaved similarly with relatively high effective CP degradability (548-569 g/kg) but low effective DM and NDF degradability (381-403 and 336-373 g/kg, respectively). Rumen pH and VFA reduced with increasing BP in the diets. Rumen pH dropped to 5.8 and 5.9 at the 40 and 60% BP feeding levels, respectively. Banana peelings were better degraded than EG but higher BP levels negatively affected feed degradability and rumen environment.

  10. Effect of cadmium on growth, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition and metal accumulation of an energy crop, king grass (Pennisetum americanum × P. purpureum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xingfeng; Zhang, Xuehong; Gao, Bo; Li, Zhian; Xia, Hanping; Li, Haifang; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of cadmium (Cd) on growth, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition and Cd accumulation of an energy crop, king grass (Pennisetum purpureum K. Schumach × P. thyphoideum Rich). Leaf shape was more sensitive to Cd than biomass and root length. Leaves had no visual toxic symptoms under 8–100 mg kg −1 Cd. High Cd pollution significantly increased the chlorophyll content of young leaves but showed no effect on mature leaves. Cd enhanced the maximum net photosynthetic rate (Amax), light compensation point (LCP) and light saturation point (LSP). For roots, Cd had a positive relationship with Zn, Mg and Ca. For stems, Cd had a positive relationship with Zn, Cu, Mg and Ca, while had a negative relationship with Mn. For leaves, Cd had a positive relationship with Zn, Mg and K, while had a negative relationship with Mn and Ca. Plant tissues accumulated 98, 21 and 26 mg kg −1 Cd in roots, stems and leaves, respectively, and extracted 477 and 515 μg Cd in roots and shoots for a single plant at 30 mg kg −1 Cd, respectively. King grass would require 23–290 years to remediate contaminated soil with 8–100 mg kg −1 Cd. It could extract 0.94–1.31 kg ha −1 Cd and produce 216–375 t ha −1 of fresh biomass and 28–79 t ha −1 of dry biomass each year. In summary, king grass had high biomass production and phytoremediation potential. - Highlights: • The effect of Cd on growth, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition and Cd accumulation of energy crop, king grass was investigated. • Plant leaves had no visual toxic symptoms under 8–100 mg kg −1 soil Cd. • Plant could extract 0.94–1.31 kg ha −1 Cd and produce 28–79 t ha −1 of dry biomass each year under 8–100 mg kg −1 soil Cd

  11. Early childhood behavioral inhibition, adult psychopathology and the buffering effects of adolescent social networks: a twenty-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Tahl I; Fox, Nathan A; Pine, Daniel S; Walker, Olga L; Degnan, Kathryn A; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We examined whether the temperament of behavioral inhibition is a significant marker for psychopathology in early adulthood and whether such risk is buffered by peer social networks. Participants (N = 165) were from a prospective study spanning the first two decades of life. Temperament was characterized during infancy and early childhood. Extent of involvement in peer social networks was measured during adolescence, and psychopathology was assessed in early adulthood. Latent Class Analyses generated comprehensive variables at each of three study time-points. Regressions assessed (a) the direct effect of early behavioral inhibition on adult psychopathology (b) the moderating effect of adolescent involvement in social peer networks on the link between temperamental risk and adult psychopathology. Stable behavioral inhibition in early childhood was negatively associated with adult mental health (R(2 ) = .07, p = .005, β = -.26), specifically increasing risk for adult anxiety disorders (R(2) = .04, p = .037, β = .19). These temperament-pathology relations were significantly moderated by adolescent peer group social involvement and network size (Total R(2) = .13, p = .027, β = -.22). Temperament predicted heightened risk for adult anxiety when adolescent social involvement was low (p = .002, β = .43), but not when adolescent social involvement was high. Stable behavioral inhibition throughout early childhood is a risk factor for adult anxiety disorders and interacts with adolescent social involvement to moderate risk. This is the first study to demonstrate the critical role of adolescent involvement in socially active networks in moderating long-lasting temperamental risk over the course of two decades, thus informing prevention/intervention approaches. © 2015 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  12. Safeguarding Ecosystem Services: A Methodological Framework to Buffer the Joint Effect of Habitat Configuration and Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza C Giannini

    schemes. Overall, our proposed methodological framework could help design novel conservational and agricultural practices that can be crucial to conserve ecosystem services by buffering the joint effect of habitat configuration and climate change.

  13. Safeguarding Ecosystem Services: A Methodological Framework to Buffer the Joint Effect of Habitat Configuration and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Tereza C.; Tambosi, Leandro R.; Acosta, André L.; Jaffé, Rodolfo; Saraiva, Antonio M.; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera L.; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    . Overall, our proposed methodological framework could help design novel conservational and agricultural practices that can be crucial to conserve ecosystem services by buffering the joint effect of habitat configuration and climate change. PMID:26091014

  14. Safeguarding Ecosystem Services: A Methodological Framework to Buffer the Joint Effect of Habitat Configuration and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Tereza C; Tambosi, Leandro R; Acosta, André L; Jaffé, Rodolfo; Saraiva, Antonio M; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera L; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    , our proposed methodological framework could help design novel conservational and agricultural practices that can be crucial to conserve ecosystem services by buffering the joint effect of habitat configuration and climate change.

  15. Organellar Calcium Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Daniel; Michalak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ is an important intracellular messenger affecting many diverse processes. In eukaryotic cells, Ca2+ storage is achieved within specific intracellular organelles, especially the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum, in which Ca2+ is buffered by specific proteins known as Ca2+ buffers. Ca2+ buffers are a diverse group of proteins, varying in their affinities and capacities for Ca2+, but they typically also carry out other functions within the cell. The wide range of organelles containing Ca2+ and the evidence supporting cross-talk between these organelles suggest the existence of a dynamic network of organellar Ca2+ signaling, mediated by a variety of organellar Ca2+ buffers. PMID:21421925

  16. Effect of Ga2O3 buffer layer thickness on the properties of Cu/ITO thin films deposited on flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Huihui; Yan Jinliang; Xu Chengyang; Meng Delan

    2014-01-01

    Cu and Cu/ITO films were prepared on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates with a Ga 2 O 3 buffer layer using radio frequency (RF) and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering. The effect of Cu layer thickness on the optical and electrical properties of the Cu film deposited on a PET substrate with a Ga 2 O 3 buffer layer was studied, and an appropriate Cu layer thickness of 4.2 nm was obtained. Changes in the optoelectrical properties of Cu(4.2 nm)/ITO(30 nm) films were investigated with respect to the Ga 2 O 3 buffer layer thickness. The optical and electrical properties of the Cu/ITO films were significantly influenced by the thickness of the Ga 2 O 3 buffer layer. A maximum transmission of 86%, sheet resistance of 45 Ω/□ and figure of merit of 3.96 × 10 −3 Ω −1 were achieved for Cu(4.2 nm)/ITO(30 nm) films with a Ga 2 O 3 layer thickness of 15 nm. (semiconductor materials)

  17. Effect of a SiO2 buffer layer on the characteristics of In2O3-ZnO-SnO2 films deposited on PET substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, B.-J.; Hong, J.-S.; Kim, S.-T.; Kim, H.-M.; Park, S.-H.; Kim, J.-J.; Ahn, J.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Transparent and conducting In 2 O 3 -ZnO-SnO 2 (IZTO) thin films were prepared on flexible PET substrates at room temperature by using an ion-gun-assisted sputtering technique. We mainly investigated the effect of a SiO 2 buffer layer, deposited in-between the film and the PET substrate, on the electrical stability of the film under various external stresses caused by moist-heat or violent temperature variations. The insertion of the SiO 2 layer improves structural, optical and electrical properties of the films: The IZTO/SiO 2 /PET film with a buffer shows a change (∼4 %) in the sheet resistance much smaller than that of the IZTO/PET film without a buffer (∼22 %), against a severe thermal stress of the repeated processes between quenching at -25 .deg. C and annealing at 100 .deg. C for 5 min at each process. Under a moist-heat stress at 90 % relative humidity at 80 .deg. C, the IZTO/SiO 2 /PET film responds with only a slight change (∼8.5 %) in the sheet resistance from 30.2 to 33.0 Ω/□ after being exposed for 240 h. The enhanced stability is understood to be the result of the buffer layers acting as a blocking barrier to water vapor or organic solvents diffusing from the PET substrate during deposition or annealing.

  18. A control volume scheme for three-dimensional transport: buffer and matrix effect on a decay chain transport in the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. G.; Kang, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional numerical code, B3R developed for nuclide transport of an arbitrary length of decay chain in the buffer between the canister and adjacent rock in a high-level radioactive waste repository by adopting a finite difference method utilizing the control-volume scheme, some illustrative calculations have been done. A linear sorption isotherm, nuclide transport due to diffusion in the buffer and the rock matrix, and advection and dispersion along thin rigid parallel fractures existing in a saturated porous rock matrix as well as diffusion through the fracture wall into the matrix is assumed. In such kind of repository, buffer and rock matrix are known to be important physico-chemical barriers in nuclide retardation. To show effects of buffer and rock matrix on nuclide transport in HLW repository and also to demonstrate usefulness of B3R, several cases of breakthrough curves as well as three-dimensional plots of concentration isopleths associated with these two barriers are introduced for a typical case of decay chain of 234 U→ 230 Th→ 226 Ra, which is the most important chain as far as the human environment is concerned

  19. Effect of InSb/In0.9Al0.1Sb superlattice buffer layer on the structural and electronic properties of InSb films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Min; Cui, Lijie; Wang, Baoqiang; Zhu, Zhanping; Zeng, Yiping

    2017-07-01

    The effect of InSb/In0.9Al0.1Sb buffer layers on InSb thin films grown on GaAs (0 0 1) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. The crystal quality and the surface morphology of InSb are characterized by XRD and AFM. The carrier transport property is researched through variable temperature hall test. The sharp interface between InSb/In0.9Al0.1Sb is demonstrated important for the high quality InSb thin film. We try different superlattice buffer layers by changing ratios, 2-0.5, thickness, 300-450 nm, and periods, 20-50. According to the function of the dislocation density to the absolute temperature below 150 K with different periods of SL buffers, we can find that the number of periods of superlattice is a major factor to decrease the density of threading dislocations. With the 50 periods SL buffer layer, the electron mobility of InSb at the room temperature and liquid nitrogen cooling temperature is ∼63,000 and ∼4600 cm2/V s, respectively. We deduce that the interface in the SL structure works as a filter layer to prevent the dislocation propagating to the upper InSb thin films.

  20. The effect of nitrogen availability and water conditions on competition between a facultative CAM plant and an invasive grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo; Carr, David E; Personius, Ashden; Collins, Scott L

    2017-10-01

    Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are increasing their abundance in drylands worldwide. The drivers and mechanisms underlying the increased dominance of CAM plants and CAM expression (i.e., nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM plants, however, remain poorly understood. We investigated how nutrient and water availability affected competition between Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (a model facultative CAM species) and the invasive C 3 grass Bromus mollis that co-occur in California's coastal grasslands. Specifically we investigated the extent to which water stress, nutrients, and competition affect nocturnal carboxylation in M. crystallinum . High nutrient and low water conditions favored M. crystallinum over B. mollis , in contrast to high water conditions. While low water conditions induced nocturnal carboxylation in 9-week-old individuals of M. crystallinum , in these low water treatments, a 66% reduction in nutrient applied over the entire experiment did not further enhance nocturnal carboxylation. In high water conditions M. crystallinum both alone and in association with B. mollis did not perform nocturnal carboxylation, regardless of the nutrient levels. Thus, nocturnal carboxylation in M. crystallinum was restricted by strong competition with B. mollis in high water conditions. This study provides empirical evidence of the competitive advantage of facultative CAM plants over grasses in drought conditions and of the restricted ability of M. crystallinum to use their photosynthetic plasticity (i.e., ability to switch to CAM behavior) to compete with grasses in well-watered conditions. We suggest that a high drought tolerance could explain the increased dominance of facultative CAM plants in a future environment with increased drought and nitrogen deposition, while the potential of facultative CAM plants such as M. crystallinum to expand to wet environments is expected to be limited.

  1. Quantifying the effects of European beach grass on aeolian sand transport over the last century: Bodega Marine Reserve, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesmat, R.; Werner, S.; Smith, M. E.; Riedel, T.; Best, R.; Olyarnik, S.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of European beach grass (Ammophila arenaria) to coastal dune systems of western North America induced significant changes to the transport and storage of sediment, and consequently the nesting habitat of the western snowy plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus). At the Bodega Marine Reserve and Sonoma Coast State Park, Ammophila was introduced within the ~0.5 km2 dune area in the 1920's to limit the flux of sand through Bodega Harbor and agricultural land. To assess the potential impact of restoration efforts (Ammophila removal) on aeolian sediment flux, we measured sediment flux as a function of wind speeds and ground cover, and used these measurements to parameterize a spatial model for historical sand deposition Fine- to coarse-grained lithic to sub-lithic sand is delivered to the Bodega dune system from Salmon Creek beach, the down-shore terminus of a littoral system fed by the 3846 km2 Russian River catchment, several small (Gaffney ridge) at the edge of the planted region. An average accumulation rate of ~4,000 m3/yr is indicated within the study swath by the preserved sediment volumes. Within the modern dune system, unvegetated areas exhibit 2-3 meter wavelength, ~1/2 meter amplitude mega-ripples, and the uppermost 2-10 cm consists of coarse-sand to granule-sized armor layer. In contrast, grain-sizes in vegetated areas are largely vertically homogenous. Open areas are typically 2-8 meters lower than adjacent vegetated areas, and show evidence for net lowering of the land surface (i.e., exposed fence posts, roots). Conversely, vegetated areas appear prone to sediment accumulation, particularly downwind of unvegetated areas. We measured sand transport using 0.5 m high traps deployed at 18 sites throughout the dune field, and used a linear mixed effects model to predict transport rate as a function of wind and ground cover class, taking into account random effects of sampling date and repeated measurements at each site. The analysis indicates up

  2. Effects of water inflow and early water uptake on buffer and backfill materials in a KBS-3V repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, L.; Sanden, T.; Dueck, A.; Nilsson, U.; Goudarzi, R.; Andersson, L.; Jensen, V.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite is an excellent sealing material when it has reached full water saturation and swelling pressure. However, bentonite is not good for sealing inflowing water from fractures with potential to build high water pressure. It cannot stop inflow of water at the depth of a repository. The water inflow into the pellets filled slots in the deposition holes and the tunnels in a KBS-3V repository is expected to continue until these slots are water filled and the water flow stopped by an end plug. Then the water pressure gradient is transferred from the fracture/bentonite interface to the plug and the bentonite will have time to homogenize and seal. This scenario leads to a number of processes that can either be harmful to the bentonite or affect the water saturation and homogenization evolution. Last year a project (EVA) started in order to investigate the processes involved by this early water inflow. The project aims at developing a model for the processes piping, erosion, water filling of pellets filled slots, early water absorption and resulting water pressure increase against the plug. The project studies the effects of water inflow in deposition holes and deposition tunnels and the emergence of piping and erosion during installation and wetting of the buffer and backfill until all slots and the pellet fillings have been water filled and piping and erosion have ceased. The project includes laboratory tests of nine different processes and modeling. The laboratory program includes tests of the following processes: 1. Erosion; 2. Piping; 3. Water flow in pellet filled slots; 4. Sealing ability of bentonite; 5. Water absorption of the bentonite blocks; 6. Formation of water or gel pockets in a pellet filled slot; 7. Formation and outflow of bentonite gel; 8. Self-sealing of cracks by eroding water; 9. Buffer swelling before placement of backfill. The laboratory tests are ongoing and preliminary results and

  3. Laboratory studies on the effect of freezing and thawing exposure on bentonite buffer performance: Closed-system tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, T.; Martikainen, J. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-12-15

    This report presents a set of results from laboratory studies on the effect of freezing and thawing on compacted bentonite buffer material. In order to evaluate the effect of freezing and thawing on compacted bentonite buffer performance a series of experiments were conducted using closed, constant-volume cells as follows: Pre- and post-freezing swelling pressure measurements were performed on fully saturated MX-80 and Deponit CA-N bentonite samples, at dry density values of approximately 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}, over five freeze/thaw cycles from room temperature to -18 deg C with rapid (instantaneous) temperature exposure. Pressure measurements were performed on fully saturated MX-80 bentonite samples, at dry density values of 1.470 and 1.501 g/cm{sup 3}, during a temperature run from room temperature to -10 deg C with step-change temperature exposure and back from -10 deg C to room temperature under continuous temperature change exposure at 0.1 deg C/h. Pressure measurements were performed on fully saturated MX-80 bentonite samples, encompassing a range of dry density values from 0.940 to 1.534 g/cm{sup 3}, during repeated temperature runs from room temperature to -10 deg C and back with continuous temperature change exposure at 0.1 deg C/h. Pressure measurements were performed on a fully saturated Deponit CA-N bentonite sample, at a dry density of 1.484 g/cm{sup 3}, during a temperature run from room temperature to -10 deg C and back with continuous temperature change exposure at 0.1 deg C/h. In some cases, hydraulic conductivity measurements were performed before and after freeze/thaw exposure. In general, exposure to freezing temperatures, down to an average temperature of -10 deg C, results in the development of significant internal pressures in compacted bentonite samples, which is attributed to the formation of ice. The specific test results are summarised as follows: Increases in pressure by factors of 1.5 to 2.2 were observed for MX-80 samples at dry densities

  4. Developing suitable buffers to capture transport cycling behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas; Schipperijn, Jasper; Christiansen, Lars Breum

    2014-01-01

    units (e.g., home-buffer-based neighborhoods) are not necessarily representative for environmental exposure. An increased understanding of appropriate neighborhoods is needed. GPS cycling tracks from 78 participants for 7 days form the basis for the development and testing of different neighborhood...... buffers for transport cycling. The percentage of GPS points per square meter was used as indicator of the effectiveness of a series of different buffer types, including home-based network buffers, shortest route to city center buffers, and city center-directed ellipse-shaped buffers. The results show...... center-directed ellipse-shaped buffers yielded better results than traditional home-based network buffer types. The ellipse-shaped buffer types could therefore be considered an alternative to more traditional buffers or administrative units in future studies of transport cycling behavior....

  5. On the stability of silicon field effect capacitors with phosphate buffered saline electrolytic gate and self assembled monolayer gate insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemed, Nofar Mintz; Inberg, Alexandra; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2013-01-01

    We herein report on the stability of Electrolyte/Insulator/Semiconductor (EIS) devices with Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) gate insulator layers, i.e. Electrolyte/SAM/Semiconductor (ESS) devices. ESS devices can be functionalized creating highly specific sensors that can be integrated on standard silicon platform. However, biosensors by their nature are in contact with biological solutions that contain ions and molecules that may affect the device characteristics and cause electrical instability. In this paper we present a list of potential hazards to ESS devices and a study of the device stability under common testing conditions analyzing possible causes for the instabilities. ESS capacitors under open circuit conditions (i.e. open circuit bias of ∼0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode) were periodically characterized. We measured the complex impedance of the capacitors versus bias and extracted the effective capacitance vs. voltage (C–V) curves using two methods. We observed a parallel shift of the C–V curves toward negative bias; showing an effective accumulation of positive charge. The quantitative analysis of the drift vs. time was found to depend on the effective capacitance evaluation method. This effect is discussed and a best-known method is proposed. The devices surface composition was tested before and after the stress experiment by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and sodium accumulation was observed. To further explore the flat-band voltage drift effect and to challenge the assumption that alkali ions are involved in the drift we conceived a novel alkali-free phosphate buffer saline (AF-PBS) where the sodium and potassium ions are replaced by ammonium ion and tested the capacitor under similar conditions to standard PBS. We found that the drift of the AF-PBS solution was much less at the first hour but was similar to that of the conventional PBS for longer stress times; hence, AF-PBS does not solve the long-term instability problem

  6. Effect of water content on the glass transition temperature of mixtures of sugars, polymers, and penetrating cryoprotectants in physiological buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Andrew C; Lee, Youngjoo; Burgess, Emma M; Karlsson, Jens O M; Eroglu, Ali; Higgins, Adam Z

    2018-01-01

    Long-term storage of viable mammalian cells is important for applications ranging from in vitro fertilization to cell therapy. Cryopreservation is currently the most common approach, but storage in liquid nitrogen is relatively costly and the requirement for low temperatures during shipping is inconvenient. Desiccation is an alternative strategy with the potential to enable viable cell preservation at more convenient storage temperatures without the need for liquid nitrogen. To achieve stability during storage in the dried state it is necessary to remove enough water that the remaining matrix forms a non-crystalline glassy solid. Thus, the glass transition temperature is a key parameter for design of cell desiccation procedures. In this study, we have investigated the effects of moisture content on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of mixtures of sugars (trehalose or raffinose), polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone or Ficoll), penetrating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, or dimethyl sulfoxide), and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutes. Aqueous solutions were dried to different moisture contents by equilibration with saturated salt solutions, or by baking at 95°C. The glass transition temperatures of the dehydrated samples were then measured by differential scanning calorimetry. As expected, Tg increased with decreasing moisture content. For example, in a desiccation medium containing 0.1 M trehalose in PBS, Tg ranged from about 360 K for a completely dry sample to about 220 K at a water mass fraction of 0.4. Addition of polymers to the solutions increased Tg, while addition of penetrating cryoprotectants decreased Tg. Our results provide insight into the relationship between relative humidity, moisture content and glass transition temperature for cell desiccation solutions containing sugars, polymers and penetrating cryoprotectants.

  7. Defensive aggregation (huddling in Rattus norvegicus toward predator odor: individual differences, social buffering effects and neural correlates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Bowen

    Full Text Available Aggregation is a defensive strategy employed by many prey species in response to predatory threat. Our group has characterized defensive aggregation (huddling in Rattus norvegicus in response to a ball of cat fur. In this situation some rats huddle less, and approach the threatening cue more than others (active vs. passive responders. The present study explored whether active responding is a stable phenotype associated with behaviors outside direct predatory encounters. The neural substrates of active and passive responding under predatory threat were explored using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Finally, we examined whether the presence of conspecifics during predatory threat biases behavior towards active responding. Active and passive responding styles were found to be stable in individual rats across consecutive group exposures to cat fur, and were predicted by anxiety-like behavior in an open-field emergence test. Active responders displayed less conditioned fear in an environment associated with predatory threat, and had higher post-exposure intake of a weak sucrose solution (a test of "anhedonia". Active responding was associated with: greater cat fur-induced activation of the accessory olfactory bulb, reflecting greater olfactory stimulation in rats actively approaching the fur; lowered activation of somatosensory cortex, reflecting reduced huddling with conspecifics; and reduced activation in the lateral septum. Social exposure to cat fur promoted active responding relative to individual exposure, and lowered c-Fos expression in the dorsomedial periaqueductal grey, medial caudate putamen and lateral habenula. We conclude that individual differences in anti-predator behavior appear stable traits with active responders having a more resilient phenotype. Social exposure to predatory threat has an acute buffering effect, subtly changing the neural and behavioral response towards threat and encouraging active responding. An association between

  8. Defensive Aggregation (Huddling) in Rattus Norvegicus toward Predator Odor: Individual Differences, Social Buffering Effects and Neural Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Michael T.; Kevin, Richard C.; May, Matthew; Staples, Lauren G.; Hunt, Glenn E.; McGregor, Iain S.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation is a defensive strategy employed by many prey species in response to predatory threat. Our group has characterized defensive aggregation (huddling) in Rattus norvegicus in response to a ball of cat fur. In this situation some rats huddle less, and approach the threatening cue more than others (active vs. passive responders). The present study explored whether active responding is a stable phenotype associated with behaviors outside direct predatory encounters. The neural substrates of active and passive responding under predatory threat were explored using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Finally, we examined whether the presence of conspecifics during predatory threat biases behavior towards active responding. Active and passive responding styles were found to be stable in individual rats across consecutive group exposures to cat fur, and were predicted by anxiety-like behavior in an open-field emergence test. Active responders displayed less conditioned fear in an environment associated with predatory threat, and had higher post-exposure intake of a weak sucrose solution (a test of “anhedonia”). Active responding was associated with: greater cat fur-induced activation of the accessory olfactory bulb, reflecting greater olfactory stimulation in rats actively approaching the fur; lowered activation of somatosensory cortex, reflecting reduced huddling with conspecifics; and reduced activation in the lateral septum. Social exposure to cat fur promoted active responding relative to individual exposure, and lowered c-Fos expression in the dorsomedial periaqueductal grey, medial caudate putamen and lateral habenula. We conclude that individual differences in anti-predator behavior appear stable traits with active responders having a more resilient phenotype. Social exposure to predatory threat has an acute buffering effect, subtly changing the neural and behavioral response towards threat and encouraging active responding. An association between active

  9. Defensive aggregation (huddling) in Rattus norvegicus toward predator odor: individual differences, social buffering effects and neural correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Michael T; Kevin, Richard C; May, Matthew; Staples, Lauren G; Hunt, Glenn E; McGregor, Iain S

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation is a defensive strategy employed by many prey species in response to predatory threat. Our group has characterized defensive aggregation (huddling) in Rattus norvegicus in response to a ball of cat fur. In this situation some rats huddle less, and approach the threatening cue more than others (active vs. passive responders). The present study explored whether active responding is a stable phenotype associated with behaviors outside direct predatory encounters. The neural substrates of active and passive responding under predatory threat were explored using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Finally, we examined whether the presence of conspecifics during predatory threat biases behavior towards active responding. Active and passive responding styles were found to be stable in individual rats across consecutive group exposures to cat fur, and were predicted by anxiety-like behavior in an open-field emergence test. Active responders displayed less conditioned fear in an environment associated with predatory threat, and had higher post-exposure intake of a weak sucrose solution (a test of "anhedonia"). Active responding was associated with: greater cat fur-induced activation of the accessory olfactory bulb, reflecting greater olfactory stimulation in rats actively approaching the fur; lowered activation of somatosensory cortex, reflecting reduced huddling with conspecifics; and reduced activation in the lateral septum. Social exposure to cat fur promoted active responding relative to individual exposure, and lowered c-Fos expression in the dorsomedial periaqueductal grey, medial caudate putamen and lateral habenula. We conclude that individual differences in anti-predator behavior appear stable traits with active responders having a more resilient phenotype. Social exposure to predatory threat has an acute buffering effect, subtly changing the neural and behavioral response towards threat and encouraging active responding. An association between active responding

  10. Effects of V2O3 buffer layers on sputtered VO2 smart windows: Improved thermochromic properties, tunable width of hysteresis loops and enhanced durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Shiwei; Cao, Xun; Sun, Guangyao; Li, Ning; Chang, Tianci; Shao, Zewei; Jin, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is one of the most well-known thermochromic materials, which exhibits a notable optical change from transparent to reflecting in the infrared region upon a metal-insulator phase transition. For practical applications, VO2 thin films should be in high crystalline quality to obtain a strong solar modulation ability (ΔTsol). Meanwhile, narrow hysteresis loops and robust ambient durability are also indispensable for sensitivity and long-lived utilization, respectively. In this work, a series of high-quality V2O3/VO2 bilayer structures were grown on quartz glass substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. Basically, the bottom V2O3 acts as the buffer layer to improve the crystallinity of the top VO2, while the VO2 serves as the thermochromic layer to guarantee the solar modulation ability for energy-saving. We observed an obvious increase in ΔTsol of 76% (from 7.5% to 13.2%) for VO2 films after introducing V2O3 buffer layers. Simultaneously, a remarkable reduction by 79% (from 21.9 °C to 4.7 °C) in width of hysteresis loop was obtained when embedding 60 nm V2O3 buffer for 60 nm VO2. In addition, VO2 with non-stoichiometry of V2O3±x buffer demonstrates a broadening hysteresis loops width, which is derived from the lattice distortion caused by lattice imperfection. Finally, durability of VO2 has been significantly improved due to positive effects of V2O3 buffer layer. Our results lead to a comprehensive enhancement in crystallinity of VO2 and shed new light on the promotion of thermochromic property by homologous oxides for VO2.

  11. Effect of buffer on the immune response to trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine in Bangladesh: a community based randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandir, Subhash; Ahamed, Kabir U; Baqui, Abdullah H; Sutter, Roland W; Okayasu, Hiromasa; Pallansch, Mark A; Oberste, Mark S; Moulton, Lawrence H; Halsey, Neal A

    2014-11-01

    Polio eradication efforts have been hampered by low responses to trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) in some developing countries. Since stomach acidity may neutralize vaccine viruses, we assessed whether administration of a buffer solution could improve the immunogenicity of tOPV. Healthy infants 4-6 weeks old in Sylhet, Bangladesh, were randomized to receive tOPV with or without a sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate buffer at age 6, 10, and 14 weeks. Levels of serum neutralizing antibodies for poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 were measured before and after vaccination, at 6 and 18 weeks of age, respectively. Serologic response rates following 3 doses of tOPV for buffer recipients and control infants were 95% and 88% (P=.065), respectively, for type 1 poliovirus; 95% and 97% (P=.543), respectively, for type 2 poliovirus; and 90% and 89% (P=.79), respectively, for type 3 poliovirus. Administration of a buffer solution prior to vaccination was not associated with statistically significant increases in the immune response to tOPV; however, a marginal 7% increase (P=.065) in serologic response to poliovirus type 1 was observed. NCT01579825. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Worktime demands and work-family interference: Does worktime control buffer the adverse effects of high demands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.A.E.; Beckers, D.G.J.; Taris, T.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Smulders, P.G.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether worktime control buffered the impact of worktime demands on work-family interference (WFI), using data from 2,377 workers from various sectors of industry in The Netherlands. We distinguished among three types of worktime demands: time spent on work according to one's

  13. Harvesting Effects on Species Composition and Distribution of Cover Attributes in Mixed Native Warm-Season Grass Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalis W. Temu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Managing grasslands for forage and ground-nesting bird habitat requires appropriate defoliation strategies. Subsequent early-summer species composition in mixed stands of native warm-season grasses (Indiangrass (IG, Sorghastrum nutans, big bluestem (BB, Andropogon gerardii and little bluestem (LB, Schizachyrium scoparium responding to harvest intervals (treatments, 30, 40, 60, 90 or 120 d and durations (years in production was assessed. Over three years, phased May harvestings were initiated on sets of randomized plots, ≥90 cm apart, in five replications (blocks to produce one-, two- and three-year-old stands. Two weeks after harvest, the frequencies of occurrence of plant species, litter and bare ground, diagonally across each plot (line intercept, were compared. Harvest intervals did not influence proportions of dominant plant species, occurrence of major plant types or litter, but increased that of bare ground patches. Harvest duration increased the occurrence of herbaceous forbs and bare ground patches, decreased that of tall-growing forbs and litter, but without affecting that of perennial grasses, following a year with more September rainfall. Data suggest that one- or two-year full-season forage harvesting may not compromise subsequent breeding habitat for bobwhites and other ground-nesting birds in similar stands. It may take longer than a year’s rest for similar stands to recover from such changes in species composition.

  14. Effects of toasting blue lupins, soybeans or barley as supplement for high-yielding organic dairy cows fed grass-clover silage ad libitum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Lisbeth; Lund, Peter; Kristensen, Troels

    2008-01-01

    . The supplement under investigation was: lupins in experiment 1, barley in experiment 2 and soybeans in experiment 3. The same forage mixture of grass-clover silage (84% of DM), grass pellets (11% of DM) and straw (5% of DM) was fed ad libitum in all the experiments. Toasting decreased effective rumen protein...... degradability determined in situ for all three supplements. Compared to untreated lupins toasting of lupins tended (P = 0.10) to increase milk yield, whereas toasting of soybeans did not affect milk yield. Toasting of lupins decreased (P = 0.03) milk protein content (32.2 versus 32.7 g/kg), whereas toasting...... of soybeans did not affect milk protein content. ECM yield was significantly higher (P = 0.002) for cows fed toasted soybeans than for cows fed untreated soybeans (28.1 versus 26.4 kg ECM) whereas there was no significant effect on ECM yield from toasting lupins or barley. It can be concluded...

  15. GUI development for GRASS GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Landa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses GUI development for GRASS GIS. Sophisticated native GUI for GRASS is one of the key points (besides the new 2D/3D raster library, vector architecture improvements, etc. for the future development of GRASS. In 2006 the GRASS development team decided to start working on the new generation of GUI instead of improving the current GUI based on Tcl/Tk.

  16. META-ANALYSIS OF NITROGEN REMOVAL IN RIPARIAN BUFFERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian buffer zones, the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands, are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling nitrogen loads entering water bodies. Riparian buffer width may be positively related to nitrogen removal effectiveness by influencing nitrog...

  17. The Effect of Feeding Calliandra Calothyrus in Different Patterns as a Supplement to Rhodes Grass Hay on Intake, Nitrogen Utilization and Milk Yield of dual Purpose Goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariuki, J.N.

    2002-01-01

    Eighteen dual purpose goats were used to evaluate the effects of feeding Calliandra caryothyrus leaf meal at different patterns as a supplement to Rhodes grass hay on intake, nitrogen utilization and milk yield. A basal diet of low quality Rhodes grass hay (fed at 90% ad libitum) and 100 g maize germ were offered to the goats over a 60-day experimental period. The treatments were:- (T1) 100 g day -1 calliandra for 60 days; (T2) 200 g day -1 calliandra for 30 days followed by another 30 days where 200 g or 0 g day -1 calliandra were alternated every 5 days; and (T3) 200 g or 0 g day -1 alternated every 5 days for 60 days. Total dry matter intake (DMI) was significantly (p -1 for T1, T2 and T3, respectively.Milk Yields had similar trend and averaged 166.1, 231.8 and 201.1 g day -1 for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. The utilization of nitrogen was also significantly (p<0.05) affected by pattern of supplement feeding. It was concluded from the results that the overall animal response could be influenced by how a limited quantity of supplement was fed

  18. Effect of heat stress and recovery on viability, oxidative damage, and heat shock protein expression in hepatic cells of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanting; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Xu, Pao; Habte-Tsion, H-Michael; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of hyperthermia and recovery on cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and heat shock protein (HSP60, 70, and 90) mRNA expression in the hepatic cells of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus. Triplicate groups of cultured cells were exposed to 30, 32, or 34 °C for 0.5 h and then immediately incubated at 27 °C in 5 % CO2 for 6, 12, 24, or 48 h. Hyperthermia stress greatly reduced cell viability and increased LDH release. Cell damage declined after recovery. Hyperthermia stress increased the lipid peroxide levels and reduced the antioxidant capacity (e.g., reduced SOD and T-AOC) of the cells. However, oxidative damage declined as the recovery period increased, and the levels of MDA, SOD, and T-AOC were restored. After cells were exposed to 32 °C, the expression of HSP60 after recovery for 1, 2, and 4 h (P recovery for 0.5 and 1 h (P recovery were significantly higher (P recovery period, the variations in HSP gene expression reflected the transition period from a state of cellular growth to one of the cellular repairs. In conclusion, hyperthermia depresses cell viability, induces oxidative damage, and increases HSP expression, which plays an important role during hyperthermic stress in grass carp hepatic cells.

  19. Stress, depression and medication nonadherence in diabetes: test of the exacerbating and buffering effects of family support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Egede, Leonard E; Wagner, Julie A; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2015-04-01

    Stressors and depressive symptoms have been associated with medication nonadherence among adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We tested whether these associations were exacerbated by obstructive family behaviors or buffered by supportive family behaviors in a sample of 192 adults with T2DM and low socioeconomic status using unadjusted and adjusted regression models. We found support for the exacerbating hypothesis. Stressors and nonadherence were only associated at higher levels of obstructive family behaviors (interaction AOR = 1.12, p = .002). Similarly, depressive symptoms and nonadherence were only associated at higher levels of obstructive family behaviors (interaction AOR = 3.31, p = .002). When participants reported few obstructive family behaviors, neither stressors nor depressive symptoms were associated with nonadherence. We did not find support for the buffering hypothesis; stressors and depressive symptoms were associated with nonadherence regardless of supportive family behaviors. Nonadherent patients experiencing stressors and/or major depressive symptoms may benefit from interventions that reduce obstructive family behaviors.

  20. How to increase the effectiveness of AES by knowing farmer perceptions -a choice experiment on pesticide free buffer zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Pedersen, Anders Branth; Nielsen, Helle Ørsted

    2010-01-01

      Danish farmers have been far less interested in agri-environmental subsidy schemes than anticipated. We use choice experiments to estimate 486 Danish farmers' preferences for a number of policy relevant schemecharacteristics. Subsidy schemes for pesticide free buffer zones along hedgerows...... management restrictions (choice of buffer zone width, using fertilizer, and reduced administrative burden). As a novelty, the administrative burden is captured by estimating how farmers value costless assistance to the actual application. For example, our model estimates indicate that an average farmer...... is willing to give up 120 Euros per hectare per year for changing a 5 year contract to a one year contract. However, whether a shorter contract is preferable from a societal point of view still depends on the environmental costs of reducing the contract length....

  1. The effects of recombination, mutation and selection on the evolution of the Rp1 resistance genes in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouet, Agathe; McMullan, Mark; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2015-06-01

    Plant immune genes, or resistance genes, are involved in a co-evolutionary arms race with a diverse range of pathogens. In agronomically important grasses, such R genes have been extensively studied because of their role in pathogen resistance and in the breeding of resistant cultivars. In this study, we evaluate the importance of recombination, mutation and selection on the evolution of the R gene complex Rp1 of Sorghum, Triticum, Brachypodium, Oryza and Zea. Analyses show that recombination is widespread, and we detected 73 independent instances of sequence exchange, involving on average 1567 of 4692 nucleotides analysed (33.4%). We were able to date 24 interspecific recombination events and found that four occurred postspeciation, which suggests that genetic introgression took place between different grass species. Other interspecific events seemed to have been maintained over long evolutionary time, suggesting the presence of balancing selection. Significant positive selection (i.e. a relative excess of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN /dS >1)) was detected in 17-95 codons (0.42-2.02%). Recombination was significantly associated with areas with high levels of polymorphism but not with an elevated dN /dS ratio. Finally, phylogenetic analyses show that recombination results in a general overestimation of the divergence time (mean = 14.3%) and an alteration of the gene tree topology if the tree is not calibrated. Given that the statistical power to detect recombination is determined by the level of polymorphism of the amplicon as well as the number of sequences analysed, it is likely that many studies have underestimated the importance of recombination relative to the mutation rate. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Social buffering and contact transmission: network connections have beneficial and detrimental effects on Shigella infection risk among captive rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Balasubramaniam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In social animals, group living may impact the risk of infectious disease acquisition in two ways. On the one hand, social connectedness puts individuals at greater risk or susceptibility for acquiring enteric pathogens via contact-mediated transmission. Yet conversely, in strongly bonded societies like humans and some nonhuman primates, having close connections and strong social ties of support can also socially buffer individuals against susceptibility or transmissibility of infectious agents. Using social network analyses, we assessed the potentially competing roles of contact-mediated transmission and social buffering on the risk of infection from an enteric bacterial pathogen (Shigella flexneri among captive groups of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Our results indicate that, within two macaque groups, individuals possessing more direct and especially indirect connections in their grooming and huddling social networks were less susceptible to infection. These results are in sharp contrast to several previous studies that indicate that increased (direct contact-mediated transmission facilitates infectious disease transmission, including our own findings in a third macaque group in which individuals central in their huddling network and/or which initiated more fights were more likely to be infected. In summary, our findings reveal that an individual’s social connections may increase or decrease its chances of acquiring infectious agents. They extend the applicability of the social buffering hypothesis, beyond just stress and immune-function-related health benefits, to the additional health outcome of infectious disease resistance. Finally, we speculate that the circumstances under which social buffering versus contact-mediated transmission may occur could depend on multiple factors, such as living condition, pathogen-specific transmission routes, and/or an overall social context such as a group’s social stability.

  3. Charge-collection efficiency of GaAs field effect transistors fabricated with a low temperature grown buffer layer: dependence on charge deposition profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMorrow, D.; Knudson, A.R.; Melinger, J.S.; Buchner, S.

    1999-01-01

    The results presented here reveal a surprising dependence of the charge-collection efficiency of LT GaAs FETs (field effect transistors) on the depth profile of the deposited charge. Investigation of the temporal dependence of the signal amplitude, carrier density contours, and potential contours reveals different mechanisms for charge collection arising from carriers deposited above and below the LT GaAs buffer layer, respectively. In particular, carriers deposited below the LT GaAs buffer layer dissipate slowly and give rise to a persistent charge collection that is associated with a bipolar-like gain process. These results may be of significance in understanding the occurrence of single-event upsets from protons, neutrons, and large-angle, glancing heavy-ion strikes. (authors)

  4. Effects of Buffering Key Habitat for Terrestrial Salamanders: Implications for the Management of the Federally Threatened Red Hills Salamander (Phaeognathus hubrichti and Other Imperiled Plethodontids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Apodaca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Forestry practices are placing ever increasing emphasis on sustainability and the maintenance of ecological processes, biodiversity, and endangered species or populations. Balancing timber harvest and the management of imperiled species presents a particularly difficult challenge during this shift, as we often know very little about these species’ natural history and how and why silviculture practices affect their populations. Accordingly, investigation of and improvement on current management practices for threatened species is imperative. We investigated the effectiveness of habitat buffers as a management technique for the imperiled Red Hills salamander (Phaeognathus hubrichti by combining genetic, transect, and body-condition data. We found that populations where habitat buffers have been employed have higher genetic diversity and higher population densities, and individuals have better overall body condition. These results indicate that buffering the habitat of imperiled species can be an effective management tool for terrestrial salamanders. Additionally, they provide further evidence that leaving the habitat of imperiled salamanders unbuffered can have both immediate and long-term negative impacts on populations.

  5. The effect of combining a relative-humidity-sensitive ventilation system with the moisture-buffering capacity of materials on indoor climate and energy efficiency of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloszyn, Monika [Universite de Lyon, Lyon F-69003 (France); Universite Lyon1, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); INSA-Lyon, CETHIL UMR CNRS 5008, bat. Sadi Carnot, F-69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Kalamees, Targo [Chair of Building Physics and Architecture, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehiteja tee 5 19086 (Estonia); Olivier Abadie, Marc [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana - PUCPR/CCET-Thermal Systems Laboratory, Rua Imaculada Conceicao, 1155 Curitiba, PR 80215-901 (Brazil); LEPTIAB-University of La Rochelle, Avenue M. Crepeau, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Steeman, Marijke [Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, UGENT-Ghent University, J. Plateaustraat 22, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Sasic Kalagasidis, Angela [Department of Building Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Sven Hultins gata 8, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2009-03-15

    Indoor moisture management, which means keeping the indoor relative humidity (RH) at correct levels, is very important for whole building performance in terms of indoor air quality (IAQ), energy performance and durability of the building. In this study, the effect of combining a relative-humidity-sensitive (RHS) ventilation system with indoor moisture buffering materials was investigated. Four comprehensive heat-air-moisture (HAM) simulation tools were used to analyse the performance of different moisture management strategies in terms of IAQ and of energy efficiency. Despite some differences in results, a good agreement was found and similar trends were detected from the results, using the four different simulation tools. The results from simulations demonstrate that RHS ventilation reduces the spread between the minimum and maximum values of the RH in the indoor air and generates energy savings. Energy savings are achieved while keeping the RH at target level, not allowing for possible risk of condensations. The disadvantage of this type of demand controlled-ventilation is that other pollutants (such as CO{sub 2}) may exceed target values. This study also confirmed that the use of moisture-buffering materials is a very efficient way to reduce the amplitude of daily moisture variations. It was possible, by the combined effect of ventilation and wood as buffering material, to keep the indoor RH at a very stable level. (author)

  6. Earthquake induced rock shear through a deposition hole when creep is considered - first model. Effect on the canister and the buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernelind, Jan [5T Engineering AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2006-08-15

    March, 2000, a study regarding 'Earthquake induced rock shear through a deposition hole' was performed. Existing fractures crossing a deposition hole may be activated and sheared by an earthquake. The effect of such a rock shear has been investigated in a project that includes both laboratory tests and finite element calculations. The buffer material in a deposition hole acts as a cushion between the canister and the rock, which reduces the effect of a rock shear substantially. Lower density of the buffer yields softer material and reduced effect on the canister. However, at the high density that is suggested for a repository the stiffness of the buffer is rather high. The stiffness is also a function of the rate of shear, which means that there may be a substantial damage on the canister at very high shear rates. The rock shear has been modeled with finite element calculations with the code ABAQUS. A three-dimensional finite element mesh of the buffer and the canister has been created and simulation of a rock shear has been performed. The rock shear has been assumed to take place perpendicular to the canister at the quarter point. The shear calculations have been driven to a total shear of 20 cm. This report summarizes the effect of considering creep in the canister for one of the previous cases. Two different creep models have been used - the first one has been suggested by K Pettersson and the second one has been suggested by R Sandstroem. Both have been implemented in the FE-code ABAQUS as a user supplied subroutine CREEP. This report summarizes results obtained by using the first model suggested by K Pettersson. As can be seen from the obtained results using the first creep model (in the following named creep{sub k}p) the effect of creep in copper doesn't affect stresses and strains in the buffer and the steel part very much. However, especially the stresses in the canister are highly affected.

  7. Forage fiber effects on particle size reduction, ruminal stratification, and selective retention in heifers fed highly digestible grass/clover silages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Anne-Katrine Skovsted; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Storm, Adam Christian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of NDF content in highly digestible grass/clover silage on particle size reduction, ruminal stratification, and selective retention in dairy heifers. The reduction in particle size from feed to feces was evaluated and related to feed intake...... measured. Intake of NDF increased linearly from 2.3 to 2.8 kg/d with greater NDF content of forages (P = 0.01), but silages were exposed to similar eating time (P = 0.55) and rumination time per kg NDF (P = 0.35). No linear effect of NDF content was found on proportion of LP in ingested feed boluses (P = 0.......31), medial rumen digesta (P = 0.95), ventral rumen digesta (P = 0.84), and feces (P = 0.09). Greater proportions of DM (P ruminal digesta compared with ventral rumen, and differences in DM proportion increased with greater NDF content (P = 0...

  8. Integrating environmental and in situ hyperspectral remote sensing variables for grass nitrogen estimation in savannah ecosystems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Information about the distribution of grass nitrogen (N) concentration is crucial in understanding rangeland vitality and facilitates effective management of wildlife and livestock. A challenge in estimating grass N concentration using remote...

  9. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques for grass nutrient estimations in savannah ecosystems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Information on the distribution of grass quality (nutrient concentration) is crucial in understanding rangeland vitality and facilitates effective management of wildlife and livestock. The spatial distribution of grass nutrient concentration occurs...

  10. Evaluation of Selenium and Molybdenum in soils and grasses of two cattle farms of Puerto Salgar (Cundinamarca) and its possible effects on livestock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Claudia; Cabrera, D; Mejia, L; Rojas, A

    1999-01-01

    The problem of selenium and seleniferous soils and its effects on animal and human population are quite well known in Colombia since Colonial times. Its doesn't happen the same with Mo and molibdenosis, an element and disease which effects are so serious or worst than those of Se, which in this investigation we assume caused by the same cretaceous sediments (Villeta Group) which traditionally has been recognized only responsible of the formation of seleniferous soils and toxic vegetation. To prove the foregoing hypothesis and as a contribution to the knowledge of the origin and effects of Mo problem in Colombia, the soil and grasses of two cattle farms of Puerto Salgar (Cundinamarca, Colombia): La Gloria and Candilejas, both located in the border of two streams recognized as carriers of seleniferous sediments coming from Villeta Formation were analyzed. The water and sediments of three recognized seleniferous streams of the area were also analyzed. In all samples Se and Mo total content were determined. As a general conclusion Se and Mo content in soils and grasses in both cattle farms could induce variable degree of intoxication on animal and human population. In La Gloria's farm Se content in soil was 11 ppm in sites close to the river's border (0-60 mt) and decrease to 2.17 ppm in farthermost sites (268 mt). In Candilejas's farm Se decreases from 5.6 ppm in closer sites to the river's border (0-130 mt) to 2.63 ppm in farther sites (296 mt). In La Gloria's farm Mo decreases from an average of 3.40 to 4.55 ppm in the closer sites, to 1 ppm in those farther. In Candilejas's farm Mo decreases from 4.64 ppm in sites near the river's border to 0.15 ppm in farther sites. In both farms Se content in Angleton grass (Dichantum aristatum) samples was 0.8 ppm, Mo instead fluctuates around 9 ppm in those samples taken next to the river's border and decreases to an average of 3 ppm in samples taken farther from border. Average content of Se and Mo in all three stream

  11. Evaluation of the effect of accounting method, IPCC v. LCA, on grass-based and confinement dairy systems' greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, D; Shalloo, L; Patton, J; Buckley, F; Grainger, C; Wallace, M

    2012-09-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guideline methodology, which are the principal greenhouse gas (GHG) quantification methods, were evaluated in this study using a dairy farm GHG model. The model was applied to estimate GHG emissions from two contrasting dairy systems: a seasonal calving pasture-based dairy farm and a total confinement dairy system. Data used to quantify emissions from these systems originated from a research study carried out over a 1-year period in Ireland. The genetic merit of cows modelled was similar for both systems. Total mixed ration was fed in the Confinement system, whereas grazed grass was mainly fed in the grass-based system. GHG emissions from these systems were quantified per unit of product and area. The results of both methods showed that the dairy system that emitted the lowest GHG emissions per unit area did not necessarily emit the lowest GHG emissions possible for a given level of product. Consequently, a recommendation from this study is that GHG emissions be evaluated per unit of product given the growing affluent human population and increasing demand for dairy products. The IPCC and LCA methods ranked dairy systems' GHG emissions differently. For instance, the IPCC method quantified that the Confinement system reduced GHG emissions per unit of product by 8% compared with the grass-based system, but the LCA approach calculated that the Confinement system increased emissions by 16% when off-farm emissions associated with primary dairy production were included. Thus, GHG emissions should be quantified using approaches that quantify the total GHG emissions associated with the production system, so as to determine whether the dairy system was causing emissions displacement. The IPCC and LCA methods were also used in this study to simulate, through a dairy farm GHG model, what effect management changes within both production systems have on GHG emissions. The findings suggest that

  12. The adsorption/desorption of phosphorus in freshwater sediments from buffer zones: the effects of sediment concentration and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Du, Yun; Du, Chao; Xu, Meng; Loáiciga, Hugo A

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffer zones adjacent to reservoirs and lakes protect aquatic ecosystems from polluted surface runoff. Sediments, collected from the buffer zones of Danjiangkou Reservoir (SR) and Honghu Lake (SL) in an ecologically fragile region in central China, were evaluated to reveal their phosphorus-adsorbing/desorbing properties and storage capacities. A nonlinear regression method was used to fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic and the modified crossover-type Langmuir isotherm models to the experimental data. It is shown that the adsorption of phosphorus onto the studied sediments followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic expression. The modified crossover-type Langmuir isotherm model was found to be a suitable method for describing adsorption/desorption processes in the experimental sediments. The maximum adsorption capacities (Q m), partitioning coefficients (K p), native adsorbed exchangeable phosphorus (NAP), and equilibrium phosphorus concentration (EPC0) were subsequently obtained for the experimental sediments. The effects of sediment concentration and pH were also investigated by batch experiments and Fourier transformation infrared and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The adsorption/desorption characteristics of different phosphate species on the sediments from reservoir and lake buffer zones were identified.

  13. Effect of oxygen pressure of SiOx buffer layer on the electrical properties of GZO film deposited on PET substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung Du; Ko, Young Gun; Oh, Sang Hoon; Song, Jean-Ho; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2009-01-01

    The present work was made to investigate the effect of oxygen pressure of SiO x layer on the electrical properties of Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films deposited on poly-ethylene telephthalate (PET) substrate by utilizing the pulsed-laser deposition at ambient temperature. For this purpose, the SiO x buffer layers were deposited at various oxygen pressures ranging from 13.3 to 46.7 Pa. With increasing oxygen pressure during the deposition of SiO x layer as a buffer, the electrical resistivity of GZO/SiO x /PET films gradually decreased from 7.6 x 10 -3 to 6.8 x 10 -4 Ω.cm, due to the enhanced mobility of GZO films. It was mainly due to the grain size of GZO films related to the roughened surface of the SiO x buffer layers. In addition, the average optical transmittance of GZO/SiO x /PET films in a visible regime was estimated to be ∼ 90% comparable to that of GZO deposited onto a glass substrate.

  14. The effect of pH, buffer capacity and ionic strength on quetiapine fumarate release from matrix tablets prepared using two different polymeric blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Rania; AlJanabi, Reem; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Abbas, Aiman

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the different physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal (GI) fluid (pH, buffer capacity, and ionic strength) on the in vitro release of the weakly basic BCS class II drug quetiapine fumarate (QF) from two once-a-day matrix tablet formulations (F1 and F2) developed as potential generic equivalents to Seroquel ® XR. F1 tablets were prepared using blends of high and low viscosity grades of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC K4M and K100LV, respectively), while F2 tablets were prepared from HPMC K4M and PEGylated glyceryl behenate (Compritol ® HD5 ATO). The two formulations attained release profiles of QF over 24 h similar to that of Seroquel ® XR using the dissolution medium published by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A series of solubility and in vitro dissolution studies was then carried out using media that simulate the gastric and intestinal fluids and cover the physiological pH, buffer capacity and ionic strength range of the GIT. Solubility studies revealed that QF exhibits a typical weak base pH-dependent solubility profile and that the solubility of QF increases with increasing the buffer capacity and ionic strength of the media. The release profiles of QF from F1, F2 and Seroquel ® XR tablets were found to be influenced by the pH, buffer capacity and ionic strength of the dissolution media to varying degrees. Results highlight the importance of studying the physiological variables along the GIT in designing controlled release formulations for more predictive in vitro-in vivo correlations.

  15. Grass defoliation affecting survival and growth of seedlings of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two experiments were conducted, one in the field and the other in the greenhouse, to investigate the effects of the intensity and frequency of grass defoliation on the survival and growth of Acacia karroo seedlings. In the greenhouse, seedlings growing with heavily clipped grasses had higher biomass production than those ...

  16. Forage fiber effects on particle size reduction, ruminal stratification, and selective retention in heifers fed highly digestible grass/clover silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, A K S; Weisbjerg, M R; Storm, A C; Nørgaard, P

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of NDF content in highly digestible grass/clover silage on particle size reduction, ruminal stratification, and selective retention in dairy heifers. The reduction in particle size from feed to feces was evaluated and related to feed intake, chewing activity, and apparent digestibility. Four grass/clover harvests (Mixtures of Lolium perenne, Trifolium pratense, and Trifolium repens) were performed from early May to late August at different maturities, at different regrowth stages, and with different clover proportions, resulting in silages with NDF contents of 312, 360, 371, and 446 g/kg DM, respectively, and decreasing NDF digestibility with greater NDF content. Four rumen-fistulated dairy heifers were fed silage at 90% of ad libitum level as the only feed source in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Silage, ingested feed boluses, medial and ventral ruminal digesta, and feces samples were washed with neutral detergent in nylon bags of 10-μm pore size, freeze dried, and divided into small (1 mm) particles by dry-sieving. Chewing activity, rumen pool size, and apparent digestibility were measured. Intake of NDF increased linearly from 2.3 to 2.8 kg/d with greater NDF content of forages (P = 0.01), but silages were exposed to similar eating time (P = 0.55) and rumination time per kg NDF (P = 0.35). No linear effect of NDF content was found on proportion of LP in ingested feed boluses (P = 0.31), medial rumen digesta (P = 0.95), ventral rumen digesta (P = 0.84), and feces (P = 0.09). Greater proportions of DM (P ruminal digesta compared with ventral rumen, and differences in DM proportion increased with greater NDF content (P = 0.02). Particle size distributions were similar for digesta from the medial and ventral rumen regardless of NDF content of the silages (P > 0.13). The LP proportion was >30% of particles in the ventral and medial rumen, whereas in the feces, the LP proportion was content of the silages

  17. Effects of form of nitrogen fertilization on the accumulation of Pb, As, Sc Ge and U in shoots of reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Moschner, Christin; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is necessary for growth and development of plants but it may also causes an increased metal uptake by plants due to changes of physiochemical properties of the elements in soil. The research in phytoremediation and phytomining conducted so far has revealed that the effect of nitrogen fertilizers initially depends on the form of application, as N is the only element that can be readily utilized by plants in its cationic (ammonia) or anionic form (nitrate) causing several effects in soil-plant system. However, to our knowledge most of the recent studies only documented an improvement of yield parameters and the uptake of heavy metals by plants as a result of different forms of N-fertilization. Here we report the result of a field experiment were we tried to obtain more information about the effects of form of N-fertilization on uptake of As, Pb, Sc Ge and U in reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.). In this study, reed canary grass was grown on 15 plots (4 m² each) under field conditions on a semi-field lysimer at the off-site soil recycling and remediation center in Hirschfeld (Saxony, Germany). To test the effects of a fertilization with different N-forms on the accumulation, the plots plants received 5 g N / m² in three doses as NH4SO4, Mg(NO3)2 or NH4NO3. The geometrical arrangement of plots was randomized and every treatment was fivefold replicated. After a 50 day period of plant growth, the plants were harvested and concentrations of trace metals in the shoots were measured with ICP-MS. As a result of the different N-treatments we found that in plants treated with NH4SO4 concentrations of Pb and As as well as of Sc, Ge and U were significantly increased in plant tissues compared to plants treated with NH4NO3. Furthermore, no significant changes in mineral composition of plants between the Mg(NO3)2 and NH4NO3 treatments could be observed. Our interpretation of these results is that it might be an effect of the acidification of

  18. Plant litter effects on soil nutrient availability and vegetation dynamics: changes that occur when annual grasses invade shrub-steppe communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel Bansal; Roger L. Sheley; Bob Blank; Edward A. Vasquez

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the quantity and quality of plant litter occur in many ecosystems as they are invaded by exotic species, which impact soil nutrient cycling and plant community composition. Such changes in sagebrush-steppe communities are occurring with invasion of annual grasses (AG) into a perennial grass (PG) dominated system. We conducted a 5-year litter manipulation...

  19. Effect of the addition of zero valent iron (Fe0) on the batch biological sulphate reduction using grass cellulose as carbon source

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mulopo, J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available of grass cuttings and iron filings. Reactors A and B received twice as much grass (100 g) as C (50 g). Reactor A received no iron filings to act as a control, while reactors B and C received 50-g iron filings for the experimental duration. The results...

  20. Effect of film thickness, type of buffer layer, and substrate temperature on the morphology of dicyanovinyl-substituted sexithiophene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Alexandr A., E-mail: alexander.levin@iapp.de [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Levichkova, Marieta [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Heliatek GmbH, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Hildebrandt, Dirk; Klisch, Marina; Weiss, Andre [Heliatek GmbH, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Wynands, David; Elschner, Chris [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Pfeiffer, Martin [Heliatek GmbH, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Leo, Karl; Riede, Moritz [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-01-31

    The influence of film thickness, type of buffer underlayer, and deposition substrate temperature on the crystal structure, microstructure, and morphology of the films of dicyanovinyl-substituted sexithiophene with four butyl-chains (DCV6T-Bu{sub 4}) is investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectivity methods. A neat Si wafer or a Si wafer covered by a 15 nm buffer underlayer of fullerene C{sub 60} or 9,9-Bis[4-(N,N-bis-biphenyl-4-yl-amino)phenyl]-9H-fluorene (BPAPF) is used as a substrate. The crystalline nature and ordered molecular arrangement of the films are recorded down to 6 nm film thickness. By using substrates heated up to 90 Degree-Sign C during the film deposition, the size of the DCV6T-Bu{sub 4} crystallites in direction perpendicular to the film surface increases up to value of the film thickness. With increasing deposition substrate temperature or film thickness, the DCV6T-Bu{sub 4} film relaxes, resulting in reducing the interplane distances closer to the bulk values. For the films of the same thickness deposited at the same substrate temperature, the DCV6T-Bu{sub 4} film relaxes for growth on Si to BPAPF to C{sub 60}. Thicker films grown at heated substrates are characterized by smaller density, higher roughness and crystallinity and better molecular ordering. A thin (up to about 6 nm-thick) intermediate layer with linear density-gradient is formed at the C{sub 60}/DCV6T-Bu{sub 4} interface for the films with buffer C{sub 60} layer. The XRD pattern of the DCV6T-Bu{sub 4} powder is indexed using triclinic unit cell parameters.