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Sample records for graphite oxidation rate

  1. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  2. Comparison of the oxidation rate and degree of graphitization of selected IG and NBG nuclear graphite grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-10-01

    The oxidation rate and degree of graphitization (DOG) were determined for some selected nuclear graphite grades (i.e., IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18, NBG-25) and compared in view of their filler coke type (i.e., pitch or petroleum coke) and the physical property of the grades. Oxidation rates were determined at six temperatures between 600 and 960 °C in air by using a three-zone vertical tube furnace at a 10 l/min air flow rate. The specimens were a cylinder with a 25.4 mm diameter and a 25.4 mm length. The DOG was determined based on the lattice parameter c determined from an X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that, even though the four examined nuclear graphite grades showed a highly temperature-sensitive oxidation behavior through out the test temperature range of 600-950 °C, the differences between the grades were not significant. The oxidation rates determined for a 5-10% weight loss at the six temperatures were nearly the same except for 702 and 808 °C, where the pitch coke graphites showed an apparent decrease in their oxidation rate, more so than the petroleum coke graphites. These effects of the coke type reduced or nearly disappeared with an increasing temperature. The average activation energy determined for 608-808 °C was 161.5 ± 7.3 kJ/mol, showing that the dominant oxidation reaction occurred by a chemical control. A relationship between the oxidation rate and DOG was not observed.

  3. Effects of air flow rate on the oxidation of NBG-18 and NBG-25 nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Chan Kim, Gen

    2017-08-01

    The effects of air flow rate (FR) (FR range: 1-10 L/min) on the oxidation of NBG-18 and NBG-25 nuclear graphite grades at temperatures between 600 and 1100 °C were studied, in reference to the standard test procedure for measuring oxidation rates of nuclear graphite in air (ASTM D 7542-09). The results showed that the FR effects on oxidation rate (OR) increase with increasing temperature with negligible FR effects at 600 °C for both materials. At high temperatures (>800 °C) there appears to be a two-stage relationship between FR and OR, which corresponds to the transition between reaction rates dominated by chemical kinetics and those dominated by diffusion. The material-specific microstructure appeared strongly influences this transition. The overall OR-FR behaviours of NBG-18 were higher than NBG-25 at 600-800 °C while negligible differences in the OR-FR behaviours between the two grades were observed at 900-1100 °C. The mercury porosimetry data showed that the higher OR-FR behaviours observed in NBG-18 may partly be attributed to the differences in the pore size distribution (open porosity and cumulative pore area) between the grades, especially for the large size pores (diameter ≫ 5 × 103 nm).

  4. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  5. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  6. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  7. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  8. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  9. Research of oxidation properties of graphite used in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xiaowei; Jean-Charles, R.

    2006-01-01

    The oxidation of graphite influences the graphite performance. There are many factors to influence the graphite oxidation. In 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor(HTR-10), the graphite IG-11 was used as moderator and structure material. The dependence of oxidation behaviour on temperature for the graphite IG-11, was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis in the temperature range of 400 to 1200 degree C. The oxidant was dry air (water content -6 ) with a flow rate of 20 ml/min. The oxidation time was 4 hours. The oxidation results exhibited three regimes: in the 400-600 degree C range, the activation energy was 158.56 kJ/mol and oxidation was controlled by chemical reaction; in the 600-800 degree C range, the activation energy was 72.01 kJ/mol and oxidation kinetics were controlled by in-pore diffusion; when the temperature was over 800 degree C, the activation energy was very small and oxidation was controlled by the boundary layer. Due to CO production, the oxidation rate increased at high temperatures. The effect of burn-off on activation energy was also investigated. In the 600-800 degree C range, the activation energy decreased with burn-off. Results in low temperature tests were very dispersible because the oxidation behaviour at low temperatures was sensitive to inhomogeneous distribution of impurities and some impurities can catalyse graphite oxidation. (authors)

  10. A pore structure model for the gas transport property changes, initial oxidation rates and cumulative weight loss of AGR moderator graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1985-09-01

    A quantitative model has been developed for the gas transport property variation, cumulative weight loss and initial oxidation rates of AGR moderator graphite. The model utilises the theory of dynamic moments of the pore structure to calculate the changes in physical properties brought about by radiolytic corrosion taking place within the graphite porosity. In order to account for the behaviour of the initial rate curves, and the weight loss data obtained it is necessary to invoke the presence of a group of cylindrical pore and a group of small slab-shaped pores. The latter are methane depleted. This is in addition to the pore group involved in gas transport which is best represented by cylinders of mean radius 2.13 μm. The model satisfactorily predicts the experimental weight loss data obtained from experiments in the DIDO 6V3 and BFB loops. (author)

  11. Air oxidation behavior of carbon and graphite materials for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Haruo

    1986-01-01

    Most components in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors are made of carbon and graphite which are efficient neutron moderators, and have high strength at high temperature. The demerit of these materials in HTGR use is that these are readily oxidized by the impurity oxidants in helium coolant in the normal operating condition, and by air in the case of an air ingress accident. In order to examine the candidate materials for the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan, the air oxidation experiment on some carbon and graphite was carried out. The materials tested were isotropic fine grain graphite (1G-11, 1G-110), anisotropic molded graphite (PGX, TS-1621), and anisotropic molded carbon (ASR-ORB, ASR-IRB, P3JHA-B). The uniform oxidation in the temperature range from 430 to 650 deg C and the non-uniform oxidation in the temperature range from 700 to 1000 deg C were tested. The oxidation of graphite by air was enhanced by the impurities in the graphite such as Co, Ni and V. The reaction rate of PGX graphite was nearly proportional to oxygen partial pressure. Below 650 deg C, the ratio of reaction products CO/CO 2 increased as temperature rose, but above 800 deg C, CO was oxidized to CO 2 . (Kako, I.)

  12. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  13. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

    2015-11-17

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

  14. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction...

  15. Graphite Oxide and Aromatic Amines : Size Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Diamanti, Evmorfi A. K.; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are performed in order to illuminate, for first time, the intercalation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic molecules into graphite oxide. Two representative molecules of this family, aniline and naphthalene amine are investigated. After intercalation, aniline

  16. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei, E-mail: wxu12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi, Lei; Zheng, Yanhua

    2016-09-15

    Graphite is widely used as moderator, reflector and structural materials in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the nuclear graphite in the reactor may be oxidized by air or steam. Oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite IG-110 which is used as the structural materials and reflector of HTR-PM is mainly researched in this paper. To investigate the penetration depth of oxygen in IG-110, this paper developed the one dimensional spherical oxidation model. In the oxidation model, the equations considered graphite porosity variation with the graphite weight loss. The effect of weight loss on the effective diffusion coefficient and the oxidation rate was also considered in this model. Based on this theoretical model, this paper obtained the relative concentration and local weight loss ratio profile in graphite. In addition, the local effective diffusion coefficient and oxidation rate in the graphite were also investigated.

  17. Comparison of Oxidation Characteristics of Selected Nuclear Graphite Grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Gen Chan

    2010-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of some selected nuclear graphite grades (i.e., IG-110, IG-430, NBG-18, NBG-25) were compared in view of their filler coke type and the physical property of the grades. Oxidation rates were determined at six temperatures between 600 ∼ 960 .deg. C in air by using a three-zone vertical tube furnace at a 10 L/min air flow rate. The specimens were a cylinder with a 25.4 mm diameter and a 25.4 mm length. Results showed that, even though the four examined nuclear graphite grades showed a highly temperature-sensitive oxidation behavior through out the test temperature range of 600 ∼ 950 .deg. C, the differences between the grades were not significant. The oxidation rates determined for a 5∼10 % weight loss at the six temperatures were nearly the same except for 702 and 808 .deg. C, where the pitch coke graphites showed an apparent decrease in their oxidation rate, more so than the petroleum coke graphites. These effects of the coke type reduced or nearly disappeared with an increasing temperature. The average activation energy determined for 608 ∼ 808 .deg. C was 161.5 ± 7.3 kJ/mol, showing that the dominant oxidation reaction occurred by a chemical control

  18. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  19. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Shi Lei; Zheng Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    Graphite is widely used in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). There are about 420,000 spherical fuel elements in the reactor core. The amount of graphite matrix in the reactor is dozens of tons. In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the matrix graphite of spherical fuel element may be oxidized by air or steam. This paper developed a new graphite oxidation model, considering the graphite porosity variation with the fractional burn-off. This model also considered the effects of microstructure development during oxidation and the resulting changing of diffusivity as well as the oxidation rate. Based on this theoretical model, this paper analyzed penetration depth and the graphite transient oxidation by oxygen. In addition, this paper obtained the weight loss ratio and oxidation rate trend over time and space. (author)

  20. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  1. Electron oxidation of graphite by fluorospecies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    The fluoride-ion affinity (A/sub F/sup -//) of phosphorus pentafluoride was determined to be 100 kcal/mole from the heats of reaction of the Lewis bases SF/sub 4/ and ClO/sub 2/F with PF/sub 5/ near room temperature. The fluoride-ion affinity of boron trifluoride was determined to be 92 kcal/mole from the heat of reaction of ClO/sub 2/F with BF/sub 3/. The crystal structure of ClO/sub 2/BF/sub 4/ was determined and a precise lattice energy was calculated from this structure and used to determined A/sub F/sup -//. Both PF/sub 5/ and BF/sub 3/ were found to react with graphite in the presence of fluorine gas to yield a variety of non-stoichiometric compounds. The fluoride-ion affinity of silicon tetrafluoride is not known, but it does not react with graphite and F/sub 2/ except at high pressures. These and previous results suggested a threshold in oxidizing power of intercalating species below which the oxidative intercalation reaction would not occur. The reduction of C/sub x/PF/sub 6/ by PF/sub 3/ proved that the reaction is thermodynamically controlled to some extent. The displacement of PF/sub 5/ in C/sub x/PF/sub 6/ by BF/sub 3/ (with a smaller A/sub F/sup -//) suggested that two BF/sub 3/ molecules may have a larger fluoride-ion affinity than one PF/sub 5/ and that B/sub 2/F/sub 7//sup -/ may be a stable anion in graphite. Conductivity studies of PF/sub x/ and BF/sub y/ salts showed that a large drop in conductivity when the reaction reaches first stage is due in the most part to direct fluorination of carbon in graphite.

  2. On modes and kinetics of nuclear graphite oxidation in massive air or steam ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M. S.; Tournier, J. M. P.

    2010-01-01

    A massive air or steam ingress in High and Very-High Temperature Reactors (HTRs and VHTRs) nominally operating at 600-950 deg. C is a design-basis accident requiring the development and validation of models for predicting the graphite oxidation and erosion and examining the potential of a fission products release and a loss in integrity of the graphite core and reflector blocks. Isotropic and porous nuclear graphite is of many types with similarities but also differences in microstructure; volume porosity, impurities; type and size of filler coke particles; graphitization; heat treatment temperature and thermal and physical properties. These as well as temperature affect the prevailing mode and kinetics of the graphite oxidation and burn-off rate. This paper reviews the fabrication procedures, characteristics, chemical kinetics and modes of oxidation of nuclear graphite for future model developments. (authors)

  3. Kinetics of Chronic Oxidation of NBG-17 Nuclear Graphite by Water Vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of kinetic measurements during accelerated oxidation tests of NBG-17 nuclear graphite by low concentration of water vapor and hydrogen in ultra-high purity helium. The objective is to determine the parameters in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) equation describing the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite in the helium coolant of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Although the helium coolant chemistry is strictly controlled during normal operating conditions, trace amounts of moisture (predictably < 0.2 ppm) cannot be avoided. Prolonged exposure of graphite components to water vapor at high temperature will cause very slow (chronic) oxidation over the lifetime of graphite components. This behavior must be understood and predicted for the design and safe operation of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. The results reported here show that, in general, oxidation by water of graphite NBG-17 obeys the L-H mechanism, previously documented for other graphite grades. However, the characteristic kinetic parameters that best describe oxidation rates measured for graphite NBG-17 are different than those reported previously for grades H-451 (General Atomics, 1978) and PCEA (ORNL, 2013). In some specific conditions, certain deviations from the generally accepted L-H model were observed for graphite NBG-17. This graphite is manufactured in Germany by SGL Carbon Group and is a possible candidate for the fuel elements and reflector blocks of HTGR.

  4. Oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-02-01

    Porous graphite plates, cylinders and cones with densities of 1.55-1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10 kW fiber laser at 0.075 -3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 - 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7 mm thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be re-deposited on the graphite surface. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside of the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. Visible emission spectroscopy reveals C2 Swan and CN red, CN violet bands and Li, Na, and K 2P3/2,1/2 - 2S1/2 doublets. The reacting boundary layer is observed using a mid-wave imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) at 2 cm-1 spectral resolution, 0.5 mm/pixel spatial resolution, and 0.75 Hz data cube rate. A two-layer radiative transfer model was used to determine plume temperature, CO, and CO2 concentrations from spectral signatures. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  5. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, A. R. S. S.; Piana, Francesco; Mičušík, M.; Pionteck, J.; Banerjee, S.; Voit, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 182, 1 October (2016), s. 237-245 ISSN 0254-0584 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite oxide * surface modification * conductive nanoparticles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.084, year: 2016

  6. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  7. Non-activated high surface area expanded graphite oxide for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermisoglou, E.C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.E.; Boukos, N.; Giannouri, M. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece); Lei, C.; Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology “Demokritos”, 153 43 Ag. Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One-step exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide via microwave irradiation. • Effect of pristine graphite (type, flake size) on the microwave expanded material. • Effect of pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the produced expanded material. • Expanded graphene materials with high BET surface areas (940 m{sup 2}/g–2490 m{sup 2}/g). • Non-activated graphene based materials suitable for supercapacitors. - Abstract: Microwave irradiation of graphite oxide constitutes a facile route toward production of reduced graphene oxide, since during this treatment both exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide occurs. In this work, the effect of pristine graphite (type, size of flakes), pretreatment and oxidation cycles on the finally produced expanded material was examined. All the types of graphite that were tested afforded materials with high BET surface areas ranging from 940 m{sup 2}/g to 2490 m{sup 2}/g, without intervening an activation stage at elevated temperature. SEM and TEM images displayed exfoliated structures, where the flakes were significantly detached and curved. The quality of the reduced graphene oxide sheets was evidenced both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The electrode material capacitance was determined via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The materials with PEDOT binder had better performance (∼97 F/g) at low operation rates while those with PVDF binder performed better (∼20 F/g) at higher rates, opening up perspectives for their application in supercapacitors.

  8. Radiation cured epoxy acrylate composites based on graphene, graphite oxide and functionalized graphite oxide with enhanced properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqiang; Bao, Chenlu; Song, Lei; Qian, Xiaodong; Yuan, Bihe; Hu, Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Epoxy acrylate (EA) composites containing graphite oxide (GO), graphene and nitrogen-double bond functionalized graphite oxide (FGO) were fabricated using UV-radiation and electron beam radiation via in-situ polymerization. Graphene and FGO were homogenously dispersed in EA matrix and enhanced properties, including thermal stability, flame retardancy, electrical conductivity and reduced deleterious gas releasing in thermo decomposition were obtained. Microscale combustion colorimeter results illustrated improved flame retardancy; EA/FGO composites achieved a 29.7% reduction in total heat release (THR) when containing only 0.1% FGO and a 38.6% reduction in peak-heat release rate (PHRR) when containing 3% FGO. The onset decomposition temperatures were delayed and the maximum decomposition values were reduced, according to thermogravimetric analysis which indicated enhanced thermal stabilities. The electrical conductivity was increased by 6 orders of magnitude (3% graphene) and the deleterious gas released during the thermo decomposition was reduced with the addition of all the graphite samples. This study represented a new approach to functionalize GO with flame retardant elements and active curable double bond to achieve better dispersion of GO into polymer matrix to obtain nanocomposites and paved a way for achieving graphene-based materials with high-performance of graphene in enhancement of flame retardancy of polymers for practical applications.

  9. Irradiation test plan of oxidation-resistant graphite in WWR-K Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Sakaba, Nariaki; Osaki, Hirotaka; Kato, Hideki; Fujitsuka, Kunihiro; Muto, Takenori; Gizatulin, Shamil; Shaimerdenov, Asset; Dyussambayev, Daulet; Chakrov, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Graphite materials are used for the in-core components of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor. In the case of air ingress accident in HTGR, SiO 2 protective layer is formed on the surface of SiC layer in TRISO CFP and oxidation of SiC does not proceed and fission products are retained inside the fuel particle. A new safety concept for the HTGR, called Naturally Safe HTGR, has been recently proposed. To enhance the safety of Naturally Safe HTGR ultimately, it is expected that oxidation-resistant graphite is used for graphite components to prevent the TRISO CFPs and fuel compacts from failure. SiC coating is one of candidate methods for oxidation-resistant graphite. JAEA and four graphite companies launched R&Ds to develop the oxidation-resistant graphite and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) partner project with JAEA and INP was launched to investigate the irradiation effects on the oxidation-resistant graphite. To determine grades of the oxidation-resistant graphite which will be adopted as irradiation test, a preliminary oxidation test was carried out. This paper described the results of the preliminary oxidation test, the plan of out-of-pile test, irradiation test and post-irradiation test (PIE) of the oxidation-resistant graphite. The results of the preliminary oxidation test showed that the integrity of the oxidation resistant graphite was confirmed and that all of grades used in the preliminary test can be adopted as the irradiation test. Target irradiation temperature was determined to be 1473 (K) and neutron fluence was determined to be from 0.54 × 10 25 through 1.4 × 10 25 (/m 2 , E>0.18MeV). Weight change, oxidation rate, activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in out-of-pile test and weight change, irradiation effect on oxidation rate and activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in PIE. (author)

  10. Lithium intercalation and interfacial kinetics of composite anodes formed by oxidized graphite and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, M.; Nobili, F.; Dsoke, S.; Tossici, R.; Marassi, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Camerino, Via S. Agostino, 1, 62032 Camerino (MC) (Italy); D' Amico, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, 62032 Camerino (MC) (Italy); Croce, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita degli Studi ' ' G. D' Annunzio' ' , Via dei Vestini, 31, 66013 Chieti (Italy)

    2009-05-01

    The electrochemical behavior of composite anodes prepared either by mixing partially oxidized graphite and Cu powders or by coating the pristine partially oxidized graphite electrodes with few-nanometer-thick Cu layers has been studied by slow-scan-rate cyclic voltammetry (SSCV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles over the temperature range of -30 C to 20 C. The interfacial intercalation/deintercalation kinetics has also been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The role of the Cu in improving low-temperature performances and kinetics of graphite electrodes is discussed. (author)

  11. Strength degradation of oxidized graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheon

    2010-01-01

    Air-ingress events caused by large pipe breaks are important accidents considered in the design of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (VHTRs). A main safety concern for this type of event is the possibility of core collapse following the failure of the graphite support column, which can be oxidized by ingressed air. In this study, the main target is to predict the strength of the oxidized graphite support column. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns, the compressive strength of IG-110 was obtained. The buckling strength of the IG-110 column is expressed using the following empirical straight-line formula: σ cr,buckling =91.34-1.01(L/r). Graphite oxidation in Zone 1 is volume reaction and that in Zone 3 is surface reaction. We notice that the ultimate strength of the graphite column oxidized in Zones 1 and 3 only depends on the slenderness ratio and bulk density. Its strength degradation oxidized in Zone 1 is expressed in the following nondimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.114. We found that the strength degradation of a graphite column, oxidized in Zone 3, follows the above buckling empirical formula as the slenderness of the column changes. (author)

  12. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  13. Effect of steam oxidation on the tensile strength of HTGR structural graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, A.J.; Chow, J.G.Y.

    1977-01-01

    The core support system of the General Atomic Company design High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contains type PGX graphite as core support blocks. The change in ultimate tensile strength of PGX graphite specimens with oxidation (burnoff) has been determined in a safety-related experimental program at Brookhaven National Laboratory(BNL). It is shown that Fe, an impurity in PGX graphite, plays a key role in the rate of oxidation. The subsequent failure of the graphite specimens is dependent upon the total weight loss due to oxidation. The results indicate that the loss in tensile strength is exponentially related to the percent burnoff (weight loss), and that grain orientation of the specimen has a significant effect

  14. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  15. CFD investigating the air ingress accident for a HTGR simulation of graphite corrosion oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferng, Y.M.; Chi, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A CFD model is proposed to investigate graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10. ► A postulated air ingress accident is assumed in this paper. ► Air ingress flowrate is the predicted result, instead of the preset one. ► O 2 would react with graphite on pebble surface, causing the graphite corrosion. ► No fuel exposure is predicted to be occurred under the air ingress accident. - Abstract: Through a compressible multi-component CFD model, this paper investigates the characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10 core under the postulated accident of gas duct rupture. In this accident, air in the steam generator cavity would enter into the core after pressure equilibrium is achieved between the core and the cavity, which is also called as the air ingress accident. Oxygen in the air would react with graphite on pebble surface, subsequently resulting in oxidation corrosion and challenging fuel integrity. In this paper, characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion during the air ingress accident can be reasonably captured, including distributions of graphite corrosion amount on the different cross-sections, time histories of local corrosion amount at the monitoring points and overall corrosion amount in the core, respectively. Based on the transient simulation results, the corrosion pattern and its corrosion rate would approach to the steady-state conditions as the accident continuously progresses. The total amount of graphite corrosion during a 3-day accident time is predicted to be about 31 kg with the predicted asymptotic corrosion rate. This predicted value is less than that from the previous work of Gao and Shi.

  16. Effects of porosity and temperature on oxidation behavior in air of selected nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongyue; Li Zhengcao; Miao Wei; Zhang Zhengjun

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite endures gas oxidation in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), which may threaten the safety of reactor. To study the oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite, weight loss curve is usually measured through Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) method. In this work, three brands of nuclear graphite for HTGR (i.e., HSM-SC, IG-11, and NBG-18) are oxidized under 873 and 1073 K in open air, and their weight loss curves are obtained. The acceleration of oxidizing rate is observed for both HSM-SC and IG-11, and is attributed to the large porosity increase during oxidation process. For HSM-SC, the porosity increase comes from preferential binder oxidation, and thus its binder quality shall be improved to obtain better oxidation resistance. Temperature effects on oxidation for HSM-SC are also studied, which shows that oxidizing gas tends to be exhausted at graphite surface at high temperature instead of penetrate into the interior of bulk. (author)

  17. A high-rate aqueous symmetric pseudocapacitor based on highly graphitized onion-like carbon/birnessite-type manganese oxide nanohybrids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgopa, K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the pseudocapacitive properties of birnessite-type MnO(sub2) grafted on highly graphitized onion-like carbon (OLC/MnO(sub2)). In a three-electrode setup, we evaluated two different substrates, namely a platinum disc and nickel...

  18. Study by electronic microscopy of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation (air, 620 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodon de Villeroche, Suzanne

    1968-01-01

    The author reports the study of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation in the air at 620 C. It is based on observations made by electronic microscopy. This study comes after another one dedicated to oxidation features obtained by hot corrosion of natural graphite, and aims at comparing pyrolytic graphite before and after irradiation in an atomic pile, and at performing tests on a graphite processed with ozone. After a recall of generalities about natural graphite and of some issues related to hot corrosion of natural graphite, the author presents some characteristics and features of irradiated and non-irradiated pyrolytic graphite. He reports the study of the oxidation of samples of pyrolytic graphite: production of thin lamellae, production of glaze-carbon replicates, oxidation of irradiated and of non-irradiated graphite, healing of irradiation defects, and oxidation of ozone-processed natural graphite [fr

  19. Elaboration of aluminum oxide-based graphite containing castables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ningsheng

    The aim of this work was set to develop effective and practicable new methods to incorporate natural flake graphite (FG) into the Al2O 3 based castables for iron and steel making applications. Three approaches, viz. micro-pelletized graphite (PG), crushed briquette of Al2O3-graphite (BAG) and TiO2 coated graphite (CFG), have been developed to insert flake graphite into Al2O 3 rich Al2O3-SiC based and Al2O 3-MgO based castables. These approaches were put into effect as countermeasures against the problems caused by FG in order: (1) to agglomerate the FG powders so as to decrease the specific surface area; (2) to diminish the density difference by using crushed carbon bonded compact of oxide-FG mixture; (3) to modify the surface of the flake graphite by forming hydrophilic coating; (4) to control the dispersion state of the graphite in the castable to maintain enough bonding strength; and (5) to use appropriate antioxidants to inhibit the oxidation of FG. The whole work was divided into two stages. In stage one, Al2O 3-SiC-C castables were dealt with to compare 4 modes of inserting graphite, i.e., by PG, BAG, CFG and FG. Overall properties were measured, all in correlation with graphite amount and incorporating mode. In stage two, efforts were made to reduce water demand in the Al2O3-MgO castables system. For this purpose, the matrix portion of the castable mixes was extracted and a coaxial double cylinder viscometer was adopted to investigate rheological characteristics of the matrix slurries vs. 4 kinds of deflocculants, through which the best deflocculant and its appropriate amount were found. Efforts were then made to add up to 30% MgO into the castables, using a limited amount of powders (antioxidants, Si, SiC, B4C and ZrB2, were added respectively or in combination. Overall properties of the castables, were investigated in correlation with MgO amount and graphite and antioxidant packages. Optimization work on oxidation and slag resistance was pursued. Finally

  20. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable. PMID:24310650

  1. Packaging material and flexible medical tubing containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A packaging material or flexible medical tubing containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g.

  2. A study of the relationship between microstructure and oxidation effects in nuclear graphite at very high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, I.-Hsuan; Tzelepi, Athanasia; Patterson, Eann A.; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang

    2018-04-01

    Graphite is used in the cores of gas-cooled reactors as both the neutron moderator and a structural material, and traditional and novel graphite materials are being studied worldwide for applications in Generation IV reactors. In this study, the oxidation characteristics of petroleum-based IG-110 and pitch-based IG-430 graphite pellets in helium and air environments at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1600 °C were investigated. The oxidation rates and activation energies were determined based on mass loss measurements in a series of oxidation tests. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Although the thermal oxidation mechanism was previously considered to be the same for all temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the significant increases in oxidation rate observed at very high temperatures suggest that the oxidation behavior of the selected graphite materials at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is different. This work demonstrates that changes in surface morphology and in oxidation rate of the filler particles in the graphite materials are more prominent at temperatures above 1200 °C. Furthermore, possible intrinsic factors contributing to the oxidation of the two graphite materials at different temperature ranges are discussed taking account of the dominant role played by temperature.

  3. Evaluation of the oxidation behavior and strength of the graphite components in the VHTR, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Motokuni; Kurosawa, Takeshi; Nomura, Shinzo; Imai, Hisashi

    1987-04-01

    Oxidation experiments have been carried out mainly on a fine-grained isotropic graphite, IG-110, at temperatures between 1173 and 1473 K in a water vapor/helium mixture. In most cases water vapor concentration was 0.65 vol% and helium pressure, 1 atm. Reaction rate and burn-off profile were measured using cylindrical specimens. On the basis of the experimental data the oxidation behavior of fuel block and core support post under the condition of the VHTR operation was estimated using the first-order or Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation with regard to water vapor concentration. Strength and stress-strain relationship of the graphite components with burn-off profiles estimated above were analyzed on the basis of the model for stress-strain relationship and strength of graphite specimens with density gradients. The estimation indicated that the integrity of the components would be maintained during normal reactor operation. (author)

  4. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  5. The characteristics of TiC and oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of TiC coated graphite under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Oku, Tatsuo; Ioka, Ikuo; Umekawa, Shokichi.

    1982-07-01

    Core region of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) consists mainly of polycrystalline graphite whose mechanical properties degradated by corrosion resulting from such impurities as O 2 , H 2 O, and CO 2 in coolant He gas. Mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of TiC coated graphite under corrosive condition were examined in order to evaluate the effects of TiC coating on preventing the graphite from its degradation in service condition of the VHTR. Characteristics of TiC coating was also examined using EPMA. Holding the specimen at 1373 K for 6 hr produced strong interface between TiC coating and the graphite, however, microcracks on TiC coating was observed, the origin of which is ascribed to mismatch in thermal expansion between TiC coating and the graphite. Oxidation rate of TiC coated graphite was one-thirds of that of uncoated graphite, which demonstrated that TiC coating on the graphite improved the oxidation resistance of the graphite. However, debonding of TiC coating layer at the interface was observed after heating for 3 to 4 hr in the oxidation condition. Changes in Young's modulus of TiC coated graphite were a half of that of uncoated graphite. Flexural strength of TiC coated graphite remained at the original value up to about 4 hr oxidation, therafter it decreased abruptly as was the trend of uncoated graphite. It is concluded that TiC coating on graphite materials is very effective in improving oxidation resistance and suppressing degradation of mechanical properties of the graphite. (author)

  6. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Theodosiou

    Full Text Available This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF. Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400-1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700-800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000-1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput.

  7. Water-soluble highly fluorinated graphite oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jankovský, O.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Matějková, Stanislava; Janoušek, Zbyněk; Šembera, Filip; Pumera, M.; Sofer, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2014), s. 1378-1387 ISSN 2046-2069 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : graphene oxide * electronic- properties * monolayer graphene * raman-spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014

  8. Degradation of graphite in gas cooled reactors due to radiolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskovic, R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnox reactors employ pile grade A (PGA) graphite as a moderator. Reactor cores are constructed typically of twelve to thirteen layers of graphite bricks. Fuel channels (FC) are in the centre of all bricks and interstitial channels (IC) at the centre of the corners of every second set of four bricks. The reactor core is cooled by carbon dioxide, the temperature of graphite core increases from 250 °C at the bottom to 360 °C at the top of the core. The neutron dose increases progressively with the operating time of the reactor. The graphite core looses mass as a result of radiolytic oxidation. The process is dependent on both total energy deposition and temperature which correlates with core height. Fast neutron dose accumulates at the same rate as the total energy deposited and is readily available. The reduction of density of moderator graphite increases the porosity and in turn changes both the physical and mechanical properties of graphite. The mechanical properties and density of graphite are measured either on samples installed in the reactor prior to service or trepanned from graphite bricks. The data obtained on these samples are interrogated using probability modelling to establish trends with increasing service life. Results of the analyses are illustrated in the paper. PGA graphite is an aggregate of coarse needle coke filler particles within a matrix of fine coke flour particles mixed with pitch binder. The bricks are fabricated in the green condition by extrusion of dry calcinated coke impregnated with liquid pitch binder and then graphitized at 2800 °C. This produces a polygranular aggregate with orthotropic properties. The strength properties of graphite are measured using different types of tests. The most commonly used tests involve bending, uniaxial and diametral compression. The initiation and propagation of cracks was investigated to improve understanding of strength behaviour. Cracking was examined on macro-scale using optical microscopy and

  9. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  10. Insight into the Mechanism of the Thermal Reduction of Graphite Oxide: Deuterium-Labeled Graphite Oxide Is the Key

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sofer, Z.; Jankovský, O.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Šturala, J.; Kosina, J.; Mikšová, Romana; Macková, Anna; Mikulics, M.; Pumera, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2015), s. 5478-5485 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09001S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : graphene * exfoliation * mechanism * isotope labeling * graphite oxide Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 13.334, year: 2015

  11. The development of transport and non-transport porosity in radiolytic graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1980-01-01

    In graphite moderated, carbon dioxide cooled, reactors, radiolytic graphite oxidation arises from the production of short lived energetic species and is confined to the internal porous structure. Exponential weight loss is possible as the volume of internal porosity, absorbing radiation, increases with time. Inhibitors are added to the coolant to minimise weight and hence strength loss. Carbon monoxide and methane are the principal gas phase inhibitors, competing with the graphite for the oxidising species. Methane has the further effect of producing a sacrificial layer at the pore wall. It follows from the mechanisms of inhibition that oxidation is reduced in the larger pores. In the small pores, the probability is high that oxidising species will reach the pore wall and exponential weight loss can occur until such time as the pores become sufficiently large for the inhibitors to operate. The results from a high weight loss experiment confirm this behaviour and allow predictions to be made with some confidence for other coolants - for which initial oxidation rate data are available. In this paper the results from an earlier weight loss experiment in an 'uninhibited', nominally pure, carbon dioxide coolant are assessed. Particular attention is drawn to the information which can be obtained from a study of transport properties as they develop with graphite weight loss. The objectives in understanding more exactly the process occurring inside the complex pore structure are to allow extensions in planned life, or greater flexibility in coolant plant operation and compatibility with fuel clad. (author)

  12. Inhibiting influence of traces of hydrogenated compounds on the combustion rate of artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoynant, Georges

    1959-01-01

    After having outlined that studies related to graphite oxidation by oxygen or by carbon dioxide in different experimental conditions (graphite type, temperature range, pressure range) gave results which revealed to be non reproducible, or not consistent, and that these discrepancies could be attributed to the graphite chemical purity, to the graphite structure or to the purity of the combustion agent, this research thesis notably focused on this last aspect. As no graphite is rigorously pure and perfectly crystallised, a chemically pure but imperfectly crystallised one has been chosen (the Acheson graphite) as well as a well crystallised but unclean graphite (graphite obtained by silicon carbide dissociation). After a presentation of these materials, the author reports the study of the texture of the Acheson graphites. Then, he highlights and studies inhibition phenomena, and discusses and interprets experimental results

  13. Synthesis of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide by needle platy natural vein graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathnayake, R.M.N.M. [National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy (Sri Lanka); Graduate School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Wijayasinghe, H.W.M.A.C., E-mail: athulawijaya@gmail.com [National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy (Sri Lanka); Pitawala, H.M.T.G.A. [Department of Geology, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Yoshimura, Masamichi; Huang, Hsin-Hui [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The high purity of this form of needle platy natural vein graphite is expected to synthesize GO and rGO readily and efficiently, as compared to the synthetic and less pure graphite raw materials. • Production of large-scale GO and rGO for industrial applications can be achieved by using this highly crystalline NPG vein graphite, and it adds value to the natural resources. • High quality, few-layer, and cost effective GO and rGO can achieve great results using this low cost, natural graphite. - Abstract: Among natural graphite varieties, needle platy vein graphite (NPG) has very high purity. Therefore, it is readily used to prepare graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). In this study, GO and rGO were prepared using chemical oxidation and reduction process, respectively. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD studies confirmed the increase of the interlayer spacing of GO and rGO in between 3.35 to 8.66 A°. AFM studies showed the layer height of rGO to be 1.05 nm after the reduction process. TEM micrographs clearly illustrated that the prepared GO has more than 25 layers, while the rGO has only less than 15 layers. Furthermore, the effect of chemical oxidation and reduction processes on surface morphology of graphite were clearly observed in FESEM micrographs. The calculated R{sub O/C} of GO and rGO using XPS analysis are 5.37% and 1.77%, respectively. The present study revealed the successful and cost effective nature of the chemical oxidation, and the reduction processes for the production of GO and rGO out of natural vein graphite.

  14. Synthesis of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide by needle platy natural vein graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnayake, R.M.N.M.; Wijayasinghe, H.W.M.A.C.; Pitawala, H.M.T.G.A.; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Huang, Hsin-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The high purity of this form of needle platy natural vein graphite is expected to synthesize GO and rGO readily and efficiently, as compared to the synthetic and less pure graphite raw materials. • Production of large-scale GO and rGO for industrial applications can be achieved by using this highly crystalline NPG vein graphite, and it adds value to the natural resources. • High quality, few-layer, and cost effective GO and rGO can achieve great results using this low cost, natural graphite. - Abstract: Among natural graphite varieties, needle platy vein graphite (NPG) has very high purity. Therefore, it is readily used to prepare graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). In this study, GO and rGO were prepared using chemical oxidation and reduction process, respectively. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD studies confirmed the increase of the interlayer spacing of GO and rGO in between 3.35 to 8.66 A°. AFM studies showed the layer height of rGO to be 1.05 nm after the reduction process. TEM micrographs clearly illustrated that the prepared GO has more than 25 layers, while the rGO has only less than 15 layers. Furthermore, the effect of chemical oxidation and reduction processes on surface morphology of graphite were clearly observed in FESEM micrographs. The calculated R O/C of GO and rGO using XPS analysis are 5.37% and 1.77%, respectively. The present study revealed the successful and cost effective nature of the chemical oxidation, and the reduction processes for the production of GO and rGO out of natural vein graphite.

  15. Preliminary design study of a large scale graphite oxidation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epel, L.G.; Majeski, S.J.; Schweitzer, D.G.; Sheehan, T.V.

    1979-08-01

    A preliminary design study of a large scale graphite oxidation loop was performed in order to assess feasibility and to estimate capital costs. The nominal design operates at 50 atmospheres helium and 1800 F with a graphite specimen 30 inches long and 10 inches in diameter. It was determined that a simple single walled design was not practical at this time because of a lack of commercially available thick walled high temperature alloys. Two alternative concepts, at reduced operating pressure, were investigated. Both were found to be readily fabricable to operate at 1800 F and capital cost estimates for these are included. A design concept, which is outside the scope of this study, was briefly considered

  16. Mass removal by oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Fox, Charles D.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Gosse, Ryan C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    The various effects of laser heating of carbon materials are key to assessing laser weapon effectiveness. Porous graphite plates, cylinders, and cones with densities of 1.55 to 1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10-kW fiber laser at 0.075 to 3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 to 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7-mm-thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be redeposited on the graphite surface. Dramatic graphite crystalline structures are also produced at higher laser irradiances. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. At ˜3.5 kW/cm2, the fractions of the mass removed from the cylindrical samples in the crater, surrounding trench, and outer region of decreased porosity are 38%, 47%, and 15%, respectively. Graphite is particularly resistant to damage by high power lasers. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  17. Oxidation kinetic analysis of a mixed uranium dicarbide and graphite compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, M., E-mail: mickael.marchand@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives, CEA, CADARACHE, DEN, DEC, SPUA/Laboratoire des Combustibles Uranium, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Fiquet, O., E-mail: olivier.fiquet@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives, CEA, CADARACHE, DEN, DEC, SPUA/Laboratoire des Combustibles Uranium, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Brothier, M. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives, CEA, CADARACHE, DEN, DEC, SPUA/Laboratoire des Combustibles Uranium, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Experimental study of uranium carbides and graphite powder oxidations. ► Single rate limiting step identification by extensive kinetic analysis. ► Pseudo-steady-state validation during chemical conversion. ► Combination of TGA, TDA, XRD and gas phase chromatography results. -- Abstract: The oxidation of a mixed uranium dicarbide and graphite powder has been investigated by simultaneous thermal gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal (DTA) analyses coupled with gas phase chromatography. For isothermal oxidation conditions with temperatures below 330 °C, only the UC{sub 2} chemical phase is progressively oxidised into U{sub 3}O{sub 8} oxides. Parabolic weight gain curves as a function of oxidation over time were obtained. A detailed kinetic study is proposed to establish a pseudo-steady-state during the oxidation process. Using an experimental method based on the sudden temperature increases, a single rate-limiting step has been validated and then modelled by a 3D diffusion law. An apparent activation energy calculated from the Arrhenius representation has been evaluated at −35 kJ/mol, thus describing the diffusion of oxygen through the oxide layer.

  18. Change of properties after oxidation of IG-11 graphite by air and CO2 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun-Soo; Chi, Se-Hwan; Cho, Kwang-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Artificial graphite is typically manufactured by carbonization of a shaped body of a kneaded mixture using granular cokes as a filler and pitch as a binder. It undergoes a pitch impregnation process if necessary and finally applying graphitization heat treatment. The effect of thermal oxidation in air or a CO 2 atmosphere on IG-11 graphite samples is investigated in this study. The results show a localized oxidation process that progressively reveals the large coke particles with increasing level of overall weight loss in air. The surface of the graphite was peeled off and no change was found in the specific gravity after air oxidation. However, the specific gravity of graphite was continuously decreased by CO 2 oxidation. The decrease in the specific gravity by CO 2 oxidation was due to CO 2 gas that progressed from the surface to the interior. The pore shape after CO 2 oxidation differed from that under air oxidation

  19. Characterisation of reduced graphene oxides prepared from natural flaky, lump and amorphous graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Weijun; Li, Hongqiang, E-mail: lhq-18@163.com; Hu, Yang; Liu, Yanyan; Song, Shaoxian

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Natural flaky, lumpy and amorphous graphites were used to synthesis rGO. • Investigation the effect of the crystal morphology on the oxidation process of GrO and characteristics of prepared rGO. • Low graphitisation degree, big specific surface area and small lateral size were beneficial to the oxidation of graphite. - Abstract: The characterisation of reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) prepared from natural flaky, lumpy, and amorphous graphites using Hummers method was investigated. The prepared graphite oxides (GrOs) and rGOs were characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrochemical performance. The results showed that amorphous graphite was much easier to oxidise than lumpy and flaky graphites and was preferable for preparing single or double layer graphene because low graphitisation degree, high defect degree, high specific surface area and small crystal size were beneficial for (1) the oxidants to attack the exposed carbon atoms, (2) the intercalation of oxidants, and (3) the diffusion of oxidants between graphitic layers. In addition, rGO synthesised from amorphous graphite had the most defects and the smallest size of the in-plane sp{sup 2} domains compared to those obtained from the other two nature graphites.

  20. Electrochemical oxidation of textile industry wastewater by graphite electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Rajendra; Joshi, Himanshu; Mall, Indra D; Srivastava, Vimal C

    2014-01-01

    In the present article, studies have been performed on the electrochemical (EC) oxidation of actual textile industry wastewater by graphite electrodes. Multi-response optimization of four independent parameters namely initial pH (pHo): 4-10, current density (j): 27.78-138.89 A/m(2), NaCl concentration (w): 0-2 g/L and electrolysis time (t): 10-130 min have been performed using Box-Behnken (BB) experimental design. It was aimed to simultaneously maximize the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal efficiencies and minimize specific energy consumption using desirability function approach. Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a high coefficient of determination value for COD (R(2) = 0.8418), color (R(2) = 0.7010) and specific energy (R(2) = 0.9125) between the experimental values and the predicted values by a second-order regression model. Maximum COD and color removal and minimum specific energy consumed was 90.78%, 96.27% and 23.58 kWh/kg COD removed, respectively, were observed at optimum conditions. The wastewater, sludge and scum obtained after treatment at optimum condition have been characterized by various techniques. UV-visible study showed that all azo bonds of the dyes present in the wastewater were totally broken and most of the aromatic rings were mineralized during EC oxidation with graphite electrode. Carbon balance showed that out of the total carbon eroded from the graphite electrodes, 27-29.2% goes to the scum, 71.1-73.3% goes into the sludge and rest goes to the treated wastewater. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the generated sludge and scum can be dried and used as a fuel in the boilers/incinerators.

  1. A new approach for preparation of magnetite-graphite composite: Intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cation into graphite oxide in L-arginine medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuqiong; Chen, Zhen; Jin, Yongdong; Chen, Shuihua; Wang, Hang; Geng, Junxia; Song, Qiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian; Qin, Zhi; Zheng, Chong

    2011-05-01

    A new approach to prepare magnetite nanoparticle pillared graphite has been put forward. The magnetic composite was normally obtained by calcining iron-intercalated graphite oxide, but the latter was prepared via intercalation reaction using polyhydroxy iron cation as iron precursor and pillaring agent, and a strong organic guanidine base, L-arginine, as alkaline agent and also intercalating agent. L-arginine, used herein instead of inorganic alkali, which would lead to the deoxygenation and reduction of graphite oxide into graphite, not only provided the alkaline condition for the formation of polyhydroxy iron cations, but also increased the interlayer spacing of graphite oxide to facilitate the intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cations into graphite oxide. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and nitrogen absorption indicated that the composite was nanoscale Fe 3O 4 pillared graphite with superparamagnetic property.

  2. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  3. Conductive ink containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide and method a conductive circuit using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A conductive ink containing a conductive polymer, wherein the conductive polymer contains at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, and it use in a method for making a conductive circuit.

  4. Electrospray painted article containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide and method for their manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A painted polymer part containing a conductive polymer composition containing at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the painted polymer part has been electrospray painted.

  5. Graphite oxidation and damage under irradiation at high temperatures in an impure helium environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Cameron S.

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a Generation IV reactor concept that uses a graphite-moderated nuclear reactor with a once-through uranium fuel cycle. In order to investigate the mechanism for corrosion of graphite in HTGRs, the graphite was placed in a similar environment in order to evaluate its resistance to corrosion and oxidation. While the effects of radiation on graphite have been studied in the past, the properties of graphite are largely dependent on the coke used in manufacturing the graphite. There are no longer any of the previously studied graphite types available for use in the HTGR. There are various types of graphite being considered for different uses in the HTGR and all of these graphite types need to be analyzed to determine how radiation will affect them. Extensive characterization of samples of five different types of graphite was conducted. The irradiated samples were analyzed with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and gas chromatography. The results prove a knowledge base for considering the graphite types best suited for use in HTGRs. In my dissertation work graphite samples were gamma irradiated and also irradiated in a mixed field, in order to study the effects of neutron as well as gamma irradiation. Thermal effects on the graphite were also investigated by irradiating the samples at room temperature and at 1000 °C. From the analysi of the samples in this study there is no evidence of substantial damage to the grades of graphite analyzed. This is significant in approving the use of these graphites in nuclear reactors. Should significant damage had occurred to the samples, the use of these grades of graphite would need to be reconsidered. This information can be used to further characterize other grades of nuclear graphite as they become available.

  6. Adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheet, Imtithal; Kabbani, Ahmad; Holail, Hanafy

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials have gained great attention because of their novel size- and shape-dependent properties, large specific surface area and high reaction activity. Moreover, nanomaterials have a wide range of applications, as in the technological and environmental challenges in the areas of solar energy conversion, catalysis, medicine, and water treatments. In the present study, nanostructured graphite oxide, silica/graphite oxide composites and silica nanoparticles were used for the removal of the heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption method and the adsorptive kinetic mechanism of heavy metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide and its SiO2 composite was evaluated. The experimental results revealed a strong adsorption of the metal cations on the surface of graphite oxide, this is reflected in the shifts in wave numbers after adsorption with nanostructured graphite oxide and the big shift in wave numbers (Δv¯) for nickel ions reflects chemosorption type of adsorption. This is confirmed by the coherence between Δv¯, removal percentage and crystal field stabilization energy (CFSE). Silica/ GO (2:3) composite showed the greatest removal percentage at different concentrations compared to pure graphite oxide and silica nanoparticles. The higher removal percentage of nickel ions by silica /GO composite (2:3) was observed at 180 min contact time and basic pH. The kinetic studies showed that silica/ GO (2:3) composite had rapid adsorption rate and efficiency and it was found to follow first order rate expression or an exponential decay of the metal cations from water study.

  7. Studies of physicochemical properties of graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewniak Sabina Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experimental research studies was to determine some electrical properties of graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide. The authors tried to interpret the obtained physicochemical results. For that purpose, both resistance measurements and investigation studies were carried out in order to characterize the samples. The resistance was measured at various temperatures in the course of composition changes of gas atmospheres (which surround the samples. The studies were also supported by such methods as: scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy (RS, atomic force microscopy (AFM and thermogravimetry (TG. Moreover, during the experiments also the elemental analyses (EA of the tested samples (graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide were performed.

  8. Use of Graphite Oxide and Graphene Oxide as Catalysts in the Synthesis of Dipyrromethane and Calix[4]pyrrole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta Mishra

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Graphite oxide and graphene oxides have been used as solid catalysts for the synthesis of 5,5-dialkyldipyrromethanes and calix[4]pyrroles in organic and aqueous solutions at room temperature.

  9. Synthesis of Graphite Oxide with Different Surface Oxygen Contents Assisted Microwave Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ibarra-Hernández

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphite oxide is synthesized via oxidation reaction using oxidant compounds that have lattice defects by the incorporation of unlike functional groups. Herein, we report the synthesis of the graphite oxide with diverse surface oxygen content through three (B, C, D different modified versions of the Hummers method assisted microwave radiation compared with the conventional graphite oxide sample obtained by Hummers method (A. These methods allow not only the production of graphite oxide but also reduced graphene oxide, without undergoing chemical, thermal, or mechanical reduction steps. The values obtained of C/O ratio were ~2, 3.4, and ~8.5 for methodologies C, B, and D, respectively, indicating the presence of graphite oxide and reduced graphene oxide, according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy of method D shows the fewest structural defects compared to the other methodologies. The results obtained suggest that the permanganate ion produces reducing species during graphite oxidation. The generation of these species is attributed to a reversible reaction between the permanganate ion with π electrons, ions, and radicals produced after treatment with microwave radiation.

  10. Modification of graphite structure by irradiation, revealed by thermal oxidation. Examination by electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouaud, Michel

    1969-01-01

    Based on the analysis of images obtained by electronic microscopy, this document reports the comparative study of the action of neutrons on three different graphites: a natural one (Ticonderoga) and two pyrolytic ones (Carbone-Lorraine and Raytheon). The approach is based on the modification of features of thermal oxidation of graphites by dry air after irradiation. Different corrosion features are identified. The author states that there seems to be a relationship between the number and shape of these features, and defects existing on the irradiated graphite before oxidation. For low doses, the feature aspect varies with depth at which oxidation occurs. For higher doses, the aspect remains the same [fr

  11. Graphitic carbon growth on crystalline and amorphous oxide substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Christine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report graphitic carbon growth on crystalline and amorphous oxide substrates by using carbon molecular beam epitaxy. The films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formations of nanocrystalline graphite are observed on silicon dioxide and glass, while mainly sp2 amorphous carbons are formed on strontium titanate and yttria-stabilized zirconia. Interestingly, flat carbon layers with high degree of graphitization are formed even on amorphous oxides. Our results provide a progress toward direct graphene growth on oxide materials. PACS: 81.05.uf; 81.15.Hi; 78.30.Ly.

  12. Direct reform of graphite oxide electrodes by using ambient plasma for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-10-01

    Ambient plasma is applied to graphite oxide electrodes directly to improve electrochemical properties for supercapacitor applications. Surface morphology of the electrodes after the plasma treatment changes dramatically and amount of oxygen reduced significantly, demonstrating a reduction effect on the graphite oxide electrode by the ambient plasma. Equivalent series resistance of the electrode also reduced from 108 Ω to 84 Ω after the plasma treatment. Corresponding specific capacitance, therefore, increases from 0.45 F cm-2 to 0.85 F cm-2, proving that the ambient plasma treatment is very efficient, clean, economic, and environment-friendly method to reform the graphite oxide electrodes directly for the supercapacitor applications.

  13. Effect of friction on oxidative graphite intercalation and high-quality graphene formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Steffen; Halbig, Christian E; Grote, Fabian; Rietsch, Philipp; Börrnert, Felix; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Bernd; Eigler, Siegfried

    2018-02-26

    Oxidative wet-chemical delamination of graphene from graphite is expected to become a scalable production method. However, the formation process of the intermediate stage-1 graphite sulfate by sulfuric acid intercalation and its subsequent oxidation are poorly understood and lattice defect formation must be avoided. Here, we demonstrate film formation of micrometer-sized graphene flakes with lattice defects down to 0.02% and visualize the carbon lattice by transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution. Interestingly, we find that only well-ordered, highly crystalline graphite delaminates into oxo-functionalized graphene, whereas other graphite grades do not form a proper stage-1 intercalate and revert back to graphite upon hydrolysis. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that ideal stacking and electronic oxidation of the graphite layers significantly reduce the friction of the moving sulfuric acid molecules, thereby facilitating intercalation. Furthermore, the evaluation of the stability of oxo-species in graphite sulfate supports an oxidation mechanism that obviates intercalation of the oxidant.

  14. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of bottom support system in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha

    2009-02-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Graphite oxidation model and structural failure model are technically required. In this study, one main target is to develop graphite oxidation model based on Arrhenius model for graphite oxidation reaction. Kinetic parameters of IG-430 were measured. Temperature was controlled at the range of 540 to 800 .deg. C to estimate activation energy. Oxygen concentration was controlled over the range of 0 to 0.34 mole fraction to find order of reaction. It turns out that activation energy Ea was 258.15 ± 1.5 kJ/mol and order of reaction was 0.37 ± 0.04. The other main target is to develop the structural failure model. Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula. σ 0 = σ straight-line -C r L σ straight-live = 91.31 MPa, C=1.01 The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ 0 /σ = exp(-kd), k=0.111 Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column

  15. Graphitic carbon nitride/graphene oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for photoluminescence and photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrzak, Malgorzata, E-mail: malgorzata.aleksandrzak@o2.pl; Kukulka, Wojciech; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride modified with graphene nanostructures. • Influence of graphene nanostructures size in photocatalytic properties of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Improved photocatalysis resulted from up-converted photoluminescence. - Abstract: The study presents a modification of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and investigation of photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties. The influence of GO and rGO lateral sizes used for the modification was investigated. The nanomaterials were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy (DR-UV-vis) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). PL revealed that pristine graphitic carbon nitride and its nanocomposites with GO and rGO emitted up-converted photoluminescence (UCPL) which could contribute to the improvement of photocatalytic activity of the materials. The photoactivity was evaluated in a process of phenol decomposition under visible light. A hybrid composed of rGO nanoparticles (rGONPs, 4–135 nm) exhibited the highest photoactivity compared to rGO with size of 150 nm–7.2 μm and graphene oxide with the corresponding sizes. The possible reason of the superior photocatalytic activity is the most enhanced UCPL of rGONPs, contributing to the emission of light with higher energy than the incident light, resulting in improved photogeneration of electron-hole pairs.

  16. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  17. Research and Development on Advanced Graphite Materials. Volume 34- Oxidation-Resistance Coatings for Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-06-01

    a very promising coating material. 1. 2. 2.4. Group V-b Oxides In Group V-b, vanadium and niobium sesquioxides have rather high melting points, 1977...Nickel Oxide NiO 1950 Aluminum Oxide AlA 2045 Niobium Oxide Nb’O, 1772 Vanadium Oxide VO, 1977 Silicon Oxide SiO, 1723 Zinc Oxide ZoO 1975 Strontium Oxide...1853 Titanium Oxide TiO, 1853 Uranium Oxide UO, Z20 Cobalt Oxide CoO 105s Vanadium Oxide VO’ 1977 Manganese Oxide MnO 1780 Yttrium Oxide 1,O Z410 Niobium

  18. Verification and validation of the THYTAN code for the graphite oxidation analysis in the HTGR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Yosuke; Isaka, Kazuyoshi; Nomoto, Yasunobu; Seki, Tomokazu; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2014-12-01

    The analytical models for the evaluation of graphite oxidation were implemented into the THYTAN code, which employs the mass balance and a node-link computational scheme to evaluate tritium behavior in the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) systems for hydrogen production, to analyze the graphite oxidation during the air or water ingress accidents in the HTGR systems. This report describes the analytical models of the THYTAN code in terms of the graphite oxidation analysis and its verification and validation (V and V) results. Mass transfer from the gas mixture in the coolant channel to the graphite surface, diffusion in the graphite, graphite oxidation by air or water, chemical reaction and release from the primary circuit to the containment vessel by a safety valve were modeled to calculate the mass balance in the graphite and the gas mixture in the coolant channel. The computed solutions using the THYTAN code for simple questions were compared to the analytical results by a hand calculation to verify the algorithms for each implemented analytical model. A representation of the graphite oxidation experimental was analyzed using the THYTAN code, and the results were compared to the experimental data and the computed solutions using the GRACE code, which was used for the safety analysis of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), in regard to corrosion depth of graphite and oxygen concentration at the outlet of the test section to validate the analytical models of the THYTAN code. The comparison of THYTAN code results with the analytical solutions, experimental data and the GRACE code results showed the good agreement. (author)

  19. Role of nuclear grade graphite in controlling oxidation in modular HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, Willaim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kane, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  20. Oxidation Protective SiC Coating on Graphite for VHTR Core Support Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un; Windes, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The potential for reducing oxidation of the supporting graphite components during normal operation and accident conditions in the VHTR design has been studied. SiC coating on graphite has been studied taking into consideration of possible dimensional change of graphite by the neutron-irradiation. Functionally gradient (FG) SiC coating on the graphite has been performed to moderate the SiC/Graphite interface: E-beam evaporative coating from varied compositions of graphite/SiC mixture in the source crucibles was carried out with an ion beam mixing. The cylindrical graphite samples were uniformly coated by rotating and revolving the samples. Auger depth profile reveals that the ion beam mixed interface is broadened and a cross sectional EDS Si elemental mapping shows a smoothly graded Si profile. The grown film exhibited a stacked columnar structure owing to a frequent sample position change during the coating process, as observed by FE-SEM. As a result of 18 thermal cycling test of 500-1000℃, no film delamination was found on the coated layer, but film cracks were formed, suggesting a strong bonding. When samples were heated at 600°C in static air for 2 h, ~45 wt% of the graphite was burnt off, whereas for the SiC coated graphite only 5 wt %. When heated at 1000 °C in air, vigorous oxidation of graphite took place through a few paths (maybe the mars and/or the crack lines) in the film only leaving the coating layer. As the crack lines were covered with SiC by repeating the ion beam mixed coating process, the oxidation resistance was improved. (author)

  1. Graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide as promising adsorbents for removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2013-01-01

    Graphenes are an emerging class of carbon nanomaterials whose adsorption properties toward organic compounds have not been well understood. In the present study, graphene nanosheets were prepared by reoxidation and abrupt heating of graphite oxide, which was prepared by sequential chemical oxidation of commercial nonporous graphite powder. Adsorption properties of three aromatic compounds (naphthalene, 2-naphthol, and 1-naphthylamine) and one pharmaceutical compound (tylosin) on graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide were examined to explore the potential of these two adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solutions. Compared with the literature data of adsorption on carbon nanotubes, adsorption of bulky, flexible tylosin on graphene nanosheets exhibited markedly faster adsorption kinetics, which can be attributed to their opened-up layer structure. Graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide showed similar sequences of adsorption affinity: 1-naphthylamine > 2-naphthol > tylosin > naphthalene (with much larger differences observed on graphite oxide). It was proposed that the strong adsorption of the three aromatic compounds was mainly due to π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions with the graphitic surfaces of adsorbents. Additionally, Lewis acid-base interaction was likely an important factor contributing to the strong adsorption of 1-naphthylamine and tylosin, especially for the O-functionality-abundant graphite oxide. After being normalized on the basis of adsorbent surface area, adsorption affinities of all four tested adsorbates on graphene nanosheets were very close to those on nonporous graphite powder, reflecting complete accessibility of the adsorbent surface area in adsorption. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene Thin Films by Chemical Reduction of Exfoliated and Intercalated Graphite Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Thema

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial flakes of graphite were prepared into functionalized graphene oxide (GO by chemical treatment. After the exfoliation and intercalation of graphene into functionalized graphene oxide that formed stable colloidal dispersion in polar aprotic solvent, the reduction process was undertaken by continuous stirring with hydrazine hydrate. The reduced material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, attenuated total reflectance (ATR FT-IR, ultraviolet visible (UV-vis, atomic force microscopy (AFM and Raman spectroscopy which confirm the oxidation of graphite and reduction of graphene oxide into graphene sheet.

  3. Studies of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphite Oxide in the Aspect of Their Possible Application in Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Sabina; Muzyka, Roksana; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz; Kotyczka-Morańska, Michalina; Setkiewicz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations on resistance structures based on graphite oxide (GRO) and graphene oxide (rGO). The subject matter of the investigations was thaw the sensitivity of the tested structures was affected by hydrogen, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide. The experiments were performed at a temperature range from 30 °C to 150 °C in two carrier gases: nitrogen and synthetic air. The measurements were also aimed at characterization of the graphite oxide and graphene oxide. In our measurements we used (among others) techniques such as: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM); Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); Raman Spectroscopy (RS); Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Microscopy (XPS). The data resulting from the characterizations of graphite oxide and graphene oxide have made it possible to interpret the obtained results from the point of view of physicochemical changes occurring in these structures. PMID:26784198

  4. Contrastive study of anodic oxidation on carbon fibers and graphite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xin; Yang Changling; Lu Yonggen

    2012-01-01

    Anodic oxidation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) graphite fibers was investigated in comparison with that of carbon fibers. The mechanical and interfacial properties of the treated fibers along with their surface structures were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, contact angle analyzer, tensile strength instrument and Raman spectrometer. The results show that the graphite fibers were inactive during anodic oxidation for the higher graphitic carbon, while the carbon fibers were active and the surface oxygen content got saturated soon. The dynamics of anodic oxidation for the fibers can be described by a homogenous thickness reduction model, which indicated that the kinetic constant of anodic oxidation for the graphite fibers was only one sixth of that for the carbon fibers. Surface roughness contributed to the improvement on fiber/matrix adhesion as well as the surface oxygen content. The achievement of the surface treatment was proved by Raman spectroscopy mapping the stress of the fiber inside an epoxy resin droplet. The increase of interfacial shear strength from the untreated graphite fibers to the anodized graphite fibers was 160% (from 65 to 170 MPa), much higher than 70% that from untreated carbon fibers to the anodized ones (from 135 to 230 MPa).

  5. Contrastive study of anodic oxidation on carbon fibers and graphite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Yang, Changling; Lu, Yonggen

    2012-03-01

    Anodic oxidation of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) graphite fibers was investigated in comparison with that of carbon fibers. The mechanical and interfacial properties of the treated fibers along with their surface structures were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, contact angle analyzer, tensile strength instrument and Raman spectrometer. The results show that the graphite fibers were inactive during anodic oxidation for the higher graphitic carbon, while the carbon fibers were active and the surface oxygen content got saturated soon. The dynamics of anodic oxidation for the fibers can be described by a homogenous thickness reduction model, which indicated that the kinetic constant of anodic oxidation for the graphite fibers was only one sixth of that for the carbon fibers. Surface roughness contributed to the improvement on fiber/matrix adhesion as well as the surface oxygen content. The achievement of the surface treatment was proved by Raman spectroscopy mapping the stress of the fiber inside an epoxy resin droplet. The increase of interfacial shear strength from the untreated graphite fibers to the anodized graphite fibers was 160% (from 65 to 170 MPa), much higher than 70% that from untreated carbon fibers to the anodized ones (from 135 to 230 MPa).

  6. Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation process for chromium oxidation at graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yudong; Zheng, Shili; Sun, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Alkaline electrochemical advanced oxidation processes for chromium oxidation and Cr-contaminated waste disposal were reported in this study. The highly graphitized multi-walled carbon nanotubes g-MWCNTs modified electrode was prepared for the in-situ electrochemical generation of HO 2 - . RRDE test results illustrated that g-MWCNTs exhibited much higher two-electron oxygen reduction activity than other nanocarbon materials with peak current density of 1.24 mA cm -2 , %HO 2 - of 77.0% and onset potential of -0.15 V (vs. Hg/HgO). It was originated from the highly graphitized structure and good electrical conductivity as illustrated from the Raman, XRD and EIS characterizations, respectively. Large amount of reactive oxygen species (HO 2 - and ·OH) were in-situ electro-generated from the two-electron oxygen reduction and chromium-induced alkaline electro-Fenton-like reaction. The oxidation of Cr(III) was efficiently achieved within 90 min and the conversion ratio maintained more than 95% of the original value after stability test, offering an efficient and green approach for the utilization of Cr-containing wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonlinear optical characterization of graphite oxide thin film by open aperture Z-scan technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreeja, V. G.; Reshmi, R.; Devasia, Sebin; Anila, E. I., E-mail: anilaei@gmail.com [Optolectronic and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Union Christian College, Aluva-683 102, Kerala (India); Cheruvalathu, Ajina [International School of Photonics, CUSAT, Cochin-22 (India)

    2016-05-23

    In this paper we explore the structural characterization of graphite oxide powder prepared from graphite powder by oxidation via modified Hummers method. The nonlinear optical properties of the spin coated graphite oxide thin film is also explored by open aperture Z-Scan technique. Structural and physiochemical properties of the samples were investigated with the help of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy (Raman).The results of FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that the graphite is oxidized by strong oxidants and the oxygen atoms are introduced into the graphite layers forming C=C, O-H and –C-H groups. The synthesized sample has good crystalline nature with lesser defects. The nonlinear optical property of GO thin film was studied by open aperture Z-Scan technique using Q-switched Nd-Yag Laser at 532 nm. The Z-scan plot showed that the investigated GO thin film has saturable absorption behavior. The nonlinear absorption coefficient and saturation intensity were also estimated to explore its applications in Q switched mode locking laser systems.

  8. Oxidation kinetics of innovative carbon materials with respect to severe air ingress accidents in HTRs and graphite disposal or processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloegel, Baerbel

    2010-01-01

    Currently future nuclear reactor concepts of the Fourth Generation (Gen IV) are under development. To some extend they apply with new, innovative materials developed just for this purpose. This thesis work aims at a concept of Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) in the framework of the European project RAPHAEL (ReActor for Process heat, Hydrogen And ELectricity generation). The concept named ANTARES (AREVA New Technology based on advanced gas-cooled Reactors for Energy Supply) was developed by AEVA NP. It is a helium cooled, graphite moderated modular reactor for electricity and hydrogen production, by providing the necessary process heat due to its high working temperature. Particular attention is given here to oxidation kinetics of newly developed carbon materials (NBG-17) with still unknown but needed information in context of severe air ingress accident in VHTR's. Special interest is paid to the Boudouard reaction, the oxidation of carbon by CO 2 . In case of an air ingress accident, carbon dioxide is produced in the primary reaction of atmospheric oxygen with reflector graphite. From there CO 2 could flow into the reactor core causing further damage by conversion into CO. The purpose of this thesis is to ascertain if and to what degree this could happen. First of all oxidation kinetic data of the Boudouard reaction with NBG-17 is determined by experiments in a thermo gravimetric facility. The measurements are evaluated and converted into a common formula and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood similar oxidation kinetic equation, as input for the computer code REACT/THERMIX. This code is then applied to analyse severe air ingress accidents for several air flow rates. The results are discussed for two accident situations, in which a certain graphite burn off is achieved. All cases show much more damage to the graphite bottom reflector than to the reactor core. Thus the bottom reflector will lose its structural integrity much earlier than the core itself will

  9. A General Route for Growing Metal Sulfides onto Graphene Oxide and Exfoliated Graphite Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Joana L; Estrada, Ana C; Fateixa, Sara; Ferro, Marta; Trindade, Tito

    2017-08-31

    Graphene-based materials are elective materials for a number of technologies due to their unique properties. Also, semiconductor nanocrystals have been extensively explored due to their size-dependent properties that make them useful for several applications. By coupling both types of materials, new applications are envisaged that explore the synergistic properties in such hybrid nanostructures. This research reports a general wet chemistry method to prepare graphene oxide (GO) sheets decorated with nanophases of semiconductor metal sulfides. This method allows the in situ growth of metal sulfides onto GO by using metal dialkyldithiocarbamate complexes as single-molecule precursors. In particular, the role of GO as heterogeneous substrate for the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals was investigated by using Raman spectroscopic and imaging methods. The method was further extended to other graphene-based materials, which are easily prepared in a larger scale, such as exfoliated graphite oxide (EGO).

  10. Dispersing molecular cobalt in graphitic carbon nitride frameworks for photocatalytic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guigang; Huang, Caijin; Wang, Xinchen

    2015-03-01

    The development of water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) to cooperate with light-energy transducers for solar energy conversion by water splitting and CO2 fixation is a demanding challenge. The key measure is to develop efficient and sustainable WOCs that can support a sustainable photocatalyst to reduce over-potentials and thus to enhance reaction rate of water oxidation reaction. Cobalt has been indentified as active component of WOCs for photo/electrochemical water oxidation, and its performance relies strongly on the contact and adhesion of the cobalt species with photoactive substrates. Here, cobalt is homogeneously engineered into the framework of pristine graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) via chemical interaction, establishing surface junctions on the polymeric photocatalyst for the water oxidation reaction. This modification promotes the surface kinetics of oxygen evolution reaction by the g-C3 N4 -based photocatalytic system made of inexpensive substances, and further optimizations in the optical and textural structure of Co-g-C3 N4 is envisaged by considering ample choice of modification schemes for carbon nitride materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. LIMITED OXIDATION OF IRRADIATED GRAPHITE WASTE TO REMOVE SURFACE CARBON-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TARA E. SMITH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of irradiated graphite waste from graphite-moderated nuclear reactors exist and are expected to increase in the case of High Temperature Reactor (HTR deployment [1,2]. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C, with a half-life of 5730 years. Fachinger et al. [2] have demonstrated that thermal treatment of irradiated graphite removes a significant fraction of the 14C, which tends to be concentrated on the graphite surface. During thermal treatment, graphite surface carbon atoms interact with naturally adsorbed oxygen complexes to create COx gases, i.e. “gasify” graphite. The effectiveness of this process is highly dependent on the availability of adsorbed oxygen compounds. The quantity and form of adsorbed oxygen complexes in pre- and post-irradiated graphite were studied using Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS in an effort to better understand the gasification process and to apply that understanding to process optimization. Adsorbed oxygen fragments were detected on both irradiated and unirradiated graphite; however, carbon-oxygen bonds were identified only on the irradiated material. This difference is likely due to a large number of carbon active sites associated with the higher lattice disorder resulting from irradiation. Results of XPS analysis also indicated the potential bonding structures of the oxygen fragments removed during surface impingement. Ester- and carboxyl- like structures were predominant among the identified oxygen-containing fragments. The indicated structures are consistent with those characterized by Fanning and Vannice [3] and later incorporated into an oxidation kinetics model by El-Genk and Tournier [4]. Based on the predicted desorption mechanisms of carbon oxides from the identified compounds, it is expected that a

  12. Scalable Preparation of Ternary Hierarchical Silicon Oxide-Nickel-Graphite Composites for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang , Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 China; Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles, Beijing 100081 China; Bao, Wurigumula [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Ma, Lu [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont Illinois 60439 USA; Tan, Guoqiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Su , Yuefeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 China; Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles, Beijing 100081 China; Chen , Shi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 China; Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles, Beijing 100081 China; Wu , Feng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 China; Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles, Beijing 100081 China; Lu, Jun [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont Illinois 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont Illinois 60439 USA

    2015-11-09

    Silicon monoxide is a promising anode candidate because of its high theoretical capacity and good cycle performance. To solve the problems associated with this material, including large volume changes during charge-discharge processes, we report a ternary hierarchical silicon oxide–nickel–graphite composite prepared by a facile two-step ball-milling method. The composite consists of nano-Si dispersed silicon oxides embedded in nano-Ni/graphite matrices (Si@SiOx/Ni/graphite). In the composite, crystalline nano-Si particles are generated by the mechanochemical reduction of SiO by ball milling with Ni. These nano-Si dispersed oxides have abundant electrochemical activity and can provide high Li-ion storage capacity. Furthermore, the milled nano-Ni/graphite matrices stick well to active materials and interconnect to form a crosslinked framework, which functions as an electrical highway and a mechanical backbone so that all silicon oxide particles become electrochemically active. Owing to these advanced structural and electrochemical characteristics, the composite enhances the utilization efficiency of SiO, accommodates its large volume expansion upon cycling, and has good ionic and electronic conductivity. The composite electrodes thus exhibit substantial improvements in electrochemical performance. This ternary hierarchical Si@SiOx/Ni/graphite composite is a promising candidate anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries. Additionally, the mechanochemical ball-milling method is low cost and easy to reproduce, indicating potential for the commercial production of the composite materials.

  13. Potassium vapor assisted preparation of highly graphitized hierarchical porous carbon for high rate performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Zeng, Ying; Tang, Qunli; Hu, Aiping; Xiao, Kuikui; Zhang, Shiying; Deng, Weina; Fan, Binbin; Zhu, Yanfei; Chen, Xiaohua

    2017-09-01

    Ultrahigh graphitized carbon microspheres with rich hierarchical pores (AGHPCM-1) have been successfully synthesized through the one-step activation-carbonization strategy (OACS) with porous sulfonated poly-divinylbenzene as the carbon precursor, iron as the hard template and catalyst, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) as activation agent. Through the XRD, TEM, Raman and BET analysis, AGHPCM-1 shows very high graphitization degree and rich micro-, meso- and macro-pores. More importantly, the mechanism for KOH to improve the graphitization degree of carbon materials in OACS has been illustrated by the thermodynamical theory. The tremendous heat releasing from the reaction between the catalyst precursor of Fe2O3 and potassium vapor plays a key role in the formation of graphitized carbon. It may provide a general direction to prepare highly graphitized porous carbon at a moderate temperature. Integrating the advantages of high graphitization degree and rich hierarchical porous structure, the AGHPCM-1 exhibits an excellent rate performance with a response to up to the high current density of 150 A g-1 and high scan rate of 2000 mV s-1. No obvious capacitance decay can be observed after 10000 charge/discharge cycles even at the high current density of 20 A g-1.

  14. One-pot synthesis of graphene oxide sheets and graphene oxide quantum dots from graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rashid, Suraya, E-mail: suraya-ar@upm.edu.my; Mohd Zobir, Syazwan Afif [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Materials Processing and Technology Laboratory, Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Group, Institute of Advanced Technology (Malaysia); Krishnan, Shutesh; Hassan, Mohd Murshid [Graphene Nanochem Sdn. Bhd., Level 9, WORK@Clearwater (Malaysia); Lim, Hong Ngee [Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    A one-pot synthesis of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO quantum dots using graphite nanofibers (GNF) as starting material is reported. Two types of GNF starting materials, namely herringbone and platelet structures, were used. HRTEM revealed that platelet GNF produces quantum dots typically less than 10 nm in size while herringbone GNF produces relatively larger GO sheets. SAED patterns indicate that the produced GO sheets have a hexagonal crystal structure. UV–Vis, PL, XPS, and Raman show salient differences between the produced GO nanostructures which correlate well with the morphological analysis. Unlike the GO sheets, the GO quantum dots are photoluminescent. The difference in PL properties was attributed to the higher oxygen content in GO quantum dots which were shown by XPS. The results offer a new insight to the importance of starting material in the synthesis of graphene nanostructures.

  15. Ruthenium(III) diphenyldithiocarbamate as mediator for the electrocatalytic oxidation of sulfhydryl compounds at graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalini, B.; Sriman Narayanan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Ruthenium(III) diphenyldithiocarbamate was used as mediator to modify graphite electrode by abrasive method. The modified electrode was characterized electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry. The electrode was scanned between 0.0 V to +0.8 V. An anodic peak at + 0.39 V and a cathodic peak at +0.24 V have been observed for a scan rate of 100 mV/s. The electrode has been characterized at various scan rate and pHs in 0.1 M KNO 3 solution. Sulfhydryl compounds, cysteine and glutathione, were electro catalytically oxidised at the modified electrode. pH variation was studied to optimize the conditions for their estimation. Linear response for cysteine is in the range of 0.00-15.20 ppm, with a correlation coefficient (r), of 0.9993. The linear range for glutathione is 0.00-30.40 ppm, with a value of 0.999 for r. The electrocatalytic oxidation of both cysteine and glutathione gave reproducible current values with a standard deviation of 0.1686 for 10 repetitive determinations. The stability and reproducibility of the electrode for the determination of cysteine and glutathione were also discussed. The electrocatalytic oxidation of the sulfhydryl compounds were also studied in hydrodynamic environment. (author)

  16. Intercalation Study of Low-Molecular-Weight Hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine into Graphite Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Katsaros, Fotios; Sideratou, Zili; Kooi, Bart J.; Karakassides, Michael. A.; Siozios, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time the intercalation of low-molecular-weight hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (PEI) into graphite oxide (GO) for the facile, bulk synthesis of novel graphene-based hybrid (GO-PEI) materials exhibiting tailored interlayer galleries. The size of the intercalant as well as the

  17. Electrochemical Oxidation and Determination of Oxalic Acid at an Exfoliated Graphite-Polystyrene Composite Electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, J.; Manea, F.; Radovan, C.; Corb, I.; Pop, A.; Burtica, G.; Malchev, P.G.; Picken, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    An exfoliated graphite-polystyrene composite electrode was evaluated as analternative electrode in the oxidation and the determination of oxalic acid in 0.1 M Na2SO4supporting electrolyte. Using CV, LSV, CA procedures, linear dependences I vs. C wereobtained in the concentrations range of oxalic

  18. A novel mechanism for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a graphite electrode in acidic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei; Zeng, Chaoliu

    2014-09-01

    With the consideration of optimizing the performance of the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), the oxidation reaction mechanism of VO2+ on a rotating graphite disk electrode has been investigated by potentiodynamic polarization in sulfuric acid solutions with various pH and vanadium concentrations. Furthermore, the reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ have been calculated from the polarization results and compared with the theoretical results according to the possible reaction mechanisms available in the literature. However, a new oxidation reaction mechanism has been proposed to describe the oxidation of VO2+ at last, and the theoretic reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ based on the new mechanism are consistent with the experimental results when the electrochemical reaction is the rate-limited process. Moreover, a corresponding kinetic equation has been established for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a spectroscopically pure graphite electrode, and can be well used to predict the polarization behavior in V (IV) acidic solutions.

  19. Oxidation damage evaluation by non-destructive method for graphite components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Tada, Tatsuya; Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    To develop non-destructive evaluation methods for oxidation damage on graphite components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), the applicability of ultrasonic wave and micro-indentation methods were investigated. Candidate graphites, IG-110 and IG-430, for core components of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) were used in this study. These graphites were oxidized uniformly by air at 500degC. The following results were obtained from this study. (1) Ultrasonic wave velocities with 1 MHz can be expressed empirically by exponential formulas to burn-off, oxidation weight loss. (2) The porous condition of the oxidized graphite could be evaluated with wave propagation analysis with a wave-pore interaction model. It is important to consider the non-uniformity of oxidized porous condition. (3) Micro-indentation method is expected to determine the local oxidation damage. It is necessary to assess the variation of the test data. (author)

  20. Effect of steam oxidation on strength, elastic modulus, and strain at fracture of graphite 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez, C.; Hightower, G.; Burnette, R.

    1977-12-01

    Stackpole Carbon's graphite grade 2020, a candidate material for support posts in GA HTGRs, was oxidized in steam-helium mixtures to 25 wt % burnoff. The effects of the oxidation on ultimate strength, elastic modulus, and strain at fracture are reported. A large number of nonoxidized and oxidized tensile specimens were tested to failure. Average losses of 6.7 wt % in strength and 7.4 wt % in elastic modulus at 1% burnoff were obtained. No significant change in strain at fracture was observed for burnoffs up to 5%. The elastic modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the oxidized samples correlated with bulk density

  1. Exfoliation approach for preparing high conductive reduced graphite oxide and its application in natural rubber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wipatkrut, Pattharaporn [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Poompradub, Sirilux, E-mail: sirilux.p@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center for Petroleum, Petrochemical and Advanced Material, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite waste was exfoliated by oxidation and chemical and thermal reduction. • The obtained graphene-T was a single layer sheet with a high electrical conductivity. • Graphene-T incorporation at 5 phr improved the electrical conductivity of NR. • Graphene-T incorporation at 5–25 phr improved the mechanical properties of NR. - Abstract: High conductivity reduced graphite oxide (RGO) was prepared by exfoliation of graphite waste from the metal smelting industry. To improve the surface properties of the RGO, the graphite oxide obtained based on Hummers’ method was reduced by L-ascorbic acid to give RGOV, which was then subjected to thermal reduction to obtain RGOT. The residual oxygen-containing groups in RGOV were almost completely removed by the thermal reduction and the conjugated graphene networks were restored in RGOT. The effect of the RGOT content in natural rubber (NR) on the cure, electrical and mechanical properties of the NR-RGOT (NG) composites was evaluated. The electrical conductivity of NR was increased by the inclusion of RGOT at a percolation threshold of 5 phr, with an electrical conductivity of 8.71 × 10{sup −6} S/m. The mechanical properties, i.e., the modulus, tensile strength and hardness, of NG were comparable with those of conductive carbon black filled NR ones.

  2. Carbon nanostructures reduced from graphite oxide as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii M. Shulga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review we present information about obtaining and properties of carbon nanomaterials (graphite oxide, grapheme oxide, reduced graphene oxide, which are used as electrodes for supercapacitors (SC. This review describes methods of obtaining graphite oxide, followed by separation of graphene oxide and reducing graphene oxide by thermal, photochemical and chemical methods. Information on the composition and concentration of functional groups in graphene oxide and the elemental composition is described in detail. Results of the analysis of еру physical, electrochemical, thermal and optical properties of the graphene oxide and its derivatives are shown. The ratio of oxygen-containing functional groups was estimated by XPS. The presence of partial surface reduction is found. Hydroge-containing functional groups are characterized by IR spectroscopy. Method of estimating the size of graphene crystallites by Raman spectroscopy is shown. Mass loss upon heating is analyzed by thermogravimetry. The gassing of graphene oxide at thermal and photochemical reduction is studied by mass spectrometry. The difference between the abovementioned reduction methods is clearly demonstrated by the difference in the composition of the evolved gases. Also the chemical method of graphene oxide reduction with hydrazine is described. Review considers the literature data which illustrate the most interesting, from the Authors׳ point of view, aspects of that field of research.

  3. Improvement in transdermal drug delivery performance by graphite oxide/temperature-responsive hydrogel composites with micro heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Jumi; Lee, Dae Hoon; Im, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2012-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) was prepared with temperature-responsive hydrogel. The graphite was oxidized and incorporated into hydrogel matrix to improve the thermal response of hydrogel. The micro heater was fabricated to control the temperature precisely by adopting a joule heating method. The drug in hydrogel was delivered through a hairless mouse skin by controlling temperature. The efficiency of drug delivery was improved obviously by incorporation of graphite oxide due to the excellent thermal conductivity and the increased interfacial affinity between graphite oxide and hydrogel matrix. The fabricated micro heater was effective in controlling the temperature over lower critical solution temperature of hydrogel precisely with a small voltage less than 1 V. The cell viability test on graphite oxide composite hydrogel showed enough safety for using as a transdermal drug delivery patch. The performance of TDDS could be improved noticeably based on temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide, and efficient micro heater. - Graphical abstract: The high-performance transdermal drug delivery system could be prepared by combining temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide with improved interfacial affinity, and efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method. Highlights: ► High performance of transdermal drug delivery system with an easy control of voltage. ► Improved thermal response of hydrogel by graphite oxide incorporation. ► Efficient micro heater fabricated by a joule heating method.

  4. Scalable Preparation of Ternary Hierarchical Silicon Oxide-Nickel-Graphite Composites for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Bao, Wurigumula; Ma, Lu; Tan, Guoqiang; Su, Yuefeng; Chen, Shi; Wu, Feng; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-07

    Silicon monoxide is a promising anode candidate because of its high theoretical capacity and good cycle performance. To solve the problems associated with this material, including large volume changes during charge-discharge processes, we report a ternary hierarchical silicon oxide-nickel-graphite composite prepared by a facile two-step ball-milling method. The composite consists of nano-Si dispersed silicon oxides embedded in nano-Ni/graphite matrices (Si@SiOx /Ni/graphite). In the composite, crystalline nano-Si particles are generated by the mechanochemical reduction of SiO by ball milling with Ni. These nano-Si dispersed oxides have abundant electrochemical activity and can provide high Li-ion storage capacity. Furthermore, the milled nano-Ni/graphite matrices stick well to active materials and interconnect to form a crosslinked framework, which functions as an electrical highway and a mechanical backbone so that all silicon oxide particles become electrochemically active. Owing to these advanced structural and electrochemical characteristics, the composite enhances the utilization efficiency of SiO, accommodates its large volume expansion upon cycling, and has good ionic and electronic conductivity. The composite electrodes thus exhibit substantial improvements in electrochemical performance. This ternary hierarchical Si@SiOx /Ni/graphite composite is a promising candidate anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries. Additionally, the mechanochemical ball-milling method is low cost and easy to reproduce, indicating potential for the commercial production of the composite materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ex situ integration of iron oxide nanoparticles onto the exfoliated expanded graphite flakes in water suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid structures composed of exfoliated expanded graphite (EG and iron oxide nanocrystals have been produced by an ex situ process. The iron oxide nanoparticles coated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, or poly(acrylic acid (PAA were integrated onto the exfoliated EG flakes by mixing their aqueous suspensions at room temperature under support of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide (EDC and N-hydroxysuccin-nimide (NHS. EG flakes have been used both, naked and functionalized with branched polyethylenimine (PEI. Complete integration of two constituents has been achieved and mainteined stable for more than 12 months. No preferential spatial distribution of anchoring sites for attachement of iron oxide nanoparticles has been observed, regardless EG flakes have been used naked or functionalized with PEI molecules. The structural and physico-chemical characteristics of the exfoliated expanded graphite and its hybrids nanostructures has been investigated by SEM, TEM, FTIR and Raman techniques. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45015

  6. Thermal cyclic oxidation behavior of the developed compositionally gradient graphite material of SiC/C in air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Fujii, Kimio; Shindo, Masami

    1993-08-01

    For the developed compositionally gradient graphite material composed of surface SiC coating layer, middle SiC/C layer and graphite matrix, the thermal cyclic oxidation test was performed together with two kinds of the SiC coated graphite materials in air environment. It was made clear that the developed material exhibited high performance under severe thermal cyclic condition independent of the morphology of middle SiC/C layers and had the longer time or the more cycle margins from crack initiation to failure for surface SiC coating layer compared with the SiC coated graphite materials. (author)

  7. Structure, temperature and frequency dependent electrical conductivity of oxidized and reduced electrochemically exfoliated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoń, Adrian; Włodarczyk, Patryk; Łukowiec, Dariusz

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the influence of reduction by hydrogen in statu nascendi and modification by hydrogen peroxide on the structure and electrical conductivity of electrochemically exfoliated graphite. It was confirmed that the electrochemical exfoliation can be used to produce oxidized nanographite with an average number of 25 graphene layers. The modified electrochemical exfoliated graphite and reduced electrochemical exfoliated graphite were characterized by high thermal stability, what was associated with removing of labile oxygen-containing groups. The presence of oxygen-containing groups was confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Influence of chemical modification by hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide on the electrical conductivity was determined in wide frequency (0.1 Hz-10 kHz) and temperature range (-50 °C-100 °C). Material modified by hydrogen peroxide (0.29 mS/cm at 0 °C) had the lowest electrical conductivity. This can be associated with oxidation of unstable functional groups and was also confirmed by analysis of Raman spectra. The removal of oxygen-containing functional groups by hydrogen in statu nascendi resulted in a 1000-fold increase in the electrical conductivity compared to the electrochemical exfoliated graphite.

  8. Physicochemical characterization, and relaxometry studies of micro-graphite oxide, graphene nanoplatelets, and nanoribbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna S Paratala

    Full Text Available The chemistry of high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents remains an active area of research. In this work, we demonstrate that the potassium permanganate-based oxidative chemical procedures used to synthesize graphite oxide or graphene nanoparticles leads to the confinement (intercalation of trace amounts of Mn(2+ ions between the graphene sheets, and that these manganese intercalated graphitic and graphene structures show disparate structural, chemical and magnetic properties, and high relaxivity (up to 2 order and distinctly different nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles compared to paramagnetic chelate compounds. The results taken together with other published reports on confinement of paramagnetic metal ions within single-walled carbon nanotubes (a rolled up graphene sheet show that confinement (encapsulation or intercalation of paramagnetic metal ions within graphene sheets, and not the size, shape or architecture of the graphitic carbon particles is the key determinant for increasing relaxivity, and thus, identifies nano confinement of paramagnetic ions as novel general strategy to develop paramagnetic metal-ion graphitic-carbon complexes as high relaxivity MRI contrast agents.

  9. Effect of graphite loading on the electrical and mechanical properties of Poly (Ethylene Oxide)/Poly (Vinyl Chloride) polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, M. D. S.; Supri, A. G.; Hanif, M. P. M.; Yazid, M. I. M.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, films consisting of a blend of poly (ethylene oxide)/poly (vinyl chloride) (PEO/PVC) and a conductive filler, graphite were prepared and characterized for their mechanical and electrical properties. Solid polymer blend films based on PEO/PVC (50/50 wt%/wt%) with different graphite loading were prepared by using solution casting technique. Electrical conductivity results discovered the conductivity increased with increasing of filler loading. However, increasing amount of graphite loading led to a decreased in tensile strength and young’s modulus of PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films. The dispersion of graphite and mechanism of conductive path in the polymer films were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of the PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films shows that agglomeration occurred to complete the connection of conductive path, thus improving the conductivity behavior of the polymer films.

  10. Contribution to the study of the influence of porosity on carbon oxidation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpinet, Joseph

    1956-01-01

    In its first part, this research thesis presents and described experiments of carbon oxidation which comprised the measurement of combustion rate in function of the BET surface of new types of graphite samples, and measurements of other kinetic quantities (reaction rate, Arrhenius activation energy, concentration of various gaseous oxides in reaction products). The second part reports a theoretical and experimental study of the possibility of limitation of the reaction rate, by using the slowness of oxygen diffusion within graphite pores. Results are related to the Thiele-Wheeler theory on chemical reactions in catalyst pores. The third part presents and discusses suggested solutions to replace this 'porosity hypothesis', and to explain why oxidation rate is almost never proportional to the BET surface all along the combustion process of a same graphite sample [fr

  11. Selective Intercalation of Graphite Oxide by Methanol in Water/Methanol Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    You, Shujie; Yu, Junchun; Sundqvist, Bertil; Belyaeva, L. A.; Avramenko, Natalya V.; Korobov, Mikhail V.; Talyzin, Alexandr V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphite oxide is selectively intercalated by methanol when exposed to liquid water/methanol mixtures with methanol fraction in the range 20-100%. Insertion of water into the GO structure occurs only when the content of water in the mixture with methanol is increased up to 90%. This conclusion is confirmed by both ambient temperature XRD data and specific temperature variations of the GO structure due to insertion/deinsertion of an additional methanol monolayer observed upon cooling/heating. ...

  12. The use of graphite oxide to produce mesoporous carbon supporting Pt, Ru, or Pd nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Gotoh, Kazuma; Kawabata, Koji; Fujii, Eiji; Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kinumoto, Taro; Miyazaki, Yuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon having platinum, ruthenium or palladium nanoparticles on exfoliated graphene sheets were produced from graphite oxide (GO) and metal complexes. The Pt included carbon was made by heating of the intercalation compound including tetraammineplatinum (II) chloride monohydrate. Samples having Ru or Pd are producible by heating in nitrogen gas atmosphere using hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride or tetraamminepalladium (II) chloride monohydrate instead of Pt complex. The particle s...

  13. Oriented Arrays of Graphene in a Polymer Matrix by in situ Reduction of Graphite Oxide Nanosheets

    KAUST Repository

    Ansari, Seema

    2010-01-18

    Graphite oxide-Nafion hybrids with a high degree of alignment are cast from aqueous solution in the absence of any external field and reduced in situ by exposure to hydrazine to produce graphene-Nafion hybrids. Dramatic enhancement of electrical conductivity indicates sufficient accessibility of the inorganic nanosheets to the reducing agent, through the nanochannels formed by the polymeric ionic domains. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Self-propagating solar light reduction of graphite oxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Boukos, N.; Vermisoglou, E. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece); Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite oxide was partially reduced by solar light irradiation in water media. • No addition of catalysts nor reductive agent were used for the reduction. • Specific capacitance increased stepwise with increase of irradiation time. • Self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide by solar light is suggested. - Abstract: Graphite Oxide (GtO) is commonly used as an intermediate material for preparation of graphene in the form of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Being a semiconductor with tunable band gap rGO is often coupled with various photocatalysts to enhance their visible light activity. The behavior of such rGO-based composites could be affected after prolonged exposure to solar light. In the present work, the alteration of the GtO properties under solar light irradiation is investigated. Water dispersions of GtO manufactured by oxidation of natural graphite via Hummers method were irradiated into solar light simulator for different periods of time without addition of catalysts or reductive agent. The FT-IR analysis of the treated dispersions revealed gradual reduction of the GtO with the increase of the irradiation time. The XRD, FT-IR and XPS analyses of the obtained solid materials confirmed the transition of GtO to rGO under solar light irradiation. The reduction of the GtO was also manifested by the CV measurements that revealed stepwise increase of the specific capacitance connected with the restoration of the sp{sup 2} domains. Photothermal self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide in aqueous media under solar light irradiation is suggested as a possible mechanism. The self-photoreduction of GtO utilizing solar light provides a green, sustainable route towards preparation of reduced graphene oxide. However, the instability of the GtO and partially reduced GO under irradiation should be considered when choosing the field of its application.

  15. Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets doped graphene oxide for electrochemical simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanqiang; Huang, Qitong; Huang, Yihong; Li, Feiming; Zhang, Wuxiang; Wei, Chan; Chen, Jianhua; Dai, Pingwang; Huang, Lizhang; Huang, Zhouyi; Kang, Lianping; Hu, Shirong; Hao, Aiyou

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic drawing of electrochemical oxidize AA, DA and UA on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite modified electrode. - Highlights: • Synthesize g-C 3 N 4 , GO and CNNS-GO composite. • CNNS-GO composite was the first time for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. • CNNS-GO/GCE displays fantastic selectivity and sensitivity for AA, DA and UA. • CNNS-GO/GCE was applied to detect real sample with satisfactory results. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets with a graphite-like structure have strong covalent bonds between carbon and nitride atoms, and nitrogen atoms in the carbon architecture can accelerate the electron transfer and enhance electrical properties effectually. The graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite was synthesized. And the electrochemical performance of the composite was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry ulteriorly. Due to the synergistic effects of layer-by-layer structures by π-π stacking or charge-transfer interactions, graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite can improved conductivity, electro-catalytic and selective oxidation performance. The proposed graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-graphene oxide composite modified electrode was employed for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid in their mixture solution, it exhibited distinguished sensitivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. Moreover, the modified electrode was applied to detect urine and dopamine injection sample, and then the samples were spiked with certain concentration of three substances with satisfactory recovery results

  16. Vanadium carbide and graphite promoted Pd electrocatalyst for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Zhang, Mingmei; Xie, Jimin; Shen, Pei Kang

    2013-12-01

    The vanadium carbide particles with the diameter of 1-3 nm on graphitized resin (GC-V8C7) are synthesized through ionic exchange process. The materials are characterized by XRD, Raman, TEM, SEM and EDS measurements. The results prove that the ion-exchange resin as both carbon source and dispersion media favors the formation of very uniform and small (1-3 nm) V8C7 particles, and protect the V8C7 from conglomeration even at the temperature of 1500 °C. Meanwhile, the vanadium compound is found efficient catalytic effect on graphitization of ion-exchange resin, leading to high graphitization degree of GC-V8C7. Pd particles are loaded on the GC-V8C7 materials as electrocatalyst (Pd/GC-V8C7) for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The cyclic voltammograms measurements show that both V8C7 and GC (graphitized ion-exchange resin) give Pd electrocatalyst improved catalytic performance in activity, stability and overpotential, compared with that of Pd supporting on Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pd/C). The present synthesizing method of GC-V8C7 is simple and effective, which can be readily scaled up for mass production of other nanomaterials.

  17. Mössbauer Study of Graphite-Containing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorescu, Monica; Trotta, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Graphite-doped hematite and magnetite nanoparticles systems (~50 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical activation for milling times ranging from 2 to 12 hours. Their structural and magnetic properties were studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The spectra corresponding to the hematite milled samples were analyzed by considering two sextets, corresponding to the incorporation of carbon atoms into the iron oxide structure. For ball-milling time of 12 hours a quadrupole split doublet has been added, representing the contribution of ultrafine particles. The Mössbauer spectra of graphite-doped magnetite were resolved considering a sextet and a magnetic hyperfine field distribution, corresponding to the tetrahedral and octahedral sublattices of magnetite, respectively. A quadrupole split doublet was incorporated in the fitting of the 12-hour milled sample. The recoilless fraction for all samples was determined using our previously developed dual absorber method. It was found that the recoilless fraction of the graphite-doped hematite nanoparticles decreases as function of ball-milling time. The f factor of graphite-containing magnetite nanoparticles for the tetrahedral sites stays constant, while that of the octahedral sublattice decreases as function of ball-milling time. These findings reinforce the idea that carbon atoms exhibit preference for the octahedral sites of magnetite.

  18. Structures and electrochemical performances of pyrolized carbons from graphite oxides for electric double-layer capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ick-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Jeon, Min-Je; Moon, Seong-In; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Yoon-Pyo; An, Kye-Hyeok; Lee, Young-Hee

    The structural features and the electrochemical performances of pyrolized needle cokes from oxidized cokes are examined and compared with those of KOH-activated needle coke. The structure of needle coke is changed to a single phase of graphite oxide after oxidation treatment with an acidic solution having an NaClO 3/needle coke composition ratio of above 7.5, and the inter-layer distance of the oxidized needle coke is expanded to 6.9 Å with increasing oxygen content. After heating at 200 °C, the oxidized needle coke is reduced to a graphite structure with an inter-layer distance of 3.6 Å. By contrast, a change in the inter-layer distance in KOH-activated needle coke is not observed. An intercalation of pyrolized needle coke, observed on first charge, occurs at 1.0 V. This value is lower than that of KOH-activation needle coke. A capacitor using pyrolized needle coke exhibits a lower internal resistance of 0.57 Ω in 1 kHz, and a larger capacitance per weight and volume of 30.3 F g -1 and 26.9 F ml -1, in the two-electrode system over the potential range 0-2.5 V compared with those of a capacitor using KOH-activation of needle coke. This better electrochemical performance is attributed to a distorted graphene layer structure derived from the process of the inter-layer expansion and shrinkage.

  19. Searching for magnetism in hydrogenated graphene: using highly hydrogenated graphene prepared via Birch reduction of graphite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Poh, Hwee Ling; Šaněk, Filip; Maryško, Miroslav; Matějková, Stanislava; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-07-23

    Fully hydrogenated graphene (graphane) and partially hydrogenated graphene materials are expected to possess various fundamentally different properties from graphene. We have prepared highly hydrogenated graphene containing 5% wt of hydrogen via Birch reduction of graphite oxide using elemental sodium in liquid NH3 as electron donor and methanol as proton donor in the reduction. We also investigate the influence of preparation method of graphite oxide, such as the Staudenmaier, Hofmann or Hummers methods on the hydrogenation rate. A control experiment involving NaNH2 instead of elemental Na was also performed. The materials were characterized in detail by electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy both at room and low temperatures, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis and electrical resistivity measurements. Magnetic measurements are provided of bulk quantities of highly hydrogenated graphene. In the whole temperature range up to room temperature, the hydrogenated graphene exhibits a weak ferromagnetism in addition to a contribution proportional to field that is caused not only by diamagnetism but also likely by an antiferromagnetic influence. The origin of the magnetism is also determined to arise from the hydrogenated graphene itself, and not as a result of any metallic impurities.

  20. Excimer laser assisted very fast exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide at room temperature under air ambient for Supercapacitors electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Hosseini, S. M. B.; Baizaee, S. M.; Naderi, Hamid Reza; Dare Kordi, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Excimer laser was used for reduction and exfoliation of graphite oxide (GO) at room temperature under air ambient. The prepared excimer laser reduced graphite oxide (XLRGO) is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption (BET method), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-vis absorption techniques for surface, structural functional groups and band gap analysis. Electrochemical properties are investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and continues cyclic voltammetry (CCV) in 0.5 M Na2SO4 as electrolyte. Electrochemical investigations revealed that XLRGO electrode has enhanced supercapacitive performance including specific capacitance of 299 F/g at a scan rate of 2 mV/s. Furthermore, CCV measurement showed that XLRGO electrode kept 97.8% of its initial capacitance/capacity after 4000 cycles. The obtained results from electrochemical investigations confirm that the reduction of GO by using an excimer laser produces high-quality graphene for supercapacitor applications without the need for additional operations.

  1. Effects of cooling rate on vermicular graphite percentage in a brake drum produced by one-step cored wire injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-shuang Feng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a vermicular graphite cast iron brake drum was produced by cored wire injection in a one-step method. Silica sand and low-density alumina-silicate ceramic were used as molding materials in order to investigate the effect of cooling rate on percentage of vermicular graphite and mechanical properties of the brake drum casting. Several thermocouples were inserted into the casting in the desired positions to measure the temperature change. By means of one-step cored wire injection, the two residual concentrations of Mg and RE were effectively controlled in the ranges of 0.013%-0.017% and 0.019%-0.025%, respectively, which are crucial for the production of vermicular graphite cast iron and the formation of vermicular graphite. In addition, the cooling rate had a significant effect on the vermicular graphite percentage. In the case of the silica mold brake drum casting, there was an obvious difference in the cooling rate with the wall change, leading to a change in vermicular graphite percentage from 70.8% to 90%. In the low-density alumina-silicate ceramic mold casting, no obvious change in temperature was detected by the thermocouples and the percentage of the vermicular graphite was stable at 85%. Therefore, the vermicular graphite cast iron brake drum with a better combination of mechanical properties could be obtained.

  2. Determination of boron in graphite by a wet oxidation decomposition/curcumin photometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuo; Toida, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The wet oxidation decomposition of graphite materials has been studied for the accurate determination of boron using a curcumin photometric method. A graphite sample of 0.5 g was completely decomposed with a mixture of 5 ml of sulfuric acid, 3 ml of perchloric acid, 0.5 ml of nitric acid and 5 ml of phosphoric acid in a silica 100 ml Erlenmeyer flask fitted with an air condenser at 200degC. Any excess of perchloric and nitric acids in the solution was removed by heating on a hot plate at 150degC. Boron was distilled with methanol, and then recovered in 10 ml of 0.2 M sodium hydroxide. The solution was evaporated to dryness. To the residue were added curcumin-acetic acid and sulfuric-acetic acid. The mixture was diluted with ethanol, and the absorbance at 555 nm was measured. The addition of 5 ml of phosphoric acid proved to be effective to prevent any volatilization loss of boron during decomposition of the graphite sample and evaporation of the resulting solution. The relative standard deviation was 4-8% for samples with 2 μg g -1 levels of boron. The results on CRMs JAERI-G5 and G6 were in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  3. Synthesis of metal-fluoride nanoparticles supported on thermally reduced graphite oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Schmitz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal-fluoride nanoparticles, (MFx-NPs with M = Fe, Co, Pr, Eu, supported on different types of thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO were obtained by microwave-assisted thermal decomposition of transition-metal amidinates, (M{MeC[N(iPr]2}n or [M(AMDn] with M = Fe(II, Co(II, Pr(III, and tris(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionatoeuropium, Eu(dpm3, in the presence of TRGO in the ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4]. The crystalline phases of the metal fluorides synthesized in [BMIm][BF4] were identified by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD to be MF2 for M = Fe, Co and MF3 for M = Eu, Pr. The diameters and size distributions of MFx@TRGO were from (6 ± 2 to (102 ± 41 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were used for further characterization of the MFx-NPs. Electrochemical investigations of the FeF2-NPs@TRGO as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries were evaluated by galvanostatic charge/discharge profiles. The results indicate that the FeF2-NPs@TRGO as cathode material can present a specific capacity of 500 mAh/g at a current density of 50 mA/g, including a significant interfacial charge storage contribution. The obtained nanomaterials show a good rate capacity as well (220 mAh/g and 130 mAh/g at a current density of 200 and 500 mA/g, respectively.

  4. Nickel Oxide and Nickel Co-doped Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanocomposites and its Octylphenol Sensing Application

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Wanyun

    2015-11-16

    Nickel oxide and nickel co-doped graphitic carbon nitride (NiO-Ni-GCN) nanocomposites were successfully prepared by thermal treatment of melamine and NiCl2 6H2O. NiO-Ni-GCN nanocomposites showed superior electrochemical catalytic activity for the oxidation of octylphenol to pure GCN. A detection method of octylphenol in environmental water samples was developed based at NiO-Ni-GCN nanocomposites modified electrode under infrared light irradiation. Differential pulse voltammetry was used as the analytic technique of octylphenol, exhibiting stable and specific concentration-dependent oxidation signal in the presence of octylphenol in the range of 10nM to 1μM and 1μM to 50μM, with a detection limit of 3.3nM (3S/N). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Improvement in transdermal drug delivery performance by graphite oxide/temperature-responsive hydrogel composites with micro heater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jumi; Lee, Dae Hoon; Im, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2012-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) was prepared with temperature-responsive hydrogel. The graphite was oxidized and incorporated into hydrogel matrix to improve the thermal response of hydrogel. The micro heater was fabricated to control the temperature precisely by adopting a joule heating method. The drug in hydrogel was delivered through a hairless mouse skin by controlling temperature. The efficiency of drug delivery was improved obviously by incorporation of graphite oxide due to the excellent thermal conductivity and the increased interfacial affinity between graphite oxide and hydrogel matrix. The fabricated micro heater was effective in controlling the temperature over lower critical solution temperature of hydrogel precisely with a small voltage less than 1 V. The cell viability test on graphite oxide composite hydrogel showed enough safety for using as a transdermal drug delivery patch. The performance of TDDS could be improved noticeably based on temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide, and efficient micro heater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A general strategy toward graphitized carbon coating on iron oxides as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunyan; Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Bin; Li, Xin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Guangwu

    2017-08-01

    Integration of carbon materials with benign iron oxides is blazing a trail in constructing high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). In this paper, a unique general, simple, and controllable strategy is developed toward in situ uniform coating of iron oxide nanostructures with graphitized carbon (GrC) layers. The basic synthetic procedure only involves a simple dip-coating process for the loading of Ni-containing seeds and a subsequent Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the growth of GrC layers. More importantly, the CVD treatment is conducted at a quite low temperature (450 °C) and with extremely facile liquid carbon sources consisting of ethylene glycol (EG) and ethanol (EA). The GrC content of the resulting hybrids can be controllably regulated by altering the amount of carbon sources. The electrochemical results reveal remarkable performance enhancements of iron oxide@GrC hybrids compared with pristine iron oxides in terms of high specific capacity, excellent rate and cycling performance. This can be attributed to the network-like GrC coating, which can improve not only the electronic conductivity but also the structural integrity of iron oxides. Moreover, the lithium storage performance of samples with different GrC contents is measured, manifesting that optimized electrochemical property can be achieved with appropriate carbon content. Additionally, the superiority of GrC coating is demonstrated by the advanced performance of iron oxide@GrC compared with its corresponding counterpart, i.e., iron oxides with amorphous carbon (AmC) coating. All these results indicate the as-proposed protocol of GrC coating may pave the way for iron oxides to be promising anodes for LIBs.

  7. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i

  8. Sulfur-doped graphene via thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in H2S, SO2, or CS2 gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Hwee Ling; Šimek, Petr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-06-25

    Doping of graphene with heteroatoms is an effective way to tailor its properties. Here we describe a simple and scalable method of doping graphene lattice with sulfur atoms during the thermal exfoliation process of graphite oxides. The graphite oxides were first prepared by Staudenmaier, Hofmann, and Hummers methods followed by treatments in hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, or carbon disulfide. The doped materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The ζ-potential and conductivity of sulfur-doped graphenes were also investigated in this paper. It was found that the level of doping is more dramatically influenced by the type of graphite oxide used rather than the type of sulfur-containing gas used during exfoliation. Resulting sulfur-doped graphenes act as metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction.

  9. Cu-BTC/aminated graphite oxide composites as high-efficiency CO2 capture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policicchio, Alfonso; Zhao, Yunxia; Zhong, Qin; Agostino, Raffaele G; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-01-08

    CO2 adsorption isotherms on Cu-BTC/aminated graphite oxide composites were measured in the pressure range up to 1.5 MPa at three different temperatures close to ambient. Adsorption capacity, isosteric heat of adsorption, and regenerability were investigated. They are considered as significant factors determining the practical application of materials for CO2 capture. The results indicate a significant improvement in the performance of the composites as CO2 adsorbents in comparison with the parent Cu-BTC MOF. Among all samples analyzed, the composite of Cu-BTC and modified graphite oxide with the highest N content (MOF/GO-U3) is the best performing sample. On its surface 13.41 mmol/g CO2 was adsorbed at room temperature and 1.5 MPa. A high selectivity for CO2 adsorption over that of CH4 was found. The selectivities for CO2 adsorption over N2 are governed by the properties of the MOF phase. A relatively low heat of CO2 adsorption and the high degree of surface homogeneity cause that the composites can be fully regenerated and used in multicycle adsorption with the minimum energy demand.

  10. A Graphite Oxide Paper Polymer Electrolyte for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A flow directed assembly of graphite oxide solution was used in the formation of free-standing graphene oxide paper of approximate thickness of 100 μm. The GO papers were characterised by XRD and SEM. Electrochemical characterization of the GO paper membrane electrode assembly revealed proton conductivities of 4.1 × 10−2 S cm−1 to 8.2 × 10−2 S cm−1 at temperatures of 25–90°C. A direct methanol fuel cell, at 60°C, gave a peak power density of 8 mW cm−2 at a current density of 35 mA cm−2.

  11. A Graphite Oxide Paper Polymer Electrolyte for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ravi; Mamlouk, Mohamed; Scott, Keith

    2011-01-01

    A flow directed assembly of graphite oxide solution was used in the formation of free-standing graphene oxide paper of approximate thickness of 100 μm. The GO papers were characterised by XRD and SEM. Electrochemical characterization of the GO paper membrane electrode assembly revealed proton conductivities of 4.1 × 10−2 S cm−1 to 8.2 × 10−2 S cm−1 at temperatures of 25–90°C. A direct methanol fuel cell, at 60°C, gave a peak power density of 8 mW cm−2 at a current density of 35 mA cm−2....

  12. Effects of Interlayer Distance and van der Waals Energy on Electrochemical Activation of Partially Reduced Graphite Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Hyun Deog; Jang, Jong Hyun; Cho, Kyeongjae; Zheng, Yongping; Park, Yuwon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Oh, Seung M.

    2015-01-01

    Partially reduced graphite oxide (GOpr) inherits expanded interlayer distance from the parent, graphite oxide (GO), and electronic conductivity from the grandparent, graphite. Indebted to the dual properties, GOpr shows unique behavior so-called electrochemical activation in organic electrolytes; when GOpr is polarized over a certain electrode potential, graphitic layers in GOpr are injected by solvated ions and become ion adsorbing sites permanently. Resultant gravimetric or volumetric capacitance (up to 200 F g −1 or 150 F ml −1 ) exceeds that of commercially available activated carbon electrodes for electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC). Previous literatures have reported that larger interlayer distance (d) lowers the on-set potential of electrochemical activation of graphitic carbons. However, the reason of this phenomenon has not yet been studied. In this paper, we combined experimental and theoretical approaches to reveal the effect of interlayer distance and van der Waals energy (U vdW ) on the electrochemical activation of graphitic carbon. More specifically, we compared the energy for the electrochemical activation (U EA ) and the van der Waals energy with respect to the interlayer distance. For this purpose, we devised an experimental method to measure U EA from cyclic voltammogram, and this method was verified by in-situ electrochemical dilatometry. The theoretical value of U vdW was calculated by semi-empirical density functional theory (DFT) and those experimental and theoretical values were linearly in accordance with each other. This finding signifies that (1) the electrochemical activation of graphitic carbon occurs by overcoming van der Waals energy to expand the interlayer distance, (2) and the on-set potential for electrochemical activation is varied by the interlayer distance because of the different van der Waals energy

  13. Influence of cooling rate and antimony addition content on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of a ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling rate and inoculation practice can greatly affect the graphite morphology of ductile irons. In the present research, the effects of the cooling rate and antimony addition on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of ductile irons have been studied. Three ductile iron castings were prepared through solidification under cooling conditions S (slow, M (medium and F (fast. The cooling rates around the equilibrium eutectic temperature (1,150 ℃ for these cooling conditions (S, M and F were set at 0.21 ℃·min-1, 0.32 ℃·min-1 and 0.37 ℃·min-1, respectively. In addition, four ductile iron castings were prepared by adding 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04% (by weight antimony, respectively under the slow cooling condition. The results show that the nodularity index, tensile strength and hardness of the ductile iron castings without antimony addition are all improved with the increase of cooling rate, while the ductile iron casting solidified under the medium cooling rate possesses the largest number of graphite nodules. Furthermore, for the four antimony containing castings, the graphite morphology and tensile strength are also improved by the antimony additions, and the effect of antimony addition is intensified when the addition increases from 0.01% to 0.03%. Moreover, the rare earth elements (REE/antimony ratio of 2 appears to be the most effective for fine nodular graphite formation in ductile iron.

  14. Diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles decrease migration and invasiveness in glioblastoma cell lines by impairing extracellular adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Slawomir; Kutwin, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The highly invasive nature of glioblastoma is one of the most significant problems regarding the treatment of this tumor. Diamond nanoparticles (ND), graphite nanoparticles (NG), and graphene oxide nanoplatelets (nGO) have been explored for their biomedical applications, especially for drug...... that nanoparticles could be used in biomedical applications as a low toxicity active compound for glioblastoma treatment....

  15. Searching for magnetism in hydrogenated graphene: Using highly hydrogenated graphene prepared via birch reduction of graphite oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eng, A.Y.S.; Poh, H. L.; Šaněk, F.; Maryško, Miroslav; Matějková, Stanislava; Šofer, Z.; Pumera, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 7 (2013), s. 5930-5939 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20507S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogenated graphene * graphane * graphite oxide * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 12.033, year: 2013

  16. Low energy hydrogen and deuterium sputtering measurements of stainless steel, graphite, and beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.; Langley, R.A.; Wilson, K.L.

    1978-01-01

    The total erosion yields of 304 stainless steel by low energy hydrogen and deuterium have been determined by 4 He ion backscattering spectroscopy at energies ranging from 0.33 to 9.0 keV. This experimental method determines the number of atoms removed by sputtering by measuring the change in depth of implanted Xe marker atoms. Data for 304 stainless steel are compared with the extensive published data obtained using the weight loss technique. The Xe marker method is used to make the first measurements of deuterium erosion on polycrystalline graphite. Deuterium erosion measurements of thermally-prepared oxide layers on Be were also made using 4 He backscattering spectroscopy to determine directly the number of removed atoms. These new data for the sputtering yields of deuterium on carbon and BeO range from 0.016 to 0.052 atoms per ion

  17. Modulating Crystallinity of Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Photocatalytic Oxidation of Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Yang, Pengju; Yuan, Rusheng; Asiri, Abdullah M; Wakeel, Muhammad; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-11-23

    Exploiting efficient photocatalysts with strengthened structure for solar-driven alcohol oxidation is of great significance. The photocatalytic performance of graphitic carbon nitrides can be considerably promoted by modulating its crystallinity. Results confirmed that a high crystallinity accelerates the separation and transfer of photogenerated charge carriers, thus providing more free charges for photoredox reactions. More importantly, the high crystallinity facilitated the adsorption of benzyl alcohol and desorption of benzaldehyde and simultaneously lowered the energy barrier for O 2 activation. As a result, the crystalline carbon nitride exhibited a roughly twelvefold promotion with respect to the normal carbon nitride. The remarkable enhancement of activity can be attributed to the synergistic effects of increased electron-hole separation and increased surface reaction kinetics. These findings will open up new opportunities to modulate the structure of polymers for a wide variety of organic reactions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. In situ emulsion cationic polymerization of isoprene onto the surface of graphite oxide sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazat, Alice; Beyou, Emmanuel; Barrès, Claire; Bruno, Florence; Janin, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite oxide sheets were functionalized by polyisoprene in a two steps procedure. • The polyisoprene chains were grafted onto functionalized GO sheets by the grafting through technique. • A polyisoprene weight content of 50% was calculated from TGA measurements. • A decrease of the air permeability coefficient of 27% for the vulcanized PI composites has been reached. - Abstract: Grafting of polymers onto graphite oxide sheets (GO) has been widely studied in recent years due to the numerous applications of GO-based composites. Herein, polyisoprene (PI) chains were anchored on the surface of GO by in situ cationic polymerization using a “grafting through” approach with allyltrimethoxysilane-modified GO (GO-ATMS). First, the functionalization of GO sheets through the hydrolysis-condensation of allyltrimethoxysilane (ATMS) molecules was qualitatively evidenced by infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and a weight content of 4% grafted ATMS was calculated from thermogravimetric analysis. Then, isoprene was in situ polymerized through a one-pot cationic mechanism by using a highly water-dispersible Lewis acid surfactant combined catalyst. For comparison, it was shown that the cationic polymerization of isoprene in presence of un-functionalized GO sheets led to a polyisoprene weight content on the solid filler divided by 3 compared to GO-ATMS. Finally, the compounding of the modified GO/PI composites was performed at a processing temperature of 80 °C with 2 phr and 15 phr loadings and it was shown a decrease of the air permeability coefficient of 27% for the vulcanizates with 15 phr loading.

  19. In situ emulsion cationic polymerization of isoprene onto the surface of graphite oxide sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazat, Alice [Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP, CNRS UMR 5223, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and INSA de Lyon, 15 boulevard Latarjet, 69122 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Laboratoire de Recherches et de Contrôle du Caoutchouc et des Plastiques, LRCCP, 60 rue Auber, 94408 Vitry-sur-Seine cedex (France); Beyou, Emmanuel, E-mail: beyou@univ-lyon1.fr [Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP, CNRS UMR 5223, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and INSA de Lyon, 15 boulevard Latarjet, 69122 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Barrès, Claire [Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP, CNRS UMR 5223, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and INSA de Lyon, 15 boulevard Latarjet, 69122 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Bruno, Florence; Janin, Claude [Laboratoire de Recherches et de Contrôle du Caoutchouc et des Plastiques, LRCCP, 60 rue Auber, 94408 Vitry-sur-Seine cedex (France)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Graphite oxide sheets were functionalized by polyisoprene in a two steps procedure. • The polyisoprene chains were grafted onto functionalized GO sheets by the grafting through technique. • A polyisoprene weight content of 50% was calculated from TGA measurements. • A decrease of the air permeability coefficient of 27% for the vulcanized PI composites has been reached. - Abstract: Grafting of polymers onto graphite oxide sheets (GO) has been widely studied in recent years due to the numerous applications of GO-based composites. Herein, polyisoprene (PI) chains were anchored on the surface of GO by in situ cationic polymerization using a “grafting through” approach with allyltrimethoxysilane-modified GO (GO-ATMS). First, the functionalization of GO sheets through the hydrolysis-condensation of allyltrimethoxysilane (ATMS) molecules was qualitatively evidenced by infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and a weight content of 4% grafted ATMS was calculated from thermogravimetric analysis. Then, isoprene was in situ polymerized through a one-pot cationic mechanism by using a highly water-dispersible Lewis acid surfactant combined catalyst. For comparison, it was shown that the cationic polymerization of isoprene in presence of un-functionalized GO sheets led to a polyisoprene weight content on the solid filler divided by 3 compared to GO-ATMS. Finally, the compounding of the modified GO/PI composites was performed at a processing temperature of 80 °C with 2 phr and 15 phr loadings and it was shown a decrease of the air permeability coefficient of 27% for the vulcanizates with 15 phr loading.

  20. The electrochemical oxidation of organic waste and activated graphite by Ag{sup 2+} in nitric acid: a literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Alsenoy, V.; Rahier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Organic wastes and activated moderator graphite can be processed by means of combustion, but the incineration of organic waste poses emission problems. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has experience with the treatment of organic wastes. Moreover, the treatment of radioactive graphite will be required since the BR-1 reactor is moderated with 492 tons of graphite. The strong oxidising properties of Ag{sup 2+} are already used in the chemical and nuclear industry to destroy organic waste. We aim to apply the process on radioactive graphite, organic resins and effluents. The reaction mechanisms will be studied, taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the different reactions involved. As a first step, this document gives a literature study of the electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. This document presents a thorough literature study, and shows that the oxidative properties of the Ag{sup 2+} ion, which can easily be formed in nitric acid by means of electrolysis, make it an ideal candidate to oxidize organic molecules into carbon dioxide and water on a perfectly well controlled manner. The process has already been used to destroy explosives and toxic organic waste in the nuclear and chemical industry. Chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of some of the reactions involved are already known and described, other reaction mechanisms are still unknown. On the basis of the information collected so far, the Research and Development group of the Radioactive Waste and Cleanup unit has proposed to start a research programme to define, test, demonstrate and finally apply a safe process for the treatment of radioactive organic material and graphite by electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. Available data confirm that the oxidation of organic material can be carried out safely, leading to the formation of water and carbon dioxide.

  1. The electrochemical oxidation of organic waste and activated graphite by Ag2+ in nitric acid: a literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Alsenoy, V.; Rahier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Organic wastes and activated moderator graphite can be processed by means of combustion, but the incineration of organic waste poses emission problems. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has experience with the treatment of organic wastes. Moreover, the treatment of radioactive graphite will be required since the BR-1 reactor is moderated with 492 tons of graphite. The strong oxidising properties of Ag 2+ are already used in the chemical and nuclear industry to destroy organic waste. We aim to apply the process on radioactive graphite, organic resins and effluents. The reaction mechanisms will be studied, taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the different reactions involved. As a first step, this document gives a literature study of the electrochemical oxidation using Ag 2+ . This document presents a thorough literature study, and shows that the oxidative properties of the Ag 2+ ion, which can easily be formed in nitric acid by means of electrolysis, make it an ideal candidate to oxidize organic molecules into carbon dioxide and water on a perfectly well controlled manner. The process has already been used to destroy explosives and toxic organic waste in the nuclear and chemical industry. Chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of some of the reactions involved are already known and described, other reaction mechanisms are still unknown. On the basis of the information collected so far, the Research and Development group of the Radioactive Waste and Cleanup unit has proposed to start a research programme to define, test, demonstrate and finally apply a safe process for the treatment of radioactive organic material and graphite by electrochemical oxidation using Ag 2+ . Available data confirm that the oxidation of organic material can be carried out safely, leading to the formation of water and carbon dioxide

  2. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shores, Erik Frederick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

  3. Preparation and characterization of expanded graphite/metal oxides for antimicrobial application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Che; Wu, Kuo-Hui; Lyu, Dong-Yi; Cheng, Ken-Fa; Huang, Wen-Chien

    2017-06-01

    Composite materials based on expanded graphite (EG) and metal oxide (MO) particles was prepared by an explosive combustion and blending method. The objective of the study was to develop EG impregnated with metal oxide particulates (Ag 2 O, CuO and ZnO) and evaluate the level of protection the materials conferred against biological agents. The physical properties of the EG/MO composites were examined using SEM, EDX and XRD spectroscopy, and the results indicated that the MO particles were incorporated into the EG matrix after impregnation. The antimicrobial activities of the EG/MO composites against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and Bacillus anthracis were investigated using zone of inhibition, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and plate-counting methods. EG/Ag 2 O exhibited a stronger antibacterial activity than EG/CuO and EG/ZnO, with a MIC of 0.3mg/mL and a MBC of 0.5mg/mL. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have demonstrated that EG/MO composites can inhibit the growth of Bacillus anthracis-adhered cells, thus preventing the process of biofilm formation. Nanoscale metal oxides display enhanced reactive properties toward bacteria due to their high surface area, large number of highly reactive edges, corner defect sites and high surface to volume ratio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  5. Oxidation of the AlSi6Cu4 alloy and AlSi6Cu4-graphite particles composite at the elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pozar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation process of AlSi6Cu4 alloy as a composite matrix and of AlSi6Cu4 / 8 vol.% graphite particles composite was investigated.Composites were prepared by stirring method for suspension obtaining and by squeeze casting of the suspension. This process wasexamined by testing specimens annealed during up to 1000 hours at 573 K and 673 K in air atmosphere. The average oxidation state, oxidelayer thickness and hardness of examined materials were measured during the annealing time. Obtained results imply the followingconclusions: composite oxidizes faster than matrix alloy at both temperatures what is confirmed by higher weight gains and thicker oxide layer. The rate of oxidation of both materials gradually slows down at both temperatures. At initial stages of annealing at 673 K the rate of oxidation of both materials is much higher than that at 573 K. With increasing time of annealing the ratio of oxidation rate at 673 K to the one at 573 K comes down. Hardness of the composite is lower than that of matrix alloy before and during annealing at both temperatures. Drop in hardness at both 573 K and 673 K is the same for matrix and composite, and after about 100 hours the hardness no longer descents.

  6. Graphitic carbon nitride: Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praus, Petr, E-mail: petr.praus@vsb.cz [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Svoboda, Ladislav [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Ritz, Michal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic); Troppová, Ivana; Šihor, Marcel; Kočí, Kamila [Institute of Environmental Technology, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. Listopadu 15/2172, Ostrava 708 33 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was synthetized by condensation of melamine at the temperatures of 400–700 °C in air for 2 h and resulting products were characterized and finally tested for the photocatalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide. The characterization methods were elemental analysis, UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, measurement of specific surface area (SSA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The XRD patterns, FTIR and Raman spectra proved the presence of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} at above 550 °C but the optimal synthesis temperature of 600–650 °C was found. Under these conditions graphitic carbon nitride of the overall empirical composition of C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 2} was formed. At lower temperatures g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a higher content of hydrogen was formed but at higher temperatures g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was decomposed. At the temperatures above 650 °C, its exfoliation was observed. The photocatalytic experiments showed that the activity of all the samples synthetized at 400–700 °C was very similar, that is, within the range of experimental error (5 %). The total conversion of N{sub 2}O reached about 43 % after 14 h. - Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) was thermally synthetized from melamine in the range of 400–700 °C. • The optimal temperature was determined at 600–650 °C. • All synthesis products were properly characterized by physico-chemical methods. • Exfoliation of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} at above 600 °C was observed. • g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was used for the photocatalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O.

  7. Effect of chemical heterogeneity on photoluminescence of graphite oxide treated with S-/N-containing modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Amani M.; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Montenegro, José María; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) obtained using Hummers method was modified by hydrothermal treatment either with sulfanilic acid or polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate at 100 °C or 85 °C, respectively. Both modifiers contain sulfur in the oxidized forms and nitrogen in the reduced forms. The materials were characterized using FTIR, XPS, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration and SEM. Their photoluminescent properties and their alteration with an addition of Ag+ were also measured. As a result of these modifications nitrogen was introduced to the graphene layers as amines, imides, amides, and sulfur as sulfones and sulfonic acids. Moreover, the presence of polyaniline was detected. This significantly affected the polarity, acid-base character, and conductivity of the materials. Apparently carboxylic groups of GO were involved in the surface reactions. The modified GOs lost their layered structure and the modifications resulted in the high degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity. Photoluminescence in visible light was recorded and linked to the presence of heteroatoms. For the polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate modified sample addition of Ag+ quenched the photoluminescence at low wavelength showing sensitivity as a possible optical detector. No apparent effect was found for the sulfanilic acid modified sample.

  8. Uncondensed Graphitic Carbon Nitride on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Oxygen Sensing via a Photoredox Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, James E; Sorescu, Dan C; Burkert, Seth C; White, David L; Star, Alexander

    2017-08-16

    Melon, a polymeric, uncondensed graphitic carbon nitride with a two-dimensional structure, has been coupled with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to create an oxygen chemiresistor sensor that is active under UV photoactivation. Oxygen gas is an important sensor target in a variety of areas including industrial safety, combustion process monitoring, as well as environmental and biomedical fields. Because of the intimate electrical interface formed between melon and rGO, charge transfer of photoexcited electrons occurs between the two materials when under UV (λ = 365 nm) irradiation. A photoredox mechanism wherein oxygen is reduced on the rGO surface provides the basis for sensing oxygen gas in the concentration range 300-100 000 ppm. The sensor response was found to be logarithmically proportional to oxygen gas concentration. DFT calculations of a melon-oxidized graphene composite found that slight protonation of melon leads to charge accumulation on the rGO layer and a corresponding charge depletion on the melon layer. This work provides an example of a metal-free system for solid-gas interface sensing via a photoredox mechanism.

  9. Analysis of the deconvolution of the thermoluminescent curve of the zirconium oxide doped with graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas C, P.; Estrada G, R.; Gonzalez M, P.R.; Mendoza A, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we present a mathematical analysis of the behavior of the thermoluminescent curve (Tl) induced by gamma radiation in samples made of zirconium oxide doped with different amounts of graphite. In accordance with the results gamma radiation induces a Tl curve with two maximum of emission localized in the temperatures at 139 and 250 C, the area under the curve is increasing as a function of the time of exposition to the radiation. The analysis of curve deconvolution, in accordance with the theory which indicates that this behavior must be obey a Boltzmann distribution, we found that each one of them has a different growth velocity as the time of exposition increase. In the same way, we observed that after the irradiation was suspended each one of the maximum decrease with different velocity. The behaviour observed in the samples is very interesting because the zirconium oxide has attracted the interest of many research groups, this material has demonstrated to have many applications in thermoluminescent dosimetry and it can be used in the quantification of radiation. (Author)

  10. Photocatalytic Activity in Phenol Removal of Water from Graphite and Graphene Oxides: Effect of Degassing and Chemical Oxidation in the Synthesis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Bustos-Ramirez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing new materials or modifying the existing ones is an amply field studied in the world of research. Due to its outstanding physical and chemical properties, graphene is attractive material for new applications. The methodologies for obtaining graphene are diverse and have changed over time. Graphene oxide is a versatile form of graphene, due to the presence of oxygenated functional groups. Chemical oxidation of graphite and exfoliation by ultrasonic waves is one of the preferred methods to obtain graphene oxide; chemical oxidation time and the degassing effect in the ultrasonic bath are parameters that play an important role in the features and properties of graphene oxide. Thus, in this study, the conventional times used for the oxidation of graphite and degassing in an ultrasonic bath to obtain graphene oxide were modified. The structural changes in the carbon materials were evaluated based on their photocatalytic activity in the removal of an organic pollutant in water (removing up to 38% of phenol. The band gaps of the graphitic materials were obtained by UV-vis obtaining a value range of 1.5–4.7 eV and the structure and morphology of the carbon materials were characterized by infrared and Raman spectroscopies and transmission electron microscopy, respectively.

  11. Nitrogen-doped graphene: effect of graphite oxide precursors and nitrogen content on the electrochemical sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, Monica; Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdenek; Klímová, Kateřina; Pumera, Martin

    2017-06-21

    Graphene, produced via chemical methods, has been widely applied for electrochemical sensing due to its structural and electrochemical properties as well as its ease of production in large quantity. While nitrogen-doped graphenes are widely studied materials, the literature showing an effect of graphene oxide preparation methods on nitrogen quantity and chemical states as well as on defects and, in turn, on electrochemical sensing is non-existent. In this study, the properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials, prepared via hydrothermal synthesis using graphite oxide produced by various classical methods using permanganate or chlorate oxidants Staudenmaier, Hummers, Hofmann and Brodie oxidation methods, were studied; the resulting nitrogen-doped graphene oxides were labeled as ST-GO, HU-GO, HO-GO and BR-GO, respectively. The electrochemical oxidation of biomolecules, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, dopamine, nicotinamide adenine nucleotide and DNA free bases, was carried out using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry techniques. The nitrogen content in doped graphene oxides increased in the order ST-GO graphene followed this trend, as shown in the cyclic voltammograms. This is a very important finding that provides insight into the electrocatalytic effect of N-doped graphene. The nitrogen-doped graphene materials exhibited improved sensitivity over bare glassy carbon for ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine detection. These studies will enhance our understanding of the effects of graphite oxide precursors on the electrochemical sensing properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials.

  12. Polymer-derived-SiCN ceramic/graphite composite as anode material with enhanced rate capability for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk-Zajac, M.; Fasel, C.; Riedel, R.

    2011-08-01

    We report on a new composite material in view of its application as a negative electrode in lithium-ion batteries. A commercial preceramic polysilazane mixed with graphite in 1:1 weight ratio was transformed into a SiCN/graphite composite material through a pyrolytic polymer-to-ceramic conversion at three different temperatures, namely 950 °C, 1100 °C and 1300 °C. By means of Raman spectroscopy we found successive ordering of carbon clusters into nano-crystalline graphitic regions with increasing pyrolysis temperature. The reversible capacity of about 350 mAh g-1 was measured with constant current charging/discharging for the composite prepared at 1300 °C. For comparison pure graphite and pure polysilazane-derived SiCN ceramic were examined as reference materials. During fast charging and discharging the composite material demonstrates enhanced capacity and stability. Charging and discharging in half an hour lead to about 200 and 10 mAh g-1, for the composite annealed at 1300 °C and pure graphite, respectively. A clear dependence between the final material capacity and pyrolysis temperature is found and discussed with respect to possible application in batteries, i.e. practical discharging potential limit. The best results in terms of capacity recovered under 1 V and high rate capability were also obtained for samples synthesized at 1300 °C.

  13. Enhancing the oxidation resistance of graphite by applying an SiC coat with crack healing at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Won, E-mail: pjw@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon-City (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon-City (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yootaek [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Kyonggi Universtiy, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Windes, William E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Ion beam mixed SiC coating was performed on the graphite for the enhanced adhesion. • The SiC coated was cracked at the elevated temperature, confirming the strong bonding, and then was vigorously oxidized leaving only the SiC layer. • For crack healing, CVD crack healing increased by ∼4 times in 20% weight reduction in air at 900 °C as compared to PVD crack healing. - Abstract: The potential of reducing the oxidation of the supporting graphite components during normal and/or accident conditions in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design has been studied. In this work efforts have been made to slow the oxidation process of the graphite with a thin SiC coating (∼ 10 μm). Upon heating at ≥ 1173 K in air, the spallations and cracks were formed in the dense columnar structured SiC coating layer grown on the graphite with a functionally gradient electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. In accordance with the formations of these defects, the sample was vigorously oxidized, leaving only the SiC coating layer. Then, efforts were made to heal the surface defects using additional EB-PVD with ion beam bombardment and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The EB-PVD did not effectively heal the cracks. But, the CVD was more appropriate for crack healing, likely due to its excellent crack line filling capability with a high density and high aspect ratio. It took ∼ 34 min for the 20% weight loss of the CVD crack healed sample in the oxidation test with annealing at 1173 K, while it took ∼ 8 min for the EB-PVD coated sample, which means it took ∼4 times longer at 1173 K for the same weight reduction in this experimental set-up.

  14. Enhancing the oxidation resistance of graphite by applying an SiC coat with crack healing at an elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un; Kim, Yootaek; Windes, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam mixed SiC coating was performed on the graphite for the enhanced adhesion. • The SiC coated was cracked at the elevated temperature, confirming the strong bonding, and then was vigorously oxidized leaving only the SiC layer. • For crack healing, CVD crack healing increased by ∼4 times in 20% weight reduction in air at 900 °C as compared to PVD crack healing. - Abstract: The potential of reducing the oxidation of the supporting graphite components during normal and/or accident conditions in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design has been studied. In this work efforts have been made to slow the oxidation process of the graphite with a thin SiC coating (∼ 10 μm). Upon heating at ≥ 1173 K in air, the spallations and cracks were formed in the dense columnar structured SiC coating layer grown on the graphite with a functionally gradient electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. In accordance with the formations of these defects, the sample was vigorously oxidized, leaving only the SiC coating layer. Then, efforts were made to heal the surface defects using additional EB-PVD with ion beam bombardment and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The EB-PVD did not effectively heal the cracks. But, the CVD was more appropriate for crack healing, likely due to its excellent crack line filling capability with a high density and high aspect ratio. It took ∼ 34 min for the 20% weight loss of the CVD crack healed sample in the oxidation test with annealing at 1173 K, while it took ∼ 8 min for the EB-PVD coated sample, which means it took ∼4 times longer at 1173 K for the same weight reduction in this experimental set-up.

  15. Visible-light-enhanced interactions of hydrogen sulfide with composites of zinc (oxy)hydroxide with graphite oxide and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredych, Mykola; Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-01-17

    Composites of zinc(oxy)hydroxide-graphite oxide and of zinc(oxy)hydroxide-graphene were used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide under ambient conditions. The initial and exhausted samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, potentiometric titration, EDX, thermal analysis, and nitrogen adsorption. An increase in the amount of H(2)S adsorbed/oxidized on their surfaces in comparison with that of pure Zn(OH)(2) is linked to the structure of the composite, the relative number of terminal hydroxyls, and the kind of graphene-based phase used. Although terminal groups are activated by a photochemical process, the graphite oxide component owing to the chemical bonds with the zinc(oxy)hydroxide phase and conductive properties helps in electron transfer, leading to more efficient oxygen activation via the formation of superoxide ions. Elemental sulfur, zinc sulfide, sulfite, and sulfate are formed on the surface. The formation of sulfur compounds on the surface of zinc(oxy)hydroxide during the course of the breakthrough experiments and thus Zn(OH)(2)-ZnS heterojunctions can also contribute to the increased surface activity of our materials. The results show the superiority of graphite oxide in the formation of composites owing to its active surface chemistry and the possibility of interface bond formation, leading to an increase in the number of electron-transfer reactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen Doped Graphene Oxide from Graphite Flakes and Powders: A Comparison of Their Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokwana, Kholiswa; Ray, Sekhar C; Khenfouch, Mohammad; Kuvarega, Alex T; Mamba, Bhekie B; Mhlanga, Sabelo D; Nxumalo, Edward N

    2018-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxide (NGO) nanosheets were prepared via a facile one-pot modified Hummer's approach at low temperatures using graphite powder and flakes as starting materials in the presence of a nitrogen precursor. It was found that the morphology, structure, composition and surface chemistry of the NGO nanosheets depended on the nature of the graphite precursor used. GO nanosheets doped with nitrogen atoms exhibited a unique structure with few thin layers and wrinkled sheets, high porosity and structural defects. NGO sheets made from graphite powder (NGOp) exhibited excellent thermal stability and remarkably high surface area (up to 240.53 m2 ·g-1) compared to NGO sheets made from graphite flakes (NGOf) which degraded at low temperatures and had an average surface area of 24.70 m2 ·g-1. NGOf sheets had a size range of 850 to 2200 nm while NGOp sheets demonstrated obviously small sizes (460-1600 nm) even when exposed to different pH conditions. The NGO nanosheets exhibited negatively charged surfaces in a wide pH range (1 to 12) and were found to be stable above pH 6. In addition, graphite flakes were found to be more suitable for the production of NGO as they produced high N-doping levels (0.65 to 1.29 at.%) compared to graphite powders (0.30 to 0.35 at.%). This study further demonstrates that by adjusting the amount of N source in the host GO, one can tailor its thermal stability, surface morphology, surface chemistry and surface area.

  17. OPA oxidation rates in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veriansyah, Bambang; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Jong-Chol; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2005-09-30

    Supercritical water oxidation can effectively destroy a large variety of high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization and complex industrial chemical. An important design consideration in the development of supercritical water oxidation is the information on the oxidation rate. In this paper, the oxidation rate of isopropyl amine (OPA), one of high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization, was investigated under supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) conditions in an isothermal tubular reactor. H2O2 was used as the oxidant. The reaction temperatures were ranged from 684 to 891 K and the residence times varied from 9 to 18s at a fixed pressure of 25 MPa. The conversion of OPA was monitored by analyzing total organic carbon (TOC) on the liquid effluent samples. The initial TOC concentrations of OPA varied from 7.21 to 143.78 mmol/l at the conversion efficiencies from 88.94 to 99.98%. By taking into account the dependence of reaction rate on oxidant and TOC concentration, a global power-law rate expression was regressed from 38 OPA experimental data. The resulting pre-exponential factor was 2.46(+/-0.65)x10(3)l(1.37)mmol(-0.37)s(-1); the activation energy was 64.12+/-1.94 kJ/mol; and the reaction orders for OPA (based on TOC) and oxidant were 1.13+/-0.02 and 0.24+/-0.01, respectively.

  18. Role of surfactant molecular weight on morphology and properties of functionalized graphite oxide filled polypropylene nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Various surfactants of different molecular weights, including alkylamine, poly(oxypropylene diamine (POP, and maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (PPgMA oligomers, were used for simultaneous funtionalization and reduction of graphite oxide (fGO. In this study, the effect of molecular weight and compatibility of the surfactants on the morphology and properties of the nanocomposites are reported. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD exhibited a definite interlayer thickness for GOA (alkylamine intercalated GO, however, the diffraction peaks were nearly suppressed for fGOs combining ODA with either POP (GOAP or PPgMA (GOAE. The uniform dispersion of the fGO flakes in the polypropylene matrix resulted in the significant increase in both the degradation temperature and the crystallization temperature. A single characteristic melting peak of monoclinic (α crystalline phase was observed from DSC traces, which was consistent with WAXD results. Dynamic mechanical analysis clearly indicated increase in both the storage modulus and the glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites due to the enhanced affinity between fGO and the polypropylene matrix. However, GOAP composite showed lower E' and Tg than GOAE because POP is less compatible with the matrix than PPgMA oligomer. Dielectric analysis also showed significant increase in both dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss at low frequency regimes with GOAE showing maximum dielectric properties. The finely dispersed GOAE and its compatibility with polymer matrix manifested the interfacial polarization, which gave rise to much greater ε' and ε" than other nanocomposites.

  19. Dielectric relaxation of alkyl chains in graphite oxide and n-alkylammonium halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Xiaoqian; Tian, Yuchen; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@nju.edu.cn; Yu, Ji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tang, Tong B. [Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-05-15

    The dynamic of n-alkylammonium halides and n-alkylammonium cations (n = 12, 14, 16, 18) intercalated in graphite oxide (GO) have been investigated with complex impedance spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis and thermogravimetry served to characterize the materials. The intercalated alkylammonium cations distributes as monolayers (when n = 12, 14 or 16) or bilayers (when n = 18), with their long axis parallel to GO layers, and with cations of headgroups bonded ionically to C-O{sup -} groups of GO; backbones of the confined molecules remain free. All halides and intercalation compounds suffer dielectric loss at low temperature. Arrhenius plots of the thermal dependence of the loss peaks, which are asymmetric, produce apparent activation energies that rise with increasing n. Ngai’s correlated-state model helps to correct for effects of dipole-dipole interaction, leading to virtually identical values for actual activation energy of 110 meV ± 5%; the values are also almost the same as the barrier energy for internal rotation in the alkyl macromolecule. We conclude that the relaxation of the alkylammonium cations arises not from C{sub 3} reorientation of the CH{sub 3} at its headgroup, but from small-angle wobbling around its major axis, an intrinsic motion.

  20. Study of conformation and dynamic of surfactant molecules in graphite oxide via NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, X.Q. [Jiangsu Second Normal University, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Nanjing (China); Ma, L.G. [Nanjing Xiaozhuang University, School of Electronic Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-08-15

    The conformation and dynamic of surfactant in graphite oxide (GO) was investigated by solid-state {sup 13}C magic-angle-spinning NMR and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra. The conformation ordering of the alkyl chains in the confined system shows strong dependence on its orientation. While the alkyl chains parallel to the GO layer in lateral monolayer arrangement are in gauche conformation in addition to a small amount of all-trans conformation, those with orientation radiating away from the GO in paraffin bilayer arrangement is in all-trans conformation in addition to some gauche conformation even though high-order diffraction peaks appears. NMR results suggest that the least mobile segment is located at the GO-surfactant interface corresponding to the N-methylene group. Further from it, the mobility of the alkyl chain increases. The terminal methyl and N-methyl carbon groups have the highest mobile. The chains in all-trans conformational state are characterized as more rigid than chains with gauche conformation; each segment of the confined alkyl chains with the lateral monolayer arrangement exhibits less mobility as compared to that with the paraffin bilayer arrangement. (orig.)

  1. Degradation of lithium ion batteries employing graphite negatives and nickel-cobalt-manganese oxide + spinel manganese oxide positives: Part 2, chemical-mechanical degradation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purewal, Justin; Wang, John; Graetz, Jason; Soukiazian, Souren; Tataria, Harshad; Verbrugge, Mark W.

    2014-12-01

    Capacity fade is reported for 1.5 Ah Li-ion batteries containing a mixture of Li-Ni-Co-Mn oxide (NCM) + Li-Mn oxide spinel (LMO) as positive electrode material and a graphite negative electrode. The batteries were cycled at a wide range of temperatures (10 °C-46 °C) and discharge currents (0.5C-6.5C). The measured capacity losses were fit to a simple physics-based model which calculates lithium inventory loss from two related mechanisms: (1) mechanical degradation at the graphite anode particle surface caused by diffusion-induced stresses (DIS) and (2) chemical degradation caused by lithium loss to continued growth of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI). These two mechanisms are coupled because lithium is consumed through SEI formation on newly exposed crack surfaces. The growth of crack surface area is modeled as a fatigue phenomenon due to the cyclic stresses generated by repeated lithium insertion and de-insertion of graphite particles. This coupled chemical-mechanical degradation model is consistent with the observed capacity loss features for the NCM + LMO/graphite cells.

  2. Effect of nodule count and cooling rate on As-Cast matrix of a Cu-Mo spheroidal graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar F., R.; Herrera-Trejo, M.; Castro, M.; Méndez N., J.; Torres T., J.; Méndez N., M.

    1999-06-01

    The transformation of austenite to ferrite and graphite or to pearlite in spheroidal graphite cast iron depends on a number of factors, among which are the nodule count and the cooling rate. In this study, the pearlite fraction decreased as the nodule count increased for a given cooling rate. Furthermore, as the cooling rate increased, the fraction of pearlite increased. Both effects were more sensitive at low nodule count. The effects of altering these parameters on the relative amount of pearlite and ferrite in the matrix of a copper-molybdenum (Cu-Mo) spheroidal graphite cast iron were addressed using heats carried out in an induction furnace, and the melts were treated with magnesium ferrosilicon in a ladle. To vary the nodule count, the melts were inoculated with two different amounts of ferrosilicon. Pouring was performed into sand molds of cylindrical cavities with different section size in order to achieve various cooling rates. Both the nodule count and the cooling rate affected the relative amount of ferrite and pearlite in the matrix.

  3. Solid state {sup 13}C NMR study on the synthesis of graphite oxide from different graphitic precursors; Estudo atravéS de RMN de {sup 13}C no estado sólido sobre a síntese de oxido de grafite utilizando diferentes precursores grafíticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Mariana A.; Frasson, Carolina Maria R.; Costa, Tainara Luiza G.; Cipriano, Daniel F.; Schettino Junior, Miguel A.; Cunha, Alfredo G.; Freitas, Jair C.C., E-mail: marianaarpini@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Carbonosos e Cerâmicos

    2017-10-15

    The influence of the structural and microstructural characteristics of graphitic precursors on the production of graphite oxide (GO) is investigated in the present work. Six different graphitic precursors were used to produce GO following a modified Hummers method, namely: natural graphite, commercial lubricant graphite, milled graphite, graphite flakes, high-purity graphite and graphite recycled from Li-ion batteries. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry, solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). {sup 13}C NMR spectra revealed the presence of epoxy, hydroxyl, carbonyl and lactol groups in the synthesized GOs. However, the oxidation degree of each product was found to be dependent on the average crystallite size (Lc) and particle size of the graphitic precursors, with the best GO samples being produced from the milled graphite and the graphite recycled from ion-Li batteries. These results were rationalized in terms of the structural and microstructural differences among the graphitic precursors, as revealed by the XRD patterns and SEM images, evidencing the importance of the correct choice of the precursor aiming the achievement of a well-developed structure for the GO product. (author)

  4. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ji-Lai, E-mail: jilaigong@gmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Huan, Shuang-Yan [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • GO-sand was prepared by coating GO on the surface of sand. • Pb(II) and MB were efficiently removed by GO-sand filter in column. • The removal of MB was enhanced with the presence of Pb(II). • GO-sand is low-cost and convenient for its application as packed bed filter. - Abstract: The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π–π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon–Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  5. Surface area-burnoff correlation for the steam--graphite reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, W.A. Jr.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    The oxidation of core graphite by steam of air represents a problem area of significant concern in safety analyses for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). Core and core-support graphite integrity and strength deteriorate with oxidation of the graphite, and oxidation furthermore could affect the rate of fission product release under upset conditions. Consequently, modeling of core response during steam or air ingress conditions requires an expression for the rate of graphite interaction with those impurities. The steam--graphite reaction in particular is a complex interaction of mass transport within the graphite with chemi-sorption and reaction on accessible surfaces; experimental results from graphite to graphite are highly variable, and the description of the reaction is not yet completely consistent. A simple etch pit model relating surface area to burnoff has been proposed and shown to provide reasonable correlation with experimental data obtained from steam oxidation studies of nuclear grade H-327 graphite. Unaccounted differences between theory and experiment arise at burnoffs exceeding 3 to 5 percent. The model, while not complete nor comprehensive, is consistent with experimental observations of graphite oxidation by O 2 (air), CO 2 , or H 2 O, and could have some utility in safety analysis

  6. Effect of Microwave Treatment of Graphite on the Electrical Conductivity and Electrochemical Properties of Polyaniline/Graphene Oxide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline (PANI/graphene oxide (GO composites were synthesized via in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of GO. The effect of microwave treatment of graphite on the electrical conductivity and electrochemical properties of PANI/GO composites was highlighted, and the morphology and microstructure were subsequently characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results demonstrated that microwave treatment of graphite imparted a well-dispersed, highly ordered layered structure to the as-prepared GO, and in turn facilitated strong bonding between the GO and PANI nanosheets, which may be responsible for the improved electrical conductivity and electrochemical properties of the resulting PANI/GO composites. The desired PANI/GO composites possessed an electrical conductivity of 508 S/m, an areal capacitance of 172.8 mF/cm2, and a retained capacitance of 87.4% after cycling, representing percentage increases of 102, 232, and 112, respectively, as a result of the microwave treatment of graphite. The resulting composites are promising electrode materials for high-performance and ecofriendly electrical energy storage devices.

  7. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajmi, Mahdi; Shalwan, Abdullah

    2015-07-08

    The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE), Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE), and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE). The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR) and coefficient of friction (COF) of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs), as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  8. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alajmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE, Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE, and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE. The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR and coefficient of friction (COF of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs, as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  9. Graphite oxide-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite and its efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Peng; Zhang Qinggang; Zhang Xungao [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Peng Tianyou, E-mail: typeng@whu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2012-03-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GO-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites were fabricated by a facile hydrothermal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The implanted GO expand the spectral responsive range of TiO{sub 2} to visible light for H{sub 2} production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As a result, stable photocatalytic H{sub 2} production efficiency were obtained over GO-TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Graphite oxide (GO)-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite was prepared by a facile hydrothermal process and was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis diffusion reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. TiO{sub 2} particles with average particle size of {approx}20 nm in the nanocomposites are attached to the surface of GO and/or intercalated into the interlayer of GO. The obtained GO-TiO{sub 2} was used as photocatalyst for H{sub 2} production under visible light ({lambda} {>=} 420 nm) irradiation, and an optimal photocatalytic H{sub 2} production rate of 380 {mu}mol h{sup -1} can be obtained over 2 wt% GO-TiO{sub 2}. The encouraging results presented here demonstrate that GO can serve as visible-light-driven photocatalyst and photosensitizer to expand the photoresponsive range of TiO{sub 2} to visible light for H{sub 2} production. The possible mechanism for H{sub 2} production was proposed for better understanding the visible-light-driven photocatalytic behaviour of the GO-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite.

  10. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK’s first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600–1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  11. Determination of lanthanides in yttrium and praseodymium oxides by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modenesi, C.R.; Abrao, A.

    1984-01-01

    The operational conditions for the graphite furnace, the instrumental parameters and the sensitivity for the determination of Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Y, Gd, Dy, Er, Ho, Tm, and Yb in Y 2 O 3 and Pr 2 O 3 by atomic absorption spectrophotometry are presented. The analyses were carried out into a highly pure argon atmosphere and using pyrolytic graphite tube and graphite supporting electrodes. The accuracy and precision of the method were checked through analyses of synthetic lanthanides mixtures. The concentration range of the lanthanides varied from 0,003 to 3,5% in Y 2 O 3 and from 0,001 to 3,5% in Pr 2 O 3 . (Author) [pt

  12. FY-09 Report: Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Gen-IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have identified that an air ingress event following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization is a very important incident. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. If this accident occurs, the oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will eventually cause the release of fission products. The potential collapse of the core bottom structures causing the release of CO and fission products is one of the concerns. Therefore, experimental validation with the analytical model and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model developed in this study is very important. Estimating the proper safety margin will require experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods Research and Development project. The second year of this three-year project (FY-08 to FY-10) was focused on (a) the analytical, CFD, and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow; (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments and modeling; (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) implementation of advanced

  13. FINAL REPORT on Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Hee C. NO; Nam Z. Cho

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Generation IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification & validation are of very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air ingress will occur through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. This study indicates that depending on the location and the size of the pipe break, the air ingress phenomena are different. In an effort to estimate the proper safety margin, experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model are required. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation, eventually. This 3-year project (FY 2008–FY 2010) is focused on various issues related to the VHTR air-ingress accident, including (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) structural tests of the oxidized core bottom structures, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  14. Electrolysis of metal oxides in MgCl2 based molten salts with an inert graphite anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yating; Li, Wei; Chen, Hualin; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo; Chen, George Z

    2016-08-15

    Electrolysis of solid metal oxides has been demonstrated in MgCl2-NaCl-KCl melt at 700 °C taking the electrolysis of Ta2O5 as an example. Both the cathodic and anodic processes have been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, and potentiostatic and constant voltage electrolysis, with the cathodic products analysed by XRD and SEM and the anodic products by GC. Fast electrolysis of Ta2O5 against a graphite anode has been realized at a cell voltage of 2 V, or a total overpotential of about 400 mV. The energy consumption was about 1 kW h kgTa(-1) with a nearly 100% Ta recovery. The cathodic product was nanometer Ta powder with sizes of about 50 nm. The main anodic product was Cl2 gas, together with about 1 mol% O2 gas and trace amounts of CO. The graphite anode was found to be an excellent inert anode. These results promise an environmentally-friendly and energy efficient method for metal extraction by electrolysis of metal oxides in MgCl2 based molten salts.

  15. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems.

  16. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems.

  17. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  18. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  19. Improvement of Strength and Oxidation Resistance for SiC/graphite Composites by SiC coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli; Shi, Zhongqi; Li, Hongwei; Li, Zhen; Jin, Zhihao; Qiao, Guanjun

    2011-03-01

    SiC/graphite composites with exelent machinable properties and thermal shock behaviour were successfully fabricated by pressureless sintering at 1700°C in nitrogen atmosphere. A dipping infiltration process was applied to improve the strength and oxidation resistance of the composites. Dense SiC coating was covered on the composites' surface by heat-treating at 1400°C in nitrogen atmosphere with dipping infiltration of silica sol and phenolic resin solutions. The flexural strength of the SiC coated composites were improved from 60 MPa to 140 MPa obviously, and the weight loss of the SiC coated composites was reduced more than 20 % comparing with the uncoated composites by oxidation resistance testing at 1000 °C for 24 h in air. SEM micrographs shows that SiC coating was surrounded the surface of pores and XRD pattern revealed that the new layer was SiC.

  20. Investigations into the effect of spinel oxide composition on rate of carbon deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Jutson, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    The deposition of carbon on fuel cladding and other steels results in a reduction in heat transfer efficiency. Methane and carbon monoxide are added to the gaseous coolant in the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) to reduce the radiolytic oxidation of the graphite moderator and this is known to increase the rate of carbon deposition. However, the composition of oxides formed on steel surfaces within the reactor may also influence deposition. In this investigation carefully characterised spinel type oxides of varying composition have been subjected to γ radiation under conditions of temperature, pressure and atmosphere similar to those experienced in the reactor. The rate of carbon deposition has been studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX). (U.K.)

  1. Influence of molding sand on the number of grains graphite and on the rate of thin ferrite in pieces in a nodular iron ferritic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Khatemi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The nodular cast irons are characterized by high mechanical properties compared to cast iron with lamellar graphite or vermiculargraphite. The ductile iron has already been the subject of many studies especially since the literature is rich on them, and sources of information are different. The fact is that the mechanical properties of nodular cast iron (FGS depend on the number of graphitegrains, their roundness, the solidification rate and nature of the matrix [3]. Many studies of nodular cast irons showed that the morespherical particles of graphite, the higher the mechanical properties are high. In gray cast irons, the graphite spheroids have anticrackingand give the ductile iron ductility. Note in this connection that the higher the number of graphite grains, the higher theductile iron has better mechanical properties. In cast iron, the nature of the matrix is depending on several parameters including thecooling rate of molten metal, the thickness, shape and dimensions of parts. The faster cooling is slow over rate of ferrite is important[3, 4]. In this paper, we tested three types of sand casting: sand –based sodium silicate, furan resin and green sand on samplesspherical graphite cast iron of different thickness. The objective in this article is to determine the number of grains of graphite andferrite for each type of sand casting under the same experimental conditions including the cooling rate and chemical composition ofthe liquid metal.

  2. Reference materials for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material. Volume 1. Uranium oxide plus graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, J.K.; Likes, R.N.; Parker, J.L.; Smith, H.A.

    1983-10-01

    This manual describes the fabrication of reference materials for use in gamma-ray-based nondestructive assay of low-density uranium-bearing samples. The sample containers are 2-l bottles. The reference materials consist of small amounts of UO 2 spread throughout a graphite matrix. The 235 U content ranges from 0 to 100 g. The manual also describes the far-field assay procedure used with low-resolution detectors

  3. In situ Raman Spectroscopy Study of the Formation of Graphene from Urea and Graphite Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    part and a vibrational part. Raman spectroscopy is then concerned with the vibrational part of the polarizability tensor which reduces to [28...pp. 1558–1565, Mar., 2007. [15] F. Li, J. Song, H. Yang , S. Gan, Q. Zhang, D. Han, A. Ivaska, and L. Niu. “One- step synthesis of graphene/SnO2...and phase transformation in graphite produced by ball milling .” Nanostructured Materials, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 393–399, May, 1996. [23] A. Ferrari, J

  4. Stable dispersions of polymer-coated graphitic nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Nguyen, Sonbinh T. (Inventor); Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of making a dispersion of reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets involves providing a dispersion of graphite oxide nanoplatelets and reducing the graphite oxide nanoplatelets in the dispersion in the presence of a reducing agent and a polymer. The reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets are reduced to an extent to provide a higher C/O ratio than graphite oxide. A stable dispersion having polymer-treated reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets dispersed in a dispersing medium, such as water or organic liquid is provided. The polymer-treated, reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets can be distributed in a polymer matrix to provide a composite material.

  5. Electrochemical label-free and sensitive nanobiosensing of DNA hybridization by graphene oxide modified pencil graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahour, F; Shamsi, A

    2017-09-01

    Based on the strong interaction between single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) and graphene material, we have constructed a novel label-free electrochemical biosensor for rapid and facile detection of short sequences ss-DNA molecules related to hepatitis C virus 1a using graphene oxide modified pencil graphite electrode. The sensing mechanism is based on the superior adsorption of single-stranded DNA to GO over double stranded DNA (ds-DNA). The intrinsic guanine oxidation signal measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) has been used for duplex DNA formation detection. The probe ss-DNA adsorbs onto the surface of GO via the π- π* stacking interactions leading to a strong background guanine oxidation signal. In the presence of complementary target, formation of helix which has weak binding ability to GO induced ds-DNA to release from the electrode surface and significant variation in differential pulse voltammetric response of guanine bases. The results indicated that the oxidation peak current was proportional to the concentration of complementary strand in the range of 0.1 nM-0.5 μM with a detection limit of 4.3 × 10 -11  M. The simple fabricated electrochemical biosensor has high sensitivity, good selectivity, and could be applied as a new platform for a range of target molecules in future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Universal Strategy for Hollow Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Encapsulated into B/N Co-Doped Graphitic Nanotubes as High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Hassina; Zou, Ruqiang; Mahmood, Asif; Liang, Zibin; Wang, Qingfei; Zhang, Hao; Gao, Song; Qu, Chong; Guo, Wenhan; Guo, Shaojun

    2018-02-01

    Yolk-shell nanostructures have received great attention for boosting the performance of lithium-ion batteries because of their obvious advantages in solving the problems associated with large volume change, low conductivity, and short diffusion path for Li + ion transport. A universal strategy for making hollow transition metal oxide (TMO) nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated into B, N co-doped graphitic nanotubes (TMO@BNG (TMO = CoO, Ni 2 O 3 , Mn 3 O 4 ) through combining pyrolysis with an oxidation method is reported herein. The as-made TMO@BNG exhibits the TMO-dependent lithium-ion storage ability, in which CoO@BNG nanotubes exhibit highest lithium-ion storage capacity of 1554 mA h g -1 at the current density of 96 mA g -1 , good rate ability (410 mA h g -1 at 1.75 A g -1 ), and high stability (almost 96% storage capacity retention after 480 cycles). The present work highlights the importance of introducing hollow TMO NPs with thin wall into BNG with large surface area for boosting LIBs in the terms of storage capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Tailor-made graphite oxide-DAB poly(propylene imine) dendrimer intercalated hybrids and their potential for efficient CO2 adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, T.; Katsaros, F.; Sideratou, Z.; Romanos, G.; Ivashenko, O.; Rudolf, P.; Kooi, B. J.; Papageorgiou, S.; Karakassides, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the rational design and synthesis of DAB poly(propylene imine) dendrimer (DAB) intercalated graphite oxide (GO) hybrids with tailorable interlayer distances. The amine groups originating from the intercalated dendrimer molecules cross-link adjacent GO sheets and strongly favour CO2

  8. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Joshua J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Smith, Rebecca E.; Strydom, Gerhard; Windes, William E.

    2017-09-01

    For the next generation of nuclear reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress warrants inclusion in the license applications of many international regulators. Much research on oxidation rates of various graphite grades under a number of conditions has been undertaken to address such an event. However, consequences to the reactor result from the microstructural changes to the graphite rather than directly from oxidation. The microstructure is inherent to a graphite's properties and ultimately degradation to the graphite's performance must be determined to establish the safety of reactor design. To understand the oxidation induced microstructural change and its corresponding impact on performance, a thorough understanding of the reaction system is needed. This article provides a thorough review of the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction in terms of kinetics, mass and energy transport, and structural evolution: all three play a significant role in the observed rate of graphite oxidation. These provide the foundations of a microstructurally informed model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system, a model kinetically independent of graphite grade, and capable of describing both the observed and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

  9. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  10. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of vanadium after cloud point extraction in the presence of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Ignacio; Marín-Hernández, Juan José; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2018-05-01

    Vanadium (V) and vanadium (IV) in the presence of a small concentration of graphene oxide (0.05 mg mL-1) are quantitatively transferred to the coacervate obtained with Triton X-114 in a cloud point microextraction process. The surfactant-rich phase is directly injected into the graphite atomizer of an atomic absorption spectrometer. Using a 10-mL aliquot sample and 150 μL of a 15% Triton X-114 solution, the enrichment factor for the analyte is 103, which results in a detection limit of 0.02 μg L-1 vanadium. The separation of V(V) and V(IV) using an ion-exchanger allows speciation of the element at low concentrations. Data for seven reference water samples with certified vanadium contents confirm the reliability of the procedure. Several beer samples are also analyzed, those supplied as canned drinks showing low levels of tetravalent vanadium.

  11. Diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles decrease migration and invasiveness in glioblastoma cell lines by impairing extracellular adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Strojny, Barbara; Kurantowicz, Natalia; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafał; Chwalibog, André; Sawosz, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The highly invasive nature of glioblastoma is one of the most significant problems regarding the treatment of this tumor. Diamond nanoparticles (ND), graphite nanoparticles (NG), and graphene oxide nanoplatelets (nGO) have been explored for their biomedical applications, especially for drug delivery. The objective of this research was to assess changes in the adhesion, migration, and invasiveness of two glioblastoma cell lines, U87 and U118, after ND, NG, and nGO treatment. All treatments affected the cell surface structure, adhesion-dependent EGFR/AKT/mTOR, and β-catenin signaling pathways, decreasing the migration and invasiveness of both glioblastoma cell lines. The examined nanoparticles did not show strong toxicity but effectively deregulated cell migration. ND was effectively taken up by cells, whereas nGO and NG strongly interacted with the cell surface. These results indicate that nanoparticles could be used in biomedical applications as a low toxicity active compound for glioblastoma treatment.

  12. Adsorption and desorption of DNA tuned by hydroxyl groups in graphite oxides-based solid extraction material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of DNA is the most crucial method used in molecular biology. Up to date silica matrices has been widely applied as solid support for selective DNA adsorption and extraction. However, since adsorption force of SiOH functional groups is much greater than that of desorption force, the DNA extraction efficiency of silica surfaces is limited. In order to increase the DNA extraction yield, a new surface with different functional groups which possess of greater desorption property is required. In this study, we proposed cellulose/graphite oxide (GO) composite as an alternative material for DNA adsorption and extraction. GO/Cellulose composite provides the major adsorption and desorption of DNA by COH, which belongs to alkyl or phenol type of OH functional group. Compared to SiOH, COH is less polarized and reactive, therefore the composite might provide a higher desorption of DNA during the elution process. The GO/cellulose composite were prepared in spherical structure by mixing urea, cellulose, NaOH, Graphite oxide and water. The concentration of GO within the composites were controlled to be 0-4.15 wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of GO. The highest yield was achieved at 4.15 wt.% GO, where the extraction efficiency was reported as 660.4 ng/μl when applying 2M GuHCl as the binding buffer. The absorbance ratios between 260 nm and 280 nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution was demonstrated as 1.86, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The results proved that GO/cellulose composite provides a simple method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Study of hot corrosion of flakes of non purified graphite and of purified graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boule, Michel

    1967-01-01

    The author reports the study of hot corrosion of the Ticonderoga graphite. He reports the study of the defects of graphite flakes (structure defects due to impurities), the dosing of these impurities, and then their removal by purification. Flakes have then been oxidised by means of a specially designed apparatus. Based on photographs taken by optical and electronic microscopy, the author compares the oxidation features obtained in dry air and in humid air, between purified and non purified flakes. He also reports the study of the evolution of oxidation with respect to the initial rate of impurities, and the study of the evolution of oxidation features in humid air during oxidation. All these comparisons are made while taking the oxidation rate into account [fr

  14. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  15. Microwave Deposition of Palladium Catalysts on Graphite Spheres and Reduced Graphene Oxide Sheets for Electrochemical Glucose Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-De Xie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work outlines a synthetic strategy inducing the microwave-assisted synthesis of palladium (Pd nanocrystals on a graphite sphere (GS and reduced graphene oxide (rGO supports, forming the Pd catalysts for non-enzymatic glucose oxidation reaction (GOR. The pulse microwave approach takes a short period (i.e., 10 min to fast synthesize Pd nanocrystals onto a carbon support at 150 °C. The selection of carbon support plays a crucial role in affecting Pd particle size and dispersion uniformity. The robust design of Pd-rGO catalyst electrode displays an enhanced electrocatalytic activity and sensitivity toward GOR. The enhanced performance is mainly attributed to the synergetic effect that combines small crystalline size and two-dimensional conductive support, imparting high accessibility to non-enzymatic GOR. The rGO sheets serve as a conductive scaffold, capable of fast conducting electron. The linear plot of current response versus glucose concentration exhibits good correlations within the range of 1–12 mM. The sensitivity of the Pd-rGO catalyst is significantly enhanced by 3.7 times, as compared to the Pd-GS catalyst. Accordingly, the Pd-rGO catalyst electrode can be considered as a potential candidate for non-enzymatic glucose biosensor.

  16. Enhanced wet air oxidation : synergistic rate acceleration upon effluent recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Birchmeier; Charles G. Hill; Carl J. Houtman; Rajai H. Atalla; Ira A. Weinstock

    2000-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) reactions of cellobiose, phenol, and syringic acid were carried out under mild conditions (155°C; 0.93MPa 02; soluble catalyst, Na5[PV2Mo10O40]). Initial oxidation rates were rapid but decreased to small values as less reactive oxidation products accumulated. Recalcitrant oxidation products were consumed more rapidly, however, if additional...

  17. Technique for production of graphite-carbon products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.N.; Bentsianovskaya, I.A.; Filatova, V.A.; Nabokov, V.S.; Nestor, V.P.; Zil' bergleyt, I.M.

    1982-01-01

    The technique for producing carbon-graphite products that includes filtration under a pressure of 0.1-015 MPa (through graphite stock) of an aqueous carbon material with the addition of surfactant, drying, and subsequent thermal treatment, is simplified and made less lengthy. Oxidized graphite is utilized with a prior addition of 1-10% water-soluble organic substance into the suspension -molasses, hemicellulose, sugar or polyacrylamide. A 0.03-1.5% suspension of oxidized graphite is utilized, with a particle size of 0.02-0.1 mkm. Thermal processing is done in a carbon fill, at a rate of 10-20 degrees/hour to 700-800/sup 0/, maintained 2-3 hours.

  18. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite; Estudo de filme de grafeno/oxido de grafeno obtido por reducao quimica parcial do oxido de grafite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H., E-mail: juliagascho@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  19. Interfacial reaction between zirconium alloy and graphite mold/yttrium oxide ceramic mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Huasheng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium alloys are active in the molten state and tend to react with the mold during casting. The casting technology of zirconium is not yet well established; especially in selecting the mold materials, which are difficult to determine. In the present work, the interfacial reactions between zirconium casting and casting mold were studied. The zirconium alloy was melted in a vacuum arc skull furnace and then cast into the graphite mold and ceramic mold, respectively. The zirconium casting samples were characterized using SEM, EDS and XRD with an emphasis on the chemical diffusion of elements. A reaction layer was observed at the casting surface. Chemical analysis shows that chemical elements C, O and Y from the mold are diffused into the molten zirconium, and new phases, such as ZrC, Zr3O, YO1.335 and Y6ZrO11, are formed at the surface. In addition, an end product of zirconium valve cast in a yttria mold has a compact structure and good surface quality.

  20. Sulfur-Modified Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanostructures as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Vinayak S; Sim, Uk; Yang, Jiwoong; Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chae, Sue In; Chang, Woo Je; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Ha, Heonjin; Hwang, Chan-Cuk; An, Junghyun; Hong, Hyo-Ki; Lee, Zonghoon; Nam, Ki Tae; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-05-01

    There is an urgent need to develop metal-free, low cost, durable, and highly efficient catalysts for industrially important oxygen evolution reactions. Inspired by natural geodes, unique melamine nanogeodes are successfully synthesized using hydrothermal process. Sulfur-modified graphitic carbon nitride (S-modified g-CN x ) electrocatalysts are obtained by annealing these melamine nanogeodes in situ with sulfur. The sulfur modification in the g-CN x structure leads to excellent oxygen evolution reaction activity by lowering the overpotential. Compared with the previously reported nonmetallic systems and well-established metallic catalysts, the S-modified g-CN x nanostructures show superior performance, requiring a lower overpotential (290 mV) to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm -2 and a Tafel slope of 120 mV dec -1 with long-term durability of 91.2% retention for 18 h. These inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and easy-to-synthesize catalysts with extraordinary performance will have a high impact in the field of oxygen evolution reaction electrocatalysis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Oxidation behaviour of the matrix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Xueliang; He Jun; Ma Changwen; Zhang Shichao

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of the three main components of the graphite matrix; nuclear grade natural graphite, petroleum coke graphite and carbon derived from thermoplastic formaldehyde resin; were studied in a flowing gas mixture of oxygen and nitrogen, or in a flowing Argon containing 1 vol % H 2 O. It is shown that the oxidation rate increases in the order of the petroleum coke graphite, the natural graphite, and the resin carbon. High temperature vacuum treatment of the natural graphite at 1950 deg. C decreases the impurities and increases the oxidation activation energy. Differences between the activation energy and the oxidation rate of the resin carbon heat-treated at 1950 and 1600 deg. C is resulted form the changes in the micro-pore texture and reduction of impurities. (author). 6 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs

  2. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  3. Identification of nano-sized holes by TEM in the graphene layer of graphite and the high rate discharge capability of Li-ion battery anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, Tsutomu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Endo, Koji [Department of Chemistry, Rikkyo University, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Fu, Lijun; Wu, Yuping [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Lee, Kyeong Jik [SODIFF Advanced Material Co. Ltd., Yeongju, Geongbuk 750-080 (Korea); Matsumoto, Takatoshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2007-12-20

    SEM images of round-shaped natural graphite, currently widely used as the anode active material of Li-ion batteries, show that the surface mainly consists of the basal plane, which suggests that the Li insertion/extraction reaction rate is quite limited. In contrast to this suggestion, however, the anode of commercial Li-ion batteries is capable of high rate charging/discharging. In order to explain this inconsistency, we propose that there are nano-holes in the graphene layers of the graphite allowing Li to be very easily inserted and extracted via the holes. Prior to the measurements a quantum chemical investigation was performed on the energy required for Li to pass through the hole in a graphene layer (E{sub act}). The results showed that the E{sub act} value is too high when the size is smaller than pyrene, but is fairly low for holes of the size of coronene, implying that Li can pass through the basal plane layer if there is a hole larger than coronene. Characterization of the rounded graphite sample and flaky natural graphite was conducted by constant-current charge/discharge cycle tests, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD revealed no appreciable difference between the rounded graphite and flaky natural graphite, in agreement with Raman data. A detailed analysis of the HRTEM results revealed the presence of a number of variously sized circular images. We believe that these are holes in the graphene layer through which Li can pass. The mechanism of formation of the holes is discussed. (author)

  4. Oxidation kinetics of innovative carbon materials with respect to severe air ingress accidents in HTRs and graphite disposal or processing; Oxidationskinetik innovativer Kohlenstoffmaterialien hinsichtlich schwerer Lufteinbruchstoerfaelle in HTR's und Graphitentsorgung oder Aufbereitung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloegel, Baerbel

    2010-07-01

    Currently future nuclear reactor concepts of the Fourth Generation (Gen IV) are under development. To some extend they apply with new, innovative materials developed just for this purpose. This thesis work aims at a concept of Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) in the framework of the European project RAPHAEL (ReActor for Process heat, Hydrogen And ELectricity generation). The concept named ANTARES (AREVA New Technology based on advanced gas-cooled Reactors for Energy Supply) was developed by AEVA NP. It is a helium cooled, graphite moderated modular reactor for electricity and hydrogen production, by providing the necessary process heat due to its high working temperature. Particular attention is given here to oxidation kinetics of newly developed carbon materials (NBG-17) with still unknown but needed information in context of severe air ingress accident in VHTR's. Special interest is paid to the Boudouard reaction, the oxidation of carbon by CO{sub 2}. In case of an air ingress accident, carbon dioxide is produced in the primary reaction of atmospheric oxygen with reflector graphite. From there CO{sub 2} could flow into the reactor core causing further damage by conversion into CO. The purpose of this thesis is to ascertain if and to what degree this could happen. First of all oxidation kinetic data of the Boudouard reaction with NBG-17 is determined by experiments in a thermo gravimetric facility. The measurements are evaluated and converted into a common formula and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood similar oxidation kinetic equation, as input for the computer code REACT/THERMIX. This code is then applied to analyse severe air ingress accidents for several air flow rates. The results are discussed for two accident situations, in which a certain graphite burn off is achieved. All cases show much more damage to the graphite bottom reflector than to the reactor core. Thus the bottom reflector will lose its structural integrity much earlier than the

  5. Microcalorimetric insight into the analysis of the reactive adsorption of ammonia on Cu-MOF and its composite with graphite oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, C.; Wrabetz, S.; Bandosz, T.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of reactive adsorption mechanisms on metal–organic frameworks remains largely unexplored and knowledge in that field would provide an important stepping stone in enhancing the performance of these materials for gas separation. In this study, the mechanisms of ammonia adsorption on HKUST-1 and its composite with graphite oxide (GO) were analyzed using microcalorimetry, and the results were compared to those derived from other characterization tools. The key to this study lies...

  6. Blunt indentation of core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, M.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Blunt indentation experiments were carried out on unoxidized and thermally oxidised IM1-24 graphite as a model to simulate local point stresses acting on graphite moderator bricks. Blunt indentation of unoxidized graphite initiates cracks close to the region of maximum tensile stress at the edge of the indentation. Cracks propagate and converge to form a cone of material. Failure is catastrophic, typically forming three pieces of graphite and ejecting the cone referred to above. The failure mode under indentation loading for highly oxidised graphite (weigh loss > 40%) is different from that for the unoxidized graphite. There is no longer a distinct crack path, the indentation is much deeper than in the case of the unoxidized graphite, and there is a region of crushed debris beneath the indentation, producing a crater-like structure. The reduction in the compressive fracture stress, σ cf , under indentation loading with increasing fractional weight loss on oxidation, x, can be fitted to σ cf /σ 0 = exp-[5.2x] where σ 0 is the compressive fracture stress of the unoxidized graphite. This indicates that the effect of thermal oxidation on indentation fracture stress is more severe than the effects of radiolytic oxidation on conventional strengths of nuclear graphites. (author). 8 refs, 12 figs

  7. Fabrication of SnO₂-reduced graphite oxide monolayer-ordered porous film gas sensor with tunable sensitivity through ultra-violet light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shipu; Sun, Fengqiang; Yang, Shumin; Pan, Zizhao; Long, Jinfeng; Gu, Fenglong

    2015-03-11

    A new graphene-based composite structure, monolayer-ordered macroporous film composed of a layer of orderly arranged macropores, was reported. As an example, SnO2-reduced graphite oxide monolayer-ordered macroporous film was fabricated on a ceramic tube substrate under the irradiation of ultra-violet light (UV), by taking the latex microsphere two-dimensional colloid crystal as a template. Graphite oxide sheets dispersed in SnSO4 aqueous solution exhibited excellent affinity with template microspheres and were in situ incorporated into the pore walls during UV-induced growth of SnO2. The growing and the as-formed SnO2, just like other photocatalytic semiconductor, could be excited to produce electrons and holes under UV irradiation. Electrons reduced GO and holes adsorbed corresponding negative ions, which changed the properties of the composite film. This film was directly used as gas-sensor and was able to display high sensitivity in detecting ethanol gas. More interestingly, on the basis of SnO2-induced photochemical behaviours, this sensor demonstrated tunable sensitivity when UV irradiation time was controlled during the fabrication process and post in water, respectively. This study provides efficient ways of conducting the in situ fabrication of a semiconductor-reduced graphite oxide film device with uniform surface structure and controllable properties.

  8. Graphite oxide incorporated crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol and sulfonated styrene nanocomposite membrane as separating barrier in single chambered microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Ruchira; Kumar, Vikash; Pramanik, Nilkamal; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2017-02-01

    Different membranes with varied molar concentrations of graphite oxide (GO), 'in situ' polymerized sulfonated polystyrene (SS) and glutaraldehyde (GA) cross linked polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), have been analyzed as an effective and low cost nanocomposite barrier in single chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The synthesized composite membranes, namely GO0.2, GO0.4 and GO0.6 exhibited comparatively better results with reduced water uptake (WU) and swelling ratios (SR) over the native PVA. The variation in properties is illustrated with membrane analyses, where GO0.4 showed an increased proton conductivity (PC) and ion exchange capacity (IEC) of 0.128 S cm-1 and 0.33 meq g-1 amongst all of the used membranes. In comparison, reduced oxygen diffusivity with lower water uptake showed a two-fold decrease in GO0.4 over pure PVA membrane (∼2.09 × 10-4 cm s-1). A maximum power density of 193.6 mW m-2 (773.33 mW m-3) with a current density of 803.33 mA m-2 were observed with GO0.4 fitted MFC, where ∼81.89% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was removed using mixed firmicutes, as biocatalyst, in 25 days operation. In effect, the efficacy of GO incorporated crosslinked PVA and SS nanocomposite membrane has been evaluated as a polymer electrolyte membrane for harnessing bio-energy from single chambered MFCs.

  9. Graphene oxide amplified electrochemiluminescence of graphitic carbon nitride and its application in ultrasensitive sensing for Cu(2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Binyuan; Chu, Mingfu; Wang, Shaofei; Wang, Wanqing; Yang, Shanli; Liu, Chengbin; Luo, Shenglian

    2015-09-03

    Here for the first time, we present a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on graphitic carbon nitride/graphene oxide (g-C3N4/GO) hybrid for the ultrasensitive detection of Cu(2+), which is a common pollutant in environmental system. The g-C3N4/GO shows stable ECL signal in the presence of the self-produced coreactant from oxygen reduction, and the ECL signal could be effectively quenched by Cu(2+), the possible ECL detection mechanism has been proposed in detail. GO can not only significantly enhance the cathodic ECL signal of g-C3N4 (∼3.8 times), but also serve as immobilization platform for g-C3N4. After optimization of experimental conditions, the proposed protocol can offer an ultrasensitive, highly selective and recyclable method for the detection of Cu(2+) with a low detection limit of 1.0 × 10(-11) M and a wide linear range from 1.0 × 10(-11) to 1.0 × 10(-7) M. Moreover, the practicability of the ECL sensor in real wastewater samples is also tested, showing that the proposed ECL sensor could be a promising alternative method for the emergency and routine monitoring of Cu(2+) in real sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved HER efficiency of Ni-Mo coatings was attributed to ‘cauliflower’ like microstructure. • RGO in nickel-RGO composite coating promoted refined grain and facilitated HER. • Synergistic effect between nickel and RGO facilitated HER due to large specific surface of RGO. - Abstract: The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between ‘cauliflower’ like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  11. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinlong, Lv, E-mail: ljlbuaa@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Improved HER efficiency of Ni-Mo coatings was attributed to ‘cauliflower’ like microstructure. • RGO in nickel-RGO composite coating promoted refined grain and facilitated HER. • Synergistic effect between nickel and RGO facilitated HER due to large specific surface of RGO. - Abstract: The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between ‘cauliflower’ like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  12. Oxidation rate in ferritic superheater materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, I.

    1992-05-01

    On the steam side of superheater tubes, compact oxide layers are formed which have a tendency to crack and flake off (exfoliate). Oxide particles then travel with the steam and can give rise to erosion damage in valves and on turbine blades. In an evaluation of conditions in superheater tubes from Swedish power boilers, it was found that the exfoliation frequency for one material quality (SS 2218) was greater than for other qualities. Against this background, a literature study has been carried out in order to determine which mechanisms govern the build-up of oxide and the exfoliation phenomenon. The study reveals that the oxide morphology is similar on all ferritic steels with Cr contents up to 5%. and that the oxide properties can therefore be expected to be similar. The reason why the exfoliation frequency is greater for tubes of SS 2218 is probably that the tubes have been exposed to higher temperatures. SS 2218 (2.25 Cr) is normally used in a higher temperature range which is accompanied by improved strength data as compared with SS 2216 (1 Cr). The principal cause of the exfoliation is said to be stresses which arise in the oxide during the cooling-down process associated with shutdowns. The stresses give rise to longitudinal cracks in the oxide, and are formed as a result of differences in thermal expansion between the oxide and the tube material. In addition, accounts are presented of oxidation constants and growth velocities, and thickness and running time. These data constitute a valuable basis for practical estimates of the operating temperature in routine checks and investigations into damage in superheater tubes. (au)

  13. Oxidative Polyoxometalates Modified Graphitic Carbon Nitride for Visible-Light CO2Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Chen, Weichao; Sun, Chunyi; Han, Lu; Qin, Chao; Chen, Mengmeng; Wang, Xinlong; Wang, Enbo; Su, Zhongmin

    2017-04-05

    Developing a photocatalysis system for converting CO 2 to valuable fuels or chemicals is a promising strategy to address global warming and fossil fuel consumption. Exploring photocatalysts with high-performance and low-cost has been two ultimate goals toward photoreduction of CO 2 . Herein, noble-metal-free polyoxometalates (Co4) with oxidative ability was first introduced into g-C 3 N 4 resulted in inexpensive hybrid materials (Co4@g-C 3 N 4 ) with staggered band alignment. The staggered composited materials show a higher activity of CO 2 reduction than bare g-C 3 N 4 . An optimized Co4@g-C 3 N 4 hybrid sample exhibited a high yield (107 μmol g -1 h -1 ) under visible-light irradiation (λ ≥ 420 nm), meanwhile maintaining high selectivity for CO production (94%). After 10 h of irradiation, the production of CO reached 896 μmol g -1 . Mechanistic studies revealed the introduction of Co4 not only facilitate the charge transfer of g-C 3 N 4 but greatly increased the surface catalytic oxidative ability. This work creatively combined g-C 3 N 4 with oxidative polyoxometalates which provide novel insights into the design of low-cost photocatalytic materials for CO 2 reduction.

  14. Graphene quantum dots, graphene oxide, carbon quantum dots and graphite nanocrystals in coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yongqiang; Lin, Jianpeng; Chen, Yingmei; Fu, Fengfu; Chi, Yuwu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-06-01

    Six coal samples of different ranks have been used to prepare single-layer graphene quantum dots (S-GQDs). After chemical oxidation and a series of centrifugation separation, every coal could be treated into two fractions, namely, CoalA and CoalB. According to the characterization results of TEM, AFM, XRD, Raman and FTIR, CoalA was revealed to be mainly composed of S-GQDs, which have an average height of about 0.5 nm and an average plane dimension of about 10 nm. The obtained S-GQDs showed excitation-dependent fluorescence and excellent electrochemiluminescence. CoalB was found to be some other carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs), including agglomerated GQDs, graphene oxide, carbon quantum dots and agglomerated carbon nanocrystals. Generally, low-ranked coals might be more suitable for the preparation of S-GQDs. The production yield of S-GQDs from the six investigated coals decreased from 56.30% to 14.66% when the coal rank increased gradually. In contrast, high-ranked coals had high production yield of CoalB and might be more suitable for preparing other CNMs that were contained in CoalB, although those CNMs were difficult to separate from each other in our experiment.Six coal samples of different ranks have been used to prepare single-layer graphene quantum dots (S-GQDs). After chemical oxidation and a series of centrifugation separation, every coal could be treated into two fractions, namely, CoalA and CoalB. According to the characterization results of TEM, AFM, XRD, Raman and FTIR, CoalA was revealed to be mainly composed of S-GQDs, which have an average height of about 0.5 nm and an average plane dimension of about 10 nm. The obtained S-GQDs showed excitation-dependent fluorescence and excellent electrochemiluminescence. CoalB was found to be some other carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs), including agglomerated GQDs, graphene oxide, carbon quantum dots and agglomerated carbon nanocrystals. Generally, low-ranked coals might be more suitable for the preparation of

  15. Impedance of electrochemically modified graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdić, Katja; Kvastek, Krešimir; Horvat-Radošević, Višnja

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS, has been applied for characterization of electrochemically modified graphite electrodes in the sulphuric acid solution. Graphite modifications were performed by potential cyclization between potentials of graphite oxide formation/reduction, different number of cycles, and prolonged reduction steps after cyclization. Impedance spectra measured at two potential points within double-layer region of graphite have been successfully modeled using the concept of porous electrodes involving two different electrolyte diffusion paths, indicating existence of two classes of pores. The evaluated impedance parameter values show continuous changes with stages of graphite modification, indicating continuous structural changes of pores by number of potential cycles applied. Differences of impedance parameter values at two potential values indicate the potential induced changes of solution properties within the pores of modified graphite.

  16. Maximal fat oxidation rates in endurance trained and untrained women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Anne Bach; Stougaard, Ole; Langfort, Josef

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the differences in fat oxidation between endurance trained (ET) and untrained (UT) women. Eight ET and nine UT women performed a progressive cycle ergometer test until exhaustion. The rate of fat oxidation was similar at low work rates (...

  17. Determination of gold and cobalt dopants in advanced materials based on tin oxide by slurry sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Daria G.; Eskina, Vasilina V.; Baranovskaya, Vasilisa B.; Vladimirova, Svetlana A.; Gaskov, Alexander M.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Karpov, Yuri A.

    2018-02-01

    A novel approach is developed for the determination of Co and Au dopants in advanced materials based on tin oxide using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS GFAAS) with direct slurry sampling. Sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (Na-CMC) is an effective stabilizer for diluted suspensions. Use Na-CMC allows to transfer the analytes into graphite furnace completely and reproducibly. The relative standard deviation obtained by HR CS GFAAS was not higher than 4%. Accuracy was proven by means inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in solutions after decomposition as a comparative technique. To determine Au and Co in the volume of SnO2, the acid decomposition conditions (HCl, HF) of the samples were suggested by means of an autoclave in a microwave oven.

  18. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  19. Dosage of boron traces in graphite, uranium and beryllium oxide; Dosage de traces de bore dans le graphite, l'uranium et l'oxyde de beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coursier, J. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles, 75 - Paris (France); Hure, J.; Platzer, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The problem of the dosage of the boron in the materials serving to the construction of nuclear reactors arises of the following way: to determine to about 0,1 ppm close to the quantities of boron of the order of tenth ppm. We have chosen the colorimetric analysis with curcumin as method of dosage. To reach the indicated contents, it is necessary to do a previous separation of the boron and the materials of basis, either by extraction of tetraphenylarsonium fluoborate in the case of the boron dosage in uranium and the beryllium oxide, either by the use of a cations exchanger resin of in the case of graphite. (M.B.) [French] Le probleme du dosage du bore dans les materiaux servant a la construction de reacteurs nucleaires se pose de la facon suivante: determiner a environ 0,1 ppm pres des quantites de bore de l'ordre de quelques dixiemes de ppm. Nous avons choisit la colorimetrie a la curcumine comme methode de dosage. Pour atteindre les teneurs indiquees, il est necessaire d'effectuer une separation prealable du bore et des materiaux de base, soit par extraction du fluoborate de tetraphenylarsonium dans le cas du dosage de bore dans l'uranium et l'oxyde de beryllium, soit par l'utilisation d'une resine echangeuse de cations dans le cas du graphite. (M.B.)

  20. Investigation of corrosion resistance of graphite under electron irradiation in the oxygen flow at the temperatures 600...800 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Ryzhov, V.P.; Borisenko, V.N.; Gamov, V.O.; Lyashchenko, A.N.; Ulybkin, A.L.; Yakovlev, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    In work results of researches of corrosion resistance of graphite samples by grades MPG, ARV and GSP (graphite bonded pyrocarbon) in oxygen flow at the temperatures of ∼ 600 and ∼ 800 deg C under the influence of electron irradiation at the accelerator ELIAS. Established that the oxidation process of graphite with the increasing temperature goes significantly more intensively and the oxidation rate increases in 6...8 times. It is shown that the best corrosion resistance under irradiation in the investigated temperature range has graphite GSP with density 1.77...1.9 g/cm 3 manufacturing of NSC KIPT

  1. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  2. One new route to optimize the oxidation resistance of TiC/hastelloy (Ni-based alloy) composites applied for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell interconnect by increasing graphite particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qian; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lujie; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Jian; Huang, Zhengren

    2017-09-01

    TiC/hastelloy composites with suitable thermal expansion and excellent electrical conductivity are promising candidates for IT-SOFC interconnect. In this paper, the TiC/hastelloy composites are fabricated by in-situ reactive infiltration, and the oxidation resistance of composites is optimized by increasing graphite particle size. Results show that the increase of graphite particles size from 1 μm to 40 μm reduces TiC particle size from 2.68 μm to 2.22 μm by affecting the formation process of TiC. Moreover, the decrease of TiC particles size accelerates the fast formation of dense and continuous TiO2/Cr2O3 oxide layer, which bring down the mass gain (800 °C/100 h) from 2.03 mg cm-2 to 1.18 mg cm-2. Meanwhile, the coefficient of thermal expansion decreases from 11.15 × 10-6 °C-1 to 10.80 × 10-6 °C-1, and electrical conductivity maintains about 5800 S cm-1 at 800 °C. Therefore, the decrease of graphite particle size is one simple and effective route to optimize the oxidation resistance of composites, and meantime keeps suitable thermal expansion and good electrical conductivity.

  3. Extracellular electron transfer mechanism in Shewanella loihica PV-4 biofilms formed at indium tin oxide and graphite electrodes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Connolly, J.O.; Woolley, R.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Marsili, E.

    to the defined medium, and 15 mM (mmol/L) lactate (final concentration) was added to the medium as electron donor [6]. The cells were grown aerobically in defined medium at 30 ºC for 2 days, under shaking condition at 150 rpm. Following centrifugation for 20... mechanism depends also on other factors, such as surface properties of the electrode material. Graphite/carbon electrode has high adsorption affinity for the biomolecules such as flavins [9]. Adsorbed flavins at the graphite interface might decrease...

  4. Investigation on the reduction of the oxides of Pd and graphite in alkaline medium and the simultaneous evolution of oxygen reduction reaction and peroxide generation features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Tathagata; Devivaraprasad, Ruttala; Bera, Bapi; Ramesh, Rahul; Neergat, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduction of GO, PdO and parallel evolution of ORR is investigated in 0.1 M KOH. • The results are compared with those of carbon, graphite, c-RGO and Pd. • Peroxide generation and ORR activity increase with reduction of GO to e-RGO. • Peroxide generation decreases and ORR activity increases with reduction of PdO. • Carbon-based materials show peroxide yield of 40–75% as compared to ∼5% with Pd/C. - Abstract: Palladium oxide (PdO) and graphene oxide (GO) are subjected to electrochemical cycling in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M KOH electrolyte in the potential range (−1.2–0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl (saturated KCl)) relevant to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Parallel to ORR, GO and PdO get gradually reduced to graphene and Pd, respectively. With cycling, the half-wave potential of ORR shifts positively with both the oxides. The simultaneous evolution of the peroxide oxidation current on the Pt ring electrode is investigated. On PdO that reduces to Pd, ORR proceeds by the four-electron reduction to OH − and the peroxide oxidation current on the ring electrode decreases with cycling. On the other hand, on GO that reduces to graphene, the ORR proceeds primarily by the two-electron reduction of oxygen and the peroxide oxidation current on the ring electrode increases with cycling. The voltammetric features stabilize with the reduction of the oxides. The ORR and the peroxide oxidation current on the ring electrode with electrochemically reduced GO (e-RGO), chemically reduced GO (c-RGO), carbon-black, and graphite are comparable and they are different from those of the Pd-based precious metal catalyst. The evolution of ORR polarization curves and the peroxide oxidation current on the ring electrode are explained on the basis of the removal of adsorbed-oxygenated species, oxides and by the hydrogen under potential deposition (H upd ) at lower potentials. The results are supported with Koutecky-Levich plots and the voltammograms.

  5. The effects of trace element content on pyrite oxidation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D. D.; Lyons, T.; Cliff, J. B.; Perea, D. E.; Johnson, A.; Romaniello, S. J.; Large, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    Pyrite acts as both an important source and sink for many different metals and metalloids in the environment, including many that are toxic. Oxidation of pyrite can release these elements while at the same time producing significant amounts of sulfuric acid. Such issues are common in the vicinity of abandoned mines and smelters, but, as pyrite is a common accessory mineral in many different lithologies, significant pyrite oxidation can occur whenever pyritic rocks are exposed to oxygenated water or the atmosphere. Accelerated exposure to oxygen can occur during deforestation, fracking for petroleum, and construction projects. Geochemical models for pyrite oxidation can help us develop strategies to mitigate these deleterious effects. An important component of these models is an accurate pyrite oxidation rate; however, current pyrite oxidation rates have been determined using relatively pure pyrite. Natural pyrite is rarely pure and has a wide range of trace element concentrations that may affect the oxidation rate. Furthermore, the position of trace elements within the mineral lattice can also affect the oxidation rate. For example, elements such as Ni and Co, which substitute into the pyrite lattice, are thought to stabilize the lattice and thus prevent pyrite oxidation. Alternatively, trace elements that are held within inclusions of other minerals could form a galvanic cell with the surrounding pyrite, thus enhancing pyrite oxidation rates. In this study, we present preliminary analyses from three different pyrite oxidation experiments each using natural pyrite with different trace element compositions. These results show that the pyrite with the highest trace element concentration has approximately an order of magnitude higher oxidation rate compared to the lowest trace element sample. To further elucidate the mechanisms, we employed microanalytical techniques to investigate how the trace elements are held within the pyrite. LA-ICPMS was used to determine the

  6. Synthesis of graphene nanoplatelets from peroxosulfate graphite intercalation compounds

    OpenAIRE

    MELEZHYK A.V.; TKACHEV A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite compound obtained by cold expansion of graphite intercalated with peroxodisulfuric acid was shown to allow the creation of graphene nanoplatelets with thickness of about 5-10 nm. The resulting graphene material contained surface oxide groups. The expanded graphite intercalation compound was exfoliated by ultrasound much easier than thermally expanded graphite. A mechanism for the cleavage of graphite to graphene nanoplatelets is proposed. It include...

  7. Miscibility and oxidation rate of the simulated metallic spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, K. S.; Joo, J. S.; Shin, Y. J.; Oh, S. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    The simulated metallic spent fuel was fabricated by using Uranium, Neodymium and Palladium in order to study the miscibility of Neodymium and Palladium with Uranium. For analysis of long-term safty on the metallized spent fuel, the simulated metallic spent fuel was oxidized under pure oxygen environment at 183{approx}250 deg C. From the results, the oxidation rate correlation and activation energy were obtained.

  8. Characterization of commercial expandable graphite fire retardants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focke, Walter Wilhelm, E-mail: walter.focke@up.ac.za; Badenhorst, Heinrich; Mhike, Washington; Kruger, Hermanus Joachim; Lombaard, Dewan

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Expandable graphite is less well-ordered than its graphite bisulfate progenitor. • It includes graphite oxide as a randomly interstratified phase. • CO{sub 2}, CO and SO{sub 2} are released during thermal-driven exfoliation. - Abstract: Thermal analysis and other techniques were employed to characterize two expandable graphite samples. The expansion onset temperatures of the expandable graphite's were ca. 220 °C and 300 °C respectively. The key finding is that the commercial products are not just pure graphite intercalation compounds with sulfuric acid species intercalated as guest ions and molecules in between intact graphene layers. A more realistic model is proposed where graphite oxide-like layers are also randomly interstratified in the graphite flakes. These graphite oxide-like layers comprise highly oxidized graphene sheets which contain many different oxygen-containing functional groups. This model explains the high oxygen to sulfur atomic ratios found in both elemental analysis of the neat materials and in the gas generated during the main exfoliation event.

  9. Artificial neural network-genetic algorithm based optimization for the adsorption of methylene blue and brilliant green from aqueous solution by graphite oxide nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Zeinali, N; Ghaedi, A M; Teimuori, M; Tashkhourian, J

    2014-05-05

    In this study, graphite oxide (GO) nano according to Hummers method was synthesized and subsequently was used for the removal of methylene blue (MB) and brilliant green (BG). The detail information about the structure and physicochemical properties of GO are investigated by different techniques such as XRD and FTIR analysis. The influence of solution pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and adsorbent dosage was examined in batch mode and optimum conditions was set as pH=7.0, 2 mg of GO and 10 min contact time. Employment of equilibrium isotherm models for description of adsorption capacities of GO explore the good efficiency of Langmuir model for the best presentation of experimental data with maximum adsorption capacity of 476.19 and 416.67 for MB and BG dyes in single solution. The analysis of adsorption rate at various stirring times shows that both dyes adsorption followed a pseudo second-order kinetic model with cooperation with interparticle diffusion model. Subsequently, the adsorption data as new combination of artificial neural network was modeled to evaluate and obtain the real conditions for fast and efficient removal of dyes. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model is applicable for accurate prediction of dyes removal percentage from aqueous solution by GO following conduction of 336 experimental data. The network was trained using the obtained experimental data at optimum pH with different GO amount (0.002-0.008 g) and 5-40 mg/L of both dyes over contact time of 0.5-30 min. The ANN model was able to predict the removal efficiency with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), a linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at hidden layer with 10 and 11 neurons for MB and BG dyes, respectively. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0012 and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.982 were found for prediction and modeling of MB removal, while the respective value for BG was the

  10. Rate law analysis of water oxidation on a hematite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Formal, Florian; Pastor, Ernest; Tilley, S David; Mesa, Camilo A; Pendlebury, Stephanie R; Grätzel, Michael; Durrant, James R

    2015-05-27

    Water oxidation is a key chemical reaction, central to both biological photosynthesis and artificial solar fuel synthesis strategies. Despite recent progress on the structure of the natural catalytic site, and on inorganic catalyst function, determining the mechanistic details of this multiredox reaction remains a significant challenge. We report herein a rate law analysis of the order of water oxidation as a function of surface hole density on a hematite photoanode employing photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals a transition from a slow, first order reaction at low accumulated hole density to a faster, third order mechanism once the surface hole density is sufficient to enable the oxidation of nearest neighbor metal atoms. This study thus provides direct evidence for the multihole catalysis of water oxidation by hematite, and demonstrates the hole accumulation level required to achieve this, leading to key insights both for reaction mechanism and strategies to enhance function.

  11. The reaction of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites with water vapor in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisashi; Nomura, Shinzo; Kurosawa, Takeshi; Fujii, Kimio; Sasaki, Yasuichi

    1980-10-01

    Nuclear graphites more than 10 brands were oxidized with water vapor in helium and then some selected graphites were irradiated with fast neutron in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to clarify the effect of radiation damage of graphite on their reaction behaviors. The reaction was carried out under a well defined condition in the temperature range 800 -- 1000 0 C at concentrations of water vapor 0.38 -- 1.30 volume percent in helium flow of total pressure of 1 atm. The chemical reactivity of graphite irradiated at 1000 +- 50 0 C increased linearly with neutron fluence until irradiation of 3.2 x 10 21 n/cm 2 . The activation energy for the reaction was found to decrease with neutron fluence for almost all the graphites, except for a few ones. The order of reaction increased from 0.5 for the unirradiated graphite to 1.0 for the graphite irradiated up to 6.0 x 10 20 n/cm 2 . Experiment was also performed to study a superposed effect between the influence of radiation damage of graphite and the catalytic action of barium on the reaction rate, as well as the effect of catalyser of barium. It was shown that these effects were not superposed upon each other, although barium had a strong catalytic action on the reaction. (author)

  12. Development of a pencil-type single shield graphite quasi-adiabatic calorimeter and comparison of its performance with a double-shield graphite calorimeter for the measurement of nuclear heat deposition rate in a fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneja, O.P.; Rosselet, M.; Ligou, J.; Gardel, P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, heat deposition rate measurements were reported that used a quasi-adiabatic double-shield graphite calorimeter. It was found that for a better understanding of nuclear heating due to incident radiation, having a calorimeter that could be conveniently moved axially and radially inside large material blocks would be advisable. Here, a simpler design, based on three elements, i.e., core, jacket, and shield is conceived. The fabrication and testing details are presented, and the performance of the current calorimeter is compared with a double-shield calorimeter under similar conditions. Such a system is found to be extremely sensitive and can be employed successfully at the LOTUS facility for future nuclear heat deposition rate measurements in large blocks of materials. The current design paves the way for the convenient testing of a large amount of kerma factor data required for constructing future fusion machines. The same configuration with minor changes can be extended to most of the fusion materials of interest. The core of the new calorimeter measures 11 mm in diameter and height and has overall dimensions of 24 mm in diameter and 180 mm in height. The response of the calorimeter is measured by placing it in front of the Haefely neutron generator. 12 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs

  13. Study for the determination of samarium, europium,terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in gadolinium oxide matrix by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caires, A.C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A study for determination of samarium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in a gadolinium oxide matrix by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace is presented. The best charrring and atomization conditions were estabilished for each element, the most convenient ressonance lines being selected as well. The study was carried out for the mentioned lanthanides both when pure and when in binary mixtures with gadolinium, besides those where all for them were together with gadolinium. The determination limits for pure lanthanides were found to be between 1.3 and 9.6 ng assuming a 20% relative standard deviation as acceptable. The detection limits were in the range 0.51 and 7.5 ng, assuming as positive any answer higher than twofold the standard deviation. (author) [pt

  14. Determination of trace amounts of rare earth elements in samarium, terbium and disprosium oxides by graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, E.S.K.

    1990-01-01

    A graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry method for the determination of neodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium at trace level in samarium oxide; of samarium, europium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium and yttrium in terbium oxide and of europium, terbium, holmium, erbium and yttrium in dysprosium oxide was established. The best pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were determined for each lanthanide considered. Calibration curves were obtained for the pure elements, for binary mixtures formed by the matrix and each of the lanthanides studied and, finally, for the complex mixtures constituted by the matrix and all the other lanthanide of the group under scrutiny. This study has been carried out to examine the interference of the presence of one lanthanide on the behaviour of the other, since a lack of linearity on the calibration curves has been observed in some cases. Detection and determination limits have been determined as well. The detection limits encountered were within the range 0.002 to 0.3% for different elements. The precision of the method expressed as the relative standard deviation was calculated for each element present in each of the matrices studied. The conclusion arrived at is that the method can be applied for determining the above mentioned lanthanides present in the matrices studied with purity up to 99.50%. (author)

  15. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  16. Dose rate effects on the radiation induced oxidation of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttafava, A.; Tavares, A.; Arimondi, M.; Zaopo, A.; Nesti, S.; Dondi, D.; Mariani, M.; Faucitano, A.

    2007-01-01

    The yields and spatial distribution of the products arising from the in source oxidation of 50 μm LDPE films induced by 60-Co gamma radiations and by 300 kev electrons have been investigated as a function of the dose rate. The dose rate was found to have a strong influence on the reaction, the hydroperoxides and carbonyls yields at the lowest gamma dose rate of 0.04 kGy/h being decreased by a factor of about three with increasing the gamma dose rate up to 0.69 kGy/h and by a factor of about 30 when operating at the e-beam dose rate of 1.5 kGy/s. The carbonyls depth concentration profiles, the EPR measurements on radicals intermediates and the experiments of post-irradiation oxidation are consistent with the conclusion that, as far as the gamma irradiation is concerned, the observed dose rate effects cannot be imputed to oxygen diffusion control and/or to the chain branching via hydroperoxides decomposition coupled to the longer times between the initiation events. The hypothesis of the dose rate acting on the kinetic chain length of the radioxidation which in turn implies a substantially uniform distribution of radicals in the amorphous phase attained through spur expansion is proposed

  17. Rate-limiting effects of gaseous hydrogen on zircaloy oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Thomas, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation rates have been measured in hydrogen-steam mixtures at 1375 and 1500 0 C for various hydrogen-to-total pressure ratios. For ratios of greater than or equal to 0.5, the oxide-layer growth rate and specimen weight gain decrease as the hydrogen content in the gas mixture increases, which implies a similar dependence for the reaction-heat-generation rate. Implications of the results for core heatup and damage have been evaluated, assuming a scenario of significant hydrogen fraction in the boundary layer of fuel rod and coolant for the upper region of the Three Mile Island-2 Reactor (TMI-2) core during the uncovery period of 100 to 174 min after the turbine trip. Analysis shows that the slower oxidation and core-heatup rates in the hydrogen-steam mixture imply significantly lower peak cladding temperature and less UO 2 liquefaction for the TMI-2 fuel rods than indicated from the previous calculations

  18. Study of corrosion resistance graphite in oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Ryzhov, V.P.; Yakovlev, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the corrosion resistance of MPG, ARV and GSP graphite grades in oxygen at temperatures of 400, 600 and 800 o C. The oxidation kinetics of graphites is defined. It is shown, that interaction process of graphites with oxygen is characterized by a decrease of sample weights. The description of installation for carrying out of tests and a technique of carrying out of tests and researches is resulted. It is shown that the best corrosion resistance in the investigated temperature range has GSP graphite with density of 1.8-1.9 g/cm 3 of NSC KIPT production.

  19. In operando neutron diffraction study of a commercial graphite/(Ni, Mn, Co) oxide-based multi-component lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazer, N. S.; Yartys, V. A.; Azib, T.; Latroche, M.; Cuevas, F.; Forseth, S.; Vie, P. J. S.; Denys, R. V.; Sørby, M. H.; Hauback, B. C.; Arnberg, L.; Henry, P. F.

    2016-09-01

    In situ neutron diffraction was employed to investigate the structural evolution of the electrode materials in an ICR 10440 commercial cylindrical lithium-ion battery, which has a discharge capacity of 360 mAh and a nominal voltage of 3.7 V. A three-phase mixture of Li(Ni,Mn,Co)O2, LiCoO2 and LiMn2O4 was identified as the active material of the cathode, with graphite acting as the anode material. The study revealed that the graphite anode underwent structural changes to form a series of insertion-type lithiated derivatives, with up to 12.7% volume expansion for the Li-saturated compound LiC6. The charge-discharge behavior was more complex for the cathode. Here, the charge process was associated with partial lithium depletion from the initially Li-saturated compounds, leading to volume shrinkage for Li(Ni,Mn,Co)O2, in contrast to (Ni,Mn)-free LiCoO2. Electrochemical discharge experiments performed under a fast regime (2 C) at 5, 25 and 45 °C revealed that the discharge capacity followed the trend of an increased diffusion rate of Li+ ions in the electrolyte and Li atoms in both electrodes, being highest for 45 °C. At the lowest tested temperature (5 °C), a rapid drop in the discharge capacity took place using the same kinetic regime.

  20. Measurement of sulfur dioxide oxidation rates in wintertime orographic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    SO2-reaction studies in the clouds are examined and summarized to experimentally confirm model predictions and previous field studies regarding dominant SO2-reaction pathways. Controlled amounts of SO2 were released into nonprecipitating orographic clouds, and sulfate yields are compared to oxidant depletions. The sulfate yields were taken from cloud-water samples and liquid-water-concentration measurements, and oxidant-depletion data were generated from continuous gas-phase measurements. Comparisons of Y sub SO4 and D sub H2O2 suggest that H2O2 is the dominant oxidant, and the in-cloud reaction between H2O2 and the bisulfite ion can be expressed by a simple rate that agrees with predictions and laboratory results. The rate measurements are found to be inconsistent with the rate law proposed by Hegg and Hobbs (1982) and with some observational data. The present conclusions are of interest to evaluating the effects of sulfur dioxide emissions on sulfuric acid deposition. 30 refs

  1. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  2. Eutectic solidification mode of spheroidal graphite cast iron and graphitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Nakae

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The shrinkage and chilling tendency of spheroidal graphite (abbreviated SG cast iron is much greater than that of the flake graphite cast iron in spite of its higher amount of C and Si contents. Why? The main reason should be the difference in their graphitization during the eutectic solidification. In this paper, we discuss the difference in the solidification mechanism of both cast irons for solving these problems using unidirectional solidification and the cooling curves of the spheroidal graphite cast iron. The eutectic solidification rate of the SG cast iron is controlled by the diffusion of carbon through the austenite shell, and the final thickness is 1.4 times the radius of the SG, therefore, the reduction of the SG size, namely, the increase in the number, is the main solution of these problems.

  3. Cure reaction of epoxy resins catalyzed by graphite-based nanofiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcione, C. Esposito; Acocella, Maria Rosaria; Giuri, Antonella; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    A significant effort was directed to the synthesis of graphene stacks/epoxy nanocomposites and to the analysis of the effect of a graphene precursor on cure reaction of a model epoxy matrix. A comparative thermal analysis of epoxy resins filled with an exfoliated graphite oxide eGO were conducted. The main aim was to understand the molecular origin of the influence of eGO on the Tg of epoxy resins. The higher Tg values previously observed for low curing temperatures, for epoxy resins with graphite-based nanofillers, were easily rationalized by a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the reaction between the epoxy and amine groups of the resin, which leads to higher crosslinking density in milder conditions. A kinetic analysis of the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin associated to the catalytical activity of the graphite based filler was performed by isothermal DSC measurements. The DSC results showed that the addition of graphite based filler greatly increased the enthalpy of epoxy reaction and the reaction rate, confirming the presence of a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the crosslinking reaction between the epoxy resin components (epoxide oligomer and di-amine). A kinetic modelling analysis, arising from an auto-catalyzed reaction mechanism, was finally applied to isothermal DSC data, in order to predict the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin in presence of the graphite based nanofiller.

  4. High performance nano-Ni/Graphite electrode for electro-oxidation in direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ahmed B.; Abdel-Samad, Hesham S.; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2016-09-01

    Ni/Graphite electrocatalysts (Ni/G) are successfully prepared through electrodeposition of Ni from acidic (pH = 0.8) and feebly acidic (pH = 5.5) aqueous Ni (II) baths. The efficiencies of such electrodes are investigated as anodes for direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells through their ethanol electrooxidation cyclic voltammetric (CV) response in alkaline medium. A direct proportionality between the amount of the electrodeposited Ni and its CV response is found. The amounts of the deposited Ni from the two baths are recorded using the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (eQCM). The Ni/G electrodes prepared from the feebly acidic bath show a higher electrocatalytic response than those prepared from the acidic bath. Surface morphology of the Ni particles electrodeposited from feebly acidic bath appears in a nano-scale dimension. Various electrochemical experiments are conducted to confirm that the Ni/G ethanol electrooxidation CV response greatly depends on the pH rather than nickel ion concentration of the deposition bath. The eQCM technique is used to detect the crystalline phases of nickel as α-Ni(OH)2/γ-NiOOH and β-Ni(OH)2/β-NiOOH and their in-situ inter-transformations during the potentiodynamic polarization.

  5. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  6. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  7. Microbial Methane Oxidation Rates in Guandu Wetland of northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling; Lin, Li-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Wetland is one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. The exact magnitude of methane emission is essentially controlled by microbial processes. Besides of methanogenesis, methanotrophy oxidizes methane with the reduction of various electron acceptors under oxic or anoxic conditions. The interplay of these microbial activities determines the final methane flux under different circumstances. In a tidal wetland, the cyclic flooding and recession of tide render oxygen and sulfate the dominant electron acceptors for methane oxidation. However, the details have not been fully examined, especially for the linkage between potential methane oxidation rates and in situ condition. In this study, a sub-tropical wetland in northern Taiwan, Guandu, was chosen to examine the tidal effect on microbial methane regulation. Several sediment cores were retrieved during high tide and low tide period and their geochemical profiles were characterized to demonstrate in situ microbial activities. Incubation experiments were conducted to estimate potential aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in surface and core sediments. Sediment cores collected in high tide and low tide period showed different geochemical characteristics, owning to tidal inundation. Chloride and sulfate concentration were lower during low tide period. A spike of enhanced sulfate at middle depth intervals was sandwiched by two sulfate depleted zones above and underneath. Methane was accumulated significantly with two methane depletion zones nearly mirroring the sulfate spike zone identified. During the high tide period, sulfate decreased slightly with depth with methane production inhibited at shallow depths. However, a methane consumption zone still occurred near the surface. Potential aerobic methane oxidation rates were estimated between 0.7 to 1.1 μmole/g/d, showing no difference between the samples collected at high tide or low tide period. However, a lag phase was widely observed and the lag phase

  8. Characterization of a microwave absorbent prepared by coprecipitation reaction of iron oxide on the surface of graphite nanosheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongqing, E-mail: ylqqyyq@yahoo.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Qi, Shuhua [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang, Jianning [Personnel Department, Ningxia University, Yinchuan 710021 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NanoG was prepared by ultrasonication of EG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was precipitated on the NanoG's surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure was characterized by SEM, XRD, EDS and FTIR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Properties such as thermal stability, conductivity and microwave absorbing were measured. - Abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was precipitated on the surface of graphite nanosheet (NanoG) to produce a microwave absorbing material Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/NanoG. The structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show that under basic conditions, FeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O and FeSO{sub 4}{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O can be used in a coprecipitation reaction to obtain Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, which are bound to and well distributed on the NanoG surface. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the thermal stability of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/NanoG is good. According to the four-point-probe test, with the increasing mass ratios of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} to NanoG, the conductivities of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/NanoG decrease. Measurement of electromagnetic parameters shows that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/NanoG has better microwave absorbing properties than Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and NanoG.

  9. Direct formation of a current collector layer on a partially reduced graphite oxide film using sputter-assisted metal deposition to fabricate high-power micro-supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Segi; Yu, Jin

    2016-03-01

    When a reduced graphite oxide (RGO) freestanding film is fabricated on a supercapacitor cell via compression onto a current collector, there are gaps between the film and the current collector, even if the cell is carefully assembled. These gaps can induce increases in the electrical series resistance (ESR) of the cell, resulting in degradation of the cell's electrochemical performance. Here, to effectively reduce the ESR of the supercapacitor, metal sputtering deposition is introduced. This enables the direct formation of the current collector layer on a partially reduced GO (pRGO) film, the model system. Using metal sputtering, a nickel (Ni) layer with a thickness formed on the pRGO film. The pRGO film sustains its film form with high packing density (∼1.31 g cm-3). Furthermore, the Ni-sputtered pRGO film with optimized Ni thickness exhibits remarkable enhancement of its electrochemical performance. This includes a superior rate capability and semi-permanent cycle life compared with the untreated pRGO film. This is due to the significant decrease in the ESR of the film.

  10. Influence of the Surfactant Nature on the Occurrence of Self-Assembly between Rubber Particles and Thermally Reduced Graphite Oxide during the Preparation of Natural Rubber Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Aguilar-Bolados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural rubber (NR latex consists of polymer particles charged negatively due to the adsorbed phospholipids and proteins molecules. The addition of stable aqueous suspension of thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO stabilized by ionic surfactants to NR latex can favor the occurrence of interaction between the stabilized TRGO and NR particles. Herein, the use of two surfactants of different nature, namely, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB, for the preparation of (TRGO/NR nanocomposites, is reported. Zeta potential and particle size measurements indicated that the use of DTAB as cationic surfactant results in the flocculation of NR particles and promoted the formation of ion-pair interactions between TRGO and the proteins and/or phospholipids present on the NR surface. This indicates that the use of DTAB can promote a self-assembly phenomenon between TRGO with adsorbed DTAB molecules and NR particles. The occurrence of self-assembly phenomenon allows obtaining homogenous dispersion of TRGO particles in the polymer matrix. The TRGO/NR nanocomposites prepared by the use of DTAB exhibited superior mechanical properties and excellent electrical conductivities reaching values of stress at 500% strain of 3.02 MPa and 10−4 S/cm, respectively.

  11. Carbon quantum dots directly generated from electrochemical oxidation of graphite electrodes in alkaline alcohols and the applications for specific ferric ion detection and cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengli; Xu, Yuanhong; Niu, Fushuang; Gooding, J Justin; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-04-25

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are attracting tremendous interest owing to their low toxicity, water dispersibility, biocompatibility, optical properties and wide applicability. Herein, CQDs with an average diameter of (4.0 ± 0.2) nm and high crystallinity were produced simply from the electrochemical oxidation of a graphite electrode in alkaline alcohols. The as-formed CQDs dispersion was colourless but the dispersion gradually changed to bright yellow when stored in ambient conditions. Based on UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), this colour change appeared to be due to oxygenation of surface species over time. Furthermore, the CQDs were used in specific and sensitive detection of ferric ion (Fe(3+)) with broad linear ranges of 10-200 μM with a low limit of detection of 1.8 μM (S/N = 3). The application of the CQDs for Fe(3+) detection in tap water was demonstrated and the possible mechanism was also discussed. Finally, based on their good characteristics of low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, the CQDs were successfully applied to cell imaging.

  12. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with layered structure graphitic carbon nitride and reduced graphene oxide modified TiO2 photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Huiru; Hu, Haihua; Cui, Can; Lin, Ping; Wang, Peng; Wang, Hao; Xu, Lingbo; Pan, Jiaqi; Li, Chaorong

    2017-11-01

    TiO2/reduced graphene oxide (TiO2/rGO) composite has been widely exploited as the photoanode material for high efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) is limited due to the charge recombination between the rGO and electrolyte. In this paper, we incorporate 5.5 wt% layered structure graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and 0.25 wt% rGO into TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) film to form a triple-component TiO2/rGO/g-C3N4 (TGC) photoanode for DSSCs. The TGC photoanode significantly increased the dye absorption and thus to improve the light harvesting efficiency. Furthermore, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis of the DSSCs based on TGC photoanode demonstrates that the incorporation of the rGO and g-C3N4 into TiO2 effectively accelerates the electron transfer and reduces the charge recombination. As a result, the DSSCs based on TGC film show PCE of 5.83%, enhanced by 50.1% compared with that of pure TiO2 photoanodes. This result strongly suggests a facile strategy to improve the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs.

  13. Ruthenium Ion-Complexed Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanosheets Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide as High-Performance Catalysts for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi; Pan, Wanzhang; Wang, Nan; Lu, Jia-En; Chen, Shaowei

    2018-01-10

    Carbon-based materials are promising, low-cost electrocatalysts toward hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), although the catalytic performance needs to be further improved before commercialization. In this study, ruthenium ions are incorporated into graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrids to form Ru-C 3 N 4 /rGO composites through Ru-N coordination bonds. The incorporation of Ru ions, at a loading of 1.93 at. %, leads to electron redistribution within the materials and dramatically enhances the HER performance over those of C 3 N 4 , C 3 N 4 /rGO, and Ru-C 3 N 4 , with an overpotential of only -80 mV to reach a current density of 10 mA cm -2 , a Tafel slope of 55 mV dec -1 , and an exchange current density of 0.462 mA cm -2 . This performance is comparable to that of Pt/C, and ascribed to the positive shift of the conduction band of the composite, where the charge carrier density increases by a factor of about 250 over that of C 3 N 4 , leading to a lower energy barrier for hydrogen evolution. The results suggest a new strategy in the design and engineering of functional nanocomposites for effective HER electrocatalysis by embedding select metal ions into carbon-based molecular skeletons. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  15. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  16. Studies of mechanical properties and irradiation damage nucleation of HTGR graphites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, P.A.

    1981-05-01

    Since the submission of the last report (COO-2712-6) work has concentrated on the examination of the effects of oxidation on the compressive strengths of graphites doped with iron, vanadium and calcium. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative effects of the impurities on the rates of oxidation in air, CO 2 and H 2 O and the resultant reduction in compressive strength

  17. NGNP Graphite Selection and Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.; Bratton, R.; Windes, W.

    2007-09-30

    The nuclear graphite (H-451) previously used in the United States for High-Temperature Reactors (HTRs) is no longer available. New graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A complete properties database for these new, available, candidate grades of graphite must be developed to support the design and licensing of NGNP core components. Data are required for the physical, mechanical (including radiation-induced creep), and oxidation properties of graphites. Moreover, the data must be statistically sound and take account of in-billet, between billets, and lot-to-lot variations of properties. These data are needed to support the ongoing development1 of the risk-derived American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) graphite design code (a consensus code being prepared under the jurisdiction of the ASME by gas-cooled reactor and NGNP stakeholders including the vendors). The earlier Fort St. Vrain design of High-Temperature Reactor (HTRs) used deterministic performance models for H-451, while the NGNP will use new graphite grades and risk-derived (probabilistic) performance models and design codes, such as that being developed by the ASME. A radiation effects database must be developed for the currently available graphite materials, and this requires a substantial graphite irradiation program. The graphite Technology Development Plan (TDP)2 describes the data needed and the experiments planned to acquire these data in a timely fashion to support NGNP design, construction, and licensing. The strategy for the selection of appropriate grades of graphite for the NGNP is discussed here. The final selection of graphite grades depends upon the chosen reactor type and vendor because the reactor type (pebble bed or prismatic block) has a major influence on the graphite chosen by the designer. However, the time required to obtain the needed irradiation data for the selected NGNP graphite is sufficiently

  18. Radiation behaviour of graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Alekseev, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations of different graphite materials, among with the standard reactor graphite manufacturing by electrode technology and a number of advanced graphites of new generation. During the investigation of radiation stability of standard reactor graphite the basic mechanisms of radiation damage of its structure were studied. With the help of transmission electron microscopy deformations and cracking of filler and binder were detected in the vicinity of the boundaries, separating these two components. Cracking begins with crystallite splitting and ends in full fracture of boundary layers. Such process of degradation can be explained by disjoint deformations resulting from difference in growth rate of filler and binder crystallites, in its turn caused by considerable difference between their sizes. It has been concluded that radiation stability of graphite may be improved by creating such graphite materials, in which the difference in sizes of crystallites of different structure components would be the minimal possible. When developing production technology of isotropic graphite for high temperature reactors, some progress was made towards the solution of this problem. Despite considerable swelling at high temperature this type of graphite appeared to be substantially less susceptible to the degradation of the structure and to deterioration of physico-mechanical properties. In addition to graphites manufactured by tradition technology, the graphite was investigated, in which pyrocarbon precipitated from gas phase under 1000 deg. C was used as binder. Carbon precipitated in such a way was non-graphitized at high temperatures and therefore it demonstrated sharp shrinkage under irradiation at high temperature, and shrinkage rate correlated with pyrocarbon quota in graphite structure. (author). 5 refs, 18 figs, 1 tab

  19. Decoding nitric oxide release rates of amine-based diazeniumdiolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Ni; Collins, Jack; Holland, Ryan J; Keefer, Larry K; Ivanic, Joseph

    2013-08-01

    Amine-based diazeniumdiolates (NONOates) have garnered widespread use as nitric oxide (NO) donors, and their potential for nitroxyl (HNO) release has more recently been realized. While NO release rates can vary significantly with the type of amine, half-lives of seconds to days under physiological conditions, there is as yet no way to determine a priori the NO or HNO production rates of a given species, and no discernible trends have manifested other than that secondary amines produce only NO (i.e., no HNO). As a step to understanding these complex systems, here we describe a procedure for modeling amine-based NONOates in water solvent that provides an excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.94) between experimentally measured dissociation rates of seven secondary amine species and their computed NO release activation energies. The significant difference in behavior of NONOates in the gas and solvent phases is also rigorously demonstrated via explicit additions of quantum mechanical water molecules. The presented results suggest that the as-yet unsynthesized simplest amine-based NONOate, the diazeniumdiolated ammonia anion [H2N-N(O)═NO(-)], could serve as an unperturbed HNO donor. These results provide a step forward toward the accurate modeling of general NO and/or HNO donors as well as for the identification of tailored prodrug candidates.

  20. High rate capability of lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, E.S.; Zelinsky, M.A.; Keister, P.

    1986-01-01

    High rate characteristics of the lithium/silver vanadium oxide system were investigated in test cells providing four different limiting surface areas. The cells were tested by constant current and constant resistance discharge with current densities ranging from 0.04 to 6.4 mA/cm/sup 2/. The maximum current density under constant resistance and constant current discharges which would deliver 50% of theoretical capacity was determined. The ability of the cells to deliver high current pulses was evaluated by application of 10 second pulses with current densities ranging from 3 to 30 mA/cm/sup 2/. The voltage delay characteristics of the cells were determined after 1 to 3 months of storage at open circuit voltage or under low level background currents. The volumetric and gravimetric energy density of the SVO system is compared to other cathode materials

  1. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  2. A plum-pudding like mesoporous SiO2/flake graphite nanocomposite with superior rate performance for LIB anode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wang, Kang; Wu, Xing-Long; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2015-09-21

    A novel kind of plum-pudding like mesoporous SiO2 nanospheres (MSNs) and flake graphite (FG) nanocomposite (pp-MSNs/FG) was designed and fabricated via a facile and cost-effective hydrothermal method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that most of the MSNs were well anchored on FG. This special architecture has multiple advantages, including FG that offers a conductive framework and hinders the volume expansion effect. Moreover, the porous structure of MSNs could provide more available lithium storage sites and extra free space to accommodate the mechanical strain caused by the volume change during the repeated reversible reaction between Li(+) and active materials. Due to the synergetic effects of its unique plum-pudding structure, the obtained pp-MSNs/FG nanocomposite exhibited a decent reversible capacity of 702 mA h g(-1) (based on the weight of MSNs in the electrode material) after 100 cycles with high Coulombic efficiency above 99% under 100 mA g(-1) and a charge capacity of 239.6 mA h g(-1) could be obtained even under 5000 mA g(-1). Their high rate performance is among the best-reported performances of SiO2-based anode materials.

  3. Oxygen transfer rates and requirements in oxidative biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Rehn, Gustav; Woodley, John

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions offer several important benefits such as regio- and stereoselectivity, avoiding the use of toxic metal based catalysts and replacing oxidizing reagents by allowing the use of oxygen. However, the development of biocatalytic oxidation processes is a complex task wh...

  4. Photocatalytic self-cleaning poly(L-lactide) materials based on a hybrid between nanosized zinc oxide and expanded graphite or fullerene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virovska, Daniela [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Paneva, Dilyana, E-mail: panevad@polymer.bas.bg [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Manolova, Nevena [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Rashkov, Iliya, E-mail: rashkov@polymer.bas.bg [Laboratory of Bioactive Polymers, Institute of Polymers, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 103A, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Karashanova, Daniela [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev St., bl. 109, BG-1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-03-01

    New self-cleaning materials of polymer fibers decorated with a hybrid between nanosized zinc oxide and expanded graphite (EG) or fullerene (C{sub 60}) were obtained. The new materials were prepared by applying electrospinning in conjunction with electrospraying. Poly(L-lactide) (PLA) was selected as a biocompatible and (bio)degradable polymer carrier. PLA solution was electrospun in combination with electrospraying of a suspension that contained the ZnO/EG or ZnO/C{sub 60} hybrid. Mats with different content of EG or C{sub 60} were obtained. The new materials were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The photocatalytic activity of the materials was evaluated by using model dyes. The formation of a hybrid between ZnO and EG led to enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of the mats at ZnO/EG weight ratios of 90/10 and 85/15. Increase in the photocatalytic activity of the ZnO-containing mats was also achieved by the formation of a hybrid between ZnO and C{sub 60} at a fullerene content of 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% in respect to ZnO weight. The new materials exhibited antibacterial activity as evidenced by the performed studies against Staphylococcus aureus. - Highlights: • New self-cleaning materials are fabricated by electrospinning/electrospraying. • PLA fibers decorated with nanosized ZnO/EG or ZnO/C{sub 60} hybrid are obtained. • Their photocatalytic activity is enhanced as compared to fibers with bare ZnO. • The new materials can be used repeatedly for degradation of MB and RR dyes. • The new self-cleaning materials exhibit antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  5. A Green and Mild Approach of Synthesis of Highly-Conductive Graphene Film by Zn Reduction of Exfoliated Graphite Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Guang-hui; Lin, Yue; Yu, Xin-xin; Ren, Wen-zhen; Wu, Yu-kun; Pan, Nan; Wang, Xiao-ping

    2012-08-01

    We report a simple and green approach to synthesize reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets at room temperature based on Zn reduction of exfoliated GO. The evolution of GO to RGO has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal that the atomic ratio of carbon to oxygen in the RGO can be tuned from 1.67 to 13.7 through controlling the reduction time. Moreover, the conductivity of the RGO is measured to be 26.9±2.2 kS/m, much larger than those previously obtained by chemical reduction through other reducing agents. More importantly, the resistance of the RGO film with 20 nm thickness can be as low as 2 kΩ/square, while a high transparency over 70% within a broad spectral range from 0.45 μm to 1.50 μm can be retained. The proposed method is low-cost, eco-friendly and highly-efficient, the as-prepared thinner RGO films are useful in a variety of potential application fields such as optoelectronics, photovoltaics and electrochemistry by serving as an ultralight, flexible and transparent electrode material.

  6. Pencil graphite electrodes for improved electrochemical detection of oleuropein by the combination of Natural Deep Eutectic Solvents and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Federico J V; Spisso, Adrian; Fernanda Silva, María

    2017-11-01

    A novel methodology is presented for the enhanced electrochemical detection of oleuropein in complex plant matrices by Graphene Oxide Pencil Grahite Electrode (GOPGE) in combination with a buffer modified with a Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent, containing 10% (v/v) of Lactic acid, Glucose and H 2 O (LGH). The electrochemical behavior of oleuropein in the modified-working buffer was examined using differential pulse voltammetry. The combination of both modifications, NADES modified buffer and nanomaterial modified electrode, LGH-GOPGE, resulted on a signal enhancement of 5.3 times higher than the bare electrode with unmodified buffer. A calibration curve of oleuropein was performed between 0.10 to 37 μM and a good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.989. Detection and quantification limits of the method were obtained as 30 and 102 nM, respectively. In addition, precision studies indicated that the voltammetric method was sufficiently repeatable, %RSD 0.01 and 3.16 (n = 5) for potential and intensity, respectively. Finally, the proposed electrochemical sensor was successfully applied to the determination of oleuropein in an olive leaf extract prepared by ultrasound-assisted extraction. The results obtained with the proposed electrochemical sensor were compared with Capillary Zone Electrophoresis analysis with satisfactory results. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Energy evaluations, graphite corrosion in Bugey I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Fiche, C.

    1967-01-01

    Bugey I presents a problem of radiolytic corrosion of the graphite by the CO 2 under pressure at high temperature. This report aims to evaluate the energy transferred to the gas by a Bugey I core cell, in normal operating conditions. The water, the carbon oxides and the hydrogen formed quantities are deduced as the consumed graphite and methane. Experimental studies are realized in parallel to validate the presented results. (A.L.B.)

  8. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  9. Wiring of Glucose Oxidizing Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzymes by Methylene Blue-Modified Third Generation Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers Attached to Spectroscopic Graphite Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaing, Victor; Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    , characterized by the heterogeneous ET rate constant of 7.1 0.1 s1; they can be used for electronic wiring of glucose-oxidizing FAD-containing enzymes, such as hexose oxidase (HOX), and further bioelectrocatalysis of glucose oxidation, starting, at pH 7, from -100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Thus, dendrimer......-templated electronic wires, comprising MB molecules conjugated to the periphery of the PAMAM and anchored to the surface of cost-effective Gr electrodes represent an efficient and robust tool for protein wiring to electrodes for their perspective bioelectronic applications in biosensors and biofuel cells....

  10. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  11. Hydrophilization of graphite using plasma above/in a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shuhei; Kawahara, Kazuma; Takeuchi, Nozomi

    2018-01-01

    A hydrophilization method for graphite is required for applications such as conductive ink. In typical chemical oxidation methods for graphite have the problems of producing many defects in graphite and a large environmental impact. In recent years, the plasma treatment has attracted attention because of the high quality of the treated samples and the low environmental impact. In this study, we proposed an above-solution plasma treatment with a high contact probability of graphite and plasma since graphite accumulates on the solution surface due to its hydrophobicity, which we compared with a so-called solution plasma treatment. Graphite was hydrophilized via reactions with OH radicals generated by the plasma. It was confirmed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were modified to the graphite and the dispersibility was improved. The above-solution plasma achieved more energy-efficient hydrophilization than the solution plasma and it was possible to enhance the dispersibility by increasing the plasma-solution contact area.

  12. Efficient visible-light photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous NO with graphitic carbon nitride (g–C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) activated by the alkaline hydrothermal treatment and mechanism analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Haoyu; Ou, Man [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Zhong, Qin, E-mail: zq304@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Zhang, Shule; Yu, Lemeng [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Various porous g–C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples were obtained by the alkaline hydrothermal treatment. • 0.12CN possesses the largest BET specific surface area and pore volume. • The NO conversion in the presence of 0.12CN reaches 40.4%. • Reasons for the enhanced PCO performance with treated g–C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was analyzed. • Further mechanism of the PCO of NO relevant with active species was investigated. - Abstract: In this paper, an enhanced visible-light photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of NO (∼400 ppm) in the presence of the graphitic carbon nitride (g–C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) treated by the alkaline hydrothermal treatment is evaluated. Various g–C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples were treated in different concentrations of NaOH solutions and the sample treated in 0.12 mol L{sup −1} of NaOH solution possesses the largest BET specific surface area as well as the optimal ability of the PCO of NO. UV–vis diffuse reflection spectra (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were also conducted, and the highly improved photocatalytic performance is ascribed to the large specific surface area and high pore volume, which provides more adsorption and active sites, the wide visible-light adsorption edge and the narrow band gap, which is favorable for visible-light activation, as well as the decreased recombination rate of photo-generated electrons and holes, which could contribute to the production of active species. Fluorescence spectra and a trapping experiment were conducted to further the mechanism analysis of the PCO of NO, illustrating that superoxide radicals (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) play the dominant role among active species in the PCO of NO.

  13. Radiation damage in graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, John Harry Walrond

    1965-01-01

    Nuclear Energy, Volume 102: Radiation Damage in Graphite provides a general account of the effects of irradiation on graphite. This book presents valuable work on the structure of the defects produced in graphite crystals by irradiation. Organized into eight chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the description of the methods of manufacturing graphite and of its physical properties. This text then presents details of the method of setting up a scale of irradiation dose. Other chapters consider the effect of irradiation at a given temperature on a physical property of graphite. This

  14. Change in properties of graphite on stake of Obninsk NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgul'ev, Yu.S.; Gundorov, V.V.; Kalyagina, I.P.; Belinskaya, N.T.; Dolgov, V.V.; Komissarov, O.V.; Stuzhnev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of testing the graphite from the AM-1 reactor masonry at the Obninsk NPP for its operation period are discussed. It is shown that the masonry graphite state after 42 years of the reactor operation remains satisfactory in the most cells inspected. Separate cells requiring a repair resulted from oxidation are characterized by strength decreased by several times. The laws of radiation changes in graphite properties are analyzed. The conclusion on possibility of the further masonry operation is drawn

  15. Sensitive Voltammetric Determination of Natural Flavonoid Quercetin on a Disposable Graphite Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Long Vu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a pencil graphite electrode was pretreated using chronoamperometry technique in phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.0 for sensitive determination of quercetin. Oxidation of quercetin was investigated using pretreated pencil graphite electrode and anodic stripping differential pulse voltammetry. Under optimal conditions, the anodic current of quercetin exhibited linear response to its concentration in the range from 0.001 to 1.5 μmol/L with the limit of detection of 0.3·10–3 μmol/L. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of quercetin in cranberry and blackcurrant juices with recovery rate from 93.2 to 94.7 %. Solid-phase extraction was found to be necessary prior to voltammetric determination of quercetin in fruit juice samples using pretreated pencil graphite electrode.

  16. Electrochemical Characterization a New Epoxy Graphite Composite Electrode as Transducer for Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel I. Balbín Tamayo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new graphite epoxy composite composition was developed by the manufacturer of transducer for DNA biosensor, which were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy field emission (FESEM. The dependence of peak potential, the anode current relationship, and cathodic current with scan rate was evaluated by voltammetry for the redox system Fe(CN63-/4- Well-defined voltammograms were obtained using the graphite-epoxy composite 3.3/2.5/1 m/m/v graphite/araldite/hardener (GEC II. The electrochemical characterization showed a quasi-reversible electrochemical behavior under the control of the linear diffusion system for Fe(CN63-/4-. The GEC III was also successfully used in the detection of the signal oxidation guanine monophosphate (GMF and adenine (AMF by square wave voltammetry. These results demonstrate the potential of GEC II in the electrochemical detection of DNA.

  17. Graphene oxide-TiO2 composite solid phase extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the speciation of inorganic selenium in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Chen, Beibei; Wu, Shaowei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a method of graphene oxide (GO)-TiO2 composite solid phase extraction followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection was proposed for the speciation of inorganic selenium in environmental waters. The adsorption behavior of inorganic Se(IV) and Se(VI) on the GO-TiO2(1:1) composite was investigated. It was found that Se(IV) was quantitatively retained on the GO-TiO2 composites within a wide pH range of 0.5-10, while Se(VI) was quantitatively adsorbed on GO-TiO2(1:1) composite at pH 0.5-2, and no obvious adsorption of Se(VI) within the pH range of 4-10 was found. By selecting pH 6.0, Se(IV) could be easily determined. After reduction of Se(VI), total Se was determined by the proposed method, and Se(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Se and Se(IV). The factors affecting the separation/preconcentration of Se(IV) and Se(VI) were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the isothermal adsorption of Se(IV) on the GO-TiO2(1:1) composite fitted Langmuir model; a linear range over 0.1-12ngmL(-1) was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) and precision of the method for Se(IV) was 0.04ngmL(-1) and 9.4% (cSe(IV)=0.5ngmL(-1), n=7), respectively. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a standard water sample (GSBZ50031-94) was analyzed, and the determined value was in a good agreement to the certified value. The established method was applied to inorganic Se speciation in environmental water samples and the recovery of 87.4-102% was obtained for the spiked samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticles on 2D supported graphitic carbon nitride and reduced graphene oxide sheets: A comparative photocatalytic degradation study of organic pollutants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabdhara, Gitashree; Das, Manash R

    2018-04-01

    Novel and sustainable bimetallic nanoparticles of Au-Pd on 2D graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets was designed adopting an eco-friendly chemical route to obtain Au-Pd/g-C 3 N 4 and Au-Pd/rGO, respectively. Elimination of hazardous pollutants, particularly phenol from water is urgent for environment remediation due to its significant carcinogenicity. Considering this aspect, the Au-Pd/g-C 3 N 4 and Au-Pd/rGO nanocomposites are used as photocatalyst towards degradation of toxic phenol, 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) and 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) under natural sunlight and UV light irradiation. Au-Pd/g-C 3 N 4 nanocomposite exhibited higher activity then Au/g-C 3 N 4 , Pd/g-C 3 N 4 and Au-Pd/rGO nanocomposites with more than 95% degradation in 180 min under sunlight. The obtained degradation efficiency of our materials is better than many other reported photocatalysts. Incorporation of nitrogen atoms in the carbon skeleton of g-C 3 N 4 provides much better properties to Au-Pd/g-C 3 N 4 nanocomposite than carbon based Au-Pd/rGO leading to its higher degradation efficiency. Due to the presence of these nitrogen atoms and some defects, g-C 3 N 4 possesses appealing electrical, chemical and functional properties. Photoluminescence results further revealed the efficient charge separation and delayed recombination of photo-induced electron-hole pairs in the Au-Pd/g-C 3 N 4 nanocomposite. Generation of reactive oxygen species during photocatalysis is well explained through photoluminescence study and the sustainability of these photocatalyst was ascertained through reusability study up to eight and five consecutive cycles for Au-Pd/g-C 3 N 4 and Au-Pd/rGO nanocomposites, respectively without substantial loss in its activity. Characterization of the photocatalysts after reaction signified the stability of the nanocomposites and added advantage to our developed photocatalytic system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structures and Performance of Graphene/Polyimide Composite Graphite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry-wet spinning process was used to gain graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers, then graphene/polyimide composite carbon and graphite fibers were obtained through carbonized and graphitized. Different graphene oxide contents of the composite carbon and graphite fibers were measured by thermal gravimetric analysis, Raman, mechanical properties, electrical properties,SEM and so on. The results show that when the GO content is 0.3%(mass fraction,the same below, the thermal property of the graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers is the best. The mechanical and electrical properties are obriously improved by the addition of GO, graphitization degree also increases. When the composite carbon fibers are treated at 2800℃, GO content increases to 2.0%, the thermal conductivity of the composite graphite fibers reaches 435.57W·m-1·K-1 and cross-section structures of carbon fibers are more compact.

  20. Preparation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofibers modified pencil graphite electrode and investigation of over-oxidation conditions for the selective and sensitive determination of uric acid in body fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özcan, Ali; İlkbaş, Salih

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have performed the preparation of over-oxidized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofibers modified pencil graphite electrode (Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE) to develop a selective and sensitive voltammetric uric acid (UA) sensor. It was noted that the over-oxidation potential and time had a prominent effect on the UA response of the Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE. Characterizations of PEDOT-nf/PGE and Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE have been performed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The highest voltammetric response of UA was obtained at pH 2.0. A linear relationship between the concentration of UA and oxidation peak currents was observed in the concentration range of 0.01–20.0 μM. The detection limit (1.3 nM according to S/N = 3) and reproducibility (RSD: 4.6 % for N:10) have also been determined. The effects of different substances on the determination of UA have been investigated. A very high peak separation value of 423 mV was obtained between UA and ascorbic acid which is the major interfering substance for UA. The use of Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE has been successfully tested in the determination of UA in human blood serum and urine samples for the first time in the literature. - Highlights: • Modification of pencil graphite with over-oxidized PEDOT nanofibers was performed. • The prepared electrodes were used in the voltammetric determination of uric acid. • The over-oxidation potential and time has a prominent effect on the responses. • A very high peak separation (463 mV) was obtained between ascorbic and uric acids. • Analytical application of the electrodes was successfully tested in real samples.

  1. Preparation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofibers modified pencil graphite electrode and investigation of over-oxidation conditions for the selective and sensitive determination of uric acid in body fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özcan, Ali, E-mail: aozcan3@anadolu.edu.tr; İlkbaş, Salih

    2015-09-03

    In this study, we have performed the preparation of over-oxidized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofibers modified pencil graphite electrode (Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE) to develop a selective and sensitive voltammetric uric acid (UA) sensor. It was noted that the over-oxidation potential and time had a prominent effect on the UA response of the Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE. Characterizations of PEDOT-nf/PGE and Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE have been performed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The highest voltammetric response of UA was obtained at pH 2.0. A linear relationship between the concentration of UA and oxidation peak currents was observed in the concentration range of 0.01–20.0 μM. The detection limit (1.3 nM according to S/N = 3) and reproducibility (RSD: 4.6 % for N:10) have also been determined. The effects of different substances on the determination of UA have been investigated. A very high peak separation value of 423 mV was obtained between UA and ascorbic acid which is the major interfering substance for UA. The use of Ox-PEDOT-nf/PGE has been successfully tested in the determination of UA in human blood serum and urine samples for the first time in the literature. - Highlights: • Modification of pencil graphite with over-oxidized PEDOT nanofibers was performed. • The prepared electrodes were used in the voltammetric determination of uric acid. • The over-oxidation potential and time has a prominent effect on the responses. • A very high peak separation (463 mV) was obtained between ascorbic and uric acids. • Analytical application of the electrodes was successfully tested in real samples.

  2. Catalytically graphitized glass-like carbon examined as anode for lithium-ion cell performing at high charge/discharge rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skowronski, Jan M.; Knofczynski, Krzysztof [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry, ul. Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2009-10-20

    The influence of a long-time heat treatment of hard carbon in the presence of iron catalyst on its structural properties and electrochemical performance is concerned in terms of potential application as anode material for lithium-ion cell. Glass-like carbon spheres obtained by carbonization of phenol resin were catalytically graphitized by heat treatment at temperature 1000 C in argon atmosphere for 20 h and 100 h. After this process iron was completely removed from the product of reaction. The original carbon was entirely useless as anode for Li-ion cell because of its extremely poor reversible capacity (54 mAh g{sup -1}). Due to heat treatment composite materials consisting of microcrystalline graphite admixed with turbostratic carbon were produced. Modified carbons were tested as anode materials using gradually increasing current density. Based on electrochemical measurements a mixed intercalation/insertion mechanism for storage of lithium ions was concluded. Discharge capacity of carbon heat treated for 100 h attained value of 276 mAh g{sup -1} and its reversible capacity appeared to be better than that of flaky graphite upon discharging at current density in the range 50-250 mA g{sup -1}. (author)

  3. Effect of Temperature and Graphite Immersion Method on Carbothermic Reduction of Fayalite Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrašinović, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, graphite flakes were used to reduce fayalite slag originated from the pyrometallurgical copper extraction process. Experiments were conducted with a significantly different contact area between graphite and slag at two temperatures, 1300°C and 1400°C. The process was continuously monitored via the concentration change of CO and CO2 in off-gas. Reduction rate values in experiments where 150-micron-diameter graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and left to float slowly to the top are about four times higher compared with when graphite flakes were dispersed at the top surface of liquid slag. The activation energy for instigating reduction was 302.61 kJ mol-1 and 306.67 kJ mol-1 in the case where graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and dispersed at the surface, respectively. The reduction process is characterized by two distinctive periods: an initial steep increase in the concentration of CO and CO2 controlled by the Boudouard reaction and a subsequent slow decrease of CO and CO2 concentrations in the off-gas controlled by mass transfer of reducible oxides from bulk to the gas-slag interface.

  4. Investigating the oxidation mechanism of tantalum nanoparticles at high heating rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisio, Jeffery B.; Wang, Xizheng; Wu, Tao; Egan, Garth C.; Jacob, Rohit J.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2017-12-01

    Reduced diffusion length scales and increased specific surface areas of nanosized metal fuels have recently demonstrated increased reaction rates for these systems, increasing their relevance in a wide variety of applications. The most commonly employed metal fuel, aluminum, tends to oxidize rapidly near its melting point (660 °C) in addition to undergoing a phase change of the nascent oxide shell. To further expand on the understanding of nanosized metal fuel oxidation, tantalum nanoparticles were studied due to their high melting point (3017 °C) in comparison to aluminum. Both traditional slow heating rate and in-situ high heating rate techniques were used to probe the oxidation of tantalum nanoparticles in oxygen containing environments in addition to nanothermite mixtures. When oxidized by gas phase oxygen, the oxide shell of the tantalum nanoparticles rapidly crystallized creating cracks that may attribute to enhanced oxygen diffusion into the particle. In the case of tantalum based nanothermites, oxide shell crystallization was shown to induce reactive sintering with the metal oxide resulting in a narrow range of ignition temperatures independent of the metal oxide used. The oxidation mechanism was modeled using the Deal-Grove model to extract rate parameters, and theoretical burn times for tantalum based nanocomposites were calculated.

  5. Oxygen transfer rates and requirements in oxidative biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Rehn, Gustav; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic oxidation reactions offer several important benefits such as regio- and stereoselectivity, avoiding the use of toxic metal based catalysts and replacing oxidizing reagents by allowing the use of oxygen. In this contribution the oxygen requirements are analysed for different process s...... without oxygen supply being limiting. Also, membrane contactors can provide a feasible oxygen supply method when bubble-less aeration is desired. However, in order to support high productivity the oxygen flux using air may be insufficient, thus requiring the use of oxygen....... scenarios, considering different biocatalyst formats and variation of the desired productivity. Also, the applicability of two different oxygen supply methods (bubbling and membrane aeration) is considered. The results indicate that growing cells could be used to reach productivities up to 3.5 g L-1h-1...

  6. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  7. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...

  8. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  9. Oxidizability and explosibility of pure graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L Rahmani; D Roubineau; S Cornet

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: While graphite is widely considered a heat-resistant material, e.g. able to screen metallic shielding from thermal damage, and graphite powder is used as a fire extinguisher agent where water or carbon dioxide should not, it still can react with air and - being carbon - give forth a significant amount of heat. Whether this makes it a hazard in operations such as dismantling nuclear reactors that contain hundreds of tons of graphite, including a small percentage of powder, is a question that has to be answered, considering that dismantling implies the use of such potential fire initiators as thermal cutters and electrical equipment. For this reason EDF commissioned the Centre National de Prevention et Protection (CNPP) to carry out explosibility tests on unirradiated, nuclear grade (i.e. with about 100 ppm of impurities) graphite powder. CNPP tests were so designed as to simulate realistic conditions that might result from a severe mishap during a dismantling operation, such as the crash of heavy equipment on graphite blocks coupled with the bruise of a high power electrical cable. EDF-CNPP tests complement others, done either in Italy most notably on irradiated graphite dust contaminated with various pollutants, or in the UK where the ability of settled graphite dust to propagate an initial gas explosion into an adjacent volume was assessed. EDF-CNPP tests comprise two steps. Step one was intended to produce a qualitative understanding of how nuclear grade graphite behaves while heated in air. In a first series of experiments graphite samples were heated up to 900 C during two and a half hours and their mass loss measured: it was found that while fine powder is wholly oxidised, coarser powder and chunks retained about two thirds of their initial mass. Oxidation kinetics, as assessed by oven temperature shoot-up, begins at 580 C and is quite low, compared with that of iron powder. In a second series of experiments a graphite piece

  10. Oxidizability and explosibility of pure graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, L.; Roubineau, D.; Cornet, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: While graphite is widely considered a heat-resistant material, e.g. able to screen metallic shielding from thermal damage, and graphite powder is used as a fire extinguisher agent where water or carbon dioxide should not, it still can react with air and - being carbon - give forth a significant amount of heat. Whether this makes it a hazard in operations such as dismantling nuclear reactors that contain hundreds of tons of graphite, including a small percentage of powder, is a question that has to be answered, considering that dismantling implies the use of such potential fire initiators as thermal cutters and electrical equipment. For this reason EDF commissioned the Centre National de Prevention et Protection (CNPP) to carry out explosibility tests on unirradiated, nuclear grade (i.e. with about 100 ppm of impurities) graphite powder. CNPP tests were so designed as to simulate realistic conditions that might result from a severe mishap during a dismantling operation, such as the crash of heavy equipment on graphite blocks coupled with the bruise of a high power electrical cable. EDF-CNPP tests complement others, done either in Italy most notably on irradiated graphite dust contaminated with various pollutants, or in the UK where the ability of settled graphite dust to propagate an initial gas explosion into an adjacent volume was assessed. EDF-CNPP tests comprise two steps. Step one was intended to produce a qualitative understanding of how nuclear grade graphite behaves while heated in air. In a first series of experiments graphite samples were heated up to 900 C during two and a half hours and their mass loss measured: it was found that while fine powder is wholly oxidised, coarser powder and chunks retained about two thirds of their initial mass. Oxidation kinetics, as assessed by oven temperature shoot-up, begins at 580 C and is quite low, compared with that of iron powder. In a second series of experiments a graphite piece

  11. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-01-01

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite. PMID:29244721

  12. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO, forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP. The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl, following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  13. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO₂ Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-12-15

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO₂ nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C₃N₄/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO₄ aqueous solution to construct the g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C₃N₄, rGO and MnO₂. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C₃N₄/rGO was covered with thin MnO₂ nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C₃N₄, g-C₃N₄/rGO and MnO₂, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  14. Oxygen-assisted low-pressure chemical vapor deposition for the low-temperature direct growth of graphitic nanofibers on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass as a counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Sheng; Hsieh, Chien-Kuo

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we report an oxygen-assisted low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) method for the direct growth of graphitic nanofibers (GNFs) on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate at a low temperature (550 °C). By adding moderate concentrations of oxygen in a gas mixture of argon, ethylene, and hydrogen during LPCVD, an extremely dense GNF forest can be obtained on a nickel-coated FTO glass substrate. Though this process, the graphitic nanofibers are grown homogenously on a large area of FTO glass. It was observed that oxygen-assisted LPCVD leads to the direct growth of high-quality GNFs as a counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In combination with an N719 dye-sensitized TiO2 working electrode and an iodine-based electrolyte, the DSSC with a GNF counter electrode showed a power conversion efficiency of 5.51% under AM 1.5 (100 mW cm-2) illumination, which approached that of the DSSC with a Pt counter electrode (5.44%). The results demonstrated that our directly grown GNFs could be promising candidates for counter electrodes to achieve high performance in DSSCs.

  15. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  16. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  17. Irradiation creep of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Displacement damage of graphite by neutron irradiation causes graphite to change dimensions. This dimensional instability requires careful attention when graphite is used as as moderator and reflector material in nuclear devices. Natural gradients in flux and temperature result in time-varying differential growth generating stresses similar to thermal stresses with an ever increasing temperature gradient. Graphite, however, does have the ability to creep under irradiation, allowing the stress intensity to relax below the fracture strength of the material. Creep strain also serves to average the radiation-induced strains, thus contributing to the stability of the core. As the dimensional instability is a function of temperature, so are the creep characteristics of graphite, and it is of interest to generalize the available data for extension to more extreme conditions of fluence and temperature. Irradiation creep of graphite is characterized by two stages of creep; a primary stage that saturates with time and a secondary stage that is generally assumed to be linear and constant with time. Virtually all past studies have not considered primary creep in detail primarily because there is limited available data at the very low fluences required to saturate primary creep. It is the purpose of this study to carefully examine primary creep in detail over the irradiation temperature range of 150 to 1000 degree C. These studies also include the combined effects of creep, differential growth, and structural changes in graphite by irradiation. 3 refs., 5 figs

  18. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  20. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  1. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  2. A study on wear behaviour of Al/6101/graphite composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Sharma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research work scrutinizes aluminium alloy 6101-graphite composites for their mechanical and tribological behaviour in dry sliding environments. The orthodox liquid casting technique had been used for the manufacturing of composite materials and imperilled to T6 heat treatment. The content of reinforcement particles was taken as 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 wt.% of graphite to ascertain it is prospective as self-lubricating reinforcement in sliding wear environments. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength of cast Al6101 metal matrix and manufactured composites were evaluated. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength decreases with increasing volume fraction of graphite reinforcement as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix. Wear tests were performed on pin on disc apparatus to assess the tribological behaviour of composites and to determine the optimum volume fraction of graphite for its minimum wear rate. Wear rate reduces with increase in graphite volume fraction and minimum wear rate was attained at 4 wt.% graphite. The wear was found to decrease with increase in sliding distance. The average co-efficient of friction also reduces with graphite addition and its minimum value was found to be at 4 wt.% graphite. The worn surfaces of wear specimens were studied through scanning electron microscopy. The occurrence of 4 wt.% of graphite reinforcement in the composites can reveal loftier wear possessions as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix.

  3. The calculation of methane profiles in graphite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The role of methane as an inhibitor of the radiolytic oxidation of the graphite moderator of an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) by the carbon dioxide coolant has been the subject of considerable study over the past decade. Although the exact mechanism of this inhibition process is not completely understood it is obvious that regions of the porous graphite structure remote from the surfaces directly accessible to the coolant can only be protected if in-depth penetration by the methane is possible. These in-pore mass transfer effects have been studied mathematically by equating the methane destruction rate with the rate of transport to and from the reaction site by means of both permeable flow and diffusion. More recently a numerical approach to the solution of the methane diffusion problem based on the FACSIMILE program for carrying out the relevant integrations has been adopted. This program has been written particularly to solve the mixed chemical, flow and diffusion problems which are typical of the kind occurring in the interpretation of AGR coolant chemistry. The advantage of a numerical technique such as this is that the solution method is quite general and may be applied to any type of radiolytic destruction term. Additionally, it is possible to solve for situations where parameters such as dose rate are a function of distance into the graphite phase and account may also be taken of the effect on the rate of the methane destruction process of changes in the water and carbon monoxide concentration produced within the structure as a result of this process. The model has recently been extended to cover this latter point and the resulting code is referred to as the MEDIC (MEthane DIffusion Calculation) program. The purpose of this paper is to describe briefly the assumptions made in the calculation and to highlight the more important conclusions. (author)

  4. The behaviour of CAGR moderator and sleeve graphites radiolytically oxidised to high weight loss in inhibited coolant gas compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, P.; Fitzgerald, B.; Ketchen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Gilsocarbon graphites were irradiated to high weight losses in three different CO 2 based coolants. The experimental data is tested against a model which interprets the gas phase chemistry and pore geometry and allows weight loss and gas flow properties to be calculated. The observed changes of oxidation rate with dose were successfully predicted from the model. An empirical relationship was also derived which was shown to fit data for moderator, sleeve and special pore structure graphites. Changes in graphite permeability and diffusivity were predicted by the model, and also by other simplified, more approximate methods. The model based upon the measured transport pore spectrum was shown to be the best with other methods proving adequate to moderate doses. (author)

  5. Preparation of anode-electrolyte structures using graphite, sodium bicarbonate or citric acid as pore forming agents for application in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Fiuza, Raigenis da; Silva, Marcos Aurelio da; Guedes, Bruna C.; Pontes, Luiz A.; Boaventura, Jaime Soares [UFBA, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil). Energy and Materials Science Group

    2010-07-01

    Cermets based on Ni supported on YSZ or GDC were prepared for use as anode in direct reform SOFCs. NaHCO3 (Na-Ni-YSZ and Na-Ni-GDC) or citric acid (Ac-Ni-YSZ and Ac-Ni-GDC) were used as pore forming agents (PFAs). The SOFC anode was also prepared using graphite (G-Ni-YSZ and G-Ni-GDC) as PFA for the purposes of comparison. The testing unitary SOFC, planar type, was made by pressing the anode-electrolyte assembly, followed by sintering at 1500 C. After this, LSM (lanthanum and strontium manganite) paint was used for the cathode deposition. The powdered cermets were evaluated in ethanol steam reforming at 650 C. The ethanol conversion was 84% and 32% for cermets Na-Ni-YSZ and G-Ni-YSZ, respectively and the selectivity to H{sub 2} was 32 and 20% for the two cermets, respectively. The Na-Ni-YSZ cermet was ten times more resistant to carbon deposition than the G-Ni-YSZ cermet. SEM micrographs of the anode-electrolyte assembly showed that the use of NaHCO{sub 3} as PFA created a well formed interface between layers with homogeneously distributed pores. In contrast, graphite as PFA formed a loose interface between anode and electrolyte. The performance of the unitary SOFC was evaluated using ethanol, hydrogen or methane as fuel. The cell operated well using any of these fuels; however, they exhibited different electrochemical behavior. (orig.)

  6. Electrochemical Deposition and Re-oxidation of Au at Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite. Stabilization of Au Nanoparticles on the Upper Plane of Step Edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinhero, Patrick Joseph; Lister, Tedd Edward; Boxley, Chett J.; White, Henry S.

    2003-10-01

    The electrochemical deposition and reoxidation of Au on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) immersed in a 5 mM AuCl4-/6 M LiCl solution is reported. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that Au nanoparticles, ~3.3 nm in height and ~10 nm in diameter, are deposited at times less than ~1 s. The density of nanoparticles, 6 × 109 cm-2, is of the same order of magnitude as the surface point defect density, suggesting that point defects act as nucleation sites for Au electrodeposition. A small subset of the Au nanoparticles (~7%) continues to grow between 1 and 50 s, reaching a height of ~150 nm and a diameter of ~300 nm. At times greater than 50 s, the larger particles coalesce to yield a surface comprised of a low density (~2 × 106 cm-2) of micrometer-size Au crystallites surrounded by Au nanoparticles. Double potential step chronocoulometric experiments demonstrate that the electrodeposition of Au is chemically irreversible, a finding supported by SEM and AFM observations of Au nanoparticles and larger crystallites on the surface after long periods of reoxidation (>3600 s). Au nanoparticles are observed to be preferentially deposited on the upper plane of step edges, a consequence of the nonuniform surface electron density that results from relaxation of the graphite lattice near steps.

  7. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  8. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept

  9. Review of oxidation rates of DOE spent nuclear fuel : Part 1 : nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The long-term performance of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a mined geologic disposal system depends highly on fuel oxidation and subsequent radionuclide release. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels are reviewed in this two-volume report to provide a baseline for comparison with release rate data and technical rationale for predicting general corrosion behavior of DOE SNF. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels in the DOE SNF inventory were organized according to metallic, Part 1, and non-metallic, Part 2, spent nuclear fuels. This Part 1 of the report reviews the oxidation behavior of three fuel types prototypic of metallic fuel in the DOE SNF inventory: uranium metal, uranium alloys and aluminum-based dispersion fuels. The oxidation rates of these fuels were evaluated in oxygen, water vapor, and water. The water data were limited to pure water corrosion as this represents baseline corrosion kinetics. Since the oxidation processes and kinetics discussed in this report are limited to pure water, they are not directly applicable to corrosion rates of SNF in water chemistry that is significantly different (such as may occur in the repository). Linear kinetics adequately described the oxidation rates of metallic fuels in long-term corrosion. Temperature dependent oxidation rates were determined by linear regression analysis of the literature data. As expected the reaction rates of metallic fuels dramatically increase with temperature. The uranium metal and metal alloys have stronger temperature dependence than the aluminum dispersion fuels. The uranium metal/water reaction exhibited the highest oxidation rate of the metallic fuel types and environments that were reviewed. Consequently, the corrosion properties of all DOE SNF may be conservatively modeled as uranium metal, which is representative of spent N-Reactor fuel. The reaction rate in anoxic, saturated water vapor was essentially the same as the water reaction rate. The long-term intrinsic

  10. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-07

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

  11. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  12. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  13. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  14. Potential rates of ammonium oxidation, nitrite oxidation, nitrate reduction and denitrification in the young barley rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    and denitrifiers. The results indicate that potential activities (enzyme contents) in the four bacterial groups were less dependent on their inorganic N substrates in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, but showed distinct and different responses to duration of soil wetting after rainfall.......Potential activities (enzyme contents) of ammonium (NH4+) oxidizing, nitrite (NO2-) oxidizing, nitrate (NO3-) reducing and denitrifying bacteria were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil obtained from young barley plants in the field. The activities as well as pools of inorganic N (NH4+, NO2......- and NO3-) were followed for 3 weeks in the beginning of the growth season (May-June). During the 3 weeks two separate periods of rain gave dramatic changes in soil water content. A rainfall in the beginning of the sampling period, resulting in a short-term wetting of the soil, stimulated the potential...

  15. A experimental system for the checking of the absorption of E.C.A.G. graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Vidal, R.

    1958-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the mean absorption cross section in thermal neutrons of graphite. This system consists of a graphite stack containing a Ra-Be source and a BF3 counter. A cavity in the stack receives the graphite to be studied or the graphite standard. By comparing the counting rates their absorption ratio can be deduced. The measurement is performed on graphite rods which have been machined before being placed in the pile. It provides the possibility of detecting over a batch of 1 ton of graphite, in a single measurement, a difference in absorption of 0.1 milli barn. (author) [fr

  16. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  17. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-03

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li + Cl - ), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li + Cl - catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA.

  18. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project

  19. The effects of trichloroethane HCl and ion-implantation on the oxidation rate of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, W.; Ahmed, E.

    1994-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of silicon was studied using a large-scale industrial oxidation system. The characteristics of the oxides resulting from pure hydrogen/oxygen (Hsub(2)/Osub(2)), trichloroethane/oxygen (TCA/Osub(2) and hydrogen chloride/oxygen (HCI/Osub(2)) mixtures are compared. Both HCI and TCA addition to oxygen produced an enhanced oxidation rate. The oxidation rate for TCA/Osub(2) was approximately 30-40% higher than for HCI/Osub(2) mixtures. A molar ratio of TCA/Osub(2) of 1% gives an optimum process for very-large-scale industrial (VLSI) applications. However, 3% HCI/Osub(2) gives comparable results to 1% TCA. In addition, boron and phosphorus implantation are observed to increase the oxidation rate. Phosphorus doping of the silicon yields a higher rate than boron-doped wafers. This behaviour is explained in terms of surface damage and chemistry. It appears that the overall mechanisms governing all these processes are similar. (8 figures, 22 references) (Author)

  20. Gas storage cylinder formed from a composition containing thermally exfoliated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A gas storage cylinder or gas storage cylinder liner, formed from a polymer composite, containing at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m(exp 2)/g to 2600 m(exp 2)2/g.

  1. Thermogravimetric and Differential Scanning Calorimetric Behavior of Ball-Milled Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Seon; Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi Hyun; Cho, Seung Yon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An examination was made to characterize the oxidation behavior of ball-milled nuclear graphite powder through a TG-DSC analysis. With the ball milling time, the BET surface area increased with the reduction of particle size, but decreased with the chemisorptions of O{sub 2} on the activated surface. The enhancement of the oxidation after the ball milling is attributed to both increases in the specific surface area and atomic scale defects in the graphite structure. In a high temperature gas-cooled reactor, nuclear graphite has been widely used as fuel elements, moderator or reflector blocks, and core support structures owing to its excellent moderating power, mechanical properties and machinability. For the same reason, it will be used in a helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module for the ITER. Each submodule has a seven-layer breeding zone, including three neutron multiplier layers packed with beryllium pebbles, three lithium ceramic pebbles packed tritium breeder layers, and a reflector layer packed with 1 mm diameter graphite pebbles to reduce the volume of beryllium. The abrasion of graphite structures owing to relative motion or thermal cycle during operation may produce graphite dust. It is expected that graphite dust will be more oxidative than bulk graphite, and thus the oxidation behavior of graphite dust must be examined to analyze the safety of the reactors during an air ingress accident. In this study, the thermal stability of ball-milled graphite powder was investigated using a simultaneous thermogravimeter-differential scanning calorimeter.

  2. Production test IP-550-I: Routine monitoring for moderator oxidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baars, R.E.

    1963-04-01

    The objectives of this production test are: 1. To authorize the outage time involved in installing and removing oxidation monitors for the reactors, and 2. To specifically define sample design, spacing of samples in the channels, and residence times to insure adequate routine monitoring of moderator oxidation rates. This production test is concerned with B, C, D, F, DR, F, and H reactors. Similar requirements have been specified in PITA IP-20-I for KE and KW reactors

  3. Electrochemical characteristics of silver- and nickel-coated synthetic graphite prepared by a gas suspension spray coating method for the anode of lithium secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Won Chang; Byun, Dongjin; Lee, Joong Kee; Cho, Byung won

    2004-01-01

    Four kinds of synthetic graphite coated with silver and nickel for the anodes of lithium secondary batteries were prepared by a gas suspension spray coating method. The electrode coated with silver showed higher charge-discharge capacities due to a Ag-Li alloy, but rate capability decreased at higher charge-discharge rate. This result can be explained by the formation of an artificial Ag oxidation film with higher impedance, this lowered the rate capability at high charge-discharge rate due to its low electrical conductivity. Rate capability is improved, however, by coating nickel and silver together on the surface of synthetic graphite. The nickel which is inactive with oxidation reaction plays an important role as a conducting agent which enhanced the conductivity of the electrode

  4. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  5. Surface amplification of pencil graphite electrode with polypyrrole and reduced graphene oxide for fabrication of a guanine/adenine DNA based electrochemical biosensors for determination of didanosine anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi-Maleh, Hassan; Bananezhad, Asma; Ganjali, Mohammad R.; Norouzi, Parviz; Sadrnia, Abdolhossein

    2018-05-01

    Didanosine is nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors with many side effects such as nausea and vomiting, stomach pain, tingling, burning and numbness and determination of this drug is very important in biological samples. This paper presents a DNA biosensor for determination of didanosine (DDI) in pharmaceutical samples. A pencil graphite electrode modified with conductive materials such as polypyrrole (PPy) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) (PGE/PPy/rGO) was used for this goal. The double-stranded DNA was successfully immobilized on PGE/PPy/rGO. The PGE/PPy/rGO was characterized by microscopic and electrochemical methods. Then, the interaction of DDI with DNA was identified by decreases in the oxidation currents of guanine and adenine by differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) method. The dynamic range of DDI identified in the range of 0.02-50.0 μM and this electrode provided a low limit of detection (LOD = 8.0 nM) for DDI. The PGE/PPy/rGO loaded with ds-DNA was utilized for the measurement of DDI in real samples and obtained data were compared with HPLC method. The statistical tests such as F-test and t-test were used for confirming ability of PGE/PPy/rGO loaded with ds-DNA for analysis of DDI in real samples.

  6. Analysis of the deconvolution of the thermoluminescent curve of the zirconium oxide doped with graphite; Analisis de la deconvolucion de la curva termoluminiscente del oxido de zirconio dopado con grafito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas C, P. [IMP, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Estrada G, R. [Depto. de Fisica y Matematicas, UIA, Unidad Stanta Fe, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez M, P.R.; Mendoza A, D. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work, we present a mathematical analysis of the behavior of the thermoluminescent curve (Tl) induced by gamma radiation in samples made of zirconium oxide doped with different amounts of graphite. In accordance with the results gamma radiation induces a Tl curve with two maximum of emission localized in the temperatures at 139 and 250 C, the area under the curve is increasing as a function of the time of exposition to the radiation. The analysis of curve deconvolution, in accordance with the theory which indicates that this behavior must be obey a Boltzmann distribution, we found that each one of them has a different growth velocity as the time of exposition increase. In the same way, we observed that after the irradiation was suspended each one of the maximum decrease with different velocity. The behaviour observed in the samples is very interesting because the zirconium oxide has attracted the interest of many research groups, this material has demonstrated to have many applications in thermoluminescent dosimetry and it can be used in the quantification of radiation. (Author)

  7. Carbon-14 Content of Carbonaceous Deposits in Oldbury Core Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, M.P.; Tzelepi, A.; Gill, J.

    2016-01-01

    Graphite specimens taken from the surface of Magnox reactor core components have been studied by differential thermal oxidation and counting of off-gases to quantify the contribution or otherwise of carbonaceous deposits to the C-14 inventory of the core graphite. While present within the open porosity of the graphite, such deposits formed from polymerization reactions in the CO 2 /CO atmosphere of the reactor and from the decomposition of methane are concentrated predominantly on the outer surfaces of components. An improved understanding of their C-14 content could influence handling of material during decommissioning and could influence treatment options. (author)

  8. QSARs for phenols and phenolates: oxidation potential as a predictor of reaction rate constants with photochemically produced oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A; Oueis, Yan; O'Connor, Meghan; Rinaman, Johanna E; Taggart, Miranda G; McCarthy, Rachel E; Foster, Kimberley A; Latch, Douglas E

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the reaction rate constants of phenols and phenolates with three photochemically produced oxidants, singlet oxygen, carbonate radical, and triplet excited state sensitizers/organic matter, are developed. The predictive variable is the one-electron oxidation potential (E 1 ), which is calculated for each species using density functional theory. The reaction rate constants are obtained from the literature, and for singlet oxygen, are augmented with new experimental data. Calculated E 1 values have a mean unsigned error compared to literature values of 0.04-0.06 V. For singlet oxygen, a single linear QSAR that includes both phenols and phenolates is developed that predicts experimental rate constants, on average, to within a factor of three. Predictions for only 6 out of 87 compounds are off by more than a factor of 10. A more limited data set for carbonate radical reactions with phenols and phenolates also gives a single linear QSAR with prediction of rate constant being accurate to within a factor of three. The data for the reactions of phenols with triplet state sensitizers demonstrate that two sensitizers, 2-acetonaphthone and methylene blue, most closely predict the reactivity trend of triplet excited state organic matter with phenols. Using sensitizers with stronger reduction potentials could lead to overestimation of rate constants and thus underestimation of phenolic pollutant persistence.

  9. Extreme nitrogen deposition can change methane oxidation rate in moist acidic tundra soil in Arctic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Kang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, extreme nitrogen(N) deposition events are observed in Arctic regions where over 90% of the annual N deposition occurred in just a few days. Since Arctic ecosystems are typically N-limited, input of extremely high amount of N could substantially affect ecosystem processes. CH4 is a potent greenhouse gas that has 25 times greater global warming potential than CO2 over a 100-year time frame. Ammonium is known as an inhibitor of methane oxidation and nitrate also shows inhibitory effect on it in temperate ecosystems. However, effects of N addition on Arctic ecosystems are still elusive. We conducted a lab-scale incubation experiment with moist acidic tundra (MAT) soil from Council, Alaska to investigate the effect of extreme N deposition events on methane oxidation. Zero point five % methane was added to the head space to determine the potential methane oxidation rate of MAT soil. Three treatments (NH4NO3-AN, (NH4)2SO4-AS, KNO3-PN) were used to compare effects of ammonium, nitrate and salts. All treatments were added in 3 levels: 10μg N gd.w-1(10), 50μg N gd.w-1(50) and 100μg N gd.w-1(100). AN10 and AN50 increased methane oxidation rate 1.7, 6% respectively. However, AN100 shows -8.5% of inhibitory effect. In AS added samples, all 3 concentrations (AN10, AN50, AN100) stimulated methane oxidation rate with 4.7, 8.9, 4%, respectively. On the contrary, PN50 (-9%) and PN100 (-59.5%) exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. We also analyzed the microbial gene abundance and community structures of methane oxidizing bacteria using a DNA-based fingerprinting method (T-RFLP) Our study results suggest that NH4+ can stimulate methane oxidation in Arctic MAT soil, while NO3- can inhibit methane oxidation significantly.

  10. Adsorption Characteristics of Polyvinyl Alcohols in Solution on Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Yan Pang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite (EG adsorbent was prepared with 50 mesh graphite as raw materials, potassium permanganate as oxidant, and vitriol as intercalation compound. Three kinds of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA with different degree of polymerization (DP in aqueous solution were used as adsorbates. We have studied the influence of initial PVA concentration, temperature and ionic strength on adsorption capacity. Langmuir constants and Gibbs free energy change (⊿G° were calculated according to experimental data respectively. Thermodynamic analysis indicates the equilibrium adsorbance of PVA on EG increase with the rise of SO42– concentration. Adsorption isotherms of PVA with different degree of polymerization are all types and we deduce PVA molecules lie flat on EG surface. Adsorption processes are all spontaneous. Kinetic studies show that the kinetic data can be described by pseudo second-order kinetic model. Second-order rate constants and the initial adsorption rate rise with the increasing of temperature and half-adsorption time decreases with the increasing of temperature. The adsorption activation energy of each PVA is less than 20 kJ•mol−1, physical adsorption is the major mode of the overall adsorption process.

  11. Evaluation of the equivalent dose rates due to neutrons emitted by plutonium oxide sources. Graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouguet, Jackie.

    1975-06-01

    In irradiated fuel processing plants, the personnel concerned with radioprotection often require a rapid estimation of the equivalent dose rates due to neutrons emitted by plutonium oxide sources, sources having different physical and geometrical characteristics. Graphs are presented which facilitate rapid determinations. Graphs enabling the equivalent dose rates to be evaluated in contact with or at some distance from plutonium oxide sources of different geometrical characteristics are presented, the plutonium being obtained from fuels having been irradiated at different burn up in light water power reactors [fr

  12. Rate law of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Yoshiki; Murakami, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive studies on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, the oxidation rate law has not been established under low O2 conditions. The importance of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions has been recently recognized; for instance, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) compositions of paleosols, ancient soils formed by weathering, can produce a quantitative pattern of the atmospheric oxygen increase during the Paleoproterozoic. The effects of partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (PO2) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate were investigated to establish the Fe(II) oxidation rate - PO2 relationships under low O2 conditions. All oxidation experiments were carried out in a glove box by introducing Ar gas at ∼10-5-∼10-4 atm of PO2, pH 7.57-8.09 and 22 °C. Luminol chemiluminescence was adopted to measure low Fe(II) concentrations (down to ∼2 nM). Combining previous data under higher PO2 conditions (10-3-0.2 atm) with the present data, the rate law for Fe(II) oxidation over a wide range of PO2 (10-5-0.2 atm) was found to be written as: d[Fe(II)]/dt=-k[Fe(II)][[]2 where the exponent of [O2], x, and the rate constant, k, change from x = 0.98 (±0.04) and log k = 15.46 (±0.06) at ∼6 × 10-3-0.2 atm of PO2 to x = 0.58 (±0.02) and log k = 13.41 (±0.03) at 10-5-∼6 × 10-3 atm of PO2. The most plausible mechanism that explains the change in x under low O2 conditions is that, instead of O2, oxygen-derived oxidants, H2O2 and to some extent, O2rad -, dominate the oxidation reactions at PO2. The rate law found in the present study requires us to reconsider distributions of Fe redox species at low PO2 in natural environments, especially in paleoweathering profiles, and may provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of atmospheric oxygen in the Precambrian.

  13. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  14. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  15. Zircaloy-oxidation and hydrogen-generation rates in degraded-core accident situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Thomas, G.R.

    1983-02-01

    Oxidation of Zircaloy cladding is the primary source of hydrogen generated during a degraded-core accident. In this paper, reported Zircaloy oxidation rates, either measured at 1500 to 1850 0 C or extrapolated from the low-temperature data obtained at 0 C, are critically reviewed with respect to their applicability to a degraded-core accident situation in which the high-temperature fuel cladding is likely to be exposed to and oxidized in mixtures of hydrogen and depleted steam, rather than in an unlimited flux of pure steam. New results of Zircaloy oxidation measurements in various mixtures of hydrogen and steam are reported for >1500 0 C. The results show significantly smaller oxidation and, hence, hydrogen-generation rates in the mixture, compared with those obtained in pure steam. It is also shown that a significant fraction of hydrogen, generated as a result of Zircaloy oxidation, is dissolved in the cladding material itself, which prevents that portion of hydrogen from reaching the containment building space. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to a more realistic method of quantifying the hydrogen source term for a degraded-core accident analysis

  16. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  17. Effect of cooling rate on achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C.; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2016-02-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the structural changes occurring in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x with y = 0.15; 0.28 and 0.45 during cooling from 1773 K to room-temperature under He + 5% H2 atmosphere. We compare the fastest and slowest cooling rates allowed by our apparatus i.e. 2 K s-1 and 0.005 K s-1, respectively. The promptly cooled samples evidenced a phase separation whereas samples cooled slowly did not due to their complete oxidation in contact with the atmosphere during cooling. Besides the composition of the annealing gas mixture, the cooling rate plays a major role on the control of the Oxygen/Metal ratio (O/M) and then on the crystallographic properties of the U1-yPuyO2-x uranium-plutonium mixed oxides.

  18. Enhancement of the rate of solar photocatalytic mineralization of organic pollutants by inorganic oxidizing species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malato, S.; Blanco, J.; Richter, C.; Braun, B.; Maldonado, M.I. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria PSA, Crta Senes s/n, Tabernas, Almeriav 04200 (Spain)

    1998-08-31

    Particulate suspensions of TiO{sub 2} irradiated with natural solar light in a large experimental plant catalyze the oxidation of a typical organic contaminant: pentachlorophenol (PCP). The addition of oxidants, concentration of which is kept constant during treatment, such as hydrogen peroxide, peroxymonosulphate (oxone) and peroxydisulphate increases the rate of photodegradation of PCP in the following order: S{sub 2}O{sup 2-}{sub 8}->Oxone->H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Peroxydisulphate (10mM), selected as the best oxidant studied, has been applied to the development of a solar photocatalytic plant for the treatment of commercial pesticide rinsates found in the wastewater produced by a pesticide container recycling plant, which includes the correct treatment of this highly contaminating effluent. The first results, without process or hardware optimisation, show that peroxydisulphate enhances the photocatalytic mineralization rate at least five times

  19. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of Micro-Cup-Extrusion Using a Graphit-ic Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microextrusion is becoming increasingly important for the manufacturing of microcomponents. However, this reduction in scale to a microlevel means that the influence of friction and the need for suitable lubrication are greatly increased. This study therefore looks at the use of a low-friction and highly wear resistant Graphit-ic coating on the mold-forming section of a microextrusion mold, this coating being applied by a closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating technique. A microcup of CuZn33 brass alloy was then extruded, with a wall thickness of 0.45 mm, outside diameter of 2.9 mm, and an internal diameter of 2 mm. The experimental results in which extrusion uses the mold coating with Graphit-ic film are compared against the experimental results in which extrusion uses the mold uncoating with Graphit-ic film. This showed that the load was decreased a lot and the self-lubricating solid coating facilitates a smooth extrusion process. As the extrusion rate was quite high, smoothed particle hydrodynamics method simulations of the extrusion process were conducted, these being then compared with the experimental results. These result showed that the SPH simulation can be applied to show the deformation of materials and predict the load trend.

  20. Graphite technology development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-01

    This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

  1. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  2. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  3. Thermal hazard assessment of oxidizer solutions and emulsion explosives utilizing accelerating rate and Dewar calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.E.G.; Lightfoot, P.D.; Fouchard, R.C. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET, Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) and adiabatic Dewar calorimetric experiments were carried out on oxidizers used in the manufacture of emulsion explosives, their aqueous solutions, a bulk explosive matrix and a detonator-sensitive packaged explosive. The experiments were carried out in both closed and vented experimental configurations. The effects of water levels on the oxidizer solutions were investigated and the results obtained by using the two different techniques were compared. The Dewar experiments were found to yield a better direct estimation of bulk onset temperatures due to their greater sensitivity and lower 'phi factor'. Onset temperatures of oxidizer solutions measured using the Dewar calorimeter were found to be about 15 degrees C lower than those measured by ARC. Onset temperatures for the same oxidizer solution are lower for open systems than for closed systems. Results for emulsion explosives appeared complex, but indications are that oxidation of the oil phase in air is the first exothermic step in the runaway reaction. Whether this oxidation reaction can generate enough heat to drive the reaction to runaway, is not clear. Further elucidation of the complex exothermic reactions of emulsion explosives and their constituents, using both ARC and Dewar calorimetric techniques is recommended. 8 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  4. Nickel evaporation in high vacuum and formation of nickel oxide nanoparticles on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franc, Jiří; Bastl, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 516, č. 18 (2008), s. 6095-6103 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400400413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : nickel oxide nanoparticles * vapour deposition * XPS * AFM Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.884, year: 2008

  5. Design Procedure of Graphite Components by ASME HTR Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Jo, Chang Keun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, design procedure for graphite components of HTRs was reviewed and the differences from metal materials were remarked. The Korean VHTR has a prismatic core which is made of multiple graphite blocks, reflectors, and core supports. One of the design issues is the assessment of the structural integrity of the graphite components because the graphite is brittle and shows quite different behaviors from metals in high temperature environment. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the latest edition of the code for the high temperature reactors (HTR) in 2015. In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, Graphite Materials was reviewed and the special features were remarked. Due the brittleness of graphites, the damage-tolerant design procedures different from the conventional metals were adopted based on semi-probabilistic approaches. The unique additional classification, SRC, is allotted to the graphite components and the full 3-D FEM or equivalent stress analysis method is required. In specific conditions, the oxidation and viscoelasticity analysis of material are required. The fatigue damage rule has not been established yet.

  6. Oxidative removal of quinclorac by permanganate through a rate-limiting [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dean; Cheng, Hanyang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Sun, Huiqing; Kong, Fanyu; Liang, Rongning; Qiang, Zhimin; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2018-04-05

    Quinclorac, a widely used herbicide in agriculture, has been recognized as an emerging environmental pollutant owing to its long persistence and potential risk to humans. However, no related information is available on the degradation of quinclorac by employing oxidants. Herein, the reactivity of quinclorac with permanganate was systematically investigated in water by combining experimental and computational approaches. The reaction followed overall second-order kinetics pointing to a bimolecular rate-limiting step. The second-order rate constant was found to be 3.47 × 10-3 M-1 s-1 at 25 °C, which was independent of pH over the range from 5 to 9 and was dependent on temperature over the range from 19 to 35 °C. The initial product was identified by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS to be mono-hydroxylated quinclorac, which was more susceptible to further oxidation. The result could be supported by the complete simulation of the reaction process in DFT calculations, indicating the [3 + 2] cycloaddition oxidation of the benzene ring in the rate-limiting step. The plausible mechanism was then proposed, accompanied by the analysis of the HOMO indicating the hydroxylation position and of the ESP suggesting a more electron-rich moiety. Considering the high effectiveness and low toxicity, permanganate oxidation was considered to be a very promising technique for removing quinclorac from aquatic environments.

  7. Rates of chemical cleavage of DNA and RNA oligomers containing guanine oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Aaron M; Alshykhly, Omar; Zhu, Judy; Muller, James G; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2015-06-15

    The nucleobase guanine in DNA (dG) and RNA (rG) has the lowest standard reduction potential of the bases, rendering it a major site of oxidative damage in these polymers. Mapping the sites at which oxidation occurs in an oligomer via chemical reagents utilizes hot piperidine for cleaving oxidized DNA and aniline (pH 4.5) for cleaving oxidized RNA. In the present studies, a series of time-dependent cleavages of DNA and RNA strands containing various guanine lesions were examined to determine the strand scission rate constants. The guanine base lesions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh), 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z), and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih) were evaluated in piperidine-treated DNA and aniline-treated RNA. These data identified wide variability in the chemical lability of the lesions studied in both DNA and RNA. Further, the rate constants for cleaving lesions in RNA were generally found to be significantly smaller than for lesions in DNA. The OG nucleotides were poorly cleaved in DNA and RNA; Sp nucleotides were slowly cleaved in DNA and did not cleave significantly in RNA; Gh and Z nucleotides cleaved in both DNA and RNA at intermediate rates; and 2Ih oligonucleotides cleaved relatively quickly in both DNA and RNA. The data are compared and contrasted with respect to future experimental design.

  8. The calculation of methane profiles in AGR graphite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Harper, A.

    1981-07-01

    The MEDIC model has been extended in order that it may be applied to experiments carried out in the Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) to measure graphite radiolytic oxidation rates in thick specimens. Three aspects are covered: (a) the extension of the analysis of conventional WAGR nest assemblies to two dimensions rather than the infinite cylinder situation used in current assessments; (b) the examination of the effect of possible paths in WAGR nests; and (c) application of the model to the more complex geometry associated with WAGR inverted nest and rod type assemblies. It is demonstrated that only small errors are introduced into the analysis of WAGR nest data by making the assumption of infinite cylinder geometry. The effect of leakage paths within the nest assembly is also shown to be probably unimportant. (author)

  9. Characterization of Exfoliated Graphite Prepared with the Method of Secondary Intervening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shengtao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliated graphite was prepared with the method of secondary intervening. The results showed that the optimum conditions for the procedure were as follows: mass ratio of nature flake graphite: sulfuric acid: nitric acid: potassium permanganate =1:9:3:0.44 and immersing time in formic acid was 150 minutes. Exfoliated graphite with 300 mL/g exfoliation volume at 900C was obtained. The prepared sample in the best process condition was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA, infrared ray spectrum (IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD. After secondary intervening, the layer distance of expandable graphite was enlarged and the boundary layers were broken. Exfoliated graphite was worm-like and graphite layers were held together at their edges, and the expanded domain had a multilayer structure with many diamond-shaped pores. Sulfuric acid, nitric acid and formic acid were intercalated into graphite, and the decomposition of exfoliated graphite at 900C was mostly derived from graphite intercalation. Crystalline of graphite was damaged because of oxidation intercalation, but the C-C bond was not undermined. Furthermore, oxidation intercalation process and mechanism were discussed.

  10. Parametric Investigation of Rate Enhancement during fast Temperature Cycling of CO Oxidation in Microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Hansen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    and confirm earlier findings of reaction rate enhancements. The enhancement is shown to increase at high frequencies. Varying the conversion and temperature oscillation amplitude is shown to have a large effect on the rate enhancement, and a large interaction between the two parameters is detected......A new microreactor that allows investigation of the effects of temperature oscillations at frequencies 10 times higher than in previous systems is presented. As an example, we investigate CO oxidation over a supported Pt catalyst subjected to a fast forced oscillation of the reactor temperature....... For the best parameter setting, reaction rates 70% higher than during slow steady-state-like oscillations are observed....

  11. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  12. Studies on mechanical properties of graphites for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, T.; Eto, M.; Fujisaki, K.; Yoda, S.; Ishiyama, S.; Sugihara, T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the mechanical properties of HTGR graphites at JAERI is reviewed. The mechanical properties of graphites are required for predicting the stresses induced in the core graphite structures during reactor operation and for evaluating non-failure probabilities of the graphite structures. In this paper, effects of irradiation, stress and oxidation on the mechanical properties and fatigue properties of petroleum coke semi-isotropic and isotropic graphites for HTGRs are primarly described. Young's modulus and bend strength before and after neutron irradiation have been measured to examine irradiation effects on a fracture criterion of graphites. Two kinds of relationships are found between the bend strength and Young's modulus, depending upon the irradiation temperature. Changes in Young's modulus after irradiation are found to be different from those after irradiation creep deformation. Young's modulus under compressive stress is equivalent to that at the onset of unloading. Oxidation gives rise to the decreases in density and modulus, and also brings about a strength degradation. Tension-compression fatigue strengths are obtained and arranged successfully using statistical trivariant method with tension-tension fatigue strength data

  13. Intimately coupled hybrid of graphitic carbon nitride nanoflakelets with reduced graphene oxide for supporting Pd nanoparticles: A stable nanocatalyst with high catalytic activity towards formic acid and methanol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenyao; Yao, Qiushi; Wu, Xiaodong; Fu, Yongsheng; Deng, Kaiming; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Intimately coupled hybrid of g-C 3 N 4 nanoflakelets with rGO is fabricated via an in situ chemical synthesis approach. • The detailed forming process of CNNF-G composite is carefully investigated. • The Pd-CNNF-G composite exhibits exceptional catalytic activity and durability. • The real fuel cells have been assembled to evaluate the performance of the electrocatalysts. • The effects of g-C 3 N 4 nanoflakelets on Pd atom were investigated by DFT computations. - Abstract: A novel nitrogen-rich support material (CNNF-G) consisting of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) nanoflakelets (CNNF) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is designed and fabricated for loading Pd nanoparticles. Structural characterizations indicates that the CNNF is formed via splitting decomposition of the g-C 3 N 4 polymer on rGO at higher temperatures and the resulting CNNF is intimately coupled to the rGO sheets. The CNNF can provide more exposed edge sites and active nitrogen species for the high dispersion of Pd NPs. It is found that the Pd NPs with an average diameter of 3.92 nm are uniformly dispersed on CNNF-G sheets. DFT computations reveal that CNNF can trap Pd adatom and thus act as a Pd nucleation site at which Pd atoms tend to accumulate to form Pd clusters. The Pd-CNNF-G nanocatalyst exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity for both formic acid and methanol oxidation reactions, including large electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) values, significantly high forward peak current densities, and reliable stability and durability, far outperforming the Pd-graphene, commercial activated carbon-supported Pd catalyst or Pd-carbon nanotubes. Such a stable Pd/CNNF-G nanocatalyst may bring new design opportunities for high-performance direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) in the future.

  14. Thermal analysis of thermo-gravimetric measurements of spent nuclear fuel oxidation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed thermal analysis was completed of the sample temperatures in the Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) system used to measure irradiated N Reactor fuel oxidation rates. Sample temperatures during the oxidation process did not show the increase which was postulated as a result of the exothermic reactions. The analysis shows the axial conduction of heat in the sample holder effectively removes the added heat and only a very small, i.e., <10 C, increase in temperature is calculated. A room temperature evaporation test with water showed the sample thermocouple sensitivity to be more than adequate to account for a temperature change of approximately 5 C. Therefore, measured temperatures in the TGA are within approximately 10 C of the actual sample temperatures and no adjustments to reported data to account for the heat input from the oxidation process are necessary

  15. Fiber optical dose rate measurement based on the luminescence of beryllium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a fiber optical dose rate measurement system based on the radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of beryllium oxide. The system consists of a small, radiation sensitive probe which is coupled to a light detection unit with a long and flexible light guide. Exposing the beryllium oxide probe to ionizing radiation results in the emission of light with an intensity which is proportional to the dose rate. Additionally, optically stimulated luminescence can be used to obtain dose and dose rate information during irradiation or retrospectively. The system is capable of real time dose rate measurements in fields of high dose rates and dose rate gradients and in complex, narrow geometries. This enables the application for radiation protection measurements as well as for quality control in radiotherapy. One inherent drawback of fiber optical dosimetry systems is the generation of Cherenkov radiation and luminescence in the light guide itself when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. This so called “stem” effect leads to an additional signal which introduces a deviation in the dose rate measurement and reduces the spatial resolution of the system, hence it has to be removed. The current system uses temporal discrimination of the effect for radioluminescence measurements in pulsed radiation fields and modulated optically stimulated luminescence for continuous irradiation conditions. This work gives an overview of the major results and discusses new-found obstacles of the applied methods of stem discrimination.

  16. Deuterium pumping and erosion behavior of selected graphite materials under high flux plasma bombardment in PISCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion behavior of selected graphite materials have been investigated using the PISCES-A facility. These materials include: Pyro-graphite; 2D-graphite weave; 4D-graphite weave; and POCO-graphite. Deuterium plasma bombardment conditions are: fluxes around 7 /times/ 10 17 ions s/sup /minus/1/cm/sup /minus/2/; exposure time in the range from 10 to 100 s; bombarding energy of 300 eV; and graphite temperatures between 20 and 120/degree/C. To reduce deuterium plasma recycling, several approaches have been investigated. Erosion due to high-fluence helium plasma conditioning significantly increases the surface porosity of POCO-graphite and 4D-graphite weave whereas little change for 2D-graphite weave and Pyro-graphite. The increased pore openings and refreshed in-pore surface sites are found to reduce the deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion rates at transient stages. The steady state recycling rates for these graphite materials can be also correlated to the surface porosity. Surface topographical modification by machined-grooves noticeably reduces the steady state deuterium recycling rate and the impurity emission from the surface. These surface topography effects are attributed to co-deposition of remitted deuterium, chemically sputtered hydrocarbon and physically sputtered carbon under deuterium plasma bombardment. The co-deposited film is found to have a characteristic surface morphology with dendritic microstructures. 18 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Cardiac-Specific Deletion of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Impairs Glucose Oxidation Rates and Induces Diastolic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Keshav; Almutairi, Malak; Al Batran, Rami; Eaton, Farah; Gandhi, Manoj; Ussher, John Reyes

    2018-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) increase the risk for cardiomyopathy, which is the presence of ventricular dysfunction in the absence of underlying coronary artery disease and/or hypertension. As myocardial energy metabolism is altered during obesity/T2D (increased fatty acid oxidation and decreased glucose oxidation), we hypothesized that restricting myocardial glucose oxidation in lean mice devoid of the perturbed metabolic milieu observed in obesity/T2D would produce a cardiomyopathy phenotype, characterized via diastolic dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis via producing mice with a cardiac-specific gene knockout for pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, gene name Pdha1 ), the rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation. Cardiac-specific Pdha1 deficient ( Pdha1 Cardiac-/- ) mice were generated via crossing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre expressing mouse under the control of the alpha-myosin heavy chain (αMHC-MerCreMer) promoter with a floxed Pdha1 mouse. Energy metabolism and cardiac function were assessed via isolated working heart perfusions and ultrasound echocardiography, respectively. Tamoxifen administration produced an ~85% reduction in PDH protein expression in Pdha1 Cardiac-/- mice versus their control littermates, which resulted in a marked reduction in myocardial glucose oxidation and a corresponding increase in palmitate oxidation. This myocardial metabolism profile did not impair systolic function in Pdha1 Cardiac-/- mice, which had comparable left ventricular ejection fractions and fractional shortenings as their αMHC-MerCreMer control littermates, but did produce diastolic dysfunction as seen via the reduced mitral E/A ratio. Therefore, it does appear that forced restriction of glucose oxidation in the hearts of Pdha1 Cardiac-/- mice is sufficient to produce a cardiomyopathy-like phenotype, independent of the perturbed metabolic milieu observed in obesity and/or T2D.

  18. High basal metabolic rate does not elevate oxidative stress during reproduction in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzęk, Paweł; Książek, Aneta; Ołdakowski, Łukasz; Konarzewski, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Increased oxidative stress (OS) has been suggested as a physiological cost of reproduction. However, previous studies reported ambiguous results, with some even showing a reduction of oxidative damage during reproduction. We tested whether the link between reproduction and OS is mediated by basal metabolic rate (BMR), which has been hypothesized to affect both the rate of radical oxygen species production and antioxidative capacity. We studied the effect of reproduction on OS in females of laboratory mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low (L-BMR) BMR, previously shown to differ with respect to parental investment. Non-reproducing L-BMR females showed higher oxidative damage to lipids (quantified as the level of malondialdehyde in internal organ tissues) and DNA (quantified as the level of 8-oxodG in blood serum) than H-BMR females. Reproduction did not affect oxidative damage to lipids in either line; however, it reduced damage to DNA in L-BMR females. Reproduction increased catalase activity in liver (significantly stronger in L-BMR females) and decreased it in kidneys. We conclude that the effect of reproduction on OS depends on the initial variation in BMR and varies between studied internal organs and markers of OS.

  19. Oxidative stress is associated with decreased heart rate variability in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaee, Shannon B; Beetham, Kassia S; Howden, Erin J; Stanton, Tony; Isbel, Nicole M; Coombes, Jeff S

    2017-09-01

    Elevated oxidative stress and reduced heart rate variability (HRV) is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have identified a positive association between elevated oxidative stress and autonomic dysfunction, however this relationship has not yet been investigated in the CKD population. Plasma was collected from 78 patients with stage 3-4 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate 25-60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ) for the assessment of oxidative stress, including plasma total F2-isoprostanes, glutathione peroxidase activity and total antioxidant capacity. Time and frequency HRV parameters were measured from a three lead electrocardiogram. Participants with elevated F2-isoprostanes had reduced HRV compared to patients with normal levels of F2-isoprostanes. A number of HRV parameters were found to be inversely correlated with F2-isoprostanes in all CKD patients, including SDNN (r = -0.337; P stress is significantly and independently associated with HRV in patients with CKD. Identifying oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction may help target therapeutic strategies.

  20. Radiation induced oxidative degradation of polymers—IV. Dose rate effects on chemical and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguchi, T.; Arakawa, K.; Hayakawa, N.; Machi, S.

    The dose rate effects on the radiation induced oxidative degradation of crosslinked polyethylene and ethylene-propylene copolymer was investigated by the tensile property, gel fraction, and dielectric loss tangent. The polymer films crosslinked by chemical agent were irradiated with various dose rates from 5×10 5 to 5×10 3{rad}/{hr} in oxygen under pressure from 5 to 0.2 atm at room temperature. It was found that the degradation at a given dose depends on the dose rate; {Deg}/{r} = k·I {-1}/{3}, where Deg is degradation, r dose, I dose rate, and k constant. For the polymers containing antioxidant the dose rate effects was not observed, then the degradation was only dependent on the total dose.

  1. Graphites for nuclear applications; Les graphites pour les applications nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, J.P.; Gosmain, L. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DMN), Lab. de Microscopie et d' Etudes de l' Endommagement, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-03-15

    Being an excellent neutron moderator, graphite is used as a structural material in many nuclear reactor types. By the end of the 50's, the French gas-cooled reactor development needed manufacturing of a nuclear-grade graphite. Graphite irradiation can lead to in-lattice energy accumulation, dimensional changes and physical properties modification. Moreover, the radiolytic corrosion induced by the coolant (CO{sub 2}) may generate mechanical properties degradation. Today, French gas-cooled reactors are all in their decommissioning phase that requires the knowledge of the radiological inventory of the irradiated graphites. At present time, graphite is still foreseen as a future material for hydrogen production by high temperature gas cooled nuclear plants. In the future, graphite will be the necessary moderator material for high temperature reactors with thermal neutron spectrum dedicated to hydrogen and electricity production. (authors)

  2. Development of image analysis for graphite pore-structure determination using fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, W.J.; Bowden, E.A.T.; Wickham, A.J.

    1983-03-01

    The use of image analysis to assess the pore structure of graphite has been developed to the point at which it may be considered available for routine use. A definitive pore structure in terms of the geometry-independent ''characteristic pore dimension'' is derived from the computer analysis of polished specimens whose open-pore structure has been impregnated with bismuth or a fluorescent epoxy resin, with the very small pores identified separately by mercury porosimetry as in the past. The pore-size distributions obtained from these combined techniques have been used successfully to predict the corrosion rates of nine graphites, of widely differing pore structure, in a variety of gas compositions and, indirectly, to confirm appropriate mean ranges and rate constants for the reaction of the oxidising species in these gas mixtures. The development of the fluorescent-impregnant technique is discussed in detail and its use is justified in preference to ''traditional'' methods. Further possible refinements are discussed, including the eventual aim of obtaining a computer prediction of the future oxidation behaviour of the graphite directly from the image analyser. (author)

  3. Effect of Time Lenght Fermentation to Katsuobushi Oxidation Rate As Fish Flavor Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalia, U.; Rianingsih, L.; Wijayanti, I.

    2018-02-01

    Katsuobushi or dried smoked skipjack had a distinctive flavor and widely used in traditional Japanese cuisine. This study aimed to evaluate the oxidation rate of Katsuobushi with different lenght fermentation. The processing treatment of the product were the differences of fish boiling time (30 min and 60 min) and the lenght of fermentation: 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks. The glutamic acid content, the oxidation rate (thiobarbituric acid and peroxide value) and Total Plate Count of katsuobushi were analyzed statistically using analysis of varians. Significant differences were found among 3 weeks of fermentation compare to 1 weeks fermentation (P < 0.05). The conclusion of this study was katsuobushi with 60 min boiling and 3 weeks fermentation was potential to be developed become basic ingredients for the fish flavor.

  4. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables

  5. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Improvement of oxidation resistance in magnesia-graphite material for casting nozzle; Chuzo nozuru yo maguneshia-kokuen zaishitsu no tai sankasei kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rikimaru, Yasushi.; Iitsuka, Shoji.; Harada, Tsutomu.; Ando, Hideyuki.; Yamato, Tsugio. [Kurosaki Corp., Fukuoka (Japan). Technical Research Center

    1999-08-01

    As for the alumina black lead quality of the material, it knows that loss grows big caused by CaO from steel and the formation of the low melting point material due to the response with the alumina in the refractories at the time of the Ca-Si management steel cast. Because of this, it was exchanged with the AG quality of the material for the nozzle union department that emphasis could specially cut abrasion and corrosion, and the application of the magnesia black lead quality of the material was examined. Slag caused by the disappearance that black lead on the operating side oxidizes and the permeation of the metal were recognized as the improvement in the corrosion though it was recognized when an actual opportunity checked a ceremony nozzle in the Ca-Si management steel while MG quality of the material was applied to the union part. The decline of the durability due to the disappearance that black lead oxidizes from not forming it was recognized on the operating side in the bone material and the steel the low melting point material layer due to the response with the element because a magnesia was high melting point material when a nozzle was usually used for the steel again. (NEDO)

  7. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its application in the C–H activation of amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride, Fe@g-C3N4, has been synthesized by adorning graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) support with iron oxide via non-covalent interaction. The magnetically recyclable catalyst showed excellent reactivity for expeditious C-H activation and cyanation of ...

  8. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  9. Acceleration of the alcohol oxidation rate in rats with aloin, a quinone derivative of Aloe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J H; Cheong, J C; Lee, J Y; Roh, H K; Cha, Y N

    1996-11-08

    Aloe contains abundant aloin, a C-glycoside derivative of anthraquinone. Based on recent reports indicating that the water extract of Aloe enhances the ethanol oxidation rate and also that quinones, in general, have a functional role in elevating the alcohol oxidation rate in vivo, we have attempted to identify the quinone derivative contained in Aloe that could increase the alcohol oxidation rate. Upon oral administration of aloin (300 mg/kg) given 12 hr prior to the administration of alcohol (3.0 g/kg), the blood alcohol area under the curve (AUC) was found to be decreased significantly (by 40%). This was supported by increases in the rates of blood alcohol elimination and the disappearance of alcohol from the body by 45 and 50%, respectively. Analysis of hepatic triglyceride (TG) levels revealed that both the ethanol and the aloin treatment alone significantly increased the TG levels in a comparable manner; however, the level obtained by the combined treatment of aloin and ethanol was not statistically different from that produced by either treatment alone. The levels of serum L-aspartate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (AST) and L-alanine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (ALT) activities were not increased by acute alcohol intoxication, aloin alone, or by the combined treatment of alcohol and aloin. Pretreatments with aloe-emodin, the anthraquinone aglycone of aloin, resulted in a significantly decreased blood alcohol AUC and an increase in the rate of ethanol disappearance. These results suggested that when the aloin localized primarily in the skin of Aloe is ingested, aloe-emodin (the quinone aglycone) may be released, and the released quinone may produce acceleration of the ethanol metabolism rate in vivo.

  10. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  11. Controlling fundamentals in high-energy high-rate pulsed power materials processing of powdered tungsten, titanium aluminides, and copper-graphite composites. Final technical report, 1 Jun 87-31 Aug 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H.L.; Bourell, D.L.; Eliezer, Z.; Weldon, W.F.

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the controlling fundamentals in the high-energy high-rate (1 MJ in 1s) processing of metal powders. This processing utilizes a large electrical current pulse to heat a pressurized powder mass. The current pulse was provided by a homopolar generator. Simple short cylindrical shapes were consolidated so as to minimize tooling costs. Powders were subjected to current densities of 5 kA/cm2 to 25 kA/cm2 under applied pressures ranging from 70 MPa to 500 MPa. Disks with diameters of 25 mm to 70 mm, and thicknesses of 1 mm to 10 mm were consolidated. Densities of 75% to 99% of theoretical values were obtained in powder consolidates of tungsten, titanium aluminides, copper-graphite, and other metal-ceramic composites. Extensive microstructural characterization was performed to follow the changes occuring in the shape and microstructure of the various powders. The processing science has at its foundation the control of the duration of elevated temperature exposure during powder consolidation.

  12. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  13. Fabrication and electrochemical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube/graphite-based electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam, Abdolmajid Bayandori; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Razavi, Taherehsadat; Riahi, Siavash; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Norouzi, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical method for determining the dihydroxybenzene derivatives on glassy carbon (GC) has been developed. In this method, the performance of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/graphite-based electrode, prepared by mixing SWCNTs and graphite powder, was described. The resulting electrode shows an excellent behavior for redox of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DBA). SWCNT/graphite-based electrode presents a significant decrease in the overvoltage for DBA oxidation as well as a dramatic improvement in the reversibility of DBA redox behavior in comparison with graphite-based and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) procedures performed for used SWCNTs

  14. A mass balance model to estimate the rate of composting, methane oxidation and anaerobic digestion in soil covers and shallow waste layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Reza; Obersky, Lizanne; Xie, Sihuang; Clarke, William P

    2017-05-01

    Although CH 4 oxidation in landfill soil covers is widely studied, the extent of composting and CH 4 oxidation in underlying waste layers has been speculated but not measured. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a mass balance model to estimate the simultaneous rates of anaerobic digestion (r AD ), CH 4 oxidation (r OX ) and composting (r COM ) in environments where O 2 penetration is variable and zones of aerobic and anaerobic activity are intermingled. The modelled domain could include, as an example, a soil cover and the underlying shallow waste to a nominated depth. The proposed model was demonstrated on a blend of biogas from three separate known sources of gas representing the three reaction processes: (i) a bottle of laboratory grade 50:50% CH 4 :CO 2 gas representing anaerobic digestion biogas; (ii) an aerated 250mL bottle containing food waste that represented composting activity; and (iii) an aerated 250mL bottle containing non-degradable graphite granules inoculated with methanotrophs and incubated with CH 4 and O 2 to represent methanotrophic activity. CO 2 , CH 4 , O 2 and the stable isotope 13 C-CO 2 were chosen as the components for the mass balance model. The three reaction rates, r (=r AD , r OX , r COM ) were calculated as fitting parameters to the overdetermined set of 4mass balance equations with the net flux of these components from the bottles q (= [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ) as inputs to the model. The coefficient of determination (r 2 ) for observed versus modelled values of r were 1.00, 0.97, 0.98 when the stoichiometry of each reaction was based on gas yields measured in the individual bottles and q was calculated by summing yields from the three bottles. r 2 deteriorated to 0.95, 0.96, 0.87 when using an average stoichiometry from 11 incubations of each of the composting and methane oxidation processes. The significant deterioration in the estimation of r

  15. Mode II interlaminar fracture of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, L. A.; Gillespie, J. W.; Trethewey, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The end notched flexure (ENF) specimen is employed in an investigation of the interlaminar fracture toughness in Mode II (skew symmetric shear) loading of unidirectional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites. Important experimental parameters such as the influence of precracking and the data reduction scheme for the Mode II toughness are discussed. Nonlinear load-deflection response is significant for the tough thermoplastic resin composite but is also present for the brittle thermoset composite. The observed nonlinearities, which are highly rate dependent, are attributed to a combination of slow stable crack growth preceding unstable crack growth and material inelastic behavior in the process zone around the crack tip.

  16. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  17. Dose rate effect on radiation-induced oxidation of polyethylene and ethylene-propylene copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, K.; Seguchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Hayakawa, N.; Kuriyama, I.; Machi, S.

    1981-01-01

    Polyethylene in powder form and films and ethylene-propylene copolymer were evacuated in a glass tube equipped with a break-off seal and filled with pure oxygen at various pressures. They were then irradiated by Co-60 γ ray up to 2.0 x 10 7 rad with a dose rate of 1.4 x 10 3 -2 x 10 6 rad/h. To eliminate oxygen-diffusion-controlled reaction, the measurements were conducted under various oxygen pressures. The amounts of consumed oxygen and evolved gases were measured by gas chromatography and the oxidative products formed in the polymer were measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The oxidative degradation was examined by the changes in gel fraction of the samples which had been cross-linked by radiation. The G values of oxygen consumption and carbonyl group were found to be not dependent on the total dose and oxygen pressure. The decrease in gel fraction and the evolution of oxidative gases such as CO 2 , CO, and H 2 O during irradiation indicated main-chain scission. A detailed discussion on the mechanism of radiation-induced oxidation is presented

  18. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  19. Rules for design of nuclear graphite core components - some considerations and approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Stilwell, T.C.; Zudans, Z.

    1977-01-01

    In the High Temperature Gas reactor (HTGR) core a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. This paper discusses the attendant difficulties, and presents some approaches, for ASME code safety-consistent design and analysis. The statistical scatter of material properties, which complicates even the definitions of allowable stress, as well as the brittle, anisotropic, inhomogeneous nature of the graphite was considered. It was found that analytic statistical methods used to arrive at a definition of minimum ultimate strength were totally unrealistic It was concluded on the basis of presently available evidence that the distinctions between secondary and primary stresses are inappropriate to graphite structures. The proposed overall design criteria and stress limits for graphite structure were reviewed. The use of the homologous stress concept is graphite fatigue calculations was reviewed. The overall design philosophy for brittle materials is applied to HTGR core structure design including such areas as graphite oxidation, component proof tests, experimental seismic modeling and fracture analysis. (Auth.)

  20. Modelling deformation and fracture of Gilsocarbon graphite subject to service environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šavija, Branko; Smith, Gillian E.; Heard, Peter J.; Sarakinou, Eleni; Darnbrough, James E.; Hallam, Keith R.; Schlangen, Erik; Flewitt, Peter E. J.

    2018-02-01

    Commercial graphites are used for a wide range of applications. For example, Gilsocarbon graphite is used within the reactor core of advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs, UK) as a moderator. In service, the mechanical properties of the graphite are changed as a result of neutron irradiation induced defects and porosity arising from radiolytic oxidation. In this paper, we discuss measurements undertaken of mechanical properties at the micro-length-scale for virgin and irradiated graphite. These data provide the necessary inputs to an experimentally-informed model that predicts the deformation and fracture properties of Gilsocarbon graphite at the centimetre length-scale, which is commensurate with laboratory test specimen data. The model predictions provide an improved understanding of how the mechanical properties and fracture characteristics of this type of graphite change as a result of exposure to the reactor service environment.

  1. High rate deposition of transparent conducting oxide thin films by vacuum arc plasma evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Ida, Satoshi; Miyata, Toshihiro

    2002-09-02

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films have been deposited at a high rate above 370 nm/min by vacuum arc plasma evaporation (VAPE) using sintered oxide fragments as the source material. It was found that the deposition rate of TCO films was strongly dependent on the deposition pressure, whereas the obtained electrical properties were relatively independent of the pressure. Resistivities of 5.6x10{sup -4} and 2.3x10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm and an average transmittance above 80% (with substrate included) in the visible range were obtained in Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films deposited at 100 and 350 deg. C, respectively. In addition, a resistivity as low as 1.4x10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm and an average transmittance above 80% were also obtained in indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films deposited at 300 deg. C. The deposited TCO films exhibited uniform distributions of resistivity and thickness on large area substrates.

  2. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of KPb{sub 4−x}Ca{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5) for oxidation of cadmium at graphite electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahrich, Sara [Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire de Chimie et Modélisation Mathématique, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire Sciences des Matériaux, des Milieux et de la Modélisation, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco); Manoun, Bouchaib [Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire Sciences des Matériaux, des Milieux et de la Modélisation, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco); El Mhammedi, Moulay Abderrahim, E-mail: elmhammedi@yahoo.fr [Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire de Chimie et Modélisation Mathématique, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco)

    2017-02-15

    Chemically modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) for cadmium (II) analysis has been constructed by mixing KPb{sub 4−x}Ca{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5) (CaLA) and graphite powder. The lacunar apatite was synthesized using solid reaction and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The refinement study was carried out using Rietveld method where the obtained results show a good agreement between the observed and calculated patterns. The detection of cadmium (II) was investigated in acetate buffer (pH 4.5) using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The limit of detection obtained under the optimized experimental conditions was 5.35 × 10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1} with a relative standard deviation of 2.37%. Possible interferences were tested and evaluated in 5.0 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} cadmium (II) in the presence of other inorganic ions. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine cadmium (II) in seawater and mussel samples. Hence, the satisfactory results confirm the applicability of this sensor in practical analysis. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of new lacunar apatites KPb{sub 4−x}Ca{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5). • Structural refinement of these compounds using Rietveld method. • A study of Ca doping effect in lacunar apatites for detecting Cd (II). • The electrochemical oxidation of Cd (II) was performed at CaLA-CPE using DPASV. • The proposed method was evaluated to detect cadmium in seawater and mussel samples.

  3. Macroscopic Properties of Restacked, Redox-Liquid Exfoliated Graphite and Graphite Mimics Produced in Bulk Quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL; Dunlap, John R [ORNL; Nelson, Kimberly M [ORNL; Duranty, Edward R [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The excellent properties exhibited by monolayer graphene have spurred the development of exfoliation techniques using bulk graphite to produce large quantities of pristine monolayer sheets. Development of simple chemistry to exfoliate and intercalate graphite and graphite mimics in large quantities is required for numerous applications. To determine the macroscopic behavior of restacked, exfoliated bulk materials, a systematic approach is presented using a simple, redox-liquid sonication process along to obtain large quantities of 2D and 3D hexagonally layered graphite, molybdenum disulfi de, and boron nitride, which are subsequently characterized to observe chemical and structural changes. For MoS 2 sonicated with the antioxidant sodium bisulfi te, results from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy indicate the presence of distorted phases from different polymorphs, and apparent nanotube structures in the bulk, restacked powder. Furthermore, using thermograviemtric analysis, the antioxidant enhances the resistance to oxidative degradation of MoS 2 , upon thermal treatment up to 900 C. The addition of the ionic antioxidant decreased dispersion stability in non-polar solvent, suggesting decreased compatibility with non-polar systems. Using simple chemical methods, the ability to generate tailored multidimensional layered materials with unique macroscopic properties is critical for numerous applications, including electrical devices, reinforced polymer composites, lithium ion capacitors, and chemical sensing.

  4. Assessment of management modes for graphite from reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, I.F.; Smith, G.M.; Saunders, L.J.; Kaye, C.J.; Martin, T.J.; Clarke, G.H.; Wakerley, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A technological and radiological assessment has been made of the management options for irradiated graphite wastes from the decommissioning of Magnox and advanced gas-cooled reactors. Detailed radionuclide inventories have been estimated, the main contribution being from activation of the graphite and its stable impurities. Three different packaging methods for graphite have been described; each could be used for either sea or land disposal, is logistically feasible and could be achieved at reasonable cost. Leaching tests have been carried out on small samples of irradiated graphite under a variety of conditions including those of the deep ocean bed; the different conditions had little effect on the observed leach rates of radiologically significant radionuclides. Radiological assessments were made of four generic options for disposal of packaged graphite: on the deep ocean bed, in deep geologic repositories at two different types of site, and by shallow land burial. Incineration of graphite was also considered, though this option presents logistical problems. With appropriate precautions during the lifetime of the Cobalt-60 content of the graphite, any of the options considered could give acceptably low doses to individuals, and all would merit further investigation in site-specific contexts

  5. Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

    2008-06-10

    Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC

  6. Comparison of labeled tracer methods to measure methane oxidation rates in the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Susan; Heintz, Monica; Blees, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The ocean is generally considered a minor source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Macro-seepage from geological sources at the seafloor is suggested to contribute the most from all of the oceanic sources, about 25 Tg CH4/yr to the atmospheric CH4 budget (4% of total sources), whereas the open ocean contributes only 0.4 Tg CH4/yr (0.07% of total sources). However, most source estimates lack certainty due to a limited knowledge of the fate of CH4 in the water column. CH4 in the water column is mainly influenced by turbulent mixing, a process that spreads and dilutes CH4, and microbial oxidation, the only process that limits the fraction of CH4 in the water column and thus the fraction of CH4 escaping into the atmosphere. Unfortunately, measurements of the rate of microbial oxidation are still rare. Only a few attempts have been made to quantify CH4 oxidation in the water column. CH4 oxidation rates were either measured indirectly by correlation with tracers such as 3He, 222Rn, CFC11 or directly by using 14CH4 or C3H4-labeling/incubation techniques. A comparison of the two labeling/incubation techniques will be presented. The ease of use, time series experiments, kinetic experiments, and the effect of incubation temperature will be discussed and water column profiles compared. Our results indicate similar depth-profiles of turnover times using the two different labeled tracers. However, the data sets are offset. More rapid turnover times were measured using C3H4 and slower turnover of CH4 was found using 14CH4.

  7. Graphitic packing removal tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  8. Effect of pressure on the transient swelling rate of oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, E.E.

    1982-04-01

    An analysis of the transient swelling rate of oxide fuel, based on fission-gas bubble conditions calculated with the FRAS3 code, has been developed and implemented in the code. The need for this capability arises in the coupling of the FRAS3 fission-gas analysis code to the FPIN fuel-pin mechanics code. An efficient means of closely coupling the calculations of swelling strains and stresses between the modules is required. The present analysis provides parameters that allow the FPIN calculation to proceed through a fairly large time step, using estimated swelling rates, to calculate the stresses. These stress values can then be applied in the FRAS3 detailed calculation to refine the swelling calculation, and to provide new values for the parameters to estimate the swelling in the next time step. The swelling rates were calculated for two representative transients and used to estimate swelling over a short time period for various stress levels

  9. Studies of the role of molten materials in interactions with UO2 and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Heiberger, J.J.; Leibowitz, L.

    1979-01-01

    Graphite, which is being considered as a lower reactor shield in gas-cooled fast reactors, would be contacted by core debris during a core disruptive accident. Information on the interaction of graphite, UO 2 , and stainless steel is needed in assessing the safety of the GCFR. In an ongoing study of the interaction of graphite, UO 2 , and stainless steel, the effects of the steel components have been investigated by electron microprobe scans, x-ray diffraction, and reaction-rate measurements. Experiments to study the role of the reaction product, FeUC 2 , in the interaction suggested that FeUC 2 promotes the interaction by acting as a carrier to bring graphite to the reaction site. Additional experiments using pyrolytic graphite show that while the reaction rate is decreased at 2400 K, at higher temperatures the rate is similar to that using other grades of graphite

  10. Graphite fluoride fibers and their applications in the space industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1990-01-01

    Characterization and potential space applications of graphite fluoride fibers from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers are presented. Graphite fluoride fibers with fluorine to carbon ratios of 0.65 and 0.68 were found to have electrical resistivity values of 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 11) Ohms-cm, respectively, and thermal conductivity values of 24 and 5 W/m-K, respectively. At this fluorine content range, the fibers have tensile strength of 0.25 + or - 0.10 GPa (36 + or - 14 ksi), Young's modulus of 170 + or - 30 GPa (25 + or - 5 Msi). The coefficient of thermal expansion value of a sample with fluorine to carbon ratio of 0.61 was found to be 7 ppm/C. These properties change and approach the graphite value as the fluorine content approach 0. Electrically insulative graphite fluoride fiber is at least five times more thermally conductive than fiberglass. Therefore, it can be used as a heat sinking printed circuit board material for low temperature, long life power electronics in spacecraft. Also, partially fluorinated fiber with tailor-made physical properties to meet the requirements of certain engineering design can be produced. For example, a partially fluorinated fiber could have a predetermined CTE value in -1.5 to 7 ppm/C range and would be suitable for use in solar concentrators in solar dynamic power systems. It could also have a predetermined electrical resistivity value suitable for use as a low observable material. Experimental data indicate that slightly fluorinated graphite fibers are more durable in the atomic oxygen environment than pristine graphite. Therefore, fluorination of graphite used in the construction of spacecraft that would be exposed to the low Earth orbit atomic oxygen may protect defect sites in atomic oxygen protective coatings and therefore decrease the rate of degradation of graphite.

  11. Radical coupling of maleic anhydride onto graphite to fabricate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transmission electron microscopy images showed graphite as transparent layers while after modification, surface of nanolayers became folded due to the opposite effects of π-conjugated domains and electrostatic repulsion of oxygen-containing groups. Keywords. Graphene oxide; chemical synthesis; maleic anhydride; ...

  12. Reaction rate constants and mean population percentage for nitrifiers in an alternating oxidation ditch system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantziaras, I D; Katsiri, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the determination of reaction rate constants for nitrifying bacteria and their mean population percentage in biomass in an alternating oxidation ditch system. The method used is based on the growth rate equations of the ASM1 model (IWA) (Henze et al. in Activated sludge models ASM1, ASM2, ASM2d, and ASM3. IWA Scientific and Technical Report no. 9, IWA Publishing, London, UK, 2000) and the application of mass balance equations for nitrifiers and ammonium nitrogen in an operational cycle of the ditch system. The system consists of two ditches operating in four phases. Data from a large-scale oxidation ditch pilot plant with a total volume of 120 m(3) within an experimental period of 8 months was used. Maximum specific growth rate for autotrophs (μ(A)) and the half-saturation constant for ammonium nitrogen (K(NH)) were found to be 0.36 day(-1) and 0.65 mgNH(4)-N/l, respectively. Additionally, the average population percentage of the nitrifiers in the biomass was estimated to be around 3%.

  13. Effect of material and environmental factors on FAC rate and on characteristics of oxide film of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yutaka; Abe, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Combined effects of Cr content and pH on corrosion rate of carbon steels due to flow accelerated corrosion have been examined by experiments and their relation to oxide scale characteristics based on detailed oxide layer characterizations using transmission electron microscope with X-ray analyzer have been discussed. Effect of Cr content on FAC mitigation decrease continuously as pH is increased from neutral to 10.4 and effect of pH on that increase significantly from pH 9.1 to 9.4. Obvious Cr enrichment has been observed in the oxide layer of 1.01 wt % Cr content steel regardless pH condition. Cr concentration is highest at top surface of oxide layer, and that decrease from surface to oxide / metal interface gradually. It has been suggested that Cr enrichment stabilize oxide layer (decrease solubility and defect density of oxide layer), as a result, FAC suppressed. (author)

  14. Heat and mass transfer analysis for paraffin/nitrous oxide burning rate in hybrid propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Basat (Sisi), Shani; Gany, Alon

    2016-03-01

    This research presents a physical-mathematical model for the combustion of liquefying fuels in hybrid combustors, accounting for blowing effect on the heat transfer. A particular attention is given to a paraffin/nitrous oxide hybrid system. The use of a paraffin fuel in hybrid propulsion has been considered because of its much higher regression rate enabling significantly higher thrust compared to that of common polymeric fuels. The model predicts the overall regression rate (melting rate) of the fuel and the different mechanisms involved, including evaporation, entrainment of droplets of molten material, and mass loss due to melt flow on the condensed fuel surface. Prediction of the thickness and velocity of the liquid (melt) layer formed at the surface during combustion was done as well. Applying the model for an oxidizer mass flux of 45 kg/(s m2) as an example representing experimental range, it was found that 21% of the molten liquid undergoes evaporation, 30% enters the gas flow by the entrainment mechanism, and 49% reaches the end of the combustion chamber as a flowing liquid layer. When increasing the oxidizer mass flux in the port, the effect of entrainment increases while that of the flowing liquid layer along the surface shows a relatively lower contribution. Yet, the latter is predicted to have a significant contribution to the overall mass loss. In practical applications it may cause reduced combustion efficiency and should be taken into account in the motor design, e.g., by reinforcing the paraffin fuel with different additives. The model predictions have been compared to experimental results revealing good agreement.

  15. Relationship between turnover rate and oxidation rate of alanine in the post-absorptive state and during parenteral nutrition before and after surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauerwein, H. P.; Michels, R. P.; Cejka, V.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of total parenteral nutrition and stomach resection on alanine turnover rate and alanine oxidation rate was measured in ten patients after single injection of U-14 C-alanine. Sequential studies were done in three patients. During parenteral nutrition alanine turnover was significantly

  16. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  17. Development of Nanoscale Graphitic Devices and The Transport Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, Venugopal

    2011-02-01

    This dissertation describes the development of graphitic based nanoscale devices with its fabrication and transport characterization results. It covers graphite nano-scale stacked-junctions fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) 3-D etching technique, a single layer graphite layer (graphene) preparation and its electrical transport characterization results and the synthesis and investigation of electrical transport behavior of graphene oxide based thin film devices. The first chapter describes the basic information about the carbon family in detail in which the electronic properties and structure of graphite, graphene and graphene oxide are discussed. In addition, the necessity of developing nanoscale graphitic devices is given. The second chapter explains the experimental techniques used in this research for fabricating nanoscale devices which includes focused ion beam 3-D fabrication procedures, mechanical exfoliation technique and photolithographic methods. In third chapter, we have reported the results on temperature dependence of graphite planar-type structures fabricated along ab-plane. In the fourth and fifth chapters, the fabrication and electrical transport characteristics of large in-plane area graphite planar-type structures (fabricated along ab-plane and c-axis) were discussed and their transport anisotropy properties were investigated briefly. In the sixth chapter, we focused the fabrication of the submicron sized graphite stacked junctions and their electrical transport characterization studies. In which, FIB was used to fabricated the submicron junctions with various in-plane area (with same stack height) are and their transport characteristics were compared. The seventh chapter reports investigation of electrical transport results of nanoscale graphite stacked-junctions in which the temperature dependent transport (R-T) studies, current-voltage measurements for the various in-plane areas and for various stack height samples were analyzed. The

  18. Determination of chlorine in graphite by combustion-ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lianzhong; Watanabe, Kazuo; Itoh, Mitsuo.

    1995-09-01

    A combustion/ion chromatographic method has been studied for the sensitive determination of chlorine in graphite. A graphite sample was burnt at 900degC in a silica reaction tube at an oxygen flow rate of 200 ml/min. Chlorine evolved was absorbed in 20 ml of a 0.1 mM sodium carbonate solution. The solution was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved with a small volume of water. Chlorine in the solution was determined using ion chromatography. The method was applied to JAERI graphite certified reference materials and practical graphite materials. The detection limit was about 0.8 μgCl/g for a 2.0 g sample. The precision was about 2.5% (relative standard deviation) for samples with chlorine content of 70 μg/g level. The method is also usable for coal samples. (author)

  19. Li4Ti5O12-coated graphite anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Meng-Lun; Li, Yu Han; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Ming; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Shih, Han C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Nano-sized Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 (LTO)-coated graphite core–shell prepared by sol–gel process. • LTO-coated graphite is used in Li-ion battery to improve the cycle life under 55 °C. • Graphite coated with LTO shows smaller resistance than graphite after cell cycling. • The LTO coating suppress the disorder of SP 2 structure in graphite during cycling. • Resistance and structure stabilization results in good cycle life of the Li-ion cell. - Abstract: In this study, we synthesized and characterized Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 (LTO)-coated graphite as an anode material for Li-batteries. The surface of graphite powders was uniformly coated by the LTO nanoparticles to form a core–shelled structure via a sol–gel process, followed by calcination. The average size of graphite core was 20 μm while the thickness of LTO shell was 60 nm to 100 nm. We found that LTO-coated graphite has better rate-capability and cycle life at RT and 55 °C, compared with the pristine graphite. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results of the cell with LTO-coated graphite anode showed a significant suppression of the impedance rise after 60 cycles. In addition, the Raman spectrum showed that after 60 charge–discharge cycles at 55 °C, the I D /I G ratio of the LTO-coated graphite electrode increased slightly, while that of the pristine graphite electrode increased significantly. The batteries with LTO-coated graphite anode exhibited excellent cyclic ability and high temperature performance

  20. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Spark Plasma Sintered Fe-Based Bulk Metallic Glass/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulin Ji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glass (BMG and BMG-graphite composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering at the sintering temperature of 575 °C and holding time of 15 min. The sintered composites exhibited partial crystallization and the presence of distributed porosity and graphite particles. The effect of graphite reinforcement on the tribological properties of the BMG/graphite composites was investigated using dry ball-on-disc sliding wear tests. The reinforcement of graphite resulted in a reduction in both the wear rate and the coefficient of friction as compared to monolithic BMG samples. The wear surfaces of BMG/graphite composites showed regions of localized wear loss due to microcracking and fracture, as was also the case with the regions covered with graphite-rich protective film due to smearing of pulled off graphite particles.

  1. Optimization of synthesis and peptization steps to obtain iron oxide nanoparticles with high energy dissipation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérida, Fernando [Deparment of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, P.O. Box 9046, Mayagüez, PR 00680 (United States); Chiu-Lam, Andreina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116005, Gainesville, FL 32611-6005 (United States); Bohórquez, Ana C. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States); Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116005, Gainesville, FL 32611-6005 (United States); Pérez, María-Eglée; Pericchi, Luis [Department of Mathematics, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, P.O. Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Torres-Lugo, Madeline [Deparment of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, P.O. Box 9046, Mayagüez, PR 00680 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116005, Gainesville, FL 32611-6005 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, P.O. Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) uses heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles exposed to alternating magnetic fields to cause a temperature increase in tumors to the hyperthermia range (43–47 °C), inducing apoptotic cancer cell death. As with all cancer nanomedicines, one of the most significant challenges with MFH is achieving high nanoparticle accumulation at the tumor site. This motivates development of synthesis strategies that maximize the rate of energy dissipation of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles, preferable due to their intrinsic biocompatibility. This has led to development of synthesis strategies that, although attractive from the point of view of chemical elegance, may not be suitable for scale-up to quantities necessary for clinical use. On the other hand, to date the aqueous co-precipitation synthesis, which readily yields gram quantities of nanoparticles, has only been reported to yield sufficiently high specific absorption rates after laborious size selective fractionation. This work focuses on improvements to the aqueous co-precipitation of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the specific absorption rate (SAR), by optimizing synthesis conditions and the subsequent peptization step. Heating efficiencies up to 1048 W/g{sub Fe} (36.5 kA/m, 341 kHz; ILP=2.3 nH m{sup 2} kg{sup −1}) were obtained, which represent one of the highest values reported for iron oxide particles synthesized by co-precipitation without size-selective fractionation. Furthermore, particles reached SAR values of up to 719 W/g{sub Fe} (36.5 kA/m, 341 kHz; ILP=1.6 nH m{sup 2} kg{sup −1}) when in a solid matrix, demonstrating they were capable of significant rates of energy dissipation even when restricted from physical rotation. Reduction in energy dissipation rate due to immobilization has been identified as an obstacle to clinical translation of MFH. Hence, particles obtained with the conditions reported here have great potential for application in nanoscale thermal

  2. Combination Carbon Nanotubes with Graphene Modified Natural Graphite and Its Electrochemical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Ling-feng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The CNTs/rGO/NG composite lithiumion battery anode material was synthesized by thermal reducing, using graphene oxide (GO and carbon nanotubes (CNTs as precursors for a 5 ∶ 3 proportion. The morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance of the composite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM, X-ray diffractometry(XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR and electrochemical measurements. The results show that reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes form a perfect three-dimensional network structure on the surface of natural graphite. CNTs/rGO/NG composite has good rate performance and cycle life,compared with pure natural graphite.The initial discharge capacity of designed anode is 479mAh/g at 0.1C, the reversible capacity up to 473mAh/g after 100 cycles,the capacity is still 439.5mAh/g, the capacity retention rate is 92%,and the capacity is 457, 433, 394mAh/g at 0.5, 1, 5C, respectively.

  3. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  4. Dose Rate Effects on The Radiation Oxidation of Polyethylene: Electron Beam vs Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucitano, A.

    2006-01-01

    The yields and spatial distribution of the oxidation products stemming from the oxidation of LLPE films induced by 60-Co gamma and by irradiation with 300 kev, 0.3 mA electrons in the dose range 0.04 kGy/h - 0.6 kGy/h (gamma) and at 1.5 kGy/hr ( e-beam) have been determined by applying a methodology involving FTIR microscopy (carbonyl products, resolution 10 μ), iodometric analysis (peroxides). The FTIR and EPR spectroscopies coupled with the multilayer technique (resolution 25 μ) were also employed for carrying on measurements of the film depth profiles of peroxyl radicals and their alky radicals precursors, radical decay kinetics, 'free' and ' bound' hydroperoxides and alcools. With gamma radiations the products yields are enhanced following the decrease of the dose rate from 0.7 to 0.04 kGy/h without substantial effect on the film depth distributions which appear rather uniform. Using e-beam (dose rate 1.5 kGy/h) a low level concentration limit is attained confined within the first 50 μ which is about 1 order of magnitude smaller as compared to gamma. The mechanistic implications inherent to the experimental results as well as the practical consequences related to the use of radiooxidation as a tool for inducing graft copolymerization reactions are discussed

  5. New Measurements of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) Photolysis Rates and Their Relevance to Global Oxidative Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, J.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Mellouki, A.; Fischer, E. V.; Kukui, A.; Véronique, D.; Ait-helal, W.; Leglise, J.; Ren, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is one of the most abundant ketones in the atmosphere. MEK can be emitted directly into the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources, and it is also formed during the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). MEK is lost via reaction with OH, photolysis and deposition to the surface. Similar to the other atmospheric ketones, the photolysis of MEK may represent a source of HOx (OH + HO2) radicals in the upper troposphere. The degradation of MEK also leads to the atmospheric formation of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. This work presents a new analysis of the temperature dependence of MEK photolysis cross-sections and a quantification of MEK photolysis rates under surface pressures using the CNRS HELIOS outdoor atmospheric chamber (Chambre de simulation atmosphérique à irradiation naturelle d'Orléans; http://www.era-orleans.org/ERA-TOOLS/helios-project.html). Additionally, we use the GEOS-Chem 3-D CTM (version 10-01, www.geos-chem.org) to investigate the impact of these newly measured rates and cross-sections on the global distribution and seasonality of MEK, as well as its importance to the tropospheric oxidative capacity.

  6. Facile one-pot synthesis of cerium oxide/sulfur-doped graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as efficient nanophotocatalysts under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourshabani, Milad; Shariatinia, Zahra; Badiei, Alireza

    2017-12-01

    Porous CeO 2 /sulfur-doped g-C 3 N 4 (CeO 2 /CNS) composites were synthesized by one-pot thermal condensation of thiourea and cerium nitrate as starting materials. The obtained CeO 2 (x)/CNS composites (x=8.4, 9.5 and 10.4wt%) with different CeO 2 contents were characterized by the XRD, FT-IR, XPS, TEM, BET, DRS and PL analyses. The TEM images displayed a nonporous and platelet-like morphology for pure CNS but a nanoporous structure with numerous uniform pore sizes of ∼40nm for the CeO 2 (9.5)/CNS composite. The XRD phase structures and TEM morphologies confirmed that structural evolution trend and stacking degree of CNS were disrupted in precense of the CeO 2 nanoparticles. The optimized photocatalyst, i.e. CeO 2 (9.5)/CNS nanocomposite, exhibited the highest visible light photocatalytic activity (91.4% after 150min) with a reaction rate constant of 0.0152min -1 toward methylene blue (MB) degradation which was greater compared with the individual CNS (0.0044min -1 ) and CeO 2 (0.0031min -1 ) photocatalysts. This enhanced photocatalytic performance was originated from heterojunctions formed between CeO 2 and CNS that improved the effective charge transfer through interfacial interactions between both components. The heterojunction prepared displayed excellent stability for the photocatalytic activity under the optimized conditions including catalyst dosage 0.08g, initial dye concentration 7mg/L and irradiation time 150min which was obtained using response surface methodology (RSM). The trapping experiments using isopropanol, benzoquinone and ethylenediaminetetraacetic as the OH, O 2 - and h + scavengers, respectively, verified that the OH and O 2 - as major species directly attacked onto the MB molecules while h + showed a negligible role. Finally, it could be stated that simultaneous doping of both sulfur and CeO 2 within the g-C 3 N 4 structure using a simple one-pot synthetic process produced very active photocatalysts illustrating their potential for

  7. The diffusion of Ag in the graphitic matrices A3-3 and A3-27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, E.

    1994-01-01

    Ag-110m contributes significantly to the plate-out activity in the coolant circuit of pebble bed reactors. The diffusion coefficient in graphitic matrices is needed to estimate the core release rate. The diffusion of Ag-110m in original, oxidized and fast neutron irradiated graphitic Matrix A3-3 and in original A3-27 was studied in vacuum by measuring the release kinetics from cylindrical specimens. The latter were previously doped with carrier-free Ag-110m at 1000 C. Concentration profiles were measured after the release of a part of the Ag-110m present initially. The release kinetics and the concentration profiles satisfied Ficks second law. In the temperature range of 800-1300 C at Ag concentrations < 4 appm the diffusion coefficient data are given. Oxidation of A3-3 accelerated the Ag migration. Ag-110m was found to be strongly enriched in the binder carbon which links the graphite grains in the matrix. (orig./HP)

  8. Spectroscopical determination of impurities in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.; Tognini, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for the direct determination of B, Cd, Si, Hg, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni, Al, Mo, Ti, Sr, Na, Zn, and As in nuclear grade graphite is described. A 9:1 ratio of graphite to copper difluoride is used in the preparation of samples and standards. The excitation is carried out in a d-c at 10 amperes. The copper fluoride used as spectrographic buffer serves to increase the volatilization rate of the impurities and to diminish the differences in the nature of the analytical and calibration samples. The relative standard deviations for the determination of the 16 trace elements, except Sr, Fe, Cd, Al and Si, are in the range of 8 - 20% in their appropriate calibration levels. For the latter five elements they are approximately 20-40%

  9. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  10. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  11. Study on wear resistance of vanadium alloying compacted/vermicular graphite cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yoon Woo

    1987-01-01

    Wear resistance of the Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast irons was studied by changing the vanadium content in the cast irons. The results obtained in this work are summarized as follows. 1. When the same amount of vanadium was added to the flake graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphitecast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphite cast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron wear resistance decreased in following sequence, that is, flake graphite cast iron> spheroidal graphite cast iron>Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron. 2. Addition of vanadium to the Compacted/Vermicular cast iron leaded to a remarkable increase in hardness because it made the amount of pearlite in matrix increase. 3. Addition of vanadium to the compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron significantly enhanced wear resistance and the maximum resistance was achieved at about 0.36% vanadium. 4. The maximum amount of wear apppeared at sliding speed of about 1.4m/sec and wear mode was considered to be oxidation abrasion from the observation of wear tracks. (Author)

  12. Graphite reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.; Cogne, F.

    1964-01-01

    The study of graphite-natural uranium power reactor physics, undertaken ten years ago when the Marcoule piles were built, has continued to keep in step with the development of this type of pile. From 1960 onwards the critical facility Marius has been available for a systematic study of the properties of lattices as a function of their pitch, of fuel geometry and of the diameter of cooling channels. This study has covered a very wide field: lattice pitch varying from 19 to 38 cm. uranium rods and tubes of cross-sections from 6 to 35 cm 2 , channels with diameters between 70 and 140 mm. The lattice calculation methods could thus be checked and where necessary adapted. The running of the Marcoule piles and the experiments carried out on them during the last few years have supplied valuable information on the overall evolution of the neutronic properties of the fuel as a function of irradiation. More detailed experiments have also been performed in Marius with plutonium-containing fuels (irradiated or synthetic fuels), and will be undertaken at the beginning of 1965 at high temperature in the critical facility Cesar, which is just being completed at Cadarache. Spent fuel analyses complement these results and help in their interpretation. The thermalization and spectra theories developed in France can thus be verified over the whole valid temperature range. The efficiency of control rods as a function of their dimensions, the materials of which they are made and the lattices surrounding them has been measured in Marius, and the results compared with calculation on the one hand and with the measurements carried out in EDF 1 on the other. Studies on the control proper of graphite piles were concerned essentially with the risks of spatial instability and the means of detecting and controlling them, and with flux distortions caused by the control rods. (authors) [fr

  13. Production test IP-725, increased graphite temperature limit, F Reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, A.

    1965-12-10

    This report presents the results of a high graphite temperature test conducted at F Reactor from January, through June, 1965. Since the reactor was soon to be permanently shut down, this was believed to be a good opportunity to investigate the effect of increased graphite temperature on graphite stack oxidation with CO{sub 2}, During the first phase of the test, the graphite temperature limit was increased, from 650 C to 700 C for a period of approximately 3 1/2 months. During this phase of the test the actual maximum operating graphite temperature was maintained near the 700 C limit. During the second phase of the test the temperature limit was further increased to 750 C for approximately 2 months. Unfortunately,, the actual graphite operating temperature was maintained at the desired temperature level for only several weeks and thus complicated interpretation of the test results. Throughout the 6 month test period, stack oxidation was monitored with graphite samples inserted in 2 bare process tube channels and by measurement of CO (reaction product of graphite and CO{sub 2}) in the reactor gas atmosphere.

  14. The effect of soil moisture on nitrous oxide production rates in large enclosed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, J.; Colodner, D.; Lin, G.; Murthy, R.

    2001-12-01

    On land, nitrous oxide (N2O) is mainly produced in soils by bacterial processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Once in the atmosphere N2O contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone destruction. Nitrification and denitrification are strongly dependent on soil moisture content, amongst other soil parameters. At Biosphere 2 Center we have begun to test the utility of meso-scale closed systems for understanding the relationship between soil properties and trace gas production at larger scales. We investigated the relationship between soil moisture content and soil N2O efflux in two large experimental closed systems (Tropical Rainforest (TR) and Intensive Forestry (IF) Mesocosms) at Biosphere 2 Center. N2O was measured every hour with an automated GC system. The daily N2O production rate was calculated as the rate of increase of N2O during the daytime, when the mesocosm was materially closed. We furthermore measured N2O and nitrate concentrations in the soil, as well as nitrate and N2O production rates in local areas. In the Rainforest Mesocosm, we found a very reproducible relationship between soil moisture content and N2O efflux, including the transient spikes in production rate upon wetting. In the Forestry Mesocosm the relation between soil moisture and N2O efflux was less clearcut.

  15. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, I.; Kage, H.

    2017-11-01

    Different matrix and graphite morphologies were generated by a special heat treatment in three chemically different series of flake graphite cast iron samples. As cast, furnace cooled and air cooled samples were investigated. The length of graphite particles and the pearlite volume of samples were determined by metallographic examination and these parameters were compared with the nondestructively measured magnetic parameters. Magnetic measurements were performed by the method of Magnetic Adaptive Testing, which is based on systematic measurement and evaluation of minor magnetic hysteresis loops. It was shown that linear correlation existed between the magnetic quantities and the graphite length, and also between the magnetic quantities and the relative pearlite content in the investigated cast iron. A numerical expression was also determined between magnetic descriptors and relative pearlite content, which does not depend on the detailed experimental conditions.

  16. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  17. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  18. Iron oxide nanoparticle agglomeration influences dose rates and modulates oxidative stress-mediated dose–response profiles in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi; Gaffrey, Matthew; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm–1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  19. Graphite coated PVA fibers as the reinforcement for cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhipeng; Liu, Zhichao

    2018-02-01

    A new preconditioning method was developed to PVA fibers as the reinforcement in cement-based materials. Virgin PVA fibers exhibits limited adhesion to graphite powders due to the presence of oil spots on the surface. Mixing PVA fibers with a moderately concentrated KMnO4-H2SO4 solution can efficiently remove the oil spots by oxidation without creating extra precipitate (MnO2) associated with the reduction reaction. This enhances the coating of graphite powders onto fiber surface and improves the mechanical properties of PVA fiber reinforced concrete (PVA-FRC). Graphite powders yields better fiber distribution in the matrix and reduces the fiber-matrix bonding, which is beneficial in uniformly distributing the stress among embedded fibers and creating steady generation and propagation of tight microcracks. This is evidenced by the significantly enhanced strain hardening behavior and improved flexural strength and toughness.

  20. Temperature and irradiation effects on the behaviour of 14C and its precursor 14N in nuclear graphite. Study of a decontamination process using steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbermann, Gwennaelle

    2013-01-01

    The dismantling of UNGG reactors in France will generate about 23 000 tons of radioactive graphite wastes. To manage these wastes, the radiological inventory and data on radionuclides (RN) location and speciation should be determined. 14 C was identified as an important RN for disposal due to its high initial activity and the risk of release of a mobile organic fraction in environment, after water ingress into the disposal. Hence, the objective of this thesis, carried out in partnership with EDF is to implement experimental studies to simulate and evaluate the impact of temperature, irradiation and graphite radiolytic corrosion on the in reactor behavior of 14 C and its precursor, 14 N. The obtained data are then used to study the thermal decontamination of graphite in presence of water vapor. The experimental approach aims at simulating the presence of 14 C and 14 N by the respective ion implantation of 13 C and 14 N or 15 N in virgin graphite. This study shows that, in the temperature range reached during reactor operation, (100-500 C) and without radiolytic corrosion, 13 C is thermally stable whatever the initial graphite structure. Moreover, irradiation experiments were performed on heated graphite (500 C) put in contact with a gas representative of the radiolized coolant gas. They show the synergistic role played by the oxidative species and the graphite structure disorder on the enhancement of 13 C mobility resulting in the gasification of the graphite surface and/or the selective oxidation of 13 C more weakly bound than 12 C. Concerning the pristine nitrogen, we showed first that the surface concentration reaches several hundred ppm (≤500 ppm at) and decreases at deeper depths to about 160 ppm at.. Unlike implanted 13 C, implanted nitrogen migrates at 500 C when the graphite is highly disordered (about 8 dpa) while remaining stable for a lower disorder rate (0.14 dpa). Experiments also show the synergistic role by electronic excitations and temperature

  1. Graphite Oxide to Graphene. Biomaterials to Bionics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brianna C; Murray, Eoin; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-12-09

    The advent of implantable biomaterials has revolutionized medical treatment, allowing the development of the fields of tissue engineering and medical bionic devices (e.g., cochlea implants to restore hearing, vagus nerve stimulators to control Parkinson's disease, and cardiac pace makers). Similarly, future materials developments are likely to continue to drive development in treatment of disease and disability, or even enhancing human potential. The material requirements for implantable devices are stringent. In all cases they must be nontoxic and provide appropriate mechanical integrity for the application at hand. In the case of scaffolds for tissue regeneration, biodegradability in an appropriate time frame may be required, and for medical bionics electronic conductivity is essential. The emergence of graphene and graphene-family composites has resulted in materials and structures highly relevant to the expansion of the biomaterials inventory available for implantable medical devices. The rich chemistries available are able to ensure properties uncovered in the nanodomain are conveyed into the world of macroscopic devices. Here, the inherent properties of graphene, along with how graphene or structures containing it interface with living cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerves and cells, are reviewed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Towards graphene bromide: bromination of graphite oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jankovský, O.; Šimek, P.; Klimová, K.; Sedmidubský, D.; Matějková, Stanislava; Pumera, M.; Sofer, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2014), s. 6065-6074 ISSN 2040-3364 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * perspectives * exfoliation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.394, year: 2014

  3. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael eBeman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation are active and actively coupled to one another—yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O2, NH4+, NO3- profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock and within Catalina Harbor, oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 x 107 genes g-1 varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in Bird Rock cores, and Catalina Harbor cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated Catalina Harbor sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria.

  4. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J M; Bertics, Victoria J; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another - yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O(2), [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock (BR) and within Catalina Harbor (CH), oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth) and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 × 10(7) genes g(-) (1)) varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in BR cores, and CH cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer) demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated CH sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

  5. Nitrous oxide uptake rates in boreal coniferous forests are associated with soil characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljanen, Henri; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a significant contributor to the destruction of the ozone layer. The radiative forcing of N2O is considered to be 320 more efficient than carbon dioxide.The major portion of global N2O is emitted from agricultural soils. There are studies suggesting that N2O has also a sink in forest soils. However there is relatively limited knowledge on factors controlling N2O consumption in forest soils. Hence N2O consumption was studied in boreal coniferous forests having different forest cover, soil chemical and physical structure and land-use history. The N2O consumption was measured by static chamber technique in the field across spatio-seasonal sampling design. Typical and atypical denitrifiers were quantified with nosZ functional gene marker. Additionally chemical and physical environmental parameters were analyzed to link N2O flux, microbial community and composition of soils. Nitrous oxide uptake could be associated with specific ecosystem and environmental conditions. Soil physical structure and land-use history were shown to be prior factors determining the strength of the uptake rate.

  6. CALANDRIA TYPE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R.M.; Mahlmeister, J.E.; Vaughn, N.E.; Sanders, W.J.; Williams, A.C.

    1964-02-11

    A sodium graphite power reactor in which the unclad graphite moderator and fuel elements are contained within a core tank is described. The core tank is submersed in sodium within the reactor vessel. Extending longitudinally through the core thnk are process tubes with fuel elements positioned therein. A bellows sealing means allows axial expansion and construction of the tubes. Within the core tank, a leakage plenum is located below the graphite, and above the graphite is a gas space. A vent line regulates the gas pressure in the space, and another line removes sodium from the plenum. The sodium coolant flows from the lower reactor vessel through the annular space between the fuel elements and process tubes and out into the reactor vessel space above the core tank. From there, the heated coolant is drawn off through an outlet line and sent to the heat exchange. (AEC)

  7. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  8. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  9. Obtaining graphene nanoplatelets from various graphite intercalation compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhyk, A.; Galunin, E.; Memetov, N.

    2015-11-01

    The work compares the exfoliation ability of different graphite materials (expanded graphite intercalation compound, thermally expanded and oxidatively intercalated graphites) and describes the properties of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) obtained dependently on intercalation/deintercalation conditions and reagents. Among the studied materials, the graphite intercalated with ammonium persulfate in sulfuric acid and expanded at 40 °C possesses the maximum ability for ultrasonic exfoliation in the presence of a surfactant. The exfoliation efficiency strongly depends on the content of water in sulfuric acid during the intercalation. The highest efficiency was achieved for the expanded graphite intercalation compound (EGIC) prepared in sulfuric acid containing diluted oleum, which may be explained by increased acidity of the medium and, correspondingly, redox potential of the persulfate compound. This is also related to increased amounts of oxygen groups in the GNPs obtained from the EGIC synthesized in 100% sulfuric acid and diluted oleum. Besides, the nature of surface groups on the GNPs strongly depends on the nature of a deintercalating reagent. Thus, the treatment of the EGIC with different nucleophilic molecules (such as water, ammonia, carbamide, hexamethylenetetramine, organic amines, etc.) can yield GNPs with various surface groups. The interaction between the EGIC and nucleophilic molecules does not only include the substitution of sulfate groups, but also redox reactions with participation of graphene layers. Depending on the nature of the nucleophile, those reactions can lead to the formation of different groups attached to the graphene surface. GNPs with almost pure surface were obtained when using ammonia and carbamide.

  10. Effect of nitric oxide on spinal evoked potentials and survival rate in rats with decompression sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsøe, Thomas; Meehan, Claire Francesca; Broholm, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing agents have, in experimental settings, been shown to decrease intravascular nitrogen bubble formation and to increase the survival rate during decompression sickness (DCS) from diving. The effect has been ascribed to a possible removal of preexisting micronuclei...... evaluated by means of spinal evoked potentials (SEPs). Anesthetized rats were decompressed from a 1-h hyperbaric air dive at 506.6 kPa (40 m of seawater) for 3 min and 17 s, and spinal cord conduction was studied by measurements of SEPs. Histological samples of the spinal cord were analyzed for lesions...... GTN (group 6) during the dive, before decompression. In all groups, decompression caused considerable intravascular bubble formation. The ISMN groups showed no difference compared with the control group, whereas the GTN groups showed a tendency toward faster SEP disappearance and shorter survival...

  11. In situ estimates of iron-oxidation and accretion rates for iron-oxidizing bacterial mats at Lō'ihi Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, David; Scott, Jarrod J.; Leavitt, Anna; Fleming, Emily; Moyer, Craig

    2017-08-01

    It is increasingly recognized that diffuse, hydrothermal venting is an important source of iron to the deep-sea that can influence oceanic iron dynamics and abundance. Lithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are dominant at diffuse hydrothermal vent sites, producing microbial iron mats that are often centimeters or more thick. At present, little is known about in situ growth rates of FeOB, specific Fe-oxidation rates, or accretion rates for iron mats. An in situ productivity chamber was developed that took advantage of the unique mineral morphotypes produced by FeOB to estimate rates of Fe-oxidation and accretion. Chambers were placed at two diffuse vents (1179 and 1300 mbsl) at Lō'ihi Seamount where they were colonized by FeOB for different amounts of time. From this analysis, it was estimated that Fe-oxidation rates could range from 8.2 to 51.9 × 10-6 mol h-1, and that iron mats could accrete at around 2.2 cm. yr-1. Molecular analysis indicated that the relative abundance of Zetaproteobacteria, a group of known FeOB, accounted for 80-90% of the bacteria colonizing the chambers. There was a distinct difference between populations at the 1179 m site (Pohaku), and the 1300 m site (North Hiolo Ridge). Microscope slides placed within the productivity chambers were colonized by different morphotypes of FeOB. The cells responsible for one common morphotype that produces a Y-shaped filament were identified as Zetaproteobacteria by use of a small subunit rRNA probe. This work confirms the importance of FeOB in the formation of chemosynthetic iron mats, and provides the first estimates for in situ Fe-oxidation rates and mat accretion rates.

  12. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Hsueh, Tzu-Wei; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Yan, Yuan-Horng; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO 4 ; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO 4 exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO 4 -exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO 4 -exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO 4 . Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO 4 -induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and celecoxib mitigated the Ni

  13. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi, E-mail: r92841005@ntu.edu.tw [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Tzu-Wei, E-mail: r95841015@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuen-Chau, E-mail: nekota@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Anaesthesiology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jing-Shiang, E-mail: jshwang@stat.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Statistical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Kai-Jen, E-mail: kjc@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yan, Yuan-Horng, E-mail: d97841006@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO{sub 4}; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO{sub 4} exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO{sub 4}. Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO{sub 4}-induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and

  14. Graphite oral tattoo: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more f...

  15. Graphite Microstructural Characterization Using Time-Domain and Correlation-Based Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, James [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-12-06

    Among techniques that have been used to determine elastic modulus in nuclear graphites, ultrasonic methods have enjoyed wide use and standards using contacting piezoelectric tranducers have been developed to ensure repeatability of these types of measurements. However, the use of couplants and the pressures used to effectively couple transducers to samples can bias measurements and produce results that are not wholly related to the properties of the graphite itself. In this work, we have investigated the use of laser ultrasonic methods for making elastic modulus measurements in nuclear graphites. These methods use laser-based transmitters and receivers to gather data and do not require use of ultrasonic couplants or mechanical contact with the sample. As a result, information directly related to the elastic responses of graphite can be gathered even if the graphite is porous, brittle and compliant. In particular, we have demonstrated the use of laser ultrasonics for the determination of both Young’s modulus and shear modulus in a range of nuclear graphites including those that are being considered for use in future nuclear reactors. These results have been analyzed to assess the contributions of porosity and microcracking to the elastic responses of these graphites. Laser-based methods have also been used to assess the moduli of NBG-18 and IG-110 where samples of each grade were oxidized to produce specific changes in porosity. These data were used to develop new models for the elastic responses of nuclear graphites and these models have been used to infer specific changes in graphite microstructure that occur during oxidation that affect elastic modulus. Specifically, we show how ultrasonic measurements in oxidized graphites are consistent with nano/microscale oxidation processes where basal plane edges react more readily than basal plane surfaces. We have also shown the use of laser-based methods to perform shear-wave birefringence measurements and have shown

  16. Direct measurement of lithium transport in graphite electrodes using neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owejan, Jon P.; Gagliardo, Jeffrey J.; Harris, Stephen J.; Wang, Howard; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Spatiotemporal measurements of lithium through the electrode thickness were quantified with high resolution neutron imaging. ► A nonuniform lithium distribution was observed early in the first intercalation cycle but relaxed as the electrode filled with lithium. ► Through-plane transport resistance in the bulk of the graphite composite electrode was measured. ► The distribution of lost capacity associated with trapped lithium was quantified and linked to regions with low intercalation rates. - Abstract: Lithium intercalation into graphite electrodes is widely studied, but few direct in situ diagnostic methods exist. Such diagnostic methods are desired to probe the influence of factors such as charge rate, electrode structure and solid electrolyte interphase layer transport resistance as they relate to lithium-ion battery performance and durability. In this work, we present a continuous measurement of through-plane lithium distributions in a composite graphite/lithium metal electrochemical cell. Capacity change in a thick graphite electrode was measured during several charge/discharge cycles with high resolution (14 μm) neutron imaging. A custom test fixture and a method for quantifying lithium are described. The measured lithium distribution within the graphite electrode is given as a function of state of charge. Bulk transport resistance is considered by comparing intercalation rates through the thickness of the electrode near the separator and current collector. The residual lithium content associated with irreversible capacity loss that results from cycling is also measured.

  17. Carbowaste: treatment and disposal of irradiated graphite and other carbonaceous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Lensa, W.; Rizzato, C.; Baginski, K.; Banford, A.W.; Bradbury, D.; Goodwin, J.; Grambow, B.; Grave, M.J.; Jones, A.N.; Laurent, G.; Pina, G.; Vulpius, D.

    2014-01-01

    The European Project on 'Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste (CARBOWASTE)' addressed the retrieval, characterization, treatment, reuse and disposal of irradiated graphite with the following main results: - I-graphite waste features significantly depend on the specific manufacture process, on the operational conditions in the nuclear reactor (neutron dose, atmosphere, temperature etc.) and on radiolytic oxidation leading to partial releases of activation products and precursors during operation. - The neutron activation process generates significant recoil energies breaking pre-existing chemical bonds resulting in dislocations of activation products and new chemical compounds. - Most activation products exist in different chemical forms and at different locations. - I-graphite can be partly purified by thermal and chemical treatment processes leaving more leach-resistant waste products. - Leach tests and preliminary performance analyses show that i-graphite can be safely disposed of in a wide range of disposal systems, after appropriate treatment and/or conditioning. (authors)

  18. Inverting the diastereoselectivity of the mukaiyama-michael addition with graphite-based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Acocella, Maria Rosaria

    2014-02-07

    Here, we show that graphite-based catalysts, mainly graphite oxide (GO) and exfoliated GO, are effective recyclable catalysts for a relevant stereoselective Mukaiyama-Michael addition, outperforming currently available catalysts. Moreover, the graphite-based catalysts described here invert the diastereoselectivity relative to that observed with known catalysts, with the unprecedented large prevalence of the anti diastereoisomer. This inverted diastereoselectivity is increased when the catalyst concentration is reduced and after catalyst recycling. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the selectivity is determined by two types of supramolecular interactions operating between the catalyst and the substrates at the diastereoselectivity- determining transition state, specifically, the π-stacking of b-nitrostyrene with graphite and the van der Waals interaction between the SiMe3 group of the silyl ether and the graphite. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Impact of Nitrogen Application Rate on Switchgrass Yield, Production Costs, and Nitrous Oxide Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Andrew R; Min, Doo-Hong; Williams, Jeffery R; Rice, Charles W

    2018-03-01

    Switchgrass ( L.) has been promoted as a potential feedstock for cellulosic biofuel in the United States. Switchgrass is known to respond to N fertilizer, but optimal rates remain unclear. Given the potential nonlinear response of nitrous oxide (NO) emissions to N inputs, N additions to switchgrass above optimal levels could have large impacts on the greenhouse gas balance of switchgrass-based biofuel. Additionally, N additions are likely to have large impacts on switchgrass production costs. Yield, N removal, and net returns were measured in switchgrass receiving 0 to 200 kg N ha in Manhattan, KS, from 2012 to 2014. Emissions of NO were measured in the 0- to 150-kg N ha treatments. Total emissions of NO increased from 0.2 to 3.0 kg NO-N ha as N inputs increased from 0 to 150 kg N ha. The 3-yr averages of fertilizer-induced emission factors were 0.7, 2.1, and 2.6% at 50, 100, and 150 kg N ha, respectively. Removal of N at harvest increased linearly with increasing N rate. Switchgrass yields increased with N inputs up to 100 to 150 kg N ha, but the critical N level for maximum yields decreased each year, suggesting that N was being applied in excess at higher N rates. Net returns were maximized at 100 kg N ha at both a high and low urea cost (US$394.71 and $945.91 ha, respectively). These results demonstrate that N inputs were necessary to increase switchgrass productivity, but rates exceeding optimal levels resulted in excessive NO emissions and increased costs for producers. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Feasibility of Ultrasonic Inspection for Nuclear Grade Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Seok; Lee, Jong Po; Yoon, Byung Sik; Jang, Chang Heui

    2008-01-01

    Graphite material has been recognized as a very competitive candidate for reflector, moderator, and structural material for very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Since VHTR is operated up to 900-950 .deg. C , small amount of impurity may accelerate the oxidation and degradation of carbon graphite, which results in increased porosity and lowered fracture toughness. In this study, ultrasonic wave propagation properties were investigated for both as-received and degradated material, and the feasibility of ultrasonic testing (UT) was estimated based on the result of ultrasonic property measurements. The ultrasonic properties of carbon graphite were half, more than 5 times, and 1/3 for velocity, attenuation, and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio respectively. Degradation reduces the ultrasonic velocity slightly by 100 m/s, however the attenuation is about 2 times of as-receive state. The results of probability of detection (POD) estimation based on S/N ratio for side-drilled-hole (SDHs) of which depths were less than 100 mm were merely affected by oxidation and degradation. This result suggests that UT would be reliable method for nondestructive testing of carbon graphite material of which thickness is not over 100 mm. In accordance with the result produced by commercial automated ultrasonic testing (AUT) system, human error of ultrasonic testing is barely expected for the material of which thickness is not over 80 mm

  1. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Aiken, SC; Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Wang, Jun [Columbia, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  2. Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on the ir graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment

  3. Anaerobic methane oxidation rates at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments from Kattegat and Skagerrak (Denmark)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, N.; Jorgensen, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    Concomitant radiotracer measurements were made of in situ rates of sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in 2-3-m-long sediment cores. Methane accumulated to high concentrations (> 1 mM CH 4 ) only below the sulfate zone, at 1 m or deeper in the sediment. Sulfate reduction showed a broad maximum below the sediment surface and a smaller, narrow maximum at the sulfate-methane transition. Methane oxidation was low (0.002-0.1 nmol CH 4 cm -3 d -1 ) throughout the sulfate zone and showed a sharp maximum at the sulfate-methane transition, coinciding with the sulfate reduction maximum. Total anaerobic methane oxidation at two stations was 0.83 and 1.16 mmol CH 4 m -2 d -1 , of which 96% was confined to the sulfate-methane transition. All the methane that was calculated to diffuse up into the sulfate-methane transition was oxidized in this zone. The methane oxidation was equivalent to 10% of the electron donor requirement for the total measured sulfate reduction. A third station showed high sulfate concentrations at all depths sampled and the total methane oxidation was only 0.013 mmol m -2 d -1 . From direct measurements of rates, concentration gradients, and diffusion coefficients, simple calculations were made of sulfate and methane fluxes and of methane production rates

  4. GRAFEC: A New Spanish Program to Investigate Waste Management Options for Radioactive Graphite - 12399

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, Eva; Pina, Gabriel; Rodriguez, Marina [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22, 28040-MADRID (Spain); Fachinger, Johannes; Grosse, Karl-Heinz [Furnaces Nuclear Application Grenoble SAS (FNAG), 4, avenue Charles de Gaulle, 38800 Le Pont de Claix (France); Leganes Nieto, Jose Luis; Quiros Gracian, Maria [ENRESA, C/ Emilio Vargas,7 - 28043 - MADRID (Spain); Seemann, Richard [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Wilhelm-Rohn-Strasse 35, 63450 Hanau (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Spain has to manage about 3700 tons of irradiated graphite from the reactor Vandellos I as radioactive waste. 2700 tons are the stack of the reactor and are still in the reactor core waiting for retrieval. The rest of the quantities, 1000 tons, are the graphite sleeves which have been already retrieved from the reactor. During operation the graphite sleeves were stored in a silo and during the dismantling stage a retrieval process was carried out separating the wires from the graphite, which were crushed and introduced into 220 cubic containers of 6 m{sup 3} each and placed in interim storage. The graphite is an intermediate level radioactive waste but it contains long lived radionuclides like {sup 14}C which disqualifies disposal at the low level waste repository of El Cabril. Therefore, a new project has been started in order to investigate two new options for the management of this waste type. The first one is based on a selective decontamination of {sup 14}C by thermal methods. This method is based on results obtained at the Research Centre Juelich (FZJ) in the Frame of the EC programs 'Raphael' and 'Carbowaste'. The process developed at FZJ is based on a preferential oxidation of {sup 14}C in comparison to the bulk {sup 12}C. Explanations for this effect are the inhomogeneous distribution and a weaker bounding of {sup 14}C which is not incorporated in the graphite lattice. However these investigations have only been performed with graphite from the high temperature reactor Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor Juelich AVR which has been operated in a non-oxidising condition or research reactor graphite operated at room temperature. The reactor Vandellos I has been operated with CO{sub 2} as coolant and significant amounts of graphite have been already oxidised. The aim of the project is to validate whether a {sup 14}C decontamination can also been achieved with graphite from Vandellos I. A second possibility under investigation is the

  5. A field study on chemistry, S(IV) oxidation rates and vertical transport during fog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joos, F.; Baltensperger, U.

    An extensive fog study was carried out in the central plateu of Switzerland. Ninety-seven fog samples were collected along with aerosol filter and cascade impactor samples, and measurements of O 3, SO 2, NO, NO x, PAN, temperature, and wind speed and direction. Maximum levels in fogwater were 4.3, 4.4., 0.033, 1.7, 0.5, 0.024 and 9.2 mmol ℓ -1 for Cl -, NO 3-, NO 2-, SO 42-, S(IV), oxalate and NH 4+, respectively. pH varied between 2.9 and 7.1. Sixteen additional elements were determined in the fog samples by ICP. The sum of the concentrations of SO 42- and S(IV) agreed very with the total sulfur concentration as determined by ICP. A substantial excess of S(IV) (up to 0.2 mmol ℓ -1) compared to Henry and acid-base equilibrium calculations was found, which can probably be attributed to complex formations with aldehydes. S(IV) oxidation rates of up to 650 nmol ℓ -1 s -1 with ozone and of up to 100 nmol ℓ -1 s -1 with NO 2 were calculated. S(IV) oxidation due to PAN, NO 2- and Fe(III) was of minor importance. A substantial fraction of the major ions was present in the intersitial aerosol (aerosol particles < 4 μm) even during fog conditions. High correlations were found for NH 4+, NO 32-. From their ratios in the fog water and the aerosol (< 4 μm) it could be concluded that at least 40% of NO 3- and 20% of NH 4+ in fog water was due to gas phase scavenging. Increasing concentrations in fog water were found during fog dissipation. Concentrations decreased with increasing height. A vertical transport model including turbulent diffusion and droplet sedimentation is introduced, which matches the experimental data of this vertical profile.

  6. Effect of acute nitric oxide synthase inhibition in the modulation of heart rate in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Fellet

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute nitric oxide synthase inhibition with N G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME on chronotropic and pressor responses was studied in anesthetized intact rats and rats submitted to partial and complete autonomic blockade. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored intra-arterially. Intravenous L-NAME injection (7.5 mg/kg elicited the same hypertensive response in intact rats and in rats with partial (ganglionic and parasympathetic blockade and complete autonomic blockade (38 ± 3, 55 ± 6, 54 ± 5, 45 ± 5 mmHg, respectively; N = 9, P = NS. L-NAME-induced bradycardia at the time when blood pressure reached the peak plateau was similar in intact rats and in rats with partial autonomic blockade (43 ± 8, 38 ± 5, 46 ± 6 bpm, respectively; N = 9, P = NS. Rats with combined autonomic blockade showed a tachycardic response to L-NAME (10 ± 3 bpm, P<0.05 vs intact animals, N = 9. Increasing doses of L-NAME (5.0, 7.5 and 10 mg/kg, N = 9 caused a similar increase in blood pressure (45 ± 5, 38 ± 3, 44 ± 9 mmHg, respectively; P = NS and heart rate (31 ± 4, 34 ± 3, 35 ± 4 bpm, respectively; P = NS. Addition of L-NAME (500 µM to isolated atria from rats killed by cervical dislocation and rats previously subjected to complete autonomic blockade did not affect spontaneous beating or contractile strength (N = 9. In vivo results showed that L-NAME promoted a tachycardic response in rats with complete autonomic blockade, whereas the in vitro experiments showed no effect on intrinsic heart rate, suggesting that humoral mechanisms may be involved in the L-NAME-induced cardiac response.

  7. Treatment rate improvement of the ozone oxidation method for laundry waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive laundry waste water generated in nuclear power plants includes organic compounds to be removed, for which ozone oxidation treatment is a possibility. To verify the applicability, its total organic carbon concentration (TOC) lowering rate improvement was examined in 0.5x10 -3 m 3 batch and 3x10 -2 m 3 pilot equipment experiments. In the batch experiments, ozone at a concentration of 200 g/Nm 3 was dispersed into 0.5x10 -3 m 3 of Simulated Laundry Waste Water (SLWW) with TOC of 11 mM. Total organic carbon concentration was measured every hour to see the effects of the temperature, and the initial concentrations of both H 2 O 2 and NaOH which were added to urge OH radical generation from ozone. In the pilot equipment experiments, 1x10 -2 to 3x10 -2 m 3 of the SLWW were circulated using an ejector to disperse the ozone. The influences of the flow rate and the SLWW volume on lowering TOC were examined, because they were related to the ejector dispersion performance and the appropriate ozone addition per SLWW volume. Appropriate initial H 2 O 2 and NaOH concentrations in the batch experiments were 14.7 mM and 1 mM, respectively. Lowering of TOC became faster at higher temperatures, because ozone self-decomposition and OH radial diffusion to the organic compound molecules were promoted. Lowering of TOC also became faster at higher flow rates, while the influence of the volume became saturated. (author)

  8. New insight of high temperature oxidation on self-exfoliation capability of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhang; Zeng, Jie; Han, Di; Wu, Kai; Yu, Bowen; Chai, Songgang; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2018-05-04

    The preparation of graphene oxide (GO) via Hummers method is usually divided into two steps: low temperature oxidation at 35 °C (step I oxidation) and high temperature oxidation at 98 °C (step II oxidation). However, the effects of these two steps on the exfoliation capability and chemical structure of graphite oxide remain unclear. In this study, both the functional group content of graphite oxide and the entire evolution of interlayer spacing were investigated during the two steps. Step I oxidation is a slowly inhomogeneous oxidation step to remove unoxidized graphite flakes. The prepared graphite oxide can be easily self-exfoliated but contains a lot of organic sulfur. During the first 20 min of step II oxidation, the majority of organic sulfur can be efficiently removed and graphite oxide still remains a good exfoliation capability due to sharp increasing of carboxyl groups. However, with a longer oxidation time at step II oxidation, the decrease of organic sulfur content is slowed down apparently but without any carboxyl groups forming, then graphite oxide finally loses self-exfoliation capability. It is concluded that a short time of step II oxidation can produce purer and ultralarge GO sheets via self-exfoliation. The pure GO is possessed with better thermal stability and liquid crystal behavior. Besides, reduced GO films prepared from step II oxidation show better mechanical and electric properties after reducing compared with that obtained only via step I oxidation.

  9. New insight of high temperature oxidation on self-exfoliation capability of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhang; Zeng, Jie; Han, Di; Wu, Kai; Yu, Bowen; Chai, Songgang; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    The preparation of graphene oxide (GO) via Hummers method is usually divided into two steps: low temperature oxidation at 35 °C (step I oxidation) and high temperature oxidation at 98 °C (step II oxidation). However, the effects of these two steps on the exfoliation capability and chemical structure of graphite oxide remain unclear. In this study, both the functional group content of graphite oxide and the entire evolution of interlayer spacing were investigated during the two steps. Step I oxidation is a slowly inhomogeneous oxidation step to remove unoxidized graphite flakes. The prepared graphite oxide can be easily self-exfoliated but contains a lot of organic sulfur. During the first 20 min of step II oxidation, the majority of organic sulfur can be efficiently removed and graphite oxide still remains a good exfoliation capability due to sharp increasing of carboxyl groups. However, with a longer oxidation time at step II oxidation, the decrease of organic sulfur content is slowed down apparently but without any carboxyl groups forming, then graphite oxide finally loses self-exfoliation capability. It is concluded that a short time of step II oxidation can produce purer and ultralarge GO sheets via self-exfoliation. The pure GO is possessed with better thermal stability and liquid crystal behavior. Besides, reduced GO films prepared from step II oxidation show better mechanical and electric properties after reducing compared with that obtained only via step I oxidation.

  10. Preparation of Sulfur-Free Exfoliated Graphite by a Two-Step Intercalation Process and Its Application for Adsorption of Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sulfur-free exfoliated graphite (EG was prepared by a two-step chemical oxidation process, using natural flake graphite (NFG as the precursor. The first chemical intercalation process was carried out at a temperature of 30°C for 50 min, with the optimum addition of NFG, potassium permanganate, and perchloric acid in a weight ratio of 1 : 0.4 : 10.56. Then, in the secondary intercalation step, dipotassium phosphate was employed as the intercalating agent to further increase the exfoliated volume (EV of EG. NFG, graphite intercalation compound (GIC, and EG were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR, BET surface area, and porosity analyzer. Also, the uptakes of crude oil, diesel oil, and gasoline by EG were determined. Results show that perchloric acid and hydrogen phosphate are validated to enter into the interlayer of graphite flake. The obtained EG possesses a large exfoliated volume (EV and has an excellent affinity to oils; thus, the material has rapid adsorption rates and high adsorption capacities for crude oil, diesel oil, and gasoline.

  11. Reaction path of the oxidative coupling of methane over a lithium-doped magnesium oxide catalyst : Factors affecting the Rate of Total Oxidation of Ethane and Ethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, J.A.; Korf, S.J.; Veehof, R.H.J.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments using gas mixtures of O2, C2H6 or C2H4 and CH4 or He have been carried out with a Li/MgO catalyst using a well-mixed reaction system which show that the total oxidation products, CO and CO2, are formed predominantly from ethylene, formed in the oxidative coupling of methane. It is

  12. Electrode Surface Composition of Dual-Intercalation, All-Graphite Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Dyatkin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dual-intercalation batteries implement graphite electrodes as both cathodes and anodes and offer high specific energy, inexpensive and environmentally sustainable materials, and high operating voltages. Our research investigated the influence of surface composition on capacities and cycling efficiencies of chemically functionalized all-graphite battery electrodes. We subjected coreshell spherical particles and synthetic graphite flakes to high-temperature air oxidation, and hydrogenation to introduce, respectively, –OH, and –H surface functional groups. We identified noticeable influences of electrode surface chemistry on first-cycle efficiencies and charge storage densities of anion and cation intercalation into graphite electrodes. We matched oxidized cathodes and hydrogenated anodes in dual-ion batteries and improved their overall performance. Our approach provides novel fundamental insight into the anion intercalation process and suggests inexpensive and environmentally sustainable methods to improve performance of these grid-scale energy storage systems

  13. An Investigation of Reverse Flotation Separation of Sericite from Graphite by Using a Surfactant: MF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangshuai Qiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a surfactant, atlox4862 (formaldehyde condensate of methyl naphthalene sulfonic sodium salt (MF, was introduced as a depressant for reverse flotation separation of sericite from graphite. Natural flake graphite has a strong hydrophobic property. After interacting with MF, the graphite became moderately hydrophilic. The flotation results showed that MF had a depressing ability for both sericite and graphite and that the flotation separation of sericite from graphite was attributed to the different declining levels of recovery between graphite and sericite with increased MF concentration. For a pulp pH of 8 and a MF concentration of 250 mg/L, the recovery rates of sericite and graphite were 89.7% and 11.3%, respectively. The results of the FTIR spectra and zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the interaction of MF with graphite and sericite is mainly through electrostatic attraction. MF was preferred to adsorb on the surface of graphite, decreasing its zeta potential and improving its hydrophilicity more than that of sericite.

  14. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  15. Intercalation reactions into graphite: a two-dimensional chemistry; Les reactions d'intercalation dans le graphite. Une chimie bidimensionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herold, C. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henri Poincare, Lab. de Chimie du Solide Mineral-UMR 7555, 54 (France); Lagrange, Ph. [Ecole Europeenne d' Ingenieurs en Genie des Materiaux, Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2006-03-15

    The lamellar structure of graphite and its oxidizing and reducing double nature lead this material to accommodate in its Van der Waals's gaps numerous and largely various chemical species, necessarily oxidizing or reducing. Thus the graphite intercalation compounds contain graphene planes, systematically reduced or oxidized. An overview on the graphite intercalation chemistry with electron donor species is presented in this paper: alkali, alkaline-earth metals, lanthanides, metallic alloys, ionic compounds like alkaline halides, chalcogenides and hydroxides. The crystal chemistry of these compounds brings the 'memory' out, that possess the intercalated sheets of the 3D structure of the initial species. Lastly, several of their electronic properties are given. (authors)

  16. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  17. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its applicationin the C-& H-activation of amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride, Fe@g-C3N4, has been synthesized by adorning graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) support with iron oxide via non-covalent interaction. The magnetically recyclable catalyst showed excellent reactivity for expeditious C-H activation and cyanation of amines.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Verma, S., R.B. Nasir Baig, H. Changseok, M. Nadagouda , and R. Varma. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its applicationin the C–H activation of amines. CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS. Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, 51(85): 15554 - 15557, (2015).

  18. The optimization of CMC concentration as graphite binder on the anode of LiFePO4 battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, S.; Cahyono, T.; Mindara, J. Y.; Riveli, N.; Alamsyah, W.; Rahayu, I.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, the most dominating power supply on the mobile electronics market are rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries. This is because of a higher energy density and a longer lifetime compared to similar rechargeable battery systems. Graphite is commonly used as anode material in the Lithium-ion batteries, because of its excellent electrochemical characteristics and low cost fabrication. In this paper, we reported the optimization of the concentration of the CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose), that acts as the binder for graphite anode. Based on our experimental results, the best composition of graphite : C : CMC is 90 : 8 : 2 in weight %. Anode with such composition has, based on SEM measurement, a relatively good surface morphology, while it also has relatively high conductivity, about 2.68 S/cm. The result of cyclic voltammogram with a scan rate of 10 mV/s in the voltage range of 0 to 1 Volt, shows the peak of reduction voltage at 0.85 Volts and the peak voltage of oxidation is at -1.5 Volt. The performance of the battery system with LiFePO4 set as the cathode, shows that the working voltage is about 2.67 Volts at 1 mA current-loading, with the efficiency around 47%.

  19. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1 h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  20. Potential rates and environmental controls of denitrification and nitrous oxide production in a temperate urbanized estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Boaventura, Rui A R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2010-12-01

    Denitrification may play a major role in inorganic nitrogen removal from estuarine ecosystems, particularly in those subjected to increased nitrate and organic matter loads. The Douro estuary (NW Portugal) suffers from both problems: freshwater input of nitrate and organic load from untreated wastewater discharges. To assess how these factors might control sediment denitrification, a 12-month survey was designed. Denitrification potential and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production were measured at different locations using the slurry acetylene blockage technique. Denitrification rate ranged from 0.4 to 38 nmol N g⁻¹ h⁻¹, increasing towards the river mouth following an urban pollution gradient. N(2)O production, a powerful greenhouse gas implicated on the destruction of the ozone layer, was significantly related with sediment organic matter and accounted for 0.5-47% of the N gases produced. Additional enrichment experiments were consistent with the results found in the environment, showing that sediments from the upper less urban stretch of the estuary, mostly sandy, respond positively to carbon and, inversely, in organic rich sediments from the lower estuary, the denitrification potential was limited by nitrate availability. The obtained results confirmed denitrification as an important process for the removal of nitrate in estuaries. The presence of wastewater discharges appears to stimulate nitrogen removal but also the production of N(2)O, a powerful greenhouse gas, exacerbating the N(2)O:N(2) ratio and thus should be controlled. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Atmospheric cycles of nitrogen oxides and ammonia. [source strengths and destruction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottger, A.; Ehhalt, D. H.; Gravenhorst, G.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric cycles of nitrogenous trace compounds for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are discussed. Source strengths and destruction rates for the nitrogen oxides: NO, NO2 and HNO3 -(NOX) and ammonia (NH3) are given as a function of latitude over continents and oceans. The global amounts of NOX-N and NH3-N produced annually in the period 1950 to 1975 (34 + 5 x one trillion g NOx-N/yr and 29 + or - 6 x one trillion g NH3-N/yr) are much less than previously assumed. Globally, natural and anthropogenic emissions are of similar magnitude. The NOx emission from anthropogenic sources is 1.5 times that from natural processes in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere, it is a factor of 3 or 4 less. More than 80% of atmospheric ammonia seems to be derived from excrements of domestic animals, mostly by bulk deposition: 24 + or - 9 x one trillion g NO3 -N/yr and 21 + or - 9 x one trillion g NH4+-N/yr. Another fraction may be removed by absorption on vegetation and soils.

  2. Effects of gas flow rate on the structure and elemental composition of tin oxide thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mansoori, Muntaser; Al-Shaibani, Sahar; Al-Jaeedi, Ahlam; Lee, Jisung; Choi, Daniel; Hasoon, Falah S.

    2017-12-01

    Photovoltaic technology is one of the key answers for a better sustainable future. An important layer in the structure of common photovoltaic cells is the transparent conductive oxide. A widely applied transparent conductive oxide is tin oxide (SnO2). The advantage of using tin oxide comes from its high stability and low cost in processing. In our study, we investigate effects of working gas flow rate and oxygen content in radio frequency (RF)-sputtering system on the growth of intrinsic SnO2 (i-SnO2) layers. X-ray diffraction results showed that amorphous-like with nano-crystallite structure, and the surface roughness varied from 1.715 to 3.936 nm. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed different types of point defects, such as tin interstitials and oxygen vacancies, in deposited i-SnO2 films.

  3. Effects of gas flow rate on the structure and elemental composition of tin oxide thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntaser Al-Mansoori

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic technology is one of the key answers for a better sustainable future. An important layer in the structure of common photovoltaic cells is the transparent conductive oxide. A widely applied transparent conductive oxide is tin oxide (SnO2. The advantage of using tin oxide comes from its high stability and low cost in processing. In our study, we investigate effects of working gas flow rate and oxygen content in radio frequency (RF-sputtering system on the growth of intrinsic SnO2 (i-SnO2 layers. X-ray diffraction results showed that amorphous-like with nano-crystallite structure, and the surface roughness varied from 1.715 to 3.936 nm. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed different types of point defects, such as tin interstitials and oxygen vacancies, in deposited i-SnO2 films.

  4. [Plasma levels of interleukin-10 and nitric oxide in response to two different desflurane anesthesia flow rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayci, Dilek; Dikmen, Bayazit; Kaçmaz, Murat; Taşpınar, Vildan; Ornek, Dilşen; Turan, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated interleukin-10 and nitric oxide plasma levels following surgery to determine whether there is a correlation between these two variables and if different desflurane anesthesia flow rates influence nitric oxide and interleukin-10 concentrations in circulation. Forty patients between 18 and 70 years and ASA I-II physical status who were scheduled to undergo thyroidectomy were enrolled in the study. Patients were allocated into two groups to receive two different desflurane anesthesia flow rates: high flow (Group HF) and low flow (Group LF). Blood samples were drawn at the beginning (t0) and end (t1) of the operation and after 24h (t2). Plasma interleukin-10 and nitric oxide levels were measured using an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay and a Griess reagents kit, respectively. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were assessed. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups with regard to interleukin-10 levels at the times of measurement. Interleukin-10 levels were increased equally in both groups at times t1 and t2 compared with preoperative concentrations. For both groups, nitric oxide circulating concentrations were significantly reduced at times t1 and t2 compared with preoperative concentrations. However, the nitric oxide value was lower for Group HF compared to Group LF at t2. No correlation was found between the IL-10 and nitric oxide levels. Clinical usage of two different flow anesthesia forms with desflurane may increase interleukin-10 levels both in Group HF and Group LF; nitric oxide levels circulating concentrations were significantly reduced at times t1 and t2 compared with preoperative concentrations; however, at 24h postoperatively they were higher in Group LF compared to Group HF. No correlation was detected between interleukin-10 and nitric oxide levels. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma levels of interleukin-10 and nitric oxide in response to two different desflurane anesthesia flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycı, Dilek; Dikmen, Bayazit; Kaçmaz, Murat; Taşpınar, Vildan; Ornek, Dilşen; Turan, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated interleukin-10 and nitric oxide plasma levels following surgery to determine whether there is a correlation between these two variables and if different desflurane anesthesia flow rates influence nitric oxide and interleukin-10 concentrations in circulation. Forty patients between 18 and 70 years and ASA I-II physical status who were scheduled to undergo thyroidectomy were enrolled in the study. Patients were allocated into two groups to receive two different desflurane anesthesia flow rates: high flow (Group HF) and low flow (Group LF). Blood samples were drawn at the beginning (t0) and end (t1) of the operation and after 24h (t2). Plasma interleukin-10 and nitric oxide levels were measured using an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay and a Griess reagents kit, respectively. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were assessed. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups with regard to interleukin-10 levels at the times of measurement. Interleukin-10 levels were increased equally in both groups at times t1 and t2 compared with preoperative concentrations. For both groups, nitric oxide circulating concentrations were significantly reduced at times t1 and t2 compared with preoperative concentrations. However, the nitric oxide value was lower for Group HF compared to Group LF at t2. No correlation was found between the IL-10 and nitric oxide levels. Clinical usage of two different flow anesthesia forms with desflurane may increase interleukin-10 levels both in Group HF and Group LF; nitric oxide levels circulating concentrations were significantly reduced at times t1 and t2 compared with preoperative concentrations; however, at 24h postoperatively they were higher in Group LF compared to Group HF. No correlation was detected between interleukin-10 and nitric oxide levels. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Plasma levels of interleukin-10 and nitric oxide in response to two different desflurane anesthesia flow rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Kalayci

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated interleukin-10 and nitric oxide plasma levels following surgery to determine whether there is a correlation between these two variables and if different desflurane anesthesia flow rates influence nitric oxide and interleukin-10 concentrations in circulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients between 18 and 70 years and ASA I-II physical status who were scheduled to undergo thyroidectomy were enrolled in the study. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were allocated into two groups to receive two different desflurane anesthesia flow rates: high flow (Group HF and low flow (Group LF. MEASUREMENTS: Blood samples were drawn at the beginning (t 0 and end (t 1 of the operation and after 24 h (t 2. Plasma interleukin-10 and nitric oxide levels were measured using an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay and a Griess reagents kit, respectively. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were assessed. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups with regard to interleukin-10 levels at the times of measurement. Interleukin-10 levels were increased equally in both groups at times t 1 and t 2 compared with preoperative concentrations. For both groups, nitric oxide circulating concentrations were significantly reduced at times t 1 and t 2 compared with preoperative concentrations. However, the nitric oxide value was lower for Group HF compared to Group LF at t 2. No correlation was found between the IL-10 and nitric oxide levels. CONCLUSION: Clinical usage of two different flow anesthesia forms with desflurane may increase interleukin-10 levels both in Group HF and Group LF; nitric oxide levels circulating concentrations were significantly reduced at times t 1 and t 2 compared with preoperative concentrations; however, at 24 h postoperatively they were higher in Group LF compared to Group HF. No correlation was detected between interleukin-10 and nitric oxide levels.

  7. Thermodynamic Simulation of Equilibrium Composition of Reaction Products at Dehydration of a Technological Channel in a Uranium-Graphite Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavliuk, A. O.; Zagumennov, V. S.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.; Bespala, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    The problems of accumulation of nuclear fuel spills in the graphite stack in the course of operation of uranium-graphite nuclear reactors are considered. The results of thermodynamic analysis of the processes in the graphite stack at dehydration of a technological channel, fuel element shell unsealing and migration of fission products, and activation of stable nuclides in structural elements of the reactor and actinides inside the graphite moderator are given. The main chemical reactions and compounds that are produced in these modes in the reactor channel during its operation and that may be hazardous after its shutdown and decommissioning are presented. Thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition is performed using the specialized code TERRA. The results of thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition in different cases of technological channel dehydration in the course of the reactor operation show that, if the temperature inside the active core of the nuclear reactor increases to the melting temperature of the fuel element, oxides and carbides of nuclear fuel are produced. The mathematical model of the nonstationary heat transfer in a graphite stack of a uranium-graphite reactor in the case of the technological channel dehydration is presented. The results of calculated temperature evolution at the center of the fuel element, the replaceable graphite element, the air gap, and in the surface layer of the block graphite are given. The numerical results show that, in the case of dehydration of the technological channel in the uranium-graphite reactor with metallic uranium, the main reaction product is uranium dioxide UO2 in the condensed phase. Low probability of production of pyrophoric uranium compounds (UH3) in the graphite stack is proven, which allows one to disassemble the graphite stack without the risk of spontaneous graphite ignition in the course of decommissioning of the uranium-graphite nuclear reactor.

  8. Mechanical properties of graphites and carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouquet, Gilbert.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of graphites and artificial carbons is related to the structure of these materials. The influence of structural modifications in a graphite monocrystal on the deformation and fracture properties is studied [fr

  9. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  10. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, o