WorldWideScience

Sample records for graphite moderator structure

  1. Structural characteristics of a graphite moderated critical assembly for a Zero Power reactor at IEA (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Ferreira, A.C. de; Hukai, R.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The structural characteristics of a graphite moderated core of a critical assembly to be installed in the Zero Power Reactor of IEA have been defined. These characteristics are the graphite block dimensions, the number and dimensions of the holes in the graphite, the pitch, the dimensions of the sticks of fuel and graphite to be inserted in the holes, and the mechanical reproducibility of the system. The composition of the fuel and moderator sticks were also defined. The main boundary conditions were the range of the relation C/U and C/TH used in commercial HTGR and the neutronics homogeneity

  2. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  3. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  4. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  5. A pore structure model for the gas transport property changes, initial oxidation rates and cumulative weight loss of AGR moderator graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1985-09-01

    A quantitative model has been developed for the gas transport property variation, cumulative weight loss and initial oxidation rates of AGR moderator graphite. The model utilises the theory of dynamic moments of the pore structure to calculate the changes in physical properties brought about by radiolytic corrosion taking place within the graphite porosity. In order to account for the behaviour of the initial rate curves, and the weight loss data obtained it is necessary to invoke the presence of a group of cylindrical pore and a group of small slab-shaped pores. The latter are methane depleted. This is in addition to the pore group involved in gas transport which is best represented by cylinders of mean radius 2.13 μm. The model satisfactorily predicts the experimental weight loss data obtained from experiments in the DIDO 6V3 and BFB loops. (author)

  6. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  7. Critical experiments on enriched uranium graphite moderated cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Kurokawa, Ryosuke

    1978-07-01

    A variety of 20 % enriched uranium loaded and graphite-moderated cores consisting of the different lattice cells in a wide range of the carbon to uranium atomic ratio have been built at Semi-Homogeneous Critical Experimental Assembly (SHE) to perform the critical experiments systematically. In the present report, the experimental results for homogeneously or heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and for simulation core of the experimental reactor for a multi-purpose high temperature reactor are filed so as to be utilized for evaluating the accuracy of core design calculation for the experimental reactor. The filed experimental data are composed of critical masses of uranium, kinetic parameters, reactivity worths of the experimental control rods and power distributions in the cores with those rods. Theoretical analyses are made for the experimental data by adopting a simple ''homogenized cylindrical core model'' using the nuclear data of ENDF/B-III, which treats the neutron behaviour after smearing the lattice cell structure. It is made clear from a comparison between the measurement and the calculation that the group constants and fundamental methods of calculations, based on this theoretical model, are valid for the homogeneously fuel loaded cores, but not for both of the heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and the core for simulation of the experimental reactor. Then, it is pointed out that consideration to semi-homogeneous property of the lattice cells for reactor neutrons is essential for high temperature graphite-moderated reactors using dispersion fuel elements of graphite and uranium. (author)

  8. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  9. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs.

  11. Calculation of reactivity of control rods in graphite moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1978-01-01

    A study about the method of calculation for the reactivity of control rods in graphite-moderated critical assemblies, is presented. The result of theoretical calculation, developed by super celles and Nordheim-Scalettar methods are compared with experimental results for the critical Assembly of General Atomic. The two methods are then applicable to reactivity calculation of the control rods of graphite moderated critical assemblies [pt

  12. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  13. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  14. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  15. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs

  16. Structural analysis of polycrystalline (graphitized) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, M.M.; Kravchik, A.E.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Specific features of the structure of polycrystal carbon materials (CM), characterized by high enough degree of structural perfection and different genesis are analyzed. From the viewpoint of fine and supercrystallite structure analysis of the most characteristic groups of graphitized CM: artificial graphites, and natural graphites, as well, has been carried out. It is ascertained that in paracrystal CM a monolayer of hexagonally-bound carbon atoms is the basic element of the structure, and in graphitized CM - a microlayer. The importance of the evaluation of the degree of three-dimensional ordering of the microlayer is shown

  17. Carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated graphite for graphite-moderated reactors. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsuo, Hideto [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The graphite moderated gas cooled reactor operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company was stopped its commercial operation on March 1998, and the decommissioning process has been started. Graphite material is often used as the moderator and the reflector materials in the core of the gas cooled reactor. During the operation, a long life nuclide of {sup 14}C is generated in the graphite by several transmutation reactions. Separation of {sup 14}C isotope and the development of the separation method have been recognized to be critical issues for the decommissioning of the reactor core. To understand the current methodologies for the carbon isotope separation, literature on the subject was surveyed. Also, those on the physical and chemical behavior of {sup 14}C were surveyed. This is because the larger part of the nuclides in the graphite is produced from {sup 14}N by (n,p) reaction, and the location of them in the material tends to be different from those of the other carbon atoms. This report summarizes the result of survey on the open literature about the behavior of {sup 14}C and the separation methods, including the list of the literature on these subjects. (author)

  18. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  19. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  20. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kage, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 442, Nov (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * cast iron * graphite structure * pearlite content Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2016

  1. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  2. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors; Reactores de moderador solido controlados por desplazamiento espectral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F

    1984-07-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs.

  3. Calculation of the Thermal State of the Graphite Moderator of the RBMK Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobiev Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to study the temperature field of the graphite stack of the RBMK reactor. In work was analyzed the influence of contact pressure between the components of the masonry on the temperature of the graphite moderator.

  4. Microstructural characterization and pore structure analysis of nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, J.; Karthik, C.; Butt, D.P.; Windes, W.E.; Ubic, R.

    2011-01-01

    Graphite will be used as a structural and moderator material in next-generation nuclear reactors. While the overall nature of the production of nuclear graphite is well understood, the historic nuclear grades of graphite are no longer available. This paper reports the virgin microstructural characteristics of filler particles and macro-scale porosity in virgin nuclear graphite grades of interest to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. Optical microscopy was used to characterize filler particle size and shape as well as the arrangement of shrinkage cracks. Computer aided image analysis was applied to optical images to quantitatively determine the variation of pore structure, area, eccentricity, and orientation within and between grades. The overall porosity ranged between ∼14% and 21%. A few large pores constitute the majority of the overall porosity. The distribution of pore area in all grades was roughly logarithmic in nature. The average pore was best fit by an ellipse with aspect ratio of ∼2. An estimated 0.6-0.9% of observed porosity was attributed to shrinkage cracks in the filler particles. Finally, a preferred orientation of the porosity was observed in all grades.

  5. The behaviour of CAGR moderator and sleeve graphites radiolytically oxidised to high weight loss in inhibited coolant gas compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, P.; Fitzgerald, B.; Ketchen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Gilsocarbon graphites were irradiated to high weight losses in three different CO 2 based coolants. The experimental data is tested against a model which interprets the gas phase chemistry and pore geometry and allows weight loss and gas flow properties to be calculated. The observed changes of oxidation rate with dose were successfully predicted from the model. An empirical relationship was also derived which was shown to fit data for moderator, sleeve and special pore structure graphites. Changes in graphite permeability and diffusivity were predicted by the model, and also by other simplified, more approximate methods. The model based upon the measured transport pore spectrum was shown to be the best with other methods proving adequate to moderate doses. (author)

  6. Structural strength of core graphite bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Futakawa, M.

    1987-01-01

    A HTR core consists of fuel, hot plenum, reflector and thermal barrier blocks. Each graphite block is supported by three thin cylindrical graphite bars called support post. Static and dynamic core loads are transmitted by the support posts to the thermal barrier blocks and a support plate. These posts are in contact with the blocks through hemispherical post seats to absorb the relative displacement caused by seismic force and the difference of thermal expansion of materials at the time of the start-up and shutdown of a reactor. The mixed fracture criterion of principal stress and modified Mohr-Coulomb's theory as well as the fracture criterion of principal stress based on elastic stress analysis was discussed in connection with the application to HTR graphite components. The buckling fracture of a support post was taken in consideration as one of the fracture modes. The effect that the length/diameter ratio of a post, small rotation and the curvature of post ends and seats exerted on the fracture strength was studied by using IG-110 graphite. Contacting stress analysis was carried out by using the structural analysis code 'COSMOS-7'. The experimental method, the analysis of buckling strength and the results are reported. The fracture of a support post is caused by the mixed mode of bending deformation, split fracture and shearing fracture. (Kako, I.)

  7. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  8. Assessments of the stresses and deformations in an RBMK graphite moderator brick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.J.; Davies, M.A.; Marsden, B.J.; Bougaenko, S.E.; Baldin, V.D.; Demintievski, V.N.; Rodtchenkov, B.S.; Sinitsyn, E.N.

    1996-01-01

    The RBMK reactors, designed by RDIPE (Moscow), are graphite moderated and cooled by light water. Graphite dimensions and thermo-mechanical properties change significantly in a complex manner during reactor life due to fast neutron damage and these changes have implications on the safe operation of all graphite moderated reactors. A joint programme of work is being carried out between AEA Technology (UK) and RDIPE (Russia) to assess the life of the RBMK graphite stack under normal operating conditions. The programme has included the modelling of graphite dimensional changes due to irradiation through reactor life and the assessment of the implications of these changes on the stresses and deformations in the graphite stack. Calculations have been carried out to assess the deformations of a moderator brick over a period from start of life up to 30 years of operation. The assessment have also included an analysis of the stresses in the bricks so that the time to brick failure could be determined. This paper describes the RBMK core design, the data and assessment methodology used in the analysis of the RBMK core and presents some results from analyses of the Leningrad Unit 1 RBMK reactor. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  9. Neutronic analysis of graphite-moderated solid breeder design for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.; Abdou, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of the INTOR tritium-production-blanket design is presented. A ternary system of solid silicate breeder, lead neutron multiplier, and graphite moderator is explored primary from safety and blanket tritium-inventory considerations. Lithium-silicate (Li 2 SiO 3 ) breeder systems are studied along with water (H 2 O/D 2 O) and Type 316 stainless steel as coolant and structural material, respectively. The analysis examines the neutronics effects on tritium-production regarding: (1) coolant choice; (2) moderator choice; (3) moderator location; (4) multiplier thickness; (5) 6 Li enrichment; and (6) 6 Li burnup. The tritium-breeding-blanket modules are located at the top, outboard, and bottom (outer) parts of the torus, resulting in a breeding coverage of approx. 60% at the first-wall surface. It is found that the reference INTOR design yields, based on a three-dimensional analysis, a net tritium breeding ratio (BR) of approx. 0.65 at the beginning of reactor operation, satisfying the design criterion of BR > 0.6

  10. Graphitic structure formation in ion implanted polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavenner, E., E-mail: tazman1492@gmail.com [Creative Polymers Pty. Ltd., 41 Wilkinson Street, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Wood, B. [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Curry, M.; Jankovic, A.; Patel, R. [Center for Applied Science and Engineering, Missouri State University, 524 North Boonville Avenue, Springfield, MO 65806 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ion implantation is a technique that is used to change the electrical, optical, hardness and biocompatibility of a wide range of inorganic materials. This technique also imparts similar changes to organic or polymer based materials. With polymers, ion implantation can produce a carbon enriched volume. Knowledge as to the nature of this enrichment and its relative concentration is necessary to produce accurate models of the physical properties of the modified material. One technique that can achieve this is X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this study the formation of graphite like structures in the near surface of polyetheretherketone by ion implantation has been elucidated from detailed analysis of the C 1s and valence band peak structures generated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further evidence is given by both Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection.

  11. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  12. Graphite structure and its relation to mechanical engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.; Kelly, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    The inhomogeneous nature of polycrystalline graphite requires property measurements to be made over dimensions large enough to average the local variations in the structure. This is particularly true for mechanical integrity, and experimental data are presented which illustrate the importance of the real aggregate structure of graphite and the difficulties of interpreting strength data from different tests. The classical statistical treatments do not hold generally, and the problem of defining a failure criterion for graphite is discussed. It is suggested that the stress conditions in graphite components might be classified in terms of the dimensions and stress gradients related to the characteristic flaw size of the material as determined experimentally. (author)

  13. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ammar, M.R. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Université Orléans, CS90055, F-45071 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Rouzaud, J.N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, UMR CNRS ENS 8538, F-75231 Paris cedex 5 (France)

    2016-03-15

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges R{sub p} of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200–1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower

  14. Structural integrity of graphite core support structures of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Toyota, Junji; Sato, Sadao; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1990-02-01

    The graphite core support structures (GCSSs) of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) are an arrangement of graphite blocks and posts that support the core and provide a lower plenum and a hot-leg path for the primary coolant. The GCSSs are designed not to be replaced by new items during plant life time (about twenty years). To maintain structural integrity of the GCSSs, conservative design has been made sufficiently on the basis of structural tests. The present study confirmed that reactor safety was still maintained even if failure and destruction of the GCSSs is supposed to occur. The GCSSs are fabricated under strict quality control and the observation and surveillance programs are planed to examine the structual integrity of the GCSSs during an operation. This paper describes the concept of design and quality control and summarizes structural tests, observation and surveillance programs. (author)

  15. Optimization of temperature coefficient and breeding ratio for a graphite-moderated molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, C.Y.; Cai, X.Z.; Jiang, D.Z.; Yu, C.G.; Li, X.X.; Ma, Y.W.; Han, J.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, J.G., E-mail: chenjg@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The temperature feedback coefficient with different moderation ratios for TMSR in thermal neutron region is optimized. • The breeding ratio and doubling time of a thermal TMSR with three different reprocessing schemes are analyzed. • The smaller hexagon size and larger salt fraction with more negative feedback coefficient can better satisfy the safety demands. • A shorter reprocessing time can achieve a better breeding ratio in a thermal TMSR. • The graphite moderator lifespan is compared with other MSRs and discussed. - Abstract: Molten salt reactor (MSR) has fascinating features: inherent safety, no fuel fabrication, online fuel reprocessing, etc. However, the graphite moderated MSR may present positive feedback coefficient which has severe implications for the transient behavior during operation. In this paper, the feedback coefficient and the breeding ratio are optimized based on the fuel-to-graphite ratio variation for a thorium based MSR (TMSR). A certain thermal core with negative feedback coefficient and relative high initial breeding ratio is chosen for the reprocessing scheme analysis. The breeding performances for the TMSR under different online fuel reprocessing efficiencies and frequencies are evaluated and compared with other MSR concepts. The results indicate that the thermal TMSR can get a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with appropriate reprocessing scheme. The low fissile inventory in thermal TMSR leads to a short doubling time and low transuranic (TRU) inventory. The lifetime of graphite used for the TMSR is also discussed.

  16. Graphite moderator annealing of the experimental reactor for irradiation (0.5 MW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, Carlos Alberto de; Pires, Luis Fernando Goncalves

    1995-01-01

    This work describes an operational procedure for the annealing of the graphite moderator in the 0,5 MW Experimental Reactor for Irradiation. A theoretical methodology has been developed for calculating the temperature field during the annealing process. The equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation for the coolant as well as for the energy conservation in the moderator are solved numerically. The energy stored in the graphite and released in the annealing is accounted for by the use of a modified source term in the energy conservation equation for the moderator. A good agreement has been found for comparisons of the calculations with annealing data from the BEPO reactor. The major parameters affecting annealing have also been determined. (author). 8 refs, 11 figs

  17. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  18. Criticality calculations for a critical assembly, graphite moderate, using 20% enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Ferreira, A.C. de; Hukai, R.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The construction of a Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) at the Instituto de Energia Atomica in order to measure the neutron characteristics (parameters) of HTGR reactors is proposed. The necessary quantity fissile uranium for these measurements has been calculed. Criticality studies of graphite moderated critical assemblies containing thorium have been made and the critical mass of each of several typical commercial HTGR compositions has been calculated using computer codes HAMMER and CITATION. Assemblies investigated contained a central cylindrical core region, simulating a typical commercial HTGR composition, a uranium-graphite driver region and a outer pure graphite reflector region. It is concluded that a 10Kg inventory of fissile uranium will be required for a program of measurements utilizing each of the several calculated assemblies

  19. A core-monitoring based methodology for predictions of graphite weight loss in AGR moderator bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, K., E-mail: kevin.mcnally@hsl.gsi.gov.uk [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Warren, N. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Fahad, M.; Hall, G.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A statistically-based methodology for estimating graphite density is presented. • Graphite shrinkage is accounted for using a finite element model. • Differences in weight loss forecasts were found when compared to the existing model. - Abstract: Physically based models, resolved using the finite element (FE) method are often used to model changes in dimensions and the associated stress fields of graphite moderator bricks within a reactor. These models require inputs that describe the loading conditions (temperature, fluence and weight loss ‘field variables’), and coded relationships describing the behaviour of graphite under these conditions. The weight loss field variables are calculated using a reactor chemistry/physics code FEAT DIFFUSE. In this work the authors consider an alternative data source of weight loss: that from a longitudinal dataset of density measurements made on small samples trepanned from operating reactors during statutory outages. A nonlinear mixed-effect model is presented for modelling the age and depth-related trends in density. A correction that accounts for irradiation-induced dimensional changes (axial and radial shrinkage) is subsequently applied. The authors compare weight loss forecasts made using FEAT DIFFUSE with those based on an alternative statistical model for a layer four moderator brick for the Hinkley Point B, Reactor 3. The authors compare the two approaches for the weight loss distribution through the brick with a particular focus on the interstitial keyway, and for the average (over the volume of the brick) weight loss.

  20. Calculation of the fissile mass of a graphite moderated critical assembly using 93% enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.; Marzo, M.A.S.; Collussi, I.; Ferreira, A.C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The critical mass of uranium has been calculated for a graphite moderated set fueled with 93% enriched uranium to be mounted on the Instituto de Energia Atomica split table Zero Power Reactor. The core composition was optimized to permit the maximum number of configurations to be studied. Analysis of three core compositions shows that 8 Kg of uranium enriched to 93% - U-235 (by weight) and 100 Kg of thorium would be sufficient for criticality experiments [pt

  1. Structures and Performance of Graphene/Polyimide Composite Graphite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry-wet spinning process was used to gain graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers, then graphene/polyimide composite carbon and graphite fibers were obtained through carbonized and graphitized. Different graphene oxide contents of the composite carbon and graphite fibers were measured by thermal gravimetric analysis, Raman, mechanical properties, electrical properties,SEM and so on. The results show that when the GO content is 0.3%(mass fraction,the same below, the thermal property of the graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers is the best. The mechanical and electrical properties are obriously improved by the addition of GO, graphitization degree also increases. When the composite carbon fibers are treated at 2800℃, GO content increases to 2.0%, the thermal conductivity of the composite graphite fibers reaches 435.57W·m-1·K-1 and cross-section structures of carbon fibers are more compact.

  2. The seismic assessment of radially keyed graphite moderator cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, A.G.; Payne, J.F.B.

    1996-01-01

    The modelling of AGR and Magnox cores has to deal with the very large number of components that make up the core, and the non-linear response due to the clearances in the keying system. This paper examines the conditions under which it is permissible to linearise the response. By comparing the results of discrete and continuum models of the core, the paper also shows that the number of components in the core is sufficiently large that the core can be approximated satisfactorily by an anisotropic solid material. The material has unusual properties, but these can be handled within the standard framework for the description of the elastic properties of an anisotropic solid. This description of the core by an equivalent solid material can readily be incorporated into finite element models of the reactor internal structure. Such models have been set up for both AGR and Magnox reactors. The models are being used to assess the seismic response of these reactors. (author). 5 refs, 6 figs

  3. Condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors and advances in their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldyrev, V.M.; Mikhaj, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is being given to results of technical and economical investigations of advisability of increasing unit power by elevating steam generating capacity as a result of inserting numerous of stereotype sectional structural elements of the reactor with similar thermodynamic parameters. It is concluded that construction of power units of condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors of 2400-3200 MWe and higher unit power capacity represents the real method for sharp growth of efficiency and labour productivity in power industry. It can also provide the required increase of the rate of putting electrogenerating powers into operation

  4. Design development of graphite primary structures enables SSTO success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagiotti, V. A.; Yahiro, J. S.; Suh, Daniel E.; Hodges, Eric R.; Prior, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a graphite composite wing and a graphite composite intertank primary structure for application toward Single-Stage to Orbit space vehicles such as those under development in NASA's X-33/Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program. The trade study and designs are based on a Rockwell vertical take-off and horizontal landing (VTHL) wing-body RLV vehicle. Northrop Grumman's approach using a building block development technique is described. Composite Graphite/Bismaleimide (Gr/BMI) material characterization test results are presented. Unique intertank and wing composite subcomponent test article designs are described and test results to date are presented. Wing and intertank Full Scale Section Test Article (FSTA) objectives and designs are outlined. Trade studies, supporting building block testing, and FSTA demonstrations combine to develop graphite primary structure composite technology that enables developing X-33/RLV design programs to meet critical SSTO structural weight and operations performance criteria.

  5. Structural performance of a graphite blanket in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.; Watson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite in a fusion reactor causes dimensional changes, enhanced creep, and changes in elastic properties and fracture strength. Temperature and flux gradients through the graphite blanket structure produce differential distortions and stress gradients. An inelastic stress analysis procedure is described which treats these variations of the graphite properties in a consistent manner as dictated by physical models for the radiation effects. Furthermore, the procedure follows the evolution of the stress and fracture strength distributions during the reactor operation as well as for possible shutdowns at any time. The lifetime of the graphite structure can be determined based on the failure criterion that the stress at any location exceeds one-half of the fracture strength. This procedure is applied to the most critical component of the blanket module in the SOLASE design

  6. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on thermal conductivity of the graphite/aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.B. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zhe.chen@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhong, S.Y.; Wu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ji, G. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59655 (France); Wang, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Various graphite fillers, such as graphite particles, graphite fibers, graphite flakes and porous graphite blocks, have been successfully incorporated into an Al alloy by squeeze casting in order to fabricate graphite/Al composites with enhanced thermal conductivity (TC). Microstructural characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy has revealed a tightly-adhered, clean and Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}-free interface between the graphite fillers and the Al matrix in all the as-fabricated composites. Taking the microstructural features into account, we generalized the corresponding predictive models for the TCs of these composites with the effective medium approximation and the Maxwell mean-field scheme, which both show good agreement with the experimental data. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on the TCs of the composites were further discussed. - Highlights: • The thermal enhancement of various graphite fillers with different topology structures. • Predictive models for the thermal conductivity of different topology structures. • Oriented flakes alignment has the high potentials for thermal enhancement.

  7. Investigating the effects of stress on the pore structures of nuclear grade graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Joshua E.L., E-mail: joshua.taylor@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Hall, Graham N., E-mail: graham.n.hall@manchester.ac.uk; Mummery, Paul M., E-mail: paul.m.mummery@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-03-15

    Graphite is used as a moderating material and as a structural component in a number of current generation nuclear reactors. During reactor operation stresses develop in the graphite components, causing them to deform. It is important to understand how the microstructure of graphite affects the material's response to these stresses. A series of experiments were performed to investigate how the pore structures of Pile Grade A and Gilsocarbon graphites respond to loading stresses. A compression rig was used to simulate the build-up of operational stresses in graphite components, and a confocal laser microscope was used to study variation of a number of important pore properties. Values of elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio were calculated and compared to existing literature to confirm the validity of the experimental techniques. Mean pore areas were observed to decrease linearly with increasing applied load, mean pore eccentricity increased linearly, and a small amount of clockwise pore rotation was observed. The response to build-up of stresses was dependent on the orientation of the pores and basal planes and the shapes of the pores with respect to the loading axis. It was proposed that pore closure and pore reorientation were competing processes. Pore separation was quantified using ‘nearest neighbour’ and Voronoi techniques, and non-pore regions were found to shrink linearly with increasing applied load. - Highlights: • Effects of stress on pore structures of Gilsocarbon and PGA graphites were studied. • Application of a compressive load was used to generate stresses in graphite. • Inverse linear relationship between stress and pore area was observed. • Mean pore eccentricity increased, clockwise pore rotation observed. • Separation of pores quantified using Voronoi and ‘nearest-neighbour’ methods.

  8. An automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Goncalves Junior, J. de.

    1989-01-01

    The work propose an automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques. The system uses a microcomputer to monitor the power and the period, to run the control algorithm, and to generate electronic signals to excite the motor, which moves vertically the control rod banks. A nuclear reactor simulator was developed to test the control system. The simulator consists of a software based on the point kinetic equations and implanted in an analogical computer. The results show that this control system has a good performance and versatility. In addition, the simulator is capable of reproducing with accuracy the behavior of a nuclear reactor. (author)

  9. Calculation of neutron flux distribution of thermal neutrons from microtron converter in a graphite moderator with water reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejsek, K.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation is made of the thermal neutron flux in the moderator and reflector by solving the neutron diffusion equation using the four-group theory. The correction for neutron absorption in the moderator was carried out using the perturbation theory. The calculation was carried out for four groups with the following energy ranges: the first group 2 MeV to 3 keV, the second group 3 keV to 5 eV, the third group 5 eV to 0.025 eV and the fourth group 0.025 eV. The values of the macroscopic cross section of capture and scattering, of the diffusion coefficient, the macroscopic cross section of the moderator, of the neutron age and the extrapolation length for the water-graphite moderator used in the calculations are given. The spatial distribution of the thermal neutron flux is graphically represented for graphite of a 30, 40, and 50 cm radius and for graphite of a 30 and 40 cm radius with a 10 cm water reflector; a graphic comparison is made of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in water and in graphite, both 40 cm in radius. The system of graphite with reflector proved to be the best and most efficient system for raising the flux density of thermal neutrons. (J.P.)

  10. Transition from glass to graphite in manufacture of composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffum, H. E.; Thompson, V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The transition from fiberglass reinforced plastic composites to graphite reinforced plastic composites is described. Structural fiberglass design and manufacturing background are summarized. How this experience provides a technology base for moving into graphite composite secondary structure and then to composite primary structure is considered. The technical requirements that must be fulfilled in the transition from glass to graphite composite structure are also included.

  11. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  12. Chapter 5: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. II: Correlation of results with the method of Syrett (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    The results are given of exponential experiments on graphite moderated systems with fuel elements consisting of single rods and tubes of natural uranium metal. A correlation is given with the method of calculation proposed by Syrett (1961) and new consistent values of neutron yield and effective resonance integral are derived. (author)

  13. Experiences in the emptying of waste silos containing solid nuclear waste from graphite- moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2003-01-01

    Before reactor sites can be handed over for ultimate decommissioning, at some sites silos containing waste from operations need to be emptied. The form and physical condition of the waste demands sophisticated retrieval technologies taking into account the onsite situation in terms of infrastructure and silo geometry. Furthermore, in the case of graphite moderated reactors, this waste usually includes several tonnes of graphite waste requiring special HVAC and dust handling measures. RWE NUKEM Group has already performed several contracts dealing with such emptying tasks. Of particular interest for the upcoming decommissioning projects in France might be the activities at Vandellos, Spain and Trawsfynnyd, UK. Retrieval System for Vandellos NPP is discussed. Following an international competitive tender exercise, RWE NUKEM won the contract to provide a turn-key retrieval system. This involved the design, manufacture and installation of a system built around the modules of a 200 kg capacity version of the ARTISAN manipulator system. The ARTISAN 200 manipulator, with remote slave arm detach facility, was deployed on a telescopic mast inserted into the silos through the roof penetrations. The manipulator deployed a range of tools to gather the waste and load it into a transfer basket, deployed through an adjacent penetration. After commissioning, the system cleared the vaults in less than the scheduled period with no failures. At the Trawsfynnyd Magnox plants two types of intermediate level waste (ILW) accumulated on site; namely Miscellaneous Activated Components (MAC) and Fuel Element Debris (FED). MAC is predominantly components that have been activated by the reactor core and then discharged. FED mainly consists of fuel cladding produced when fuel elements were prepared for dispatch to the reprocessing facility. RWE NUKEM Ltd. was awarded a contract to design, supply, commission and operate equipment to retrieve, pack and immobilize the two waste streams. Major

  14. Thermal linear expansion coefficient of structural graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu.S.

    1995-01-01

    The data now available on radiation induced changes of linear thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) for native structural carbon materials (SCM) irradiated with high fluences are summarized. For different types of native and foreign SCM dose dependences of CTE changes in the temperature range of 300...1600 K and at fluences up to (2...3)x10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.18 meV) are compared. On the base of this comparison factors defined the CTE changes under neutron irradiation are revealed and the explanation of observed phenomena is offered. Large number of the factors revealed does not allowed to calculate CTE radiation induced changes. 39 refs.; 16 figs.; 5 tabs

  15. Chapter 8: Exponential experiments on graphite moderated lattices fuelled by natural uranium tubes containing cylindrical graphite cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out using a fuel element comprising a 2.75 in. o.d./2.40 in. i.d. natural uranium tube containing a graphite core of diameter 2.0 in. Values of material buckling and migration area asymmetry for lattices at 7 in., 8 in. and 8/2 in. pitch have been obtained, and correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) to derive an effective resonance integral for the cored element. By comparison with the resonance integral for the same fuel tube without a core, a value for the constant 'γ' of the theory of Stace (1959) is obtained. (author)

  16. Design of a graphite-moderated {sup 241}Am-Li neutron field to simulate reactor spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, N., E-mail: tsujimura.norio@jaea.go.j [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Yoshida, T. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    A neutron calibration field using {sup 241}Am-Li sources and a moderator was designed to simulate the neutron fields found outside a reactor. The moderating assembly selected for the design calculation consists of a cube of graphite blocks with dimensions of 50 cm by 50 cm by 50 cm, in which the {sup 241}Am-Li sources are placed. Monte Carlo calculations revealed the optimal depth of the source to be 15 cm. This moderated neutron source can be used to provide a test field that has a large number of intermediate energy neutrons with a small portion of MeV component.

  17. Topological Characterization of Carbon Graphite and Crystal Cubic Carbon Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Wei Gao Muhammad Kamran; Naeem, Muhammad; Rehman, Najma Abdul

    2017-09-07

    Graph theory is used for modeling, designing, analysis and understanding chemical structures or chemical networks and their properties. The molecular graph is a graph consisting of atoms called vertices and the chemical bond between atoms called edges. In this article, we study the chemical graphs of carbon graphite and crystal structure of cubic carbon. Moreover, we compute and give closed formulas of degree based additive topological indices, namely hyper-Zagreb index, first multiple and second multiple Zagreb indices, and first and second Zagreb polynomials.

  18. Development of cold source moderator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Tomokaze; Ishikura, Syuichi; Terada, Atsuhiko; Teshigawara, Makoto; Watanabe, Noboru; HIno, Ryutaro

    1999-01-01

    The cold and thermal neutrons generated at the target (which works as a spallation neutron source under a 5MW proton beam condition) is filtered with cold source moderators using supercritical hydrogen. Preliminary structural analysis was carried out to clarify technical problems on the concept of the thin-walled structure for the cold source moderator. Structural analytical results showed that the maximum stress of 1 12MPa occurred on the moderator surface, which exceeded the allowable design stresses of ordinary aluminum alloys. Flow patterns measured by water flow experiments agreed well with hydraulic analytical results, which showed that an impinging jet flow from an inner pipe of the moderator caused a recirculation flow on a large scale. Based on analytical and experimental results, new moderator structures with minute frames, blowing flow holes etc. were proposed to keep its strength and to suppress the recirculation flow. (author)

  19. Structural features of the adsorption layer of pentacene on the graphite surface and the PMMA/graphite hybrid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeeva, A. I.; Gorbunov, V. A.; Litunenko, T. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using the molecular dynamics and the Monte Carlo methods, we have studied the structural features and growth mechanism of the pentacene film on graphite and polymethylmethacrylate /graphite surfaces. Monolayer capacity and molecular area, optimal angles between the pentacene molecules and graphite and PMMA/graphite surfaces as well as the characteristic angles between the neighboring pentacene molecules in the adsorption layer were estimated. It is shown that the orientation of the pentacene molecules in the film is determined by a number of factors, including the surface concentration of the molecules, relief of the surface, presence or absence of the polymer layer and its thickness. The pentacene molecules adsorbed on the graphite surface keep a horizontal position relative to the long axis at any surface coverage/thickness of the film. In the presence of the PMMA layer on the graphite, the increase of the number of pentacene molecules as well as the thickness of the PMMA layer induce the change of molecular orientation from predominantly horizontal to vertical one. The reason for such behavior is supposed to be the roughness of the PMMA surface.

  20. Effect of structural disorder on quantum oscillations in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, B. C., E-mail: b.c-camargo@yahoo.com.br; Kopelevich, Y. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Usher, A.; Hubbard, S. B. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-18

    We have studied the effect of structural disorder on the de Haas van Alphen and Shubnikov de Haas quantum oscillations measured in natural, Kish, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples at temperatures down to 30 mK and at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The measurements were performed on different samples characterized by means of x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy techniques. Our results reveal a correlation between the amplitude of quantum oscillations and the sample surface roughness.

  1. Buckling and reaction rate experiments in plutonium/uranium metal fuelled, graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 400 deg. C. Part I: Experimental techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Clarke, W G; Gibson, M; Hobday, R; Hunt, C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Symons, C R; Wass, T [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-07-15

    This report presents experimental measurements of bucklings, flux fine structure and fission rate distributions in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium/uranium metal at temperatures up to 400 deg. C in the sub-critical assemblies SCORPIO I and SCORPIO II. The experimental techniques employed are described in some detail. The accuracy of the experimental measurements appears to be adequate for testing methods of calculation being developed for the calculation of reactivity and temperature coefficient of reactivity for power reactors containing plutonium and uranium. (author) 26 refs, 17 tabs, 17 figs

  2. Nondestructive testing on graphite structures for high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kambe, Mamoru; Tsuji, Nobumasa.

    1994-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic (for internal defects) and eddy current testing (for surface defects) were investigated on the structures of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphite for the HTTR. The equipment were developed in order to detect the specific configuration of graphite blocks and the testing conditions were defined as the practical testing methods. The established testing methods are being used for the acceptance tests of graphite structures in the HTTR. (author)

  3. Designing a TAC thermometer from a VHTR graphite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James A., E-mail: James.Smith@INL.gov; Kotter, Dale, E-mail: James.Smith@INL.gov [Fuel Performance and Design, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Garrett, Steven L.; Ali, Randall A. [Graduate Program in Acoustics, Penn State University, State College, PA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. Very High Temperature Reactors are pushing the in core temperatures even higher. A unique sensing approach will be discussed to address the necessary high temperature measurements. Thermoacoustic thermometry exploits high temperatures and uses materials that are immune to the effects of ionizing radiation to create a temperature sensor that is self-powered and wireless. In addition, the form-factor for the Thermoacoustic Thermometer (TACT) can be designed to be integrated within common in-pile structures. There are no physical moving parts required for TACT and the sensor is self-powered, as it uses the nuclear fuel for its heat source. TACT data will be presented from a laboratory prototype mimicking the design necessary for a VHTR graphite structure.

  4. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  5. Computational prediction of dust production in graphite moderated pebble bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Maziar

    The scope of the work reported here, which is the computational study of graphite wear behavior, supports the Nuclear Engineering University Programs project "Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermomechanics Issues for Design and Safety" funded by the US Department of Energy. In this work, modeling and simulating the contact mechanics, as anticipated in a PBR configuration, is carried out for the purpose of assessing the amount of dust generated during a full power operation year of a PBR. A methodology that encompasses finite element analysis (FEA) and micromechanics of wear is developed to address the issue of dust production and its quantification. Particularly, the phenomenon of wear and change of its rate with sliding length is the main focus of this dissertation. This work studies the wear properties of graphite by simulating pebble motion and interactions of a specific type of nuclear grade graphite, IG-11. This study consists of two perspectives: macroscale stress analysis and microscale analysis of wear mechanisms. The first is a set of FEA simulations considering pebble-pebble frictional contact. In these simulations, the mass of generated graphite particulates due to frictional contact is calculated by incorporating FEA results into Archard's equation, which is a linear correlation between wear mass and wear length. However, the experimental data by Johnson, University of Idaho, revealed that the wear rate of graphite decreases with sliding length. This is because the surfaces of the graphite pebbles become smoother over time, which results in a gradual decrease in wear rate. In order to address the change in wear rate, a more detailed analysis of wear mechanisms at room temperature is presented. In this microscale study, the wear behavior of graphite at the asperity level is studied by simulating the contact between asperities of facing surfaces. By introducing the effect of asperity removal on wear rate, a nonlinear

  6. Transmission electron-microscopic studies of structural changes in polycrystalline graphite after high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Karpukhin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Transmission electron-microscopic investigation of polycrystalline graphite before and after irradiation is carried out. The direct use of graphite samples after ion thinning, as an inquiry subject is the basic peculiarity of the work. Main structural components of MPG-6 graphite before and after irradiation are revealed, the structural mechanism of the reactor graphite destruction under irradiation is demonstrated. The mean values of L αm and L cm crystallite dimensions are determined. Radiation defects, occuring in some crystallites after irradiation are revealed by the dark-field electron microscopy method

  7. A first principles study of adhesion and electronic structure at Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yangzhen; Xing, Jiandong; Li, Yefei, E-mail: yefeili@126.com; Sun, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • The surface energy of graphite (0001) and Fe (110) has been calculated and the number of layers of graphite slab and Fe slab has been estimated. • The work of adhesion of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface with different interfacial separation d{sub 0} (1.7–3 Å) has been systematically discussed. • The total electron density and electron density difference of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are used to study the bonding characteristics. • The Interfacial energy and fracture toughness of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are estimated. - Abstract: Using first–principles calculations, we discuss the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite and that of the surface, the work of adhesion, and the electronic structure of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface. In this study, the experimental results of the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite reveal that our adopted parameters are reliable. Moreover, the results of surface energy demonstrate that nine atomic layers of graphite (0001) and five atomic layers of Fe (110) exhibit bulk–like interiors. The lattice mismatch of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface is about 6%. The results also exhibit that the Fe atom residing on top of the second layer of graphite slab (HCP structure) is the preferred stacking sequence. The work of adhesion (W{sub ad}) of the optimized Fe/graphite interface of HCP structure is 1.36 J/m{sup 2}. Electronic structures indicate that the bonding characteristics are a mixture of covalent and ionic bonds in the HCP interface. Moreover, the magnetic moment of atoms at the interface was studied using the spin polarized density of states.

  8. The role of graphite morphology and matrix structure on low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Thermal cycling resistance; graphite morphology; grey cast iron; austempered ductile iron; compacted/vermicular graphite iron; matrix decompo- sition. 1. Introduction. When a material is subjected to a temperature gradient, it tends to expand differentially. During this process, thermal stresses are induced. The source of ...

  9. Structural and Kinetic Properties of Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-29

    The exfoliation of graphite-FeCl 3NH has been used for making blankets for the extinction of metal fires [12). In addition. exfoliated graphite is...FeCl3-oH3 has been used (Aerotech GCma, 0.5 MHz wideband) equipped with for making blankets for the extinction of metal fires (3). In addition

  10. Structure and nanotribology of thermally deposited gold nanoparticles on graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cihan, Ebru [UNAM - Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Özoğul, Alper [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Baykara, Mehmet Z., E-mail: mehmet.baykara@bilkent.edu.tr [UNAM - Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Structure and tribology of thermally deposited AuNPs on HOPG have been studied. • Well-faceted, hexagonal AuNPs are formed on HOPG upon post-deposition annealing. • The crystalline character of the AuNPs is confirmed via TEM measurements. • AFM measurements reveal a “2/3” power law dependence of friction on load on AuNPs. • Friction forces at AuNP edges evolve linearly with increasing height and load. - Abstract: We present experiments involving the structural and frictional characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) thermally deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The effect of thermal deposition amount, as well as post-deposition annealing on the morphology and distribution of gold on HOPG is studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is utilized to confirm the crystalline character of the nanoparticles. Lateral force measurements conducted via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions are employed to investigate the nanotribological properties of the gold nanoparticles as a function of normal load. Finally, the increase in lateral force experienced at the edges of the nanoparticles is studied as a function of normal load, as well as nanoparticle height. As a whole, our results constitute a comprehensive structural and frictional characterization of the AuNP/HOPG material system, forming the basis for nanotribology experiments involving the lateral manipulation of thermally deposited AuNPs on HOPG via AFM under ambient conditions.

  11. Structure and nanotribology of thermally deposited gold nanoparticles on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Özoğul, Alper; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Structure and tribology of thermally deposited AuNPs on HOPG have been studied. • Well-faceted, hexagonal AuNPs are formed on HOPG upon post-deposition annealing. • The crystalline character of the AuNPs is confirmed via TEM measurements. • AFM measurements reveal a “2/3” power law dependence of friction on load on AuNPs. • Friction forces at AuNP edges evolve linearly with increasing height and load. - Abstract: We present experiments involving the structural and frictional characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) thermally deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The effect of thermal deposition amount, as well as post-deposition annealing on the morphology and distribution of gold on HOPG is studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is utilized to confirm the crystalline character of the nanoparticles. Lateral force measurements conducted via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions are employed to investigate the nanotribological properties of the gold nanoparticles as a function of normal load. Finally, the increase in lateral force experienced at the edges of the nanoparticles is studied as a function of normal load, as well as nanoparticle height. As a whole, our results constitute a comprehensive structural and frictional characterization of the AuNP/HOPG material system, forming the basis for nanotribology experiments involving the lateral manipulation of thermally deposited AuNPs on HOPG via AFM under ambient conditions.

  12. Impact of radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion on the release of {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl implanted into nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behaviour of {sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl in gas cooled graphite moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncoffre, N., E-mail: nathalie.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Toulhoat, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Silbermann, G. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); and others

    2016-04-15

    Graphite finds widespread use in many areas of nuclear technology based on its excellent moderator and reflector qualities as well as its strength and high temperature stability. Thus, it has been used as moderator or reflector in CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG, MAGNOX, and AGR. However, neutron irradiation of graphite results in the production of {sup 14}C (dose determining radionuclide) and {sup 36}Cl (long lived radionuclide), these radionuclides being a key issue regarding the management of the irradiated waste. Whatever the management option (purification, storage, and geological disposal), a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide's location and speciation has to be made. During reactor operation, the effects of radiolysis are likely to promote the radionuclide release especially at the gas/graphite interface. Radiolysis of the coolant is mainly initiated through γ irradiation as well as through Compton electrons in the graphite pores. Radiolysis can be simulated in laboratory using γ irradiation or ion irradiation. In this paper, {sup 13}C, {sup 37}Cl and {sup 14}N are implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate respectively the presence of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and nitrogen, a {sup 14}C precursor. Different irradiation experiments were carried out using different irradiation devices on implanted graphite brought into contact with a gas simulating the coolant. The aim was to assess the effects of gas radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion induced by γ or He{sup 2+} irradiation at the gas/graphite interface in order to evaluate their role on the radionuclide release. Our results allow inferring that radiolytic corrosion has clearly promoted the release of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}N located at the graphite brick/gas interfaces and open pores.

  13. Graphitic Carbon Foam Structural Cores and Multifunctional Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphitic carbon foams include a family of material forms and products with mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties that are tailor-able over a wide range....

  14. Ionic liquids at the surface of graphite: Wettability and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Emilie; Douce, Laurent; Quitevis, Edward L.; Pádua, Agílio A. H.; Costa Gomes, Margarida

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a better understanding of the interface between graphite and different molecular and ionic liquids. Experimental measurements of the liquid surface tension and of the graphite-liquid contact angle for sixteen ionic liquids and three molecular liquids are reported. These experimental values allowed the calculation of the solid/liquid interfacial energy that varies, for the ionic liquids studied, between 14.5 mN m-1 for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide and 37.8 mN m-1 for 3-dodecyl-1-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium tetrafluoroborate. Imidazolium-based ionic liquids with large alkyl side-chains or functionalized with benzyl groups seem to interact more favourably with freshly peeled graphite surfaces. Even if the interfacial energy seems a good descriptor to assess the affinity of a liquid for a carbon-based solid material, we conclude that both the surface tension of the liquid and the contact angle between the liquid and the solid can be significant. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the ordering of the ions near the graphite surface. We conclude that the presence of large alkyl side-chains in the cations increases the ordering of ions at the graphite surface. Benzyl functional groups in the cations lead to a large affinity towards the graphite surface.

  15. Chapter 4: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. I: Performance and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    A description is given of the methods used on the first BICEP stack for the performance and analysis of graphite exponential experiments. These differ in many respects from the methods formerly employed at A.E.R.E. The accuracy of the measurements has been increased, and the time taken to carry out and analyse an experiment has been reduced by approximately a factor of four. The following have contributed to the experimental work reported in this paper: J. R. Dyson, W. M. Holderay, R. M. Turner, S. D. R. Summers. (author)

  16. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; Gibson, M.; King, D.C.; Marshall, J.; Puckett, B.J.; Richards, A.E.; Wass, T.; Wilson, D.J.

    1965-07-01

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO 2 /UO 2 fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author)

  17. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Gibson, M; King, D C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Richards, A E; Wass, T; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-07-15

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author) 14 refs, 30 figs, 18 tabs

  18. Eddy current testing on structures of nuclear-grade IG-110 graphite for acceptance test in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Saikusa, Akio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    1993-09-01

    Core and core support graphite structures in the HTTR are mainly made of IG-110 graphite which is fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade. Nondestructive inspection with eddy current testing is planned to be applied to these graphite structures. Eddy current testing is widely applied to metallic structures and its testing method has been already established. On the other hand, the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from these of metals. Therefore, the eddy current testing method provided for metallic structures can not be applied directly to graphite structures. Thus the eddy current testing method and condition were established for the graphite structures made of IG-110 graphite. (author)

  19. In-service inspection methods for graphite-epoxy structures on commercial transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    In-service inspection methods for graphite-epoxy composite structures on commercial transport aircraft are determined. Graphite/epoxy structures, service incurred defects, current inspection practices and concerns of the airline and manufacturers, and other related information were determind by survey. Based on this information, applicable inspection nondestructive inspection methods are evaluated and inspection techniques determined. Technology is developed primarily in eddy current inspection.

  20. A preliminary definition of the parameters of an experimental natural - uranium, graphite - moderated, helium - cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, O.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study of the technical characteristic of an experiment at 32 MWe power with a natural uconium, graphite-moderated, helium cooled reactor is described. The national participation and the use of reactor as an instrument for the technological development of future high temperature gas cooled reactor is considered in the choice of the reactor type. Considerations about nuclear power plants components based in extensive bibliography about similar english GCR reactor is presented. The main thermal, neutronic an static characteristic and in core management of the nuclear fuel is stablished. A simplified scheme of the secondary system and its thermodynamic performance is determined. A scheme of parameters calculation of the reactor type is defined based in the present capacity of calculation developed by Coordenadoria de Engenharia Nuclear and Centro de Processamento de Dados, IEA, Brazil [pt

  1. Local structure of the silicon implanted in a graphite single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Shimoyama, Iwao; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2002-01-01

    Solid carbon forms two kinds of local structures, i.e., diamond-like and two-dimensional graphite structures. In contrast, silicon carbide tends to prefer only diamond structure that is composed of sp 3 bonds. In order to clarify weather or not two-dimensional graphitic Si x C layer exists, we investigate the local structures of Si x C layer produced by Si + -ion implantation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by means of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The energy of the resonance peak in the Si K-edge NEXAFS spectra for Si + -implanted HOPG is lower than those for any other Si-containing materials. The intensity of the resonance peak showed a strong polarization dependence. These results suggests that the final state orbitals around Si atoms have π*-like character and the direction of this orbital is perpendicular to the graphite plane. It is elucidated that the Si-C bonds produced by the Si + -ion implantation are nearly parallel to the graphite plane, and Si x C phase forms a two-dimensionally spread graphite-like layer with sp 2 bonds. (author)

  2. Studies on the behavior of graphite structures irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.; Ridealgh, F.

    1971-11-15

    Design data for the physical and mechanical property changes which occur in graphite structural and fuel body components irradiated in an HTR are largely obtained from small specimens tested in the laboratory and in materials test reactors. A brief data summary is given. This graphite physics data can be used to predict dimensional changes, internal stress generation and strength changes in the graphite materials of HTR fuel elements irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. In this paper, the results which have been obtained from post-irradiation examination of a number of fuel pins, are compared with prediction.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on layer structured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on graphite was simulated using molecular dynamics. Especially, the layer structure of the graphite was maintained by interlayer intermolecular interaction. Three kinds of graphite surfaces, flat (0 0 0 1) surface, armchair (1 1 2-bar 0) surface and zigzag (1 0 1-bar 0) surface, are dealt with as targets of hydrogen atom bombardment. In the case of the flat surface, graphene layers were peeled off one by one and yielded molecules had chain structures. On the other hand, C 2 H 2 and H 2 are dominant yielded molecules on the armchair and zigzag surfaces, respectively. In addition, the interaction of a single hydrogen isotope on a single graphene is investigated. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates are obtained as functions of incident energy and explain hydrogen retention on layered graphite. (author)

  4. Structural superlubricity of platinum on graphite under ambient conditions: The effects of chemistry and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özoǧul, Alper; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2017-11-01

    An investigation of the frictional behavior of platinum nanoparticles laterally manipulated on graphite has been conducted to answer the question of whether the recent observation of structural superlubricity under ambient conditions [E. Cihan, S. İpek, E. Durgun, and M. Z. Baykara, Nat. Commun. 7, 12055 (2016)] is exclusively limited to the gold-graphite interface. Platinum nanoparticles have been prepared by e-beam evaporation of a thin film of platinum on graphite, followed by post-deposition annealing. Morphological and structural characterization of the nanoparticles has been performed via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, revealing a crystalline structure with no evidence of oxidation under ambient conditions. Lateral manipulation experiments have been performed via atomic force microscopy under ambient conditions, whereby results indicate the occurrence of structural superlubricity at mesoscopic interfaces of 4000-75 000 nm2, with a noticeably higher magnitude of friction forces when compared with gold nanoparticles of similar contact areas situated on graphite. Ab initio simulations of sliding involving platinum and gold slabs on graphite confirm the experimental observations, whereby the higher magnitude of friction forces is attributed to stronger energy barriers encountered by platinum atoms sliding on graphite, when compared with gold. On the other hand, as predicted by theory, the scaling power between friction force and contact size is found to be independent of the chemical identity of the sliding atoms, but to be determined by the geometric qualities of the interface, as characterized by an average "sharpness score" assigned to the nanoparticles.

  5. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  6. Statistical modeling of static strengths of nuclear graphites with relevance to structural design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taketoshi

    1992-02-01

    Use of graphite materials for structural members poses a problem as to how to take into account of statistical properties of static strength, especially tensile fracture stresses, in component structural design. The present study concerns comprehensive examinations on statistical data base and modelings on nuclear graphites. First, the report provides individual samples and their analyses on strengths of IG-110 and PGX graphites for HTTR components. Those statistical characteristics on other HTGR graphites are also exemplified from the literature. Most of statistical distributions of individual samples are found to be approximately normal. The goodness of fit to normal distributions is more satisfactory with larger sample sizes. Molded and extruded graphites, however, possess a variety of statistical properties depending of samples from different with-in-log locations and/or different orientations. Second, the previous statistical models including the Weibull theory are assessed from the viewpoint of applicability to design procedures. This leads to a conclusion that the Weibull theory and its modified ones are satisfactory only for limited parts of tensile fracture behavior. They are not consistent for whole observations. Only normal statistics are justifiable as practical approaches to discuss specified minimum ultimate strengths as statistical confidence limits for individual samples. Third, the assessment of various statistical models emphasizes the need to develop advanced analytical ones which should involve modeling of microstructural features of actual graphite materials. Improvements of other structural design methodologies are also presented. (author)

  7. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  8. Fuel elements for high temperature reactors having special suitability for reuse of the structural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Herrmann, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    There are prepared fuel elements for high temperature reactors from which the fuel zone can be removed from the structural graphite after the burnup of the fissile material has taken place so that the fuel element can be filled with new fuel and again placed in the reactor by having the strength of the matrix in the fuel zone sufficient for binding the embedded coated fuel particles but substantially less than the strength of the structural graphite whereby by the action of force it can be easily split up without destroying the particles

  9. The moderator's moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    A brief account is given of the development of graphite moderators for Magnox and advanced gas cooled reactors. The accident at Windscale in 1957 brought to worldwide attention the importance of irradiation damage in graphite and the consequent storage of Wigner energy. In spite of the Windscale setback, preparations for the civil programme of Magnox reactors went ahead apace. Some of the background to the disastrous Dungeness B tender is presented. In spite of all the difficulties and uncertainties, the graphite in UK reactors has performed well. In all cases, as far as the author is aware, the behaviour of the graphite moderators will not prevent design life being achieved. (author)

  10. The calculation of methane profiles in AGR graphite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Harper, A.

    1981-07-01

    The MEDIC model has been extended in order that it may be applied to experiments carried out in the Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) to measure graphite radiolytic oxidation rates in thick specimens. Three aspects are covered: (a) the extension of the analysis of conventional WAGR nest assemblies to two dimensions rather than the infinite cylinder situation used in current assessments; (b) the examination of the effect of possible paths in WAGR nests; and (c) application of the model to the more complex geometry associated with WAGR inverted nest and rod type assemblies. It is demonstrated that only small errors are introduced into the analysis of WAGR nest data by making the assumption of infinite cylinder geometry. The effect of leakage paths within the nest assembly is also shown to be probably unimportant. (author)

  11. Mechanical design philosophy for the graphite components of the core structure of an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, E.

    1987-01-01

    Parallel to the layout and design of the graphite components for THTRs and the succeeding high temperature reactor projects, the design methods for graphite components have been improved over the years. The aim of this works is to develop the design methods which take into account both the particular properties of graphite and the particular functions of the components. Because of the close relation ship between materials and design codes, this development work has progressed with the development, testing and qualification of German reactor graphite. In this paper, the experience in this field of Hochtemperatur Reaktorbau GmbH and the results of the work and approach to the design problems are reported. The example of a HTR 500 design for a 550 MWe power station is taken up, and the core structure is explained. The graphite components are divided into three classes according to the stress limits. The loading of these components is reviewed. The aim of the design is not the complete avoidance of failure, but to avoid the failure of a single component from leading to a disadvantageous consequence which is not allowable. The classification of loading events, Weibull statistics and maximum allowable stress, the formation of the permissible stress, the assessment of stress due to multiaxial loading and so on are described. (Kako, I.)

  12. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  13. Structure of solid monolayers and multilayers of n-hexane on graphite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We present all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of n-hexane on the ... cluster of n-hexane molecules on graphite, using the all-atom interaction model. ... We do not include such molecules in our analyses of the structure factor and other.

  14. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  15. Fine structure and spectral index measurements in natural uranium - graphite lattices; Mesures fines dans des reseaux a graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogne, F; Journet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The experiments described in this report have been carried out for the most part in the critical facility MARIUS, and a few during the start up of the EDF-1 power reactor. The first part deals with the fine structure measurements made in various lattices and with their analysis. Integration over the neutron spectrum of the mono-kinetic disadvantage factor derived by the A.B.H method yields results in good agreement with the experiments. The second part deals with spectral indexes measurements (Pu/U, In/Mn) made at room temperature in MARIUS. Comparison are made of experiments with calculations using various thermalization models. Experiments carried out at higher temperatures in EDF-1 are also described. (authors) [French] Les mesures decrites dans ce rapport ont ete faites pour la plupart dans l'empilement critique MARIUS sur des reseaux a graphite-uranium naturel. Une premiere partie traite des mesures de structure fine faites dans differents reseaux et de leur interpretation. On montre en particulier qu'une integration sur le spectre d'un calcul monocinetique type A.B.H. rend bien compte des experiences. Dans une deuxieme partie, on donne les resultats de mesures d'indices de spectre Pu/U et In/Mn faites sur des reseaux froids a MARIUS et leur comparaison avec les differents modeles de calculs de thermalisation. On donne egalement les resultats de quelques mesures en temperature effectuees lors du demarrage du reacteur EDF-1. (auteurs)

  16. Mechanochemical formation of heterogeneous diamond structures during rapid uniaxial compression in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Goldman, Nir

    2018-05-01

    We predict mechanochemical formation of heterogeneous diamond structures from rapid uniaxial compression in graphite using quantum molecular dynamics simulations. Ensembles of simulations reveal the formation of different diamondlike products starting from thermal graphite crystal configurations. We identify distinct classes of final products with characteristic probabilities of formation, stress states, and electrical properties and show through simulations of rapid quenching that these products are nominally stable and can be recovered at room temperature and pressure. Some of the diamond products exhibit significant disorder and partial closure of the energy gap between the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (i.e., the HOMO-LUMO gap). Seeding atomic vacancies in graphite significantly biases toward forming products with small HOMO-LUMO gap. We show that a strong correlation between the HOMO-LUMO gap and disorder in tetrahedral bonding configurations informs which kinds of structural defects are associated with gap closure. The rapid diffusionless transformation of graphite is found to lock vacancy defects into the final diamond structure, resulting in configurations that prevent s p3 bonding and lead to localized HOMO and LUMO states with a small gap.

  17. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  18. Self-consistent electronic structure of a model stage-1 graphite acceptor intercalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campagnoli, G.; Tosatti, E.

    1981-04-01

    A simple but self-consistent LCAO scheme is used to study the π-electronic structure of an idealized stage-1 ordered graphite acceptor intercalate, modeled approximately on C 8 AsF 5 . The resulting non-uniform charge population within the carbon plane, band structure, optical and energy loss properties are discussed and compared with available spectroscopic evidence. The calculated total energy is used to estimate migration energy barriers, and the intercalate vibration mode frequency. (author)

  19. Monte Carlo calculations on transmutation of trans-uranic nuclear waste isotopes using spallation neutrons difference of lead and graphite moderators

    CERN Document Server

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Brandt, R; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Odoj, R; Sosnin, A N; Wan, J S; Westmeier, W

    2002-01-01

    Transmutation rates of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and some minor actinides ( sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am, sup 2 sup 4 sup 5 Cm and sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 Cm), in two accelerator-driven systems (ADS) with lead or graphite moderating environments, were calculated using the LAHET code system. The ADS that were used had a large volume (approx 32 m sup 3) and contained no fissile material, except for a small amount of fissionable waste nuclei that existed in some cases. Calculations were performed at an incident proton energy of 1.5 GeV and the spallation target was lead. Also breeding rates of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 U as well as the transmutation rates of two long-lived fission products sup 9 sup 9 Tc and sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I were calculated at different locations in the moderator. It is shown that an ADS with graphite moderator is a much more effective transmuter than that with lead moderator.

  20. Development of visual inspection technology for HTTR core support graphite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, So; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Masuma, Yoshitaka; Miki, Toshiya.

    1996-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is now constructing the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which employs a visual inspection of core support graphite structure, as an inservice inspection (ISI). In this inspection, TV camera will be used to investigate the alignment and integrity of the structure. Therefore, the ISI system, a combination of radiation tolerant TV camera and graphic processing system, is developed and examined its detectability and viewing angles using a simulated hot plenum of HTTR, which has artificial defects. As a result of a series of tests, it was confirmed that this system satisfied the requirements and was quite applicable for the ISI system of HTTR core support graphite structure. In addition, further improvement of the system, like a remote control procedure, will be investigated. (author)

  1. Hierarchical structure graphitic-like/MoS2 film as superlubricity material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenbin; Jia, Xiaolong; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Junyan

    2017-08-01

    Friction and wear result in a great amount of energy loss and the invalidation of mechanical parts, thus it is necessary to minimize friction in practical application. In this study, the graphitic-like/MoS2 films with hierarchical structure were synthesized by the combination of pulse current plasma chemical-vapor deposition and medium frequency unbalanced magnetron sputtering in preheated environment. This hierarchical structure composite with multilayer nano sheets endows the films excellent tribological performance, which easily achieves macro superlubricity (friction coefficient ∼0.004) under humid air. Furthermore, it is expected that hierarchical structure of graphitic-like/MoS2 films could match the requirements of large scale, high bear-capacity and wear-resistance of actual working conditions, which could be widely used in the industrial production as a promising superlubricity material.

  2. Electrochemical insertion in solid media of alkali cations in carbonated host structures (polyacetylene, fullerene and graphite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemont, Sylvain

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis reports the investigation of electrochemical insertion of alkali cations in different host carbon containing structures (polyacetylene, fullerene, graphite). After a recall of the main characteristics of the three considered compounds, the author reports a bibliographical survey, describes the different compounds which can be used as solid electrolytes and explains the choice of the studied compounds with respect to their phase diagrams, ionic conductivity, electrochemical stability range. He describes the experimental methods, discusses the results obtained by intercalation of alkali cations (Li + , Na + , K + ) in polyacetylene. He discusses the electrochemical and structural results obtained on intercalation compounds of lithium and sodium ions in fullerene. The structures of several phases have been obtained by electron diffraction. Preliminary studies of electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) are reported. The last part compares the results obtained on two types of graphite: pellets and spherules [fr

  3. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  4. Investigation on structural integrity of graphite component during high temperature 950degC continuous operation of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shimazaki, Yosuke; Shibata, Taiju

    2014-01-01

    Graphite material is used for internal structures in high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The core components and graphite core support structures are so designed as to maintain the structural integrity to keep core cooling capability. To confirm that the core components and graphite core support structures satisfy the design requirements, the temperatures of the reactor internals are measured during the reactor operation. Surveillance test of graphite specimens and in-service inspection using TV camera are planned in conjunction with the refueling. This paper describes the evaluation results of the integrity of the core components and graphite core support structures during the high temperature 950degC continuous operation, a high temperature continuous operation with reactor outlet temperature of 950degC for 50 days, in high temperature engineering test reactor. The design requirements of the core components and graphite core support structures were satisfied during the high temperature 950degC continuous operation. The dimensional change of graphite which directly influences the temperature of coolant was estimated considering the temperature profiles of fuel block. The magnitude of irradiation-induced dimensional change considering temperature profiles was about 1.2 times larger than that under constant irradiation temperature of 1000degC. In addition, the programs of surveillance test and ISI using TV camera were introduced. (author)

  5. Structure, temperature and frequency dependent electrical conductivity of oxidized and reduced electrochemically exfoliated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoń, Adrian; Włodarczyk, Patryk; Łukowiec, Dariusz

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the influence of reduction by hydrogen in statu nascendi and modification by hydrogen peroxide on the structure and electrical conductivity of electrochemically exfoliated graphite. It was confirmed that the electrochemical exfoliation can be used to produce oxidized nanographite with an average number of 25 graphene layers. The modified electrochemical exfoliated graphite and reduced electrochemical exfoliated graphite were characterized by high thermal stability, what was associated with removing of labile oxygen-containing groups. The presence of oxygen-containing groups was confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Influence of chemical modification by hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide on the electrical conductivity was determined in wide frequency (0.1 Hz-10 kHz) and temperature range (-50 °C-100 °C). Material modified by hydrogen peroxide (0.29 mS/cm at 0 °C) had the lowest electrical conductivity. This can be associated with oxidation of unstable functional groups and was also confirmed by analysis of Raman spectra. The removal of oxygen-containing functional groups by hydrogen in statu nascendi resulted in a 1000-fold increase in the electrical conductivity compared to the electrochemical exfoliated graphite.

  6. The retardation effect of structural graphite on the release of fission products in case of hypothetical accidents of HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniotakis, N.; Decken, C.B. von der

    1982-01-01

    In case of a hypothetical core heat up accident of an HTR the structural graphite of the reactor causes under certain circumstances a very important retardation of the release of fission products into the containment building of the plant. A model is presented which describes the transport phenomena in the graphite structure extensively taking into account specially the macro-structure of the graphite. It is shown by parameter variations under which conditions one can expect a large retardation effect and quantitative values of this retardation, which can be very important, are given. (author)

  7. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  8. Development of image analysis for graphite pore-structure determination using fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, W.J.; Bowden, E.A.T.; Wickham, A.J.

    1983-03-01

    The use of image analysis to assess the pore structure of graphite has been developed to the point at which it may be considered available for routine use. A definitive pore structure in terms of the geometry-independent ''characteristic pore dimension'' is derived from the computer analysis of polished specimens whose open-pore structure has been impregnated with bismuth or a fluorescent epoxy resin, with the very small pores identified separately by mercury porosimetry as in the past. The pore-size distributions obtained from these combined techniques have been used successfully to predict the corrosion rates of nine graphites, of widely differing pore structure, in a variety of gas compositions and, indirectly, to confirm appropriate mean ranges and rate constants for the reaction of the oxidising species in these gas mixtures. The development of the fluorescent-impregnant technique is discussed in detail and its use is justified in preference to ''traditional'' methods. Further possible refinements are discussed, including the eventual aim of obtaining a computer prediction of the future oxidation behaviour of the graphite directly from the image analyser. (author)

  9. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  10. The role of graphite foam pore structure on saturated pool boiling enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranoto, I.; Leong, K.C.; Jin, L.W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the pool boiling phenomena and performance of porous graphite foam evaporators of different structures and thermophysical properties. Two dielectric liquids viz. FC-72 and HFE-7000 were used as working fluids. Block and fin evaporators of different fin-to-block-surface-area ratios (AR) were designed to study the role of the internal pore structure of graphite foams in a compact air-cooled thermosyphon under saturated pool boiling condition for high heat flux electronics cooling applications. The wall temperatures were measured and the boiling heat transfer coefficients were calculated to analyze the boiling performance. It was found that both fin structures with AR = 3.70 and 2.73 result in reduced boiling heat transfer performances and higher wall temperatures. The experimental results show that the boiling heat transfer coefficients of the block structures are about 1.2–1.6 times higher than those of the fin structures. The total internal surface area to volume ratio (β) and the total exposed areas (A T ) of the graphite foams were calculated in this study. The results show that the values of β and A T of the block structures are much higher than the fin structures for both tested “Pocofoam” 61% porosity and “Kfoam” 78% porosity evaporators which resulted in higher boiling heat transfer coefficient and lower wall temperature of the block structures. A visualization study shows that more bubbles were generated from the block structures compared to the fin structures due to the larger number of nucleation sites from the block structures. It was also found that use of FC-72 resulted in better boiling heat transfer performance compared to HFE-7000. - Highlights: ► We studied the pool boiling performance of a thermosyphon with graphite foam evaporators of block and fin structures. ► FC-72 and HFE-7000 were used as the working fluids. ► The boiling heat transfer coefficients of the block structures are 1.2

  11. Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly design with graphite-moderating rods to reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin, E-mail: nzcho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The graphite rod-inserted SFR fuel assembly is proposed to achieve low sodium void reactivity. • The neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analyses are performed for the proposed SFR cores. • The sodium void reactivity is improved about 960–1030 pcm compared to reference design. - Abstract: The concept of a graphite-moderating rod-inserted sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly is proposed in this study to achieve a low sodium void reactivity coefficient. Using this concept, two types of SFR cores are analyzed; the proposed SFR type 1 core has new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions while the proposed SFR type 2 core has a B{sub 4}C absorber sandwich in the middle of the active core region as well as new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions. For the proposed SFR core designs, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed using the DIF3D, REBUS3, and the MATRA-LMR codes. In the neutronics analysis, the sodium void reactivity coefficient is obtained in various void situations. The two types of proposed core designs reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient by about 960–1030 pcm compared to the reference design. However, the TRU enrichment for the proposed SFR core designs is increased. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the temperature distributions are calculated for the two types of proposed core designs and the mass flow rate is optimized to satisfy the design constraints for the highest power generating assembly. The results of this study indicate that the proposed SFR assembly design concept, which adopts graphite-moderating rods which are inserted into the fuel assembly, can feasibly minimize the sodium void reactivity coefficient. Single TRU enrichment and an identical fuel slug diameter throughout the SFR core are also achieved because the radial power peak can be flattened by varying the number of moderating rods in each core region.

  12. Development of IR Contrast Data Analysis Application for Characterizing Delaminations in Graphite-Epoxy Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havican, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Develop infrared (IR) flash thermography application based on use of a calibration standard for inspecting graphite-epoxy laminated/honeycomb structures. Background: Graphite/Epoxy composites (laminated and honeycomb) are widely used on NASA programs. Composite materials are susceptible for impact damage that is not readily detected by visual inspection. IR inspection can provide required sensitivity to detect surface damage in composites during manufacturing and during service. IR contrast analysis can provide characterization of depth, size and gap thickness of impact damage. Benefits/Payoffs: The research provides an empirical method of calibrating the flash thermography response in nondestructive evaluation. A physical calibration standard with artificial flaws such as flat bottom holes with desired diameter and depth values in a desired material is used in calibration. The research devises several probability of detection (POD) analysis approaches to enable cost effective POD study to meet program requirements.

  13. Spontaneous and artificial structures of thin, Keggin-like polyoxometallate arrays on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, I

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopic studies have been performed to study the 2D structuring of the inorganic salt, the Keggin-type [AlO 4 Al 12 (OH) 24 (H 2 O) 12 ] 7+ in its sulfate form. This compound forms patches of well ordered monolayer separated by defects seen on large scan images on the top of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite surface. A negative differential resistance peak has been found by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Surfactant molecules self-assemble horizontally in the first layer on the graphite plane. Higher uptake resulted in the formation of hemicylinders. In this study sodium dodecyl sulfate has been used to modify the 2D Keggin arrangements. By this combination of organic and inorganic materials the large counter ions were expected to re-arrange on the surface. In this surfactant assisted artificial ordering the distance between the Keggin-type units has been increased

  14. Local electronic and geometric structures of silicon atoms implanted in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao

    2002-01-01

    Low-energy Si + ions were implanted in highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) up to 1% of surface atomic concentration, and the local electronic and geometric structures around the silicon atoms were in situ investigated by means of the Si K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation. The resonance peak appeared at 1839.5 eV in the Si K-edge XANES spectra for Si + -implanted HOPG. This energy is lower than those of the Si 1s→σ * resonance peaks in any other Si-containing materials. The intensity of the resonance peak showed strong polarization dependence, which suggests that the final state orbitals around the implanted Si atoms have π * -like character. It is concluded that the σ-type Si-C bonds produced by the Si + -ion implantation are nearly parallel to the graphite plane, and Si x C phase forms two-dimensionally spread graphite-like layer with sp 2 bonds

  15. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses for pre-moderator of cold moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Tomokazu; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-08-01

    A light-water cooled pre-moderator with a thin-walled structure made of aluminum alloy is installed around a liquid hydrogen moderator in order to enhance the neutron performance of a MW-scale spallation target system which is being developed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Since the pre-moderator is needed to be located close to a target working as a neutron source, it is indispensable to remove nuclear heat deposition in the pre-moderator effectively by means of smooth water flow without flow stagnation. Also, the structural integrity of the thin-walled structure should be kept against the water pressure. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analytical results showed that the water temperature rise could be suppressed less than 1degC while keeping the smooth water flow, which would assure the expected neutron performance. As for the structural integrity, several measures to meet allowable stress conditions of aluminum alloy were proposed on the basis of the preliminary structural strength analyses. (author)

  16. Study of new structures adapted to gas-graphite and gas-heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    The experience acquired as a result of the operation of the Marcoule reactors and of the construction and start-up of the E.D.F. reactors on the one hand, and the conclusions of research and tests carried out out-of-pile on the other hand, lead to a considerable change in the general design of reactors of the gas-graphite type. The main modifications envisaged are analysed in the paper. The adoption of an annular fuel element and of a down-current cooling will make it possible to increase considerably the specific power and the power output of each channel; as a result there will be a considerable reduction in the number of the channels and a corresponding increase in the size of the unit cell. The graphite stack will have to be adapted to there new conditions. For security reasons, the use of prestressed concrete for the construction of the reactor vessel is becoming more widespread; they could lead to the exchangers and the fuel-handling apparatus becoming integrated inside the vessel (the so-called 'attic' device). A full-size mode) of this attic has been built at Saclay with the participation of EURATOM; the operational results obtained are presented as well as a new original design for the control rods. As for as the gas-heavy-water system is concerned, the research is carried out on two points of design; the first, which retains the use of horizontal pressure tubes, takes into account the experience acquired during the construction of the EL 4 reactor of which it will constitute an extrapolation; the second, arising from the research carried out on the gas-graphite system, will use a pre-stressed concrete vessel for holding the pressure, the moderator being almost at the same pressure as the cooling fluid and the fuel being placed in vertical channels. The relative merits of these two variants are analysed in the present paper. (authors) [fr

  17. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  18. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  19. Chapter 3: Exponential experiments on graphite-moderated lattices fuelled with near-natural uranium metal rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Clarke, W.G.; Ashworth, F.P.O.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Exponential experiments have been carried out on graphite lattices fuelled by 1.2 in. diameter uranium metal rods at three near-natural U 235 compositions, 0.6 Co, 1.3 Co and 1.6 Co. The results, together with those already existing from earlier exponential or critical measurements on these and similar natural uranium rods, have been correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) and also with the modified form of this theory given in Vol.1, Ch. 7. (author)

  20. Structures and electrochemical performances of pyrolized carbons from graphite oxides for electric double-layer capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ick-Jun; Yang, Sunhye; Jeon, Min-Je; Moon, Seong-In; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Yoon-Pyo; An, Kye-Hyeok; Lee, Young-Hee

    The structural features and the electrochemical performances of pyrolized needle cokes from oxidized cokes are examined and compared with those of KOH-activated needle coke. The structure of needle coke is changed to a single phase of graphite oxide after oxidation treatment with an acidic solution having an NaClO 3/needle coke composition ratio of above 7.5, and the inter-layer distance of the oxidized needle coke is expanded to 6.9 Å with increasing oxygen content. After heating at 200 °C, the oxidized needle coke is reduced to a graphite structure with an inter-layer distance of 3.6 Å. By contrast, a change in the inter-layer distance in KOH-activated needle coke is not observed. An intercalation of pyrolized needle coke, observed on first charge, occurs at 1.0 V. This value is lower than that of KOH-activation needle coke. A capacitor using pyrolized needle coke exhibits a lower internal resistance of 0.57 Ω in 1 kHz, and a larger capacitance per weight and volume of 30.3 F g -1 and 26.9 F ml -1, in the two-electrode system over the potential range 0-2.5 V compared with those of a capacitor using KOH-activation of needle coke. This better electrochemical performance is attributed to a distorted graphene layer structure derived from the process of the inter-layer expansion and shrinkage.

  1. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  2. Study on structural recovery of graphite irradiated with swift heavy ions at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellemoine, F., E-mail: pellemoi@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Avilov, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bender, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Ewing, R.C. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Fernandes, S. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lang, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Li, W.X. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Mittig, W. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Schein, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Severin, D. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Tomut, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Laboratory of Magnetism and Superconductivity, National Institute for Materials Physics NIMP, Bucharest (Romania); Trautmann, C. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Dept. of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-12-15

    Thin graphite foils bombarded with an intense high-energy (8.6 MeV/u) gold beam reaching fluences up to 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} lead to swelling and electrical resistivity changes. As shown earlier, these effects are diminished with increasing irradiation temperature. The work reported here extends the investigation of beam induced changes of these samples by structural analysis using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. A nearly complete recovery from swelling at irradiation temperatures above about 1500 °C is identified.

  3. Development of in-service inspection system for core support graphite structures in the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumita, Junya; Hanawa, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Ishihara, Masahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Visual inspection of core support graphite structures using TV camera as in-service inspection and measurement of material characteristics using surveillance test specimens are planned in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm structural integrity of the core support graphite structures. For the visual inspection, in-service inspection system developed from September 1996 to June 1998, and pre-service inspection using the system was carried out. As the result of the pre-service inspection, it was validated that high quality of visual inspection with TV camera can be carried out, and also structural integrity of the core support graphite structures at the initial stage of the HTTR operation was confirmed. (author)

  4. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  5. Preparation of Fe-intercalated Graphite Based on Coal Tailings, Dimensional Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Gustian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercalated graphite from coal tailings have been modified through the intercalation of iron. Coal tailings which is a byproduct of the destruction process and flakes washing results from mining coal. Intercalation of iron goal is to improve the physical properties of graphite and modifying sizes of crystal lattice structure with thermal method. Modification process begins with the carbonization of coal tailings at 500ºC and activated with phosphoric acid. Activation process has done by pyrolysis at 700ºC. The results of pyrolysis was soaked in mineral oil for 24 hours, then pyrolysis again with variations in temperature 800°C and 900ºC for 1 hour and subsequent intercalation iron at 1% and 2%. Material before activated, after activated, and the results of pyrolysis still indicates order nano: 29, 25 and 36 nm respectively. X-ray diffraction characterization results indicate that change in the structure, the sizes crystal lattice structure of the material The greater the concentration of iron was added, the resulting peak at 2θ = 33 and 35 also will be more sharply. The results of SEM showed different morphologies from each treatment.

  6. Melting of contaminated steel scrap from the dismantling of the CO2 systems of gas cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feaugas, J.; Jeanjacques, M.; Peulve, J.

    1994-01-01

    G2 and G3 are the natural Uranium cooled reactors Graphite/Gas. The two reactors were designed for both plutonium and electricity production (45 MWe). The dismantling of the reactors at stage 2 has produced more than 4 000 tonnes of contaminated scrap. Because of their large mass and low residual contamination level, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) considered various possibilities for the processing of these metallic products in order to reduce the volume of waste going to be stored. After different studies and tests of several processes and the evaluation of their results, the choice to melt the dismantled pipeworks was taken. It was decided to build the Nuclear Steel Melting Facility known as INFANTE, in cooperation with a steelmaker (AHL). The realization time schedule for the INFANTE lasted 20 months. It included studies, construction and the licensing procedure. (authors). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  7. New Insights of Graphite Anode Stability in Rechargeable Batteries: Li-Ion Coordination Structures Prevail over Solid Electrolyte Interphases

    KAUST Repository

    Ming, Jun

    2018-01-04

    Graphite anodes are not stable in most noncarbonate solvents (e.g., ether, sulfoxide, sulfone) upon Li ion intercalation, known as an urgent issue in present Li ions and next-generation Li–S and Li–O2 batteries for storage of Li ions within the anode for safety features. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is commonly believed to be decisive for stabilizing the graphite anode. However, here we find that the solvation structure of the Li ions, determined by the electrolyte composition including lithium salts, solvents, and additives, plays a more dominant role than SEI in graphite anode stability. The Li ion intercalation desired for battery operation competes with the undesired Li+–solvent co-insertion, leading to graphite exfoliation. The increase in organic lithium salt LiN(SO2CF3)2 concentration or, more effectively, the addition of LiNO3 lowers the interaction strength between Li+ and solvents, suppressing the graphite exfoliation caused by Li+–solvent co-insertion. Our findings refresh the knowledge of the well-known SEI for graphite stability in metal ion batteries and also provide new guidelines for electrolyte systems to achieve reliable and safe Li–S full batteries.

  8. Structures, origin and evolution of various carbon phases in the ureilite Northwest Africa 4742 compared with laboratory-shocked graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, C.; Rouzaud, J. N.; Remusat, L.; Jambon, A.; Bourot-Denise, M.

    2010-07-01

    Mineralogical structures of carbon phases within the ureilite North West Africa 4742, a recent find, are investigated at various scales by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman microspectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Ureilites are the most carbon-rich of all meteorites, containing up to 6 wt.% carbon. Diamond, graphite and so-called "amorphous carbon" are typically described, but their crystallographic relationships and respective thermal histories remain poorly constrained. We especially focus on the origin of "amorphous carbon" and graphite, as well as their relationship with diamond. Two aliquots of carbon-bearing material were extracted: the insoluble organic matter (IOM) and the diamond fraction. We also compare the observed structures with those of laboratory-shocked graphite. Polycrystalline diamond aggregates with mean coherent domains of about 40 nm are reported for the first time in a ureilite and TEM demonstrates that all carbon phases are crystallographically related at the nanometre scale. Shock features show that diamond is produced from graphite through a martensitic transition. This observation demonstrates that graphite was present when the shock occurred and is consequently a precursor of diamond. The structure of what is commonly described as the "amorphous carbon" has been identified. It is not completely amorphous but only disordered and consists of nanometre-sized polyaromatic units surrounding the diamond. Comparison with laboratory-shocked graphite, partially transformed into diamond, indicates that the disordered carbon could be the product of diamond post-shock annealing. As diamond is the carrier of noble gases, whereas graphite is noble gas free, graphite cannot be the sole diamond precursor. This implies a multiple-stage history. A first generation of diamond could have been synthesized from a noble gas rich precursor or environment by either a shock or a condensation process. Thermally-induced graphitization

  9. Ion irradiation used as surrogate of neutron irradiation in graphite: Consequences on 14C and 36Cl behavior and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2018-04-01

    Graphite has been widely used as neutron moderator, reflector or fuel matrix in different types of reactors such as gas cooled nuclear reactors (UNGG, Magnox, AGR), RBMK reactors or high temperature gas cooled reactors. Their operation produces a great quantity of irradiated graphite or other carbonaceous waste (around 250,000 tons worldwide) that requires a special management strategy. In the case of disposal, which is a current management strategy, two main radionuclides, 14C and 36Cl might be dose determining at the outlet. Particular attention is paid to 14C due to its long half-life (T∼5730 years) [1] and as major contributor to the radioactive dose. 14C has two main production routes, i) transmutation of nitrogen (14N(n,p)14C) where nitrogen is mainly adsorbed at the surfaces of the irradiated graphite; ii) activation of carbon from the matrix (13C(n,γ)14C). According to leaching tests, it was shown that even if the quantity of 14C released in the solution is low (less than 1% of the initial inventory), around 30% is in the organic form that would be mobile in repository conditions [2,3]. 36Cl is mainly produced through the activation of 35Cl (35Cl(n,γ)36Cl) which is an impurity in nuclear graphite. Its activity is low but it might be highly mobile in clay host rocks. Thus, in order to make informed decisions about the best management process and to anticipate potential radionuclide dissemination during dismantling and in the repository, it is necessary to collect information on 14C and 36Cl location and speciation in graphite, after reactor closure. The goal of the present paper is therefore to use ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation and to evaluate the irradiation effects on the behavior of 36Cl and 14C as well as on the induced graphite structure modifications. For that, to understand and model the underlying mechanisms, we used an indirect approach based on 13C or 37Cl implantation to simulate the respective presence of 14C or 36Cl. These

  10. Spherical cauliflower-like carbon dust formed by interaction between deuterium plasma and graphite target and its internal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)], E-mail: ohno@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yoshimi, M. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tokitani, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takamura, S. [Department of Electronics, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Simulated experiments to produce carbon dust particles with cauliflower structure have been performed in a liner plasma device, NAGDIS-II by exposing high density deuterium plasma to a graphite sample (IG-430U). Formation of carbon dust depends on the surface temperature and the incident ion energy. At a surface temperature 600-700 K, a lot of isolated spherical dust particles are observed on the graphite target. The internal structure of an isolated dust particle was observed with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) in detail. FIB analysis clearly shows there exist honey-combed cell structure with thin carbon walls in the dust particle and the dust particle grows from the graphite surface. TEM image also shows that the dust particle is made of amorphous carbon with crystallized grains with diameters of 10-50 nm.

  11. Structure and Performance of Epoxy Resin Cladded Graphite Used as Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhentao; Li, Haijun

    This paper is concerning to prepare modified natural graphite which is low-cost and advanced materials used as lithium ion battery anode using the way of cladding natural graphite with epoxy resin. The results shows that the specific capacity and circular performance of the modified natural graphite, which is prepared in the range of 600°C and 1000°C, have been apparently improved compare with the not-modified natural graphite. The first reversible capacity of the modified natural graphite is 338mAh/g and maintain more than 330mAh/g after 20 charge/discharge circles.

  12. Evaluation of microstructures and oxidation behaviors of graphite for core support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Jin; Bae, Kyung Min

    2010-03-01

    This work studies the oxidation-induced characteristics of five nuclear graphites (NBG-17, NBG-18, NBG-25, IG-110, and IG-430). The oxidation characteristics of the nuclear graphites were measured at 600 .deg. C. The surface properties of the oxidation graphites were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle methods. The N2/77K adsorption isotherm characteristics, including the specific surface area and micropore volume, were investigated by means of BET and t-plot methods. The experimental results show an increase in the average pore size of graphites; they also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. For example the surface area of NBG-17 increases slightly whereas the surface area of IG-110 increases significantly. This result confirms that the original surface state of each graphite is unique

  13. Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results of the test for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  14. Electronic structures of ultra-thin silicon carbides deposited on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Shimoyama, I.; Nath, Krishna G.

    2004-01-01

    Electronic structures of ultra-thin silicon carbide films have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Si K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) using linearly polarized synchrotron soft X-rays. Silicon carbide films were deposited on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by ion beam deposition method. Tetramethylsilane (Si(CH 3 ) 4 ) was used as a discharge gas. The XPS and XANES features for the thick layers were similar to those for the bulk SiC. For sub-monolayered films, the Si 1s binding energy in XPS was higher by 2.5 eV than that for bulk SiC. This suggests the existence of low-dimensional SiC x where the silicon atoms are more positively charged than those in bulk SiC. After annealing the sub-monolayered film at 850 deg. C, a new peak appeared around 1840 eV in the XANES spectrum. The energy of this new peak was lower than those for any other silicon compounds. The low-energy feature of the XANES peak suggests the existence of π*-like orbitals around the silicon atom. On the basis of the polarization dependencies of the XANES spectra, it was revealed that the direction of the π*-like orbitals are nearly perpendicular to the surface. We conclude that sub-monolayered SiC x film exhibits flat-lying structure of which configuration is similar to a single sheet of graphite

  15. Thermogravimetric and Differential Scanning Calorimetric Behavior of Ball-Milled Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Seon; Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi Hyun; Cho, Seung Yon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An examination was made to characterize the oxidation behavior of ball-milled nuclear graphite powder through a TG-DSC analysis. With the ball milling time, the BET surface area increased with the reduction of particle size, but decreased with the chemisorptions of O{sub 2} on the activated surface. The enhancement of the oxidation after the ball milling is attributed to both increases in the specific surface area and atomic scale defects in the graphite structure. In a high temperature gas-cooled reactor, nuclear graphite has been widely used as fuel elements, moderator or reflector blocks, and core support structures owing to its excellent moderating power, mechanical properties and machinability. For the same reason, it will be used in a helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module for the ITER. Each submodule has a seven-layer breeding zone, including three neutron multiplier layers packed with beryllium pebbles, three lithium ceramic pebbles packed tritium breeder layers, and a reflector layer packed with 1 mm diameter graphite pebbles to reduce the volume of beryllium. The abrasion of graphite structures owing to relative motion or thermal cycle during operation may produce graphite dust. It is expected that graphite dust will be more oxidative than bulk graphite, and thus the oxidation behavior of graphite dust must be examined to analyze the safety of the reactors during an air ingress accident. In this study, the thermal stability of ball-milled graphite powder was investigated using a simultaneous thermogravimeter-differential scanning calorimeter.

  16. Multigroup Moderation Test in Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Dwi Mulyanto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Structured Component Analysis (GSCA is an alternative method in structural modeling using alternating least squares. GSCA can be used for the complex analysis including multigroup. GSCA can be run with a free software called GeSCA, but in GeSCA there is no multigroup moderation test to compare the effect between groups. In this research we propose to use the T test in PLS for testing moderation Multigroup on GSCA. T test only requires sample size, estimate path coefficient, and standard error of each group that are already available on the output of GeSCA and the formula is simple so the user does not need a long time for analysis.

  17. Recent Advances in Preparation, Structure, Properties and Applications of Graphite Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suneel Kumar; Pionteck, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide, also referred as graphitic oxide or graphitic acid, is an oxidized bulk product of graphite with a variable composition. However, it did not receive immense attention until it was identified as an important and easily obtainable precursor for the preparation of graphene. This inspired many researchers to explore facts related to graphite oxide in exploiting its fascinating features. The present article culminates up-dated review on different preparative methods, morphology and characterization of physical/chemical properties of graphite oxide by XRD, XPS, FTIR, Raman, NMR, UV-visible, and DRIFT analyses. Finally, recent developments on intercalation and applications of GO in multifaceted areas of catalysis, sensor, supercapacitors, water purification, hydrogen storage and magnetic shielding etc. has also been reviewed.

  18. Structural Testing of a Stitched/Resin Film Infused Graphite-Epoxy Wing Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a series of tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the behavior of an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with non-visible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole.

  19. Surface structure modification of single crystal graphite after slow, highly charged ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaher, I.; Akcöltekin, S.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Manil, B.; Dey, K. R.; Been, T.; Boduch, P.; Rothard, H.; Schleberger, M.; Lebius, H.

    2018-04-01

    Single crystal graphite was irradiated by slow, highly charged ions. The modification of the surface structure was studied by means of Low-Energy Electron Diffraction. The observed damage cross section increases with the potential energy, i.e. the charge state of the incident ion, at a constant kinetic energy. The potential energy is more efficient for the damage production than the kinetic energy by more than a factor of twenty. Comparison with earlier results hints to a strong link between early electron creation and later target atom rearrangement. With increasing ion fluence, the initially large-scale single crystal is first transformed into μ m-sized crystals, before complete amorphisation takes place.

  20. On the defect structure due to low energy ion bombardment of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, D.; Bu, H.; Boyd, K. J.; Todorov, S. S.; Al-Bayati, A. H.; Rabalais, J. W.

    1995-03-01

    Graphite surfaces cleaved perpendicular to the c axis have been irradiated with low doses of Ar + ions at 50 eV kinetic energy and perpendicular incidence. Scanning tunneling micrographs (STM) of these irradiated surfaces exhibited dome-like features as well as point defects. These dome-like features retain undisturbed graphite periodicity. This finding is attributed to the stopping of ions between the first and second graphite sheets. The possibility of doping semiconductors at extremely shallow depths is raised.

  1. Proposition of a core model for the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR) minimizing the graphite moderator quantity in core; Proposition d'un modele de coeur pour le RSF thorium minimisant la quantite de moderateur graphite en coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuttin, A

    2004-07-01

    This work deals with the problem of fast damage of graphite in the core of TMSR. The approach consists to minimize the quantity of graphite used in the core (by an increase of the voluminal power) and then to extract and to reprocess. (O.M.)

  2. Adsorption and Electronic Structure of Sr and Ag Atoms on Graphite Surfaces: a First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Feng; Fang, Chao; Li, Xin; Lai, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Li-Feng; Liang, Tong-Xiang

    2013-06-01

    The adsorption behaviors of radioactive strontium and silver nuclides on the graphite surface in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are studied by first-principles theory using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local density approximation (LDA) pseudo-potentials. It turns out that Sr prefers to be absorbed at the hollow of the carbon hexagonal cell by 0.54 eV (GGA), while Ag likes to sit right above the carbon atom with an adsorption energy of almost zero (GGA) and 0.45 eV (LDA). Electronic structure analysis reveals that Sr donates its partial electrons of the 4p and 5s states to the graphite substrate, while Ag on graphite is a physical adsorption without any electron transfer.

  3. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wareing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  4. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareing, Alan; Abrahamsen-Mills, Liam; Fowler, Linda; Jarvis, Richard; Banford, Anthony William [National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Grave, Michael [Doosan Babcock, Gateshead (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, Martin [National Nuclear Laboratory, Gloucestershire (United Kingdom); Norris, Simon [Radioactive Waste Management Limited, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  5. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  6. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  7. A 3-D inelastic analysis of HTR graphite structures and a comparison with A 2-D approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willaschek, J.

    1979-01-01

    In High Temperature Reactor Cores (HTR) a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. The dimensions of the graphite components are limited by stresses and strains resulting from thermal loads, irradiation induced dimensional changes and stress-dependent irradiation creep. Therefore it is necessary to examine the feasibility of design concepts with regard to the structural integrity of the material. This paper presents an analysis of a radial reflector concept for use in a 3000 MWth HTR for process heat production. This concept of a pebble bed reactor (OTTO cycle) requires reflector dimensions and shapes which have previously not been used and which may exceed acceptable stress limits. Graphite reflector elements in a HTR are subject to a high fluence of fast neutrons. The fluence varies spatially within an element. Irradiation-induced strains occur which in turn vary non-linearly with the fluence. At low fluences the graphite shrinks. With increasing fluence shrinkage is saturated and after a 'turn-around' point the graphite begins to swell. The net effect of fluence gradient and irradiation-induced strain is a 'necking' of the element which moves radially outwards with time. In this paper a three-dimensional inelastic analysis of a graphite block with the above deformation history is described. The influence of irradiation on dimensional stability and other material properties was taken into account. Numerical results were obtained with the finite-element computer code ADINA, modified at INTERATOM for the task in hand. The radial reflector block was modelled using 21-node three-dimensional continuum elements of elastic-creep material. The element stiffness matrices were calculated using the standard 2x2x2 Gauss integration; material nonlinearities with quadratic displacement functions and linearised initial strains were employed. (orig.)

  8. Adsorption and diffusion of dilute gases in microporous graphite pellets in relation to their macroscopic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvakis, C.; Tsimillis, K.; Petropoulos, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption and gas-phase or surface diffusion properties of a series of microporous pellets made by the compaction of very fine graphite powder are reported. The overall degree of compaction of the powder was very nearly the same in all cases, but the mode of compaction was varied. The resulting variation in the macroscopic structural inhomogeneity of the pellets (examined in some detail in a parallel study) has been shown to affect both adsorption and diffusion properties. The effect on adsorption properties was modest but definite and can be accounted for by the dependence of the extent of adsorption on pore size. On the other hand, the experimental gas-phase and surface diffusion coefficients were strongly dependent on macroscopic structure. The dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient was particularly marked and is of special interest: such effects have not, so far, been taken into account in interpretations of experimental data, although they can be predicted theoretically. Previous analyses of the structure dependence of experimental gas-phase and surface diffusion coefficients are thus subject to revision in the light of the present conclusions. (author)

  9. Basic data for surveillance test on core support graphite structures for the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Ishihara, Masahiro; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2007-02-01

    Both of the visual inspection by a TV camera and the measurement of material properties by surveillance test on core support graphite structures are planned for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to confirm their structural integrity and characteristics. The surveillance test is aimed to investigate the change of material properties by aging effects such as fast neutron irradiation and oxidation. The obtained data will be used not only for evaluating the structural integrity of the core support graphite structures of the HTTR but also for design of advanced Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) discussed at generation IV international forum. This report describes the initial material properties of surveillance specimens before installation and installed position of surveillance specimens in the HTTR. (author)

  10. Changes in the physical and mechanical properties of graphite on irradiation in ditolylmethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilin, A.I.; Lebedev, I.G.; Sudakova, N.V.; Rizvanov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from the irradiation and mechanical and structural testing of four grades of graphite - GMZ, VPG, MPG-6, and PG-50 - for use as moderator materials in organic cooled and graphite moderated reactors. Irradiation was carried out in the ARBUS-AST-1 reactor. Photomicrography was used to determine pore structure and ultimate strength in bending and compression was determined mechanically. Irradiation was found to increase the strength of GMZ, PMG-6, and PG-50 considerably, due to the healing of microdefects as a result of the pores filling with radiolysis products from the coolant, ditolylmethane. Conversely, VPG graphite, which has closed porosity, lost strength on irradiation

  11. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  12. The structure of n-alkane binary mixtures adsorbed on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espeau, Philippe; White, John W.; Papoular, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermodynamics and structure of the surface adsorbed phase in binary C15-C16 and C15-C17 n-alkane mixtures confined in graphite pores have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and small-angle X-ray scattering. The previously observed selective adsorption of the longer alkane for chain length differences greater than five carbon atoms is verified but reduced for chain length differences less than or equal to two. With a difference in chain length of one carbon atom, Vegard's law is followed for the melting points of the adsorbed mixture and the (0 2) d-spacing is a continuous function of the mole fraction x. With a two-carbon atom difference, samples aged for 1 week have a lamellar structure for which the entities A 1-x B x try to be commensurate with the substrate. The same samples aged for 1 month show a continuous parabolic x-dependence for both the melting points and the d-spacings. An explanation in terms of selective probability of adsorption is proposed based on crystallographic considerations

  13. The structure of n-alkane binary mixtures adsorbed on graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espeau, Philippe [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Minerale, Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Rene Descartes-Paris V, F-75006 Paris (France)]. E-mail: philippe.espeau@univ-paris5.fr; White, John W. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Papoular, Robert J. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA-CEN Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2005-12-15

    The thermodynamics and structure of the surface adsorbed phase in binary C15-C16 and C15-C17 n-alkane mixtures confined in graphite pores have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and small-angle X-ray scattering. The previously observed selective adsorption of the longer alkane for chain length differences greater than five carbon atoms is verified but reduced for chain length differences less than or equal to two. With a difference in chain length of one carbon atom, Vegard's law is followed for the melting points of the adsorbed mixture and the (0 2) d-spacing is a continuous function of the mole fraction x. With a two-carbon atom difference, samples aged for 1 week have a lamellar structure for which the entities A{sub 1-x}B {sub x} try to be commensurate with the substrate. The same samples aged for 1 month show a continuous parabolic x-dependence for both the melting points and the d-spacings. An explanation in terms of selective probability of adsorption is proposed based on crystallographic considerations.

  14. Molecular Structure and Dynamics in Thin Water Films at the Silica and Graphite Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Tummala, Dr. Naga Rajesh [University of Oklahoma; StrioloDr., A [Vanderbilt University; Cole, David R [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The structure and dynamic properties of interfacial water at the graphite and silica solid surfaces were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of surface properties on the characteristics of interfacial water was quantified by computing density profiles, radial distribution functions, surface density distributions, orientation order parameters, and residence and reorientation correlation functions. In brief, our results show that the surface roughness, chemical heterogeneity, and surface heterogeneous charge distribution affect the structural and dynamic properties of the interfacial water molecules, as well as their rate of exchange with bulk water. Most importantly, our results indicate the formation of two distinct water layers at the SiO2 surface covered by a large density of hydroxyl groups. Further analysis of the data suggests a highly confined first layer where the water molecules assume preferential hydrogen-down orientation and a second layer whose behavior and characteristics are highly dependent on those of the first layer through a well-organized hydrogen bond network. The results suggest that water-water interactions, in particular hydrogen bonds, may be largely responsible for macroscopic interfacial properties such as adsorption and contact angle.

  15. The ISIS operation: Robotics repair work on the CHINON A3 natural uranium, carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmoine, R.M.E.

    1989-01-01

    After describing the upper internal support structures of the CHINON A3 reactor, the problems resulting from their degradation due to corrosion and to the difficulties of the ISIS operation are presented here. The repair method is as follows: all tools and repair parts reach the working area by the feeding-pipes drilled through the 7 m thick concrete vessel surrounding the reactor core; the robots handle into the reactor, the tool heads and the repair parts which are automatically positioned and welded around the corroded structure, thus restoring the support of measurement devices. The parts are either linked together or to the existing structure by means of 2 studs of 12 mm in diameter. The different phases to sort out a problem are: in-core topography, reconforming of the full-scale mock-up with the repair area, learning on this mock-up and in-core repair. The technical specificities of the robots used are the following: they have an 11 meter long, 0.22 meter across telescopic mast with jointed arms reaching a radius of 2.7 m. Then the useful load is 70 daN and the repeatability 0.1 mm. Different tool heads can be handled by the robot: telemeter and laser reconstruction: it allows to locate the in core points and to materialize them on the mock-up by a laser crossed-beams locating technique; scouring: it cleans the corroded parts of the structures before welding; welding: it allows the parts handling and the carried studs welding; screwing; tensile test: carried out when the stud welds are defective. A high level computerized control system is organized around a central unit which calculates the displacements of robots and synchronises the actions of different tools by communicating with several local units. A 100,000 hour designing, a 200,000 hour building and assembling and a 450,000 hour operating on working area were necessary to repair 15 out of the 102 corroded structures by fitting and welding 205 repair parts. 10 figs

  16. Modification of graphite structure by irradiation, revealed by thermal oxidation. Examination by electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouaud, Michel

    1969-01-01

    Based on the analysis of images obtained by electronic microscopy, this document reports the comparative study of the action of neutrons on three different graphites: a natural one (Ticonderoga) and two pyrolytic ones (Carbone-Lorraine and Raytheon). The approach is based on the modification of features of thermal oxidation of graphites by dry air after irradiation. Different corrosion features are identified. The author states that there seems to be a relationship between the number and shape of these features, and defects existing on the irradiated graphite before oxidation. For low doses, the feature aspect varies with depth at which oxidation occurs. For higher doses, the aspect remains the same [fr

  17. STIGMA STIG STEGT STAGT STABA, Stress Analysis of Dragon HTR Graphite Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinkead, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Nature of the physical problem solved: Stress analysis of graphite structures for the DRAGON high temperature reactor is performed by this family of computer codes. Two-dimensional plane strain irradiation dose dependent core problems have been solved. 2 - Method of solution: STAGT, which is the oldest in this series of programmes, can handle multiply connected regions but is confined to plane strain in x-y geometry. Variations in temperature loading during irradiation is accounted for (Wigner strain component.) STIG, is a version of STAGT where an anisotropic elasticity matrix has been introduced to handle transversely isotropic materials. An additional feature of 'STIG' is the introduction of a boundary restraint condition of practical importance to prismatic gas cooled reactor core construction. This is defined as rotational plane strain in which free distortion of the prism arising from overall gradient of temperature and/or fast neutron damage flux coincident with any single direction may be assumed to occur if variation of thermal expansion coefficient with irradiation is included. 'STIGMA' is intended for evaluation of stress and displacement in composite axisymmetrical bodies subject to variable loadings in the axial and radial directions. The code has been prepared to take account of transverse isotropy in material characteristics for up to four separate bonded interface zones within a single composite material problem. Although specifically designed for the analysis of graphite structural components in the fast neutron irradiation environment of a reactor core, it is equally applicable to initial state design of prestressed concrete pressure vessels and other problems involving rotational symmetry. 'STABA'-stress,temperature and bowing analysis. The aim of this quasi 3-D computer code is to apply the principle of rotational plane strain over the full length of a prismatic core component, taking into account spatial variations in fast neutron and

  18. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  19. An Facile High-Density Polyethylene - Exfoliated Graphite - Aluminium Hydroxide Composite: Manufacture, Morphology, Structure, Antistatic and Fireproof Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui LI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite intercalation compounds (GIC and exfoliated graphite (EG as raw materials were prepared with flake graphite, concentrated sulphuric acid (H2SO4, potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7 and peracetic acid (CH3CO3H and characterized. Then, high-density polyethylene-exfoliated graphite (HDPE-EG composites were fabricated with HDPE and EG via in situ synthesis technique in the different mass ratio, and their resistivity values (ohms/sq were measured. Based on the resistivity values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG composite with the antistatic property could be fabricated while the mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30. Last, HDPE-EG-aluminium hydroxide (HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composites were manufactured with HDPE, GIC and Al(OH3 via the in situ synthesis-thermal expansion technique, and their resistivity values and limiting oxygen index (LOI values were measured. Based on the resistivity values and LOI values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite with the antistatic and fireproof property could be manufactured while HDPE, GICs and Al(OH3 of mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30 : 1.00. Otherwise, the petal-like morphology and structure of HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite were characterized, which consisted of EG, HDPE and Al(OH3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4275

  20. Structure optimization of CFB reactor for moderate temperature FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Kai; You, Changfu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactors for moderate temperature flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have significant influence on the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio for sulfur reaction. Experimental and numerical methods were used to investigate the influence of the key reactor structures, including the reactor outlet structure, internal structure, feed port and circulating port, on the gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time. Experimental results showed that the desulfurization efficiency increased 5-10% when the internal structure was added in the CFB reactor. Numerical analysis results showed that the particle residence time of the feed particles with the average diameter of 89 and 9 {mu}m increased 40% and 17% respectively, and the particle residence time of the circulating particles with the average diameter of 116 {mu}m increased 28% after reactor structure optimization. The particle concentration distribution also improved significantly, which was good for improving the contact efficiency between the sorbent particles and SO{sub 2}. In addition, the optimization guidelines were proposed to further increase the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio.

  1. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  2. Patterned structures of graphene and graphitic carbon and methods for their manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Ronen; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Burckel, David Bruce; Wheeler, David R.; Brozik, Susan M.; Beechem, Thomas Edwin

    2018-01-09

    A patterned graphene or graphitic body is produced by providing a three-dimensionally patterned carbonaceous body; coating the body with a catalytic metal whereby is formed a coating having an inner surface proximal the body and an outer surface distal the body; and annealing the coated body under time and temperature conditions effective to form a graphene or graphitic layer on the outer surface of the catalytic metal coating.

  3. Non-destructive evaluation on mechanical properties of nuclear graphite with porous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Hanawa, Satoshi; Sumita, Junya; Tada, Tatsuya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    As a research subjects of 'Research and development for advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor fuels and graphite components,' we started the study of development of non-destructive evaluation methods for mechanical properties of graphite components. The micro-indentation and ultrasonic wave methods are focused to evaluate the degradation of graphite components in VHTR core. For the micro-indentation method, the test apparatus was designed for the indentation test on graphite specimens with some stress levels. It is expected the stress condition is evaluated by the indentation load-depth characteristics and hardness. For the ultrasonic wave method, ultrasonic wave testing machine and probes were prepared for experiments. It is expected that the stress and inner porous conditions are evaluated by the wave propagation characteristics with wave-pore interaction model. R and D plan to develop the non-destructive evaluation method for graphite is presented in this paper. (This study is the result of contract research in the fiscal year of 2004, Research and development for advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor fuels and graphite components,' which is entrusted to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.) (author)

  4. The mechanism of domain-wall structure formation in Ar-Kr submonolayer films on graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patrykiejew

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using Monte Carlo simulation method in the canonical ensemble, we have studied the commensurate-incommensurate transition in two-dimensional finite mixed clusters of Ar and Kr adsorbed on graphite basal plane at low temperatures. It has been demonstrated that the transition occurs when the argon concentration exceeds the value needed to cover the peripheries of the cluster. The incommensurate phase exhibits a similar domain-wall structure as observed in pure krypton films at the densities exceeding the density of a perfect (√3x√3R30º commensurate phase, but the size of commensurate domains does not change much with the cluster size. When the argon concentration increases, the composition of domain walls changes while the commensurate domains are made of pure krypton. We have constructed a simple one-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova-like model that yields the results being in a good qualitative agreement with the Monte Carlo results obtained for two-dimensional systems.

  5. Ab initio study on stacking sequences, free energy, dynamical stability and potential energy surfaces of graphite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, P; Valsakumar, M C; Chandra, Sharat; Panigrahi, B K

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio simulations have been performed to study the structure, energetics and stability of several plausible stacking sequences in graphite. These calculations suggest that in addition to the standard structures, graphite can also exist in AA-simple hexagonal, AB-orthorhombic and ABC-hexagonal type stacking. The free energy difference between these structures is very small (∼1 meV/atom), and hence all the structures can coexist from purely energetic considerations. Calculated x-ray diffraction patterns are similar to those of the standard structures for 2θ ⩽ 70°. Shear elastic constant C 44 is negative in AA-simple hexagonal, AB-orthorhombic and ABC-hexagonal structures, suggesting that these structures are mechanically unstable. Phonon dispersions show that the frequencies of some modes along the Γ–A direction in the Brillouin zone are imaginary in all of the new structures, implying that these structures are dynamically unstable. Incorporation of zero point vibrational energy via the quasi-harmonic approximation does not result in the restoration of dynamical stability. Potential energy surfaces for the unstable normal modes are seen to have the topography of a potential hill for all the new structures, confirming that all of the new structures are inherently unstable. The fact that the potential energy surface is not in the form of a double well implies that the structures are linearly as well as globally unstable. (paper)

  6. Theoretically predicted soft x-ray emission and absorption spectra of graphitic-structured BC2N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    Theoretical B K, C K and N K x-ray emission/absorption spectra of three possible graphitic-structured BC2N clusters are predicted based on the B2p-, C2p-, and N2p- density-of-states (DOS) calculated by discrete variational (DV)-X[alpha] molecular orbital calculations. Several prominent differences in DOS spectral features among BC2Ns, h-BN, and graphite are confirmed from comparison of calculated B2p-, C2p-, and N2p-DOS spectra. These variations in the spectra allow BC2N structures to be positively identified by high-resolution x-ray emission/absorption spectroscopy in the B K, C K, and N K regions.

  7. Evaluation of aseismic integrity in the HTTR core-bottom structure. V. On the static and dynamic behavior of graphite HTTR key-keyway structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futakawa, M.; Iyoku, T.

    1996-01-01

    For pt.IV see ibid., vol.154, p.83-95, 1995. The graphite components in high temperature gas-cooled reactors are connected to each other through a key-keyway structure that has gaps between the key and the keyway to accommodate thermal expansion. Because a dynamic load concentrates on the key-keyway structure during earthquakes, it is considered to be a crucial element for assessing the integrity of the graphite components. A combination of experiments and analyses was employed to investigate the dynamic behavior of the key-keyway structure, i.e. the equivalent stiffness associated with vibrational characteristics of the graphite components and the stress distribution under dynamic loading. The experiments were performed using a graphite scale model and a dynamic photo-elastic method. The analysis was carried out using the finite element method (FEM) code ABAQUS, taking account of the contact behavior between the key and the keyway. The following conclusions were derived. (1) The equivalent stiffness of the key-keyway structure shows nonlinearity, owing to the contact deformation. (2) The equivalent stiffness evaluated by the FEM analysis, taking account of the non-linear contact deformation, is applicable for predicting the vibrational characteristics of the key-keyway structure. (3) The stress concentration under dynamic loading is lower than or nearly equal to that under static loading. The maximum stress concentration of the seismic load can be sufficiently evaluated under static loading conditions. (orig.)

  8. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  9. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  10. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  11. {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C behaviour in UNGG graphite during leaching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, C.; Guy, C.; Comte, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - C.E.A., Laboratoire d' Analyses Radiochimiques et Chimiques (L.A.R.C.) 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator in Natural Uranium Graphite Gas reactors. Among the radionuclides, the long-lived activation product {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C, which are abundant in graphite after irradiation can be the main contributors to the dose during disposal. This paper deals with the first results obtained on irradiated graphite from French G2 reactor. Both leaching and diffusion experiments have been performed in order to understand and quantify the radionuclides behaviour. Chlorine leaching seems to be controlled by diffusion transport through graphite matrix. On the contrary {sup 14}C leaching is very low, probably because after irradiation, the remaining {sup 14}C was produced from {sup 13}C activation in the crystalline structure of graphite. (authors)

  12. Pyrolysis and its potential use in nuclear graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.B.; Bradbury, D.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite is used as a moderator material in a number of nuclear reactor designs, such as MAGNOX and AGR gas cooled reactors in the United Kingdom and the RBMK design in Russia. During construction the moderator of the reactor is usually installed as an interlocking structure of graphite bricks. At the end of reactor life the graphite moderator, weighing typically 2,000 tonnes, is a radioactive waste which requires eventual management. Radioactive graphite disposal options conventionally include: In-situ SAFESTORE for extended periods to permit manual disassembly of the graphite moderator through decay of short-lived radionuclides. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by disposal of the graphite blocks. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by incineration of the graphite and release of the resulting carbon dioxide Studsvik, Inc. is a nuclear waste management and waste processing company organised to serve the US nuclear utility and government facilities. Studsvik's management and technical staff have a wealth of experience in processing liquid, slurry and solid low level radioactive waste using (amongst others) pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques. Bradtec is a UK company specialising in decontamination and waste management. This paper describes the use of pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques to gasify graphite leading to a low volume off-gas product. This allows the following options/advantages. Safe release of any stored Wigner energy in the graphite. The process can accept small pieces or a water-slurry of graphite, which enables the graphite to be removed from the reactor core by mechanical machining or water cutting techniques, applied remotely in the reactor fuel channels. In certain situations the process could be used to gasify the reactor moderator in-situ. The low volume of the off-gas product enables non-carbon radioactive impurities to be efficiently separated from the off-gas. The off-gas product can

  13. Proposal of a core model for the thorium molten salt reactor minimizing the quantity of graphite moderator in the core; Proposition d'un modele de coeur pour le RSF thorium minimisant la quantite de moderateur graphite en coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuttin, A

    2004-06-01

    In the present day TMSR design, the average power in the salt is about 200 W/cm{sup 3}, i.e. two times the one of MSBR. The average neutron flux in the core has doubled and the lifetime of graphite is two times lower. There is two approaches to solve this worrying problem: reducing the volume power to 50 W/cm{sup 3} or minimizing the amount of graphite used in the core. A solution should be to increase the volume power in order to reduce the core dimensions and thus the amount of graphite. By acting both on the total power ('economical' minimum of 1000 MWth) and on the average volume power ('physical' maximum of 500 W/cm{sup 3}) it is possible to reduce the core to a single channel or a single cylindrical ring and to concentrate graphite in a place easily accessible for its extraction and reprocessing. (J.S.)

  14. Capital Structure: Target Adjustment Model and a Mediation Moderation Model with Capital Structure as Mediator

    OpenAIRE

    Abedmajid, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    This study consists of two models. Model one is conducted to check if there is a target adjustment toward optimal capital structure, in the context of Turkish firm listed on the stock market, over the period 2003-2014. Model 2 captures the interaction between firm size, profitability, market value and capital structure using the moderation mediation model. The results of model 1 have shown that there is a partial adjustment of the capital structure to reach target levels. The results of...

  15. Effect of graphite nanoplatelets on the structure and properties of PA6-elastomer nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thanh, Tran Duy; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Hromádková, Jiřina; Kelnar, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, January (2014), s. 39-45 ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-15255S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite nanoplatelets * polyamide 6 * elastomer Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 3.005, year: 2014

  16. Structures, Compositions, and Activities of Live Shewanella Biofilms Formed on Graphite Electrodes in Electrochemical Flow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Miho; Koga, Ryota; Kasai, Takuya; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-09-01

    An electrochemical flow cell equipped with a graphite working electrode (WE) at the bottom was inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expressing an anaerobic fluorescent protein, and biofilm formation on the WE was observed over time during current generation at WE potentials of +0.4 and 0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrodes), under electrolyte-flow conditions. Electrochemical analyses suggested the presence of unique electron-transfer mechanisms in the +0.4-V biofilm. Microscopic analyses revealed that, in contrast to aerobic biofilms, current-generating biofilm (at +0.4 V) was thin and flat (∼10 μm in thickness), and cells were evenly and densely distributed in the biofilm. In contrast, cells were unevenly distributed in biofilm formed at 0 V. In situ fluorescence staining and biofilm recovery experiments showed that the amounts of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) in the +0.4-V biofilm were much smaller than those in the aerobic and 0-V biofilms, suggesting that Shewanella cells suppress the production of EPSs at +0.4 V under flow conditions. We suggest that Shewanella cells perceive electrode potentials and modulate the structure and composition of biofilms to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes. IMPORTANCE A promising application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is to save energy in wastewater treatment. Since current is generated in these MFCs by biofilm microbes under horizontal flows of wastewater, it is important to understand the mechanisms for biofilm formation and current generation under water-flow conditions. Although massive work has been done to analyze the molecular mechanisms for current generation by model exoelectrogenic bacteria, such as Shewanella oneidensis , limited information is available regarding the formation of current-generating biofilms over time under water-flow conditions. The present study developed electrochemical flow cells and used them to examine the electrochemical and structural features of current

  17. Study of new structures adapted to gas-graphite and gas-heavy water reactors; Etude de structures nouvelles adaptees aux reacteurs graphite-gaz et eau lourde-gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R; Roche, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The experience acquired as a result of the operation of the Marcoule reactors and of the construction and start-up of the E.D.F. reactors on the one hand, and the conclusions of research and tests carried out out-of-pile on the other hand, lead to a considerable change in the general design of reactors of the gas-graphite type. The main modifications envisaged are analysed in the paper. The adoption of an annular fuel element and of a down-current cooling will make it possible to increase considerably the specific power and the power output of each channel; as a result there will be a considerable reduction in the number of the channels and a corresponding increase in the size of the unit cell. The graphite stack will have to be adapted to there new conditions. For security reasons, the use of prestressed concrete for the construction of the reactor vessel is becoming more widespread; they could lead to the exchangers and the fuel-handling apparatus becoming integrated inside the vessel (the so-called 'attic' device). A full-size mode) of this attic has been built at Saclay with the participation of EURATOM; the operational results obtained are presented as well as a new original design for the control rods. As for as the gas-heavy-water system is concerned, the research is carried out on two points of design; the first, which retains the use of horizontal pressure tubes, takes into account the experience acquired during the construction of the EL 4 reactor of which it will constitute an extrapolation; the second, arising from the research carried out on the gas-graphite system, will use a pre-stressed concrete vessel for holding the pressure, the moderator being almost at the same pressure as the cooling fluid and the fuel being placed in vertical channels. The relative merits of these two variants are analysed in the present paper. (authors) [French] L'experience acquise par l'exploitation des reacteurs de MARCOULE, la construction et le demarrage des reacteurs d

  18. Porosity effects in the neutron total cross section of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R; Dawidowski, J; Petriw, S. N

    2009-01-01

    Graphite has been used in nuclear reactors since the birth of the nuclear industry due to its good performance as a neutron moderator material. Graphite is still an option as moderator for generation IV reactors due to its good mechanical and thermal properties at high operation temperatures. So, there has been renewed interest in a revision of the computer libraries used to describe the neutron cross section of graphite. For sub-thermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a larger total cross section (between 4 and 8 barns) than predicted by existing theoretical models (0.2 barns). In order to investigate the origin of this discrepancy we measured the total cross section of graphite samples of three different origins, in the energy range from 0.001 eV to 10 eV. Different experimental arrangements and sample treatments were explored, to identify the effect of various experimental parameters on the total cross section measurement. The experiments showed that the increase in total cross section is due to neutrons scattered around the forward direction. We associate these small-angle scattered neutrons (SANS) to the porous structure of graphite, and formulate a very simple model to compute its contribution to the total cross section of the material. This results in an analytic expression that explicitly depends on the density and mean size of the pores, which can be easily incorporated in nuclear library codes. [es

  19. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  20. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Because of its high strength and stability at very high temperature, as well as very low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, graphite has been widely used as a structural material in Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR). Recently, many countries are developing the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) because of the potentials of hydrogen production, as well as its safety and viable economics. In VHTR, helium gas serves as the primary coolant. Graphite will be used as a reflector, moderator and core structural materials. The life time of graphite is determined from dimensional changes due to neutron irradiation, which closely relates to the changes of crystal structure. The changes of both lattice parameter and crystallite size can be easily measured by X-ray diffraction method. However, due to high cost and long time of neutron irradiation test, ion irradiation test is being performed instead in KAERI. Therefore, it is essential to develop the technique for measurement of ion irradiation damage of nuclear graphite. Fracture toughness of nuclear grade graphite is one of the key properties in the design and development of VHTR. It is important not only to evaluate the various properties of candidate graphite but also to assess the integrity of nuclear grade graphite during operation. Although fracture toughness tests on graphite have been performed in many laboratories, there have been wide variations in values of the calculated fracture toughness, due to the differences in the geometry of specimens and test conditions. Hence, standard test method for nuclear graphite is required to obtain the reliable fracture toughness values. Crack growth behavior of nuclear grade graphite shows rising R-curve which means the increase in crack growth resistance as the crack length increases. Crack bridging and microcracking have been proposed to be the dominant mechanisms of rising R-curve behavior. In this paper, the technique to measure the changes of crystallite size and

  1. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  2. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  3. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  4. Surface Patterning of Benzene Carboxylic Acids on Graphite: Influence of structure, solvent, and concentration on molecular self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Gina; Stiso, Kimberly; Campanelli, Joseph; Dessources, Kimberly; Folkes, Trudi

    2012-02-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was used to investigate the molecular self-assembly of four different benzene carboxylic acid derivatives at the liquid/graphite interface: pyromellitic acid (1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid), trimellitic acid (1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid), trimesic acid (1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid), and 1,3,5-benzenetriacetic acid. A range of two dimensional networks are observed that depend sensitively on the number of carboxylic acids present, the nature of the solvent, and the solution concentration. We will describe our recent efforts to determine (a) the preferential two-dimensional structure(s) for each benzene carboxylic acid at the liquid/graphite interface, (b) the thermodynamic and kinetic factors influencing self-assembly (or lack thereof), (c) the role solvent plays in the assembly, (e) the effect of in situ versus ex situ dilution on surface packing density, and (f) the temporal evolution of the self-assembled monolayer. Results of computational analysis of analog molecules and model monolayer films will also be presented to aid assignment of network structures and to provide a qualitative picture of surface adsorption and network formation.

  5. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  6. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  7. Differences in the irradiation effects of IG-110 and IG-430 nuclear graphites : effects of coke difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Gen Chan; Kim, Eung Seon; Hong, Jin Ki; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    In the high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), graphite acts as a moderator and reflector as well as a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and shut down, and thermal and neutron shielding. During a reactor operation, many of the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of these graphite components are significantly modified as a function of the temperature, environment, and an irradiation. On the other hand, currently, all the nuclear graphites are being manufactured from two types of cokes, i.e., petroleum and coal-tar pitch coke, and it has been understood that the type of coke plays the most critical role determining the properties of a specific graphite grade. To investigate the effects of coke types on the irradiation response of a graphite, two graphites of different cokes were irradiated by 3 MeV C+ ions and the differences in the response of ion-irradiation were investigated

  8. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  9. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  10. Evaluation of the Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Upbending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  11. Interfacial effects in ZnO nanotubes/needle-structured graphitic diamond nanohybrid for detecting dissolved acetone at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Deepa; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-12-01

    A high-performance ZnO nanotubes (ZNTs)/needle-structured graphitic diamond (NGD) nanohybrid material was prepared and observed the electrochemical sensing properties of liquid acetone in water. Initially, we synthesized NGD film using bias-enhanced growth (BEG) process. Afterwards, a well-etched ZNTs were spatially grown on the NGD film using simple hydrothermal method, and utilized as sensing material for assemble an electrochemical sensor (via EGFET configuration) operating at room temperature. The systematic investigations depict the ultra-high sensing properties attained from ZNTs grown on NGD film. The NGD film mostly have needle or wire shaped diamond grains, which contributes extremely high electrical conductivity. Furthermore, needle shaped diamond grains cover with multi-layer graphitic material generates conduction channels for ZNTs and leads to enhance the oxygen residuals and species. The material stability and conductivity of NGD as well the defects exist with oxygen vacancies in ZNTs offers superior sensing properties. Thus, the interesting combination of these wide band gap semiconductor materials exhibit high sensor response (89 mV/mL), high stability and long-term reliability (tested after 60 days).

  12. A flexible and transparent graphene/ZnO nanorod hybrid structure fabricated by exfoliating a graphite substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Gwang-Hee; Baek, Seong-Ho; Cho, Chang-Hee; Park, Il-Kyu

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a graphene/ZnO nanorod (NR) hybrid structure by mechanical exfoliation of ZnO NRs grown on a graphite substrate. We confirmed the existence of graphene sheets on the hybrid structure by analyzing the Raman spectra and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The Raman spectra of the exfoliated graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure show G and 2D band peaks that are shifted to lower wavenumbers, indicating that the exfoliated graphene layer exists under a significant amount of strain. The I-V characteristics of the graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure show current flow through the graphene layer, while no current flow is observed on the ZnO NR/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite without graphene, thereby indicating that the few-layer graphene was successfully transferred onto the hybrid structure. A piezoelectric nanogenerator is demonstrated by using the fabricated graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure. The nanogenerator exhibits stable output voltage up to 3.04 V with alternating current output characteristics.We demonstrate the fabrication of a graphene/ZnO nanorod (NR) hybrid structure by mechanical exfoliation of ZnO NRs grown on a graphite substrate. We confirmed the existence of graphene sheets on the hybrid structure by analyzing the Raman spectra and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The Raman spectra of the exfoliated graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure show G and 2D band peaks that are shifted to lower wavenumbers, indicating that the exfoliated graphene layer exists under a significant amount of strain. The I-V characteristics of the graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure show current flow through the graphene layer, while no current flow is observed on the ZnO NR/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite without graphene, thereby indicating that the few-layer graphene was successfully transferred onto the hybrid structure. A piezoelectric nanogenerator is demonstrated by using the fabricated graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure. The nanogenerator

  13. Nonlinear seismic analysis of a graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laframboise, W.L.; Desmond, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Design and construction of the Department of Energy's N-Reactor located in Richland, Washington was begun in the late 1950s and completed in the early 1960s. Since then, the reactor core's structural integrity has been under review and is considered by some to be a possible safety concern. The reactor core is moderated by graphite. The safety concern stems from the degradation of the graphite due to the effects of long-term irradiation. To assess the safety of the reactor core when subjected to seismic loads, a dynamic time-history structural analysis was performed. The graphite core consists of 89 layers of numerous graphite blocks which are assembled in a 'lincoln-log' lattice. This assembly permits venting of steam in the event of a pressure tube rupture. However, such a design gives rise to a highly nonlinear structure when subjected to earthquake loads. The structural model accounted for the nonlinear interlayer sliding and for the closure and opening of gaps between the graphite blocks. The model was subjected to simulated earthquake loading, and the time-varying response of selected elements critical to safety were monitored. The analytically predicted responses (displacements and strains) were compared to allowable responses to assess margins of safety. (orig.)

  14. The calculation of methane profiles in AGR graphite structures. Part I: cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the diffusion, permeable flow and radiolytic destruction of methane in graphite specimens utilised in the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor development programme. The integration of the diffusion equations governing the rate of mass transport is carried out by the Harwell FACSIMILE program and in its simple form the model has shown good agreement with analytical solutions. The model has been extended to take into account the changes in water and carbon monoxide concentrations resulting from radiolytic reactions within the system and the magnitude of these effects has been assessed. A simple method for the introduction of the effect of water production arising directly from the methane destruction process has been derived and a technique for calculating the gas-in-gas diffusion coefficients for the migrating species from the molecular theory of gases is outlined. (author)

  15. Heat transfer in the core graphite structures of RBMK nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoglinger, E., E-mail: ernst.knoglinger@a1.net [Am Winklerwald 15, A 4020 Linz (Austria); Wölfl, H., E-mail: herbert.woelfl@tele2.at [Berg, Im Weideland 19, A 4060 Linz (Austria); Kaliatka, A., E-mail: algirdas.kaliatka@lei.lt [Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos 3, LT-44403 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Proposed solution of heat transfer model from a hollow cylinder to a fluid through narrow duct. • Thermal conductance of annular gaps, filled by two component gas was discussed. • Xenon transient preceding the Chernobyl Accident was analyzed. • Reactivity balance during power manoeuvres and potenrial causes of the accident were discussed. - Abstract: Conductive and combined radiative/conductive gap conductance models are presented and discussed in great detail. The heat resistance concept and an exact solution to the one dimensional heat conduction equation for a 3-region composite hollow cylinder are used to calculate gap conductance in function of gap gas composition and fuel burn up. The study includes the back calculation of a reactor experiment performed at the Ignalina NPP Unit-1 which provides some insight in the function of the RBMK nitrogen supply and regulating device and an investigation of the role the graphite temperature played during the power manoeuvres preceding the Chernobyl Accident.

  16. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  17. Thermodynamic Simulation of Equilibrium Composition of Reaction Products at Dehydration of a Technological Channel in a Uranium-Graphite Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavliuk, A. O.; Zagumennov, V. S.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.; Bespala, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    The problems of accumulation of nuclear fuel spills in the graphite stack in the course of operation of uranium-graphite nuclear reactors are considered. The results of thermodynamic analysis of the processes in the graphite stack at dehydration of a technological channel, fuel element shell unsealing and migration of fission products, and activation of stable nuclides in structural elements of the reactor and actinides inside the graphite moderator are given. The main chemical reactions and compounds that are produced in these modes in the reactor channel during its operation and that may be hazardous after its shutdown and decommissioning are presented. Thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition is performed using the specialized code TERRA. The results of thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition in different cases of technological channel dehydration in the course of the reactor operation show that, if the temperature inside the active core of the nuclear reactor increases to the melting temperature of the fuel element, oxides and carbides of nuclear fuel are produced. The mathematical model of the nonstationary heat transfer in a graphite stack of a uranium-graphite reactor in the case of the technological channel dehydration is presented. The results of calculated temperature evolution at the center of the fuel element, the replaceable graphite element, the air gap, and in the surface layer of the block graphite are given. The numerical results show that, in the case of dehydration of the technological channel in the uranium-graphite reactor with metallic uranium, the main reaction product is uranium dioxide UO2 in the condensed phase. Low probability of production of pyrophoric uranium compounds (UH3) in the graphite stack is proven, which allows one to disassemble the graphite stack without the risk of spontaneous graphite ignition in the course of decommissioning of the uranium-graphite nuclear reactor.

  18. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  19. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  20. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  1. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  2. Structure and phase transitions of monolayers of intermediate-length n-alkanes on graphite studied by neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diama, A.; Matthies, B.; Herwig, K. W.; Hansen, F. Y.; Criswell, L.; Mo, H.; Bai, M.; Taub, H.

    2009-08-01

    We present evidence from neutron diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three different monolayer phases of the intermediate-length alkanes tetracosane (n-C24H50 denoted as C24) and dotriacontane (n-C32H66 denoted as C32) adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. Our measurements indicate that the two monolayer films differ principally in the transition temperatures between phases. At the lowest temperatures, both C24 and C32 form a crystalline monolayer phase with a rectangular-centered (RC) structure. The two sublattices of the RC structure each consists of parallel rows of molecules in their all-trans conformation aligned with their long axis parallel to the surface and forming so-called lamellas of width approximately equal to the all-trans length of the molecule. The RC structure is uniaxially commensurate with the graphite surface in its [110] direction such that the distance between molecular rows in a lamella is 4.26 Å=√3 ag, where ag=2.46 Å is the lattice constant of the graphite basal plane. Molecules in adjacent rows of a lamella alternate in orientation between the carbon skeletal plane being parallel and perpendicular to the graphite surface. Upon heating, the crystalline monolayers transform to a "smectic" phase in which the inter-row spacing within a lamella expands by ˜10% and the molecules are predominantly oriented with the carbon skeletal plane parallel to the graphite surface. In the smectic phase, the MD simulations show evidence of broadening of the lamella boundaries as a result of molecules diffusing parallel to their long axis. At still higher temperatures, they indicate that the introduction of gauche defects into the alkane chains drives a melting transition to a monolayer fluid phase as reported previously.

  3. Graphite nanoplatelets-modified PLA/PCL: Effect of blend ratio and nanofiller localization on structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelnar, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Zhigunov, Alexander; Nevoralová, Martina

    2017-07-01

    Structure and properties of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) influenced by graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were studied in dependence on blend composition. Electron microscopy indicates predominant localization of GNP in PCL. GNP-induced changes in viscosity hinder refinement of PCL inclusions, support PCL continuity in the co-continuous system, and lead to reduction of PLA inclusions size without GNP being present at the interface in the PCL-matrix blend. Negligible differences in crystallinity of both phases indicate that mechanical behaviour is mainly influenced by reinforcement and GNP-induced changes in morphology. Addition of 5 parts of GNP leads to ~40% and ~25% increase of stiffness in the PCL- and PLA-matrix systems, respectively, whereas the reinforcing effect is practically eliminated in the co-continuous systems due to GNP-induced lower continuity of PLA which enhances toughness. Impact resistance of the 80/20 blend shows increase with 5 parts content due to synergistic effect of PCL/GNP stacks, whereas minor increase in the blend of the ductile PCL matrix with brittle PLA inclusions is caused by GNP-modification of the component parameters. Results indicate high potential of GNP in preparing biocompatible systems with wide range of structure and properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J.; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Warr, Gregory G.; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-06-01

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level

  5. Inert annealing of irradiated graphite by inductive heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzem, W.; Woerner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Fission neutrons change physical properties of graphite being used in nuclear reactors as moderator and as structural material. The understanding of these effects on an atomic model is expressed by dislocations of carbon atoms within the graphite and the thereby stored energy is known as Wigner Energy. The dismantling of the Pile 1 core may necessitate the thermal treatment of the irradiated but otherwise undamaged graphite. This heat treatment - usually called annealing - initiates the release of stored Wigner Energy in a controlled manner. This energy could otherwise give rise to an increase in temperature under certain conditions during transport or preparation for final storage. In order to prevent such an effect it is intended to anneal the major part of Pile 1 graphite before it is packed into boxes suitable for final disposal. Different heating techniques have been assessed. Inductive heating in an inert atmosphere was selected for installation in the Pile 1 Waste Processing Facility built for the treatment and packaging of the dismantled Pile 1 waste. The graphite blocks will be heated up to 250 deg. C in the annealing ovens, which results in the release of significant amount of the stored energy. External heat sources in a final repository will never heat up the storage boxes to such a temperature. (author)

  6. Initial Comparison of Baseline Physical and Mechanical Properties for the VHTR Candidate Graphite Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Mark C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-09-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled configuration capable of producing thermal energy for power generation as well as process heat for industrial applications that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is establishing accurate as-manufactured mechanical and physical property distributions in nuclear-grade graphites by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a thorough comparison between these values in different graphite grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons both in specific properties and in the associated variability between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between each of the grades of graphite that are considered “candidate” grades from four major international graphite producers. These particular grades (NBG-18, NBG-17, PCEA, IG-110, and 2114) are the major focus of the evaluations presently underway on irradiated graphite properties through the series of Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL from which billets are formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration. NBG-17 graphite from SGL is essentially NBG-18 with the grain size reduced by a factor of two. PCEA, petroleum coke graphite from GrafTech with a similar grain size to NBG-17, is formed via an extrusion process and was initially considered the favored grade for the prismatic layout. IG-110 and 2114, from Toyo Tanso and Mersen (formerly Carbone Lorraine), respectively, are fine-grain grades produced via an isomolding

  7. Erosion of common structural materials and the degradation of suspended particles in flowing suspension of graphite powder in carbon dioxide gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, D.A.; Hawes, R.I.; Rose, P.W.

    1968-06-01

    Experiments have been performed to examine the erosion of common materials of construction by a flowing suspension of graphite powder in carbon dioxide gas and the degradation of the graphite powder in the suspension. The suspension was circulated through a stainless steel loop at a pressure of 200 p.s.i.g. and bulk fluid temperature of 100-150 deg. C. No change in the weight of pins of mild steel, stainless steel and zircaloy, which were placed across the flow stream in a region where the velocity approached 100 ft./sec, could be detected after 350 hours of circulation. Examination of micro-photographs of the cross sections of the specimens showed no change in the structure of the metals. Considerable erosion of graphite pins producing a 6% decrease in the weight was observed under similar conditions. Detailed spectrographic analysis of the suspended powder taken at various times during the experiment showed no noticeable increase in the impurity content which could be attributed to erosion of the test specimens. A considerable increase in the tungsten, tin and cobalt concentration was observed and this is attributed to wear of the pump seal surfaces. The mean particle size of the suspended graphite powder was observed to decrease rapidly from 5 microns to 3 microns after only a few hours of circulation in the loop. After this initial period there was little further change in the particle size, the mean diameter being 2.85 microns after 167 hours of circulation. (author)

  8. Multilevel structural equation models for assessing moderation within and across levels of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preacher, Kristopher J; Zhang, Zhen; Zyphur, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Social scientists are increasingly interested in multilevel hypotheses, data, and statistical models as well as moderation or interactions among predictors. The result is a focus on hypotheses and tests of multilevel moderation within and across levels of analysis. Unfortunately, existing approaches to multilevel moderation have a variety of shortcomings, including conflated effects across levels of analysis and bias due to using observed cluster averages instead of latent variables (i.e., "random intercepts") to represent higher-level constructs. To overcome these problems and elucidate the nature of multilevel moderation effects, we introduce a multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) logic that clarifies the nature of the problems with existing practices and remedies them with latent variable interactions. This remedy uses random coefficients and/or latent moderated structural equations (LMS) for unbiased tests of multilevel moderation. We describe our approach and provide an example using the publicly available High School and Beyond data with Mplus syntax in Appendix. Our MSEM method eliminates problems of conflated multilevel effects and reduces bias in parameter estimates while offering a coherent framework for conceptualizing and testing multilevel moderation effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Do gender and directness of trauma exposure moderate PTSD's latent structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankfurt, Sheila B; Armour, Cherie; Contractor, Ateka A; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-11-30

    The PTSD diagnosis and latent structure were substantially revised in the transition from DSM-IV to DSM-5. However, three alternative models (i.e., anhedonia model, externalizing behavior model, and hybrid model) of PTSD fit the DSM-5 symptom criteria better than the DSM-5 factor model. Thus, the psychometric performance of the DSM-5 and alternative models' PTSD factor structure needs to be critically evaluated. The current study examined whether gender or trauma directness (i.e., direct or indirect trauma exposure) moderates the PTSD latent structure when using the DSM-5 or alternative models. Model performance was evaluated with measurement invariance testing procedures on a large undergraduate sample (n=455). Gender and trauma directness moderated the DSM-5 PTSD and externalizing behavior model and did not moderate the anhedonia and hybrid models' latent structure. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Role Stress Revisited: Job Structuring Antecedents, Work Outcomes, and Moderating Effects of Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Sharon; You, Sukkyung

    2014-01-01

    A previous study examined role stress in relation to work outcomes; in this study, we added job structuring antecedents to a model of role stress and examined the moderating effects of locus of control. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the plausibility of our conceptual model, which specified hypothesized linkages among teachers'…

  11. Organizational structure and continuous improvement and learning: Moderating effects of cultural endorsement of participative leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowen Huang; Joseph C Rode; Roger G Schroeder

    2011-01-01

    Building upon the culturally endorsed implicit theory of leadership, we investigated the moderating effects of national culture on the relationship between organizational structure and continuous improvement and learning. We propose that the relationship between organic organizations (characterized by flat, decentralized structures with a wide use of multifunctional employees) and continuous improvement and learning will be stronger when national cultural endorsement for participative leaders...

  12. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  13. A comparison of predicted and measured graphite moderator behaviour during 16 years' operation of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, N.

    1980-01-01

    The Windscale AGR has operated since January 1963 at a cumulative load factor of nearly 70% during which time the peak irradiation damage dose has built up to more than 5x10 n/cm 2 (equivalent DIDO nickel), well beyond its original design life. This paper recounts the findings of monitoring measurements on the moderator at high exposure levels with regard to radiolytic oxidation and various aspects of dimensional change behaviour. It is shown that the measured dimensional changes are in good agreement with predictions based on small specimens irradiated in MTR's, thus confirming the absence of any size effect and adding confidence to predictive methods. However, recent measurements of channel straightness show that the observed distortions are only about 10% of the maximum predictions, perhaps due to localised creep at the brick ends creating flats which impart some stability to the columns of moderator bricks. The magnitude of radiolytic oxidation determined by trepanning specimens from the core in 1976 was found to be only about 5%, whereas it was thought possible that peak weight losses would conceivably be as high as 11% due to the depleted concentration of methane inhibitor reaching the brick interior by diffusion processes. It has subsequently been shown by calculation that this result is consistent with the existence of radial pressure drops across the moderator brick walls giving greater penetration of methane inhibitor. (author)

  14. Oxidation Behavior of IG-11, IG-110 and IG-430 Graphites in Air Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Ki; Chi, Se Hwan

    2006-01-01

    In high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), graphite is used as a moderator and a reflector as well as a major structural component. During operation or in the event of an accident, subsequent graphite oxidation due to the graphite out-gassing or heat exchanger tube leakage results in changes in the physical and mechanical properties of the components. For this reason, a lot of studies on oxidation have long been performed to understand the high temperature oxidation behavior and to find a proper countermeasure over the expected operating range. In this study, the oxidation rates of IG-11, IG-110 and IG-430 nuclear graphites were determined at high temperature and evaluated in view of the grades and the oxidation mechanisms at different temperature range

  15. Wear Behavior of Selected Nuclear Grade Graphites at Room Temperature in Ambient Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung-Seon; Park, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2008-01-01

    In a very high temperature reactor (VHTR), graphite will be used not only for as a moderator and reflector but also as a major structural component due to its excellent neutronic, thermal and mechanical properties. In the VHTR, wear of graphite components is inevitable due to a neutron irradiation-induced dimensional change, thermal gradient, relative motions of graphite components and a shock load such as an earthquake. Large wear particles accumulated at the bottom of a reactor can influence the cooling of the lower part and small wear particles accumulated on the primary circuit and heat exchanger tube can make it difficult to inspect the equipment, and also decrease the heat exchange rate. In the present work, preliminary wear tests were performed at room temperature in ambient air environment to understand the basic wear characteristics of selected nuclear grade graphites for the VHTR

  16. Temperature distribution in graphite during annealing in air cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, C.R. de.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the evaluation temperature distributions in graphite during annealing operation in graphite. Moderated an-cooled reactors, is presented. One single channel and one dimension for air and graphite were considered. A numerical method based on finite control volumes was used for partioning the mathematical equations. The problem solution involves the use of unsteady equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for air, and energy conservation for graphite. The source term was considered as stored energy release during annealing for describing energy conservation in the graphite. The coupling of energy conservation equations in air and graphite is performed by the heat transfer term betwen air and graphite. The results agree with experimental data. A sensitivity analysis shown that the termal conductivity of graphite and the maximum inlet channel temperature have great effect on the maximum temperature reached in graphite during the annealing. (author)

  17. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  18. Graphite materials testing in the ATR for lifetime management of Magnox reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on their graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment. (author)

  19. Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on the ir graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment

  20. The Development of Materials for Application to Control Rod Systems in Graphite moderated Reactors; Mise au Point de Materiaux pour les Dispositifs de Controle a Barres, Utilbes dans les Reacteurs Ralentis au Graphite; Razrabotka materialov , primenyaemykh v sistemakh upravlyayushchikh sterzhnej v reaktorakh s grafitovym zamedlitelem; Perfeccionamiento de Materiales Aplicables a las Barras de Control en los Reactores Moderados por Grafito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, G. E.; Kempf, F. J. [Hanford Atomic Products Operation, General Electric Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1964-06-15

    Material problems associated with the control- and safety-rod systems for graphite moderated, tube-type reactors can be divided into two categories: control materials and operating-channel liner materials. The control materials, such as boron or gadolinium, can be integral with the rod sheath, as in the boron stainless steel used for safety rods. Another approach is the enclosure of a boron-containing sintered compact, such as B{sub 4}C-graphite or B{sub 4}C-aluminium, in a metallic sheath. Rods of the latter type are adaptable for control purposes because of the increased percentages of boron that can be included. Test and fabrication experience indicate that a wide range of satisfactory rod designs is possible with any of these materials. The rod operating channels in the reactor often require liners to protect the surrounding graphite moderator from rod-insertion impact loads and wear and to help maintain channel alignment. Abrasion- and impact resistant, high-strength, low cross-section materials that will operate uncooled are required for these liners. Pyrolytic graphite, pyrolytic graphite composites, aluminium oxide and silicon carbide have been tested for such applications. Physical and irradiation damage data indicate that some of these materials are suitable for lining rod-operating channels. (author) [French] Les problemes de materiaux lies aux dispositifs de controle a barres de reglage et de securite pour les reacteurs tubulaires ralentis au graphite sont doubles et concernent les materiaux absorbants d'une part et les materiaux de garnissage des canaux d'autre part. Les materiaux absorbants tels que le bore ou le gadolinium peuvent former un tout avec le materiau de gainage comme dans le cas ou les barres de securite sont en acier inoxydable au bore. Une autre technique consiste a enfermer un melange presse et fritte contenant du bore, tel que B4C-graphite ou B4C-aluminium, dans une gaine metallique. Les barres de ce dernier type peuvent etre adaptees

  1. Charge superlattice effects on the electronic structure of a model acceptor graphite intercalation compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campagnoli, G.; Tosatti, E.

    1981-08-01

    In the present attempt we have considered a model ordered situation (a super-superlattice) where starting from a basic stoichiometry C 8 X, a fraction 1/3 of the molecules acquire one electron, the remaining 2/3 being left neutral. We have performed an electronic structure calculation using tight-binding plus electrostatic (Hartree) self-consistency

  2. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  3. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  4. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  5. Growth of Hexagonal Columnar Nanograin Structured SiC Thin Films on Silicon Substrates with Graphene–Graphitic Carbon Nanoflakes Templates from Solid Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanshun Zhao

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for growing hexagonal columnar nanograin structured silicon carbide (SiC thin films on silicon substrates by using graphene–graphitic carbon nanoflakes (GGNs templates from solid carbon sources. The growth was carried out in a conventional low pressure chemical vapor deposition system (LPCVD. The GGNs are small plates with lateral sizes of around 100 nm and overlap each other, and are made up of nanosized multilayer graphene and graphitic carbon matrix (GCM. Long and straight SiC nanograins with hexagonal shapes, and with lateral sizes of around 200–400 nm are synthesized on the GGNs, which form compact SiC thin films.

  6. Surface and interfacial interactions of multilayer graphitic structures with local environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzocco, R.; Robinson, B.J.; Rabot, C.; Delamoreanu, A.; Zenasni, A.; Dickinson, J.W.; Boxall, C.; Kolosov, O.V.

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the potential of graphene in next-generation devices, such as supercapacitors, rechargeable batteries, displays and ultrathin sensors, it is crucial to understand the solvent interactions with the graphene surface and interlayers, especially where the latter may be in competition with the former, in the medium of application deployment. In this report, we combine quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and ultrasonic force microscopy methods to investigate the changes in the film–substrate and film–environment interfaces of graphene and graphene oxide films, produced by diverse scalable routes, in both polar (deionised water) and non-polar (dodecane) liquid and vapour environments. In polar liquid environments, we observe nanobubble adsorption/desorption on the graphene film corresponding to a surface coverage of up to 20%. As no comparable behaviour is observed for non-polar environment, we conclude that nanobubble formation is directly due to the hydrophobic nature of graphene with direct consequences for electrode structures immersed in electrolyte solutions. The amount of water adsorbed by the graphene films was found to vary considerably from 0.012 monolayers of water per monolayer of reduced graphene oxide to 0.231 monolayers of water per monolayer of carbon diffusion growth graphene. This is supported by direct nanomechanical mapping of the films immersed in water where an increased variation of local stiffness suggests water propagation within the film and/or between the film and substrate. Transferred film thickness calculations performed for QCM, atomic force microscopy topography and optical transmission measurements, returns results an order of magnitude larger (46 ± 1 layers) than Raman spectroscopy (1 - 2 graphene layers) on pristine pre-transferred films due to contamination during transfer and possible turbostratic structures of large areas. - Highlights: • Exploring interaction of graphene films with polar and nonpolar liquids

  7. Development and properties of aluminum-clad graphite/epoxy tubes for space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Kural, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the development and properties of seamless aluminum-clad P75/Epoxy tubes and the unique manufacturing method used in their production. Thermo-mechanical properties of the tubes were determined analytically and verified by tests. These properties were shown to be suitable for space structures that require high stiffness, low weight and thermal expansion, and dimensional stability during operational life. A special feature of the tubes is the ability to tune the tube for thermal expansion after fabrication by a chemical milling process. The tubes are also resistant to atomic oxygen and handling damage. The toughness of the tubes was demonstrated by impact testing. Cyclic thermal testing showed no adverse effects on the expansion and stiffness behavior of the tubes. The paper also includes a discussion of a joining method that uses aluminum end fittings and an efficient scarf joint configuration. Additional studies considered various adhesives and fitting materials. Joint allowables were higher for titanium and B4C particulate magnesium fittings. The effect of different adhesives under static loading conditions favored the high-strength adhesives.

  8. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  9. Thermodynamic and structural properties of ball-milled mixtures composed of nano-structural graphite and alkali(-earth) metal hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Fujii, Hironobu

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen desorption properties of mechanically milled materials composed of nano-structural hydrogenated-graphite (C nano H x ) and alkali(-earth) metal hydride (MH; M = Na, Mg and Ca) were investigated from the thermodynamic and structural points of view. The hydrogen desorption temperature for all the C nano H x and MH composites was obviously lower than that of the corresponding each hydride. In addition, the desorption of hydrocarbons from C nano H x was significantly suppressed by making composite of C nano H x with MH, even though C nano H x itself thermally desorbs a considerably large amount of hydrocarbons. These results indicate that an interaction exists between C nano H x and MH, and hydrogen in both the phases is destabilized by a close contact between polar C-H groups in C nano H x and the MH solid phase. Moreover, a new type of chemical bonding between the nano-structural carbon (C nano ) and the Li, Ca, or Mg metal atoms may be formed after hydrogen desorption. Thus, the above metal-C-H system would be recognized as a new family of H-storage materials

  10. Regularized Estimation of Structural Instability in Factor Models: The US Macroeconomy and the Great Moderation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callot, Laurent; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    This paper shows that the parsimoniously time-varying methodology of Callot and Kristensen (2015) can be applied to factor models.We apply this method to study macroeconomic instability in the US from 1959:1 to 2006:4 with a particular focus on the Great Moderation. Models with parsimoniously time...... that the parameters of both models exhibit a higher degree of instability in the period from 1970:1 to 1984:4 relative to the following 15 years. In our setting the Great Moderation appears as the gradual ending of a period of high structural instability that took place in the 1970s and early 1980s....

  11. Graphite and carbonaceous materials in a molten salt nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, Ginette; Lecocq, Alfred; Hery, Michel.

    1982-09-01

    A project for a molten salt 1000 MWe reactor is studied by EDF-CEA teams. The design provides for a chromesco 3 vessel housing graphite structures in which the salt circulates. The salt (Th, U, Be and Li fluorides) is cooled by direct contact with lead. The graphites and carbonated materials, inert with respect to lead and the fuel salt, are being considered not only as moderators, but as reflectors and in the construction of the sections where the heat exchange takes place. On the basis of the problems raised in the operation of the reactor, a study programme on French experimental materials (Le Carbone Lorraine, SERS, SEP) has been defined. Hence, depending on the function or functions that the material is to ensure in the structure, the criteria of choice which follow will have to be examined: behaviour under irradiation, insertion of a fluid in the material, thermal properties required, mechanical properties required, utilization [fr

  12. Probing the structure and mechanical properties of the graphite nodules in ductile cast irons via nano-indentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Fæster, Søren; Winther, Grethe

    2018-01-01

    Little is known today about the mechanical properties of the graphite nodules, despite the key influence these particles have on the performance of ductile cast irons. To address this issue, nano-indentation tests were performed on the cross-section of a nodule whose sub-surface morphology...

  13. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  14. Statistical Comparison of the Baseline Mechanical Properties of NBG-18 and PCEA Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark C. Carroll; David T. Rohrbaugh

    2013-08-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled design that is capable of producing process heat for power generation and for industrial process that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a comprehensive comparison between these values in different nuclear grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons and variations between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between the two grades of graphite that were initially favored in the two main VHTR designs. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration, while PCEA, a smaller grain, petroleum coke, extruded graphite from GrafTech was favored for the prismatic configuration. An analysis of the comparison between these two grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  15. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  16. Potassium vapor assisted preparation of highly graphitized hierarchical porous carbon for high rate performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Zeng, Ying; Tang, Qunli; Hu, Aiping; Xiao, Kuikui; Zhang, Shiying; Deng, Weina; Fan, Binbin; Zhu, Yanfei; Chen, Xiaohua

    2017-09-01

    Ultrahigh graphitized carbon microspheres with rich hierarchical pores (AGHPCM-1) have been successfully synthesized through the one-step activation-carbonization strategy (OACS) with porous sulfonated poly-divinylbenzene as the carbon precursor, iron as the hard template and catalyst, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) as activation agent. Through the XRD, TEM, Raman and BET analysis, AGHPCM-1 shows very high graphitization degree and rich micro-, meso- and macro-pores. More importantly, the mechanism for KOH to improve the graphitization degree of carbon materials in OACS has been illustrated by the thermodynamical theory. The tremendous heat releasing from the reaction between the catalyst precursor of Fe2O3 and potassium vapor plays a key role in the formation of graphitized carbon. It may provide a general direction to prepare highly graphitized porous carbon at a moderate temperature. Integrating the advantages of high graphitization degree and rich hierarchical porous structure, the AGHPCM-1 exhibits an excellent rate performance with a response to up to the high current density of 150 A g-1 and high scan rate of 2000 mV s-1. No obvious capacitance decay can be observed after 10000 charge/discharge cycles even at the high current density of 20 A g-1.

  17. Source Term Analysis of the Irradiated Graphite in the Core of HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuegang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR has potential utilization due to its featured characteristics such as inherent safety and wide diversity of utilization. One distinct difference between HTGR and traditional pressurized water reactor (PWR is the large inventory of graphite in the core acting as reflector, moderator, or structure materials. Some radionuclides will be generated in graphite during the period of irradiation, which play significant roles in reactor safety, environmental release, waste disposal, and so forth. Based on the actual operation of the 10 MW pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10 in Tsinghua University, China, an experimental study on source term analysis of the irradiated graphite has been done. An irradiated graphite sphere was randomly collected from the core of HTR-10 as sample in this study. This paper focuses on the analytical procedure and the establishment of the analytical methodology, including the sample collection, graphite sample preparation, and analytical parameters. The results reveal that the Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Eu-154 are the major γ contributors, while H-3 and C-14 are the dominating β emitting nuclides in postirradiation graphite material of HTR-10. The distribution profiles of the above four nuclides are also presented.

  18. The great moderation of inflation: a structural analysis of recent U.S. monetary business cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Casares Polo, Miguel; Vázquez, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    U.S. inflation has experienced a great moderation in the last two decades. This paper examines the factors behind this and other stylized facts, such as the weaker correlation of inflation and nominal interest rate (Gibson paradox). Our findings point at lower exogenous variability of supply-side shocks and, to a lower extent, structural changes in money demand, monetary policy, and firms’ sticky pricing behavior as the main driving forces of the changes observed in recent U.S. business cycle...

  19. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  20. Electrical Characterization of Graphite/InP Schottky Diodes by I-V-T and C-V Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiagulskyi, Stanislav; Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan

    2018-02-01

    A rectifying junction was prepared by casting a drop of colloidal graphite on the surface of an InP substrate. The electrophysical properties of graphite/InP junctions were investigated in a wide temperature range. Temperature-dependent I-V characteristics of the graphite/InP junctions are explained by the thermionic emission mechanism. The Schottky barrier height (SBH) and the ideality factor were found to be 0.9 eV and 1.47, respectively. The large value of the SBH and its weak temperature dependence are explained by lateral homogeneity of the junction, which is related to the structure of the graphite layer. The moderate disagreement between the current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements is attributed to the formation of interfacial native oxide film on the InP surface.

  1. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  2. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A.N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite exhibits

  3. Graphite nanoplatelets-modified PLA/PCL: effect of blend ratio and nanofiller localization on structure and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kelnar, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Zhigunov, Alexander; Nevoralová, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, July (2017), s. 271-278 ISSN 1751-6161 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03194S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly (epsilon-caprolactone) * poly (lactic acid) * graphite nanoplatelets Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016

  4. Performance of brazed graphite, carbon-fiber composite, and TZM materials for actively cooled structures: qualification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Watson, R. D.; Linke, J.; Cardella, A.; Bolt, H.; Reheis, N.; Kny, E.

    1995-01-01

    The divertor of a near-term fusion device has to withstand high heat fluxes, heat shocks, and erosion caused by the plasma. Furthermore, it has to be maintainable through remote techniques. Above all, a good heat removal capability across the interface (low-Z armor/heat sink) plus overall integrity after many operational cycles are needed. To meet all these requirements, an active metal brazing technique is applied to bond graphite and carbon-fiber composite materials to a heat sink consisting of a Mo-41Re coolant tube through a TZM body. Plain brazed graphite and TZM tiles are tested for their fusion-relevant properties. The interfaces appear undamaged after thermal cycling when the melting point of the braze joint is not exceeded and when the graphite armor is > 4 mm thick. High heat flux tests are performed on three actively cooled divertor targets. The braze joints show no sign of failure after exposure to thermal loads ∼ 25 % higher than the design value surface heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 . (author)

  5. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  6. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  7. Metal burning in graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.; Ball, S.J.; Daw, C.S.; Thomas, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo var. black beauty) were grown in a randomized complete-block field/pot experiment at a site that contained the highest observed levels of surface gross gamma radioactivity within Los Alamos Canyon (LAC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Soils as well as washed edible and nonedible crop tissues were analyzed for various radionuclides and heavy metals. Most radionuclides, with the exception of 3 H and tot U, in soil from LAC were detected in significantly higher concentrations (p -1 . This dose was below the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit (PDL) of 100 mrem y -1 from all pathways; however, the addition of other internal and external exposure route factors may increase the overall dose over the PDL. Also, the risk of an excess cancer fatality, based on 74 mrem y -1 , was 3.7 x 10 -5 (37 in a million), which is above the Environmental Protection Agency's (acceptable) guideline of one in a million. 25 refs

  8. Porous (Swiss-Cheese Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Abrahamson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous graphite was prepared without the use of template by rapidly heating the carbonization products from mixtures of anthracene, fluorene, and pyrene with a CO2 laser. Rapid CO2 laser heating at a rate of 1.8 × 106 °C/s vaporizes out the fluorene-pyrene derived pitch while annealing the anthracene coke. The resulting structure is that of graphite with 100 nm spherical pores. The graphitizablity of the porous material is the same as pure anthracene coke. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces between graphitic layers and the pore walls are unimpeded. Traditional furnace annealing does not result in the porous structure as the heating rates are too slow to vaporize out the pitch, thereby illustrating the advantage of fast thermal processing. The resultant porous graphite was prelithiated and used as an anode in lithium ion capacitors. The porous graphite when lithiated had a specific capacity of 200 mAh/g at 100 mA/g. The assembled lithium ion capacitor demonstrated an energy density as high as 75 Wh/kg when cycled between 2.2 V and 4.2 V.

  9. Ab initio and Molecular Dynamic models of displacement damage in crystalline and turbostratic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Alice

    One of the functions of graphite is as a moderator in several nuclear reactor designs, including the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR). In the reactor graphite is used to thermalise the neutrons produced in the fission reaction thus allowing a self-sustained reaction to occur. The graphite blocks, acting as the moderator, are constantly irradiated and consequently suffer damage. This thesis examines the types of damage caused using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and ab intio calculations. Neutron damage starts with a primary knock-on atom (PKA), which is travelling so fast that it creates damage through electronic and thermal excitation (this is addressed with thermal spike simulations). When the PKA has lost energy the subsequent cascade is based on ballistic atomic displacement. These two types of simulations were performed on single crystal graphite and other carbon structures such as diamond and amorphous carbon as a comparison. The thermal spike in single crystal graphite produced results which varied from no defects to a small number of permanent defects in the structure. It is only at the high energy range that more damage is seen but these energies are less likely to occur in the nuclear reactor. The thermal spike does not create damage but it is possible that it can heal damaged sections of the graphite, which can be demonstrated with the motion of the defects when a thermal spike is applied. The cascade simulations create more damage than the thermal spike even though less energy is applied to the system. A new damage function is found with a threshold region that varies with the square root of energy in excess of the energy threshold. This is further broken down in to contributions from primary and subsequent knock-on atoms. The threshold displacement energy (TDE) is found to be Ed=25eV at 300K. In both these types of simulation graphite acts very differently to the other carbon structures. There are two types of polycrystalline graphite structures

  10. Structural nested mean models for assessing time-varying effect moderation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Daniel; Ten Have, Thomas; Murphy, Susan A

    2010-03-01

    This article considers the problem of assessing causal effect moderation in longitudinal settings in which treatment (or exposure) is time varying and so are the covariates said to moderate its effect. Intermediate causal effects that describe time-varying causal effects of treatment conditional on past covariate history are introduced and considered as part of Robins' structural nested mean model. Two estimators of the intermediate causal effects, and their standard errors, are presented and discussed: The first is a proposed two-stage regression estimator. The second is Robins' G-estimator. The results of a small simulation study that begins to shed light on the small versus large sample performance of the estimators, and on the bias-variance trade-off between the two estimators are presented. The methodology is illustrated using longitudinal data from a depression study.

  11. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  12. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  13. Irradiation damage in graphite due to fast neutrons in fission and fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    Gas cooled reactors have been in operation for the production of electricity for over forty years, encompassing a total of 56 units operated in seven countries. The predominant experience has been with carbon dioxide cooled reactors (52 units), with the majority operated in the United Kingdom. In addition, four prototype helium cooled power plants were operated in the United States and Germany. The United Kingdom has no plans for further construction of carbon dioxide units, and the last helium cooled unit was shutdown in 1990. However, there has been an increasing interest in modular helium cooled reactors during the 1990s as a possible future nuclear option. Graphite is a primary material for the construction of gas cooled reactor cores, serving as a low absorption neutron moderator and providing a high temperature, high strength structure. Commercial gas cooled reactor cores (both carbon dioxide cooled and helium cooled) utilise large quantities of graphite. The structural behaviour of graphite (strength, dimensional stability, susceptibility to cracking, etc.) is a complex function of the source material, manufacturing process, chemical environment, and temperature and irradiation history. A large body of data on graphite structural performance has accumulated from operation of commercial gas cooled reactors, beginning in the 1950s and continuing to the present. The IAEA is supporting a project to collect graphite data and archive it in a retrievable form as an International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties, with limited general access and more detailed access by participating Member States. Because of the large size of the database, the complexity of the phenomena and the number of variables involved, a general understanding of graphite behaviour is essential to the understanding and use of the data

  14. Experiments on graphite block gaps connected with leak flow in bottom-core structure of experimental very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kaburaki, Hideo; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1984-01-01

    In order to minimize the leak flow rate of an experimental VHTR (a multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor), the graphite blocks are tightened to reduce the gap distance between blocks by core restrainers surrounded outside of the fixed reflectors of the bottom-core structure and seal elements are placed in the gaps. By using a 1/2.75-scale model of the bottom-core structure, the experiments on the following items have been carried out: a relationship between core restraint force and block gap, a relationship between core restraint force and inclined angle of the model, leak flow characteristics of seal elements etc. The conclusions derived from the experiments are as follows: (1) Core restraint force is significantly effective for decreasing the gap distance between hot plenum blocks, but ineffective for the gap between hot plenum block and fixed reflector. (2) Graphite seal element reduces the leak flow rate from the top surface of hot plenum block into plenum region to one-third. (author)

  15. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  16. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14 C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14 C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  17. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on the Mechanical and Structural Properties of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kay Woodroof

    1982-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) and graphite/polyimide composites (C6000/PMR 15) were exposed to various levels of 0.5 MeV electron radiation with the maximum dose being 10,000 Mrad. A three point bending test was used to evaluate the ultimate stress and modulus of the composites. In all composites except transverse samples of C6000/PMR 15 ultimate stress values remained approximately constant or increased slightly. The modulus values remained approximately constant for all composite types regardless of the radiation level. Interfacial aspects of composites were studied. Interlaminar shear tests were performed on T300/5208 and C6000/PMR 15 composites irradiated to 10,000 Mrad. There was an initial increase in interlaminar shear strength (up to 1,000 Mrad) followed by a sharp decrease with further radiation exposure. Using scanning electron microscopy no visual differences in the mode of fracture could be detected between ruptured control samples and those exposed to various levels of radiation. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) revealed little change in the surface elements present in control and highly irradiated T300/5208 composite samples.

  18. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  19. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  20. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C α r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior comprising 329

  1. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishibashi, Matsujiro [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tokunaga, Hiroko [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Florida State University, 1115 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States); Tokunaga, Masao [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Kuroki, Ryota, E-mail: kuroki.ryota@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C{sup α} r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior

  2. School climate, family structure, and academic achievement: a study of moderation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Meagan; Voight, Adam; Renshaw, Tyler L; Eklund, Katie

    2015-03-01

    School climate has been lauded for its relationship to a host of desirable academic, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes for youth. The present study tested the hypothesis that school climate counteracts youths' home-school risk by examining the moderating effects of students' school climate perceptions on the relationship between family structure (i.e., two-parent, one-parent, foster-care, and homeless households), and academic performance (i.e., self-reported [grade point average] GPA). The present sample consisted of 902 California public high schools, including responses from over 490,000 students in Grades 9 and 11. Results indicated that, regardless of family structure, students with more positive school climate perceptions self-reported higher GPAs. Youths with two-parent, one-parent, and homeless family structures displayed stepwise, linear improvements in self-reported GPA as perceptions of climate improved. Foster-care students' positive school climate perceptions had a weaker effect on their self-reported GPA compared with students living in other family structures. A unique curvilinear trend was found for homeless students, as the relationship between their school climate perceptions and self-reported GPA was stronger at lower levels. Overall, the moderation effect of positive school climate perceptions on self-reported GPA was strongest for homeless youth and youth from one-parent homes, suggesting that school climate has a protective effect for students living in these family structures. A protective effect was not found for youth in foster-care. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Bratton, Rob; Marsden, Barry; Srinivasan, Makuteswara; Penfield, Scott; Mitchell, Mark; Windes, Will

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version (a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version (a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV

  4. Study on graphite samples for nuclear usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.M.; Silva Roseira, M. da

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The graphite, due to its properties (mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, high-temperature stability, machinability etc.) have many industrial applications, and consequently, an important strategic value. In the nuclear area, it has been used as moderator and reflector of neutrons in the fission process of uranium. The graphite can be produced from many types of carbonaceous materials by a variety of process dominated by the manufactures. This is the reason why there are in the world market a lot of graphite types with different physical and mechanical properties. The present investigation studies some physical characteristics of the graphite samples destined to use in a nuclear reactor. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  5. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shigang; Sun Libin; Zhang Zhengming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  6. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  7. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  8. Forest structure and light regimes following moderate wind storms: implications for multi-cohort management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jacob J; Lorimer, Craig G

    2007-07-01

    Moderate-severity disturbances appear to be common throughout much of North America, but they have received relatively little detailed study compared to catastrophic disturbances and small gap dynamics. In this study, we examined the immediate impact of moderate-intensity wind storms on stand structure, opening sizes, and light regimes in three hemlock-hardwood forests of northeastern Wisconsin. These were compared to three stands managed by single-tree and group selection, the predominant forest management system for northern hardwoods in the region. Wind storms removed an average of 41% of the stand basal area, compared to 27% removed by uneven-aged harvests, but both disturbances removed trees from a wide range of size classes. The removal of nearly half of the large trees by wind in two old-growth stands caused partial retrogression to mature forest structure, which has been hypothesized to be a major disturbance pathway in the region. Wind storms resulted in residual stand conditions that were much more heterogeneous than in managed stands. Gap sizes ranged from less than 10 m2 up to 5000 m2 in wind-disturbed stands, whereas the largest opening observed in managed stands was only 200 m2. Wind-disturbed stands had, on average, double the available solar radiation at the forest floor compared to managed stands. Solar radiation levels were also more heterogeneous in wind-disturbed stands, with six times more variability at small scales (0.1225 ha) and 15 times more variability at the whole-stand level. Modification of uneven-aged management regimes to include occasional harvests of variable intensity and spatial pattern may help avoid the decline in species diversity that tends to occur after many decades of conventional uneven-aged management. At the same time, a multi-cohort system with these properties would retain a high degree of average crown cover, promote structural heterogeneity typical of old-growth forests, and maintain dominance by late

  9. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  10. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  11. A study of the coefficient of thermal expansion of nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.

    2001-02-01

    This thesis presents the results of a study of the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of two grades of nuclear graphite that are used as the moderator in the Magnox and Advanced Gas-Cooled reactors operated in the UK. This work has two main aims, the first is to characterise those elements of the graphite microstructure that control CTE within these materials and to relate these to the effects induced within the reactor. The second is to develop a microstructural model, of general applicability, that can initially be applied to model the CTE changes within the graphites under reactor conditions (neutron irradiation and radiolytic oxidation). These aims have been met by study in three interlinked areas, theoretical, experimental and modelling. Previous to this study, a loose assembly of single crystals together with changes in small scale nanometric porosity (Mrozowski cracks) were used to describe CTE behaviour of nuclear graphite both as-received and under reactor conditions. Within the experimental part of this thesis the graphite nanostructure was studied using, primarily, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This work concluded that structure on this scale was complex and that the loose assembly of single crystals was a poor microstructural approximation for modelling the CTE of these materials. Other experimental programmes measured the CTE of highly oxidised samples and simulated the effects of irradiation. The former discovered that CTE remained largely unaffected to high weight losses. This insensitivity was explained by ''The Continuous Network Hypothesis'' that was also related to classical percolation theory. The final part of the thesis modelled an abstraction of the key microstructural features identified in the previous parts of the thesis. This approach has been applied to AGR moderator graphite where it has successfully modelled the thermal expansion behaviour of the as-received, irradiated and oxidised material. (author)

  12. Structure and properties of combined coatings on C (graphite)/Al/Al2O3 base after Ti ion implantation with subsequent electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnjak, A.D.; Pogrebnjak, N.A.; Gritsenko, B.P.; Kylyshkanov, M.K.; Ruzimov, Sh.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The presented report deals with new results on deposition of combined coatings using Al metallization (by a plasma jet) and micro-arc (discharge) Al oxidation. After this, the coating was implanted by Ti ions with 5·10 I7 cm -2 dose (60 and 90 kV and about 200 μs duration). One series of samples with such coatings was irradiated using the accelerator Y-112 by an electron beam in melting regime (two regimes). Analysis of the structure and element composition was performed using SIMS, RBS, SEM with micro-analysis (WDS), XRD as well as measurements of microhardness, wear and adhesion. It had been demonstrated that the coating was able to sustain very high temperatures and oxidation medium. However, after electron beam irradiation temperature resistance decreased because the oxide coating was melted almost to the graphite surface. The work was funded by the Project of NANU 'Nanosystems, nanomaterials and nanotechnology'

  13. Time-varying effect moderation using the structural nested mean model: estimation using inverse-weighted regression with residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Daniel; Griffin, Beth Ann; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Ramchand, Rajeev; Yuen, Robert A.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the problem of examining time-varying causal effect moderation using observational, longitudinal data in which treatment, candidate moderators, and possible confounders are time varying. The structural nested mean model (SNMM) is used to specify the moderated time-varying causal effects of interest in a conditional mean model for a continuous response given time-varying treatments and moderators. We present an easy-to-use estimator of the SNMM that combines an existing regression-with-residuals (RR) approach with an inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) strategy. The RR approach has been shown to identify the moderated time-varying causal effects if the time-varying moderators are also the sole time-varying confounders. The proposed IPTW+RR approach provides estimators of the moderated time-varying causal effects in the SNMM in the presence of an additional, auxiliary set of known and measured time-varying confounders. We use a small simulation experiment to compare IPTW+RR versus the traditional regression approach and to compare small and large sample properties of asymptotic versus bootstrap estimators of the standard errors for the IPTW+RR approach. This article clarifies the distinction between time-varying moderators and time-varying confounders. We illustrate the methodology in a case study to assess if time-varying substance use moderates treatment effects on future substance use. PMID:23873437

  14. Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-14

    Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

  15. A study of the relationship between microstructure and oxidation effects in nuclear graphite at very high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, I.-Hsuan; Tzelepi, Athanasia; Patterson, Eann A.; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang

    2018-04-01

    Graphite is used in the cores of gas-cooled reactors as both the neutron moderator and a structural material, and traditional and novel graphite materials are being studied worldwide for applications in Generation IV reactors. In this study, the oxidation characteristics of petroleum-based IG-110 and pitch-based IG-430 graphite pellets in helium and air environments at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1600 °C were investigated. The oxidation rates and activation energies were determined based on mass loss measurements in a series of oxidation tests. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Although the thermal oxidation mechanism was previously considered to be the same for all temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the significant increases in oxidation rate observed at very high temperatures suggest that the oxidation behavior of the selected graphite materials at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is different. This work demonstrates that changes in surface morphology and in oxidation rate of the filler particles in the graphite materials are more prominent at temperatures above 1200 °C. Furthermore, possible intrinsic factors contributing to the oxidation of the two graphite materials at different temperature ranges are discussed taking account of the dominant role played by temperature.

  16. Acceptance test for graphite components and construction status of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, T.; Ishihara, M.; Maruyama, S.; Shiozawa, S.; Tsuji, N.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    In March, 1991, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started to constructed the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) which is a 30-MW(thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on the core support graphite structures. Two types of graphite materials are used in the HTTR. One is the garde IG-110, isotropic fine grain graphite, another is the grade PGX, medium-to-fine grained molded graphite. These materials were selected on the basis of the appropriate properties required by the HTTR reactor design. Industry-wide standards for an acceptance test of graphite materials used as main components of a nuclear reactor had not been established. The acceptance standard for graphite components of the HTTR, therefore, was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The acceptance standard consists of the material testing, non-destructive examination such as the ultrasonic and eddy current testings, dimensional and visual inspections and assembly test. Ultrasonic and eddy current testings are applied to graphite logs to detect an internal flaw and to graphite components to detect a surface flaw, respectively. The assembly test is performed at the works, prior to their installation in the reactor pressure vessel, to examine fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures. The graphite components of the HTTR had been tested on the basis of the acceptance standard. It was confirmed that the graphite manufacturing process was well controlled and high quality graphite components were provided to the HTTR. All graphite components except for the fuel graphite blocks are to be installed in the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR in September 1995. The paper describes the construction status of the HTTR focusing on the graphite components. The acceptance test results are also presented in this paper. (author). Figs

  17. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  18. Channel uranium-graphite reactor mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polushkin, K.K.; Kuznetsov, A.G.; Zheleznyakov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    According to theoretical principles of general engineering technology the engineering experience of construction-mounting works at the NPP with channel uranium-graphite reactors is systematized. Main parameters and structural features of the 1000 MW channel uranium-graphite reactors are considered. The succession of mounting operations, premounting equipment and pipelines preparation and mounting works technique are described. The most efficient methods of fitting, welding and machining of reactor elements are recommended. Main problems of technical control service are discussed. A typical netted diagram of main equipment of channel uranium-graphite reactors mounting is given

  19. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  20. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  1. One-step synthesis of shell/core structural boron and nitrogen co-doped graphitic carbon/nanodiamond as efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Yanhui; Dong, Liang; Chen, Xi; Xin, Guoxiang; Zhang, Yan; Zang, Jianbing

    2016-01-01

    Shell/core structural boron and nitrogen co-doped graphitic carbon/nanodiamond (BN-C/ND) non-noble metal catalyst has been synthesized by a simple one-step heat-treatment of the mixture with nanodiamond, melamine, boric acid and FeCl 3 . In the process of the surface graphitization of nanodiamond with catalysis by FeCl 3 , B and N atoms from the decomposition of boric acid and melamine were directly introduced into the graphite lattice to form B, N co-doped graphitic carbon shell, while the core still retained the diamond structure. Electrochemical measurements of the BN-C/ND catalyst show much higher electrocatalytic activities towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium than its analogues doped with B or N alone (B-C/ND or N-C/ND). The high catalytic activity of BN-C/ND is attributed to the synergetic effect caused by co-doping of C/ND with B and N. Meanwhile, the BN-C/ND exhibits an excellent electrochemical stability due to the special shell/core structure. There is almost no alteration occurred in the cyclic voltammetry measurements for BN-C/ND before and after 5000 cycles. All experimental results prove that the BN-C/ND may be exploited as a potentially efficient and inexpensive non-noble metal cathode catalyst for ORR to substitute Pt-based catalysts in fuel cells.

  2. The Factor Structure for the Geriatric Depression Scale in Screening Depression in Taiwanese Patients with Very Mild to Moderate Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Si-Sheng; Liao, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Wen-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Background: To define the factor structures of the 30 items Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30) when assessing the depression in patients with very mild to moderate dementia. Methods: A total of 240 pairs of patients with very mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers who visited the memory clinic of the medical center in Taiwan from July 2001 to October 2008 were surveyed. The depression of patients with dementia was evaluated using the Chinese version of the GDS-30. We analyzed the ...

  3. Observation of Compressive Deformation Behavior of Nuclear Graphite by Digital Image Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Eungseon; Kim, Minhwan; Kim, Yongwan

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline nuclear graphite has been proposed as a fuel element, moderator and reflector blocks, and core support structures in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor. During reactor operation, graphite core components and core support structures are subjected to various stresses. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of deformation and fracture of nuclear graphites, and their significance to structural integrity assessment methods. Digital image correlation (DIC) is a powerful tool to measure the full field displacement distribution on the surface of the specimens. In this study, to gain an understanding of compressive deformation characteristic, the formation of strain field during a compression test was examined using a commercial DIC system. An examination was made to characterize the compressive deformation behavior of nuclear graphite by a digital image correlation. The non-linear load-displacement characteristic prior to the peak load was shown to be mainly dominated by the presence of localized strains, which resulted in a permanent displacement. Young's modulus was properly calculated from the measured strain

  4. Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids in bainite during graphitization annealing of a medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.X.; Wei, B.Q.; Li, D.D.; He, K.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in bainite during graphitization annealing at 680 °C of Jominy-quenched bars of an Al-Si bearing medium carbon (0.4C wt%) steel has been studied and compared with that in martensite by using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the graphitization process in bainite is different from that in martensite in many aspects such as the initial carbon state, the behavior of cementite, the nucleation-growth feature and kinetics of formation of graphite spheroids during graphitization annealing, and the shape, size and distribution of these graphite spheroids. The fact that the graphitization in bainite can produce more homogeneous graphite spheroids with more spherical shape and finer size in a shorter annealing time without the help of preexisting coring particles implies that bainite should be a better starting structure than martensite for making graphitic steel. - Highlights: • This article presents a microstructural characterization of formation of graphite spheroids in bainite. • Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids formed in bainite and martensite are compared. • Bainite should be a better starting structure for making graphitic steel as results show.

  5. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  6. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  7. Crystallization degree change of expanded graphite by milling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qunwei; Wu Jihuai; Sun Hui; Fang Shijun

    2009-01-01

    Expanded graphite was ball milled with a planetary mill in air atmosphere, and subsequently thermal annealed. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in the milling initial stage (less than 12 h), the crystallization degree of the expanded graphite declined gradually, but after milling more than 16 h, a recrystallization of the expanded graphite toke place, and ordered nanoscale expanded graphite was formed gradually. In the annealing initial stage, the non-crystallization of the graphite occurred, but, beyond an annealing time, recrystallizations of the graphite arise. Higher annealing temperature supported the recrystallization. The milled and annealed expanded graphite still preserved the crystalline structure as raw material and hold high thermal stability.

  8. Monte Carlo calculation of standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of calculation of neutron flux space and energy distribution in the standard graphite block (SGB) obtained by the MCNP TM code. VMCCS nuclear data library, based on the ENDF / B-VI release 4 evaluation file, is used. MCNP model of the SGB considers detailed material, geometric and spectral properties of the neutron source, source carrier, graphite moderator medium, aluminium foil holders and proximate surrounding of SGB Geometric model is organised to provide the simplest homogeneous volume cells in order to obtain the maximum acceleration of neutron history tracking (author)

  9. Application of X-ray micro-CT for micro-structural characterization of APCVD deposited SiC coatings on graphite conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, A K; Sarkar, P S; Singh, B; Kashyap, Y S; Rao, P T; Sinha, A

    2016-02-01

    SiC coatings are commonly used as oxidation protective materials in high-temperature applications. The operational performance of the coating depends on its microstructure and uniformity. This study explores the feasibility of applying tabletop X-ray micro-CT for the micro-structural characterization of SiC coating. The coating is deposited over the internal surface of pipe structured graphite fuel tube, which is a prototype of potential components of compact high-temperature reactor (CHTR). The coating is deposited using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) and properties such as morphology, porosity, thickness variation are evaluated. Micro-structural differences in the coating caused by substrate distance from precursor inlet in a CVD reactor are also studied. The study finds micro-CT a potential tool for characterization of SiC coating during its future course of engineering. We show that depletion of reactants at larger distances causes development of larger pores in the coating, which affects its morphology, density and thickness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of alkyl chain length and anion species on ionic liquid structure at the graphite interface as a function of applied potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hua; Wood, Ross J; Atkin, Rob; Endres, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements elucidate the effect of cation alkyl chain length and the anion species on ionic liquid (IL) interfacial structure at highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces as a function of potential. Three ILs are examined: 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([HMIM] FAP), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([EMIM] FAP), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM] TFSA). The step-wise force-distance profiles indicate the ILs adopt a multilayered morphology near the surface. When the surface is biased positively or negatively versus Pt quasireference electrode, both the number of steps, and the force required to rupture each step increase, indicating stronger interfacial structure. At all potentials, push-through forces for [HMIM] FAP are the highest, because the long alkyl chain results in strong cohesive interactions between cations, leading to well-formed layers that resist the AFM tip. The most layers are observed for [EMIM] FAP, because the C 2 chains are relatively rigid and the dimensions of the cation and anion are similar, facilitating neat packing. [EMIM] TFSA has the smallest push-through forces and fewest layers, and thus the weakest interfacial structure. Surface-tip attractive forces are measured for all ILs. At the same potential, the attractions are the strongest for [EMIM] TFSA and the weakest for [HMIM] FAP because the interfacial layers are better formed for the longer alkyl chain cation. This means interfacial forces are stronger, which masks the weak attractive forces. (paper)

  11. An active structure preservation method for developing functional graphitic carbon dots as an effective antibacterial agent and a sensitive pH and Al(iii) nanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peng; Yang, Tong; Liu, Hui; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2017-11-16

    Functional engineering is a crucial prerequisite for specific and wide applications of optical probes. In this study, we proposed a facile active structure preservation (ASP) method to directly develop new self-functional graphitic carbon dots (g-CDs) through a hydrothermal synthesis route by taking ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, an antibiotic belonging to a group of fluoroquinolone drugs, as an example. To retain the functional structures of the starting materials, the reaction temperature is intentionally controlled below the decomposition temperature of the reactants that hold the functional groups. As a proof of concept, we successfully prepared g-CDs with ciprofloxacin-like structures on its surface, as identified by mass spectrometric (MS) analysis. The as-prepared g-CDs not only exhibit effective antibacterial activity towards the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), but can also optically sense pH in the range from 5.02 to 9.91. Furthermore, the g-CDs can coordinate with aluminum ions to show a chelation-enhanced photoluminescence (CHEP) effect. These results indicate that the ASP method can be promising for engineering CDs with various properties.

  12. Radionuclide characterization of graphite stacks from plutonium production reactors of the Siberian group of chemical enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushuev, A.V.; Verzilov, Yu.M.; Zubarev, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    The residual radionuclide concentrations and distributions in graphite from moderator stack of plutonium production reactors at Tomsk-7 have been investigated. It was found that the dominant activity of graphite is 14 C. To gain information on surface and volume contamination of graphite blocks from the moderator stack, the special sets of samples were collected and assayed. The schemes are proposed for evaluation of individual radionuclide inventories together with results of the evaluations performed. (author)

  13. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  14. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  15. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  16. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  17. Multilayer core-shell structured composite paper electrode consisting of copper, cuprous oxide and graphite assembled on cellulose fibers for asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Caichao; Jiao, Yue; Li, Jian

    2017-09-01

    An easily-operated and inexpensive strategy (pencil-drawing-electrodeposition-electro-oxidation) is proposed to synthesize a novel class of multilayer core-shell structured composite paper electrode, which consists of copper, cuprous oxide and graphite assembled on cellulose fibers. This interesting electrode structure plays a pivotal role in providing more active sites for electrochemical reactions, facilitating ion and electron transport and shorting their diffusion pathways. This electrode demonstrates excellent electrochemical properties with a high specific capacitance of 601 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 and retains 83% of this capacitance when operated at an ultrahigh current density of 100 A g-1. In addition, a high energy density of 13.4 W h kg-1 at the power density of 0.40 kW kg-1 and a favorable cycling stability (95.3%, 8000 cycles) were achieved for this electrode. When this electrode was assembled into an asymmetric supercapacitor with carbon paper as negative electrode, the device displays remarkable electrochemical performances with a large areal capacitances (122 mF cm-2 at 1 mA cm-2), high areal energy density (10.8 μW h cm-2 at 402.5 μW cm-2) and outstanding cycling stability (91.5%, 5000 cycles). These results unveil the potential of this composite electrode as a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors.

  18. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  19. Teacher structure as a predictor of students' perceived competence and autonomous motivation: The moderating role of differentiated instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Frédéric; Roy, Amélie; Valois, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    An important pedagogical practice is the provision of structure (Farkas & Grolnick, 2010, Motiv. Emot., 34, 266). According to self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985, Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior, Plenum, New York, NY), structure allows students to develop perceived competence in different school subjects, which in turn facilitates the development of autonomous motivation towards these subjects and limits the development of controlled motivation. In this study, we test a mediated moderation model that posits that teacher structure has a stronger positive effect on students' autonomous motivation (and a negative effect on controlled motivation) in French class when differentiated instruction is used, and that this moderation effect is mediated by perceived competence. To test this model, we used a sample of 27 elementary school teachers and 422 students from Quebec, a province of Canada. Data for teachers and students were collected with self-report measures. The method used was a correlational one with a single measurement time. Results revealed that (1) the effect of teacher structure on students' autonomous motivation was positive only when differentiated instruction strategies were frequently used, and this moderated effect was partially mediated by perceived competence, and (2) teacher structure was negatively associated with students' controlled motivation only when differentiated instruction was provided infrequently, and this moderated effect was not explained by perceived competence. These findings are discussed in the light of the literature on SDT and on differentiated instruction. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  1. Application of INAA for chemical quality control analysis of C-C composite and high purity graphite by determining trace elemental concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, Amol D.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Acharya, R.; Venugopalan, Ramani

    2015-01-01

    Carbon based materials like graphite and C-C composites are used for various scientific and technological applications. Owing to its low neutron capture cross section and good moderating properties, graphite is used as a moderator or reflector in nuclear reactors. For high temperature reactors like CHTR, graphite and C-C composites are proposed as structural materials. Studies are in progress to use C-C composites as prospective candidate instead of graphite due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. The advantage of carbon-carbon composite is that the microstructure and the properties can be tailor made. Impurities like rare earth elements and neutron poisons which have high neutron absorption cross section and elements whose activation products of have longer half-lives like 60 Co (5.27 y), 65 Zn (244.3 d) and 59 Fe (44.5 d) are not desired in structural materials. For chemical quality control (CQC) it is necessary to evaluate accurately the impurity concentrations using a suitable non-destructive analytical technique. In the present work, two carbon/carbon composite samples and two high purity graphite samples were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using high-flux reactor neutrons. Samples, sealed in Al foil, were irradiated in tray-rod position of Dhruva reactor, BARC at a neutron flux of ∼ 5 x 10 13 cm -2 s -1 . Radioactive assay was carried out using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry using 40% HPGe detector

  2. Study on practical of eddy current testing of core and core support graphite components in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ooka, Norikazu; Shindo, Yoshihisa; Kawae, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Motomitsu; Kambe, Mamoru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Ide, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    Core and core support graphite components in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) are mainly made of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphites. Nondestructive inspection with Eddy Current Testing (ECT) is planned to be applied to these components. The method of ECT has been already established for metallic components, however, cannot be applied directly to the graphite ones, because the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from those of metals. Therefore, ECT method and condition were studied for the application of the ECT to the graphite components. This paper describes the study on practical method and conditions of ECT for above mentioned graphite structures. (author)

  3. Structural and Psychological Empowerment Climates, Performance, and the Moderating Role of Shared Felt Accountability: A Managerial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. Craig; Johnson, Paul D.; Mathe, Kimberly; Paul, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model in which data were collected from managers (n = 539) at 116 corporate-owned quick service restaurants to assess the structural and psychological empowerment process as moderated by shared-felt accountability on indices of performance from a managerial perspective. The authors found that empowering leadership…

  4. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  5. [Community structure and diversity of culturable moderate halophilic bacteria isolated from Qrhan salt lake on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuo

    2017-04-04

    I studied the community structure and diversity of culturable moderate halophilic bacteria isolated from Qrhan Salt Lake. I isolated and cultured the moderate halophilic bacteria on different selective media. After the 16S rRNA gene sequences was amplified and measured, I constructed the phylogenic tree, analyzed the community structure and calculated the diversity indexes according to the 16S rRNA gene information. A total of 421 moderate halophilic bacteria were isolated from water and mud samples in Qrhan Salt Lake. The 16S rRNA gene information showed that 4 potential novel species belonged to the family Bacillaceae. Eighty-three model strains belonged to 3 phylurms 6 families 16 genus. Among them, Bacillus sp., Oceanobacillus sp. and Halomonas sp. were dominant species. Diversity analysis showed that the diversity of strains isolated from water sample was higher than that from mud sample, but the dominance degree of strains isolated from mud sample was higher than that from water sample. The genetic diversity of moderate halophilic bacteria isolated from Qrhan Salt Lake was abundant. Also, there were dominant and novel species of culturable moderate halophilic bacteria in this lake.

  6. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with layered structure graphitic carbon nitride and reduced graphene oxide modified TiO2 photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Huiru; Hu, Haihua; Cui, Can; Lin, Ping; Wang, Peng; Wang, Hao; Xu, Lingbo; Pan, Jiaqi; Li, Chaorong

    2017-11-01

    TiO2/reduced graphene oxide (TiO2/rGO) composite has been widely exploited as the photoanode material for high efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) is limited due to the charge recombination between the rGO and electrolyte. In this paper, we incorporate 5.5 wt% layered structure graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and 0.25 wt% rGO into TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) film to form a triple-component TiO2/rGO/g-C3N4 (TGC) photoanode for DSSCs. The TGC photoanode significantly increased the dye absorption and thus to improve the light harvesting efficiency. Furthermore, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis of the DSSCs based on TGC photoanode demonstrates that the incorporation of the rGO and g-C3N4 into TiO2 effectively accelerates the electron transfer and reduces the charge recombination. As a result, the DSSCs based on TGC film show PCE of 5.83%, enhanced by 50.1% compared with that of pure TiO2 photoanodes. This result strongly suggests a facile strategy to improve the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs.

  7. Strategy for Handling and Treatment of INPP RBMK-1500 Irradiated Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oryšaka, A.

    2016-01-01

    There are two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite-moderated channel-type power reactors at Ignalina NPP. After the final shutdown of the INPP, radioactive i-graphite dismantling, handling, conditioning, storage and disposal is an important part of the decommissioning activities. The core of the INPP unit 1 and 2 contains about 3600 tons of i-graphite. Formation of activation products strongly depends on the contents of impurities, operational mode and concentration of impurities in the graphite. The case study for INPP envisages the analysis of possibilities of graphite handling and treatment in the context of immediate decommissioning. (author)

  8. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan [Nano Science and Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), PO Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-26

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F{sub 2g} vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond.

  9. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F 2g vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond

  10. Ion irradiation of {sup 37}Cl implanted nuclear graphite: Effect of the energy deposition on the chlorine behavior and consequences for the mobility of {sup 36}Cl in irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Moncoffre, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Sainsot, P. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, LaMCoS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5259 (France); Rouzaud, J.-N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS), Paris, UMR CNRS-ENS 8538 (France)

    2015-09-15

    Graphite is used in many types of nuclear reactors due to its ability to slow down fast neutrons without capturing them. Whatever the reactor design, the irradiated graphite waste management has to be faced sooner or later regarding the production of long lived or dose determining radioactive species such as {sup 14}C, {sup 3}H or {sup 36}Cl. The first carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors resulted in a huge quantity of irradiated graphite waste for which the management needs a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide’s location and speciation. As the detection limits of usual spectroscopic methods are generally not adequate to detect the low concentration levels (<1 ppm) of the radionuclides, we used an indirect approach based on the implantation of {sup 37}Cl, to simulate the presence of {sup 36}Cl. Our previous studies show that temperature is one of the main factors to be considered regarding the structural evolution of nuclear graphite and chlorine mobility during reactor operation. However, thermal release of chlorine cannot be solely responsible for the depletion of the {sup 36}Cl inventory. We propose in this paper to study the impact of irradiation and its synergetic effects with temperature on chlorine release. Indeed, the collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic collisions. However, a small part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the lattice through electronic excitation. This paper aims at elucidating the effects of the different irradiation regimes (ballistic and electronic) using ion irradiation, on the mobility of implanted {sup 37}Cl, taking into account the initial disorder level of the nuclear graphite.

  11. Vanadium-rich tourmaline from graphitic rocks at Bítovánky, Czech republic; compositional variation, crystal structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cempírek, J.; Houzar, S.; Novák, M.; Selway, J.B.; Šrein, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 28, Spec. pap. (2006), s. 39-41 ISSN 1896-2203. [Central European Mineralogical Conference /1./. Vyšná Boca, 11.09.2006-15.09.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : V-rich tourmaline * compositional variation * crystal structure Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  12. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  13. Determination of a geometry-dependent parameter and development of a calculation model for describing the fission products transport from spherical fuel elements of graphite moderated gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissfloch, R

    1973-07-15

    The fuel elements of high-temperature reactors, coated with pyrolitic carbon and covered with graphite, release fission products like all other fuel elements. Because of safety reasons, the rate of this release has to be kept low and has also to be predictable. Measured values from irradiation tests and from post-irradiation tests about the actual release of different fission products are presented. The physical and chemical mechanism, which determines the release, is extraordinarily complex and in particular not clearly defined. Because of the mentioned reasons, a simplified calculation model was developed, which only considers the release-mechanisms phenomenologically. This calculation model coincides very well in its results with values received in experiments until now. It can be held as an interim state on the way to a complete theory.

  14. Determination of a geometry-dependent parameter and development of a calculation model for describing the fission products transport from spherical fuel elements of graphite moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissfloch, R.

    The fuel elements of High-Temperature Reactors, coated with pyrolitic carbon and covered with graphite, release fission products like all other fuel elements. Because of safety reasons the rate of this release has to be kept low and has also to be predictable. Measured values from irradiation tests and from post-irradiation tests about the actual release of different fission products are present. The physical and chemical mechanism, which determines the release, is extraordinarily complex and in particular not clearly defined. Because of the mentioned reasons a simplified calculation model was developed, which only considers the release-mechanisms phenomenologically. This calculation model coincides very well in its results with values received in experiments until now. It can serve as an interim state on the way to a complete theory. (U.S.)

  15. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  16. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  17. An analysis of irradiation creep in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Hacker, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear graphite under load shows remarkably high creep ductility with neutron irradiation, well in excess of any strain experienced in un-irradiated graphite (and additional to any dimensional changes that would occur without stress). As this behaviour compensates, to some extent, some other irradiation effects such as thermal shutdown stresses, it is an important property. This paper briefly reviews the approach to irradiation creep in the UK, described by the UK Creep Law. It then offers an alternative analysis of irradiation creep applicable to most situations, including HTR systems, using AGR moderator graphite as an example, to high values of neutron fluence, applied stress and radiolytic weight loss. (authors)

  18. The effective neutron temperature in heated graphite sleeves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J A; Small, V G [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    In a series of oscillator measurements carried out in the reactor NERO the variation of the relative reaction rates of cadmium and boron absorbers has been used to determine the effective neutron temperature inside heated graphite sleeves. This work extends the scope of similar oscillator measurements previously carried out in DIMPLE, in that the bulk moderator is now graphite as opposed to D{sub 2}O in the former case. (author)

  19. White Matter Structure in Older Adults Moderates the Benefit of Sleep Spindles on Motor Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Bryce A; Zhu, Alyssa H; Lindquist, John R; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J; Walker, Matthew P

    2017-11-29

    Sleep spindles promote the consolidation of motor skill memory in young adults. Older adults, however, exhibit impoverished sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism(s) explaining why motor memory consolidation in older adults fails to benefit from sleep remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that male and female older adults show impoverished overnight motor skill memory consolidation relative to young adults, with the extent of impairment being associated with the degree of reduced frontal fast sleep spindle density. The magnitude of the loss of frontal fast sleep spindles in older adults was predicted by the degree of reduced white matter integrity throughout multiple white matter tracts known to connect subcortical and cortical brain regions. We further demonstrate that the structural integrity of selective white matter fiber tracts, specifically within right posterior corona radiata, right tapetum, and bilateral corpus callosum, statistically moderates whether sleep spindles promoted overnight consolidation of motor skill memory. Therefore, white matter integrity within tracts known to connect cortical sensorimotor control regions dictates the functional influence of sleep spindles on motor skill memory consolidation in the elderly. The deterioration of white matter fiber tracts associated with human brain aging thus appears to be one pathophysiological mechanism influencing subcortical-cortical propagation of sleep spindles and their related memory benefits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Numerous studies have shown that sleep spindle expression is reduced and sleep-dependent motor memory is impaired in older adults. However, the mechanisms underlying these alterations have remained unknown. The present study reveals that age-related degeneration of white matter within select fiber tracts is associated with reduced sleep spindles in older adults. We further demonstrate that, within these same fiber tracts, the degree of

  20. Enhanced generation of hydroxyl radicals on well-crystallized molybdenum trioxide/nano-graphite anode with sesame cake-like structure for degradation of bio-refractory antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Du, Jiannan; Feng, Qingmao; Zhang, Jiaqi; Wu, Dan; Jiang, Xiankai; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong

    2018-05-01

    Anodic electro-catalysis oxidation is a highly effective way to solve the pollution problem of antibiotics in wastewater and receiving water bodies. In this study, for the first time, molybdenum trioxide/Nano-graphite (MoO 3 /Nano-G) composites are synthesized as anodic catalysts by a surfactant-assisted solvothermal method followed by low-temperature calcination. The effects of the proportion of MoO 3 to Nano-G (10, 30 and 50%) on the properties of composites are investigated through structural characterizations and electrochemical measurements. Results indicate that MoO 3 (30)/Nano-G electrode displays the electro-catalysis degradation efficiency of 99.9% towards ceftazidime, which is much higher than those of Nano-G (46.7%) and dimensionally stable anode (69.2%). The degradation mechanism for ceftazidime is studied by investigating the yields and kinds of active species. Results show that all of the OH, O 2- and H 2 O 2 are responsible for the electro-catalytic degradation process, and the produced OH radicals are the major active species for ceftazidime degradation. The synergistic effects between MoO 3 and Nano-G greatly contribute to the activation of H 2 O molecules to produce OH, meanwhile the special sesame cake-like structure facilitates to the exposure of contaminants to OH on active sites to enhance the degradation efficiency. These results suggest that MoO 3 /Nano-G electrodes can be considered as the promising catalysts for treating bio-refractory organic wastewater. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. THE EFFECT OF APPLIED STRESS ON THE GRAPHITIZATION OF PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg, R H; Crooks, D D; Fenn, Jr, R W; Hammond, M L

    1963-06-15

    Metallographic and x-ray diffraction studies were made of the effect of applied stress at high temperature on the structure of pyrolytic graphite (PG). The dominant factor was whether the PG was above or below its graphitization temperature, which, in turn, was not strongly dependent on applied stress. Below the graphitization temperature, the PG showed a high proportion of disordered layers (0.9), a fairly large mean tilt angle (20 deg ) and a small crystailite size (La --150 A). Fracture occurred at low stress and strain and the materiai exhibited a high apparent Young's modulus ( approximates 4 x 10/sup 6/ psi). Above the graphitization temperature, graphitization was considerably enhanced by strain up to about 8%. The disorder parameter was decreased from a zero strain value of 0.3 to 0.l5 with strain, the mean tilt angle was decreased to 4 deg , and a fivefold increase in crystallite size occurred. When the strainenhanced graphitization was complete, the material exhibited a low apparent modulus ( approximates 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ psi) and large plastic strains (>100%) for a constant stress ( approximates 55 ksi). Graphitization was shown to be a spontaneous process that is promoted by breaking cross-links thermally, and the process is furthered by chemical attack and plastic strain. (auth)

  2. Design of the Graphite Reflectors in Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Haeng; Cho, Yeong Garp; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Graphite is often used as one of reflector materials for research reactors because of its low neutron absorption cross-section, good moderating properties, and relatively low and stable price. In addition, graphite has excellent properties at high temperatures, so it is widely used as a core material in high temperature reactors. However, its material characteristics such as strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, dimensional change, and thermal conductivity sensitively depend on neutron fluence, temperature, and its manufacturing process. In addition, the Wigner energy and the treatment of the graphite waste such as C-14 should also be considered. For the design of the graphite reflectors, it is therefore essential to understand the material characteristics of chosen graphite materials at given conditions. Especially, the dimensional changes and the thermal conductivity are very important factors to design the nuclear components using graphite as a nonstructural material. Hence, in this study, the material characteristics of graphite are investigated via some experiments in literature. Improving design methods for graphite reflectors in research reactors are then suggested to minimize the problems, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are also discussed

  3. Technical development of graphite waste treatment in NUPEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saishu, S.; Inoue, T.

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, Tokai Power Station, which is a Gas Cooled Reactor and uses graphite as moderator, ceased operation at the end of March in 1998 and it is planned to transfer to decommissioning stage. In this decommissioning stage it is very important to be able to treat and dispose the graphite waste in order to carry out the decommissioning safely and economically. NUPEC has been developing the graphite treatment and disposal technology since 1997 and we introduce the outline of the technical development. For the technology on high density packing into disposal container, the high density packing method and the assessment method on nuclide leaching characteristics were developed, and the cementing test for graphite powder by using Tokai spare graphite was performed and the hydrophobic characteristics between graphite and cement was grasped and the accelerator candidature for affinity was selected. From the view point of economical treatment, the incinerating technology was selected as candidature, and the methods for incinerating graphite and treating off gas are developed. The method of collecting C-14 in off gas was selected for reducing the off gas radiation level. The applicability of actual graphite treatment technology was considered from the view point of safety, economics and preparation of technical standard; the technical theme appeared, the developing planning items were established, and the detailed and actual scale tests will be carried out according to the planning. (author)

  4. Structural and Mössbauer spectroscopy characterization of bulk and nanostructured TiFe{sub 0.5} Ni{sub 0.5}/graphite compounds and their hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, M. A. R., E-mail: fisicorodriguez@gmail.com; André-Filho, J.; Félix, L. L.; Coaquira, J. A. H.; Garg, V. K.; Oliveira, A. C. [Universidade de Brasília, Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada (Brazil); Mestnik-Filho, J. [Instituto de Pesquisas energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    The structural and hyperfine properties of bulk TiFe{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5} intermetallic and ball-milled TiFe{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}/graphite compounds and their hydrides have been studied. The bulk and nanostructured TiFe{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5} compounds crystallize in the cubic crystal structure of CsCl (B2). After hydrogenation, the formation of hydrogen-poor phase (∝-phase) and hydride phase (β-phase) have been determined for the bulk compound. However, the formation of the ∝-phase and the hydrogen-richest phase (γ-phase) and other secondary phases have been determined for the ball-milled TiFe{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}/graphite sample. It has been determined that the ball-milled TiFe{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}/graphite sample presents a large amount of the γ-phase which indicates that the presence of graphite nearby nanostructured intermetallic grains enhances the absorption of hydrogen. Mossbauer results are consistent with the structural results. Meanwhile, no significant changes in the isomer shift (IS) value has been determined for the α-phase with respect to the intermetallic compound, a strong increase in the IS value has been determined for the β- and γ-phases with respect to the ∝-phase. That increase indicates a decrease of the s-electron density at the Fe nuclei due to the charge transfer from the metal to the nearby hydrogen atoms.

  5. Performance enhancement of spherical natural graphite by phenol resin in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.-S.; Wang, Y.-H.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The capacity of natural graphite in the lithium ion battery anode decays seriously. The phenol resin is used as a reaction material to modify the electrochemical performance of spherical graphite as the anode material in lithium ion batteries. Measuring the reversible capacity indicates change in the surface structure of spherical graphite. A dense layer of methyl groups was thus formed. Some structural imperfections are removed and the stability of the graphite structure is increased. Clearly, reducing the irreversible capacity is beneficial in controlling the uniformity of the spherical graphite surface structure

  6. Moderation and Mediation in Structural Equation Modeling: Applications for Early Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Second-generation early intervention research typically involves the specification of multivariate relations between interventions, outcomes, and other variables. Moderation and mediation involve variables or sets of variables that influence relations between interventions and outcomes. Following the framework of Baron and Kenny's (1986) seminal…

  7. School Climate, Family Structure, and Academic Achievement: A Study of Moderation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Meagan; Voight, Adam; Renshaw, Tyler L.; Eklund, Katie

    2015-01-01

    School climate has been lauded for its relationship to a host of desirable academic, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes for youth. The present study tested the hypothesis that school climate counteracts youths' home-school risk by examining the moderating effects of students' school climate perceptions on the relationship between family…

  8. Thermal behaviour of chlorine in nuclear graphite at a microscopic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudey, C.E., E-mail: vaudey@ipnl.in2p3.f [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.f [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Bererd, N. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Universite de Lyon, UCBL-IUT A, departement chimie, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Raimbault, L. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Geosciences, 35 rue Saint Honore, F-77305 Fontainebleau cedex (France); Sainsot, P. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, LaMCoS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5259, F-69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, UMR CNRS-ENS 8538, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris cedex 5 (France); Perrat-Mabilon, A. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, we present the study of thermal behaviour of {sup 36}Cl in nuclear graphite used in the St. Laurent A2 UNGG reactor (graphite moderated and CO{sub 2} cooled reactor). {sup 37}Cl, used to simulate {sup 36}Cl displaced from its original structural site by recoil, has been implanted into nuclear graphite samples (energy = 250 keV, fluence = 5 x 10{sup 13} at cm{sup -2}). The samples have been annealed in the 200-800 deg. C temperature range and analysed by SIMS. Structural modifications have been controlled by Raman microspectroscopy. This study shows that, in the considered temperature range and for a short annealing duration (4 h), chlorine is released almost athermally. At 500 deg. C, around 20% of the initial {sup 37}Cl content is released. At 800 deg. C, the release reaches a plateau and the loss of {sup 37}Cl is around 30%. Raman microspectroscopy shows that {sup 37}Cl implantation induces a structural disorder and that during annealing, the original structure is not completely recovered.

  9. Theoretical basis for graphite stress analysis in BERSAFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, P.G.

    1980-03-01

    The BERSAFE finite element computer program for structural analysis has been extended to deal with structures made from irradiated graphite. This report describes the material behaviour which has been modelled and gives the theoretical basis for the solution procedure. (author)

  10. Sensing capabilities of graphite based MR elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, T F; Li, W H; Deng, Y M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents both experimental and theoretical investigations of the sensing capabilities of graphite based magnetorheological elastomers (MREs). In this study, eight MRE samples with varying graphite weight fractions were fabricated and their resistance under different magnetic fields and external loadings were measured with a multi-meter. With an increment of graphite weight fraction, the resistance of MRE sample decreases steadily. Higher magnetic fields result in a resistance increase. Based on an ideal assumption of a perfect chain structure, a mathematical model was developed to investigate the relationship between the MRE resistance with external loading. In this model, the current flowing through the chain structure consists of both a tunnel current and a conductivity current, both of which depend on external loadings. The modelling parameters have been identified and reconstructed from comparison with experimental results. The comparison indicates that both experimental results and modelling predictions agree favourably well

  11. Electrostatic Manipulation of Graphene On Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Verdu, Carmen; Saenz-Arce, Giovanni; Martinez-Asencio, Jesús; Milan, David C.; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan J.; Caturla, Maria Jose

    2015-03-01

    Here we report the use of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) under ambient and vacuum conditions to study the controlled exfoliation of the last layer of a graphite surface when an electrostatic force is applied from a STM tip. In this work we have focused on the study of two parameters: the applied voltage needed to compensate the graphite interlayer attractive force and the one needed to break atomic bonds to produce folded structures. Additionally, we have studied the influence of edge structure in the breaking geometry. Independently of the edge orientation the graphite layer is found to tear through the zig-zag direction and the lifled layer shows a zig-zag folding direction. Molecular Dinamics simulations and DFT calculations have been performed to understand our results, showing a strong correlation with the experiments. Comunidad Valenciana through Prometeo project.

  12. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  13. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  14. Characteristics of first loaded IG-110 graphite in HTTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    IG-110 graphite is a fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade graphite with excellent resistivity on both irradiation and corrosion and with high strength. The IG-110 graphite is used for the graphite components of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) such as fuel and control rod guide blocks and support posts. In order to design and fabricate the graphite components in the HTTR, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (the Japan Atomic Energy Agency at present) had established the graphite structural design code and design data on the basis of former research results. After the design code establishment, the IG-110 graphite components were fabricated and loaded in the HTTR core. This report summarized the characteristics of the first loaded IG-110 graphite as basic data for surveillance test, measuring material characteristics changed by neutron irradiation and oxidation. By comparing the design data, it was shown that the first loaded IG-110 graphite had excellent strength properties and enough safety margins to the stress limits in the design code. (author)

  15. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  16. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  17. MACS, Lattice Vibrations Structure Factors for Thermal Neutron Scattering in Moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurry, H.L.; Suitt, W.J.; Worlton, T.G.; Martin, R.M.

    1974-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: This package of seven related codes is basically aimed at giving maximum capability for calculating slow-neutron scattering by moderators. MACS-C computes crystal vibrations when the potential energy is a sum of parts arising from short-range forces and long-range Coulomb interactions. It also obtains Jacobian matrices for determining adjustments in force constants and ionic charge which can lead to improved agreement with data. Structure factors for neutron inelastic scattering can also be calculated. MACS-J computes the dynamical matrix for the harmonic oscillations of a crystal, its eigenvalues and eigenvectors, the corresponding structure factors for coherent single-phonon scattering of neutrons, and Jacobian matrices for use in adjusting force constants to fit calculated to observed dispersion curves. REVISED-D calculates valance coordinates in terms of mass adjusted atom displacements, together with coordinates which define rigid group rotations. REVISED-MVFC constructs force constant matrices for use in valance force potential functions which are used in other programs dealing with molecular and crystal vibrations. ADJUSTER is a force adjuster program to obtain a least squares fit to observed frequencies of molecules and crystals. DIPOLE-SUM calculates dipole sums for an arbitrary crystal. MODEL-PI calculates crystal vibrations when the potential energy is a sum of short-range and long- or intermediate-range terms in the dipole coordinate approximation. It also obtains Jacobian matrices for use in adjusting input parameters. 2 - Method of solution: In MACS-C, ADJUSTER, and REVISED-D, matrix manipulations are applied to matrices which describe physical conditions. In MACS-J, first-order difference equations are substituted for partial differential equations for Jacobian elements. In MVFC the user employs a set of criteria for defining different types of interactions to prepare by hand the input to the program. For

  18. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  19. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance field-modulation eddy-current analysis of silver-plated graphite resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mett, Richard R.; Anderson, James R.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2005-09-01

    Magnetic field modulation is often introduced into a cylindrical TE011 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) cavity through silver plating over a nonconductive substrate. The plating thickness must be many times the skin depth of the rf and smaller than the skin depth of the modulation. We derive a parameter that quantifies the modulation field penetration and find that it also depends on resonator dimensions. Design criteria based on this parameter are presented graphically. This parameter is then used to predict the behavior of eddy currents in substrates of moderate conductivity, such as graphite. The conductivity of the graphite permits improved plating uniformity and permits use of electric discharge machining (EDM) techniques to make the resonator. EDM offers precision tolerances of 0.005 mm and is suitable for small, complicated shapes that are difficult to machine by other methods. Analytic predictions of the modulation penetration are compared with the results of finite-element simulations. Simulated magnetic field modulation uniformity and penetration are shown for several elemental coils and structures including the plated graphite TE011 cavity. Fabrication and experimental testing of the structure are discussed. Spatial inhomogeneity of the modulation phase is also investigated by computer simulation. We find that the modulation phase is uniform to within 1% over the TE011 cavity. Structures of lower symmetry have increased phase nonuniformity.

  1. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept

  2. Resistivity features in intercalated graphite compounds with bromine and iodine chloride in the region of structural phase transitions in the layer of intercalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovsyijenko, Yi.V.; Lazarenko, O.A.; Matsuj, L.Yu.; Prokopov, O.Yi.

    2013-01-01

    In the paper anomalous changes of resistivity in graphite intercalated compounds with iodine chloride and bromine are investigated in the phase transition temperature interval. It is shown that these anomalies are caused by the change of carriers mobility in the phase transitional interval as well as by the origin of ''mobile ions liquids''

  3. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  4. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  5. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  6. Experimental Study on the Force-Bearing Performance of Masonry Structures with a Marble-Graphite Slide Seismic Isolator at the Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suizi Jia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of the search for a seismic isolator for low-rise buildings, this paper proposes a marble-graphite slide seismic isolation system composed of marble-graphite slides, an upper foundation beam, the lower counterpart of the upper beam, and the corresponding stop blocks, with the stop blocks consisting of restrictive screws, positioning plates, nut connectors and stop holes linking the two foundation beams. To provide the desired isolation performance, plain mortar bars can be included at the beam interface to better control the initiating loads for foundation slippage. Tests of low-reversed cyclic loading were performed on four different masonry specimens: a recycled brick wall, a clay brick wall, an integrated recycled brick wall with flay ash blocks sandwiched between, and its clay brick counterpart. The four specimens were provided with marble-graphite slide isolators placed at the foundations. The isolator thickness was 20 mm, and the graphite and the marble served as a lubricant and a bearing, respectively. This paper then analyses all of the specimens in terms of the damage that occurred, the initiating load for slippage, the hysteretic performance, the bearing capacity and the performance of the stop blocks. The results indicate that mortar bars embedded in the marble-graphite slide isolator offer effective control of the initiating load, and the isolation system delivers good hysteretic performance. The stop blocks are capable of withstanding a large-magnitude earthquake and are a good choice for constraining the slippage displacement. Damage or failure of the specimens occurs only when the low-reversed cyclic loading continues after slippage takes place. The design is shown to be an outstanding and flexible seismic scheme for use in low-rise buildings.

  7. Graphite target for the spiral project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J.; Loiselet, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author)

  8. Role of nuclear grade graphite in controlling oxidation in modular HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, Willaim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kane, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  9. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  10. New insights into canted spiro carbon interstitial in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The self-interstitial carbon is the key to radiation damage in graphite moderator nuclear reactor, so an understanding of its behavior is essential for plant safety and maximized reactor lifetime. The density functional theory is applied on four different graphite unit cells, starting from of 64 carbon atoms up to 256 carbon atoms, using AIMPRO code to obtain the energetic, athermal and mechanical properties of carbon interstitial in graphite. This study presents first principles calculations of the energy of formation that prove its high barrier to athermal diffusion (1.1 eV) and the consequent large critical shear stress (39 eV-50 eV) necessary to shear graphite planes in its presence. Also, for the first time, the gamma surface of graphite in two dimensions is calculated and found to yield the critical shear stress for perfect graphite. Finally, in contrast to the extensive literature describing the interstitial of carbon in graphite as spiro interstitial, in this work the ground state of interstitial carbon is found to be canted spiro interstitial.

  11. Formation of dislocation dipoles in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a dislocation dipole accumulation model to explain the irradiation-induced amorphization of graphite. However, the structure of dislocation dipole in the hexagonal networks is still an open question at the atomic-level. In this paper, we propose a possible formation process of the dislocation dipole

  12. Thermoexpanded graphite modification by titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semko, L.S.; Gorbik, P.P.; Chujko, O.O.; Kruchek, Ya.Yi.; Dzyubenko, L.S.; Orans'ka, O.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of thermoexpanded graphite (TEG) powders coated by titanium dioxide is developed. The conversion of n-buthylorthotitanate into TiO 2 on the TEG surface is investigated. The optimal parameters of the synthesis and the structure of titanium dioxide clusters on the TEG surface are determined

  13. GRAPHITIZED STEELS IN MACHINE-BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that graphitized steels in some cases due to its intermediate disposition by structure and characteristics among low-carbon steels and cast irons, can provide the necessary combination of characteristics of construction material and consequently to increase safety and durability of details of metallurgical and machinebuilding industry machines.

  14. Complex modal properties of coupled moderately light equipment-structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Jaw Jingwen

    1986-01-01

    A new improved perturbation method for evaluating complex modal properties of coupled equipment-structure systems is presented. The method is applicable even when the equipment is not very light, and when the secondary system (equipment) introduces static constraint on the primary system (structure). The new method is applied to nine 8DOF coupled multiply connected equipment-structure systems. It is shown that the new method yields results which are in excellent agreement with the corresponding exact results. (orig.)

  15. Characterization, treatment and conditioning of radioactive graphite from decommissioning of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator and reflector of neutrons in more than 100 nuclear power plants and in many research and plutonium-production reactors. It is used primarily as a neutron reflector or neutron moderator, although graphite is also used for other features of reactor cores, such as fuel sleeves. Many of the graphite-moderated reactors are now quite old, with some already shutdown. Therefore radioactive graphite dismantling and the management of radioactive graphite waste are becoming an increasingly important issue for a number of IAEA Member States. Worldwide, there are more than 230 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite which will eventually need to be managed as radioactive waste. Proper management of radioactive graphite waste requires complex planning and the implementation of several interrelated operations. There are two basic options for graphite waste management: (1) packaging of non-conditioned graphite waste with subsequent direct disposal of the waste packages, and (2) conditioning of graphite waste (principally either by incineration or calcination) with separate disposal of any waste products produced, such as incinerator ash. In both cases, the specific properties of graphite - such as Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility, and radioactive gases released from waste graphite - have a potential impact on the safety of radioactive graphite waste management and need to be carefully considered. Radioactive graphite waste management is not specifically addressed in IAEA publications. Only general and limited information is available in publications dealing with decommissioning of nuclear reactors. This report provides a comprehensive discussion of radioactive graphite waste characterization, handling, conditioning and disposal throughout the operating and decommissioning life cycle. The first draft report was prepared at a meeting on 23-27 February 1998. A technical meeting (TM) was held in October 1999 in coincidence with the Seminar on

  16. Graphite behaviour in relation to the fuel element design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Manzel, R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Blackstone, R. [Reactor Centrum, Petten (Netherlands); Delle, W. [Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich (Germany); Lungagnani, V. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands); Krefeld, R. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands)

    1969-09-01

    The first designs of H.T.R. power reactors will probably use a Gilsocarbon based graphite for both the moderator/carrier blocks and for the fuel tubes. The initial physical properties and changes of dimensions, thermal expansion coefficient, Young*s modulus, and thermal conductivity on irradiation of Gilsocarbon graphites to typical reactor dwell-time fast neutron doses of 4 * 1021 cm -2 Ni dose Dido equivalent are given and values for the irradiation creep constant are presented. The influence of these property changes and those of chemical corrosion are considered briefly in relation to the present fuel element designs. The selection of an eventual less costly replacement graphite for Gilsocarbon graphite is discussed in terms of materials properties.

  17. Thermal strain measurements in graphite using electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulevicius, S.; Augulis, L.; Augulis, R.; Zabarskas, V.; Levinskas, R.; Poskas, P.

    2001-01-01

    Two 1500 MW(e) RBMK Units are operated at Ignalina NPP in Lithuania. Due to recent decision of the Parliament on the earlier closure of Unit 1, preparatory work for decommissioning have been initiated. Preferred decommissioning strategy is based on delayed dismantling after rather long safe enclosure period. Since graphite is one of the basic and probably the most voluminous components of the reactor internals, a sufficient information on status and behaviour of graphite moderator and reflector during long time safe enclosure period is of special significance. In this context, thermal strain in graphite is one of the parameters requiring particular interest. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry has been proposed and successfully tested to control this parameter using the real samples of graphite from Ignalina NPP Units. (author)

  18. Research on the phenomenon of graphitization. Crystallographic study - Study of bromine sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, Jacques

    1967-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the mechanism of graphitization of carbon by using X-ray diffraction analysis and the physical and chemical study of lamellar reactions between carbon and bromine. The author first presents generalities and results of preliminary studies (meaning of graphitization, presentation of the various carbon groups and classes), and then reports the study of the graphitization of compact carbons (soft carbons). More precisely, he reports the crystallographic study of partially graphitized carbons: methods and principles, experimental results and their analysis, discussion of the graphitization mechanism. In the next part, the author reports the study of bromine sorption on carbons: experimental method, isotherms of a natural graphite and of a graphitized carbon, structure of carbon-bromine complexes, isotherms of graphitizable carbons and of all other carbons, distribution of bromine layers in partially graphitized carbons, bromine sorption and Fermi level

  19. "What matters most:" a cultural mechanism moderating structural vulnerability and moral experience of mental illness stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lawrence H; Chen, Fang-pei; Sia, Kathleen Janel; Lam, Jonathan; Lam, Katherine; Ngo, Hong; Lee, Sing; Kleinman, Arthur; Good, Byron

    2014-02-01

    To understand Chinese immigrants' experiences with mental illness stigma and mental health disparities, we integrate frameworks of 'structural vulnerability' and 'moral experience' to identify how interaction between structural discrimination and cultural engagements might shape stigma. Fifty Chinese immigrants, including 64% Fuzhounese immigrants who experienced particularly harsh socio-economical deprivation, from two Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units in New York City were interviewed from 2006 to 2010 about their experiences of mental illness stigma. Interview questions were derived from 4 stigma measures, covering various life domains. Participants were asked to elaborate their rating of measure items, and thus provided open-ended, narrative data. Analysis of the narrative data followed a deductive approach, guided by frameworks of structural discrimination and "what matters most" - a cultural mechanism signifying meaningful participation in the community. After identifying initial coding classifications, analysis focused on the interface between the two main concepts. Results indicated that experiences with mental illness stigma were contingent on the degree to which immigrants were able to participate in work to achieve "what mattered most" in their cultural context, i.e., accumulation of financial resources. Structural vulnerability - being situated in an inferior position when facing structural discrimination - made access to affordable mental health services challenging. As such, structural discrimination increased healthcare spending and interfered with financial accumulation, often resulting in future treatment nonadherence and enforcing mental health disparities. Study participants' internalizing their structurally-vulnerable position further led to a depreciated sense of self, resulting in a reduced capacity to advocate for healthcare system changes. Paradoxically, the multi-layered structural marginalization experienced by Chinese

  20. Parenteral structured triglyceride emulsion improves nitrogen balance and is cleared faster from the blood in moderately catabolic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruimel, J W; Naber, T H; van der Vliet, J A; Carneheim, C; Katan, M B; Jansen, J B

    2001-01-01

    Most postoperative patients lose net protein mass, which reflects loss of muscle tissue and organ function. Perioperative parenteral nutrition may reduce the loss of protein, but in general, with conventional lipid emulsions a waste of protein still remains. We compared the effects on nitrogen balance of an emulsion containing structured triglycerides, a new type of synthesized triglycerides, with an emulsion of a physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides as part of parenteral feeding in moderately catabolic patients. The first 5 days after placement of an aortic prosthesis patients received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) providing 0.2 g of nitrogen per kg body weight per day; energy requirement was calculated using Harris and Benedict's equation, adding 300 kcal per day for activity. Twelve patients were treated with the structured triglyceride emulsion and 13 patients with the emulsion of the physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides. The design was a randomized, double-blind parallel study. In the patients who completed the study, the mean cumulative nitrogen balance over the first 5 postoperative days was -8+/-2 g in 10 patients on the structured triglyceride emulsion and -21+/-4 g in 9 patients on the emulsion of the physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides; the mean difference was 13 g of nitrogen (95% confidence interval 4 to 22, p = .015) in favor of the structured triglyceride emulsion. On the first postoperative day serum triglyceride and plasma medium-chain free fatty acid levels increased less during infusion of the structured triglyceride emulsion than with the physical mixture emulsion. The parenteral structured triglyceride emulsion improves the nitrogen balance and is cleared faster from the blood, compared with the emulsion of the physical mixture of medium- and long-chain triglycerides, in moderately catabolic patients.

  1. Impermeable Graphite: A New Development for Embedding Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fachinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Irradiated graphite has to be handled as radioactive waste after the operational period of the reactor. However, the waste management of irradiated graphite e.g. from the Spanish Vandellos reactor shows, that waste management of even low contaminated graphite could be expensive and requires special retrieval, treatment and disposal technologies for safe long term storage as low or medium radioactive waste. FNAG has developed an impermeable graphite matrix (IGM) as nuclear waste embedding material. This IGM provides a long term stable enclosure of radioactive waste and can reuse irradiated graphite as feedstock material. Therefore, no additional disposal volume is required if e.g. concrete waste packages were replaced by IGM waste packages. The variability of IGM as embedding has been summarized in the following paper usable for metal scraps, ion exchange resins or debris from buildings. Furthermore the main physical, chemical and structural properties are described. (author)

  2. The Moderation Role of the Audit Committee Quality on the Effect of the Ownership Structure on Intellectual Capital Disclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desi Alifia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual capital is an intangible asset which is able to increase company’s value. Intellectual capital inherent to skill, knowledge and experience that can create competitive advantage for company. The purposes of this study are to analyze the effect of ownership structure (managerial ownership, institutional ownership, government ownership, foreign ownership with the quality of audit committee as moderating variable on intellectual capital. The population of this study is financial companies listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange from 2013 until 2015. Samples are selected using purposive sampling method, and obtained 165 units as observations. Data was collected by documentation, and the analysis data is  moderated regression analysis. The study found that managerial ownership has negative effect on intellectual capital disclosure. Government ownership and foreign ownership has positive effect on intellectual capital disclosure, and institutional ownership has not been proven to effect on intellectual capital disclosure. Then, the study also found that the quality of audit committee has significant effect as a moderating variable on the influence of institutional ownership, but it has not been proven to have a moderating effect on the influence of managerial ownership, government ownership and foreign ownership intellectual capital disclosure. The recommendation for further study is to use another technique such as questionnaires that is directly given to company for discovering the level of company’s intellectual capital disclosure. For the company, the limitation of managerial ownership can be used as a control to the company disclosure practice, and improve the role of audit committee to maximize disclosure practice in the company.

  3. Erosion of pyrolytic graphite and Ti-doped graphite due to high flux irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Yusuke; Ohashi, Junpei; Ueda, Yoshio; Isobe, Michiro; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    The erosion of pyrolytic graphite and titanium doped graphite RG-Ti above 1,780 K was investigated by 5 keV Ar beam irradiation with the flux from 4x10 19 to 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . The total erosion yields were significantly reduced with the flux. This reduction would be attributed to the reduction of RES (radiation enhanced sublimation) yield, which was observed in the case of isotropic graphite with the flux dependence of RES yield of φ -0.26 (φ: flux) obtained in our previous work. The yield of pyrolytic graphite was roughly 30% higher than that of isotropic graphite below the flux of 10 20 m -2 ·s -1 whereas each yield approached to very close value at the highest flux of 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . This result indicated that the effect of graphite structure on the RES yield, which was apparent in the low flux region, would disappear in the high flux region probably due to the disordering of crystal structure. In the case of irradiation to RG-Ti at 1,780 K, the surface undulations evolved with a mean height of about 3 μm at 1.2x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 , while at higher flux of 8.0x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 they were unrecognizable. These phenomena can be explained by the reduction of RES of graphite parts excluding TiC grains. (author)

  4. Physics experiments in graphite lattices (1962); Experiences sur les reseaux a graphite (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A review is made of the various experimental methods used to determine the physics of graphite, natural uranium lattices: integral lattice experiments; both absolute and differential, effective cross section measurements, both by activation methods and by analysis of irradiated fuels, fine structure measurements. A number of experimental results are also given. (authors) [French] On decrit les differentes methodes experimentales utilisees pour determiner les parametres physiques de reseaux a uranium-graphite. Il s'agit d'experiences globales: mesures absolues et relatives de laplaciens, mesures de sections efficaces effectives par activation et par analyses de combustibles irradies, mesures de structures fines. Un certain nombre de resultats experimentaux sont communiques. (auteurs)

  5. A microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; McEnaney, B.; Tucker, M.O.; Rose, A.P.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports a new microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in three nuclear graphites: (i) PGA, the moderator material in UK Magnox reactors; (ii) IMl-24, the moderator material in UK Advanced gas cooled reactors (AGR); and (iii) a pitch coke graphite, which is used in the fabrication of AGR fuel sleeves. The fracture mechanisms in nuclear graphites are initiated by microcrack formation at low stresses. Typically, microcracks form in regions of well-aligned binder or at favourably-oriented pores, where stress is concentrated. With increasing applied loads, microcracks propagate taking advantage of easy cleavage paths or linking with pores. Eventually, coalescence of such cracks and inherent porosity produces a crack of critical length for fast fracture. (orig./MM)

  6. Derivation of a radionuclide inventory for irradiated graphite-chlorine-36 inventory determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.J.; Palmer, J.D.; Wood, P.

    2001-01-01

    The irradiation of materials in nuclear reactors results in neutron activation of component elements. Irradiated graphite wastes arise from their use in UK gas-cooled research and commercial reactor cores, and in fuel element components, where the graphite has acted as the neutron moderator. During irradiation the residual chlorine, which was used to purify the graphite during manufacture, is activated to chlorine-36. This isotope is long-lived and poorly retarded by geological barriers, and may therefore be a key radionuclide with respect to post-closure disposal facilities performance. United Kingdom Nirex Limited, currently responsible for the development of a disposal route for intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK, carried out a major research programme to support an overall assessment of the chlorine-36 activity of all wastes including graphite reactor components. The various UK gas cooled reactors reactors have used a range of graphite components made from diverse graphite types; this has necessitated a systematic programme to cover the wide range of graphite and production processes. The programme consisted of: precursor measurements - on the surface and/or bulk of representative samples of relevant materials, using specially developed methods; transfer studies - to quantify the potential for transfer of Cl-36 into and between waste streams during irradiation of graphite; theoretical assessments - to support the calculational methodology; actual measurements - to confirm the modelling. For graphite, a total of 458 measurements on samples from 57 batches were performed, to provide a detailed understanding of the composition of nuclear graphite. The work has resulted in the generation of probability density functions (PDF) for the mean chlorine concentration of three classes of graphite: fuel element graphite; Magnox moderator and reflector graphite and AGR reflector graphite; AGR moderator graphite. Transfer studies have shown that a significant

  7. Structural changes in connective tissues caused by a moderate laser heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N; Bagratashvili, N V; Sviridov, A P; Shakh, G Sh; Ignat'eva, Natalia Yu; Lunin, Valery V; Grokhovskaya, T E; Averkiev, S V

    2002-01-01

    The structural changes in adipose and fibrous tissues caused by 2- and 3-W IR laser irradiation are studied by the methods of IR and Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is shown that heating of fibrous tissue samples to 50 0 C and adipose tissue samples to 75 0 C by IR laser radiation changes the supramolecular structure of their proteins and triacylglycerides, respectively, without the intramolecular bond breaking. Heating of fibrous tissue to 70 0 C and adipose tissue to 90 - 110 0 C leads to a partial reversible denaturation of proteins and to oxidation of fats.

  8. Temperature control of the graphite stack of the reactor RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnoj, S.

    1998-01-01

    The paper includes general information about RBMK-1500 reactor, construction features and main technical data; graphite moderator stack, temperature channel, thermocouple TXA-1379, its basic technical and metrologic parameters as well as its advantages and disadvantages

  9. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO{sub 2}-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, DRD/CM – 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, Parc de la Croix-Blanche, F-92298 Châtenay-Malabry cedex (France); Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Khodja, H. [Laboratoire d’Etude des Eléments Légers, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/NIMBE, UMR 3299 SIS2M – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO{sub 2}-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for “Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz”) to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D{sup +} ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO{sub 2}) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the

  10. Assessing Mediation Using Marginal Structural Models in the Presence of Confounding and Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Donna L.; Zhong, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article presents marginal structural models with inverse propensity weighting (IPW) for assessing mediation. Generally, individuals are not randomly assigned to levels of the mediator. Therefore, confounders of the mediator and outcome may exist that limit causal inferences, a goal of mediation analysis. Either regression adjustment or IPW…

  11. Maternal Parenting Style and Delinquency by Race and the Moderating Effect of Structural Disadvantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowen, Thomas J.; Schroeder, Ryan D.

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary research suggests authoritative parenting is the most effective parenting style in deterring juvenile delinquency. Some research has found there are differences in parenting style between racial groups due to structural disadvantage faced by marginalized individuals. Yet, relatively little is known about how racial differences in…

  12. Conserving Tropical Tree Diversity and Forest Structure: The Value of Small Rainforest Patches in Moderately-Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ruedas, Manuel A.; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Meave, Jorge A.; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Ibarra-Manríquez, Guillermo; Martínez, Esteban; Jamangapé, Gilberto; Melo, Felipe P. L.; Santos, Bráulio A.

    2014-01-01

    Rainforests are undergoing severe deforestation and fragmentation worldwide. A huge amount of small forest patches are being created, but their value in conserving biodiversity and forest structure is still controversial. Here, we demonstrate that in a species-rich and moderately-managed Mexican tropical landscape small rainforest patches (tree diversity and forest structure. These patches showed diverse communities of native plants, including endangered species, and a new record for the country. Although the number of logged trees increased in smaller patches, patch size was a poor indicator of basal area, stem density, number of species, genera and families, and community evenness. Cumulative species-area curves indicated that all patches had a similar contribution to the regional species diversity. This idea also was supported by the fact that patches strongly differed in floristic composition (high β-diversity), independently of patch size. Thus, in agreement with the land-sharing approach, our findings support that small forest patches in moderately-managed landscapes should be included in conservation initiatives to maintain landscape heterogeneity, species diversity, and ecosystem services. PMID:24901954

  13. Conserving tropical tree diversity and forest structure: the value of small rainforest patches in moderately-managed landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ruedas, Manuel A; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Meave, Jorge A; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Ibarra-Manríquez, Guillermo; Martínez, Esteban; Jamangapé, Gilberto; Melo, Felipe P L; Santos, Bráulio A

    2014-01-01

    Rainforests are undergoing severe deforestation and fragmentation worldwide. A huge amount of small forest patches are being created, but their value in conserving biodiversity and forest structure is still controversial. Here, we demonstrate that in a species-rich and moderately-managed Mexican tropical landscape small rainforest patches (<100 ha) can be highly valuable for the conservation of tree diversity and forest structure. These patches showed diverse communities of native plants, including endangered species, and a new record for the country. Although the number of logged trees increased in smaller patches, patch size was a poor indicator of basal area, stem density, number of species, genera and families, and community evenness. Cumulative species-area curves indicated that all patches had a similar contribution to the regional species diversity. This idea also was supported by the fact that patches strongly differed in floristic composition (high β-diversity), independently of patch size. Thus, in agreement with the land-sharing approach, our findings support that small forest patches in moderately-managed landscapes should be included in conservation initiatives to maintain landscape heterogeneity, species diversity, and ecosystem services.

  14. Board Structures and Financial Performance of UK Top Firms: An Investigation of the Moderating Role of the Directors’ Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O. Alabede

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies have empirically investigated the connection between corporate governance structures and financial performance, evidence from the literature indicates that findings from these studies are inconsistent, hence inconclusive. In this light, some scholars suggest that the inconsistency in the findings could be an indication that there is factor(s moderating the relationship between the two variables. For this reason, we investigate how corporate board structures relate to financial performance and the effect of directors’ financial compensation on such relationship using samples of the UK top firms. The findings of the study suggest that board composition is positively associated with financial performance (Tobin q. Other than that, the study also indicates that the effect of directors’ financial compensation interacts positively with board composition to influence financial performance. By implication, this finding demonstrates that financial rewards to the outside directors play an inevitable role in influencing the relationship between corporate board and financial performance.

  15. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  16. From Core to Capture: Graphite Management by Gasification and Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, J.; Bradbury, D.; Black, S.; Tomlinson, T.; Livesey, B.; Robinson, J.; Lindberg, M.; Newton, C.; Jones, A.; Wickham, A.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive graphite waste arises principally from the moderators of graphite/gas-cooled reactors at the end of life of the reactors. Commercial power producing reactors (for example, Magnox, AGR and RBMK) have graphite moderators, each containing several thousand tonnes of graphite, with the UK having the largest inventory of over 90,000 tonnes. Additionally, there are smaller quantities of graphite arising from other sources such as fuel element components. The current long term strategy for management of reactor graphite in the UK is for these wastes to be conditioned for disposal followed by transfer to a geological disposal facility (GDF). With this baseline position, these wastes will account for about 30% of the ILW inventory in a GDF. As the volume of the graphite waste is so large, it is not currently economic to retrieve and process the graphite in advance of the availability of a geological disposal facility. Recent work by the NDA has ascribed a much smaller “incremental” volume of 2% due to graphite, calculated on the basis that the GDF has to be a certain size anyway in order to dissipate the decay heat from high level waste

  17. Capillary-based micro-battery cell for in situ X-ray powder diffraction studies of working batteries: a study of the initial intercalation and deintercalation of lithium into graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Rune; Norby, Poul

    2013-01-01

    –charging cycle show that the structure of the graphite changes from an intergrown structure of graphite 2H and graphite 3R to a nearly ideal graphite 2H structure. DIFFaX+ was also used to refine a model of the stacking disorder in an apparent stage III compound with AαAB- and AαAC-type slabs....

  18. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  19. Radiation damage and life-time evaluation of RBMK graphite stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, P A; Chugunov, O K; Manevsky, V N; Karpukhin, V I [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Reactor Material Div.

    1996-08-01

    At the present time there are 11 NPP units with RBMK reactors in operation in Russia, with the oldest now in operation 22 years. Design life-time of the RBMK-1000 reactor is 30 years. This paper addresses the evaluation of RBMK graphite stack life-time. It is the practice in Russia to evaluate the reliability of the channel reactor graphite stack using at least three criteria: degradation of physical-mechanical properties of graphite, preservation of the graphite brick integrity, and degradation of the graphite stack as a structure. Stack life-time evaluation by different criteria indicates that the most realistic approach may be realized on the basis of the criteria of brick cracking and degradation of the graphite stack as a structure. The RBMK reactor graphite stack life-time depends on its temperature and for different units it may be different. (author). 2 refs, 10 figs.

  20. Transformational leadership and change readiness and a moderating role of perceived bureaucratic structure: an empirical investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Badri Abbasi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between transformational leadership and change readiness through perceived bureaucratic structure among government employees in Rasht. As a methodology, descriptive method was applied using questionnaire to collect data. The studied population consisted of 600 employees from three state organizations including Municipality, Gilan Tax Department and Gilan Justice Court. According to Morgan table, the sample size was estimated at 234. Th...

  1. Assessing mediation using marginal structural models in the presence of confounding and moderation

    OpenAIRE

    Coffman, Donna L.; Zhong, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents marginal structural models (MSMs) with inverse propensity weighting (IPW) for assessing mediation. Generally, individuals are not randomly assigned to levels of the mediator. Therefore, confounders of the mediator and outcome may exist that limit causal inferences, a goal of mediation analysis. Either regression adjustment or IPW can be used to take confounding into account, but IPW has several advantages. Regression adjustment of even one confounder of the mediator and ou...

  2. Wood structural differences between northern and southern beech provenances growing at a moderate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilmann, B; Sterck, F; Wegner, L; de Vries, S M G; von Arx, G; Mohren, G M J; den Ouden, J; Sass-Klaassen, U

    2014-08-01

    Planting provenances originating from southern to northern locations has been discussed as a strategy to speed up species migration and mitigate negative effects of climate change on forest stability and productivity. Especially for drought-susceptible species such as European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the introduction of drought-tolerant provenances from the south could be an option. Yet, beech has been found to respond plastically to environmental conditions, suggesting that the climate on the plantation site might be more important for tree growth than the genetic predisposition of potentially drought-adapted provenances. In this study, we compared the radial growth, wood-anatomical traits and leaf phenology of four beech provenances originating from southern (Bulgaria, France) and northern locations (Sweden, the Netherlands) and planted in a provenance trial in the Netherlands. The distribution of precipitation largely differs between the sites of origin. The northern provenances experience a maximum and the southern provenances experience a minimum of rainfall in summer. We compared tree productivity and the anatomy of the water-conducting system for the period from 2000 to 2010, including the drought year 2003. In addition, tree mortality and the timing of leaf unfolding in spring were analysed for the years 2001, 2007 and 2012. Comparison of these traits in the four beech provenances indicates the influence of genetic predisposition and local environmental factors on the performance of these provenances under moderate site conditions. Variation in radial growth was controlled by environment, although the growth level slightly differed due to genetic background. The Bulgarian provenance had an efficient water-conducting system which was moreover unaffected by the drought in 2003, pointing to a high ability of this provenance to cope well with dry conditions. In addition, the Bulgarian provenance showed up as most productive in terms of height and radial

  3. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  4. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  5. A New Method to Measure Crack Extension in Nuclear Graphite Based on Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigang Lai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite components, used as moderators, reflectors, and core-support structures in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, play an important role in the safety of the reactor. Specifically, they provide channels for the fuel elements, control rods, and coolant flow. Fracture is the main failure mode for graphite, and breaching of the above channels by crack extension will seriously threaten the safety of a reactor. In this paper, a new method based on digital image correlation (DIC is introduced for measuring crack extension in brittle materials. Cross-correlation of the displacements measured by DIC with a step function was employed to identify the advancing crack tip in a graphite beam specimen under three-point bending. The load-crack extension curve, which is required for analyzing the R-curve and tension softening behaviors, was obtained for this material. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis of the threshold value employed for the cross-correlation parameter in the crack identification process was conducted. Finally, the results were verified using the finite element method.

  6. Irradiated graphite studies prior to decommissioning of G1, G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonal, J.P.; Vistoli, J.Ph.; Combes, C.

    2005-01-01

    G1 (46 MW th ), G2 (250 MW th ) and G3 (250 MW th ) are the first French plutonium production reactors owned by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). They started to be operated in 1956 (G1), 1959 (G2) and 1960 (G3); their final shutdown occurred in 1968, 1980 and 1984 respectively. Each reactor used about 1200 tons of graphite as moderator, moreover in G2 and G3, a 95 tons graphite wall is used to shield the rear side concrete from neutron irradiation. G1 is an air cooled reactor operated at a graphite temperature ranging from 30 C to 230 C; G2 and G3 are CO 2 cooled reactors and during operation the graphite temperature is higher (140 C to 400 C). These reactors are now partly decommissioned, but the graphite stacks are still inside the reactors. The graphite core radioactivity has decreased enough so that a full decommissioning stage may be considered. Conceming this decommissioning, the studies reported here are: (i) stored energy in graphite, (ii) graphite radioactivity measurements, (iii) leaching of radionuclide ( 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 60 Co, 3 H) from graphite, (iv) chlorine diffusion through graphite. (authors)

  7. The Effect of Ownership Structure and Investor Protection on Firm Value: Analyst Following as Moderating Variable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desi Susilawati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research related to the association between structure ownership and the firm value is a discussion about corporate governance which is still has contradictory conclusion and mixed result. It indicates open question that needs empirical evidence. The influence of concentrated ownership on firm value still brought conflict of interest so the role of analyst following can be stated as an alternative of corporate governance mechanism (Lang et al., 2004. The objectives of this research are to examine the interaction effect between concentrated ownership and analyst following, and the effect of investor protection toward firm value in five Asian companies. Asia is chosen because it has unique characteristic, in term of corporates ownership structure which is more concentrated on families and board of governance is weak (Choi, 2003. The data is consisting of 7.100 firm year observations obtained from Bloomberg and OSIRIS database for the period 2011-2013 in five Asian Countries, i.e. China, South Korea,  Malaysia, Taiwan, and Thailand. Multiple Regression analysis is used to test hypotheses. The results show that concentrated ownership is positively affects the firm value. However, there is no empirical evidence that the interaction of concentrated ownership and analyst following positively affect the firm value. As hypothesized, this research also shows that investor protection has negative impact on firm’s value.

  8. Innovative approaches to the Management of Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Wastes: Addressing the Challenges through International Collaboration with Project 'GRAPA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Ojovan, M.; O'Sullivan, P.; )

    2017-01-01

    There exists more than 250.000 tonnes of irradiated (and therefore radioactive) nuclear graphite (i-graphite) in the world, primarily as a result of the development of graphite-moderated power-reactor systems, initially for defence and subsequently for commercial purposes. Only a very small number of such plants have been dismantled and, for most cases, the final destiny of the irradiated graphite remains unresolved. Future high-temperature reactor programmes, such as the Chinese HTR-PM development, will produce more graphite and carbonaceous wastes from both structural components and the fuel pebbles (which are approximately 96% carbonaceous), the latter producing a continuous stream of so-called 'operational waste'. The problem of dismantling irradiated graphite reactor stacks, possibly distorted through neutron damage and in some cases degraded further by radiation-chemical attack by gaseous coolants, and then finding the appropriate treatments and final destiny of the material, has exercised both the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency for more than 25 years, seeking to address the different issues and available disposal solutions in different IAEA Member States. An IAEA collaborative research programme on treatment options has recently been completed, and an active group of international specialists in this area has now been established as part of the IAEA International Decommissioning Network under the envelope of Project 'GRAPA' (Irradiated Graphite Processing Approaches), which includes representatives from Belgium, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Lithuania, Rep. of Korea, Romania, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine and the Russian Federation with direct responsibilities for various parts of the decommissioning and graphite-disposal process in a variety of reactor designs. Interest has also been expressed by colleagues from Sweden and Japan. Work is in progress on a number of topic areas where weaknesses in the

  9. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  10. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  11. Recent developments in graphite. [Use in HTGR and aerospace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications.

  12. Graphite development for gas-cooled reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) graphite activities in the USA which currently include the following research and development tasks: coke examination; effects of irradiation; variability of physical properties (mechanical, thermal-physical, and fracture); fatigue behavior, oxidation behavior; NDE techniques; structural design criteria; and carbon-carbon composite control rod clad materials. These tasks support nuclear grade graphite manufacturing technology including nondestructive examination of billets and components. Moreover, data shall be furnished to support design and licensing of graphite components for the MHTGR

  13. Corrosion-induced microstructural changes in a US core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Lee, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The results reported here apply to Great Lakes grade H-451 graphite, the core graphite specified for the US HTGR. This graphite is structurally similar to the German reflector grades we have investigated at ORNL, and hence should be applicable to them if similar impurity levels are obtained. Moreover, these results extend and confirm the behavior pattern exhibited by the fuel matrix material A3-3 reported in the previous paper, although the effects are more pronounced in A3-3 presumably due to its resin-type binder and low heat-treatment temperatures

  14. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  15. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  16. Preparation of anode-electrolyte structures using graphite, sodium bicarbonate or citric acid as pore forming agents for application in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Fiuza, Raigenis da; Silva, Marcos Aurelio da; Guedes, Bruna C.; Pontes, Luiz A.; Boaventura, Jaime Soares [UFBA, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil). Energy and Materials Science Group

    2010-07-01

    Cermets based on Ni supported on YSZ or GDC were prepared for use as anode in direct reform SOFCs. NaHCO3 (Na-Ni-YSZ and Na-Ni-GDC) or citric acid (Ac-Ni-YSZ and Ac-Ni-GDC) were used as pore forming agents (PFAs). The SOFC anode was also prepared using graphite (G-Ni-YSZ and G-Ni-GDC) as PFA for the purposes of comparison. The testing unitary SOFC, planar type, was made by pressing the anode-electrolyte assembly, followed by sintering at 1500 C. After this, LSM (lanthanum and strontium manganite) paint was used for the cathode deposition. The powdered cermets were evaluated in ethanol steam reforming at 650 C. The ethanol conversion was 84% and 32% for cermets Na-Ni-YSZ and G-Ni-YSZ, respectively and the selectivity to H{sub 2} was 32 and 20% for the two cermets, respectively. The Na-Ni-YSZ cermet was ten times more resistant to carbon deposition than the G-Ni-YSZ cermet. SEM micrographs of the anode-electrolyte assembly showed that the use of NaHCO{sub 3} as PFA created a well formed interface between layers with homogeneously distributed pores. In contrast, graphite as PFA formed a loose interface between anode and electrolyte. The performance of the unitary SOFC was evaluated using ethanol, hydrogen or methane as fuel. The cell operated well using any of these fuels; however, they exhibited different electrochemical behavior. (orig.)

  17. The effect of light intensity and temperature on performance of photoelectrochemical solar cells of structure ITO/TiO2/PVC-LiClO4/graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusri Abd Rahman; Muhammad Mat Salleh; Ibrahim Abu Talib; Muhammad Yahaya

    2006-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of a photoelectrochemical solar cells of ITO/TiO 2 /PVC-LiCIO 4 /Graphite are reported. This paper is concerned with the effect of light intensity and temperature on performance of the device. The photoelectrochemical solar cell material was a screen-printed layer of titanium dioxide onto an ITO-covered glass substrate which was used as a working electrode of the device. The electrolyte used was PVC-LiCIO 4 that was prepared by solution casting technique. The ionic conductivity of the electrolyte as a function of temperature was obtained from impedance spectroscopy technique. The graphite film which serve as a counter electrode were prepared onto glass substrate by electron beam evaporation technique. The current-voltage, I-V characteristics of the device under illumination of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mWcm -2 light from tungsten halogen lamp at 40 degree C were obtained using Keithley Voltmeter 175A and Keithley Amperemeter 197A. The current-voltage under illumination of 100 mWcm -2 at 30 degree C, 35 degree C, 40 degree C, 45 degree C and 50 degree C respectively were also obtained. It was found that efficiency of the device increases with both light intensity and temperature

  18. Structural and psychological empowerment climates, performance, and the moderating role of shared felt accountability: a managerial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J Craig; Johnson, Paul D; Mathe, Kimberly; Paul, Jeff

    2011-07-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model in which data were collected from managers (n = 539) at 116 corporate-owned quick service restaurants to assess the structural and psychological empowerment process as moderated by shared-felt accountability on indices of performance from a managerial perspective. The authors found that empowering leadership climate positively relates to psychological empowerment climate. In turn, psychological empowerment climate relates to performance only under conditions of high-felt accountability; it does not relate to performance under conditions of low-felt accountability. Overall, the present results indicate that the quick-service restaurant managers, who feel more empowered, operate restaurants that perform better than managers who feel less empowered, but only when those empowered managers also feel a high sense of accountability.

  19. Friction and wear of carbon-graphite materials for high energy brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Caliper-type brakes simulation experiments were conducted on seven different carbon-graphite material formulations against a steel disk material and against a carbon-graphite disk material. The effects of binder level, boron carbide (B4C) additions, graphite fiber additions, and graphite cloth reinforcement on friction and wear behavior were investigated. Reductions in binder level and additions of B4C each resulted in increased wear. The wear rate was not affected by the addition of graphite fibers. Transition to severe wear and high friction was observed in the case of graphite-cloth-reinforced carbon sliding against a disk of similar composition. This transition was related to the disruption of a continuous graphite shear film that must form on the sliding surfaces if low wear is to occur. The exposure of the fiber structure of the cloth constituent is believed to play a role in the shear film disruption.

  20. Analysis of electrochemical disintegration process of graphite matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lifang; Wen Mingfen; Chen Jing

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical method with ammonium nitrate as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from the simulative fuel elements for high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The influences of process parameters, including salt concentration, system temperature and current density, on the disintegration rate of graphite fragments were investigated in the present work. The experimental results showed that the disintegration rate depended slightly on the temperature and salt concentration. The current density strongly affected the disintegration rate of graphite fragments. Furthermore, the content of introduced oxygen in final graphite fragments was independent of the current density and the concentration of electrolyte. Moreover, the structural evolution of graphite was analyzed based on the microstructural parameters determined by X-ray diffraction profile fitting analysis using MAUD (material analysis using diffraction) before and after the disintegration process. It may safely be concluded that the graphite disintegration can be ascribed to the influences of the intercalation of foreign molecules in between crystal planes and the partial oxidation involved. The disintegration process was described deeply composed of intercalate part and further oxidation part of carbon which effected together to lead to the collapse of graphite crystals.

  1. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  2. Design Procedure of Graphite Components by ASME HTR Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Jo, Chang Keun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, design procedure for graphite components of HTRs was reviewed and the differences from metal materials were remarked. The Korean VHTR has a prismatic core which is made of multiple graphite blocks, reflectors, and core supports. One of the design issues is the assessment of the structural integrity of the graphite components because the graphite is brittle and shows quite different behaviors from metals in high temperature environment. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the latest edition of the code for the high temperature reactors (HTR) in 2015. In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, Graphite Materials was reviewed and the special features were remarked. Due the brittleness of graphites, the damage-tolerant design procedures different from the conventional metals were adopted based on semi-probabilistic approaches. The unique additional classification, SRC, is allotted to the graphite components and the full 3-D FEM or equivalent stress analysis method is required. In specific conditions, the oxidation and viscoelasticity analysis of material are required. The fatigue damage rule has not been established yet

  3. Design Procedure of Graphite Components by ASME HTR Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Jo, Chang Keun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, design procedure for graphite components of HTRs was reviewed and the differences from metal materials were remarked. The Korean VHTR has a prismatic core which is made of multiple graphite blocks, reflectors, and core supports. One of the design issues is the assessment of the structural integrity of the graphite components because the graphite is brittle and shows quite different behaviors from metals in high temperature environment. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the latest edition of the code for the high temperature reactors (HTR) in 2015. In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, Graphite Materials was reviewed and the special features were remarked. Due the brittleness of graphites, the damage-tolerant design procedures different from the conventional metals were adopted based on semi-probabilistic approaches. The unique additional classification, SRC, is allotted to the graphite components and the full 3-D FEM or equivalent stress analysis method is required. In specific conditions, the oxidation and viscoelasticity analysis of material are required. The fatigue damage rule has not been established yet.

  4. Effect of various dopant elements on primary graphite growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, N; Theuwissen, K; Lacaze, J; Sertucha, J

    2012-01-01

    Five spheroidal graphite cast irons were investigated, a usual ferritic grade and four pearlitic alloys containing Cu and doped with Sb, Sn and Ti. These alloys were remelted in a graphite crucible, leading to volatilization of the magnesium added for spheroidization and to carbon saturation of the liquid. The alloys were then cooled down and maintained at a temperature above the eutectic temperature. During this step, primary graphite could develop showing various features depending on the doping elements added. The largest effects were that of Ti which greatly reduces graphite nucleation and growth, and that of Sb which leads to rounded agglomerates instead of lamellar graphite. The samples have been investigated with secondary ion mass spectrometry to enlighten distribution of elements in primary graphite. SIMS analysis showed almost even distribution of elements, including Mg and Al (from the inoculant) in the ferritic grade, while uneven distribution was evident in all doped alloys. Investigations are going on to clarify if the uneven distribution is associated with structural defects in the graphite precipitates.

  5. Formation of Ag nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces. A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrusi, Rubén E.; García, Silvana G.; Pronsato, María E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining silver nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces theoretically, using density functional theory calculations. Three layer slabs are used to model graphite surfaces with and without defects. Adsorption energies for Ag atoms on graphite surfaces were calculated showing the preference of Ag adatoms to locate on the steps, forming linear structures like nanowires. An analysis of the charge densities and projected densities of states for different structures is also performed.

  6. 3-D Analysis of Graphite Nodules in Ductile Cast Iron Using FIB-SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, Luca; Jespersen, Freja N.; MacDonald, A. Nicole

    Ductile cast iron samples were analysed in a Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope, FIB-SEM. The focussed ion beam was used to carefully remove layers of the graphite nodules to reveal internal structures in the nodules. The sample preparation and milling procedure for sectioning graphite...... inside the nodules, their orientation in relation to the graphite and the chemistry of the inclusions is analysed and described. Formation of the structures during solidification and subsequent cooling to room temperature is discussed....

  7. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  8. High-temperature annealing of graphite: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrew; Gillette, Victor

    2018-05-01

    A modified AIREBO potential was developed to simulate the effects of thermal annealing on the structure and physical properties of damaged graphite. AIREBO parameter modifications were made to reproduce Density Functional Theory interstitial results. These changes to the potential resulted in high-temperature annealing of the model, as measured by stored-energy reduction. These results show some resemblance to experimental high-temperature annealing results, and show promise that annealing effects in graphite are accessible with molecular dynamics and reactive potentials.

  9. Fracture toughness testing of a reactor grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeding, M.; Klein, G.; Schiffers, H.; Nickel, H.

    1976-03-15

    Fracture mechanics is a well established tool for the assessment of brittle fracture in metallic structural materials. In this paper an attempt is made to apply fracture mechanics to a reactor-grade graphite. The effect of several test parameters on the stress intensity factor was measured; this was found to lie in the range 25 and 50 N/mm/sup -3/2/. The results are discussed in terms of the well known mechanical characteristics of graphite.

  10. Study of graphite reactivity worth on well-defined cores assembled on LR-0 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Košťál, Michal; Rypar, Vojtěch; Milčák, Ján; Juříček, Vlastimil; Losa, Evžen; Forget, Benoit; Harper, Sterling

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A light water critical facility for graphite reactivity worth measurements. • Comparison of calculated and measured k eff . • Effect of graphite description on k eff . - Abstract: Graphite is an often-used moderating material on the basis of its good moderating power and very low absorption cross section. This small absorption cross section permits the use of natural or low-enriched uranium in graphite moderated reactors. Graphite is now being considered as the moderator for Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR). The critical moderator level was measured for various graphite block configurations in an experimental dry assembly of the LR-0 reactor. Comparisons with experiments were performed between Monte Carlo simulation tools for which satisfactory agreement was obtained with the exception of some systematic discrepancies. The larger discrepancies were observed when using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. To decrease the uncertainties, based on conservative assumptions, relative comparisons were done. The results provided by the different nuclear data libraries are within 3 sigma interval of experimental uncertainties. It has been determined that differences between the results of calculations are caused by variations in the (n,n), (n,n′), (n,g) reactions and also by various angular distributions, while the (n,g) cross section variations play only a minor role for these configurations.

  11. Statistical considerations of graphite strength for assessing design allowable stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, M.; Mogi, H.; Ioka, I.; Arai, T.; Oku, T.

    1987-01-01

    Several aspects of statistics need to be considered to determine design allowable stresses for graphite structures. These include: 1) Statistical variation of graphite material strength. 2) Uncertainty of calculated stress. 3) Reliability (survival probability) required from operational and safety performance of graphite structures. This paper deals with some statistical considerations of structural graphite for assessing design allowable stress. Firstly, probability distribution functions of tensile and compressive strengths are investigated on experimental Very High Temperature candidated graphites. Normal, logarithmic normal and Weibull distribution functions are compared in terms of coefficient of correlation to measured strength data. This leads to the adaptation of normal distribution function. Then, the relation between factor of safety and fracture probability is discussed on the following items: 1) As the graphite strength is more variable than metalic material's strength, the effect of strength variation to the fracture probability is evaluated. 2) Fracture probability depending on survival probability of 99 ∼ 99.9 (%) with confidence level of 90 ∼ 95 (%) is discussed. 3) As the material properties used in the design analysis are usually the mean values of their variation, the additional effect of these variations on the fracture probability is discussed. Finally, the way to assure the minimum ultimate strength with required survival probability with confidence level is discussed in view of statistical treatment of the strength data from varying sample numbers in a material acceptance test. (author)

  12. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of decommissioning of water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, a large amount of rad-waste in the form of graphite stack fragments is generated (on average 1500-2000 tons per reactor). That is why it is essentially important, although complex from the technical point of view, to develop advanced technologies based on up-to-date remotely-controlled systems for unmanned dismantling of the graphite stack containing highly-active long-lived radionuclides and for conditioning of irradiated graphite (IG) for the purposes of transportation and subsequent long term and ecologically safe storage either on NPP sites or in special-purpose geological repositories. The main characteristics critical for radiation and nuclear hazards of the graphite stack are as follows: the graphite stack is contaminated with nuclear fuel that has gotten there as a result of the accidents; the graphite mass is 992 tons, total activity -6?104 Ci (at the time of unit shutdown); the fuel mass in the reactor stack amounts to 100-140 kg, as estimated by IPPE and RDIPE, respectively; γ-radiation dose rate in the stack cells varies from 4 to 4300 R/h, with the prevailing values being in the range from 50 to 100 R/h. In this paper the traditional methods of rad-waste handling as bituminization technology, cementing technology are discussed. In terms of IG handling technology two lines were identified: long-term storage of conditioned IG and IG disposal by means of incineration. The specific cost of graphite immobilization in a radiation-resistant polymeric matrix amounts to -2600 USD per 1 t of graphite, whereas the specific cost of immobilization in slag-stone containers with an inorganic binder (cement) is -1400 USD per 1 t of graphite. On the other hand, volume of conditioned IG rad-waste subject for disposal, if obtained by means of the first technology, is 2-2.5 times less than the volume of rad-waste generated by means of the second technology. It can be concluded from the above that

  13. Thermodynamic and structural study of two-dimensional phase transitions within films of molecules physi-sorbed on graphite; the role of orientational order in wetting and roughening phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angerand, Francois

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional phase transitions within films physi-sorbed upon the basal face of graphite have been investigated using two experimental methods: volumetric measurements of adsorption isotherms and neutron diffraction. Our main objective was to study the role played by orientational order in these films, its influence on their thermodynamic and structural properties, and its significance in wetting and roughening phenomena, which are indirectly accessible from adsorption studies. A comparative study of the adsorption isotherms of two molecules having comparable dipole moments, NH 3 and C 2 H 3 F, discloses very dissimilar behaviours, due to the fact that hydrogen bonding is involved in the interaction between NH 3 , but not C 2 H 3 F, molecules. The impossibility of such a bond for the interaction of the adsorbate with the substrate results in a poor cohesion energy of the NH 3 ad-film in comparison with those of its bulk condensed phases. The situation is opposite for the film of C 2 H 3 F which behaves almost as a rare gas film. From multilayer adsorption isotherms of CO it is shown that graphite (0001) is perfectly wet by the plastic (orientationally disordered) crystal phase, β-CO, whereas it is incompletely wet by the low-temperature crystal phase α-CO, in which the molecules are orientationally ordered. The critical temperatures of two-dimensional condensation have been measured for the successive ad-layers, up to the fifth. They seem to converge towards a value of 65 K, which we consider as representing the temperature of the roughening transition of the (0001) face of β-CO. A neutron diffraction study of the monolayers of N 2 O and C(CD 3 ) 4 adsorbed on graphite has been carried out. For N 2 O our results suggest a structure more involved than conjectured. For C(CD 3 ) 4 we have evidence for a triple point at 178 K. The crystal monolayer has a compact hexagonal structure. (author) [fr

  14. New In Situ Synthesis Method for Fe3O4/Flake Graphite Nanosheet Composite Structure and Its Application in Anode Materials of Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhao Qian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure torsion (HPT, a severe plastic deformation (SPD method, is rarely used in the manufacturing process of functional materials. In the present work, the authors creatively proposed using HPT as an alternative method an approach for high energy ball-milling in the preparation of an Fe3O4 and lamellar graphite nanosheet (GNS composite material. The corresponding electrochemical experiments verified that the in situ synthesized Fe3O4/GNS composite material has good lithium-storage performance and that it can retain good capacity (548.2 mA h g−1 even after several hundred cycles with high current density (8 C. Meanwhile, this performance has directly confirmed that SPD technique has great potential for the preparation of anode materials of lithium-ion batteries, especially in manufacturing metallic functional nanomaterials.

  15. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  16. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  17. An Investigation of Reverse Flotation Separation of Sericite from Graphite by Using a Surfactant: MF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangshuai Qiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a surfactant, atlox4862 (formaldehyde condensate of methyl naphthalene sulfonic sodium salt (MF, was introduced as a depressant for reverse flotation separation of sericite from graphite. Natural flake graphite has a strong hydrophobic property. After interacting with MF, the graphite became moderately hydrophilic. The flotation results showed that MF had a depressing ability for both sericite and graphite and that the flotation separation of sericite from graphite was attributed to the different declining levels of recovery between graphite and sericite with increased MF concentration. For a pulp pH of 8 and a MF concentration of 250 mg/L, the recovery rates of sericite and graphite were 89.7% and 11.3%, respectively. The results of the FTIR spectra and zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the interaction of MF with graphite and sericite is mainly through electrostatic attraction. MF was preferred to adsorb on the surface of graphite, decreasing its zeta potential and improving its hydrophilicity more than that of sericite.

  18. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly du Bois, B.; Bernard, J.L.; Naudet, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors) [fr

  19. Graphite coated PVA fibers as the reinforcement for cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhipeng; Liu, Zhichao

    2018-02-01

    A new preconditioning method was developed to PVA fibers as the reinforcement in cement-based materials. Virgin PVA fibers exhibits limited adhesion to graphite powders due to the presence of oil spots on the surface. Mixing PVA fibers with a moderately concentrated KMnO4-H2SO4 solution can efficiently remove the oil spots by oxidation without creating extra precipitate (MnO2) associated with the reduction reaction. This enhances the coating of graphite powders onto fiber surface and improves the mechanical properties of PVA fiber reinforced concrete (PVA-FRC). Graphite powders yields better fiber distribution in the matrix and reduces the fiber-matrix bonding, which is beneficial in uniformly distributing the stress among embedded fibers and creating steady generation and propagation of tight microcracks. This is evidenced by the significantly enhanced strain hardening behavior and improved flexural strength and toughness.

  20. On estimating the fracture probability of nuclear graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2008-01-01

    The properties of nuclear grade graphites exhibit anisotropy and could vary considerably within a manufactured block. Graphite strength is affected by the direction of alignment of the constituent coke particles, which is dictated by the forming method, coke particle size, and the size, shape, and orientation distribution of pores in the structure. In this paper, a Weibull failure probability analysis for components is presented using the American Society of Testing Materials strength specification for nuclear grade graphites for core components in advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The risk of rupture (probability of fracture) and survival probability (reliability) of large graphite blocks are calculated for varying and discrete values of service tensile stresses. The limitations in these calculations are discussed from considerations of actual reactor environmental conditions that could potentially degrade the specification properties because of damage due to complex interactions between irradiation, temperature, stress, and variability in reactor operation

  1. Impact-Contact Analysis of Prismatic Graphite Blocks Using Abaqus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji Ho; Kim, Gyeong Ho; Choi, Woo Seok

    2010-12-01

    Graphite blocks are the important core components of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. As these blocks are simply stacked in array, collisions among neighboring components may occur during earthquakes or accidents. The final objective of the research project is to develop a reliable seismic model of the stacked graphite blocks from which their behavior can be predicted and, thus, they are designed to have sufficient strength to maintain their structural integrity during the anticipated occurrences. The work summarized in this report is a first step toward the big picture and is dedicated to build a realistic impact-contact dynamics model of the graphite block using a commercial FEM package, Abaqus. The developed model will be further used to assist building a reliable lumped dynamics model of these stacked graphite components

  2. Evaluation of coke microstructure and its effects on graphite fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotourehchian, S.; Ahmadi, S.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of applications for cokes (metallurgy, petroleum, etc.) have been defined in parallel to the new industrial technology growth. Coke is rich in carbon and has the main role in manufacturing carbonaceous materials such as graphite, steel, silicon carbide, titanium carbide, etc. Among the most important applications of different variety of cokes is their usage for different graphite fabrications. The crystalline structure of graphite (hexagonal with sp 2 hybrid) is based upon the microstructure of coke and it causes anisotropy in properties of produced graphite. Thus, the study of macrostructure and anisotropy degree of cokes is of importance. There are several theoretical and experimental methods to determine the Coke's microstructure and anisotropy. Numerous tests have been conducted on different variety of cokes based on the used method. Here, it is attempted to introduce an applied method to determine the microstructure and anisotropy degree of cokes based upon the kind of application

  3. On the Thermal Conductivity Change of Matrix Graphite Materials after Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Kim, Eung-Seon; Sah, Injin; Park, Daegyu; Kim, Youngjun; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this work, the variations of the thermal conductivity of the A3-3 matrix graphite after neutron irradiation is discussed as well as of the IG-110 graphite for comparison. Neutron irradiation of the graphite specimens was carried out as a part of the first irradiation test of KAERI's coated particle fuel specimens by use of Hanaro research reactor. This work can be summarized as follows: 1) In the evaluation of the specific heat of the graphite materials, various literature data were used and the variations of the specific heat data of all the graphite specimens are observed well agreed, irrespectively of the difference in specimens (graphite and matrix graphite and irradiated and un-irradiated). 2) This implies that it should be reasonable that for both structural graphite and fuel matrix graphite, and even for the neuron-irradiated graphite, any of these specific heat data set be used in the calculation of the thermal conductivity. 3) For the irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity decreased on both directions. On the radial direction, the tendency of variation upon temperature is similar to that of unirradiated specimen, i.e., decreasing as the temperature increases. 4) In the German irradiation experiments with A3-27 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity of the un-irradiated specimen shows a decrease and that of irradiated specimen is nearly constant as the temperature increases. 5) The thermal conductivity of the irradiated IG-110 was considerably decreased compared with that of un-irradiated specimens The difference of the thermal conductivity of un-irradiated and irradiated IG-110 graphite specimens is much larger than that of un-irradiated and irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens.

  4. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  5. Magnetic response of certain curved graphitic geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Davids, P.S.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-particle energy spectra associated with some members of buckyfamily (curved graphitic geometries), in particular C 50 , C 60 , C 70 and related fullerenes as well as coaxial helical microtubules of graphite, are obtained analytically within the mean-field approximation. These energy spectra are then used to calculate various response functions. Specifically, we calculate the specific heat, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility in the presence of an external magnetic field at low temperatures. For a single microtubule an extra peak superimposed on the first de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation in magnetic susceptibility is found in the 50--170 Tesla range depending on the radius which is possibly accessible in special (explosive flux compression) experiments. Finally, we point to important potential applications of these novel mesoscopic structures in nanotechnology

  6. Preparation of nanoporous carbons from graphite nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung-Joo [Department of Green Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, PO Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-14

    In this study we manufactured highly porous graphite nanofibres (GNFs) by physical activation in order to develop promising energy storage materials. The activation was performed at activation temperatures in the range of 800-1050 deg. C. The pore structures of the porous GNFs were analysed using N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. After the activation, the porous GNFs showed a decrease in diameter and scratches on their surfaces, resulting from surface oxidation and the opening of the graphitic layers, respectively. It was found that the specific surface area of the porous GNFs prepared at 1050 deg. C was more than 2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} without loss of their fibre shape or serious increase in electrical resistivity. This result indicates that porous GNFs prepared under optimal conditions can have a much higher specific surface area and are promising materials for energy storage technologies.

  7. Low-energy electron observation of graphite and molybdenite crystals. Application to the study of graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.

    1969-01-01

    The LEED study of cleaved (0001) faces of crystals having a layered structure allowed to investigate flakes free of steps on graphite and molybdenite, to show twinning on natural graphite. By intensity measurements and computation in the case of a kinematical approximation it has been possible to determine an inner potential of 19 eV for graphite and to identify the direction of the Mo-S bond of the surface layer of molybdenite. The oxidation of graphite has been studied by observing changes, in symmetry of the diffraction patterns and by mass spectrometry of the gases evolved during the oxidation. No surface compounds have been detected and the carbon layers appeared to be peeled off one after the other. The oxidation took place at temperatures higher than 520 C under an oxygen pressure of 10 -5 torr. (author) [fr

  8. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  9. Electron oxidation of graphite by fluorospecies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    The fluoride-ion affinity (A/sub F - /) of phosphorus pentafluoride was determined to be 100 kcal/mole from the heats of reaction of the Lewis bases SF 4 and ClO 2 F with PF 5 near room temperature. The fluoride-ion affinity of boron trifluoride was determined to be 92 kcal/mole from the heat of reaction of ClO 2 F with BF 3 . The crystal structure of ClO 2 BF 4 was determined and a precise lattice energy was calculated from this structure and used to determined A/sub F - /. Both PF 5 and BF 3 were found to react with graphite in the presence of fluorine gas to yield a variety of non-stoichiometric compounds. The fluoride-ion affinity of silicon tetrafluoride is not known, but it does not react with graphite and F 2 except at high pressures. These and previous results suggested a threshold in oxidizing power of intercalating species below which the oxidative intercalation reaction would not occur. The reduction of C/sub x/PF 6 by PF 3 proved that the reaction is thermodynamically controlled to some extent. The displacement of PF 5 in C/sub x/PF 6 by BF 3 (with a smaller A/sub F - /) suggested that two BF 3 molecules may have a larger fluoride-ion affinity than one PF 5 and that B 2 F 7 - may be a stable anion in graphite. Conductivity studies of PF/sub x/ and BF/sub y/ salts showed that a large drop in conductivity when the reaction reaches first stage is due in the most part to direct fluorination of carbon in graphite

  10. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  11. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  12. Childhood Emotional Abuse Moderates Associations Among Corticomotor White Matter Structure and Stress Neuromodulators in Women With and Without Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlton P. Frost

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Adverse caregiving during development can produce long-lasting changes to neural, endocrine, and behavioral responses to stress, and is strongly related to elevated risk of adult psychopathology. While prior experience of adversity is associated with altered sympathetic nervous system (SNS and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity, the underlying neural pathways are not completely understood. In a double-blind crossover study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to examine whether variation in white matter structure predicts differences in HPA-SNS interactions as a function of early adversity. Participants included 74 women who exhibited a wide range of depression severity and/or childhood emotional abuse (EA. Participants attended two experimental sessions during which they were administered 20 mg cortisol (CORT or placebo and after 90 min, viewed emotionally laden pictures while undergoing MRI scanning. Immediately after emotional picture-viewing, we collected salivary alpha-amylase (sAA to index SNS activation. We tested whether EA moderated the relation between fractional anisotropy (FA, a measure of white matter fiber structure, and sAA. In the placebo condition, for participants with minimal history of EA, higher FA in corticomotor projections was negatively correlated with sAA, whereas in participants with severe EA, the correlation was trending in the opposite direction. Following CORT administration, FA and sAA were not related, suggesting that SNS tone during acute cortisol elevation may depend on neural pathways other than corticomotor projections. The results suggest that at baseline—though not during cortisol elevation—increased FA in these tracts is associated with lower levels of SNS activity in women with minimal EA, but not in women with severe EA. These findings provide evidence that corticomotor projections may be a key component of altered neural circuitry in adults with history of maltreatment, and may be

  13. Preparation, quantitative surface analysis, intercalation characteristics and industrial implications of low temperature expandable graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Liu, Bin; Gao, Xuechao; Luo, Liqun; Sun, Hongjuan

    2018-06-01

    Expandable graphite is widely used as a new functional carbon material, especially as fire-retardant; however, its practical application is limited due to the high expansion temperature. In this work, preparation process of low temperature and highly expandable graphite was studied, using natural flake graphite as raw material and KMnO4/HClO4/NH4NO3 as oxidative intercalations. The structure, morphology, functional groups and thermal properties were characterized during expanding process by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectra, thermo-gravimetry differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis showed that by oxidation intercalation, some oxygen-containing groups were grafted on the edge and within the graphite layer. The intercalation reagent entered the graphite layer to increase the interlayer spacing. After expansion, the original flaky expandable graphite was completely transformed into worm-like expanded graphite. The order of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) was proposed and determined to be 3 for the prepared expandable graphite, based on quantitative XRD peak analysis. Meanwhile, the detailed intercalation mechanisms were also proposed. The comprehensive investigation paved a benchmark for the industrial application of such sulfur-free expanded graphite.

  14. Interaction of boron with graphite: A van der Waals density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen; Liang, Tongxiang; Lai, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A van der Waals density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. • VdW-DF functionals give fair agreement of crystal parameters with experiments. • The π electron approaches boron while adsorbing on graphite surface. • The hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. • PBE cannot describe the interstitial boron in graphite because of the ignoring binding of graphite sheets. - Abstract: Boron doping has been widely investigated to improve oxidation resistance of graphite. In this work the interaction of boron with graphite is investigated by a van der Waals density-functional approach (vdW-DF). The traditional density-functional theory (DFT) is well accounted for the binding in boron-substituted graphite. However, to investigate the boron atom on graphite surface and the interstitial impurities require use of a description of graphite interlayer binding. Traditional DFT cannot describe the vdW physics, for instance, GGA calculations show no relevant binding between graphite sheets. LDA shows some binding, but they fail to provide an accurate account of vdW forces. In this paper, we compare the calculation results of graphite lattice constant and cohesive energy by several functionals, it shows that vdW-DF such as two optimized functionals optB88-vdW and optB86b-vdW give much improved results than traditional DFT. The vdW-DF approach is then applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. Boron adsorption, substitution, and intercalation are discussed in terms of structural parameters and electronic structures. When adsorbing on graphite surface, boron behaves as π electron acceptor. The π electron approaches boron atom because of more electropositive of boron than carbon. For substitution situation, the hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. The B-doped graphite system with the hole has less

  15. Interaction of boron with graphite: A van der Waals density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen [Beijing Key Lab of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang, E-mail: txliang@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lai, Wensheng [Advanced Material Laboratory, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • A van der Waals density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. • VdW-DF functionals give fair agreement of crystal parameters with experiments. • The π electron approaches boron while adsorbing on graphite surface. • The hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. • PBE cannot describe the interstitial boron in graphite because of the ignoring binding of graphite sheets. - Abstract: Boron doping has been widely investigated to improve oxidation resistance of graphite. In this work the interaction of boron with graphite is investigated by a van der Waals density-functional approach (vdW-DF). The traditional density-functional theory (DFT) is well accounted for the binding in boron-substituted graphite. However, to investigate the boron atom on graphite surface and the interstitial impurities require use of a description of graphite interlayer binding. Traditional DFT cannot describe the vdW physics, for instance, GGA calculations show no relevant binding between graphite sheets. LDA shows some binding, but they fail to provide an accurate account of vdW forces. In this paper, we compare the calculation results of graphite lattice constant and cohesive energy by several functionals, it shows that vdW-DF such as two optimized functionals optB88-vdW and optB86b-vdW give much improved results than traditional DFT. The vdW-DF approach is then applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. Boron adsorption, substitution, and intercalation are discussed in terms of structural parameters and electronic structures. When adsorbing on graphite surface, boron behaves as π electron acceptor. The π electron approaches boron atom because of more electropositive of boron than carbon. For substitution situation, the hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. The B-doped graphite system with the hole has less

  16. Gravity Effects on the Free Vibration of a Graphite Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Dong-Ok; Kim, Jong-Bum; Park, Keun-Bae; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The gravity effects on the free vibration of a graphite column are studied. Graphite block is a key component of a HTGR (High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor). The major core elements, such as the fuel blocks and neutron reflector blocks, of HTTR (High Temperature Test Reactor, Japan) and GT-MHR (Gas Turbine- Modular Helium Reactor, USA) consist of stacked hexagonal graphite blocks forming a group of columns. The vibration of the columns induced by earthquakes may lead to solid impacts between graphite blocks and structural integrity problems. The study of free vibration characteristics of the graphite block column is the first step in the core internal structure dynamic analysis. Gravity force bring a negative stiffness term to the transverse vibration analysis of heavy long column structures, and results in natural frequency reductions. Generally it is not considered in the not so tall structure cases, because the gravity term makes the analysis and design complicated. Therefore it is important to check whether the gravity effect is severe or not

  17. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  18. Ageing Management of Beryllium and Graphite Blocks in Research Reactor MARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golab, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    In the paper the phenomenon of beryllium moderator poisoning by thermal neutron absorption and the method and results of this phenomenon control is presented. Also the phenomenon of graphite blocks damage due to fast neutrons accumulation and the methods and results of this process supervising is described. These methods refer especially to: visual inspection of their state and radiography of graphite blocks. Special attention is paid to permanent estimate of fast neutron fluency accumulated in blocks and methods of their shuffling in the reactor core. The shuffling makes possible to increase the lifetime of beryllium and graphite blocks and decrease the cost of reactor operation.

  19. COMPUTER PROCESSING OF MICROSTRUCTURES OF IRON WITH DIFFERENT INCLUSIONS AMOUNTS OF LAMELLAR AND SPHERICAL GRAPHITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on cast iron microstructures with different amounts of impurities of plastic and nodular graphite given in CCITT 3443-87 “Cast iron with various forms of graphite. Methods for determining the structure “shows the possibilities of automated quantitative analysis of microstructures SG2, PG4, PG6, PG10, PG12 (Plastic Box and SHG2, SHG4, SHG6, SHG10, SHG12 (spheroidal graphite, which allows the development of methods for the determination of impurities of plastic and spherical graphite according to the microstructures image under the light microscope.

  20. An ab initio study on the transition paths from graphite to diamond under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Xiao; Zhou Xiangfeng; Wang Huitian; Qian Guangrui; Zhao Zhisheng; Tian Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    We calculate and compare the transition paths from graphite to two types of diamond using the variable cell nudged elastic band method. For the phase transition from graphite to cubic diamond, we analyze in detail how the π bonds transit to the σ bonds in an electronic structure. Meanwhile, a new transition path with a lower energy barrier for the transformation from graphite to hexagonal diamond is discovered. The path has its own peculiar sp 2 –sp 3 bonding configurations, serving as a transition state. Further calculation suggests that the sp 2 –sp 3 transition state represents an expected general phenomenon for cold-compressed graphite. (paper)

  1. Assessment of different mechanisms of C-14 production in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narkunas, Ernestas; Smaizys, Arturas; Poskas, Povilas; Kilda, Raimondas

    2010-01-01

    Two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite-moderated channel-type power reactors at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) are under decommissioning now. The total mass of irradiated graphite in the cores of both units is more than 3600 tons. The main source of uncertainty in the numerical assessment of graphite activity is the uncertainty of the initial impurities content in graphite. Nitrogen is one of the most important impurities, having a large neutron capture cross-section. This impurity may become the dominant source of C-14 production. RBMK reactors graphite stacks operate in the cooling mixture of helium-nitrogen gases and this may additionally increase the quantity of the nitrogen impurity. In this paper the results of the numerical modelling of graphite activation for the INPP Unit I reactor are presented. In order to evaluate the C-14 activity dependence on the nitrogen impurity content, several cases with different nitrogen content were modelled taking into account initial nitrogen impurity quantities in the graphite matrix and possible nitrogen quantities entrapped in the graphite pores from cooling gases. (orig.)

  2. R and D and maintenance on graphite tile of divertor region at EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, X.; Song, Y.T.; Wu, S.T.; Hao, J.; Du, S.; Peng, Y.; Cao, L.; Wang, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Find out the reason of damage of graphite tile. ► Simulation the halo current. ► Stress analysis of graphite tile by ANSYS. ► Do the experiments to test the strength of graphite tile. ► Do the optimization and maintenance of graphite tile. - Abstract: EAST, with full superconducting magnetic coils, had been designed and constructed to address the scientific and engineering issues under steady state operation. The in-vessel components are full graphite tiles as first wall had been operated successfully. In the experiment campaign of 2010, the H mode operation and 1 MA operation have been gotten on EAST. However, in some case, some of the graphite tiles of divertor region are damaged with the plasma parameter enhanced. As most of the damaged graphite tiles are in the divertor region, they are probably damaged by the electro-magnetic force of the halo current when the VDEs occur. The force of the halo current is re-estimated. The structure analysis has been done by the ANSYS software. From the analysis result. It can be obtained that the stress is larger than the allowable stress when the halo current on the graphite tile is larger than 2.7 kA. The tensile testing of the graphite also has been done. As the result, the graphite tiles are damaged when the forces are up to 2400 N. To deal with the problem, two proposes are accepted. In the one hand, the new type graphite material is used, whose tensile strength is up to 45 MPa. In the other hand, the structure of the graphite tiles is optimized.

  3. Structural and functional social network attributes moderate the association of self-rated health with mental health in midlife and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Tim D; Rioseco, Pilar; Fiori, Katherine L; Curtis, Rachel G; Booth, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Social relationships are multifaceted, and different social network components can operate via different processes to influence well-being. This study examined associations of social network structure and relationship quality (positive and negative social exchanges) with mental health in midlife and older adults. The focus was on both direct associations of network structure and relationship quality with mental health, and whether these social network attributes moderated the association of self-rated health (SRH) with mental health. Analyses were based on survey data provided by 2001 (Mean age = 65, SD = 8.07) midlife and older adults. We used Latent Class Analysis (LCA) to classify participants into network types based on network structure (partner status, network size, contact frequency, and activity engagement), and used continuous measures of positive and negative social exchanges to operationalize relationship quality. Regression analysis was used to test moderation. LCA revealed network types generally consistent with those reported in previous studies. Participants in more diverse networks reported better mental health than those categorized into a restricted network type after adjustment for age, sex, education, and employment status. Analysis of moderation indicated that those with poorer SRH were less likely to report poorer mental health if they were classified into more diverse networks. A similar moderation effect was also evident for positive exchanges. The findings suggest that both quantity and quality of social relationships can play a role in buffering against the negative implications of physical health decline for mental health.

  4. Characteristics of Pyrolytic Graphite as a Neutron Monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; El-Mesiry, M.S.; Fathallah, M.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolytic graphite (PG) has become nearly indispensable in neutron spectroscopy. Since the integrated reflectivity of the monochromatic neutrons from PG crystals cut along its c-axis is high within a wavelength band from 0.1 nm up to .65 nm. The monochromatic features of PG crystal is detailed in terms of the optimum mosaic spread, crystal thickness and reactor moderating temperature for efficient integrated neutron reflectivity within the wavelength band. A computer code Mono-PG has been developed to carry out the required calculations for the PG hexagonal close-packed structure. Calculation shows that, 2 mm thick of PG crystal having 0.30 FWHM on mosaic spread are the optimum parameters of PG crystal as a monochromator at selected neutron wavelength shorter than 2 nm. However, the integrated neutron intensity of 2nd and 3rd orders from thermal reactor flux is even higher than that of the 1st order one at neutron wavelengths longer than 2 nm. While, from cold reactor flux, integrated neutron intensity of the 1st order within the wavelength band from 0.25 up to 0.5 nm is higher than the 2nd and 3rd ones

  5. Absorption spectra of AA-stacked graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C W; Lee, S H; Chen, S C; Lin, M F; Shyu, F L

    2010-01-01

    AA-stacked graphite shows strong anisotropy in geometric structures and velocity matrix elements. However, the absorption spectra are isotropic for the polarization vector on the graphene plane. The spectra exhibit one prominent plateau at middle energy and one shoulder structure at lower energy. These structures directly reflect the unique geometric and band structures and provide sufficient information for experimental fitting of the intralayer and interlayer atomic interactions. On the other hand, monolayer graphene shows a sharp absorption peak but no shoulder structure; AA-stacked bilayer graphene has two absorption peaks at middle energy and abruptly vanishes at lower energy. Furthermore, the isotropic features are expected to exist in other graphene-related systems. The calculated results and the predicted atomic interactions could be verified by optical measurements.

  6. Ethical Leadership, Leader-Member Exchange and Feedback Seeking: A Double-Moderated Mediation Model of Emotional Intelligence and Work-Unit Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing; Wang, Bin; Han, Zhuo; Song, Baihe

    2017-01-01

    This research elucidates the role of ethical leadership in employee feedback seeking by examining how and when ethical leadership may exert a positive influence on feedback seeking. Using matched reports from 64 supervisors and 265 of their immediate employees from a hotel group located in a major city in China, we proposed and tested a moderated mediation model that examines leader-member exchange (LMX) as the mediator and emotional intelligence as well as work-unit structure as double moderators in the relationships between ethical leadership and followers’ feedback-seeking behavior from supervisors and coworkers. Our findings indicated that (1) LMX mediated the positive relationship between ethical leadership and feedback seeking from both ethical leaders and coworkers, and (2) emotional intelligence and work-unit structure served as joint moderators on the mediated positive relationship in such a way that the relationship was strongest when the emotional intelligence was high and work-unit structure was more of an organic structure rather than a mechanistic structure. PMID:28744251

  7. The influence of affective and cognitive arguments on message judgement and attitude change: The moderating effects of meta-bases and structural bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keer, Mario; van den Putte, Bas; Neijens, Peter; de Wit, John

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether the efficacy of affective vs. cognitive persuasive messages was moderated by (1) individuals' subjective assessments of whether their attitudes were based on affect or cognition (i.e. meta-bases) and (2) the degree individuals' attitudes were correlated with affect and cognition (i.e. structural bases). Participants (N = 97) were randomly exposed to a message containing either affective or cognitive arguments discouraging binge drinking. The results demonstrated that meta-bases and not structural bases moderated the influence of argument type on message judgement. Affective (cognitive) messages were judged more positively when individuals' meta-bases were more affective (cognitive). In contrast, structural bases and not meta-bases moderated the influence of argument type on attitude and intention change following exposure to the message. Surprisingly, change was greater among individuals who read a message that mismatched their structural attitude base. Affective messages were more effective as attitudes were more cognition-based, and vice versa. Thus, although individuals prefer messages that match their meta-base, attitude and intention change regarding binge drinking are best established by mismatching their structural base.

  8. Direct conversion of graphite into diamond through electronic excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, H

    2003-01-01

    An ab initio total energy calculation has been performed for electronic excited states in diamond and rhombohedral graphite by the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA). First, calculations for the core-excited state in diamond have been performed to show that the ab initio calculations based on the LDA describe the wavefunctions in the electronic excited states as well as in the ground state quite well. Fairly good coincidence with both experimental data and theoretical prediction has been obtained for the lattice relaxation of the core exciton state. The results of the core exciton state are compared with nitrogen-doped diamond. Next, the structural stability of rhombohedral graphite has been investigated to examine the possibility of the transition into the diamond structure through electronic excited states. While maintaining the rhombohedral symmetry, rhombohedral graphite can be spontaneously transformed to cubic diamond. Tota...

  9. The moderating effects of sample type as evidence of the effects of faking on personality scale correlations and factor structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEVIN M. BRADLEY

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivational differences as a function of sample type (applicants versus incumbents have frequently been suspected of causing meaningful differences in the psychometric properties of personality inventories due to the effects of faking. In this quantitative review, correlations among the Big Five personality constructs were estimated and sample type was examined as a potential moderator of the personality construct inter-correlations. The resulting subgroup meta-analytic correlation matrices were factor-analyzed, and the second order factor solutions for job incumbents and job applicants were compared. Results of the meta-analyses indicate frequent, but small moderating effects. The second order factor analyses indicated that the observed moderation had little effect on the congruence of factor loadings. Together, the results are consistent with the position that faking is of little practical consequence in selection settings.

  10. Development of Nanoscale Graphitic Devices and The Transport Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, Venugopal

    2011-02-01

    This dissertation describes the development of graphitic based nanoscale devices with its fabrication and transport characterization results. It covers graphite nano-scale stacked-junctions fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) 3-D etching technique, a single layer graphite layer (graphene) preparation and its electrical transport characterization results and the synthesis and investigation of electrical transport behavior of graphene oxide based thin film devices. The first chapter describes the basic information about the carbon family in detail in which the electronic properties and structure of graphite, graphene and graphene oxide are discussed. In addition, the necessity of developing nanoscale graphitic devices is given. The second chapter explains the experimental techniques used in this research for fabricating nanoscale devices which includes focused ion beam 3-D fabrication procedures, mechanical exfoliation technique and photolithographic methods. In third chapter, we have reported the results on temperature dependence of graphite planar-type structures fabricated along ab-plane. In the fourth and fifth chapters, the fabrication and electrical transport characteristics of large in-plane area graphite planar-type structures (fabricated along ab-plane and c-axis) were discussed and their transport anisotropy properties were investigated briefly. In the sixth chapter, we focused the fabrication of the submicron sized graphite stacked junctions and their electrical transport characterization studies. In which, FIB was used to fabricated the submicron junctions with various in-plane area (with same stack height) are and their transport characteristics were compared. The seventh chapter reports investigation of electrical transport results of nanoscale graphite stacked-junctions in which the temperature dependent transport (R-T) studies, current-voltage measurements for the various in-plane areas and for various stack height samples were analyzed. The

  11. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  12. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  13. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  14. Preparation of graphite intercalation compounds containing oligo and polyethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyang; Lerner, Michael M.

    2016-02-01

    Layered host-polymer nanocomposites comprising polymeric guests between inorganic sheets have been prepared with many inorganic hosts, but there is limited evidence for the incorporation of polymeric guests into graphite. Here we report for the first time the preparation, and structural and compositional characterization of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) containing polyether bilayers. The new GICs are obtained by either (1) reductive intercalation of graphite with an alkali metal in the presence of an oligo or polyether and an electrocatalyst, or (2) co-intercalate exchange of an amine for an oligo or polyether in a donor-type GIC. Structural characterization of products using powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal analyses supports the formation of well-ordered, first-stage GICs containing alkali metal cations and oligo or polyether bilayers between reduced graphene sheets.Layered host-polymer nanocomposites comprising polymeric guests between inorganic sheets have been prepared with many inorganic hosts, but there is limited evidence for the incorporation of polymeric guests into graphite. Here we report for the first time the preparation, and structural and compositional characterization of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) containing polyether bilayers. The new GICs are obtained by either (1) reductive intercalation of graphite with an alkali metal in the presence of an oligo or polyether and an electrocatalyst, or (2) co-intercalate exchange of an amine for an oligo or polyether in a donor-type GIC. Structural characterization of products using powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal analyses supports the formation of well-ordered, first-stage GICs containing alkali metal cations and oligo or polyether bilayers between reduced graphene sheets. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Domain size, additional Raman spectra info, compositional calculation, and packing fractions. See DOI: 10.1039/c5

  15. Effects of different types of moderate severity disturbance on forest structural complexity and ecosystem functioning: A story of ice and fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, R. T.; Atkins, J.; Gough, C. M.; Hardiman, B. S.; Haber, L.; Stuart-Haentjens, E.; David, O.; Campbell, J. L.; Rustad, L.; Duffy, M.

    2017-12-01

    Disturbances that alter the structure and function of forest ecosystems occur along a continuum of severity. In contrast to the extremes of the disturbance gradient (i.e., stand-replacing disturbance and small gap formation), moderate severity disturbances are poorly understood, even though they make up the majority of the gradient and their spatial extent (and likely overall importance to regional disturbance regimes) often exceeds that of more severe disturbances. Moderate severity disturbances originate from a variety of causes, such as fires, ice storms, or pest and pathogen outbreaks, and each of these could reshape structure and function in different ways. Observational data from a limited number of sites shows that moderate disturbance can increase ecosystem complexity, but the generality of this effect has not been tested across a broad range of disturbance types and severities. Here, we utilize data from a set of five case studies of experimental or natural moderate disturbance to assess the effects of different types and severities of disturbance on forest canopy structural complexity (CSC) and the relationship of canopy structure with ecosystem functioning. Using pre- and post-disturbance measures of CSC derived from aerial and terrestrial LiDAR, UAV imagery, and Landsat data we quantified changes in CSC following an experimental ice storm, a low-severity surface fire, Beech Bark Disease and Hemlock Wooly Adelgid outbreaks, and experimental accelerated succession. Our initial findings indicate that different disturbance types have highly variable effects on CSC, and also that progressive increases in disturbance severity alter CSC differently among disturbance types. Differential effects of variable disturbance types on CSC has implications for the carbon cycle, as forest structure is strongly linked with both growth-limiting resource (e.g., nutrients and light) acquisition and net primary productivity. Understanding how different types and severities of

  16. THE EFFECT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE MECHANISM, OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE, AND EXTERNAL AUDITOR TOWARD CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY DISCLOSURE WITH EARNING MANAGEMENT AS MODERATING VARIABLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwana M.A.J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effect of earning management on corporate governance mechanism, ownership structure, and external auditor toward corporate social responsibility disclosure. This study finds that the increase of ownership structure (foreign ownership and institutional ownership will increase corporate social responsibility disclosure. However corporate governance mechanism and external auditor is not affecting corporate social responsibility disclosure. Furthermore, this study provides additional empirical evidence for agency theory especially agency cost, that corporate governance mechanism, ownership structure, and Big Four audit firm do not have an effective role as agency cost to prevent or decrease earning management practice.

  17. Study of hot corrosion of flakes of non purified graphite and of purified graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boule, Michel

    1967-01-01

    The author reports the study of hot corrosion of the Ticonderoga graphite. He reports the study of the defects of graphite flakes (structure defects due to impurities), the dosing of these impurities, and then their removal by purification. Flakes have then been oxidised by means of a specially designed apparatus. Based on photographs taken by optical and electronic microscopy, the author compares the oxidation features obtained in dry air and in humid air, between purified and non purified flakes. He also reports the study of the evolution of oxidation with respect to the initial rate of impurities, and the study of the evolution of oxidation features in humid air during oxidation. All these comparisons are made while taking the oxidation rate into account [fr

  18. Oxidation kinetics of innovative carbon materials with respect to severe air ingress accidents in HTRs and graphite disposal or processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloegel, Baerbel

    2010-01-01

    Currently future nuclear reactor concepts of the Fourth Generation (Gen IV) are under development. To some extend they apply with new, innovative materials developed just for this purpose. This thesis work aims at a concept of Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) in the framework of the European project RAPHAEL (ReActor for Process heat, Hydrogen And ELectricity generation). The concept named ANTARES (AREVA New Technology based on advanced gas-cooled Reactors for Energy Supply) was developed by AEVA NP. It is a helium cooled, graphite moderated modular reactor for electricity and hydrogen production, by providing the necessary process heat due to its high working temperature. Particular attention is given here to oxidation kinetics of newly developed carbon materials (NBG-17) with still unknown but needed information in context of severe air ingress accident in VHTR's. Special interest is paid to the Boudouard reaction, the oxidation of carbon by CO 2 . In case of an air ingress accident, carbon dioxide is produced in the primary reaction of atmospheric oxygen with reflector graphite. From there CO 2 could flow into the reactor core causing further damage by conversion into CO. The purpose of this thesis is to ascertain if and to what degree this could happen. First of all oxidation kinetic data of the Boudouard reaction with NBG-17 is determined by experiments in a thermo gravimetric facility. The measurements are evaluated and converted into a common formula and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood similar oxidation kinetic equation, as input for the computer code REACT/THERMIX. This code is then applied to analyse severe air ingress accidents for several air flow rates. The results are discussed for two accident situations, in which a certain graphite burn off is achieved. All cases show much more damage to the graphite bottom reflector than to the reactor core. Thus the bottom reflector will lose its structural integrity much earlier than the core itself will

  19. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  20. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  1. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  2. Solid state {sup 13}C NMR study on the synthesis of graphite oxide from different graphitic precursors; Estudo atravéS de RMN de {sup 13}C no estado sólido sobre a síntese de oxido de grafite utilizando diferentes precursores grafíticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Mariana A.; Frasson, Carolina Maria R.; Costa, Tainara Luiza G.; Cipriano, Daniel F.; Schettino Junior, Miguel A.; Cunha, Alfredo G.; Freitas, Jair C.C., E-mail: marianaarpini@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Carbonosos e Cerâmicos

    2017-10-15

    The influence of the structural and microstructural characteristics of graphitic precursors on the production of graphite oxide (GO) is investigated in the present work. Six different graphitic precursors were used to produce GO following a modified Hummers method, namely: natural graphite, commercial lubricant graphite, milled graphite, graphite flakes, high-purity graphite and graphite recycled from Li-ion batteries. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry, solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). {sup 13}C NMR spectra revealed the presence of epoxy, hydroxyl, carbonyl and lactol groups in the synthesized GOs. However, the oxidation degree of each product was found to be dependent on the average crystallite size (Lc) and particle size of the graphitic precursors, with the best GO samples being produced from the milled graphite and the graphite recycled from ion-Li batteries. These results were rationalized in terms of the structural and microstructural differences among the graphitic precursors, as revealed by the XRD patterns and SEM images, evidencing the importance of the correct choice of the precursor aiming the achievement of a well-developed structure for the GO product. (author)

  3. Graphite and boron carbide composites made by hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Hagio, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Composites consisting of graphite and boron carbide were made by hot-pressing mixed powders of coke carbon and boron carbide. The change of relative density, mechanical strength and electrical resistivity of the composites and the X-ray parameters of coke carbon were investigated with increase of boron carbide content and hot-pressing temperature. From these experiments, it was found that boron carbide powder has a remarkable effect on sintering and graphitization of coke carbon powder above the hot-pressing temperature of 2000 0 C. At 2200 0 C, electrical resistivity of the composite and d(002) spacing of coke carbon once showed minimum values at about 5 to 10 wt% boron carbide and then increased. The strength of the composite increased with increase of boron carbide content. It was considered that some boron from boron carbide began to diffuse substitutionally into the graphite structure above 2000 0 C and densification and graphitization were promoted with the diffusion of boron. Improvements could be made to the mechanical strength, density, oxidation resistance and manufacturing methods by comparing with the properties and processes of conventional graphites. (author)

  4. Levels of Management Commitment: a Moderator the Structural Relationships Among Critical Success Factors of TQM, World-Class Performance in Operations, and Company Financial Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Slamet Ciptono, Wakhid

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the moderating impacts of the three levels of management commitment (top, middle, and low levels) on the structural relationships among the constructs— six critical success factors of TQM (quality improvement program, supervisory leadership, supplier involvement, management commitment, training to improve products/services, cross-functional relationships); world-class performance in operations (world-class company practices, operational excellence practices, company no...

  5. Structural and thermodynamic study of the system Th-C-N in the presence of excess graphite; the existence of a new hexagonal phase β 'ThCN' stable at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pialoux, A.

    1980-01-01

    The progressive reaction of nitrogen on the 'dicarbide' of thorium in the presence of excess graphite has been studied using X-ray diffractometry at high temperature (T 0 C) under controlled pressure (10 -3 0 C using measurements of crystalline parameters, equilibrium pressures and free enthalpies of standard formation of the various carbonitrides and nitrides observed. It is notably shown that the 'dicarbide' in stable at psub(N2)'s considerably weaker than those stated by Benz and Froxel, the nitrogen content of the γ Th C 2 ' cubic phase increasing furthermore with temperature. The new β 'ThCN' phase which does not quench crystallizes in the hexagonal system and in reattatched to the group space with P31 m, the various contractions of tis crystalline parameter Csub(β) is interpreted as a closing of the double bond of the C 2 pairs in this structure. The temperature of 1125 0 C is attributed to the new polymorphic transformation: β 'ThCN' hexagonal reversible α 'ThCN' monoclinic which appear to be of the martensitic type, the crystalline parameters of α'ThCN' being furthermore measured from 20 to 1125 0 C. (orig.)

  6. Temperature annealing of tracks induced by ion irradiation of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Yao, H.J.; Sun, Y.M.; Duan, J.L.; Hou, M.D.; Mo, D.; Wang, Z.G.; Jin, Y.F.; Abe, H.; Li, Z.C.; Sekimura, N.

    2006-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were irradiated by Xe ions of initial kinetic energy of 3 MeV/u. The irradiations were performed at temperatures of 500 and 800 K. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images show that the tracks occasionally have elongated structures under high-temperature irradiation. The track creation yield at 800 K is by three orders of magnitude smaller compared to that obtained during room-temperature irradiation. STM and Raman spectra show that amorphization occurs in graphite samples irradiated at 500 K to higher fluences, but not at 800 K. The obtained experimental results clearly reveal that the irradiation under high temperature causes track annealing

  7. Graphite to Inconel brazing using active filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; Baity, F.W.; Walls, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas are designed to supply large amounts of auxiliary heating power to fusion-grade plasmas in the Toroidal Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and Tore Supra fusion energy experiments. A single Faraday shield structure protects a pair of resonant double loops which are designed to launch up to 2 MW of power per loop. The shield consists of two tiers of actively cooled Inconel alloy tubes with the front tier being covered with semicircular graphite tiles. Successful operation of the antenna requires the making of high integrity bonds between the Inconel tubes and graphite tiles by brazing. This paper discusses this process

  8. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  9. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  10. Seismic capacity of a reinforced concrete frame structure without seismic detailing and limited ductility seismic design in moderate seismicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. K.; Kim, I. H.

    1999-01-01

    A four-story reinforced concrete frame building model is designed for the gravity loads only. Static nonlinear pushover analyses are performed in two orthogonal horizontal directions. The overall capacity curves are converted into ADRS spectra and compared with demand spectra. At several points the deformed shape, moment and shear distribution are calculated. Based on these results limited ductility seismic design concept is proposed as an alternative seismic design approach in moderate seismicity resign

  11. Transport of fission products in matrix and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, E.

    1983-06-01

    In the past years new experimental methods were applied to or developed for the investigation of fission product transport in graphitic materials and to characterization of the materials. Models for fission product transport and computer codes for the calculation of core release rates were improved. Many data became available from analysis of concentration profiles in HTR-fuel elements. New work on the effect on diffusion of graphite corrosion, fast neutron flux and fluence, heat treatment, chemical interactions and helium pressure was reported on recently or was in progress in several laboratories. It seemed to be the right time to discuss the status of transport of metallic fission products in general, and in particular the relationship between structural and transport properties. Following a suggestion a Colloquium was organized at the HMI Berlin. Interdisciplinary discussions were stimulated by only inviting a limited number of participants who work in different fields of graphite and fission product transport research. (orig./RW)

  12. Fabrication of graphene device from graphite intercalation compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Ryuta; Kobara, Hiroaki; Shimomura, Midori; Tahara, Fumiya; Fukada, Seiya

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical exfoliation of graphite is possibly the simplest and practical method in laboratories to obtain graphene flakes for scientific research. However efficiency for obtaining graphene, with desired layer-number and size, depends largely on crystal specific characters, eg., dislocations. To improve the issue, we have adopted graphite intercalation compound (GIC) instead of graphite for a starting material. Generally, GIC is chemically active. We used SbCl5- GIC, which is stable in the atmosphere. Stage structure of SbCl5-GIC could be tuned by temperature of intercalation. We found that considerable number of undoped graphene flakes coexisted with thin SbCl5-GIC flakes, on a substrate where flakes were transferred.?Statistical inspection of number of graphene layer indicated that it is significantly dependent on the stage number of GIC.

  13. Rapid analysis method for the determination of 14C specific activity in irradiated graphite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidmantas Remeikis

    Full Text Available 14C is one of the limiting radionuclides used in the categorization of radioactive graphite waste; this categorization is crucial in selecting the appropriate graphite treatment/disposal method. We propose a rapid analysis method for 14C specific activity determination in small graphite samples in the 1-100 μg range. The method applies an oxidation procedure to the sample, which extracts 14C from the different carbonaceous matrices in a controlled manner. Because this method enables fast online measurement and 14C specific activity evaluation, it can be especially useful for characterizing 14C in irradiated graphite when dismantling graphite moderator and reflector parts, or when sorting radioactive graphite waste from decommissioned nuclear power plants. The proposed rapid method is based on graphite combustion and the subsequent measurement of both CO2 and 14C, using a commercial elemental analyser and the semiconductor detector, respectively. The method was verified using the liquid scintillation counting (LSC technique. The uncertainty of this rapid method is within the acceptable range for radioactive waste characterization purposes. The 14C specific activity determination procedure proposed in this study takes approximately ten minutes, comparing favorably to the more complicated and time consuming LSC method. This method can be potentially used to radiologically characterize radioactive waste or used in biomedical applications when dealing with the specific activity determination of 14C in the sample.

  14. Rapid analysis method for the determination of 14C specific activity in irradiated graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remeikis, Vidmantas; Lagzdina, Elena; Garbaras, Andrius; Gudelis, Arūnas; Garankin, Jevgenij; Plukienė, Rita; Juodis, Laurynas; Duškesas, Grigorijus; Lingis, Danielius; Abdulajev, Vladimir; Plukis, Artūras

    2018-01-01

    14C is one of the limiting radionuclides used in the categorization of radioactive graphite waste; this categorization is crucial in selecting the appropriate graphite treatment/disposal method. We propose a rapid analysis method for 14C specific activity determination in small graphite samples in the 1-100 μg range. The method applies an oxidation procedure to the sample, which extracts 14C from the different carbonaceous matrices in a controlled manner. Because this method enables fast online measurement and 14C specific activity evaluation, it can be especially useful for characterizing 14C in irradiated graphite when dismantling graphite moderator and reflector parts, or when sorting radioactive graphite waste from decommissioned nuclear power plants. The proposed rapid method is based on graphite combustion and the subsequent measurement of both CO2 and 14C, using a commercial elemental analyser and the semiconductor detector, respectively. The method was verified using the liquid scintillation counting (LSC) technique. The uncertainty of this rapid method is within the acceptable range for radioactive waste characterization purposes. The 14C specific activity determination procedure proposed in this study takes approximately ten minutes, comparing favorably to the more complicated and time consuming LSC method. This method can be potentially used to radiologically characterize radioactive waste or used in biomedical applications when dealing with the specific activity determination of 14C in the sample.

  15. ICP-MS determination of boron: method optimization during preparation of graphite reference material for boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granthali, S.K.; Shailaja, P.P.; Mainsha, V.; Venkatesh, K.; Kallola, K.S.; Sanjukta, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    Graphite finds widespread use in nuclear reactors as moderator, reflector, and fuel fabricating components because of its thermal stability and integrity. The manufacturing process consists of various mixing, moulding and baking operations followed by heat-treatment between 2500 °C and 3000 °C. The high temperature treatment is required to drive the amorphous carbon-to-graphite phase transformation. Since synthetic graphite is processed at high temperature, impurity concentrations in the precursor carbon get significantly reduced due to volatilization. However boron may might partly gets converted into boron carbide at high temperatures in the carbon environment of graphite and remains stable (B_4C: boiling point 3500 °C) in the matrix. Literature survey reveals the use of various methods for determination of boron. Previously we have developed a method for determination of boron in graphite electrodes using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method involves removal of graphite matrix by ignition of the sample at 800°C in presence of saturated barium hydroxide solution to prevent the loss of boron. Here we are reporting a modification in the method by using calcium carbonate in place of barium hydroxide and using beryllium (Be) as an internal standard, which resulted in a better precession. The method was validated by spike recovery experiments as well as using another technique viz. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The modified method was applied in evaluation of boron concentration in the graphite reference material prepared

  16. High-temperature properties of commercial pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzel, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    Pyrolytic graphite is produced commercially as free-standing massive structures of continuously-nucleated and surface-nucleated varieties. Both are used for rocket nozzle components. The major design-significant thermal and mechanical properties of both material types are presented as a function of temperature up to 3000 K. They are compared with each other and with previous data. (author)

  17. Cluster Deposition and Implantation on/in Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    is chosen for surface experiments because it is a good model material; it has an atomically smooth surface that makes it easy to resolve very small deposited clusters or damaged areas. Layered structure of graphite with strong covalent bonds in the graphene sheets and very week van der Waals interactions...

  18. Recent work on graphite corrosion in dragon HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, V.J.; Parsons, P.D.; Lind, R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent studies are described of graphite corrosion in the Dragon reactor as a consequence of a programme of moisture additions to the helium coolant. The pattern of oxidation was significantly different from that expected from out-of-pile studies. Explanations are suggested in terms of flow and pore structure effects. (orig.) [de

  19. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Under certain conditions, pyrolysis of ruthenocene gives rise to graphite coated ruthenium nanoparticles as well as worm-like carbon structures. Pyrolysis of mixtures of ruthenocene and ferrocene gives rise to nanoparticles or nanorods of FeRu alloys, the composition depending upon the composition of the original mixture.

  20. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: → Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. → The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. → A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. → The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  1. Study on paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhengguo; Fang Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    A paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material was prepared by absorbing the paraffin into an expanded graphite that has an excellent absorbability. In such a composite, the paraffin serves as a latent heat storage material and the expanded graphite acts as the supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin from its porous structure due to the capillary and surface tension forces. The inherent structure of the expanded graphite did not change in the composite material. The solid-liquid phase change temperature of the composite PCM was the same as that of the paraffin, and the latent heat of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite material was equivalent to the calculated value based on the mass ratio of the paraffin in the composite. The heat transfer rate of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite was obviously higher than that of the paraffin due to the combination with the expanded graphite that had a high thermal conductivity. The prepared paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change material had a large thermal storage capacity and improved thermal conductivity and did not experience liquid leakage during its solid-liquid phase change

  2. Structure and phase transitions of monolayers of intermediate-length n-alkanes on graphite studied by neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diama, A.; Matthies, B.; Herwig, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    measurements indicate that the two monolayer films differ principally in the transition temperatures between phases. At the lowest temperatures, both C24 and C32 form a crystalline monolayer phase with a rectangular-centered (RC) structure. The two sublattices of the RC structure each consists of parallel rows...... show evidence of broadening of the lamella boundaries as a result of molecules diffusing parallel to their long axis. At still higher temperatures, they indicate that the introduction of gauche defects into the alkane chains drives a melting transition to a monolayer fluid phase as reported previously...

  3. Depleted Hydrocarbon Reservoirs Present a Safe and Practical Burial Solution for Graphite Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution for graphite waste is proposed that combines reliance on thick impermeable host rock that is needed to confine the long-life radioactivity content of most irradiated graphite with low capitalistic and operational unit volume costs that are required to render this bulky waste form manageable. The solution, uniquely applicable to irradiated graphite due to its low dose rates, moderate mechanical strength and light density, consists in three steps: first, graphite is fine-crushed under water; second, it is made in an aqueous suspension; third, the suspension is injected into a deep, disused hydrocarbon reservoir. Each of these steps only involves well mastered techniques. Regulatory changes that may allow this solution to be added to the gamut of available waste routes, geochemical issues, availability of depleted reservoirs and cost projections are presented. (author)

  4. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  5. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  6. Moderate Bravery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to act in a purposeful and effective way amid institutional tensions and paradoxes is, right now, a highly prized quality in public leadership. The purpose of this chapter is to qualify moderately brave acts as a learning format that combines the analytical and performative...

  7. The Moderating Role of Corporate Governance on the Relationship between Capital Structure and Financial Performance: Evidence from Manufacturing Sector of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Iqbal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The key purpose of this research paper is to explore the moderating effect of Corporate Governance on the relationship between accounting base financial performance i.e. ROA, and ROE and Capital Structure of 173 Manufacturing firms listed in KSE of Pakistan for the period of 2009 to 2014. In this study multiple regression method is used under fixed effect regression model approach on panel data. The empirical results show that the inclusion of Corporate Governance Index (CGI as moderating variable has influenced the interaction between Capital Structure and Financial Performance which was positively significant. The result is generally found that the most of Pakistani manufacturing listed firms pursue good corporate governance mechanism and use good and optimal level of Capital Mix to get the better and high financial performance. Furthermore, the corporate governance sub-indices i.e. board structure (BOD-I and transparency & disclosure (DISC-III both also have positive and statistically significant association with both firms performance variables: ROA and ROE. Moreover, the ownership structure sub-index (OWS-II has not significant influence on financial performance. In last, the capital structure also has positive relationship with financial performance, interestingly about 70 per cent of Capital is financed by Equity capital and the Debt capital signifies 30 per cent only. The core significance of this paper is to investigate the impact of Corporate Governance practices on financial decisions from the Pakistani perspective.

  8. Diffusion of graphite. The effect of cylindrical canals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.; Clouet d'Orval, C.; Martelly, J.; Mazancourt, T. de; Sagot, M.; Lattes, R.; Teste du Bailler, A.

    1957-01-01

    Experiments on thermal neutron diffusion in the graphite used as moderator in the pile G1 have been carried out. The object of these experiments is to determine: - the intrinsic quality of this graphite, characterised by its diffusion length L or its Laplacian 1/L 2 - the effect of the canals, which modifies anisotropically the macroscopic diffusion equation and is characterized by two principal diffusion regions (or two principal Laplacian), valid respectively for the diffusion in the direction of the canals and in a perpendicular direction. In order to determine them two experiments are necessary, in which the second derivatives of the flux in relation to the space coordinates are very different. These experiments form the object of the first two parts. Part 1: Diffusion along the axis of a flux coming from the pile source, and limited radially by a quasi cylindrical screen of cadmium bars. This screen, or Faraday cage is designed to give to the thermal flux produced the same radius of extrapolation to zero as that of the pile source. The determination of L (with the graphite full) has been made under the same conditions. The measurements have been interpreted in two ways. The influence of the brackets holding the detectors is discussed. Part 2: Radial diffusion in the graphite surrounding the 'long' cylindrical pile. This is well described by a sum of Bessel functions. Part 3: Results (valid for d = 1.61 t = 17 deg. C). For the graphite without cavity L = 52.7 ± 0.4 cm. The effect of the canals on the diffusion area and its anisotropy are in excellent agreement with the theory of Behrens: L(parallel) = 64.6 cm and L(perpendicular) 62.2 cm. Appendix: Theory of the Faraday cage. (author) [fr

  9. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  10. A small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure of graphitized carbon black aggregates in Triton X-100/water solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garamus, V.M.; Pedersen, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    concentration to a lower value. The CB aggregates have a fractal structure and the apparent fractal dimension is lower near the match point (75% heavy water). The scattering data are modelled using fractal-like aggregates (CB+surfactant), and voids in the CB particles and micelles. The data are fitted...... simultaneously for three different contrasts. The fractal dimension is found to be larger than 3 with the maximum size of the fractal aggregate being around 150-200 Angstrom. The primary CB particles have a broad size distribution with an average size of about 30-80 Angstrom. The surfactant coverage of the CB...... particles is 8% and is constant with varying CB and surfactant concentration. The volume fraction of the voids does not exceed 1% of the CB; The micelle structure is found to be the same as in surfactant/water solutions. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V....

  11. Interaction of moderate UV-B exposure and temperature on the formation of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugart, Susanne; Fiol, Michaela; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Zrenner, Rita; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2014-05-07

    Kale has a high number of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. In this study we investigated the interaction of moderate UV-B radiation and temperature on these compounds. Kale plants were grown at daily mean temperatures of 5 or 15 °C and were exposed to five subsequent daily doses (each 0.25 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) of moderate UV-B radiation at 1 d intervals. Of 20 phenolic compounds, 11 were influenced by an interaction of UV-B radiation and temperature, e.g., monoacylated quercetin glycosides. Concomitantly, enhanced mRNA expression of flavonol 3'- hydroxylase showed an interaction of UV-B and temperature, highest at 0.75 kJ m(-2) and 15 °C. Kaempferol glycosides responded diversely and dependent on, e.g., the hydroxycinnamic acid residue. Compounds containing a catechol structure seem to be favored in the response to UV-B. Taken together, subsequent exposure to moderate UV-B radiation is a successful tool for enhancing the flavonoid profile of plants, and temperature should be considered.

  12. High temperature resin matrix composites for aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and the outlook for graphite-polyimide composite structures are briefly outlined. Laminates, skin-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich panels, chopped fiber moldings, and structural components were fabricated with Celion/LARC-160 and Celion/PMR-15 composite materials. Interlaminar shear and flexure strength data obtained on as-fabricated specimens and specimens that were exposed for 125 hours at 589 K indicate that epoxy sized and polyimide sized Celion graphite fibers exhibit essentially the same behavior in a PMR-15 matrix composite. Analyses and tests of graphite-polyimide compression and shear panels indicate that utilization in moderately loaded applications offers the potential for achieving a 30 to 50 percent reduction in structural mass compared to conventional aluminum panels. Data on effects of moisture, temperature, thermal cycling, and shuttle fluids on mechanical properties indicate that both LARC-160 and PMR-15 are suitable matrix materials for a graphite-polyimide aft body flap. No technical road blocks to building a graphite-polyimide composite aft body flap are identified.

  13. Nanosecond formation of diamond and lonsdaleite by shock compression of graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D; Ravasio, A; Gauthier, M; Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Frydrych, S; Helfrich, J; Fletcher, L B; Schaumann, G; Nagler, B; Barbrel, B; Bachmann, B; Gamboa, E J; Göde, S; Granados, E; Gregori, G; Lee, H J; Neumayer, P; Schumaker, W; Döppner, T; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H; Roth, M

    2016-03-14

    The shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond has been of great scientific and technological interest since the discovery of microscopic diamonds in remnants of explosively driven graphite. Furthermore, shock synthesis of diamond and lonsdaleite, a speculative hexagonal carbon polymorph with unique hardness, is expected to happen during violent meteor impacts. Here, we show unprecedented in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of diamond formation on nanosecond timescales by shock compression of pyrolytic as well as polycrystalline graphite to pressures from 19 GPa up to 228 GPa. While we observe the transition to diamond starting at 50 GPa for both pyrolytic and polycrystalline graphite, we also record the direct formation of lonsdaleite above 170 GPa for pyrolytic samples only. Our experiment provides new insights into the processes of the shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond and uniquely resolves the dynamics that explain the main natural occurrence of the lonsdaleite crystal structure being close to meteor impact sites.

  14. Substitution of Acetylene Black by Using Modified Flake Graphite Applied in Activated Carbon Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Peng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flake graphite was mechanically modified at different times in N-methyl pyrrolidone under normal pressure. The results of the scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the structure of the flake graphite was modified. The crystallinity of the flake graphite, and many defects were introduced into the material. The evaluation of capacitor performance by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge tests, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was also performed. Results showed that the electrochemical performance of flake graphite was strongly enhanced, particularly when it was exfoliated for 6 h. Moreover, the electrochemical capacitive properties of activated carbon were obviously enhanced through the substitution of acetylene black by flake graphite modified for 6 h.

  15. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  16. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  17. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  18. Effect of iron and chromium on the graphitization behaviour of sulfur-containing carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyumentsev, V.A.; Belenkov, E.A.; Saunina, S.I.; Podkopaev, S.A.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    Process of transition of carbonaceous material, containing structurally incorporated sulfur, into graphite and impact of iron and chromium additions are studied. It is established that carbonaceous material, containing more than 1.5 mass % S and also 1.5 mass % Cr 2 O 3 is heterogeneous after thermal treatment at 1300-1600 deg C. It consists of large and sufficiency complete areas of coherent scattering having graphite structure and ultra-dispersed matrix. The number of graphite crystals formed in the presence of dispersed iron within this temperature range, decreases by two times [ru

  19. Resilience moderates the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical communication ability among Chinese practice nursing students: A structural equation model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghua; Liu, Yun; Li, Guopeng; Fang, Yueyan; Kang, Xiaofei; Li, Ping

    2016-11-01

    To examine the positive association between emotional intelligence and clinical