WorldWideScience

Sample records for graphite moderator pebbles

  1. Computational prediction of dust production in graphite moderated pebble bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Maziar

    The scope of the work reported here, which is the computational study of graphite wear behavior, supports the Nuclear Engineering University Programs project "Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermomechanics Issues for Design and Safety" funded by the US Department of Energy. In this work, modeling and simulating the contact mechanics, as anticipated in a PBR configuration, is carried out for the purpose of assessing the amount of dust generated during a full power operation year of a PBR. A methodology that encompasses finite element analysis (FEA) and micromechanics of wear is developed to address the issue of dust production and its quantification. Particularly, the phenomenon of wear and change of its rate with sliding length is the main focus of this dissertation. This work studies the wear properties of graphite by simulating pebble motion and interactions of a specific type of nuclear grade graphite, IG-11. This study consists of two perspectives: macroscale stress analysis and microscale analysis of wear mechanisms. The first is a set of FEA simulations considering pebble-pebble frictional contact. In these simulations, the mass of generated graphite particulates due to frictional contact is calculated by incorporating FEA results into Archard's equation, which is a linear correlation between wear mass and wear length. However, the experimental data by Johnson, University of Idaho, revealed that the wear rate of graphite decreases with sliding length. This is because the surfaces of the graphite pebbles become smoother over time, which results in a gradual decrease in wear rate. In order to address the change in wear rate, a more detailed analysis of wear mechanisms at room temperature is presented. In this microscale study, the wear behavior of graphite at the asperity level is studied by simulating the contact between asperities of facing surfaces. By introducing the effect of asperity removal on wear rate, a nonlinear

  2. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  3. Surface coating of graphite pebbles for Korean HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young-Hoon, E-mail: yunh2@dsu.ac.kr [Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on graphite pebbles for neutron reflector. • Dense and fine-grained surface morphologies of the SiC coatings were observed. • Oxidation resistance of the CVR-SiC-coated graphite pebbles was improved. - Abstract: The new concept of the recently modified Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is to adopt a graphite reflector in the form of a pebble bed. A protective SiC coating is applied to the graphite pebbles to prohibit their reaction with steam or air as well as dust generation during TBM operation. In this research, the chemical vapor reaction (CVR) method was applied to fabricate SiC-coated graphite pebbles in a silica source. Relatively dense CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on the graphite pebbles through the reduction of the graphite phase with SiO gas that was simply created from the silica source at 1850 °C (2 h). The microstructural features, XRD patterns, pore-size distribution and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite pebbles were investigated. To develop the practical process, which will be applied for mass production hereafter, a novel alternative method was applied to form the layer of SiC coating on the graphite pebbles over the silica source.

  4. Surface coating of graphite pebbles for Korean HCCR TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Yun, Young-Hoon; Park, Yi-Hyun; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on graphite pebbles for neutron reflector. • Dense and fine-grained surface morphologies of the SiC coatings were observed. • Oxidation resistance of the CVR-SiC-coated graphite pebbles was improved. - Abstract: The new concept of the recently modified Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is to adopt a graphite reflector in the form of a pebble bed. A protective SiC coating is applied to the graphite pebbles to prohibit their reaction with steam or air as well as dust generation during TBM operation. In this research, the chemical vapor reaction (CVR) method was applied to fabricate SiC-coated graphite pebbles in a silica source. Relatively dense CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on the graphite pebbles through the reduction of the graphite phase with SiO gas that was simply created from the silica source at 1850 °C (2 h). The microstructural features, XRD patterns, pore-size distribution and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite pebbles were investigated. To develop the practical process, which will be applied for mass production hereafter, a novel alternative method was applied to form the layer of SiC coating on the graphite pebbles over the silica source

  5. Effect of a Central Graphite Column on a Pebble Flow in a Pebble Bed Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Lee, W. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    A pebble bed reactor(PBR) uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. The pebble bed core is configured as cylindrical or annular depending on the reactor power. It is well known that an annular core can increase a cores' thermal power. The annular inner core zone is typically filled with movable graphite balls or a fixed graphite column. The first problem with this conventional annular core is that it is difficult to maintain a boundary between the central graphite ball zone and the outer fuel zone. The second problem is that it is expensive to replace the central fixed graphite column after several tens of years of reactor operation. In order to resolve these problems, a PBR with a central graphite column in a low core is invented. This paper presents the effect of the central graphite column on a pebble flow by using the computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-10

  6. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  7. HTR-proteus pebble bed experimental program core 4: random packing with a 1:1 moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snoj, Luka [Jozef Stefan Inst. (IJS), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor [Jozef Stefan Inst. (IJS), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koberl, Oliver [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  8. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  9. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  10. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  11. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  12. Irradiation creep performance of graphite relevant for pebble bed HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleist, G.; O'Connor, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation - induced creep in the core reflector component graphite of high temperature reactors is of primary importance to the core designer since it provides a mechanism for the relief of internal stresses arising from differential Wigner shrinkage and thermal expansion. The experimental determination of the extent of this creep for conditions relevant to the reactor is thus imperative

  13. Development and testing of nuclear graphite for the German pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, G.; Delle, W.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.; Wilhelmi, G.

    1987-01-01

    Several types of high temperature reactors have been developed in the Federal Republic of Germany. They are all based on spherical fuel elements being surrounded by graphite as reflector material. As an example, HTR-500 developed by the Hochtemperatur Reaktorbau GmbH is shown. The core consists of the top reflector, the side reflector with inner and outer parts, the bottom reflector and the core support columns. The most serious problem with respect to fast neutron radiation damage had to be solved for the materials of those parts near the pebble bed. Regarding the temperature profile in the core, the top reflector is at 300 deg C, and as cooling gas flows from the top downward, the temperature of the inner side reflector rises to about 700 deg C at the bottom. Fortunately, the highest fast neutron load accumulated during the life time of a reactor corresponds to the lowest temperature. This makes graphite components easier to survive neutron exposure without being mechanically damaged, although the maximum fast neutron fluence is as high as 4 x 10 22 /cm 2 at about 400 deg C. HTR graphite components are divided into four classes according to loading. The raw materials for nuclear graphite, the development of pitch coke nuclear graphite, the irradiation behavior of ATR-2E and ASR-IRS and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. An Analysis of Fuel Region to Region Dancoff Factor with the Random Mixture Effects of Moderator and Fuel Pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Hong Chul; Kim, Jong Kyung; Noh, Jae Man

    2009-01-01

    Dancoff factor is an entering probability of the neutron escaped from specific fuel kernel to another one without the interaction with moderators. In order to analytically evaluate Dancoff factor considering double-heterogeneous effect, inter-pebble and intra-pebble Dancoff factors should be calculated, respectively. Intra-pebble Dancoff factor related with the fuel kernels in one pebble was analyzed in the past study. The fuel and moderator pebbles are randomly located in the pebble-type reactor. For the evaluation of inter-pebble Dancoff factor, a repetition of simple pebble structure is commonly assumed to simulate the complex geometry of pebble-type reactor. The evaluation using these structures can be underestimated because of the shadowing effects generated from the repetition of simple pebble structure. Fuel region to region Dancoff factor (FRDF) was defined as an entering probability of the neutron escaped from a specific fuel region to another one without any collision with moderator for a preliminary evaluation of inter-pebble Dancoff factor. To solve the underestimation problem of FRDF from the shadow effect, the specific pebble was assumed and FRDF was evaluated with the approximation method proposed in this study

  15. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  16. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  17. Pebble bed pebble motion: Simulation and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This dissertation presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to

  18. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs.

  20. Calculation of reactivity of control rods in graphite moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1978-01-01

    A study about the method of calculation for the reactivity of control rods in graphite-moderated critical assemblies, is presented. The result of theoretical calculation, developed by super celles and Nordheim-Scalettar methods are compared with experimental results for the critical Assembly of General Atomic. The two methods are then applicable to reactivity calculation of the control rods of graphite moderated critical assemblies [pt

  1. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  2. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs

  3. HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program cores 9 & 10: columnar hexagonal point-on-point packing with a 1:1 moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  4. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  5. Carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated graphite for graphite-moderated reactors. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsuo, Hideto [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The graphite moderated gas cooled reactor operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company was stopped its commercial operation on March 1998, and the decommissioning process has been started. Graphite material is often used as the moderator and the reflector materials in the core of the gas cooled reactor. During the operation, a long life nuclide of {sup 14}C is generated in the graphite by several transmutation reactions. Separation of {sup 14}C isotope and the development of the separation method have been recognized to be critical issues for the decommissioning of the reactor core. To understand the current methodologies for the carbon isotope separation, literature on the subject was surveyed. Also, those on the physical and chemical behavior of {sup 14}C were surveyed. This is because the larger part of the nuclides in the graphite is produced from {sup 14}N by (n,p) reaction, and the location of them in the material tends to be different from those of the other carbon atoms. This report summarizes the result of survey on the open literature about the behavior of {sup 14}C and the separation methods, including the list of the literature on these subjects. (author)

  6. Critical experiments on enriched uranium graphite moderated cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Kurokawa, Ryosuke

    1978-07-01

    A variety of 20 % enriched uranium loaded and graphite-moderated cores consisting of the different lattice cells in a wide range of the carbon to uranium atomic ratio have been built at Semi-Homogeneous Critical Experimental Assembly (SHE) to perform the critical experiments systematically. In the present report, the experimental results for homogeneously or heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and for simulation core of the experimental reactor for a multi-purpose high temperature reactor are filed so as to be utilized for evaluating the accuracy of core design calculation for the experimental reactor. The filed experimental data are composed of critical masses of uranium, kinetic parameters, reactivity worths of the experimental control rods and power distributions in the cores with those rods. Theoretical analyses are made for the experimental data by adopting a simple ''homogenized cylindrical core model'' using the nuclear data of ENDF/B-III, which treats the neutron behaviour after smearing the lattice cell structure. It is made clear from a comparison between the measurement and the calculation that the group constants and fundamental methods of calculations, based on this theoretical model, are valid for the homogeneously fuel loaded cores, but not for both of the heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and the core for simulation of the experimental reactor. Then, it is pointed out that consideration to semi-homogeneous property of the lattice cells for reactor neutrons is essential for high temperature graphite-moderated reactors using dispersion fuel elements of graphite and uranium. (author)

  7. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-11-01

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to

  8. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2011-01-01

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to determine

  9. Graphite-moderated and heavy water-moderated spectral shift controlled reactors; Reactores de moderador solido controlados por desplazamiento espectral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala Ruiz, F

    1984-07-01

    It has been studied the physical mechanisms related with the spectral shift control method and their general positive effects on economical and non-proliferant aspects (extension of the fuel cycle length and low proliferation index). This methods has been extended to non-hydrogenous fuel cells of high moderator/fuel ratio: heavy water cells have been con- trolled by graphite rods graphite-moderated and gas-cooled cells have been controlled by berylium rods and graphite-moderated and water-cooled cells have been controlled by a changing mixture of heavy and light water. It has been carried out neutron and thermal analysis on a pre design of these types of fuel cells. We have studied its neutron optimization and their fuel cycles, temperature coefficients and proliferation indices. Finally, we have carried out a comparative analysis of the fuel cycles of conventionally controlled PWRs and graphite-moderated, water-cooled and spectral shift controlled reactors. (Author) 71 refs.

  10. Structural characteristics of a graphite moderated critical assembly for a Zero Power reactor at IEA (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Ferreira, A.C. de; Hukai, R.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The structural characteristics of a graphite moderated core of a critical assembly to be installed in the Zero Power Reactor of IEA have been defined. These characteristics are the graphite block dimensions, the number and dimensions of the holes in the graphite, the pitch, the dimensions of the sticks of fuel and graphite to be inserted in the holes, and the mechanical reproducibility of the system. The composition of the fuel and moderator sticks were also defined. The main boundary conditions were the range of the relation C/U and C/TH used in commercial HTGR and the neutronics homogeneity

  11. Calculation of the Thermal State of the Graphite Moderator of the RBMK Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobiev Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to study the temperature field of the graphite stack of the RBMK reactor. In work was analyzed the influence of contact pressure between the components of the masonry on the temperature of the graphite moderator.

  12. Researchers solve big mysteries of pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shams, Afaque; Roelofs, Ferry; Komen, E.M.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Baglietto, Emilio [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering; Sgro, Titus [CD-adapco, London (United Kingdom). Technical Marketing

    2014-03-15

    The PBR is one type of High Temperature Reactors, which allows high temperature work while preventing the fuel from melting (bringing huge safety margins to the reactor) and high electricity efficiency. The design is also highly scalable; a plant could be designed to be as large or small as needed, and can even be made mobile, allowing it to be used onboard a ship. In a PBR, small particles of nuclear fuel, embedded in a moderating graphite pebble, are dropped into the reactor as needed. At the bottom, the pebbles can be removed simply by opening a small hatch and letting gravity pull them down. To cool the reactor and create electricity, helium gas is pumped through the reactor to pull heat out which is then run through generators. One of the most difficult problems to deal with has been the possible appearance of local temperature hotspots within the pebble bed heating to the point of melting the graphite moderators surrounding the fuel. Obviously, constructing a reactor and experimenting to investigate this possibility is out of the question. Instead, nuclear engineers have been attempting to simulate a PBR with various CFD codes. The thermo-dynamic analysis to simulate realistic conditions in a pebble bed are described and the results are shown. (orig.)

  13. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  14. Assessments of the stresses and deformations in an RBMK graphite moderator brick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.J.; Davies, M.A.; Marsden, B.J.; Bougaenko, S.E.; Baldin, V.D.; Demintievski, V.N.; Rodtchenkov, B.S.; Sinitsyn, E.N.

    1996-01-01

    The RBMK reactors, designed by RDIPE (Moscow), are graphite moderated and cooled by light water. Graphite dimensions and thermo-mechanical properties change significantly in a complex manner during reactor life due to fast neutron damage and these changes have implications on the safe operation of all graphite moderated reactors. A joint programme of work is being carried out between AEA Technology (UK) and RDIPE (Russia) to assess the life of the RBMK graphite stack under normal operating conditions. The programme has included the modelling of graphite dimensional changes due to irradiation through reactor life and the assessment of the implications of these changes on the stresses and deformations in the graphite stack. Calculations have been carried out to assess the deformations of a moderator brick over a period from start of life up to 30 years of operation. The assessment have also included an analysis of the stresses in the bricks so that the time to brick failure could be determined. This paper describes the RBMK core design, the data and assessment methodology used in the analysis of the RBMK core and presents some results from analyses of the Leningrad Unit 1 RBMK reactor. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  15. HTR-Proteus Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 5,6,7,&8: Columnar Hexagonal Point-on-Point Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snoj, Luka [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lengar, Igor [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Koberl, Oliver [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  16. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  17. Operating windows of pebble divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhiro, K.; Isobe, M.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Nishikawa, M.

    2001-01-01

    A marked feature of the pebble divertor is an effect by use of functional multi-layer coated pebble, which consists of a surface plasma facing layer, an intermediate tritium permeation barrier layer, and a kernel for heat removal. The dimensions, structure and the irradiation conditions of pebbles are the important issues for the development of the pebble divertor. From the view point of resistance of the induced thermal stress, the pebble is taken as small as possible in size. On the other hand, from the view point of the pumping performance, the suitable irradiation temperature range of the surface layer of pebble was estimated from the experiments and the numerical analysis. The pumping process enhanced by dynamic retention is available to extend the higher allowable irradiation temperature range from 900K to 1100K. As taking the temperature rise limitation due to pumping effect and the fractural strength due to the induced thermal stress limitation, it was found that the diameter of the pebble is possible to be 1-2 mm in about 20 MW/m 2 for the SiC kernel and 2-3 mm in less than 30 MW/m 2 for the graphite kernel. (author)

  18. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  19. Thermogravimetric and Differential Scanning Calorimetric Behavior of Ball-Milled Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung Seon; Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi Hyun; Cho, Seung Yon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    An examination was made to characterize the oxidation behavior of ball-milled nuclear graphite powder through a TG-DSC analysis. With the ball milling time, the BET surface area increased with the reduction of particle size, but decreased with the chemisorptions of O{sub 2} on the activated surface. The enhancement of the oxidation after the ball milling is attributed to both increases in the specific surface area and atomic scale defects in the graphite structure. In a high temperature gas-cooled reactor, nuclear graphite has been widely used as fuel elements, moderator or reflector blocks, and core support structures owing to its excellent moderating power, mechanical properties and machinability. For the same reason, it will be used in a helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module for the ITER. Each submodule has a seven-layer breeding zone, including three neutron multiplier layers packed with beryllium pebbles, three lithium ceramic pebbles packed tritium breeder layers, and a reflector layer packed with 1 mm diameter graphite pebbles to reduce the volume of beryllium. The abrasion of graphite structures owing to relative motion or thermal cycle during operation may produce graphite dust. It is expected that graphite dust will be more oxidative than bulk graphite, and thus the oxidation behavior of graphite dust must be examined to analyze the safety of the reactors during an air ingress accident. In this study, the thermal stability of ball-milled graphite powder was investigated using a simultaneous thermogravimeter-differential scanning calorimeter.

  20. Optimization of temperature coefficient and breeding ratio for a graphite-moderated molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, C.Y.; Cai, X.Z.; Jiang, D.Z.; Yu, C.G.; Li, X.X.; Ma, Y.W.; Han, J.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, J.G., E-mail: chenjg@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The temperature feedback coefficient with different moderation ratios for TMSR in thermal neutron region is optimized. • The breeding ratio and doubling time of a thermal TMSR with three different reprocessing schemes are analyzed. • The smaller hexagon size and larger salt fraction with more negative feedback coefficient can better satisfy the safety demands. • A shorter reprocessing time can achieve a better breeding ratio in a thermal TMSR. • The graphite moderator lifespan is compared with other MSRs and discussed. - Abstract: Molten salt reactor (MSR) has fascinating features: inherent safety, no fuel fabrication, online fuel reprocessing, etc. However, the graphite moderated MSR may present positive feedback coefficient which has severe implications for the transient behavior during operation. In this paper, the feedback coefficient and the breeding ratio are optimized based on the fuel-to-graphite ratio variation for a thorium based MSR (TMSR). A certain thermal core with negative feedback coefficient and relative high initial breeding ratio is chosen for the reprocessing scheme analysis. The breeding performances for the TMSR under different online fuel reprocessing efficiencies and frequencies are evaluated and compared with other MSR concepts. The results indicate that the thermal TMSR can get a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with appropriate reprocessing scheme. The low fissile inventory in thermal TMSR leads to a short doubling time and low transuranic (TRU) inventory. The lifetime of graphite used for the TMSR is also discussed.

  1. Graphite moderator annealing of the experimental reactor for irradiation (0.5 MW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, Carlos Alberto de; Pires, Luis Fernando Goncalves

    1995-01-01

    This work describes an operational procedure for the annealing of the graphite moderator in the 0,5 MW Experimental Reactor for Irradiation. A theoretical methodology has been developed for calculating the temperature field during the annealing process. The equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation for the coolant as well as for the energy conservation in the moderator are solved numerically. The energy stored in the graphite and released in the annealing is accounted for by the use of a modified source term in the energy conservation equation for the moderator. A good agreement has been found for comparisons of the calculations with annealing data from the BEPO reactor. The major parameters affecting annealing have also been determined. (author). 8 refs, 11 figs

  2. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  3. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-01-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production

  4. Criticality calculations for a critical assembly, graphite moderate, using 20% enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Ferreira, A.C. de; Hukai, R.Y.

    1975-01-01

    The construction of a Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) at the Instituto de Energia Atomica in order to measure the neutron characteristics (parameters) of HTGR reactors is proposed. The necessary quantity fissile uranium for these measurements has been calculed. Criticality studies of graphite moderated critical assemblies containing thorium have been made and the critical mass of each of several typical commercial HTGR compositions has been calculated using computer codes HAMMER and CITATION. Assemblies investigated contained a central cylindrical core region, simulating a typical commercial HTGR composition, a uranium-graphite driver region and a outer pure graphite reflector region. It is concluded that a 10Kg inventory of fissile uranium will be required for a program of measurements utilizing each of the several calculated assemblies

  5. A core-monitoring based methodology for predictions of graphite weight loss in AGR moderator bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, K., E-mail: kevin.mcnally@hsl.gsi.gov.uk [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Warren, N. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Fahad, M.; Hall, G.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A statistically-based methodology for estimating graphite density is presented. • Graphite shrinkage is accounted for using a finite element model. • Differences in weight loss forecasts were found when compared to the existing model. - Abstract: Physically based models, resolved using the finite element (FE) method are often used to model changes in dimensions and the associated stress fields of graphite moderator bricks within a reactor. These models require inputs that describe the loading conditions (temperature, fluence and weight loss ‘field variables’), and coded relationships describing the behaviour of graphite under these conditions. The weight loss field variables are calculated using a reactor chemistry/physics code FEAT DIFFUSE. In this work the authors consider an alternative data source of weight loss: that from a longitudinal dataset of density measurements made on small samples trepanned from operating reactors during statutory outages. A nonlinear mixed-effect model is presented for modelling the age and depth-related trends in density. A correction that accounts for irradiation-induced dimensional changes (axial and radial shrinkage) is subsequently applied. The authors compare weight loss forecasts made using FEAT DIFFUSE with those based on an alternative statistical model for a layer four moderator brick for the Hinkley Point B, Reactor 3. The authors compare the two approaches for the weight loss distribution through the brick with a particular focus on the interstitial keyway, and for the average (over the volume of the brick) weight loss.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases

  7. Calculation of the fissile mass of a graphite moderated critical assembly using 93% enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.; Marzo, M.A.S.; Collussi, I.; Ferreira, A.C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The critical mass of uranium has been calculated for a graphite moderated set fueled with 93% enriched uranium to be mounted on the Instituto de Energia Atomica split table Zero Power Reactor. The core composition was optimized to permit the maximum number of configurations to be studied. Analysis of three core compositions shows that 8 Kg of uranium enriched to 93% - U-235 (by weight) and 100 Kg of thorium would be sufficient for criticality experiments [pt

  8. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  9. An automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Goncalves Junior, J. de.

    1989-01-01

    The work propose an automatic regulating control system for a graphite moderated reactor using digital techniques. The system uses a microcomputer to monitor the power and the period, to run the control algorithm, and to generate electronic signals to excite the motor, which moves vertically the control rod banks. A nuclear reactor simulator was developed to test the control system. The simulator consists of a software based on the point kinetic equations and implanted in an analogical computer. The results show that this control system has a good performance and versatility. In addition, the simulator is capable of reproducing with accuracy the behavior of a nuclear reactor. (author)

  10. Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration. Part I: Flow (velocity) field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, A.; Roelofs, F.; Komen, E.M.J.; Baglietto, E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNS) of a pebble bed configuration has been performed. ► This q-DNS database may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. ► A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data throughout the computational domain has been generated. ► Results for mean, RMS and covariance of velocity field are extensively reported in this paper. -- Abstract: High temperature reactors (HTR) are being considered for deployment around the world because of their excellent safety features. The fuel is embedded in a graphite moderator and can sustain very high temperatures. However, the appearance of hot spots in the pebble bed cores of HTR's may affect the integrity of the pebbles. A good prediction of the flow and heat transport in such a pebble bed core is a challenge for available turbulence models and such models need to be validated. In the present article, quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNS) of a pebble bed configuration are reported, which may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. Such approaches can be used in order to perform calculations for a randomly arranged pebble bed. Simulations are performed at a Reynolds number of 3088, based on pebble diameter, with a porosity level of 0.42. Detailed flow analyses have shown complex physics flow behavior and make this case challenging for turbulence model validation. Hence, a wide range of qualitative and quantitative data for velocity and temperature field have been extracted for this benchmark. In the present article (part I), results related to the flow field (mean, RMS and covariance of velocity) are documented and discussed in detail. Moreover, the discussion regarding the temperature field will be published in a separate article

  11. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the 235 U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of k eff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of k eff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

  12. The effects of temperatures on the pebble flow in a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, R. S.; Cogliati, J. J.; Gougar, H. D.

    2012-01-01

    The core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor (PBHTR) moves during operation, a feature which leads to better fuel economy (online refueling with no burnable poisons) and lower fuel stress. The pebbles are loaded at the top and trickle to the bottom of the core after which the burnup of each is measured. The pebbles that are not fully burned are recirculated through the core until the target burnup is achieved. The flow pattern of the pebbles through the core is of importance for core simulations because it couples the burnup distribution to the core temperature and power profiles, especially in cores with two or more radial burnup 'zones '. The pebble velocity profile is a strong function of the core geometry and the friction between the pebbles and the surrounding structures (other pebbles or graphite reflector blocks). The friction coefficient for graphite in a helium environment is inversely related to the temperature. The Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR) operated in Germany between 1983 and 1989. It featured a two-zone core, an inner core (IC) and outer core (OC), with different fuel mixtures loaded in each zone. The rate at which the IC was refueled relative to the OC in THTR was designed to be 0.56. During its operation, however, this ratio was measured to be 0.76, suggesting the pebbles in the inner core traveled faster than expected. It has been postulated that the positive feedback effect between inner core temperature, burnup, and pebble flow was underestimated in THTR. Because of the power shape, the center of the core in a typical cylindrical PBHTR operates at a higher temperature than the region next to the side reflector. The friction between pebbles in the IC is lower than that in the OC, perhaps causing a higher relative flow rate and lower average burnup, which in turn yield a higher local power density. Furthermore, the pebbles in the center region have higher velocities than the pebbles next to the side reflector due to the

  13. The effects of temperatures on the pebble flow in a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, R. S.; Cogliati, J. J.; Gougar, H. D. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor (PBHTR) moves during operation, a feature which leads to better fuel economy (online refueling with no burnable poisons) and lower fuel stress. The pebbles are loaded at the top and trickle to the bottom of the core after which the burnup of each is measured. The pebbles that are not fully burned are recirculated through the core until the target burnup is achieved. The flow pattern of the pebbles through the core is of importance for core simulations because it couples the burnup distribution to the core temperature and power profiles, especially in cores with two or more radial burnup 'zones '. The pebble velocity profile is a strong function of the core geometry and the friction between the pebbles and the surrounding structures (other pebbles or graphite reflector blocks). The friction coefficient for graphite in a helium environment is inversely related to the temperature. The Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR) operated in Germany between 1983 and 1989. It featured a two-zone core, an inner core (IC) and outer core (OC), with different fuel mixtures loaded in each zone. The rate at which the IC was refueled relative to the OC in THTR was designed to be 0.56. During its operation, however, this ratio was measured to be 0.76, suggesting the pebbles in the inner core traveled faster than expected. It has been postulated that the positive feedback effect between inner core temperature, burnup, and pebble flow was underestimated in THTR. Because of the power shape, the center of the core in a typical cylindrical PBHTR operates at a higher temperature than the region next to the side reflector. The friction between pebbles in the IC is lower than that in the OC, perhaps causing a higher relative flow rate and lower average burnup, which in turn yield a higher local power density. Furthermore, the pebbles in the center region have higher velocities than the pebbles next to the side reflector due to the

  14. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  15. Calculation of neutron flux distribution of thermal neutrons from microtron converter in a graphite moderator with water reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejsek, K.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation is made of the thermal neutron flux in the moderator and reflector by solving the neutron diffusion equation using the four-group theory. The correction for neutron absorption in the moderator was carried out using the perturbation theory. The calculation was carried out for four groups with the following energy ranges: the first group 2 MeV to 3 keV, the second group 3 keV to 5 eV, the third group 5 eV to 0.025 eV and the fourth group 0.025 eV. The values of the macroscopic cross section of capture and scattering, of the diffusion coefficient, the macroscopic cross section of the moderator, of the neutron age and the extrapolation length for the water-graphite moderator used in the calculations are given. The spatial distribution of the thermal neutron flux is graphically represented for graphite of a 30, 40, and 50 cm radius and for graphite of a 30 and 40 cm radius with a 10 cm water reflector; a graphic comparison is made of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in water and in graphite, both 40 cm in radius. The system of graphite with reflector proved to be the best and most efficient system for raising the flux density of thermal neutrons. (J.P.)

  16. A methodology to investigate the contribution of conduction and radiation heat transfer to the effective thermal conductivity of packed graphite pebble beds, including the wall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, M., E-mail: maritz.db@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Du Toit, C.G., E-mail: Jat.DuToit@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pieter.rousseau@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The radiation and conduction components of the effective thermal conductivity are separated. • Near-wall effects have a notable influence on the effective thermal conductivity. • Effective thermal conductivity is a function of the macro temperature gradient. • The effective thermal conductivity profile shows a characteristic trend. • The trend is a result of the interplay between conduction and radiation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity represents the overall heat transfer characteristics of a packed bed of spheres and must be considered in the analysis and design of pebble bed gas-cooled reactors. During depressurized loss of forced cooling conditions the dominant heat transfer mechanisms for the passive removal of decay heat are radiation and conduction. Predicting the value of the effective thermal conductivity is complex since it inter alia depends on the temperature level and temperature gradient through the bed, as well as the pebble packing structure. The effect of the altered packing structure in the wall region must therefore also be considered. Being able to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena and the characteristics of the resultant effective thermal conductivity. This paper introduces a purpose-designed test facility and accompanying methodology that combines physical measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction heat transfer, including the wall effects. Preliminary results obtained with the methodology offer important insights into the trends observed in the experimental results and provide a better understanding of the interplay between the underlying heat transfer phenomena.

  17. Neutronic analysis of graphite-moderated solid breeder design for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.; Abdou, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of the INTOR tritium-production-blanket design is presented. A ternary system of solid silicate breeder, lead neutron multiplier, and graphite moderator is explored primary from safety and blanket tritium-inventory considerations. Lithium-silicate (Li 2 SiO 3 ) breeder systems are studied along with water (H 2 O/D 2 O) and Type 316 stainless steel as coolant and structural material, respectively. The analysis examines the neutronics effects on tritium-production regarding: (1) coolant choice; (2) moderator choice; (3) moderator location; (4) multiplier thickness; (5) 6 Li enrichment; and (6) 6 Li burnup. The tritium-breeding-blanket modules are located at the top, outboard, and bottom (outer) parts of the torus, resulting in a breeding coverage of approx. 60% at the first-wall surface. It is found that the reference INTOR design yields, based on a three-dimensional analysis, a net tritium breeding ratio (BR) of approx. 0.65 at the beginning of reactor operation, satisfying the design criterion of BR > 0.6

  18. The behaviour of CAGR moderator and sleeve graphites radiolytically oxidised to high weight loss in inhibited coolant gas compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, P.; Fitzgerald, B.; Ketchen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Gilsocarbon graphites were irradiated to high weight losses in three different CO 2 based coolants. The experimental data is tested against a model which interprets the gas phase chemistry and pore geometry and allows weight loss and gas flow properties to be calculated. The observed changes of oxidation rate with dose were successfully predicted from the model. An empirical relationship was also derived which was shown to fit data for moderator, sleeve and special pore structure graphites. Changes in graphite permeability and diffusivity were predicted by the model, and also by other simplified, more approximate methods. The model based upon the measured transport pore spectrum was shown to be the best with other methods proving adequate to moderate doses. (author)

  19. Chapter 5: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. II: Correlation of results with the method of Syrett (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    The results are given of exponential experiments on graphite moderated systems with fuel elements consisting of single rods and tubes of natural uranium metal. A correlation is given with the method of calculation proposed by Syrett (1961) and new consistent values of neutron yield and effective resonance integral are derived. (author)

  20. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  1. Experiences in the emptying of waste silos containing solid nuclear waste from graphite- moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2003-01-01

    Before reactor sites can be handed over for ultimate decommissioning, at some sites silos containing waste from operations need to be emptied. The form and physical condition of the waste demands sophisticated retrieval technologies taking into account the onsite situation in terms of infrastructure and silo geometry. Furthermore, in the case of graphite moderated reactors, this waste usually includes several tonnes of graphite waste requiring special HVAC and dust handling measures. RWE NUKEM Group has already performed several contracts dealing with such emptying tasks. Of particular interest for the upcoming decommissioning projects in France might be the activities at Vandellos, Spain and Trawsfynnyd, UK. Retrieval System for Vandellos NPP is discussed. Following an international competitive tender exercise, RWE NUKEM won the contract to provide a turn-key retrieval system. This involved the design, manufacture and installation of a system built around the modules of a 200 kg capacity version of the ARTISAN manipulator system. The ARTISAN 200 manipulator, with remote slave arm detach facility, was deployed on a telescopic mast inserted into the silos through the roof penetrations. The manipulator deployed a range of tools to gather the waste and load it into a transfer basket, deployed through an adjacent penetration. After commissioning, the system cleared the vaults in less than the scheduled period with no failures. At the Trawsfynnyd Magnox plants two types of intermediate level waste (ILW) accumulated on site; namely Miscellaneous Activated Components (MAC) and Fuel Element Debris (FED). MAC is predominantly components that have been activated by the reactor core and then discharged. FED mainly consists of fuel cladding produced when fuel elements were prepared for dispatch to the reprocessing facility. RWE NUKEM Ltd. was awarded a contract to design, supply, commission and operate equipment to retrieve, pack and immobilize the two waste streams. Major

  2. Neutron Fluence And DPA Rate Analysis In Pebble-Bed HTR Reactor Vessel Using MCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Amir; Suwoto; Rohanda, Anis; Adrial, Hery; Bakhri, Syaiful; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    In the Pebble-bed HTR reactor, the distance between the core and the reactor vessel is very close and the media inside are carbon and He gas. Neutron moderation capability of graphite material is theoretically lower than that of water-moderated reactors. Thus, it is estimated much more the fast neutrons will reach the reactor vessel. The fast neutron collisions with the atoms in the reactor vessel will result in radiation damage and could be reducing the vessel life. The purpose of this study was to obtain the magnitude of neutron fluence in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. Neutron fluence calculations in the pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel were performed using the MCNP computer program. By determining the tally position, it can be calculated flux, spectrum and neutron fluence in the position of Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. The calculations results of total neutron flux and fast neutron flux in the reactor vessel of 1.82x108 n/cm2/s and 1.79x108 n/cm2/s respectively. The fast neutron fluence in the reactor vessel is 3.4x1017 n/cm2 for 60 years reactor operation. Radiation damage in stainless steel material caused by high-energy neutrons (> 1.0 MeV) will occur when it has reached the neutron flux level of 1.0x1024 n/cm2. The neutron fluence results show that there is no radiation damage in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel, so it is predicted that it will be safe to operate at least for 60 years.

  3. A Preliminary Study on Calculation of Inter-Pebble Dancoff Factor in a Pebble Type Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Hong Chul; Kim, Soon Young; Noh, Jae Man; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2009-01-01

    The Dancoff factor is an entering probability of the neutron escaped from specific fuel kernel to another one without the interaction with moderators. Currently, Dancoff factors are mainly evaluated from stochastic methods, hence a research on analytical method is considerably insufficient in this field. In order to analytically evaluate Dancoff factor considering double-heterogeneous effect, inter-pebble and intra-pebble Dancoff factors should be calculated, respectively. Intra-pebble Dancoff factor related with the fuel kernels in one pebble was analyzed in past study. For the evaluation of inter-pebble Dancoff factor, fuel region to region Dancoff factor (FRDF) was defined and the method to calculate the FRDF is developed in this study. The result is compared with the calculation result of the MCNP5 code

  4. Chapter 8: Exponential experiments on graphite moderated lattices fuelled by natural uranium tubes containing cylindrical graphite cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out using a fuel element comprising a 2.75 in. o.d./2.40 in. i.d. natural uranium tube containing a graphite core of diameter 2.0 in. Values of material buckling and migration area asymmetry for lattices at 7 in., 8 in. and 8/2 in. pitch have been obtained, and correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) to derive an effective resonance integral for the cored element. By comparison with the resonance integral for the same fuel tube without a core, a value for the constant 'γ' of the theory of Stace (1959) is obtained. (author)

  5. Design of a graphite-moderated {sup 241}Am-Li neutron field to simulate reactor spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, N., E-mail: tsujimura.norio@jaea.go.j [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Yoshida, T. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    A neutron calibration field using {sup 241}Am-Li sources and a moderator was designed to simulate the neutron fields found outside a reactor. The moderating assembly selected for the design calculation consists of a cube of graphite blocks with dimensions of 50 cm by 50 cm by 50 cm, in which the {sup 241}Am-Li sources are placed. Monte Carlo calculations revealed the optimal depth of the source to be 15 cm. This moderated neutron source can be used to provide a test field that has a large number of intermediate energy neutrons with a small portion of MeV component.

  6. Pebble Bed Reactor: core physics and fuel cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Worley, B.A.

    1979-10-01

    The Pebble Bed Reactor is a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor that is continuously fueled with small spherical fuel elements. The projected performance was studied over a broad range of reactor applicability. Calculations were done for a burner on a throwaway cycle, a converter with recycle, a prebreeder and breeder. The thorium fuel cycle was considered using low, medium (denatured), and highly enriched uranium. The base calculations were carried out for electrical energy generation in a 1200 MW/sub e/ plant. A steady-state, continuous-fueling model was developed and one- and two-dimensional calculations were used to characterize performance. Treating a single point in time effects considerable savings in computer time as opposed to following a long reactor history, permitting evaluation of reactor performance over a broad range of design parameters and operating modes.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Particle Flow Motion in a Two-Dimensional Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor with Discrete Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modular pebble-bed nuclear reactor (MPBNR technology is promising due to its attractive features such as high fuel performance and inherent safety. Particle motion of fuel and graphite pebbles is highly associated with the performance of pebbled-bed modular nuclear reactor. To understand the mechanism of pebble’s motion in the reactor, we numerically studied the influence of number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles, funnel angle of the reactor, height of guide ring on the distribution of pebble position, and velocity by means of discrete element method (DEM in a two-dimensional MPBNR. Velocity distributions at different areas of the reactor as well as mixing characteristics of fuel and graphite pebbles were investigated. Both fuel and graphite pebbles moved downward, and a uniform motion was formed in the column zone, while pebbles motion in the cone zone was accelerated due to the decrease of the cross sectional flow area. The number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles and the height of guide ring had a minor influence on the velocity distribution of pebbles, while the variation of funnel angle had an obvious impact on the velocity distribution. Simulated results agreed well with the work in the literature.

  8. Random detailed model for probabilistic neutronic calculation in pebble bed Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Curbelo, J.; Rosales, J.; Garcia, L.; Garcia, C.; Brayner, C.

    2013-01-01

    The pebble bed nuclear reactor is one of the main candidates for the next generation of nuclear power plants. In pebble bed type HTRs, the fuel is contained within graphite pebbles in the form of TRISO particles, which form a randomly packed bed inside a graphite-walled cylindrical cavity. Pebble bed reactors (PBR) offer the opportunity to meet the sustainability requirements, such as nuclear safety, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and a minimal production of radioactive waste. In order to simulate PBRs correctly, the double heterogeneity of the system must be considered. It consists on randomly located pebbles into the core and TRISO particles into the fuel pebbles. These features are often neglected due to the difficulty to model with MCPN code. The main reason is that there is a limited number of cells and surfaces to be defined. In this study, a computational tool which allows getting a new geometrical model of fuel pebbles for neutronic calculations with MCNPX code, was developed. The heterogeneity of system is considered, and also the randomly located TRISO particles inside the pebble. Four proposed fuel pebble models were compared regarding their effective multiplication factor and energy liberation profiles. Such models are: Homogeneous Pebble, Five Zone Homogeneous Pebble, Detailed Geometry, and Randomly Detailed Geometry. (Author)

  9. On the Evaluation of Pebble Bead Reactor Critical Experiments Using the Pebbed Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougar, Hans D.; Sen, R. Sonat

    2014-01-01

    Critical experiments pose a particular but necessary challenge to validating pebble bed reactor design codes. Fuel and core heterogeneities, impurities in graphite, variable packing of pebbles, and moderately strong neutronic coupling are among the factors that inject uncertainty into the results obtained with lower fidelity core physics models. Some of these are addressed in this study. The PEBBED pebble bed reactor fuel management code under development at the Idaho National Laboratory is designed for rapid design and analysis of pebble bed high temperature reactors (PBRs). Embedded within the code are the THERMIX-KONVEK thermal fluid solver and the COMBINE-7 spectrum generation code for inline cross section homogenization. Because 1D symmetry can be found at each stage of core heterogeneity; spherical at TRISO and pebble levels, and cylindrical at the control rod and core levels, the 1-D transport capability of ANISN is assumed to be sufficient in most cases for generating flux solutions for cross section homogenization. Furthermore, it is fast enough to be executed during the analysis or the equilibrium core. Multi-group diffusion-based design codes such as PEBBED and VSOP are not expected to yield the accuracy and resolution of continuous energy Monte Carlo codes for evaluation of critical experiments. Nonetheless, if the preparation of multigroup cross sections can adequately capture the physics of the mixing of PBR fuel elements and leakage from the core, reasonable results may be obtained. In this paper, results of the application of PEBBED to two critical experiments (HTR Proteus and HTR-10) and associated computational models are presented. The embedded 1-D transport solver is shown to capture the double heterogeneity of the pebble fuel in unit cell calculations. Eigenvalue calculations of a whole core are more challenging, particularly if the boron concentration is uncertain. The sensitivity of major safety parameters to variations in modeling

  10. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors, Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiruta, Mie; Johnson, Gannon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Rostamian, Maziar, E-mail: mrostamian@asme.org [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Potirniche, Gabriel P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Ougouag, Abderrafi M. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Bertino, Massimo; Franzel, Louis [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Custom-built high temperature, high pressure tribometer is designed. • Two different wear phenomena at high temperatures are observed. • Experimental wear results for graphite are presented. • The graphite wear dust production in a typical Pebble Bed Reactor is predicted. -- Abstract: This paper is the continuation of Part I, which describes the high temperature and high pressure helium environment wear tests of graphite–graphite in frictional contact. In the present work, it has been attempted to simulate a Pebble Bed Reactor core environment as compared to Part I. The experimental apparatus, which is a custom-designed tribometer, is capable of performing wear tests at PBR relevant higher temperatures and pressures under a helium environment. This environment facilitates prediction of wear mass loss of graphite as dust particulates from the pebble bed. The experimental results of high temperature helium environment are used to anticipate the amount of wear mass produced in a pebble bed nuclear reactor.

  11. CFD simulation of a coolant flow and a heat transfer in a pebble bed reactor - HTR2008-58334

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Lee, W. J.; Hassan, Y. A.

    2008-01-01

    This CFD study is to simulate a coolant(gas) flow and heat transfer in a PBR core during a normal operation. This study used a pebble array with direct area contacts among the pebbles which is one of the pebbles arrangements for a detailed simulation of PBR core CFD studies. A CFD model is developed to more adequately represent the pebbles randomly stacked in the PBR core. The CFD predictions showed a large variation of the temperature on the pebble surface as well as in the pebble core. The temperature drop in the outer graphite layer is smaller than that in the pebble-core region. This is because the thermal conductivity of graphite is higher than the fuel (UO, mixture) conductivity in the pebble core. Higher pebble surface temperature is predicted downstream of the pebble contact due to a reverse flow. Multiple vortices are predicted to occur downstream of the spherical pebbles due to a flow separation. The coolant flow structure and fuel temperature in the PBR core appears to largely depend on the in-core distribution of the pebbles. (authors)

  12. Failure analysis of pebble bed reactors during earthquake by discrete element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluated the load acting on the central reflector beam of a pebble bed reactor. ► The load acting on the reflector beam highly depends on fuel element distribution. ► The contact force values do not show high dependence on fuel element distribution. ► Earthquake increases the load of the reflector, not the contact forces. -- Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) are graphite-moderated, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. PBR reactors use a large number of spherical fuel elements called pebbles. From mechanical point of view, the arrangement of “small” spherical fuel elements in a container poses the same problem, as the so-called silo problem in powder technology and agricultural engineering. To get more exact information about the contact forces arising between the fuel elements in static and dynamic case, we simulated the static case and the effects of an earthquake on a model reactor by using discrete element method. We determined the maximal contact forces acting between the individual fuel elements. We found that the value of the maximal bending moment in the central reflector beam has a high deviation from the average value even in static case, and it can significantly increase in case of an earthquake. Our results can help the engineers working on the design of such types of reactors to get information about the contact forces, to determine the dust production and the crush probability of fuel elements within the reactor, and to model different accident scenarios

  13. Failure analysis of pebble bed reactors during earthquake by discrete element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppler, Istvan, E-mail: keppler.istvan@gek.szie.hu [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Design, Szent István University, Páter K.u.1., Gödöllő H-2103 (Hungary)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We evaluated the load acting on the central reflector beam of a pebble bed reactor. ► The load acting on the reflector beam highly depends on fuel element distribution. ► The contact force values do not show high dependence on fuel element distribution. ► Earthquake increases the load of the reflector, not the contact forces. -- Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) are graphite-moderated, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. PBR reactors use a large number of spherical fuel elements called pebbles. From mechanical point of view, the arrangement of “small” spherical fuel elements in a container poses the same problem, as the so-called silo problem in powder technology and agricultural engineering. To get more exact information about the contact forces arising between the fuel elements in static and dynamic case, we simulated the static case and the effects of an earthquake on a model reactor by using discrete element method. We determined the maximal contact forces acting between the individual fuel elements. We found that the value of the maximal bending moment in the central reflector beam has a high deviation from the average value even in static case, and it can significantly increase in case of an earthquake. Our results can help the engineers working on the design of such types of reactors to get information about the contact forces, to determine the dust production and the crush probability of fuel elements within the reactor, and to model different accident scenarios.

  14. Modeling stationary and moving pebbles in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiang; Montgomery, Trent; Zhang, Sijun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The stationary and moving pebbles in a PBR are numerically studied by DEM. • The packing structure of stationary pebbles is simulated by a filling process. • The packing structural properties are obtained and analyzed. • The dynamic behavior of pebbles is predicted and discussed. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical study of the stationary and moving pebbles in a pebble bed reactor (PBR) by means of discrete element method (DEM). The packing structure of stationary pebbles is simulated by a filling process that terminates with the settling of the pebbles into a PBR. The packing structural properties are obtained and analyzed. Subsequently, when the outlet of the PBR is opened during the operation of the PBR, the stationary pebbles start to flow downward and are removed at the bottom of the PBR. The dynamic behavior of pebbles is predicted and discussed. Our results indicate the DEM can offer both macroscopic and microscopic information for PBR design calculations and safety assessment

  15. Transient heat conduction in a pebble fuel applying fractional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez A, R.; Espinosa P, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we presents the equation of thermal diffusion of temporary-fractional order in the one-dimensional space in spherical coordinates, with the objective to analyze the heat transference between the fuel and coolant in a fuel element of a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. The pebble fuel is the heterogeneous system made by microsphere constitutes by U O, pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide mixed with graphite. To describe the heat transfer phenomena in the pebble fuel we applied a constitutive law fractional (Non-Fourier) in order to analyze the behaviour transient of the temperature distribution in the pebble fuel with anomalous thermal diffusion effects a numerical model is developed. (Author)

  16. Condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors and advances in their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldyrev, V.M.; Mikhaj, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is being given to results of technical and economical investigations of advisability of increasing unit power by elevating steam generating capacity as a result of inserting numerous of stereotype sectional structural elements of the reactor with similar thermodynamic parameters. It is concluded that construction of power units of condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors of 2400-3200 MWe and higher unit power capacity represents the real method for sharp growth of efficiency and labour productivity in power industry. It can also provide the required increase of the rate of putting electrogenerating powers into operation

  17. On-line interrogation of pebble bed reactor fuel using passive gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multipass fuel cycle in which graphite fuel pebbles (of varying enrichment) are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burnup limit (˜80,000--100,000 MWD/MTU). Unlike the situation with conventional light water reactors (LWRs), depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management will be highly inaccurate. As a result, an on-line measurement approach becomes the only accurate method to assess whether a particular pebble has reached its end-of-life burnup limit. In this work, an investigation was performed to assess the feasibility of passive gamma-ray spectrometry assay as an approach for on-line interrogation of PBR fuel for the simultaneous determination of burnup and enrichment on a pebble-by-pebble basis. Due to the unavailability of irradiated or fresh pebbles, Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the gamma-ray spectra of the PBR fuel at various levels of burnup. A pebble depletion calculation was performed using the ORIGEN code, which yielded the gamma-ray source term that was introduced into the input of an MCNP simulation. The MCNP simulation assumed the use of a high-purity coaxial germanium detector. Due to the lack of one-group high temperature reactor cross sections for ORIGEN, a heterogeneous MCNP model was developed to describe a typical PBR core. Subsequently, the code MONTEBURNS was used to couple the MCNP model and ORIGEN. This approach allowed the development of the burnup-dependent, one-group spectral-averaged PBR cross sections to be used in the ORIGEN pebble depletion calculation. Based on the above studies, a relative approach for performing the measurements was established. The approach is based on using the relative activities of Np-239/I-132 in combination

  18. Modeling stationary and dynamic pebbles in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiang; Montgomery, Trent; Zhang, Sijun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the stationary and dynamic pebbles in a pebble bed reactor (PBR) by means of discrete element method (DEM). At first, the packing structure of stationary pebbles is simulated by filling process until the settling of pebbles into PBR. The packing structural properties are obtained and analyzed. Subsequently, when the outlet of PBR is open during the operational maintenance of PBR, the stationary pebbles start to flow downward and are removed at the bottom of PBR. The dynamic behavior of pebbles is predicted and discussed. Our results indicate the DEM can offer both macroscopic and microscopic information for PBR design calculations and safety assessment. (author)

  19. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  20. Impact of radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion on the release of {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl implanted into nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behaviour of {sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl in gas cooled graphite moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncoffre, N., E-mail: nathalie.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Toulhoat, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Silbermann, G. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); EDF – DPI - DIN – CIDEN, DIE - Division Environnement, Lyon (France); and others

    2016-04-15

    Graphite finds widespread use in many areas of nuclear technology based on its excellent moderator and reflector qualities as well as its strength and high temperature stability. Thus, it has been used as moderator or reflector in CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG, MAGNOX, and AGR. However, neutron irradiation of graphite results in the production of {sup 14}C (dose determining radionuclide) and {sup 36}Cl (long lived radionuclide), these radionuclides being a key issue regarding the management of the irradiated waste. Whatever the management option (purification, storage, and geological disposal), a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide's location and speciation has to be made. During reactor operation, the effects of radiolysis are likely to promote the radionuclide release especially at the gas/graphite interface. Radiolysis of the coolant is mainly initiated through γ irradiation as well as through Compton electrons in the graphite pores. Radiolysis can be simulated in laboratory using γ irradiation or ion irradiation. In this paper, {sup 13}C, {sup 37}Cl and {sup 14}N are implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate respectively the presence of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and nitrogen, a {sup 14}C precursor. Different irradiation experiments were carried out using different irradiation devices on implanted graphite brought into contact with a gas simulating the coolant. The aim was to assess the effects of gas radiolysis and radiolytic corrosion induced by γ or He{sup 2+} irradiation at the gas/graphite interface in order to evaluate their role on the radionuclide release. Our results allow inferring that radiolytic corrosion has clearly promoted the release of {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}N located at the graphite brick/gas interfaces and open pores.

  1. Pebble breakage in gravel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuitz, C.

    2012-01-01

    The spatial clustering of broken pebbles in gravel layers of a Miocene sedimentary succession was investigated. Field observations suggested that the occurrence of broken pebbles could be related with gravel hosted shear deformation bands, which were the result of extensional regional deformation. Several different methods were used in this work to elucidate these observations. These methods include basic field work, measurements of physical pebble and gravel properties and, the application of different numerical modelling schemes. In particular, the finite element method in 2D and the discrete element method in 2D and 3D were used in order to quantify mechanisms of pebble deformation. The main objective of this work was to identify potential mechanisms that control particle breakage in fluvial gravel, which could explain the clustered spatial distribution of broken pebbles. The results of 2D finite element stress analysis indicated that the breakage load of differently located and oriented diametrical loading axes on a pebble varies and, that the weakest loading configuration coincides with the smallest principal axis of the pebble. The 3D discrete element method was applied to study the contact load distribution on pebbles in gravel deposits and the influence of different degrees of particle imbrication and orientation. The results showed that an increase of the number of imbricated particles leads to a significant load transfer from the rim to the centre of the oblate sides of the ellipsoidal particles. The findings of these pebble-scale investigations provided the basis for outcropscale modelling, where simulated gravel layers were subjected to layer-parallel extension. These outcrop-scale models revealed the existence of a particle breakage enhancing mechanism that becomes active during early stages of shear band formation. The interaction of such shear bands with the less deformed host material results in particle stress concentrations and subsequently

  2. Pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohnert, G.; Mueller-Frank, U.; Heil, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pebble-bed nuclear reactor of large power rating comprises a container having a funnel-shaped bottom forming a pebble run-out having a centrally positioned outlet. A bed of downwardly-flowing substantially spherical nuclear fuel pebbles is positioned in the container and forms a reactive nuclear core maintained by feeding unused pebbles to the bed's top surface while used or burned-out pebbles run out and discharge through the outlet. A substantially conical body with its apex pointing upwardly and its periphery spaced from the periphery of the container spreads the bottom of the bed outwardly to provide an annular flow down the funnel-shaped bottom forming the runout, to the discharge outlet. This provides a largely constant downward velocity of the spheres throughout the diameter of the bed throughout a substantial portion of the down travel, so that all spheres reach about the same burned-out condition when they leave the core, after a single pass through the core area

  3. Calculation of the packing fraction in a pebble-bed ADS and redesigning of the Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, L.; Pérez, J.; García, C.; Escrivá, A.; Rosales, J.; Abánades, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We based our study on an ADS for TRU transmutation and high temperature production. ► We calculated the number of pebbles that fit in a cylindrical ADS core. ► In both ADS design options studied, the mass of Pu isotopes reduces considerably. ► The system can reach coolant outlet temperatures high enough for hydrogen production. ► The maximum temperature values obtained in the ADS are not dangerous for TRISO fuel. - Abstract: One of the main problems that should be addressed in the use of nuclear fuels for heat and electricity production is the management of nuclear waste from conventional nuclear power plants and its inventory minimization. Fast reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) are the main options for reducing the long-lived radioactive waste inventory. In previous studies, the conceptual design of a Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA) has been made. The TADSEA is a pebble-bed ADS cooled by helium and moderated by graphite; it uses as fuel small amounts of transuranic elements in the form of TRISO particles, confined in 3 cm radius graphite pebbles. It has been conceived for Plutonium (Pu) and Minor Actinides (MA) transmutation and for achieving very high helium temperatures at the core's outlet to match the thermal requirements for hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis (HTE) or by the iodine-sulfur (I–S) thermo-chemical cycle. In this paper, a geometrical method for calculating the real number of pebbles that fit in a cylindrical ADS core, according to its size and pebble configuration, is described. Based on its results, the packing fraction influence on the TADSEA's main work parameters is studied, and the redesign of the previous configuration is done in order to maintain the exit thermal power established in the preliminary design. Results have shown the capability of the system to reach coolant outlet temperatures high enough for its application to hydrogen

  4. Chapter 4: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. I: Performance and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    A description is given of the methods used on the first BICEP stack for the performance and analysis of graphite exponential experiments. These differ in many respects from the methods formerly employed at A.E.R.E. The accuracy of the measurements has been increased, and the time taken to carry out and analyse an experiment has been reduced by approximately a factor of four. The following have contributed to the experimental work reported in this paper: J. R. Dyson, W. M. Holderay, R. M. Turner, S. D. R. Summers. (author)

  5. Sockets and Pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This close-up Sojourner rover image of a small rock shows that weathering has etched-out pebbles to produce sockets. In the image, sunlight is coming from the upper left. Sockets (with shadows on top) are visible at the lower left and pebbles (with bright tops and shadowed bases) are seen at the lower center and lower right. Two pebbles (about 0.5 cm across) are visible at the lower center.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  6. Studies on air ingress for pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.L.; Oh, C.H.; Merrill, B.J.; Petti, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been considered a critical event for helium-cooled pebbled bed reactors. Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken air will enter the core through the break and then by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and graphite pebbles. Thus, without any mitigating features a LOCA will lead to an air ingress event. The INEEL is studying such an event with two well-respected light water reactor transient response codes: RELAP5/ATHENA and MELCOR. To study the degree of graphite oxidation occurring due to an air ingress event, a MELCOR model of a reference pebble bed design was constructed. A modified version of MELCOR developed at INEEL, which includes graphite oxidation capabilities, and molecular diffusion of air into helium was used for these calculations. Results show that the lower reflector graphite consumes all of the oxygen before reaching the core. The results also show a long time delay between the time that the depressurization phase of the accident is over and the time that natural circulation air through the core occurs. (author)

  7. Kr-85m activity as burnup measurement indicator in a pebble bed reactor based on ORIGEN2.1 Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husnayani, I.; Udiyani, P. M.; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor which employs graphite as a moderator and helium as a coolant. In a multi-pass PBR, burnup of the fuel pebble must be measured in each cycle by online measurement in order to determine whether the fuel pebble should be reloaded into the core for another cycle or moved out of the core into spent fuel storage. One of the well-known methods for measuring burnup is based on the activity of radionuclide decay inside the fuel pebble. In this work, the activity and gamma emission of Kr-85m were studied in order to investigate the feasibility of Kr-85m as burnup measurement indicator in a PBR. The activity and gamma emission of Kr-85 were estimated using ORIGEN2.1 computer code. The parameters of HTR-10 were taken as a case study in performing ORIGEN2.1 simulation. The results show that the activity revolution of Kr-85m has a good relationship with the burnup of the pebble fuel in each cycle. The Kr-85m activity reduction in each burnup step,in the range of 12% to 4%, is considered sufficient to show the burnup level in each cycle. The gamma emission of Kr-85m is also sufficiently high which is in the order of 1010 photon/second. From these results, it can be concluded that Kr-85m is suitable to be used as burnup measurement indicator in a pebble bed reactor.

  8. PEBBLES: A COMPUTER CODE FOR MODELING PACKING, FLOW AND RECIRCULATIONOF PEBBLES IN A PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2006-10-01

    A comprehensive, high fidelity model for pebble flow has been developed and embodied in the PEBBLES computer code. In this paper, a description of the physical artifacts included in the model is presented and some results from using the computer code for predicting the features of pebble flow and packing in a realistic pebble bed reactor design are shown. The sensitivity of models to various physical parameters is also discussed.

  9. A preliminary definition of the parameters of an experimental natural - uranium, graphite - moderated, helium - cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, O.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study of the technical characteristic of an experiment at 32 MWe power with a natural uconium, graphite-moderated, helium cooled reactor is described. The national participation and the use of reactor as an instrument for the technological development of future high temperature gas cooled reactor is considered in the choice of the reactor type. Considerations about nuclear power plants components based in extensive bibliography about similar english GCR reactor is presented. The main thermal, neutronic an static characteristic and in core management of the nuclear fuel is stablished. A simplified scheme of the secondary system and its thermodynamic performance is determined. A scheme of parameters calculation of the reactor type is defined based in the present capacity of calculation developed by Coordenadoria de Engenharia Nuclear and Centro de Processamento de Dados, IEA, Brazil [pt

  10. Renewable side reflector structure for a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Roger.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a renewable side reflector structure for a pebble bed high temperature reactor of the kind comprising a cylindrical graphite vessel constituting the neutron reflector, this vessel being filled with graphite pebbles containing the nuclear fuel and enclosed in a concrete protective containment. The internal peripheral area of the vessel is constituted by a line of adjacent graphite rods mounted so that they can rotate about their longitudinal axis and manoeuvrable from outside the concrete containment by means of a shaft passing into it [fr

  11. Pebble Puzzle Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 In the quest to determine if a pebble was jamming the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, scientists and engineers examined this up-close, approximate true-color image of the tool. The picture was taken by the rover's panoramic camera, using filters centered at 601, 535, and 482 nanometers, at 12:47 local solar time on sol 200 (August 16, 2004). Colored spots have been drawn on this image corresponding to regions where panoramic camera reflectance spectra were acquired (see chart in Figure 1). Those regions are: the grinding wheel heads (yellow); the rock abrasion tool magnets (green); the supposed pebble (red); a sunlit portion of the aluminum rock abrasion tool housing (purple); and a shadowed portion of the rock abrasion tool housing (brown). These spectra demonstrated that the composition of the supposed pebble was clearly different from that of the sunlit and shadowed portions of the rock abrasion tool, while similar to that of the dust-coated rock abrasion tool magnets and grinding heads. This led the team to conclude that the object disabling the rock abrasion tool was indeed a martian pebble.

  12. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part I: Pebble Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept [ ] focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor (LWR) fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into tri-isotopic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400) [ ]. Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (FY) (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking, and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. Regarding the coated particle performance, the FY 2009 investigations showed that no

  13. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part I: Pebble Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Brian; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2011-01-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor (LWR) fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into tri-isotopic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (FY) (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking, and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. Regarding the coated particle performance, the FY 2009 investigations showed that no significant

  14. Mechanics of binary and polydisperse spherical pebble assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annabattula, R.K.; Gan, Y.; Kamlah, M.

    2012-01-01

    The micromechanical behavior of an assembly of binary and polydisperse spherical pebbles is studied using discrete element method (DEM) accounting for microscopic interactions between individual pebbles. A in-house DEM code has been used to simulate the assemblies consisting of different pebble diameters and the results of the simulations are compared with that of mono-size pebble assemblies. The effect of relative radii and volume fraction of the pebbles on the macroscopic stress–strain response is discussed. Furthermore, the effect of packing factor and coefficient of friction on the overall stress–strain behavior of the system is studied in detail. The shear (tangential) stiffness between the particles is also another influencing parameter. For a very small shear stiffness the system shows a strong dependence on the packing factor while a pebble material dependent shear stiffness shows a rather moderate dependence on the packing factor. For a similar packing factor, the mono-size assembly shows a stiff behavior during loading compared to binary assembly. However, the simulations do not show a significant difference between the two behaviors in contrast to the observations made in the experiments. The discrepancy can be attributed to (i) probable difference in packing factors for mono-size and binary assemblies in the experiments, (ii) arbitrary friction coefficient in the current model and (iii) the tangential interaction (constant shear stiffness) implemented in the present model which needs further modification as a function of the load history on the pebbles. Evolution of other micromechanical characteristics such as coordination number, contact force distribution and stored elastic energy of individual pebbles as a function of external load and system parameters is presented which can be used to estimate important macroscopic properties such as overall thermal conductivity and crushing resistance of the pebble beds.

  15. Mechanics of binary and polydisperse spherical pebble assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annabattula, R.K., E-mail: ratna.annabattula@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WBM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gan, Y., E-mail: yixiang.gan@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, 2006 NSW, Sydney (Australia); Kamlah, M., E-mail: marc.kamlah@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WBM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    The micromechanical behavior of an assembly of binary and polydisperse spherical pebbles is studied using discrete element method (DEM) accounting for microscopic interactions between individual pebbles. A in-house DEM code has been used to simulate the assemblies consisting of different pebble diameters and the results of the simulations are compared with that of mono-size pebble assemblies. The effect of relative radii and volume fraction of the pebbles on the macroscopic stress-strain response is discussed. Furthermore, the effect of packing factor and coefficient of friction on the overall stress-strain behavior of the system is studied in detail. The shear (tangential) stiffness between the particles is also another influencing parameter. For a very small shear stiffness the system shows a strong dependence on the packing factor while a pebble material dependent shear stiffness shows a rather moderate dependence on the packing factor. For a similar packing factor, the mono-size assembly shows a stiff behavior during loading compared to binary assembly. However, the simulations do not show a significant difference between the two behaviors in contrast to the observations made in the experiments. The discrepancy can be attributed to (i) probable difference in packing factors for mono-size and binary assemblies in the experiments, (ii) arbitrary friction coefficient in the current model and (iii) the tangential interaction (constant shear stiffness) implemented in the present model which needs further modification as a function of the load history on the pebbles. Evolution of other micromechanical characteristics such as coordination number, contact force distribution and stored elastic energy of individual pebbles as a function of external load and system parameters is presented which can be used to estimate important macroscopic properties such as overall thermal conductivity and crushing resistance of the pebble beds.

  16. Localization of the hot spots in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Leisheng; Lee, Wooram; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR) is a candidate reactor type for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is one of the Generation-IV reactor types. The HTGR design concept exhibits excellent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core which gives a large thermal inertia in an accident such as loss of coolant. The conclusions are made and may contribute to a better design of a PBR core and a closer inspection of the local hot spots to avoid destruction of pebbles from happening. Thermal field of a PBR core is investigated in this study. Specifically, experiments on measuring the pebbles' surface temperature are performed. It is found that the upper pebble has an overall higher temperature profile than the other pebbles and the stagnation zone under does not increase its surface's temperature. In addition, the temperature profile of the side pebble shows a concave form and it keeps decreasing from the contact point to the vertex in the lower pebble. Lastly, the maximum temperature difference among these points is 5.83 deg. C. These findings above are validated by CFX simulations under two different turbulence models (k-e, SST) and two contact areas (diameter of 6mm and 3.5mm). By contrasting the temperature variation trends of all simulation cases, it is concluded that SST turbulence model with 20% intensity shows a better agreement with the experiment result, nevertheless, slightly deviation is also found in terms of total temperature difference and the peak appears in position 17-19 in experiments

  17. Localization of the hot spots in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leisheng; Lee, Wooram; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR) is a candidate reactor type for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is one of the Generation-IV reactor types. The HTGR design concept exhibits excellent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core which gives a large thermal inertia in an accident such as loss of coolant. The conclusions are made and may contribute to a better design of a PBR core and a closer inspection of the local hot spots to avoid destruction of pebbles from happening. Thermal field of a PBR core is investigated in this study. Specifically, experiments on measuring the pebbles' surface temperature are performed. It is found that the upper pebble has an overall higher temperature profile than the other pebbles and the stagnation zone under does not increase its surface's temperature. In addition, the temperature profile of the side pebble shows a concave form and it keeps decreasing from the contact point to the vertex in the lower pebble. Lastly, the maximum temperature difference among these points is 5.83 deg. C. These findings above are validated by CFX simulations under two different turbulence models (k-e, SST) and two contact areas (diameter of 6mm and 3.5mm). By contrasting the temperature variation trends of all simulation cases, it is concluded that SST turbulence model with 20% intensity shows a better agreement with the experiment result, nevertheless, slightly deviation is also found in terms of total temperature difference and the peak appears in position 17-19 in experiments.

  18. Verification of two-temperature method for heat transfer process within a pebble fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dali; Peng Minjun

    2014-01-01

    A typical pebble fuel that used in high temperature reactor (HTR), mainly consists of a graphite matrix with numerous dispersed tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and a surrounding thin non-fueled graphite shell. These high heterogeneities lead to difficulty in explicit thermal calculation of a pebble fuel. We proposed a two-temperature method (TTM) to calculate the temperature distribution within a pebble fuel. The method is not only convenient to perform but also gives more realistic results since particles and graphite matrix are considered separately while the traditional ways are considering the fuel zone as average heat generation source. The method is validated both by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method and Wiener bounds. Results show that TTM has a stable performance and high accuracy. (author)

  19. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  20. The moderator's moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    A brief account is given of the development of graphite moderators for Magnox and advanced gas cooled reactors. The accident at Windscale in 1957 brought to worldwide attention the importance of irradiation damage in graphite and the consequent storage of Wigner energy. In spite of the Windscale setback, preparations for the civil programme of Magnox reactors went ahead apace. Some of the background to the disastrous Dungeness B tender is presented. In spite of all the difficulties and uncertainties, the graphite in UK reactors has performed well. In all cases, as far as the author is aware, the behaviour of the graphite moderators will not prevent design life being achieved. (author)

  1. Pebbles, Cobbles, and Sockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This Rover image of 'Shark' (upper left center), 'Half Dome' (upper right), and a small rock (right foreground) reveal textures and structures not visible in lander camera images. These rocks are interpreted as conglomerates because their surfaces have rounded protrusions up to several centimeters in size. It is suggested that the protrusions are pebbles and granules.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  2. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  3. Pebble bed modular reactor fuel enrichment discrimination using delayed neutrons - HTR2008-58133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoda, R.; Rataj, J.; Uhera, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor which utilise fuel in form of spheres that are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burn-up limit. When the reactor is started up for the first time, the lower-enriched start-up fuel is used, mixed with graphite spheres, to bring the core to criticality. As the core criticality is established and the start-up fuel is burned-in, the graphite spheres are progressively removed and replaced with more start-up fuel. Once it becomes necessary for maintaining power output, the higher enriched equilibrium fuel is introduced to the reactor and the start-up fuel is removed. During the initial run of the reactor it is important to discriminate between the irradiated startup fuel and the irradiated equilibrium fuel to ensure that only the equilibrium fuel is returned to the reactor. There is therefore a need for an on-line enrichment discrimination device that can discriminate between irradiated start-up fuel spheres and irradiated equilibrium fuel spheres. The device must also not be confused by the presence of any remaining graphite spheres. Due to it's on-line nature the device must accomplish the discrimination within tight time limits. Theoretical calculations and experiments show that Fuel Enrichment Discrimination based on delayed neutrons detection is possible. The paper presents calculations and experiments showing viability of the method. (authors)

  4. Monte Carlo calculations on transmutation of trans-uranic nuclear waste isotopes using spallation neutrons difference of lead and graphite moderators

    CERN Document Server

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Brandt, R; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Odoj, R; Sosnin, A N; Wan, J S; Westmeier, W

    2002-01-01

    Transmutation rates of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and some minor actinides ( sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np, sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am, sup 2 sup 4 sup 5 Cm and sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 Cm), in two accelerator-driven systems (ADS) with lead or graphite moderating environments, were calculated using the LAHET code system. The ADS that were used had a large volume (approx 32 m sup 3) and contained no fissile material, except for a small amount of fissionable waste nuclei that existed in some cases. Calculations were performed at an incident proton energy of 1.5 GeV and the spallation target was lead. Also breeding rates of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 U as well as the transmutation rates of two long-lived fission products sup 9 sup 9 Tc and sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I were calculated at different locations in the moderator. It is shown that an ADS with graphite moderator is a much more effective transmuter than that with lead moderator.

  5. A pore structure model for the gas transport property changes, initial oxidation rates and cumulative weight loss of AGR moderator graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1985-09-01

    A quantitative model has been developed for the gas transport property variation, cumulative weight loss and initial oxidation rates of AGR moderator graphite. The model utilises the theory of dynamic moments of the pore structure to calculate the changes in physical properties brought about by radiolytic corrosion taking place within the graphite porosity. In order to account for the behaviour of the initial rate curves, and the weight loss data obtained it is necessary to invoke the presence of a group of cylindrical pore and a group of small slab-shaped pores. The latter are methane depleted. This is in addition to the pore group involved in gas transport which is best represented by cylinders of mean radius 2.13 μm. The model satisfactorily predicts the experimental weight loss data obtained from experiments in the DIDO 6V3 and BFB loops. (author)

  6. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  7. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors, Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mie Hiruta; Gannon Johnson; Maziar Rostamian; Gabriel P. Potirniche; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Massimo Bertino; Louis Franzel; Akira Tokuhiro

    2013-10-01

    This paper is the continuation of Part I, which describes the high temperature and high pressure helium environment wear tests of graphite–graphite in frictional contact. In the present work, it has been attempted to simulate a Pebble Bed Reactor core environment as compared to Part I. The experimental apparatus, which is a custom-designed tribometer, is capable of performing wear tests at PBR relevant higher temperatures and pressures under a helium environment. This environment facilitates prediction of wear mass loss of graphite as dust particulates from the pebble bed. The experimental results of high temperature helium environment are used to anticipate the amount of wear mass produced in a pebble bed nuclear reactor.

  8. The modular pebble bed nuclear reactor - the preferred new sustainable energy source for electricity, hydrogen and potable water production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a joint project of Massachusetts Institute of technology, Nu-Tec Inc. and Proto Power. The elegant simplicity of graphite moderated pebble bed reactor is the basis for the 'generation four' nuclear power plants. High Temperature Gas Cooled (HTGC) nuclear power plant have the potential to become the preferred base load sustainable energy source for the new millennium. The great attraction of these helium cooled 'Generation Four' nuclear plant can be summarised as follows: Factory assembly line production; Modularity and ease of delivery to site; High temperature Brayton Cycle ideally suited for cogeneration of electricity, potable water and hydrogen; Capital and operating costs competitive with hydrocarbon plant; Design is inherently meltdown proof and proliferation resistant

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Bratton, Rob; Marsden, Barry; Srinivasan, Makuteswara; Penfield, Scott; Mitchell, Mark; Windes, Will

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version (a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version (a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV

  10. Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly design with graphite-moderating rods to reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Hyuck; Cho, Nam Zin, E-mail: nzcho@kaist.ac.kr; Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The graphite rod-inserted SFR fuel assembly is proposed to achieve low sodium void reactivity. • The neutronics/thermal-hydraulics analyses are performed for the proposed SFR cores. • The sodium void reactivity is improved about 960–1030 pcm compared to reference design. - Abstract: The concept of a graphite-moderating rod-inserted sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) fuel assembly is proposed in this study to achieve a low sodium void reactivity coefficient. Using this concept, two types of SFR cores are analyzed; the proposed SFR type 1 core has new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions while the proposed SFR type 2 core has a B{sub 4}C absorber sandwich in the middle of the active core region as well as new SFR fuel assemblies at the inner/mid core regions. For the proposed SFR core designs, neutronics and thermal-hydraulic analyses are performed using the DIF3D, REBUS3, and the MATRA-LMR codes. In the neutronics analysis, the sodium void reactivity coefficient is obtained in various void situations. The two types of proposed core designs reduce the sodium void reactivity coefficient by about 960–1030 pcm compared to the reference design. However, the TRU enrichment for the proposed SFR core designs is increased. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the temperature distributions are calculated for the two types of proposed core designs and the mass flow rate is optimized to satisfy the design constraints for the highest power generating assembly. The results of this study indicate that the proposed SFR assembly design concept, which adopts graphite-moderating rods which are inserted into the fuel assembly, can feasibly minimize the sodium void reactivity coefficient. Single TRU enrichment and an identical fuel slug diameter throughout the SFR core are also achieved because the radial power peak can be flattened by varying the number of moderating rods in each core region.

  11. Source Term Analysis of the Irradiated Graphite in the Core of HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuegang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR has potential utilization due to its featured characteristics such as inherent safety and wide diversity of utilization. One distinct difference between HTGR and traditional pressurized water reactor (PWR is the large inventory of graphite in the core acting as reflector, moderator, or structure materials. Some radionuclides will be generated in graphite during the period of irradiation, which play significant roles in reactor safety, environmental release, waste disposal, and so forth. Based on the actual operation of the 10 MW pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10 in Tsinghua University, China, an experimental study on source term analysis of the irradiated graphite has been done. An irradiated graphite sphere was randomly collected from the core of HTR-10 as sample in this study. This paper focuses on the analytical procedure and the establishment of the analytical methodology, including the sample collection, graphite sample preparation, and analytical parameters. The results reveal that the Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Eu-154 are the major γ contributors, while H-3 and C-14 are the dominating β emitting nuclides in postirradiation graphite material of HTR-10. The distribution profiles of the above four nuclides are also presented.

  12. Buckling and reaction rate experiments in plutonium/uranium metal fuelled, graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 400 deg. C. Part I: Experimental techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Clarke, W G; Gibson, M; Hobday, R; Hunt, C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Symons, C R; Wass, T [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-07-15

    This report presents experimental measurements of bucklings, flux fine structure and fission rate distributions in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium/uranium metal at temperatures up to 400 deg. C in the sub-critical assemblies SCORPIO I and SCORPIO II. The experimental techniques employed are described in some detail. The accuracy of the experimental measurements appears to be adequate for testing methods of calculation being developed for the calculation of reactivity and temperature coefficient of reactivity for power reactors containing plutonium and uranium. (author) 26 refs, 17 tabs, 17 figs

  13. Calculation of the packing fraction in a pebble-bed ADS and redesigning of the Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L., E-mail: maiden@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Av. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, 10400 (Cuba); Perez, J., E-mail: jcurbelo@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Av. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, 10400 (Cuba); Garcia, C., E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Av. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, 10400 (Cuba); Escriva, A., E-mail: aescriva@iqn.upv.es [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica (IIE), Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (UPV), Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rosales, J., E-mail: jrosales@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Av. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, 10400 (Cuba); Abanades, A., E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros Industriales (ETSII), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), J. Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We based our study on an ADS for TRU transmutation and high temperature production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculated the number of pebbles that fit in a cylindrical ADS core. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In both ADS design options studied, the mass of Pu isotopes reduces considerably. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system can reach coolant outlet temperatures high enough for hydrogen production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum temperature values obtained in the ADS are not dangerous for TRISO fuel. - Abstract: One of the main problems that should be addressed in the use of nuclear fuels for heat and electricity production is the management of nuclear waste from conventional nuclear power plants and its inventory minimization. Fast reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) are the main options for reducing the long-lived radioactive waste inventory. In previous studies, the conceptual design of a Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA) has been made. The TADSEA is a pebble-bed ADS cooled by helium and moderated by graphite; it uses as fuel small amounts of transuranic elements in the form of TRISO particles, confined in 3 cm radius graphite pebbles. It has been conceived for Plutonium (Pu) and Minor Actinides (MA) transmutation and for achieving very high helium temperatures at the core's outlet to match the thermal requirements for hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis (HTE) or by the iodine-sulfur (I-S) thermo-chemical cycle. In this paper, a geometrical method for calculating the real number of pebbles that fit in a cylindrical ADS core, according to its size and pebble configuration, is described. Based on its results, the packing fraction influence on the TADSEA's main work parameters is studied, and the redesign of the previous configuration is done in order to maintain the exit thermal power established in the preliminary design

  14. Nuclear safeguards considerations for pebble bed reactors (PBRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports by the Department of Energy National Laboratories have discussed safeguards considerations for low enriched uranium (LEU)-fueled pebble bed reactors (PBRs) and the need for bulk accountancy of the plutonium in “used fuel.” These reports fail to account for the degree of plutonium dilution in the graphitized-carbon pebbles that is sufficient to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) “provisional” guidelines for termination of safeguards on “measured discards.” The thrust of this finding is not to terminate safeguards but to limit the need for specific accountancy of plutonium in stored used fuel. While the residual uranium in the used fuel is not sufficiently diluted to meet the IAEA provisional guidelines for termination of safeguards, the estimated quantities of the uranium minor isotopes 232 U and 236 U in the used fuel at the target burnup of ∼90 Gigawatt-days per metric ton (GWD/MT) exceed standard specification limits for reprocessed uranium and will require extensive blending with either natural uranium or uranium enrichment tails to dilute the 236 U content to fall within specification. Hence, the PBR used fuel is less desirable for commercial reprocessing and reuse than that from light water reactors. Also the PBR specific activity of a reprocessed uranium isotopic mixture and its A 2 values for effective dose limits if released in a dispersible form during a transportation accident are more limiting than the equivalent values for light-water-reactor used fuel at 55 GWD/MT without accounting for the presence of the principal carry-over fission product (technetium, 99 Tc) and plutonium contamination. Thus, the potentially recoverable uranium from PBR used fuel carries reactivity penalties and radiological penalties likely greater than those for reprocessed uranium from light water reactors. These factors impact the economics of reprocessing, but a more significant consideration is that reprocessing technologies for

  15. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  16. A Pebble Bed Reactor cross section methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, Nathanael H.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Rahnema, Farzad; Gougar, Hans

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for the evaluation of microscopic cross sections for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) neutron diffusion computational models during convergence to an equilibrium (asymptotic) fuel cycle. This method considers the isotopics within a core spectral zone and the leakages from such a zone as they arise during reactor operation. The randomness of the spatial distribution of fuel grains within the fuel pebbles and that of the fuel and moderator pebbles within the core, the double heterogeneity of the fuel, and the indeterminate burnup of the spectral zones all pose a unique challenge for the computation of the local microscopic cross sections. As prior knowledge of the equilibrium composition and leakage is not available, it is necessary to repeatedly re-compute the group constants with updated zone information. A method is presented to account for local spectral zone composition and leakage effects without resorting to frequent spectrum code calls. Fine group data are pre-computed for a range of isotopic states. Microscopic cross sections and zone nuclide number densities are used to construct fine group macroscopic cross sections, which, together with fission spectra, flux modulation factors, and zone buckling, are used in the solution of the slowing down balance to generate a new or updated spectrum. The microscopic cross-sections are then re-collapsed with the new spectrum for the local spectral zone. This technique is named the Spectral History Correction (SHC) method. It is found that this method accurately recalculates local broad group microscopic cross sections. Significant improvement in the core eigenvalue, flux, and power peaking factor is observed when the local cross sections are corrected for the effects of the spectral zone composition and leakage in two-dimensional PBR test problems.

  17. Core homogenization method for pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulik, V.; Sanchez, R.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a core homogenization scheme for treating a stochastic pebble bed loading in pebble bed reactors. The reactor core is decomposed into macro-domains that contain several pebble types characterized by different degrees of burnup. A stochastic description is introduced to account for pebble-to-pebble and pebble-to-helium interactions within a macro-domain as well as for interactions between macro-domains. Performance of the proposed method is tested for the PROTEUS and ASTRA critical reactor facilities. Numerical simulations accomplished with the APOLLO2 transport lattice code show good agreement with the experimental data for the PROTEUS reactor facility and with the TRIPOLI4 Monte Carlo simulations for the ASTRA reactor configuration. The difference between the proposed method and the traditional volume-averaged homogenization technique is negligible while only one type of fuel pebbles present in the system, but it grows rapidly with the level of pebble heterogeneity. (authors)

  18. Numerical Simulation of a Coolant Flow and Heat Transfer in a Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wang-Kee; Kim, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae

    2008-01-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor(PBR) is one of the very high temperature gas cooled reactors(VHTR) which have been reviewed in the Generation IV International Forum as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. The pebble bed modular reactor(PBMR) exhibits inherent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core. PBR uses coated fuel particles(TRISO) embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the PBR core during a reactor operation and the coolant flows around randomly distributed spheres. For the reliable operation and the safety of the PBR, it is important to understand the coolant flow structure and the fuel pebble temperature in the PBR core. There have been few experimental and numerical studies to investigate the fluid and heat transfer phenomena in the PBR core. The objective of this paper is to predict the fluid and heat transfer in the PBR core. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, STAR-CCM+(V2.08) is used to perform the CFD analysis using the design data for the PBMR400

  19. Research on application of burnable poison in pebble bed HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Chunlin; Zhang Jian; Shan Wenzhi; Jing Xingqing

    2013-01-01

    Burnable poison in fuel ball was used in pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR) to optimize the shape and the peak factor of power distribution in certain conditions. Two options are available and evaluated, that is the homogeneous burnable poison in graphite matrix and burnable poison particles (BPPs) in fuel balls. Due to the absorption cross section of "1"0B, the depletion speed for homogeneous burnable poison is very fast, and difficult to control, on the other side, the depletion speed of BPPs can be optimized respecting to its size, and better shape and peak value of power distribution can be achieved. (authors)

  20. The Emerging Paradigm of Pebble Accretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, C.W.; Pessah, M.; Gressel, O.

    2017-01-01

    Pebble accretion is the mechanism in which small particles ("pebbles") accrete onto big bodies big (planetesimals or planetary embryos) in gas-rich environments. In pebble accretion accretion , accretion occurs by settling and depends only on the mass of the gravitating body gravitating , not its

  1. PBMR Project - Pebble Fuel Advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slabber, Johan; Matzie, Regis; Casperson, Sten; Kriel, Willem

    2006-01-01

    An overview is presented of all the important issues that influenced the choice of pebble fuel for the High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed by South Africa. Each of these issues is then discussed in detail and compared with other fuel configurations proposed for direct cycle High-temperature Reactor (HTR) applications. The comparisons are provided using objective data generated by analyses done for the design of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and data that is available in open literature for the other fuel configurations

  2. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  3. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, G.; Zou, Y.; Xu, H.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability of thorium fuel in a Pebble-Bed Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (PBFHR) is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative Flibe (2LiF-BeF_2) salt Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (TRC). Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tri-structural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle system for increasing fuel loading and decreasing excessive moderation. To analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared two refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern) and two kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite). This method found that the feasible region of breeding and negative Flibe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% fuel loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, Flibe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong "9Be(n,2n) reaction and low neutron absorption of "6Li (even at 1000 ppm) in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows a good safety margin. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the decades irradiation time of the pebble fuel. (A.C)

  4. Chapter 3: Exponential experiments on graphite-moderated lattices fuelled with near-natural uranium metal rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Clarke, W.G.; Ashworth, F.P.O.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Exponential experiments have been carried out on graphite lattices fuelled by 1.2 in. diameter uranium metal rods at three near-natural U 235 compositions, 0.6 Co, 1.3 Co and 1.6 Co. The results, together with those already existing from earlier exponential or critical measurements on these and similar natural uranium rods, have been correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) and also with the modified form of this theory given in Vol.1, Ch. 7. (author)

  5. Initial Comparison of Baseline Physical and Mechanical Properties for the VHTR Candidate Graphite Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Mark C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). VHTR Program

    2014-09-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled configuration capable of producing thermal energy for power generation as well as process heat for industrial applications that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is establishing accurate as-manufactured mechanical and physical property distributions in nuclear-grade graphites by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a thorough comparison between these values in different graphite grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons both in specific properties and in the associated variability between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between each of the grades of graphite that are considered “candidate” grades from four major international graphite producers. These particular grades (NBG-18, NBG-17, PCEA, IG-110, and 2114) are the major focus of the evaluations presently underway on irradiated graphite properties through the series of Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL from which billets are formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration. NBG-17 graphite from SGL is essentially NBG-18 with the grain size reduced by a factor of two. PCEA, petroleum coke graphite from GrafTech with a similar grain size to NBG-17, is formed via an extrusion process and was initially considered the favored grade for the prismatic layout. IG-110 and 2114, from Toyo Tanso and Mersen (formerly Carbone Lorraine), respectively, are fine-grain grades produced via an isomolding

  6. Characteristic behaviour of Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors during water ingress events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoza, Samukelisiwe N.; Serfontein, Dawid E.; Reitsma, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    in order to curb the increase in the multiplication factor, the level of under-moderation in the fuel can be decreased by reducing the heavy metal loading of the fuel spheres and/or the porosity of the graphite reflector block must be increased in order to increase water ingress into the reflectors. For the PBMR-400 the diameter of the central reflector can also be reduced. Results from past studies of water ingress into Pebble Bed Reactors were used to validate and verify the present simulation approach and results. (author)

  7. Transmutation of plutonium in pebble bed type high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bende, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Reactor (HTR) has been studied as a uranium-free burner of reactor grade plutonium. In a parametric study, the plutonium loading per pebble as well as the type and size of the coated particles (CPs) have been varied to determine the plutonium consumption, the final plutonium burnup, the k ∞ and the temperature coefficients as a function of burnup. The plutonium loading per pebble is bounded between 1 and 3 gr Pu per pebble. The upper limit is imposed by the maximal allowable fast fluence for the CPs. A higher plutonium loading requires a longer irradiation time to reach a desired burnup, so that the CPs are exposed to a higher fast fluence. The lower limit is determined by the temperature coefficients, which become less negative with increasing moderator-actinide ratio. A burnup of about 600 MWd/kgHM can be reached. With the HTR's high efficiency of 40%, a plutonium supply of 1520 kg/GW e a is achieved. The discharges of plutonium and minor actinides are then 450 and 110 kg/GW e a, respectively. (author)

  8. Statistical Comparison of the Baseline Mechanical Properties of NBG-18 and PCEA Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark C. Carroll; David T. Rohrbaugh

    2013-08-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled design that is capable of producing process heat for power generation and for industrial process that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a comprehensive comparison between these values in different nuclear grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons and variations between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between the two grades of graphite that were initially favored in the two main VHTR designs. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration, while PCEA, a smaller grain, petroleum coke, extruded graphite from GrafTech was favored for the prismatic configuration. An analysis of the comparison between these two grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  9. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  10. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Per; Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m 3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m 3 . This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X-PREX facility uses novel

  11. Melting of contaminated steel scrap from the dismantling of the CO2 systems of gas cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feaugas, J.; Jeanjacques, M.; Peulve, J.

    1994-01-01

    G2 and G3 are the natural Uranium cooled reactors Graphite/Gas. The two reactors were designed for both plutonium and electricity production (45 MWe). The dismantling of the reactors at stage 2 has produced more than 4 000 tonnes of contaminated scrap. Because of their large mass and low residual contamination level, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) considered various possibilities for the processing of these metallic products in order to reduce the volume of waste going to be stored. After different studies and tests of several processes and the evaluation of their results, the choice to melt the dismantled pipeworks was taken. It was decided to build the Nuclear Steel Melting Facility known as INFANTE, in cooperation with a steelmaker (AHL). The realization time schedule for the INFANTE lasted 20 months. It included studies, construction and the licensing procedure. (authors). 2 tabs., 3 figs

  12. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; Gibson, M.; King, D.C.; Marshall, J.; Puckett, B.J.; Richards, A.E.; Wass, T.; Wilson, D.J.

    1965-07-01

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO 2 /UO 2 fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author)

  13. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Gibson, M; King, D C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Richards, A E; Wass, T; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-07-15

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author) 14 refs, 30 figs, 18 tabs

  14. Proposition of a core model for the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR) minimizing the graphite moderator quantity in core; Proposition d'un modele de coeur pour le RSF thorium minimisant la quantite de moderateur graphite en coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuttin, A

    2004-07-01

    This work deals with the problem of fast damage of graphite in the core of TMSR. The approach consists to minimize the quantity of graphite used in the core (by an increase of the voluminal power) and then to extract and to reprocess. (O.M.)

  15. Experimental performance and results of the critical pebble bed facility KAHTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, F. J.; Drueke, V.; Kirch, N.; Neef, R. D.

    1974-10-15

    The paper provides a description and results of critical experiments performed in KAHTER fueled with pebbles containing coated particles of HEU/Th oxide with a ratio of uranium-to-thorium of 1.1:5. Core loadings with varying amounts of fuel and solid graphite pebbles were tested with fuel-to-graphite pebble ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3. Tests included criticality for various fuel loadings with all control rods removed, control rod worths for reflector-mounted control as single rods and in a bank and control worths for a central control rod, reaction rates by flux wire activations (Dy, Mn, In, Au, and U-235) and detector measurements (BF3 and fission chamber), simulated xenon stability testing using the motions of a Cf-252 source and Cd-absorber observed by an externally-located BF3 detector, and the reactivity worth of a Hf burnable absorber. For calculations of the room-temperature zero-power critical experiment, the values for nitrogen and hydrogen contents of the graphite were taken from previous experiments in CESAR.

  16. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  17. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  18. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements

  19. Experimental investigation on feasibility of two-region-designed pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xingtuan; Hu Wenping; Jiang Shengyao

    2009-01-01

    Phenomenological experiments were performed on a 2-dimensional scaled model of the two-region designed pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core consisting of the distinct fuel pebble region and graphite pebble region. Issues with respect to the feasibility of the two-region design, including the establishment of the two-region arrangement, the mixing zone between the two regions, and the stagnant zone existence, were investigated. Three equilibrium conditions were proposed to evaluate the stable two-region arrangement formation. The general characteristics of the flow of the pebble bed were analyzed on basis of the observed phenomenon. It was found that a stable two-region arrangement was formed under the experimental conditions: the pebbles' motion was to some extent random but also confined by the neighbors of pebbles so that the mixing zone is constrained to a reasonable size. Guide plates utilized to improve mixing are proved to be effective without noticeable effect on the two-region arrangement features. Stagnant zones were observed under the experimental conditions and they were expected to be avoided by improving the design of the experimental setup. (author)

  20. Flow distribution of pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactors using large eddy simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokhan Yesilyurt; Hassan, Y.A.

    2003-01-01

    A High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the renewed reactor designs to play a role in nuclear power generation. This reactor design concepts is currently under consideration and development worldwide. Since the HTGR concept offers inherent safety, has a very flexible fuel cycle with capability to achieve high burnup levels, and provides good thermal efficiency of power plant, it can be considered for further development and improvement as a reactor concept of generation IV. The combination of coated particle fuel, inert helium gas as coolant and graphite moderated reactor makes it possible to operate at high temperature yielding a high efficiency. In this study the simulation of turbulent transport for the gas through the gaps of the spherical fuel elements (fuel pebbles) will be performed. This will help in understanding the highly three-dimensional, complex flow phenomena in pebble bed caused by flow curvature. Under these conditions, heat transfer in both laminar and turbulent flows varies noticeably around curved surfaces. Curved flows would be present in the presence of contiguous curved surfaces. In the case of a laminar flow and of an appreciable effect of thermogravitional forces, the Nusselt (Nu) number depends significantly on the curvature shape of the surface. It changes with order of 10 times. The flow passages through the gap between the fuel balls have concave and convex configurations. Here the action of the centrifugal forces manifests itself differently on convex and concave parts of the flow path (suppression or stimulation of turbulence). The flow of this type has distinctive features. In such flow there is a pressure gradient, which strongly affects the boundary layer behavior. The transition from a laminar to turbulent flow around this curved flow occurs at deferent Reynolds (Re) numbers. Consequently, noncircular curved flows as in the pebble-bed situation, in detailed local sense, is interesting to be investigated. To the

  1. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadak, Andrew C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2007-03-15

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis.

  2. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis

  3. Plutonium burning in a pebble-bed type high temperature nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bende, E.E

    2000-01-24

    in an HTR pebble. The Dancoff factors used in the pebble-cell calculations of chapters 3 and 4 were calculated according to this analytic expression. Appendix B gives the temperature profile across a pebble and derives, on the basis of this profile, the average and effective temperature of the fuel and the graphite. Appendix C presents a study on the maximisation of the Doppler-effect (i.e. the fuel temperature reactivity feedback). refs.

  4. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled High Temperature Reactor - 15171

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, G.; Zou, Y.; Xu, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability of thorium fuel in a pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (PB-FHR) is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative FLiBe (2LiF-BeF 2 ) salt temperature reactivity coefficient (TRC). Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tri-structural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle system for increasing heavy metal loading and decreasing excessive moderation. In order to analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared 2 refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern) and 2 kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite). This method has found that the feasible regions of breeding and negative FLiBe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% heavy metal loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, FLiBe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong 9 Be(n,2n) reaction and low neutron absorption of 6 Li (even at 1000 ppm) in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows good safety margins. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the very long irradiation time of the pebble fuel. (authors)

  5. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  6. Contact detection acceleration in pebble flow simulation for pebble bed reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Ji, W. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Rensselaer, Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Pebble flow simulation plays an important role in the steady state and transient analysis of thermal-hydraulics and neutronics for Pebble Bed Reactors (PBR). The Discrete Element Method (DEM) and the modified Molecular Dynamics (MD) method are widely used to simulate the pebble motion to obtain the distribution of pebble concentration, velocity, and maximum contact stress. Although DEM and MD present high accuracy in the pebble flow simulation, they are quite computationally expensive due to the large quantity of pebbles to be simulated in a typical PBR and the ubiquitous contacts and collisions between neighboring pebbles that need to be detected frequently in the simulation, which greatly restricted their applicability for large scale PBR designs such as PBMR400. Since the contact detection accounts for more than 60% of the overall CPU time in the pebble flow simulation, the acceleration of the contact detection can greatly enhance the overall efficiency. In the present work, based on the design features of PBRs, two contact detection algorithms, the basic cell search algorithm and the bounding box search algorithm are investigated and applied to pebble contact detection. The influence from the PBR system size, core geometry and the searching cell size on the contact detection efficiency is presented. Our results suggest that for present PBR applications, the bounding box algorithm is less sensitive to the aforementioned effects and has superior performance in pebble contact detection compared with basic cell search algorithm. (authors)

  7. Contact detection acceleration in pebble flow simulation for pebble bed reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Ji, W.

    2013-01-01

    Pebble flow simulation plays an important role in the steady state and transient analysis of thermal-hydraulics and neutronics for Pebble Bed Reactors (PBR). The Discrete Element Method (DEM) and the modified Molecular Dynamics (MD) method are widely used to simulate the pebble motion to obtain the distribution of pebble concentration, velocity, and maximum contact stress. Although DEM and MD present high accuracy in the pebble flow simulation, they are quite computationally expensive due to the large quantity of pebbles to be simulated in a typical PBR and the ubiquitous contacts and collisions between neighboring pebbles that need to be detected frequently in the simulation, which greatly restricted their applicability for large scale PBR designs such as PBMR400. Since the contact detection accounts for more than 60% of the overall CPU time in the pebble flow simulation, the acceleration of the contact detection can greatly enhance the overall efficiency. In the present work, based on the design features of PBRs, two contact detection algorithms, the basic cell search algorithm and the bounding box search algorithm are investigated and applied to pebble contact detection. The influence from the PBR system size, core geometry and the searching cell size on the contact detection efficiency is presented. Our results suggest that for present PBR applications, the bounding box algorithm is less sensitive to the aforementioned effects and has superior performance in pebble contact detection compared with basic cell search algorithm. (authors)

  8. Behavior of beryllium pebbles under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle-Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik; Baldwin, D.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Kawamura, H.; Oliver, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are being considered in fusion reactor blanket designs as neutron multiplier. An example is the European `Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket.` Several forms of beryllium pebbles are commercially available but little is known about these forms in response to fast neutron irradiation. Commercially available beryllium pebbles have been irradiated to approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 390degC. Pebbles 1-mm in diameter manufactured by Brush Wellman, USA and by Nippon Gaishi Company, Japan, and 3-mm pebbles manufactured by Brush Wellman were included. All were irradiated in the below-core area of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho Falls, USA, in molybdenum alloy capsules containing helium. Post-irradiation results are presented on density change measurements, tritium release by assay, stepped-temperature anneal, and thermal ramp desorption tests, and helium release by assay and stepped-temperature anneal measurements, for Be pebbles from two manufacturing methods, and with two specimen diameters. The experimental results on density change and tritium and helium release are compared with the predictions of the code ANFIBE. (author)

  9. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2010-01-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  10. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  11. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  12. Effect of bed configuration on pebble flow uniformity and stagnation in the pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for HTR-PM. • Arc- and brachistochrone-shaped configuration effects are studied by DEM simulation. • Best bed configurations with uniform flow and no stagnated pebbles are suggested. • Detailed quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects are shown for explanation. - Abstract: Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for the design of pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Pebble flows inside some specifically designed contraction configurations of pebble bed are studied by discrete element method. The results show the characteristics of stagnation rates, recycling rates, radial distribution of pebble velocity and residence time. It is demonstrated clearly that the bed with a brachistochrone-shaped configuration achieves optimum levels of flow uniformity and recycling rate concentration, and almost no pebbles are stagnated in the bed. Moreover, the optimum choice among the arc-shaped bed configurations is demonstrated too. Detailed information shows the quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects on flow uniformity. In addition, a good design of the pebble bed configuration is suggested

  13. Estimation of Graphite Dust Production in ITER TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji Ho; Kim, Eung Seon

    2013-01-01

    This scheme uses simple equations and the calculation time is much less than others. However, the contact equation requires a specially tuned material properties and instability of system matrix were reported. Second, only a couple of pebbles were modeled using FEM(Finite Element Method) and appropriate boundary and loading conditions are imposed. This scheme gives a detailed information of stress distribution of the pebbles and the stability of calculation is well established. However, the calculation cost is fairly high and only a few pebble can be analyzed in detail at a time with specifically assigned contact conditions. In this study, a prediction model of graphite dust production in ITER(International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) TBM(Test Blanket Module) using FEM was introduced and the amount of dust production for an operation cycle was estimated. In this study, graphite dust generation in the reflector zone of ITER TBM was estimated using FE analysis. A unit-cell model was defined to simulate normal contact forces and slip distances on contact points between the center pebble and the surrounding pebbles. The dust production was calculated using Archard equation. The simulation was repeated with different friction coefficient of graphite material to investigate the effect of friction on the dust production. The calculation result showed that the amount of dust production was 2.22∼3.67e-4 g/m 3 which was almost linearly proportional to the friction coefficient of graphite material. The amount of graphite dust production was considered too much small for a dust explosion

  14. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  15. Proposal of a core model for the thorium molten salt reactor minimizing the quantity of graphite moderator in the core; Proposition d'un modele de coeur pour le RSF thorium minimisant la quantite de moderateur graphite en coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuttin, A

    2004-06-01

    In the present day TMSR design, the average power in the salt is about 200 W/cm{sup 3}, i.e. two times the one of MSBR. The average neutron flux in the core has doubled and the lifetime of graphite is two times lower. There is two approaches to solve this worrying problem: reducing the volume power to 50 W/cm{sup 3} or minimizing the amount of graphite used in the core. A solution should be to increase the volume power in order to reduce the core dimensions and thus the amount of graphite. By acting both on the total power ('economical' minimum of 1000 MWth) and on the average volume power ('physical' maximum of 500 W/cm{sup 3}) it is possible to reduce the core to a single channel or a single cylindrical ring and to concentrate graphite in a place easily accessible for its extraction and reprocessing. (J.S.)

  16. Investigations on accidents with massive water ingress exemplified by the pebble bed reactor PNP-500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moormann, R.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code is used for analyses of massive water ingress accidents in the High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor concept PNP-500 with pebble bed core. The analyses are mainly focussed on graphite corrosion processes. For the investigated accidents a correct reactor shut down in assumed. The mass of water ingressing into the primary circuit is varied between 1000 and 7500 kg (i.e., up to hypothetical values). The dependence of accident consequences on parameters such as intensity and starting time of the afterheat removal system or kinetic values of the chemical processes is examined. The results show that even under pessimistic assumptions the extent of the graphite corrosion is relatively low; significant damaging of fuel elements or graphite components does not occur. A primary circuit depressurization, combined with local burning of water gas, would probably not affect the fission product retention potential of the (gastight) containment. Summing up, the risk caused by these accidents remains small. (orig.) [de

  17. Pebble bed reactors simulation using MCNP: The Chinese HTR-10 reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Hosseini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Given the role of Gas-Graphite reactors as the fourth generation reactors and their recently renewed importance, in 2002 the IAEA proposed a set of Benchmarking problems. In this work, we propose a model both efficient in time and resources and exact to simulate the HTR-10 reactor using MCNP-4C code. During the present work, all of the pressing factors in PBM reactor design such as the inter-pebble leakage, fuel particle distribution and fuel pebble packing fraction effects have been taken into account to obtain an exact and easy to run model. Finally, the comparison between the results of the present work and other calculations made at INEEL proves the exactness of the proposed model.

  18. The Cross-Flow Mixing Analysis of Quasi-Static Pebble Flow in Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiang; Liu Zhiyong; Sun Yanfei; Yang Xingtuan; Jiang Shengyao

    2014-01-01

    In the pebble bed reactor, large number of fuel pebbles’ movement law and moving state can affect the reactor’s design, operation and safety directly. Therefore the pebble flow, which is based on the theory of particle streaming, is one of the most important research subjects of the pebble bed reactor engineering. The in-core pebble flow is a very slow particle flow (or called quasi-static particle flow), which is very different from the usual particle motion. How to accurately describe the characteristics of in-core pebble flow is a central issue for this subject. Due to the presence of random flow, the cross-mixing phenomenon will occur inevitably. In the present paper, the mixing phenomenon of pebble flow is generalized on the basis of experiment results. The pebble flow cross-mixing probability serves as the parameter which describes both the regularity and the randomness of pebble flow. The results are provided in the form of diagrammatic presentation. (author)

  19. Effect of friction on pebble flow pattern in pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yu; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3D DEM study on particle–wall/particle friction in pebble bed reactor is carried out. • Characteristic values are defined to evaluate features of pebble flow pattern quantitatively. • Particle–wall friction is dominant to determine flow pattern in a specific pebble bed. • Friction effect of hopper part on flow field is more critical than that of cylinder part. • Three cases of 1:1 full scale practical pebble beds are simulated for demonstration. - Abstract: Friction affects pebble flow pattern in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) significantly. Through a series of three dimensional DEM (discrete element method) simulations it is shown that reducing friction can be beneficial and create a uniform and consistent flow field required by nuclear engineering. Particle–wall friction poses a decisive impact on flow pattern, and particle–particle friction usually plays a secondary role; relation between particle–wall friction and flow pattern transition is also concluded. Moreover, new criteria are created to describe flow patterns quantitatively according to crucial issues in HTGR like stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence. Last but not least, it is proved that friction control of hopper part is more important than that of cylinder part in practical pebble beds, so reducing friction between pebbles and hopper surface is the engineering priority.

  20. Effect of heat source shape on the thermal field in the pebble bed core of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leisheng; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, in order to minimize the error brought by non-uniform heat flux, the spherical heaters are employed as heat source; subsequently, thermal field and heat transfer characteristics of the pebbles are investigated. The thermal field of the pebble surface in PBR is measured with heat source in different shapes. The HTGR design concept exhibits excellent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core which gives a large thermal inertia in an accident such as loss of coolant. However, the possible appearance of hot spots in the pebble bed cores of HTGR may affect the integrity of the pebbles, which has drawn the attention of many scientists to investigate the thermal field and to predict the maximum temperature locations in the pebbles using CFD method, Lee et.al has also done some experimental work on measuring the surface temperature of the pebbles as well as visualizing flow patterns of the coolant gas, and it was found that the temperature near the contacting points between pebbles was not higher than the flow stagnation points due to the higher thermal conductivity of the pebble. Certain error of temperature measurement might occur because of not very uniform heat flux in the pebbles since heater in cylindrical shape was utilized as heat source in previous experiment. More uniform heat flux and more complicated thermal profile are found in the result obtained using spherical heaters. The result shows that the temperature in contact point is higher than that in the top point, which is different from the previous results. The complex thermal phenomena observed in the lower-half side-sphere can be explained by the flow pattern near the surface.

  1. Experimental and computational investigation of flow of pebbles in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khane, Vaibhav B.

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a 4th generation nuclear reactor which is conceptually similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBR core, nuclear fuel in the form of pebbles moves slowly under the influence of gravity. Due to the dynamic nature of the core, a thorough understanding about slow and dense granular flow of pebbles is required from both a reactor safety and performance evaluation point of view. In this dissertation, a new integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a PBR has been performed. Continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking flow of pebbles in a PBR, is designed and developed. Experimental investigation of the flow of pebbles in a mimicked test reactor was carried out for the first time using non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) and residence time distribution (RTD) techniques to measure the pebble trajectory, velocity, overall/zonal residence times, flow patterns etc. The tracer trajectory length and overall/zonal residence time is found to increase with change in pebble's initial seeding position from the center towards the wall of the test reactor. Overall and zonal average velocities of pebbles are found to decrease from the center towards the wall. Discrete element method (DEM) based simulations of test reactor geometry were also carried out using commercial code EDEM(TM) and simulation results were validated using the obtained benchmark experimental data. In addition, EDEM(TM) based parametric sensitivity study of interaction properties was carried out which suggests that static friction characteristics play an important role from a packed/pebble beds structural characterization point of view. To make the RPT technique viable for practical applications and to enhance its accuracy, a novel and dynamic technique for RPT calibration was designed and developed. Preliminary feasibility results suggest that it can be implemented as a non

  2. Fission Product Transport and Source Terms in HTRs: Experience from AVR Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Moormann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission products deposited in the coolant circuit outside of the active core play a dominant role in source term estimations for advanced small pebble bed HTRs, particularly in design basis accidents (DBA. The deposited fission products may be released in depressurization accidents because present pebble bed HTR concepts abstain from a gas tight containment. Contamination of the circuit also hinders maintenance work. Experiments, performed from 1972 to 88 on the AVR, an experimental pebble bed HTR, allow for a deeper insight into fission product transport behavior. The activity deposition per coolant pass was lower than expected and was influenced by fission product chemistry and by presence of carbonaceous dust. The latter lead also to inconsistencies between Cs plate out experiments in laboratory and in AVR. The deposition behavior of Ag was in line with present models. Dust as activity carrier is of safety relevance because of its mobility and of its sorption capability for fission products. All metal surfaces in pebble bed reactors were covered by a carbonaceous dust layer. Dust in AVR was produced by abrasion in amounts of about 5 kg/y. Additional dust sources in AVR were ours oil ingress and peeling of fuel element surfaces due to an air ingress. Dust has a size of about 1  m, consists mainly of graphite, is partly remobilized by flow perturbations, and deposits with time constants of 1 to 2 hours. In future reactors, an efficient filtering via a gas tight containment is required because accidents with fast depressurizations induce dust mobilization. Enhanced core temperatures in normal operation as in AVR and broken fuel pebbles have to be considered, as inflammable dust concentrations in the gas phase.

  3. Thermo-mechanical screening tests to qualify beryllium pebble beds with non-spherical pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.reimann@partner.kit.edu [IKET, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fretz, Benjamin [KBHF GmbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pupeschi, Simone [IAM, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • In present ceramic breeder blankets, pebble-shaped beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier. • Spherical pebbles are considered as the candidate material, however, non-spherical particles are of economic interest. • Thermo-mechanical pebble bed data do merely exist for non-spherical beryllium grades. • Uniaxial compression tests (UCTs), combined with the Hot Wire Technique (HWT) were used to measure the stress–strain relations and the thermal conductivity. • A small experimental set-up had to be used and a detailed 3D modelling was of prime importance. • Compared to spherical pebble beds, non-spherical pebble beds are generally softer and mainly the thermal conductivity is lower. - Abstract: In present ceramic breeder blankets, pebble-shaped beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier. Fairly spherical pebbles are considered as a candidate material, however, non-spherical particles are of economic interest because production costs are much lower. Yet, thermo-mechanical pebble bed data do merely exist for these beryllium grades, and the blanket relevant potential of these grades cannot be judged. Screening experiments were performed with three different grades of non-spherical beryllium pebbles, produced by different companies, accompanied by experiments with the reference beryllium pebble beds. Uniaxial compression tests (UCTs), combined with the Hot Wire Technique (HWT), were performed to measure both the stress–strain relation and the thermal conductivity, k, at different stress levels. Because of the limited amounts of the non-spherical materials, the experimental set-ups were small and a detailed 3D modelling was of prime importance in order to prove that the used design was appropriate. Compared to the pebble beds consisting of spherical pebbles, non-spherical pebble beds are generally softer (smaller stress for a given strain), and, mainly as a consequence of this, for a given strain value, the thermal conductivity is lower. This

  4. Effects of random pebble distribution on the multiplication factor in HTR pebble bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auwerda, G.J., E-mail: g.j.auwerda@tudelft.n [Department of Physics of Nuclear Reactors at the Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, Delft (Netherlands); Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der [Department of Physics of Nuclear Reactors at the Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    In pebble bed reactors the pebbles have a random distribution within the core. The usual approach in modeling the bed is homogenizing the entire bed. To quantify the errors arising in such a model, this article investigates the effect on k{sub eff} of three phenomena in random pebble distributions: non-uniform packing density, neutron streaming in between the pebbles, and variations in Dancoff factor. For a 100 cm high cylinder with reflective top and bottom boundary conditions 25 pebble beds were generated. Of each bed three core models were made: a homogeneous model, a zones model including density fluctuations, and an exact model with all pebbles modeled individually. The same was done for a model of the PROTEUS facility. k{sub eff} calculations were performed with three codes: Monte Carlo, diffusion, and finite element transport. By comparing k{sub eff} of the homogenized and zones model the effect of including density fluctuations in the pebble bed was found to increase k{sub eff} by 71 pcm for the infinite cylinder and 649 pcm for PROTEUS. The large value for PROTEUS is due to the low packing fraction near the top of the pebble bed, causing a significant lower packing fraction for the bulk of the pebble bed in the homogenized model. The effect of neutron streaming was calculated by comparing the zones model with the exact model, and was found to decrease k{sub eff} by 606 pcm for the infinite cylinder, and by 1240 pcm for PROTEUS. This was compared with the effect of using a streaming correction factor on the diffusion coefficient in the zones model, which resulted in {Delta}{sub streaming} values of 340 and 1085 pcm. From this we conclude neutron streaming is an important effect in pebble bed reactors, and is not accurately described by the correction factor on the diffusion coefficient. Changing the Dancoff factor in the outer part of the pebble bed to compensate for the lower probability of neutrons to enter other fuel pebbles caused no significant changes

  5. Treatment and Disposal of the Radioactive Graphite Waste of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) represent one of the Gen IV reactors in the future market, with efficient generation of energy and the supply of process heat at high temperature utilised in many industrial processes. HTGR development has been carried out within China’s National High Technology Research and Development Program. The first industrial demonstration HTGR of 200 MWe is under construction in Shandong Province China. HTGRs use ceramic-coated fuel particles that are strong and highly resistant to irradiation. Graphite is used as moderator and helium is used as coolant. The fuel particles and the graphite block in which they are imbedded can withstand very high temperature (up to ~1600℃). Graphite waste presents as the fuel element components of HTGR with up to 95% of the whole element beside the graphite blocks in the core. For example, a 200 MWe reactor could discharge about 90,000 fuel elements with 17 tonnes irradiated graphite included each year. The core of the HTGR in China consists of a pebble bed with spherical fuel elements. The UO 2 fuel kernel particles (0.5mm diameter) (triple-coated isotropic fuel particles) are coated by several layers including inner buffer layer with less dense pyrocarbon, dense pyro-carbon, SiC layer and outer layer of dense pyro-carbon, which can prevent the leaking of fission products (Fig. 1). Spherical fuel elements (60mm diameter) consist of a 50mm diameter inner zone and 5mm thick shell of fuel free zone [3]. The inner zone contains about 8300 triple-coated isotropic fuel particles of 0.92mm in diameter dispersed in the graphite matrix

  6. Optimized Core Design and Fuel Management of a Pebble-Bed Type Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the six most promising nuclear reactor concepts that are expected to enter service in the second half of the 21st century. The VHTR is characterized by a high plant efficiency and a high fuel discharge burnup level. More specifically, the (pebble-bed type) High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is known for its inherently safe characteristics, coming from a negative temperature reactivity feedback, a low power density and a large thermal inertia of the core. The core of a pebble-bed reactor consists of graphite spheres (pebbles) that form a randomly packed porous bed, which is cooled by high pressure helium. The pebbles contain thousands of fuel particles, which are coated with several pyrocarbon and silicon carbon layers that are designed to contain the fission products that are formed during operation of the reactor. The inherent safety concept has been demonstrated in small pebble-bed reactors in practice, but an increase in the reactor size and power is required for cost-effective power production. An increase of the power density in order to increase the helium coolant outlet temperature is attractive with regard to the efficiency and possible process heat applications. However, this increase leads in general to higher fuel temperatures, which could lead to a consequent increase of the fuel coating failure probability. This thesis deals with the pebble-bed type VHTR that aims at an increased coolant outlet temperature of 1000 degrees C and beyond. For the simulation of the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor the DALTON-THERMIX coupled code system has been developed and has been validated against experiments performed in the AVR and HTR-10 reactors. An analysis of the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) design shows that the inherent safety concept that has been demonstrated in practice in the smaller AVR and HTR-10

  7. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  8. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  9. Pebble Accretion in Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziyan; Bai, Xue-Ning; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2017-09-01

    It has been realized in recent years that the accretion of pebble-sized dust particles onto planetary cores is an important mode of core growth, which enables the formation of giant planets at large distances and assists planet formation in general. The pebble accretion theory is built upon the orbit theory of dust particles in a laminar protoplanetary disk (PPD). For sufficiently large core mass (in the “Hill regime”), essentially all particles of appropriate sizes entering the Hill sphere can be captured. However, the outer regions of PPDs are expected to be weakly turbulent due to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), where turbulent stirring of particle orbits may affect the efficiency of pebble accretion. We conduct shearing-box simulations of pebble accretion with different levels of MRI turbulence (strongly turbulent assuming ideal magnetohydrodynamics, weakly turbulent in the presence of ambipolar diffusion, and laminar) and different core masses to test the efficiency of pebble accretion at a microphysical level. We find that accretion remains efficient for marginally coupled particles (dimensionless stopping time {τ }s˜ 0.1{--}1) even in the presence of strong MRI turbulence. Though more dust particles are brought toward the core by the turbulence, this effect is largely canceled by a reduction in accretion probability. As a result, the overall effect of turbulence on the accretion rate is mainly reflected in the changes in the thickness of the dust layer. On the other hand, we find that the efficiency of pebble accretion for strongly coupled particles (down to {τ }s˜ 0.01) can be modestly reduced by strong turbulence for low-mass cores.

  10. Loads on pebble bed fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E.; Maly, V.

    1974-03-15

    A comparison is made of key parameters for multi-recycle pebbles and single-pass once-through (OTTO) pebbles. The parameters analyzed include heat transfer characteristics with burn-up, temperature profiles, power per element as a function of axial position in the core, and burn-up. For the OTTO-scheme, the comparisons addressed the use of the conventional fuel element and the advanced "shell ball" designed to reduce the peak fuel temperature in the center of the fuel element. All studies addressed the uranium-thorium fuel cycle.

  11. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  12. Neutronic design of a Liquid Salt-cooled Pebble Bed Reactor (LSPBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Zwaan, S. J.; Boer, B.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    A renewed interest has been raised for liquid salt cooled nuclear reactors. The excellent heat transfer properties of liquid salt coolants provide several benefits, like lower fuel temperatures, higher coolant outlet temperatures, increased core power density and better decay heat removal. In order to benefit from the online refueling capability of a pebble bed reactor, the Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactor (LSPBR) is proposed. This is a high temperature pebble-bed reactor with a fuel design similar to existing HTRs, but using a liquid salt as a coolant. In this paper, the selection criteria for the liquid salt coolant are described. Based on its neutronic properties, LiF-BeF 2 (FLIBE) was selected for the LSPBR. Two designs of the LSPBR were considered: a cylindrical core and an annular core with a graphite inner reflector. Coupled neutronic-thermal hydraulic calculations were performed to obtain the steady state power distribution and the corresponding fuel temperatures. Finally, calculations were performed to investigate the decay heat removal capability in a protected loss-of-forced cooling accident. The maximum allowable power that can be produced with the LSPBR is hereby determined. (authors)

  13. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 7. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology: Implications for the provenance and tectonic setting of Lower Cretaceous sediments in the Zhucheng Basin (Jiaodong peninsula, North China). Jin-Long Ni Jun-Lai Liu Xiao-Ling Tang ...

  14. "Smart pebble" designs for sediment transport monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Alexakis, Athanasios; Pavlovskis, Edgars

    2015-04-01

    Sediment transport, due to primarily the action of water, wind and ice, is one of the most significant geomorphic processes responsible for shaping Earth's surface. It involves entrainment of sediment grains in rivers and estuaries due to the violently fluctuating hydrodynamic forces near the bed. Here an instrumented particle, namely a "smart pebble", is developed to investigate the exact flow conditions under which individual grains may be entrained from the surface of a gravel bed. This could lead in developing a better understanding of the processes involved, focusing on the response of the particle during a variety of flow entrainment events. The "smart pebble" is a particle instrumented with MEMS sensors appropriate for capturing the hydrodynamic forces a coarse particle might experience during its entrainment from the river bed. A 3-axial gyroscope and accelerometer registers data to a memory card via a microcontroller, embedded in a 3D-printed waterproof hollow spherical particle. The instrumented board is appropriately fit and centred into the shell of the pebble, so as to achieve a nearly uniform distribution of the mass which could otherwise bias its motion. The "smart pebble" is powered by an independent power to ensure autonomy and sufficiently long periods of operation appropriate for deployment in the field. Post-processing and analysis of the acquired data is currently performed offline, using scientific programming software. The performance of the instrumented particle is validated, conducting a series of calibration experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions.

  15. Measurements of the purge helium pressure drop across pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Sena, Ali, E-mail: ali.abou-sena@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Schlindwein, Georg

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The objective is to measure the purge helium pressure drop across various HCPB-relevant pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles. • The purge helium pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter from one run to another. • At the same superficial velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the helium inlet pressure. • The Ergun's equation can successfully model the purge helium pressure drop for the HCPB-relevant pebble beds. • The measured values of the purge helium pressure drop for the lithium orthosilicate pebble bed will support the design of the purge gas system for the HCPB breeder units. - Abstract: The lithium orthosilicate pebble beds of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket are purged by helium to transport the produced tritium to the tritium extraction system. The pressure drop of the purge helium has a direct impact on the required pumping power and is a limiting factor for the purge mass flow. Therefore, the objective of this study is to measure the helium pressure drop across various HCPB-relevant pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles. The pebble bed was formed by packing the pebbles into a stainless steel cylinder (ID = 30 mm and L = 120 mm); then it was integrated into a gas loop that has four variable-speed side-channel compressors to regulate the helium mass flow. The static pressure was measured at two locations (100 mm apart) along the pebble bed and at inlet and outlet of the pebble bed. The results demonstrated that: (i) the pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter, (ii) for the same superficial velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the inlet pressure, and (iii) predictions of Ergun's equation agree well with the experimental results. The measured pressure drop for the lithium orthosilicate pebble bed will support the design of the purge gas system for the HCPB.

  16. Effect of fuel particles' size variations on multiplication factor in pebble-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2005-01-01

    The pebble-bed reactor (Pbr) spherical fuel element consists of two radial zones: the inner zone, in which the fissile material in form of the so-called TRISO particles is uniformly dispersed in graphite matrix and the outer zone, a shell of pure graphite. A TRISO particle is composed of a fissile kernel (UO 2 ) and several layers of carbon composites. The effect of TRISO particles' size variations and distance between them on PBR multiplication factor is studied using MCNP code. Fuel element is modelled in approximation of a cubical unit cell with periodic boundary condition. The multiplication factor of the fuel element depends on the size of the TRISO particles due to resonance self-shielding effect and on the inter-particle distance due to inter-kernel shadowing. (author)

  17. "Smart pebble" design for environmental monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Pavlovskis, Edgars

    2014-05-01

    Sediment transport, due to primarily the action of water, wind and ice, is one of the most significant geomorphic processes responsible for shaping Earth's surface. It involves entrainment of sediment grains in rivers and estuaries due to the violently fluctuating hydrodynamic forces near the bed. Here an instrumented particle, namely a "smart pebble", is developed to investigate the exact flow conditions under which individual grains may be entrained from the surface of a gravel bed. This could lead in developing a better understanding of the processes involved, while focusing on the response of the particle during a variety of flow entrainment events. The "smart pebble" is a particle instrumented with MEMS sensors appropriate for capturing the hydrodynamic forces a coarse particle might experience during its entrainment from the river bed. A 3-axial gyroscope and accelerometer registers data to a memory card via a microcontroller, embedded in a 3D-printed waterproof hollow spherical particle. The instrumented board is appropriately fit and centred into the shell of the pebble, so as to achieve a nearly uniform distribution of the mass which could otherwise bias its motion. The "smart pebble" is powered by an independent power to ensure autonomy and sufficiently long periods of operation appropriate for deployment in the field. Post-processing and analysis of the acquired data is currently performed offline, using scientific programming software. The performance of the instrumented particle is validated, conducting a series of calibration experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions. "Smart pebble" allows for a wider range of environmental sensors (e.g. for environmental/pollutant monitoring) to be incorporated so as to extend the range of its application, enabling accurate environmental monitoring which is required to ensure infrastructure resilience and preservation of ecological health.

  18. X-ray tomography investigations on pebble bed structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, J.; Rolli, R.; Pieritz, R.A.; Ferrero, C.; Di Michiel, M.

    2007-01-01

    Granular materials (pebbles) are used in present ceramic breeder blankets both for the ceramic breeder material and beryllium. The thermal-mechanical behaviour of these pebble beds strongly depends on the arrangement of the pebbles in the bed, their contacts and contact surfaces with other pebbles and with walls. The influence of these quantities is most pronounced for beryllium pebble beds because of the large thermal conductivity ratio of beryllium to helium gas atmosphere. At present, the data base for the pebble bed thermal conductivity (k) and heat transfer coefficient (h) is quite limited for compressed beds and significant discrepancies exist in respect to h. The detailed knowledge of the pebble bed topology is, therefore, essential to better understand the heat transfer mechanisms. In the present work, results from detailed X-ray tomography investigations are reported on pebble topology in i) the pebble bed bulk (which is relevant for k), and ii) the region close to walls with thicknesses of several pebble diameters (relevant for h). At Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, pebble beds consisting of aluminium spheres with diameters of 2.3 and 5 mm, respectively, (simulating the blanket relevant 1 mm beryllium pebbles), were uniaxially compressed at different pressure levels. High resolution three-dimensional microtomography (MT) experiments were subsequently performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble. Radial and axial void fraction distributions were found to be oscillatory next to the walls and non-oscillatory in the bulk. For non-compressed pebble beds, the bulk void fraction is fairly constant; for compressed beds, a gradient exists along the compression axis. In the bulk, the angular distribution of pebble contacts was found to be fairly constant, indicating that no regular packing structure is induced. In the wall region, the pebble layer touching the wall is composed of zones with hexagonal structures as shown clearly by MT images. This

  19. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  20. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Hot-Spot Fuel Temperature in Pebble Bed and Prismatic Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Lee, S. W.; Lim, H. S.; Lee, W. J.

    2006-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors(HTGR) have been reviewed as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor(PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor(PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both a PBR and a PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the hot-spot fuel temperature distributions in a PBR and a PMR at a steady state. The computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-10 is used to perform the three-dimensional analysis. The latest design data was used here based on the reference reactor designs, PBMR400 and GTMHR60

  1. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  2. A discrete element method study on the evolution of thermomechanics of a pebble bed experiencing pebble failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lew, Jon T., E-mail: jtvanlew@fusion.ucla.edu; Ying, Alice; Abdou, Mohamed

    2014-10-15

    The discrete element method (DEM) is used to study the thermal effects of pebble failure in an ensemble of lithium ceramic spheres. Some pebbles crushing in a large system is unavoidable and this study provides correlations between the extent of pebble failure and the reduction in effective thermal conductivity of the bed. In the model, we homogeneously induced failure and applied nuclear heating until dynamic and thermal steady-state. Conduction between pebbles and from pebbles to the boundary is the only mode of heat transfer presently modeled. The effective thermal conductivity was found to decrease rapidly as a function of the percent of failed pebbles in the bed. It was found that the dominant contributor to the reduction was the drop in inter-particle forces as pebbles fail; implying the extent of failure induced may not occur in real pebble beds. The results are meant to assist designers in the fusion energy community who are planning to use packed beds of ceramic pebbles. The evolution away from experimentally measured thermomechanical properties as pebbles fail is necessary for proper operation of fusion reactors.

  3. Innovative approaches to the Management of Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Wastes: Addressing the Challenges through International Collaboration with Project 'GRAPA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Ojovan, M.; O'Sullivan, P.; )

    2017-01-01

    There exists more than 250.000 tonnes of irradiated (and therefore radioactive) nuclear graphite (i-graphite) in the world, primarily as a result of the development of graphite-moderated power-reactor systems, initially for defence and subsequently for commercial purposes. Only a very small number of such plants have been dismantled and, for most cases, the final destiny of the irradiated graphite remains unresolved. Future high-temperature reactor programmes, such as the Chinese HTR-PM development, will produce more graphite and carbonaceous wastes from both structural components and the fuel pebbles (which are approximately 96% carbonaceous), the latter producing a continuous stream of so-called 'operational waste'. The problem of dismantling irradiated graphite reactor stacks, possibly distorted through neutron damage and in some cases degraded further by radiation-chemical attack by gaseous coolants, and then finding the appropriate treatments and final destiny of the material, has exercised both the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency for more than 25 years, seeking to address the different issues and available disposal solutions in different IAEA Member States. An IAEA collaborative research programme on treatment options has recently been completed, and an active group of international specialists in this area has now been established as part of the IAEA International Decommissioning Network under the envelope of Project 'GRAPA' (Irradiated Graphite Processing Approaches), which includes representatives from Belgium, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Lithuania, Rep. of Korea, Romania, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine and the Russian Federation with direct responsibilities for various parts of the decommissioning and graphite-disposal process in a variety of reactor designs. Interest has also been expressed by colleagues from Sweden and Japan. Work is in progress on a number of topic areas where weaknesses in the

  4. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  5. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in 235 U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 μm and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core

  6. Ceramic breeder pebble bed packing stability under cyclic loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunbo, E-mail: chunbozhang@fusion.ucla.edu [Fusion Science and Technology Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Ying, Alice; Abdou, Mohamed A. [Fusion Science and Technology Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Park, Yi-Hyun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The feasibility of obtaining packing stability for pebble beds is studied. • The responses of pebble bed to cyclic loads have been presented and analyzed in details. • Pebble bed packing saturation and its applications are discussed. • A suggestion is made regarding the improvement of pebbles filling technique. - Abstract: Considering the optimization of blanket performance, it is desired that the bed morphology and packing state during reactor operation are stable and predictable. Both experimental and numerical work are performed to explore the stability of pebble beds, in particular under pulsed loading conditions. Uniaxial compaction tests have been performed for both KIT’s Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and NFRI’s Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble beds at elevated temperatures (up to 750 °C) under cyclic loads (up to 6 MPa). The obtained data shows the stress-strain loop initially moves towards the larger strain and nearly saturates after a certain number of cyclic loading cycles. The characterized FEM CAP material models for a Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebble bed with an edge-on configuration are used to simulate the thermomechanical behavior of pebble bed under ITER pulsed operations. Simulation results have shown the cyclic variation of temperature/stress/strain/gap and also the same saturation trend with experiments under cyclic loads. Therefore, it is feasible for pebble bed to maintain its packing stability during operation when disregarding pebbles’ breakage and irradiation.

  7. Mechanics of a crushable pebble assembly using discrete element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annabattula, R.K.; Gan, Y.; Zhao, S.; Kamlah, M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of crushing of individual pebbles on the overall strength of a pebble assembly is investigated using discrete element method. An assembly comprising of 5000 spherical pebbles is assigned with random critical failure energies with a Weibull distribution in accordance with the experimental observation. Then, the pebble assembly is subjected to uni-axial compression (ε 33 =1.5%) with periodic boundary conditions. The crushable pebble assembly shows a significant difference in stress–strain response in comparison to a non-crushable pebble assembly. The analysis shows that a ideal plasticity like behaviour (constant stress with increase in strain) is the characteristic of a crushable pebble assembly with sudden damage. The damage accumulation law plays a critical role in determining the critical stress while the critical number of completely failed pebbles at the onset of critical stress is independent of such a damage law. Furthermore, a loosely packed pebble assembly shows a higher crush resistance while the critical stress is insensitive to the packing factor (η) of the assembly.

  8. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  9. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  10. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  11. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  12. Fabrication of modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles by addition of titania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knitter, R., E-mail: regina.knitter@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT), Karlsruhe, 76021 (Germany); Kolb, M.H.H.; Kaufmann, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-WPT), Karlsruhe, 76021 (Germany); Goraieb, A.A. [Goraieb Versuchstechnik (GVT), Karlsruhe, 76227 (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titania were fabricated by a modified melt-based process. ► The fabricated pebbles exhibit a very fine-grained microstructure with lithium metatitanate as a secondary phase. ► Due to the addition of titanate, the crush load of the pebbles was significantly increased. ► The closed porosity was found to be slightly increased with increasing titanate content. -- Abstract: Lithium orthosilicate pebbles are one of the ceramic tritium breeder materials destined for the European solid breeder test blanket modules of ITER, the large-scale scientific experiment intended to prove the viability of fusion as an energy source, presently under construction in Cadarache, France. While the current reference material is fabricated by melt-spraying with 2.5 wt.% excess of silica, resulting in a two-phase material of lithium orthosilicate and metasilicate, a modified melt-based process was used to fabricate breeder pebbles with additions of titania in order to obtain pebbles with lithium metatitanate as a secondary phase. The fabricated two-phase pebbles exhibit a fine-grained microstructure and increased crush loads. The optimum titanate content has yet to be evaluated, nonetheless the pebbles may have the potential to combine the advantages of both lithium orthosilicate and metatitanate breeder ceramics.

  13. A comparison of predicted and measured graphite moderator behaviour during 16 years' operation of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, N.

    1980-01-01

    The Windscale AGR has operated since January 1963 at a cumulative load factor of nearly 70% during which time the peak irradiation damage dose has built up to more than 5x10 n/cm 2 (equivalent DIDO nickel), well beyond its original design life. This paper recounts the findings of monitoring measurements on the moderator at high exposure levels with regard to radiolytic oxidation and various aspects of dimensional change behaviour. It is shown that the measured dimensional changes are in good agreement with predictions based on small specimens irradiated in MTR's, thus confirming the absence of any size effect and adding confidence to predictive methods. However, recent measurements of channel straightness show that the observed distortions are only about 10% of the maximum predictions, perhaps due to localised creep at the brick ends creating flats which impart some stability to the columns of moderator bricks. The magnitude of radiolytic oxidation determined by trepanning specimens from the core in 1976 was found to be only about 5%, whereas it was thought possible that peak weight losses would conceivably be as high as 11% due to the depleted concentration of methane inhibitor reaching the brick interior by diffusion processes. It has subsequently been shown by calculation that this result is consistent with the existence of radial pressure drops across the moderator brick walls giving greater penetration of methane inhibitor. (author)

  14. Temperature distribution in graphite during annealing in air cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, C.R. de.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the evaluation temperature distributions in graphite during annealing operation in graphite. Moderated an-cooled reactors, is presented. One single channel and one dimension for air and graphite were considered. A numerical method based on finite control volumes was used for partioning the mathematical equations. The problem solution involves the use of unsteady equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for air, and energy conservation for graphite. The source term was considered as stored energy release during annealing for describing energy conservation in the graphite. The coupling of energy conservation equations in air and graphite is performed by the heat transfer term betwen air and graphite. The results agree with experimental data. A sensitivity analysis shown that the termal conductivity of graphite and the maximum inlet channel temperature have great effect on the maximum temperature reached in graphite during the annealing. (author)

  15. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next

  16. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  17. Review of PSI studies on reactor physics and thermal fluid dynamics of pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-01-01

    density ratios are expected in air ingress scenarios at an HTR. As a spin-off from aerosol studies for severe accidents, theoretical studies were started on graphite dust in pebble bed reactors. Wear and tear of the fuel spheres can produce significant quantities of graphite dust. Simulations of the pebble flow in a random package have been carried out in a generic full-size reactor geometry (440’000 pebbles) using the discrete-element method (DEM). The simulations provide the residence time distribution of the pebbles and the spatial distribution of wear. The model is ready for an implementation of a dust production term. In parallel, preliminary results on dust deposition were obtained for a particle laden flow around a single sphere and a linear arrangement of spheres. For this purpose a RANS turbulence model was coupled with a continuous random walk model for the integration of the particle trajectories in Lagrangian coordinates. Based on the outlined expertise, PSI plans to intensify the work on HTR in the future. (author)

  18. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  19. How cores grow by pebble accretion. I. Direct core growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, M. G.; Vazan, A.; Ormel, C. W.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Planet formation by pebble accretion is an alternative to planetesimal-driven core accretion. In this scenario, planets grow by the accretion of cm- to m-sized pebbles instead of km-sized planetesimals. One of the main differences with planetesimal-driven core accretion is the increased thermal ablation experienced by pebbles. This can provide early enrichment to the planet's envelope, which influences its subsequent evolution and changes the process of core growth. Aims: We aim to predict core masses and envelope compositions of planets that form by pebble accretion and compare mass deposition of pebbles to planetesimals. Specifically, we calculate the core mass where pebbles completely evaporate and are absorbed before reaching the core, which signifies the end of direct core growth. Methods: We model the early growth of a protoplanet by calculating the structure of its envelope, taking into account the fate of impacting pebbles or planetesimals. The region where high-Z material can exist in vapor form is determined by the temperature-dependent vapor pressure. We include enrichment effects by locally modifying the mean molecular weight of the envelope. Results: In the pebble case, three phases of core growth can be identified. In the first phase (Mcore mixes outwards, slowing core growth. In the third phase (Mcore > 0.5M⊕), the high-Z inner region expands outwards, absorbing an increasing fraction of the ablated material as vapor. Rainout ends before the core mass reaches 0.6 M⊕, terminating direct core growth. In the case of icy H2O pebbles, this happens before 0.1 M⊕. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pebble accretion can directly form rocky cores up to only 0.6 M⊕, and is unable to form similarly sized icy cores. Subsequent core growth can proceed indirectly when the planet cools, provided it is able to retain its high-Z material.

  20. The Development of Materials for Application to Control Rod Systems in Graphite moderated Reactors; Mise au Point de Materiaux pour les Dispositifs de Controle a Barres, Utilbes dans les Reacteurs Ralentis au Graphite; Razrabotka materialov , primenyaemykh v sistemakh upravlyayushchikh sterzhnej v reaktorakh s grafitovym zamedlitelem; Perfeccionamiento de Materiales Aplicables a las Barras de Control en los Reactores Moderados por Grafito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, G. E.; Kempf, F. J. [Hanford Atomic Products Operation, General Electric Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1964-06-15

    Material problems associated with the control- and safety-rod systems for graphite moderated, tube-type reactors can be divided into two categories: control materials and operating-channel liner materials. The control materials, such as boron or gadolinium, can be integral with the rod sheath, as in the boron stainless steel used for safety rods. Another approach is the enclosure of a boron-containing sintered compact, such as B{sub 4}C-graphite or B{sub 4}C-aluminium, in a metallic sheath. Rods of the latter type are adaptable for control purposes because of the increased percentages of boron that can be included. Test and fabrication experience indicate that a wide range of satisfactory rod designs is possible with any of these materials. The rod operating channels in the reactor often require liners to protect the surrounding graphite moderator from rod-insertion impact loads and wear and to help maintain channel alignment. Abrasion- and impact resistant, high-strength, low cross-section materials that will operate uncooled are required for these liners. Pyrolytic graphite, pyrolytic graphite composites, aluminium oxide and silicon carbide have been tested for such applications. Physical and irradiation damage data indicate that some of these materials are suitable for lining rod-operating channels. (author) [French] Les problemes de materiaux lies aux dispositifs de controle a barres de reglage et de securite pour les reacteurs tubulaires ralentis au graphite sont doubles et concernent les materiaux absorbants d'une part et les materiaux de garnissage des canaux d'autre part. Les materiaux absorbants tels que le bore ou le gadolinium peuvent former un tout avec le materiau de gainage comme dans le cas ou les barres de securite sont en acier inoxydable au bore. Une autre technique consiste a enfermer un melange presse et fritte contenant du bore, tel que B4C-graphite ou B4C-aluminium, dans une gaine metallique. Les barres de ce dernier type peuvent etre adaptees

  1. The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor: An obituary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Steve, E-mail: stephen.thomas@gre.ac.u [Public Services International Research Unit (PSIRU), Business School, University of Greenwich, 30 Park Row, London SE10 9LS (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) has exerted a peculiar attraction over nuclear engineers. Despite many unsuccessful attempts over half a century to develop it as a commercial power reactor, there is still a strong belief amongst many nuclear advocates that a highly successful HTGR technology will emerge. The most recent attempt to commercialize an HTGR design, the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), was abandoned in 2010 after 12 years of effort and the expenditure of a large amount of South African public money. This article reviews this latest attempt to commercialize an HTGR design and attempts to identify which issues have led to its failure and what lessons can be learnt from this experience. It concludes that any further attempts to develop HTGRs using Pebble Bed technology should only be undertaken if there is a clear understanding of why earlier attempts have failed and a high level of confidence that earlier problems have been overcome. It argues that the PBMR project has exposed serious weaknesses in accountability mechanisms for the expenditure of South African public money. - Research highlights: {yields} In this study we examine the reasons behind the failure of the South African PBMR programme. {yields} The study reviews the technical issues that have arisen and lessons for future reactor developments. {yields} The study also identifies weaknesses in the accountability mechanisms for public spending.

  2. A safety re-evaluation of the AVR pebble bed reactor operation and its consequences for future HTR concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moormann, R.

    2008-06-15

    The AVR pebble bed reactor (46 MW{sub th}) was operated 1967-88 at coolant outlet temperatures up to 990 C. A principle difference of pebble bed HTRs as AVR to conventional reactors is the continuous movement of fuel element pebbles through the core which complicates thermohydraulic, nuclear and safety estimations. Also because of a lack of other experience AVR operation is still a relevant basis for future pebble bed HTRs and thus requires careful examination. This paper deals mainly with some insufficiently published unresolved safety problems of AVR operation and of pebble bed HTRs but skips the widely known advantageous features of pebble bed HTRs. The AVR primary circuit is heavily contaminated with metallic fission products (Sr-90, Cs-137) which create problems in current dismantling. The amount of this contamination is not exactly known, but the evaluation of fission product deposition experiments indicates that the end of life contamination reached several percent of a single core inventory, which is some orders of magnitude more than precalculated and far more than in large LWRs. A major fraction of this contamination is bound on graphitic dust and thus partly mobile in depressurization accidents, which has to be considered in safety analyses of future reactors. A re-evaluation of the AVR contamination is performed here in order to quantify consequences for future HTRs (400 MW{sub th}). It leads to the conclusion that the AVR contamination was mainly caused by inadmissible high core temperatures, increasing fission product release rates, and not - as presumed in the past - by inadequate fuel quality only. The high AVR core temperatures were detected not earlier than one year before final AVR shut-down, because a pebble bed core cannot yet be equipped with instruments. The maximum core temperatures are still unknown but were more than 200 K higher than calculated. Further, azimuthal temperature differences at the active core margin of up to 200 K were

  3. A safety re-evaluation of the AVR pebble bed reactor operation and its consequences for future HTR concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moormann, R.

    2008-06-01

    The AVR pebble bed reactor (46 MW th ) was operated 1967-88 at coolant outlet temperatures up to 990 C. A principle difference of pebble bed HTRs as AVR to conventional reactors is the continuous movement of fuel element pebbles through the core which complicates thermohydraulic, nuclear and safety estimations. Also because of a lack of other experience AVR operation is still a relevant basis for future pebble bed HTRs and thus requires careful examination. This paper deals mainly with some insufficiently published unresolved safety problems of AVR operation and of pebble bed HTRs but skips the widely known advantageous features of pebble bed HTRs. The AVR primary circuit is heavily contaminated with metallic fission products (Sr-90, Cs-137) which create problems in current dismantling. The amount of this contamination is not exactly known, but the evaluation of fission product deposition experiments indicates that the end of life contamination reached several percent of a single core inventory, which is some orders of magnitude more than precalculated and far more than in large LWRs. A major fraction of this contamination is bound on graphitic dust and thus partly mobile in depressurization accidents, which has to be considered in safety analyses of future reactors. A re-evaluation of the AVR contamination is performed here in order to quantify consequences for future HTRs (400 MW th ). It leads to the conclusion that the AVR contamination was mainly caused by inadmissible high core temperatures, increasing fission product release rates, and not - as presumed in the past - by inadequate fuel quality only. The high AVR core temperatures were detected not earlier than one year before final AVR shut-down, because a pebble bed core cannot yet be equipped with instruments. The maximum core temperatures are still unknown but were more than 200 K higher than calculated. Further, azimuthal temperature differences at the active core margin of up to 200 K were observed

  4. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  5. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  6. Optimization of MOX fuel cycles in pebble bed HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jinfeng; Li Fu; Sun Yuliang

    2013-01-01

    Compared with light water reactor (LWR), the pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is able to operate in a full mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled core without significant change to core structure design. Based on a reference design of 250 MW pebble bed HTGR, four MOX fuel cycles were designed and evaluated by VSOP program package, including the mixed Pu-U fuel pebbles and mixed loading of separate Pu-pebbles and U-pebbles. Some important physics features were investigated and compared for these four cycles, such as the effective multiplication factor of initial core, the pebble residence time, discharge burnup, and temperature coefficients. Preliminary results show that the overall performance of one case is superior to other equivalent MOX fuel cycles on condition that uranium fuel elements and plutonium fuel elements are separated as the different fuel pebbles and that the uranium fuel elements are irradiated longer in the core than the plutonium fuel elements, and the average discharge burnup of this case is also higher than others. (authors)

  7. The ESKOM pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    An audit has been made of the design, construction, safety, economics and marketability of the ESKOM pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR). In this paper that audit is briefly summarized. The principal conclusions of the audit are as follows. The design is sound. It is a logical development of the designs proposed for other, modern, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. More than 80% of the cost of constructing and commissioning a series of PBMRs would be spent in South Africa. The PBMR is much safer than existing nuclear power reactors and for many practical purposes it may be treated as a conventional chemical plant. The PBMR is economically competitive with thermal power stations. There is a substantial global market for the PBMR. (author)

  8. Safeguards Challenges for Pebble-Bed Reactors (PBRs):Peoples Republic of China (PRC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is operating the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor (PBR) and is in the process of building a prototype PBR plant with two modular reactors (250-MW(t) per reactor) feeding steam to a single turbine-generator. It is likely to be the first modular hightemperature reactor to be ready for commercial deployment in the world because it is a highpriority project for the PRC. The plant design features multiple modular reactors feeding steam to a single turbine generator where the number of modules determines the plant output. The design and commercialization strategy are based on PRC strengths: (1) a rapidly growing electric market that will support low-cost mass production of modular reactor units and (2) a balance of plant system based on economics of scale that uses the same mass-produced turbine-generator systems used in PRC coal plants. If successful, in addition to supplying the PRC market, this strategy could enable China to be the leading exporter of nuclear reactors to developing countries. The modular characteristics of the reactor match much of the need elsewhere in the world. PBRs have major safety advantages and a radically different fuel. The fuel, not the plant systems, is the primary safety system to prevent and mitigate the release of radionuclides under accident conditions. The fuel consists of small (6-cm) pebbles (spheres) containing coatedparticle fuel in a graphitized carbon matrix. The fuel loading per pebble is small (~9 grams of low-enriched uranium) and hundreds of thousands of pebbles are required to fuel a nuclear plant. The uranium concentration in the fuel is an order of magnitude less than in traditional nuclear fuels. These characteristics make the fuel significantly less attractive for illicit use (weapons production or dirty bomb); but, its unusual physical form may require changes in the tools used for safeguards. This report describes PBRs, what is different, and the safeguards challenges. A series of

  9. Safeguards Challenges for Pebble-Bed Reactors (PBRs):Peoples Republic of China (PRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Moses, David Lewis

    2009-01-01

    The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is operating the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor (PBR) and is in the process of building a prototype PBR plant with two modular reactors (250-MW(t) per reactor) feeding steam to a single turbine-generator. It is likely to be the first modular high temperature reactor to be ready for commercial deployment in the world because it is a high priority project for the PRC. The plant design features multiple modular reactors feeding steam to a single turbine generator where the number of modules determines the plant output. The design and commercialization strategy are based on PRC strengths: (1) a rapidly growing electric market that will support low-cost mass production of modular reactor units and (2) a balance of plant system based on economics of scale that uses the same mass-produced turbine-generator systems used in PRC coal plants. If successful, in addition to supplying the PRC market, this strategy could enable China to be the leading exporter of nuclear reactors to developing countries. The modular characteristics of the reactor match much of the need elsewhere in the world. PBRs have major safety advantages and a radically different fuel. The fuel, not the plant systems, is the primary safety system to prevent and mitigate the release of radionuclides under accident conditions. The fuel consists of small (6-cm) pebbles (spheres) containing coated particle fuel in a graphitized carbon matrix. The fuel loading per pebble is small (∼9 grams of low-enriched uranium) and hundreds of thousands of pebbles are required to fuel a nuclear plant. The uranium concentration in the fuel is an order of magnitude less than in traditional nuclear fuels. These characteristics make the fuel significantly less attractive for illicit use (weapons production or dirty bomb); but, its unusual physical form may require changes in the tools used for safeguards. This report describes PBRs, what is different, and the safeguards challenges. A series of

  10. Failure initiation and propagation of Li4SiO4 pebbles in fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shuo; Gan Yixiang; Kamlah, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) pebbles are considered to be a candidate as solid tritium breeder in the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket. These ceramic pebbles might be crushed during thermomechanical loading in the blanket. In this work, the failure initiation and propagation of pebbles in pebble beds is investigated using the discrete element method (DEM). Pebbles are simplified as mono-sized elastic spheres. Every pebble has a contact strength in terms of critical strain energy, which is derived from a validated strength model and crush test data for pebbles from a specific batch of Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles. Pebble beds are compressed uniaxially and triaxially in DEM simulations. When the strain energy absorbed by a pebble exceeds its critical energy it fails. The failure initiation is defined as a given small fraction of pebbles crushed. It is found that the load level for failure initiation can be very low. For example, if failure initiation is defined as soon as 0.02% of the pebbles have been crushed, the pressure required for uniaxial loading is about 2.5 MPa. Therefore, it is essential to study the influence of failure propagation on the macroscopic response of pebble beds. Thus a reduction ratio defined as the size ratio of a pebble before and after its failure is introduced. The macroscopic stress–strain relation is investigated with different reduction ratios. A typical stress plateau is found for a small reduction ratio.

  11. Estimation of graphite dust production in ITER TBM using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji-Ho, E-mail: jhkang@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daekeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daekeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young; Lee, Youngmin; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148, Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust production was estimated for the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector. • Wear amount was calculated by Archard model using finite element analysis results. • Life time estimation of graphite dust production was done. - Abstract: In this study, an estimation method of graphite dust production in the pebble-bed type reflector region of the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project using Finite Element Method (FEM) was proposed and the total amount of dust production was calculated. A unit-cell model of uniformly arranged pebbles was defined with thermal and mechanical loadings. A commercial FEM program, Abaqus V6.10, was used to model and solve the stress field under multiple contact constraints between pebbles in the unit-cell. Resultant normal contact forces and slip distances on the contact points were applied into the Archard adhesive wear model to calculate the amount of graphite dust. The Finite Element (FE) analysis was repeated at 27 unit-cell locations chosen to form an interpolated dust density function for the entire region of the reflector. The dust production calculation was extended to the life time of the HCCR and the total graphite dust production was estimated to 0.279 g at the end of the life time with the maximum graphite dust density of 0.149 μg/mm{sup 3}. The dust explosion could be a safety issue with the calculated dust density level and it requires that an appropriate maintenance to remove sufficient amount of graphite dust regularly to prevent the possibility of dust explosion.

  12. Estimation of graphite dust production in ITER TBM using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Kim, Eung Seon; Ahn, Mu-Young; Lee, Youngmin; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite dust production was estimated for the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector. • Wear amount was calculated by Archard model using finite element analysis results. • Life time estimation of graphite dust production was done. - Abstract: In this study, an estimation method of graphite dust production in the pebble-bed type reflector region of the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project using Finite Element Method (FEM) was proposed and the total amount of dust production was calculated. A unit-cell model of uniformly arranged pebbles was defined with thermal and mechanical loadings. A commercial FEM program, Abaqus V6.10, was used to model and solve the stress field under multiple contact constraints between pebbles in the unit-cell. Resultant normal contact forces and slip distances on the contact points were applied into the Archard adhesive wear model to calculate the amount of graphite dust. The Finite Element (FE) analysis was repeated at 27 unit-cell locations chosen to form an interpolated dust density function for the entire region of the reflector. The dust production calculation was extended to the life time of the HCCR and the total graphite dust production was estimated to 0.279 g at the end of the life time with the maximum graphite dust density of 0.149 μg/mm"3. The dust explosion could be a safety issue with the calculated dust density level and it requires that an appropriate maintenance to remove sufficient amount of graphite dust regularly to prevent the possibility of dust explosion.

  13. Matrix formulation of pebble circulation in the pebbed code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougar, H.D.; Terry, W.K.; Ougouag, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The PEBBED technique provides a foundation for equilibrium fuel cycle analysis and optimization in pebble-bed cores in which the fuel elements are continuously flowing and, if desired, recirculating. In addition to the modern analysis techniques used in or being developed for the code, PEBBED incorporates a novel nuclide-mixing algorithm that allows for sophisticated recirculation patterns using a matrix generated from basic core parameters. Derived from a simple partitioning of the pebble flow, the elements of the recirculation matrix are used to compute the spatially averaged density of each nuclide at the entry plane from the nuclide densities of pebbles emerging from the discharge conus. The order of the recirculation matrix is a function of the flexibility and sophistication of the fuel handling mechanism. This formulation for coupling pebble flow and neutronics enables core design and fuel cycle optimization to be performed by the manipulation of a few key core parameters. The formulation is amenable to modern optimization techniques. (author)

  14. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  15. Thermo-mechanical characterization of ceramic pebbles for breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Frano, Rosa, E-mail: rosa.lofrano@ing.unipi.it; Aquaro, Donato; Scaletti, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental activities to characterize the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. • Compression tests of pebbles. • Experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of pebbles bed at different temperatures. • Experimental test with/without compression load. - Abstract: An open issue for fusion power reactor is to design a suitable breeding blanket capable to produce the necessary quantity of the tritium and to transfer the energy of the nuclear fusion reaction to the coolant. The envisaged solution called Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket foresees the use of lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) or lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebble beds. The thermal mechanical properties of the candidate pebble bed materials are presently extensively investigated because they are critical for the feasibility and performances of the numerous conceptual designs which use a solid breeder. This study is aimed at the investigation of mechanical properties of the lithium orthosilicate and at the characterization of the main chemical, physical and thermo-mechanical properties taking into account the production technology. In doing that at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI) of the University of Pisa adequate experiments were carried out. The obtained results may contribute to characterize the material of the pebbles and to optimize the design of the envisaged fusion breeding blankets.

  16. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  17. Particle flow of ceramic breeder pebble beds in bi-axial compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsmeyer, S.; Reimann, J.

    2002-01-01

    Pebble beds of ceramic material are investigated within the framework of developing solid breeder blankets for future fusion power plants. A thermo-mechanical characterisation of such pebble beds is mandatory for understanding the behaviour of pebble beds, and thus the overall blanket, under fusion environment conditions. The mechanical behaviour of pebble beds is typically explored with uni-axial, bi-axial and tri-axial compression experiments. The latter two types of experiment are particularly revealing since they contain explicitly, beyond a compression behaviour of the bed, information on the conditions for pebble flow, i.e. macroscopic relocation, in the pebble bed. (orig.)

  18. Neutronic modeling of pebble bed reactors in APOLLO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimod, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we develop a new iterative homogenization technique for pebble bed reactors, based on a 'macro-stochastic' transport approximation in the collision probability method. A model has been developed to deal with the stochastic distribution of pebbles with different burnup in the core, considering spectral differences in homogenization and depletion calculations. This is generally not done in the codes presently used for pebble bed analyses, where a pebble with average isotopic composition is considered to perform the cell calculation. Also an iterative core calculation scheme has been set up, where the low-order RZ S N full-core calculation computes the entering currents in the spectrum zones subdividing the core. These currents, together with the core k eff , are then used as surface source in the fine-group heterogeneous calculation of the multi-pebble geometries. The developed method has been verified using reference Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified PBMR- 400 model. The pebbles in this model are individually positioned and have different randomly assigned burnup values. The APOLLO2 developed method matches the reference core k eff within ± 100 pcm, with relative differences on the production shape factors within ± 4%, and maximum discrepancy of 3% at the hotspot. Moreover, the first criticality experiment of the HTR-10 reactor was used to perform a first validation of the developed model. The computed critical number of pebbles to be loaded in the core is very close to the experimental value of 16890, only 77 pebbles less. A method to calculate the equilibrium reactor state was also developed and applied to analyze the simplified PBMR-400 model loaded with different fuel types (UO 2 , Pu, Pu + MA). The potential of the APOLLO2 method to compute different fluxes for the different pebble types of a multi-pebble geometry was used to evaluate the bias committed by the average composition pebble approximation. Thanks to a 'compensation of error

  19. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  20. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  1. Pebble red modular reactor - South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.; Mulder, E.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995 the South African Electricity Utility, ESKOM, was convinced of the economical advantages of high temperature gas-cooled reactors as viable supply side option. Subsequently planning of a techno/economic study for the year 1996 was initiated. Continuation to the construction phase of a prototype plant will depend entirely on the outcome of this study. A reactor plant of pebble bed design coupled with a direct helium cycle is perceived. The electrical output is limited to about 100 MW for reasons of safety, economics and flexibility. Design of the reactor will be based on internationally proven, available technology. An extended research and development program is not anticipated. New licensing rules and regulations will be required. Safety classification of components will be based on the merit of HTGR technology rather than attempting to adhere to traditional LWR rules. A medium term time schedule for the design and construction of a prototype plant, commissioning and performance testing is proposed during the years 2002 and 2003. Pending the performance outcome of this plant and the current power demand, series production of 100 MWe units is foreseen. (author)

  2. Metal burning in graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.; Ball, S.J.; Daw, C.S.; Thomas, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo var. black beauty) were grown in a randomized complete-block field/pot experiment at a site that contained the highest observed levels of surface gross gamma radioactivity within Los Alamos Canyon (LAC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Soils as well as washed edible and nonedible crop tissues were analyzed for various radionuclides and heavy metals. Most radionuclides, with the exception of 3 H and tot U, in soil from LAC were detected in significantly higher concentrations (p -1 . This dose was below the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit (PDL) of 100 mrem y -1 from all pathways; however, the addition of other internal and external exposure route factors may increase the overall dose over the PDL. Also, the risk of an excess cancer fatality, based on 74 mrem y -1 , was 3.7 x 10 -5 (37 in a million), which is above the Environmental Protection Agency's (acceptable) guideline of one in a million. 25 refs

  3. A study for fuel reloading strategy in pebble bed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Chul

    2012-02-01

    A fuel reloading analysis system for pebble bed reactor was developed by using a Monte Carlo code. The kinematic model was modified to improve the accuracy of the pebble velocity profile and to develop the model so that the diffusion coefficient is not changed by the geometry of the core. In addition, the point kernel method was employed to solve an equation derived in this study. Then, the analysis system for the pebble bed reactor was developed to accommodate the double heterogeneity, pebble velocity, and pebble refueling features using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The batch-tracking method was employed to simulate the movement of the pebbles and an automation system was written in the C programming language to implement it. The proposed analysis system can be utilized to verify new core analysis codes, deep-burn studies, various sensitivity studies, and other analysis tools available for the application of new fuel reloading strategies. It is noted that the proposed algorithm for the optimum fuel reloading pattern differs from other optimization methods using sensitivity analysis. In this algorithm, the reloading strategy, including the loading of fresh fuel and the reloading positions of the fresh and reloaded fuels, is determined by the interrelations of the criticality, the nuclear material inventories in the extracted fuel, and the power density. The devised algorithm was applied to the PBMR and NHDD-PBR200. The results show that the proposed algorithm can apply to satisfy the nuclear characteristics such as the criticality or power density since the pebble bed core has the characteristics that the fuels are reloaded every day

  4. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2007-01-15

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 {mu}m and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core.

  5. Identification of the key parameters defining the life of graphite core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, M.N.

    2005-01-01

    The Core Structures of a Pebble Bed rector core comprise graphite reflectors constructed from blocks. These blocks are subject to high flux and temperatures as well as significant gradients in flux and temperature. This loading combined with the behaviour of graphite under irradiation gives rise to complex stress states within the reflector blocks. At some point, the stress state will reach a critical level and cracks will initiate within the blocks. The point of crack initiation is a useful point to define as the end of the part's life. The life of these graphite reflector parts in a pebble bed reactor (PBR) core determines the service life of the Core Structures. The replacement of the Core Structures' components will be a costly and time consuming. It is important that the components of the Core Structures be designed for the best life possible. As part of the conceptual design of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), the assessment of the life of these components was examined. To facilitate the understanding of the parameters that influence the design life of the PBMR, a study has been completed into the effect of various design parameters on the design life of a typical side reflector block. Parameters investigated include: block geometry, material property variations, and load variations. The results of this study are to be presented. (author)

  6. Manufacturing Technology of Ceramic Pebbles for Breeding Blanket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Lo Frano

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An open issue for the fusion power reactor is the choice of breeding blanket material. The possible use of Helium-Cooled Pebble Breeder ceramic material in the form of pebble beds is of great interest worldwide as demonstrated by the numerous studies and research on this subject. Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4 is a promising breeding material investigated in this present study because the neutron capture of Li-6 allows the production of tritium, 6Li (n, t 4He. Furthermore, lithium orthosilicate has the advantages of low activation characteristics, low thermal expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, high density and stability. Even if they are far from the industrial standard, a variety of industrial processes have been proposed for making orthosilicate pebbles with diameters of 0.1–1 mm. However, some manufacturing problems have been observed, such as in the chemical stability (agglomeration phenomena. The aim of this study is to provide a new methodology for the production of pebbles based on the drip casting method, which was jointly developed by the DICI-University of Pisa and Industrie Bitossi. Using this new (and alternative manufacturing technology, in the field of fusion reactors, appropriately sized ceramic pebbles could be produced for use as tritium breeders.

  7. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14 C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14 C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  8. Letters initiating Clean Water Act 404(c) review of mining at Pebble deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correspondence between EPA and the Pebble Limited Partnership and the State of Alaska initiating review under section 404(c) of the Clean Water Act of potential adverse environmental effects associated with mining the Pebble deposit in southwest Alaska.

  9. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  10. CFD investigating the air ingress accident for a HTGR simulation of graphite corrosion oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferng, Y.M.; Chi, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A CFD model is proposed to investigate graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10. ► A postulated air ingress accident is assumed in this paper. ► Air ingress flowrate is the predicted result, instead of the preset one. ► O 2 would react with graphite on pebble surface, causing the graphite corrosion. ► No fuel exposure is predicted to be occurred under the air ingress accident. - Abstract: Through a compressible multi-component CFD model, this paper investigates the characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10 core under the postulated accident of gas duct rupture. In this accident, air in the steam generator cavity would enter into the core after pressure equilibrium is achieved between the core and the cavity, which is also called as the air ingress accident. Oxygen in the air would react with graphite on pebble surface, subsequently resulting in oxidation corrosion and challenging fuel integrity. In this paper, characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion during the air ingress accident can be reasonably captured, including distributions of graphite corrosion amount on the different cross-sections, time histories of local corrosion amount at the monitoring points and overall corrosion amount in the core, respectively. Based on the transient simulation results, the corrosion pattern and its corrosion rate would approach to the steady-state conditions as the accident continuously progresses. The total amount of graphite corrosion during a 3-day accident time is predicted to be about 31 kg with the predicted asymptotic corrosion rate. This predicted value is less than that from the previous work of Gao and Shi.

  11. Conceptual study of ferromagnetic pebbles for heat exhaust in fusion reactors with short power decay length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gierse

    2015-03-01

    The key results of this study are that very high heat fluxes are accessible in the operation space of ferromagnetic pebbles, that ferromagnetic pebbles are compatible with tokamak operation and current divertor designs, that the heat removal capability of ferromagnetic pebbles increases as λq decreases and, finally, that for fusion relevant values of q∥ pebble diameters below 100 μm are required.

  12. Tritium adsorption/release behaviour of advanced EU breeder pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, Matthias H.H., E-mail: matthias.kolb@kit.edu; Rolli, Rolf; Knitter, Regina

    2017-06-15

    The tritium loading of current grades of advanced ceramic breeder pebbles with three different lithium orthosilicate (LOS)/lithium metatitanate (LMT) compositions (20–30 mol% LMT in LOS) and pebbles of EU reference material, was performed in a consistent way. The temperature dependent release of the introduced tritium was subsequently investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to gain insight into the desorption characteristics. The obtained TPD data was decomposed into individual release mechanisms according to well-established desorption kinetics. The analysis showed that the pebble composition of the tested samples does not severely change the release behaviour. Yet, an increased content of lithium metatitanate leads to additional desorption peaks at medium temperatures. The majority of tritium is released by high temperature release mechanisms of chemisorbed tritium, while the release of physisorbed tritium is marginal in comparison. The results allow valuable projections for the tritium release behaviour in a fusion blanket.

  13. Tritium adsorption/release behaviour of advanced EU breeder pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Rolli, Rolf; Knitter, Regina

    2017-06-01

    The tritium loading of current grades of advanced ceramic breeder pebbles with three different lithium orthosilicate (LOS)/lithium metatitanate (LMT) compositions (20-30 mol% LMT in LOS) and pebbles of EU reference material, was performed in a consistent way. The temperature dependent release of the introduced tritium was subsequently investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to gain insight into the desorption characteristics. The obtained TPD data was decomposed into individual release mechanisms according to well-established desorption kinetics. The analysis showed that the pebble composition of the tested samples does not severely change the release behaviour. Yet, an increased content of lithium metatitanate leads to additional desorption peaks at medium temperatures. The majority of tritium is released by high temperature release mechanisms of chemisorbed tritium, while the release of physisorbed tritium is marginal in comparison. The results allow valuable projections for the tritium release behaviour in a fusion blanket.

  14. Study on graphite samples for nuclear usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.M.; Silva Roseira, M. da

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The graphite, due to its properties (mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, high-temperature stability, machinability etc.) have many industrial applications, and consequently, an important strategic value. In the nuclear area, it has been used as moderator and reflector of neutrons in the fission process of uranium. The graphite can be produced from many types of carbonaceous materials by a variety of process dominated by the manufactures. This is the reason why there are in the world market a lot of graphite types with different physical and mechanical properties. The present investigation studies some physical characteristics of the graphite samples destined to use in a nuclear reactor. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  15. A virtual pebble game to ensemble average graph rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Luis C; Wang, Hui; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    The body-bar Pebble Game (PG) algorithm is commonly used to calculate network rigidity properties in proteins and polymeric materials. To account for fluctuating interactions such as hydrogen bonds, an ensemble of constraint topologies are sampled, and average network properties are obtained by averaging PG characterizations. At a simpler level of sophistication, Maxwell constraint counting (MCC) provides a rigorous lower bound for the number of internal degrees of freedom (DOF) within a body-bar network, and it is commonly employed to test if a molecular structure is globally under-constrained or over-constrained. MCC is a mean field approximation (MFA) that ignores spatial fluctuations of distance constraints by replacing the actual molecular structure by an effective medium that has distance constraints globally distributed with perfect uniform density. The Virtual Pebble Game (VPG) algorithm is a MFA that retains spatial inhomogeneity in the density of constraints on all length scales. Network fluctuations due to distance constraints that may be present or absent based on binary random dynamic variables are suppressed by replacing all possible constraint topology realizations with the probabilities that distance constraints are present. The VPG algorithm is isomorphic to the PG algorithm, where integers for counting "pebbles" placed on vertices or edges in the PG map to real numbers representing the probability to find a pebble. In the VPG, edges are assigned pebble capacities, and pebble movements become a continuous flow of probability within the network. Comparisons between the VPG and average PG results over a test set of proteins and disordered lattices demonstrate the VPG quantitatively estimates the ensemble average PG results well. The VPG performs about 20% faster than one PG, and it provides a pragmatic alternative to averaging PG rigidity characteristics over an ensemble of constraint topologies. The utility of the VPG falls in between the most

  16. Gas cooled high temperature reactor with a heap of pebble shaped fuel elements and absorber rods which can be driven directly into the heap of pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elter, C.; Schmitt, H.; Schoening, J.; Weicht, U.

    1980-01-01

    The absorber rod for the graphite moderated, helium cooled reactor is cylindrical and has a tip in the shape of the frustrum of a cone. It consists of three coaxially arranged sleeve tubes made of steel, the inner and centre sleeve tubes surrounding the absorber part (B4C) so as to be gastight. The inner sleeve tube represents the supporting tube and is cooled by cold gas, as is the annular gap between the centre and outer sleeve tube. (RW) [de

  17. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  18. Pebble bed modular reactor safeguards: developing new approaches and implementing safeguards by design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durst, Philip [INL; Bean, Robert [INL

    2010-01-01

    The design of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) does not fit or seem appropriate to the IAEA safeguards approach under the categories of light water reactor (LWR), on-load refueled reactor (OLR, i.e. CANDU), or Other (prismatic HTGR) because the fuel is in a bulk form, rather than discrete items. Because the nuclear fuel is a collection of nuclear material inserted in tennis-ball sized spheres containing structural and moderating material and a PBMR core will contain a bulk load on the order of 500,000 spheres, it could be classified as a 'Bulk-Fuel Reactor.' Hence, the IAEA should develop unique safeguards criteria. In a multi-lab DOE study, it was found that an optimized blend of: (i) developing techniques to verify the plutonium content in spent fuel pebbles, (ii) improving burn-up computer codes for PBMR spent fuel to provide better understanding of the core and spent fuel makeup, and (iii) utilizing bulk verification techniques for PBMR spent fuel storage bins should be combined with the historic IAEA and South African approaches of containment and surveillance to verify and maintain continuity of knowledge of PBMR fuel. For all of these techniques to work the design of the reactor will need to accommodate safeguards and material accountancy measures to a far greater extent than has thus far been the case. The implementation of Safeguards-by-Design as the PBMR design progresses provides an approach to meets these safeguards and accountancy needs.

  19. Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermo-mechanics Issues for Design and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Potirniche, Gabriel; Cogliati, Joshua; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    An experimental and computational study, consisting of modeling and simulation (M&S), of key thermal-mechanical issues affecting the design and safety of pebble-bed (PB) reactors was conducted. The objective was to broaden understanding and experimentally validate thermal-mechanic phenomena of nuclear grade graphite, specifically, spheres in frictional contact as anticipated in the bed under reactor relevant pressures and temperatures. The contact generates graphite dust particulates that can subsequently be transported into the flowing gaseous coolent. Under postulated depressurization transients and with the potential for leaked fission products to be adsorbed onto graphite 'dust', there is the potential for fission products to escape from the primary volume. This is a design safety concern. Furthermore, earlier safety assessment identified the distinct possibility for the dispersed dust to combust in contact with air if sufficient conditions are met. Both of these phenomena were noted as important to design review and containing uncertainty to warrant study. The team designed and conducted two separate effects tests to study and benchmark the potential dust-generation rate, as well as study the conditions under which a dust explosion may occure in a standardized, instrumented explosion chamber.

  20. The correction of pebble bed reactor nodal cross sections for the effects of leakage and depletion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Nathanael Harrison

    An accurate and computationally fast method to generate nodal cross sections for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) was presented. In this method, named Spectral History Correction (SHC), a set of fine group microscopic cross section libraries, pre-computed at specified depletion and moderation states, was coupled with the nodal nuclide densities and group bucklings to compute the new fine group spectrum for each node. The relevant fine group cross-section library was then recollapsed to the local broad group cross-section structure with this new fine group spectrum. This library set was tracked in terms of fuel isotopic densities. Fine group modulation factors (to correct the homogeneous flux for heterogeneous effects) and fission spectra were also stored with the cross section library. As the PBR simulation converges to a steady state fuel cycle, the initial nodal cross section library becomes inaccurate due to the burnup of the fuel and the neutron leakage into and out of the node. Because of the recirculation of discharged fuel pebbles with fresh fuel pebbles, a node can consist of a collection of pebbles at various burnup stages. To account for the nodal burnup, the microscopic cross sections were combined with nodal averaged atom densities to approximate the fine group macroscopic cross-sections for that node. These constructed, homogeneous macroscopic cross sections within the node were used to calculate a numerical solution for the fine group spectrum with B1 theory. This new fine spectrum was used to collapse the pre-computed microscopic cross section library to the broad group structure employed by the fuel cycle code. This SHC technique was developed and practically implemented as a subroutine within the PBR fuel cycle code PEBBED. The SHC subroutine was called to recalculate the broad group cross sections during the code convergence. The result was a fast method that compared favorably to the benchmark scheme of cross section calculation with the lattice

  1. Parametric study for high conversion pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E.; Ruetten, H. J.

    1975-06-15

    Tables are presented of fuel cycle costs, conversion ratios and accompanying variations in fuel element designs for a 3,00 MWth high conversion pebble bed reactor with initial high enriched uranium/thorium cycle and subsequent recycling of U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  2. Uraniferous quartz-pebble conglomerates in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Backstroem, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a short background statement summarizing data on the Dominion Reef Group, the Witwatersrand Supergroup, and the Ventersdorp Contact Reef, with particular reference to the close relationship of gold and uranium with sedimentary features as well as the mineralization, conditions of deposition, and the nature of the quartz-pebble conglomerates

  3. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  4. Performance Evaluation of a Pebble Bed Solar Crop Dryer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology ... The solar crop dryer consists of an imbedded pebble bed solar heat storage unit/solar collector ... The crop-drying chamber is made of drying trays of wire gauze while the roof is made of transparent glazing.

  5. Fabrication of Li2TiO3 pebbles by a freeze drying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Park, Yi-Hyun; Yu, Min-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles were successfully fabricated by using a freeze drying process. The Li 2 TiO 3 slurry was prepared using a commercial powder of particle size 0.5–1.5 μm and the pebble pre-form was prepared by dropping the slurry into liquid nitrogen through a syringe needle. The droplets were rapidly frozen, changing their morphology to spherical pebbles. The frozen pebbles were dried at −10 °C in vacuum. To make crack-free pebbles, some glycerin was employed in the slurry, and long drying time and a low vacuum condition were applied in the freeze drying process. In the process, the solid content in the slurry influenced the spheroidicity of the pebble green body. The dried pebbles were sintered at 1200 °C in an air atmosphere. The sintered pebbles showed almost 40% shrinkage. The sintered pebbles revealed a porous microstructure with a uniform pore distribution and the sintered pebbles were crushed under an average load of 50 N in a compressive strength test. In the present study, a freeze drying process for fabrication of spherical Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles is introduced. The processing parameters, such as solid content in the slurry and the conditions of freeze drying and sintering, are also examined

  6. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  7. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  8. Automated Design and Optimization of Pebble-bed Reactor Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougar, Hans D.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Terry, William K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a conceptual design approach for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors using recirculating pebble-bed cores. The design approach employs PEBBED, a reactor physics code specifically designed to solve for and analyze the asymptotic burnup state of pebble-bed reactors, in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain a core that maximizes a fitness value that is a function of user-specified parameters. The uniqueness of the asymptotic core state and the small number of independent parameters that define it suggest that core geometry and fuel cycle can be efficiently optimized toward a specified objective. PEBBED exploits a novel representation of the distribution of pebbles that enables efficient coupling of the burnup and neutron diffusion solvers. With this method, even complex pebble recirculation schemes can be expressed in terms of a few parameters that are amenable to modern optimization techniques. With PEBBED, the user chooses the type and range of core physics parameters that represent the design space. A set of traits, each with acceptable and preferred values expressed by a simple fitness function, is used to evaluate the candidate reactor cores. The stochastic search algorithm automatically drives the generation of core parameters toward the optimal core as defined by the user. The optimized design can then be modeled and analyzed in greater detail using higher resolution and more computationally demanding tools to confirm the desired characteristics. For this study, the design of pebble-bed high temperature reactor concepts subjected to demanding physical constraints demonstrated the efficacy of the PEBBED algorithm.

  9. Modelling of thermal and mechanical behaviour of pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccaccini, L.V.; Buehler, L.; Hermsmeyer, S.; Wolf, F.

    2001-01-01

    FZK (Forshungzentrum Karlsruhe) is developing a Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket Concept for fusion power reactors based on the use of ceramic breeder materials and beryllium multiplier in the form of pebble beds. The design of such a blanket requires models and computer codes describing the thermal-mechanical behavior of pebble beds to evaluate the temperatures, stresses, deformations and mechanical interactions between pebble beds and the structure with required accuracy and reliability. The objective to describe the beginning of life condition for the HCPB blanket seems near to be reached. Mechanical models that describe the thermo-mechanical behavior of granular materials used in form of pebble beds are implemented in a commercial structure code. These models have been calibrated using the results of a large series of dedicated experiments. The modeling work is practically concluded for ceramic breeder; it will be carried on in the next year for beryllium to obtain the required correlations for creep and the thermal conductivity. The difficulties for application in large components (such as the HCPB blanket) are the limitations of the present commercial codes to manage such a set of constitutive equations under complex load conditions and large mesh number. The further objective is to model the thermal cycles during operation; the present correlations have to be adapted for the release phase. A complete description of the blanket behavior during irradiation is at the present out of our capability; this objective requires an extensive R and D program that at the present is only at the beginning. (Y.Tanaka)

  10. Experimental and numerical validation of a two-region-designed pebble bed reactor with dynamic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.Y.; Yang, X.T.; Tang, Z.W.; Wang, W.J.; Tu, J.Y.; Liu, Z.Y.; Li, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The experimental installation has been built to investigate the pebble flow. ► The feasibility of two-region pebble bed reactor has been verified. ► The pebble flow is more uniform in a taller vessel than that in a lower vessel. ► Larger base cone angle will decrease the scale of the stagnant zone. - Abstract: The pebble flow is the principal issue for the design of the pebble bed reactor. In order to verify the feasibility of a two-region-designed pebble bed reactor, the experimental installation with a taller vessel has been built, which is proportional to the real pebble bed reactor. With the aid of the experimental installation, the stable establishment and maintenance of the two-region arrangement has been verified, at the same time, the applicability of the DEM program has been also validated. Research results show: (1) The pebble's bouncing on the free surface is an important factor for the mixing of the different colored pebbles. (2) Through the guide plates installed in the top of the pebble packing, the size of the mixing zone can be reduced from 6–7 times to 3–4 times the pebble diameter. (3) The relationship between the width of the central region and the ratio of loading pebbles is approximately linear in the taller vessel. (4) The heighten part of the pebble packing can improve the uniformity of the flowing in the lower. (5) To increase the base cone angle can decrease the scale of the stagnant zone. All of these conclusions are meaningful to the design of the real pebble reactor.

  11. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  12. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  13. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of a Pebble Bed HTGR Loss of Cooling Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Very High Temperature Reactor Methods Development group at the Idaho National Laboratory identified the need for a defensible and systematic uncertainty and sensitivity approach in 2009. This paper summarizes the results of an uncertainty and sensitivity quantification investigation performed with the SUSA code, utilizing the International Atomic Energy Agency CRP 5 Pebble Bed Modular Reactor benchmark and the INL code suite PEBBED-THERMIX. Eight model input parameters were selected for inclusion in this study, and after the input parameters variations and probability density functions were specified, a total of 800 steady state and depressurized loss of forced cooling (DLOFC transient PEBBED-THERMIX calculations were performed. The six data sets were statistically analyzed to determine the 5% and 95% DLOFC peak fuel temperature tolerance intervals with 95% confidence levels. It was found that the uncertainties in the decay heat and graphite thermal conductivities were the most significant contributors to the propagated DLOFC peak fuel temperature uncertainty. No significant differences were observed between the results of Simple Random Sampling (SRS or Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS data sets, and use of uniform or normal input parameter distributions also did not lead to any significant differences between these data sets.

  14. Monte Carlo calculation of standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of calculation of neutron flux space and energy distribution in the standard graphite block (SGB) obtained by the MCNP TM code. VMCCS nuclear data library, based on the ENDF / B-VI release 4 evaluation file, is used. MCNP model of the SGB considers detailed material, geometric and spectral properties of the neutron source, source carrier, graphite moderator medium, aluminium foil holders and proximate surrounding of SGB Geometric model is organised to provide the simplest homogeneous volume cells in order to obtain the maximum acceleration of neutron history tracking (author)

  15. Radionuclide characterization of graphite stacks from plutonium production reactors of the Siberian group of chemical enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushuev, A.V.; Verzilov, Yu.M.; Zubarev, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    The residual radionuclide concentrations and distributions in graphite from moderator stack of plutonium production reactors at Tomsk-7 have been investigated. It was found that the dominant activity of graphite is 14 C. To gain information on surface and volume contamination of graphite blocks from the moderator stack, the special sets of samples were collected and assayed. The schemes are proposed for evaluation of individual radionuclide inventories together with results of the evaluations performed. (author)

  16. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  17. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  18. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  19. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  20. Nonproliferation and safeguard considerations: Pebble Bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, conpare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  1. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wareing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  2. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareing, Alan; Abrahamsen-Mills, Liam; Fowler, Linda; Jarvis, Richard; Banford, Anthony William [National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Grave, Michael [Doosan Babcock, Gateshead (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, Martin [National Nuclear Laboratory, Gloucestershire (United Kingdom); Norris, Simon [Radioactive Waste Management Limited, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  3. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming

  4. Thermal cycling tests on Li4SiO4 and beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Norajitra, P.; Weisenburger, A.

    1995-01-01

    The European B.O.T. Demo-relevant solid breeder blanket is based on the use of beds of beryllium and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles. Particularly dangerous for the pebble integrity are the rapid temperature changes which could occur, for instance, by a sudden blanket power shut-down. A series of thermal cycle tests have been performed for various beds of beryllium and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles. No breaking was observed in the beryllium pebbles, however the Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles broke by temperature rates of change of about -50 C/sec independently on pebbles size and lithium enrichment. This value is considerably higher than the peak temperature rates of change expected in the blanket. (orig.)

  5. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  6. Development of Chinese HTR-PM pebble bed equivalent conductivity test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Cheng; Yang, Xingtuan; Jiang, Shengyao [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology

    2016-01-15

    The first two 250-MWt high-temperature reactor pebble bed modules (HTR-PM) have been installing at the Shidaowan plant in Shandong Province, China. The values of the effective thermal conductivity of the pebble bed core are essential parameters for the design. For their determination, Tsinghua University in China has proposed a full-scale heat transfer experiment to conduct comprehensive thermal transfer tests in packed pebble bed and to determine the effective thermal conductivity.

  7. A COMPARISON OF PEBBLE MIXING AND DEPLETION ALGORITHMS USED IN PEBBLE-BED REACTOR EQUILIBRIUM CYCLE SIMULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougar, Hans D.; Reitsma, Frederik; Joubert, Wessel

    2009-01-01

    Recirculating pebble-bed reactors are distinguished from all other reactor types by the downward movement through and reinsertion of fuel into the core during operation. Core simulators must account for this movement and mixing in order to capture the physics of the equilibrium cycle core. VSOP and PEBBED are two codes used to perform such simulations, but they do so using different methods. In this study, a simplified pebble-bed core with a specified flux profile and cross sections is used as the model for conducting analyses of two types of burnup schemes. The differences between the codes are described and related to the differences observed in the nuclide densities in pebbles discharged from the core. Differences in the methods for computing fission product buildup and average number densities lead to significant differences in the computed core power and eigenvalue. These test models provide a key component of an overall equilibrium cycle benchmark involving neutron transport, cross section generation, and fuel circulation.

  8. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  9. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  10. Strategy for Handling and Treatment of INPP RBMK-1500 Irradiated Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oryšaka, A.

    2016-01-01

    There are two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite-moderated channel-type power reactors at Ignalina NPP. After the final shutdown of the INPP, radioactive i-graphite dismantling, handling, conditioning, storage and disposal is an important part of the decommissioning activities. The core of the INPP unit 1 and 2 contains about 3600 tons of i-graphite. Formation of activation products strongly depends on the contents of impurities, operational mode and concentration of impurities in the graphite. The case study for INPP envisages the analysis of possibilities of graphite handling and treatment in the context of immediate decommissioning. (author)

  11. Stable isotope compositions of quartz pebbles and their fluid inclusions as tracers of sediment provenance: Implications for gold- and uranium-bearing quartz pebble conglomerates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vennemann, T.W.; Kesler, S.E.; O' Neil, J.R. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of pebbles from late Archean to paleo-Proterozoic gold- and/or uranium-bearing oligomictic quartz pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand district, South Africa, and Huronian Supergroup, Canada, were determined in an attempt to define the nature of the source terrain. The [delta][sup 18]O values of quartz pebbles within any one sample typically vary by [approximately] 4[per thousand] or more, but occasionally by as much as 8[per thousand], even for adjacent pebbles within the same hand specimen. In addition, adjacent quartz pebbles of widely contrasting [delta][sup 18]O values also preserve distinct isotopic signatures of their fluid inclusions. This overall heterogeneity suggests that the pebbles did not undergo significant oxygen isotope exchange after incorporation in the conglomerates. Therefore, oxygen isotope analyses of such quartz pebbles, in combination with a detailed investigation of their mineral and fluid inclusions, can provide a useful method for characterizing pebble populations and hence dominant sediment source modes. Comparison of values found in this study with [delta][sup 18]O values of quartz from Archean granites, pegmatites, and mesothermal greenstone gold veins, i.e., [delta][sup 18]O values of sources commonly proposed for the conglomerate ores, suggests that uranium is derived from a granitic source, whereas gold has a mesothermal greenstone gold source. Low [delta][sup 18]O values of chert pebbles (9[per thousand] to 11.5[per thousand]) relative to those expected for Archean and Proterozoic marine cherts (commonly [ge] 17[per thousand]) effectively exclude marine cherts, and therefore, auriferous iron formations and exhalatives, as likely sources of gold.

  12. Stable isotope compositions of quartz pebbles and their fluid inclusions as tracers of sediment provenance: Implications for gold- and uranium-bearing quartz pebble conglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vennemann, T.W.; Kesler, S.E.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of pebbles from late Archean to paleo-Proterozoic gold- and/or uranium-bearing oligomictic quartz pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand district, South Africa, and Huronian Supergroup, Canada, were determined in an attempt to define the nature of the source terrain. The δ 18 O values of quartz pebbles within any one sample typically vary by ∼ 4 per-thousand or more, but occasionally by as much as 8 per-thousand, even for adjacent pebbles within the same hand specimen. In addition, adjacent quartz pebbles of widely contrasting δ 18 O values also preserve distinct isotopic signatures of their fluid inclusions. This overall heterogeneity suggests that the pebbles did not undergo significant oxygen isotope exchange after incorporation in the conglomerates. Therefore, oxygen isotope analyses of such quartz pebbles, in combination with a detailed investigation of their mineral and fluid inclusions, can provide a useful method for characterizing pebble populations and hence dominant sediment source modes. Comparison of values found in this study with δ 18 O values of quartz from Archean granites, pegmatites, and mesothermal greenstone gold veins, i.e., δ 18 O values of sources commonly proposed for the conglomerate ores, suggests that uranium is derived from a granitic source, whereas gold has a mesothermal greenstone gold source. Low δ 18 O values of chert pebbles (9 per-thousand to 11.5 per-thousand) relative to those expected for Archean and Proterozoic marine cherts (commonly ≥ 17 per-thousand) effectively exclude marine cherts, and therefore, auriferous iron formations and exhalatives, as likely sources of gold

  13. Reasons of an experimental effort for pebble bed reactors. A program of measurements in the CESAR reactor at Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, W; Bock, H J; Krings, F; Neef, R D; Langlet, G; Dixmier, M; Laponche, B; Morier, F

    1972-06-15

    An extended experimental program on neutron physics of HTR fuel balls is being performed in the graphite moderated critical faclity CESAR at CEN Cadarache (France). The experiments are done in the frame of a cooperation between KFA Juelich and CEA Cadarache.

  14. Determination of a geometry-dependent parameter and development of a calculation model for describing the fission products transport from spherical fuel elements of graphite moderated gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissfloch, R

    1973-07-15

    The fuel elements of high-temperature reactors, coated with pyrolitic carbon and covered with graphite, release fission products like all other fuel elements. Because of safety reasons, the rate of this release has to be kept low and has also to be predictable. Measured values from irradiation tests and from post-irradiation tests about the actual release of different fission products are presented. The physical and chemical mechanism, which determines the release, is extraordinarily complex and in particular not clearly defined. Because of the mentioned reasons, a simplified calculation model was developed, which only considers the release-mechanisms phenomenologically. This calculation model coincides very well in its results with values received in experiments until now. It can be held as an interim state on the way to a complete theory.

  15. Determination of a geometry-dependent parameter and development of a calculation model for describing the fission products transport from spherical fuel elements of graphite moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissfloch, R.

    The fuel elements of High-Temperature Reactors, coated with pyrolitic carbon and covered with graphite, release fission products like all other fuel elements. Because of safety reasons the rate of this release has to be kept low and has also to be predictable. Measured values from irradiation tests and from post-irradiation tests about the actual release of different fission products are present. The physical and chemical mechanism, which determines the release, is extraordinarily complex and in particular not clearly defined. Because of the mentioned reasons a simplified calculation model was developed, which only considers the release-mechanisms phenomenologically. This calculation model coincides very well in its results with values received in experiments until now. It can serve as an interim state on the way to a complete theory. (U.S.)

  16. The reprocessing of advanced mixed lithium orthosilicate/metatitanate tritium breeder pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leys, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.leys@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Bergfeldt, Thomas; Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Knitter, Regina [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Goraieb, Aniceto A. [Karlsruhe Beryllium Handling Facility, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • The recycling of advanced breeder pebbles without a deterioration of the material properties is possible using a melt-based process. • The only accumulation of impurities upon reprocessing, results from the platinum crucible alloy used for processing. • It is possible to replenish burnt-up lithium by additions of LiOH·H{sub 2}O to the melt during reprocessing. - Abstract: The recycling of tritium breeding materials will be necessary for any future use of nuclear fusion energy due to economical as well as ecological considerations. In the case of the solid breeder blanket concept, the ceramic pebble beds that are intended for the generation of tritium will eventually need to be restored due to depleted lithium levels as well as due to fractured pebbles, which will cause a deterioration of the pebble bed properties. It is proposed that the pebbles, which are fabricated using a melt-based process, are recycled using the same initial process, by replenishing the lithium levels and reforming the pebbles at the same time. To prove this recycling scheme, advanced ceramic pebbles were fabricated and then re-melted multiple times to prove that the reprocessing did not have any negative effect on the pebble properties and secondly, pebbles were produced with a simulated lithium burn-up and subsequently replenished by additions of LiOH to the melt. It was shown that the re-melting and lithium re-enrichment had no effect on the pebble properties, demonstrating that a melt-based process is suitable for recycling used breeder pebbles.

  17. Mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles at blanket relevant temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurinskiy, Petr, E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials—Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rolli, Rolf [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials—Materials Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nakamichi, Masaru [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Fusion Institute, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Oaza-Obuchi-Aza-Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aoori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Mechanical behavior of two kinds of Be–Ti pebbles in the temperature range of 400–800 °C was investigated. • It was experimentally shown that Be-7 at.%Ti pebbles have the enhanced ductile properties compared to Be-7.7 at.%Ti pebbles. • Brittle failure of both kinds of Be–Ti pebbles was observed by testing at 400 °C using the constant loading with 150 N. - Abstract: Mechanical performance of beryllium-based materials is a matter of a great interest from the point of view of their use as neutron multipliers of the tritium breeding blankets. The compression strains which can occur in beryllium pebble beds under blanket working conditions will lead to deformation or even failure of individual pebbles [1,2] (Reimann et al. 2002; Ishitsuka and Kawamura, 1995). Mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles having chemical contents of Be-7.0 at.% Ti and Be-7.7 at.%Ti was investigated in the temperature range of 400–800 °C. Constant loads varying from 10 up to 150 N were applied uniaxially. It was shown that Be–Ti pebbles compared to pure beryllium pebbles possess much lower ductility, although their strength properties exceed corresponding characteristics of pure beryllium. Also, the influence of titanium content on mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles was investigated. Specific features of deformation of pure beryllium and Be–Ti pebbles having different titanium contents at blanket operation temperatures are discussed.

  18. Fabrication of Li_2TiO_3 pebbles by a selective laser sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qilai; Gao, Yue; Liu, Kai; Xue, Lihong; Yan, Youwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Selective laser sintering (SLS) is employed to fabricate ceramic pebbles. • Quantities and diameter of the pebbles could be easily controlled by adjusting the model of pebbles. • All the pebbles could be prepared at a time within several minutes. • The Li_2TiO_3 pebbles sintered at 1100 °C show a notable crush load of 43 N. - Abstract: Lithium titanate, Li_2TiO_3, is an important tritium breeding material for deuterium (D)–tritium (T) fusion reactor. In test blanket module (TBM) design of China, Li_2TiO_3 is considered as one candidate material of tritium breeders. In this study, selective laser sintering (SLS) technology was introduced to fabricate Li_2TiO_3 ceramic pebbles. This fabrication process is computer assisted and has a high level of flexibility. Li_2TiO_3 powder with a particle size of 1–3 μm was used as the raw material, whilst epoxy resin E06 was adopted as a binder. Green Li_2TiO_3 pebbles with certain strengths were successfully prepared via SLS. Density of the green pebbles was subsequently increased by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) process. Li_2TiO_3 pebbles with a diameter of about 2 mm were obtained after high temperature sintering. Density of the pebbles reaches 80% of theoretical density (TD) with a comparable crush load of 43 N. This computer assisted approach provides a new efficient route for the production of Li_2TiO_3 ceramic pebbles.

  19. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  20. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  1. An analysis of irradiation creep in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Hacker, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear graphite under load shows remarkably high creep ductility with neutron irradiation, well in excess of any strain experienced in un-irradiated graphite (and additional to any dimensional changes that would occur without stress). As this behaviour compensates, to some extent, some other irradiation effects such as thermal shutdown stresses, it is an important property. This paper briefly reviews the approach to irradiation creep in the UK, described by the UK Creep Law. It then offers an alternative analysis of irradiation creep applicable to most situations, including HTR systems, using AGR moderator graphite as an example, to high values of neutron fluence, applied stress and radiolytic weight loss. (authors)

  2. The effective neutron temperature in heated graphite sleeves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J A; Small, V G [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    In a series of oscillator measurements carried out in the reactor NERO the variation of the relative reaction rates of cadmium and boron absorbers has been used to determine the effective neutron temperature inside heated graphite sleeves. This work extends the scope of similar oscillator measurements previously carried out in DIMPLE, in that the bulk moderator is now graphite as opposed to D{sub 2}O in the former case. (author)

  3. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  4. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  5. Design of the Graphite Reflectors in Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Haeng; Cho, Yeong Garp; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Graphite is often used as one of reflector materials for research reactors because of its low neutron absorption cross-section, good moderating properties, and relatively low and stable price. In addition, graphite has excellent properties at high temperatures, so it is widely used as a core material in high temperature reactors. However, its material characteristics such as strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, dimensional change, and thermal conductivity sensitively depend on neutron fluence, temperature, and its manufacturing process. In addition, the Wigner energy and the treatment of the graphite waste such as C-14 should also be considered. For the design of the graphite reflectors, it is therefore essential to understand the material characteristics of chosen graphite materials at given conditions. Especially, the dimensional changes and the thermal conductivity are very important factors to design the nuclear components using graphite as a nonstructural material. Hence, in this study, the material characteristics of graphite are investigated via some experiments in literature. Improving design methods for graphite reflectors in research reactors are then suggested to minimize the problems, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are also discussed

  6. Technical development of graphite waste treatment in NUPEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saishu, S.; Inoue, T.

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, Tokai Power Station, which is a Gas Cooled Reactor and uses graphite as moderator, ceased operation at the end of March in 1998 and it is planned to transfer to decommissioning stage. In this decommissioning stage it is very important to be able to treat and dispose the graphite waste in order to carry out the decommissioning safely and economically. NUPEC has been developing the graphite treatment and disposal technology since 1997 and we introduce the outline of the technical development. For the technology on high density packing into disposal container, the high density packing method and the assessment method on nuclide leaching characteristics were developed, and the cementing test for graphite powder by using Tokai spare graphite was performed and the hydrophobic characteristics between graphite and cement was grasped and the accelerator candidature for affinity was selected. From the view point of economical treatment, the incinerating technology was selected as candidature, and the methods for incinerating graphite and treating off gas are developed. The method of collecting C-14 in off gas was selected for reducing the off gas radiation level. The applicability of actual graphite treatment technology was considered from the view point of safety, economics and preparation of technical standard; the technical theme appeared, the developing planning items were established, and the detailed and actual scale tests will be carried out according to the planning. (author)

  7. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  8. Pyrolysis and its potential use in nuclear graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.B.; Bradbury, D.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite is used as a moderator material in a number of nuclear reactor designs, such as MAGNOX and AGR gas cooled reactors in the United Kingdom and the RBMK design in Russia. During construction the moderator of the reactor is usually installed as an interlocking structure of graphite bricks. At the end of reactor life the graphite moderator, weighing typically 2,000 tonnes, is a radioactive waste which requires eventual management. Radioactive graphite disposal options conventionally include: In-situ SAFESTORE for extended periods to permit manual disassembly of the graphite moderator through decay of short-lived radionuclides. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by disposal of the graphite blocks. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by incineration of the graphite and release of the resulting carbon dioxide Studsvik, Inc. is a nuclear waste management and waste processing company organised to serve the US nuclear utility and government facilities. Studsvik's management and technical staff have a wealth of experience in processing liquid, slurry and solid low level radioactive waste using (amongst others) pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques. Bradtec is a UK company specialising in decontamination and waste management. This paper describes the use of pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques to gasify graphite leading to a low volume off-gas product. This allows the following options/advantages. Safe release of any stored Wigner energy in the graphite. The process can accept small pieces or a water-slurry of graphite, which enables the graphite to be removed from the reactor core by mechanical machining or water cutting techniques, applied remotely in the reactor fuel channels. In certain situations the process could be used to gasify the reactor moderator in-situ. The low volume of the off-gas product enables non-carbon radioactive impurities to be efficiently separated from the off-gas. The off-gas product can

  9. Pebble bed blanket design for deuterium burning tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, S.P.; Dhir, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    The UCLA tandem mirror reactor, SATYR, was developed around the capability of tandem mirrors with thermal barriers to burn deuterium at reasonable efficiency levels. The pebble bed concept has been incorporated into our blanket design for the following reasons: 1) Large area-to-volume ratio for purposes of heat removal; 2) Large volume of structure for high thermal capacity thus increasing the safety margin during off-normal incidents; 3) Relatively inexpensive manufacturing costs because of large acceptable tolerances and lack of exotic materials (i.e., lithium). A simplified stress analysis of the blanket module was performed to optimize and simplify the design. The pre-specified stress intensity limitations used were based upon a 30-year predicted lifetime for each module. Along with stress analysis of the vessel a detailed thermal hydraulic analysis of the pebble bed has been completed. Parameters affecting the pebble bed design are fluidization velocity, pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient, thermally induced stress in the spheres and spatial variation of the power density. Although reasonable gross thermal efficiencies of the 2 designs has been achieved (28% for H 2 O and 39% for He) the high net recirculating power fraction for heating and neutral beams results in relatively low net plant efficiencies (21% and 27%). The results show that a blanket can be designed with good thermal efficiency and a relative-ly simple configuration. However, application of this concept to the high Q deuterium-tritium fuel cycle would have difficulties resulting from the need for continuous removal of the tritium. (orig./HP)

  10. Planet population synthesis driven by pebble accretion in cluster environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndugu, N.; Bitsch, B.; Jurua, E.

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of protoplanetary discs embedded in stellar clusters depends on the age and the stellar density in which they are embedded. Stellar clusters of young age and high stellar surface density destroy protoplanetary discs by external photoevaporation and stellar encounters. Here, we consider the effect of background heating from newly formed stellar clusters on the structure of protoplanetary discs and how it affects the formation of planets in these discs. Our planet formation model is built on the core accretion scenario, where we take the reduction of the core growth time-scale due to pebble accretion into account. We synthesize planet populations that we compare to observations obtained by radial velocity measurements. The giant planets in our simulations migrate over large distances due to the fast type-II migration regime induced by a high disc viscosity (α = 5.4 × 10-3). Cold Jupiters (rp > 1 au) originate preferably from the outer disc, due to the large-scale planetary migration, while hot Jupiters (rp meaning that more gas giants are formed at larger metallicity. However, our synthetic population of isolated stars host a significant amount of giant planets even at low metallicity, in contradiction to observations where giant planets are preferably found around high metallicity stars, indicating that pebble accretion is very efficient in the standard pebble accretion framework. On the other hand, discs around stars embedded in cluster environments hardly form any giant planets at low metallicity in agreement with observations, where these changes originate from the increased temperature in the outer parts of the disc, which prolongs the core accretion time-scale of the planet. We therefore conclude that the outer disc structure and the planet's formation location determines the giant planet occurrence rate and the formation efficiency of cold and hot Jupiters.

  11. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Safety and licensing evaluaion of German Pebble Bed Reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor, as developed in the Federal Republic of Germany, was reviewed from a United States Safety and Licensing perspective. The primary concepts considered were the steam cycle electric generating pebble bed (HTR-K) and the process heat pebble bed (PNP), although generic consideration of the direct cycle gas turbine pebble bed (HHT) was included. The study examines potential U.S. licensing issues and offers some suggestions as to required development areas

  12. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weijing [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Pupeschi, Simone [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Hanaor, Dorian [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science and Technologies, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Gan, Yixiang, E-mail: yixiang.gan@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  13. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Weijing; Pupeschi, Simone; Hanaor, Dorian; Gan, Yixiang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  14. On the hyperporous non-linear elasticity model for fusion-relevant pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Maio, P.A.; Giammusso, R.; Vella, G.

    2010-01-01

    Packed pebble beds are particular granular systems composed of a large amount of small particles, arranged in irregular lattices and surrounded by a gas filling interstitial spaces. Due to their heterogeneous structure, pebble beds have non-linear and strongly coupled thermal and mechanical behaviours whose constitutive models seem limited, being not suitable for fusion-relevant design-oriented applications. Within the framework of the modelling activities promoted for the lithiated ceramics and beryllium pebble beds foreseen in the Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed breeding blanket concept of DEMO, at the Department of Nuclear Engineering of the University of Palermo (DIN) a thermo-mechanical constitutive model has been set-up assuming that pebble beds can be considered as continuous, homogeneous and isotropic media. The present paper deals with the DIN non-linear elasticity constitutive model, based on the assumption that during the reversible straining of a pebble bed its effective logarithmic bulk modulus depends on the equivalent pressure according to a modified power law and its effective Poisson modulus remains constant. In these hypotheses the functional dependence of the effective tangential and secant bed deformation moduli on either the equivalent pressure or the volumetric strain have been derived in a closed analytical form. A procedure has been, then, defined to assess the model parameters for a given pebble bed from its oedometric test results and it has been applied to both polydisperse lithium orthosilicate and single size beryllium pebble beds.

  15. The activation analysis of gold in small refractory pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibby, D.M.; Chaix, R.P.

    1975-08-01

    The gold content of a suite of small pebbles, residual to the milling and leach of a gold bearing ore, has been investigated by means of neutron activation analysis (NAA). An NAA technique presenting a sensitivity of 0.02μgm gold, was used as being appropriate to the samples under investigation. An alternative NAA technique developed with the same sample suite showed a sensitivity of the order of 10 -4 to 10 -5 μgm gold. The NAA techniques developed, are appropriate to the determination of gold in small samples of ore not normally amenable to milling and/or dissolution

  16. A 350 MW HTR with an annular pebble bed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dazhong; Jiang Zhiqiang; Gao Zuying; Xu Yuanhui

    1992-12-01

    A conceptual design of HTR-module with an annular pebble bed core was proposed. This design can increase the unit power capacity of HTR-Module from 200 MWt to 350 MWt while it can keep the inherent safety characteristics of modular reactor. The preliminary safety analysis results for 350 MW HTR are given. In order to solve the problem of uneven helium outlet temperature distribution a gas flow mixing structure at bottom of core was designed. The experiment results of a gas mixing simulation test rig show that the mixing function can satisfy the design requirements

  17. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle optimization using particle swarm algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavron, Barak, E-mail: btavron@bgu.ac.il [Planning, Development and Technology Division, Israel Electric Corporation Ltd., P.O. Box 10, Haifa 31000 (Israel); Shwageraus, Eugene, E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Particle swarm method has been developed for fuel cycle optimization of PBR reactor. • Results show uranium utilization low sensitivity to fuel and core design parameters. • Multi-zone fuel loading pattern leads to a small improvement in uranium utilization. • Thorium mixes with highly enriched uranium yields the best uranium utilization. - Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) features, such as robust thermo-mechanical fuel design and on-line continuous fueling, facilitate wide range of fuel cycle alternatives. A range off fuel pebble types, containing different amounts of fertile or fissile fuel material, may be loaded into the reactor core. Several fuel loading zones may be used since radial mixing of the pebbles was shown to be limited. This radial separation suggests the possibility to implement the “seed-blanket” concept for the utilization of fertile fuels such as thorium, and for enhancing reactor fuel utilization. In this study, the particle-swarm meta-heuristic evolutionary optimization method (PSO) has been used to find optimal fuel cycle design which yields the highest natural uranium utilization. The PSO method is known for solving efficiently complex problems with non-linear objective function, continuous or discrete parameters and complex constrains. The VSOP system of codes has been used for PBR fuel utilization calculations and MATLAB script has been used to implement the PSO algorithm. Optimization of PBR natural uranium utilization (NUU) has been carried out for 3000 MWth High Temperature Reactor design (HTR) operating on the Once Trough Then Out (OTTO) fuel management scheme, and for 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) operating on the multi-pass (MEDUL) fuel management scheme. Results showed only a modest improvement in the NUU (<5%) over reference designs. Investigation of thorium fuel cases showed that the use of HEU in combination with thorium results in the most favorable reactor performance in terms of

  18. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle optimization using particle swarm algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavron, Barak; Shwageraus, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Particle swarm method has been developed for fuel cycle optimization of PBR reactor. • Results show uranium utilization low sensitivity to fuel and core design parameters. • Multi-zone fuel loading pattern leads to a small improvement in uranium utilization. • Thorium mixes with highly enriched uranium yields the best uranium utilization. - Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) features, such as robust thermo-mechanical fuel design and on-line continuous fueling, facilitate wide range of fuel cycle alternatives. A range off fuel pebble types, containing different amounts of fertile or fissile fuel material, may be loaded into the reactor core. Several fuel loading zones may be used since radial mixing of the pebbles was shown to be limited. This radial separation suggests the possibility to implement the “seed-blanket” concept for the utilization of fertile fuels such as thorium, and for enhancing reactor fuel utilization. In this study, the particle-swarm meta-heuristic evolutionary optimization method (PSO) has been used to find optimal fuel cycle design which yields the highest natural uranium utilization. The PSO method is known for solving efficiently complex problems with non-linear objective function, continuous or discrete parameters and complex constrains. The VSOP system of codes has been used for PBR fuel utilization calculations and MATLAB script has been used to implement the PSO algorithm. Optimization of PBR natural uranium utilization (NUU) has been carried out for 3000 MWth High Temperature Reactor design (HTR) operating on the Once Trough Then Out (OTTO) fuel management scheme, and for 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) operating on the multi-pass (MEDUL) fuel management scheme. Results showed only a modest improvement in the NUU (<5%) over reference designs. Investigation of thorium fuel cases showed that the use of HEU in combination with thorium results in the most favorable reactor performance in terms of

  19. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite

  20. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Majumdar, Saurindranath [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite.

  1. South African safety assessment framework for the pebble bed modular reactor - HTR2008-58192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, J.; Kohtz, N.; Coe, I.

    2008-01-01

    It is planned to construct a first of a kind Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) in South Africa. A need has been recognized to accompany the licensing process for the PBMR with independent safety assessments to ensure that the safety case submitted by the applicant complies with the licensing requirements of the NNR. At the HTR 2006 Conference, the framework and major challenges on safety assessment that the South African National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) faces in developing and applying appropriate strategies and tools were presented. This paper discusses the current status of the various NNR assessment activities and describes how this will be considered in the NNR Final Report on the PBMR Safety Case. The traditional safety assessment process has been adapted to take into account the developmental nature of the project. By performing safety assessments, the designer and applicant must ensure that the design as proposed for construction and as-built meets the safety requirements defined by the regulatory framework. The regulator performs independent safety assessments, including independent analyses in areas deemed safety significant and potentially safety significant. The developmental nature of the project also led to the identification of a series of regulatory assessment activities preceding the formal assessment of the safety case. Besides an assessment of the resolution of Key Licensing Issues which have been defined in an early stage of the project and are discussed in /l/, these activities comprise the participation in an SAR Early Intervention Process, the execution of a regulatory HAZOP and the development of a regulatory assessment specification for the formal assessment of the safety case. This paper briefly describes these activities and their current status. During the last two years, significant progress was made with the development or adjustment of tools for the independent analysis by the regulator of the steady state core design, of the transient

  2. Application of a model to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of randomly packed fusion pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    In our precious study, a prediction model, which calculates the effective thermal conductivity k{sub eff} of mono-sized pebble beds, has been developed and validated. Based on this model, here the effects of these influencing factors such as pebble size, thermal radiation, contact area, filling gas, gas flow, gas pressure, etc. on the k{sub eff} of randomly packed fusion pebble beds are studied and analyzed. The pebble beds investigated include Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O, Be and BeO pebble beds. In the current study, many important and meaningful conclusions are derived and some of them are similar to the existing research results. Particularly, some critters that under which conditions the effect of some influencing factors can be neglected or should be considered are also presented.

  3. Preliminary neutronic study on Pu-based OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setiadipura, Topan; Zuhair [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Irwanto, Dwi [Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Bandung (Indonesia). Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group

    2017-12-15

    The neutron physics characteristic of Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) allows a better incineration of plutonium (Pu). An optimized design of simple PBR might give a symbiotic solution of providing a safe energy source, effective fuel utilization shown by a higher burnup value, and incineration of Pu stockpiles. This study perform a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt Once Through Then Out (OTTO) cycle PBR with Pu-based fuel. The safety criteria of the design were represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. In this preliminary phase, the parametric survey is limited to the heavy metal (HM) loading per pebble and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum high burnup of 419.7 MWd/kg-HM was achieved in this study. This optimum design uses a HM loading of 2.5 g/pebble with average axial fuel velocity 0.5 cm/day.

  4. Production of various sizes and some properties of beryllium pebbles by the rotating electrode method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwadachi, T.; Sakamoto, N.; Nishida, K. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Kawamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The particle size distribution of beryllium pebbles produced by the rotating electrode method was investigated. Particle size depends on some physical properties and process parameters, which can practicaly be controlled by varying electrode angular velocities. The average particle sizes produced were expressed by the hyperbolic function with electrode angular velocity. Particles within the range of 0.3 and 2.0 mm in diameter are readily produced by the rotating electrode method while those of 0.2 mm in diameter are also fabricable. Sphericity and surface roughness were good in each size of pebble. Grain sizes of the pebbles are 17 {mu} m in 0.25 mm diameter pebbles and 260 {mu} m in 1.8 mm diameter pebbles. (author)

  5. Application of discrete element method to study mechanical behaviors of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Zhiyong; Ying, Alice; Abdou, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the discrete element method (DEM) approach has been applied to study mechanical behaviors of ceramic breeder pebble beds. Directly simulating the contact state of each individual particle by the physically based interaction laws, the DEM numerical program is capable of predicting the mechanical behaviors of non-standard packing structures. The program can also provide the data to trace the evolution of contact characteristics and forces as deformation proceeds, as well as the particle movement when the pebble bed is subjected to external loadings. Our numerical simulations focus on predicting the mechanical behaviors of ceramic breeder pebble beds, which include typical fusion breeder materials in solid breeder blankets. Current numerical results clearly show that the packing density and the bed geometry can have an impact on the mechanical stiffness of the pebble beds. Statistical data show that the contact forces are highly related to the contact status of the pebbles

  6. Thermal safety analysis for pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie

    1998-01-01

    Pebble bed blanket hybrid reactor may have more advantages than slab element blanket hybrid reactor in nuclear fuel production and nuclear safety. The thermo-hydraulic calculations of the blanket in the Tokamak helium cooling pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor developed in China are carried out using the Code THERMIX and auxiliary code. In the calculations different fuel pebble material and steady state, depressurization and total loss of flow accident conditions are included. The results demonstrate that the conceptual design of the Tokamak helium cooling pebble bed blanket fusion-fission hybrid reactor with dump tank is feasible and safe enough only if the suitable fuel pebble material is selected and the suitable control system and protection system are established. Some recommendations for due conceptual design are also presented

  7. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  8. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  9. Integrated design approach of the pebble bed modular using models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is the first pebble bed reactor that will be utilised in a high temperature direct Brayton cycle configuration. This implies that there are a number of unique features in the PBMR that extend from the German experience base. One of the challenges in the design of the PBMR is managing the integrated design process between the designers, the physicists and the analysts. This integrated design process is managed through model-based development work. Three-dimensional CAD models are constructed of the components and parts in the reactor. From the CAD models, CFD models, neutronic models, shielding models, FEM models and other thermodynamic models are derived. These models range from very simple models to extremely detailed and complex models. The models are used in legacy software as well as commercial off-the-shelf software. The different models are also used in code-to-code comparisons to verify the results. This paper will briefly discuss the different models and the interaction between the models, showing the iterative design process that is used in the development of the reactor at PBMR. (author)

  10. Dynamics of a small direct cycle pebble bed HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkerk, E.C.; Heek, A.I. van

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch market for combined generation of heat and power identifies a unit size of 40 MW thermal for the conceptual design of a nuclear cogeneration plant. The ACACIA system provides 14 MW(e) electricity combined with 17 t/h of high temperature steam (220 deg. C, 10 bar) with a pebble bed high temperature reactor directly coupled with a helium compressor and a helium turbine. To come to quantitative statements about the ACACIA transient behaviour, a calculational coupling between the high temperature reactor core analysis code package Panthermix (Panther-Thermix/Direkt) and the thermal hydraulic code RELAP5 for the energy conversion system has been made. This paper will present the analysis of safety related transients. The usual incident scenarios Loss of Coolant Incident (LOCI) and Loss of Flow Incident (LOFI) have been analysed. Besides, also a search for the real maximum fuel temperature (inside a fuel pebble anywhere in the core) has been made. It appears that the maximum fuel temperatures are not reached during a LOFI or LOCI with a halted mass flow rate, but for situations with a small mass flow rate, 1-0.5%. As such, a LOFI or LOCI does not represent the worst-case scenario in terms of maximal fuel temperature. (author)

  11. Power Peaking Effect of OTTO Fuel Scheme Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadipura, T.; Suwoto; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) type of Hight Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a very interesting nuclear reactor design to fulfill the growing electricity and heat demand with a superior passive safety features. Effort to introduce the PBR design to the market can be strengthen by simplifying its system with the Once-through-then-out (OTTO) cycle PBR in which the pebble fuel only pass the core once. Important challenge in the OTTO fuel scheme is the power peaking effect which limit the maximum nominal power or burnup of the design. Parametric survey is perform in this study to investigate the contribution of different design parameters to power peaking effect of OTTO cycle PBR. PEBBED code is utilized in this study to perform the equilibrium PBR core analysis for different design parameter and fuel scheme. The parameters include its core diameter, height-per-diameter (H/D), power density, and core nominal power. Results of this study show that diameter and H/D effectsare stronger compare to the power density and nominal core power. Results of this study might become an importance guidance for design optimization of OTTO fuel scheme PBR.

  12. Torques Induced by Scattered Pebble-flow in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Llambay, Pablo; Pessah, Martin E.

    2018-03-01

    Fast inward migration of planetary cores is a common problem in the current planet formation paradigm. Even though dust is ubiquitous in protoplanetary disks, its dynamical role in the migration history of planetary embryos has not been assessed. In this Letter, we show that the scattered pebble-flow induced by a low-mass planetary embryo leads to an asymmetric dust-density distribution that is able to exert a net torque. By analyzing a large suite of multifluid hydrodynamical simulations addressing the interaction between the disk and a low-mass planet on a fixed circular orbit, and neglecting dust feedback onto the gas, we identify two different regimes, gas- and gravity-dominated, where the scattered pebble-flow results in almost all cases in positive torques. We collect our measurements in a first torque map for dusty disks, which will enable the incorporation of the effect of dust dynamics on migration into population synthesis models. Depending on the dust drift speed, the dust-to-gas mass ratio/distribution, and the embryo mass, the dust-induced torque has the potential to halt inward migration or even induce fast outward migration of planetary cores. We thus anticipate that dust-driven migration could play a dominant role during the formation history of planets. Because dust torques scale with disk metallicity, we propose that dust-driven outward migration may enhance the occurrence of distant giant planets in higher-metallicity systems.

  13. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  14. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  15. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept

  16. Fabrication and characterization of lithium orthosilicate pebbles using LiOH as a new raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knitter, R.; Reimann, J.; Risthaus, P.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Piazza, G.

    2004-01-01

    For the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket slightly overstoichiometric lithium orthosilicate pebbles (Li 4 SiO 4 +SiO 2 ) have been chosen as one optional breeder material. This material is developed in collaboration between Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK) and the Schott Glas, Mainz. The lithium orthosilicate (OSi) pebbles are fabricated by the melting and spraying method in a semi-industrial scale facility. In the past, the not enriched pebbles were produced from a mixture of Li 4 SiO 4 and SiO 2 powders, but due to the fact that enriched Li 4 SiO 4 is not available on the market, highly enriched carbonate powder was used that finally resulted in nonsatisfying pebble characteristics. Enriched LiOH powder is commercially available, therefore, a new production route was pursued based on the following, simplified reaction: 4 LiOH + SiO 2 → Li 4 SiO 4 + 2 H 2 O. The melting process of LiOH and SiO 2 is less difficult to control than the melting of Li 2 CO 3 in spite of the decomposition of water. The pebbles produced from LiOH and SiO 2 are similar to those produced from Li 4 SiO 4 and SiO 2 . They exhibit a distinctly dendritic structure and show only a small amount of pores and cracks. In addition to the main constituent Li 4 SiO 4 , the high temperature phase Li 6 Si 2 O 7 was detected due to the quenching process and the excess of SiO 2 . This minor constituent, however, decomposes to Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 SiO 3 during annealing. In compressive crush load tests of single pebbles a crush load of about 9.5 N was measured for pebbles after drying at 300degC. The chemical analysis revealed a further advantage of the use of LiOH in the melting process. As LiOH is available in high-purity quality, the pebbles contain impurities to a lower degree than pebbles produced from Li 4 SiO 4 or Li 2 CO 3 . In order to obtain characteristic pebble bed data, first Uniaxial Compression Tests (UCTs) were performed at temperatures between ambient and at 850deg

  17. Pressurizing Behavior on Ingress of Coolant into Pebble Bed of Blanket of Fusion DEMO Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daigo Tsuru; Mikio Enoeda; Masato Akiba

    2006-01-01

    Solid breeder blankets are being developed as candidate blankets for the Fusion DEMO reactor in Japan. JAEA is performing the development of the water cooled and helium cooled solid breeder blankets. The blanket utilizes ceramic breeder pebbles and multiplier pebbles beds cooled by high pressure water or high pressure helium in the cooling tubes placed in the blanket box structure. In the development of the blanket, it is very important to incorporate the safety technology as well as the performance improvement on tritium production and energy conversion. In the safety design and technology, coolant ingress in the blanket box structure is one of the most important events as the initiators. Especially the thermal hydraulics in the pebble bed in the case of the high pressure coolant ingress is very important to evaluate the pressure propagation and coolant flow behavior. This paper presents the preliminary results of the pressure loss characteristics by the coolant ingress in the pebble bed. Experiments have been performed by using alumina pebble bed (4 litter maximum volume of the pebble bed) and nitrogen gas to simulate the helium coolant ingress into breeder and multiplier pebble beds. Reservoir tank of 10 liter is filled with 1.0 MPa nitrogen. The nitrogen gas is released at the bottom part of the alumina pebble bed whose upper part is open to the atmosphere. The pressure change in the pebble bed is measured to identify the pressure loss. The measured values are compared with the predicted values by Ergun's equation, which is the correlation equation on pressure loss of the flow through porous medium. By the results of the experiments with no constraint on the alumina pebble bed, it was clarified that the measured value agreed in the lower flow rate. However, in the higher flow rate where the pressure loss is high, the measured value is about half of the predicted value. The differences between the measured values and the predicted values will be discussed from

  18. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  19. Role of nuclear grade graphite in controlling oxidation in modular HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, Willaim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kane, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  20. Neutron physical investigations on the shutdown effect of small boronated absorbing spheres for pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouridis, S.; Schurrer, F.; Muller, H.; Ninaus, W.; Oswald, K.; Neef, R.D.; Schaal, H.

    1987-01-01

    An emergency shutdown system for high-temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactors is proposed in addition to the common absorber rod shutdown system. This system is based on the strongly absorbing effect of small boronated graphite spheres (called KLAK), which trickle in case of emergency by gravity from the top reflector into the reactor core. The inner reflector of the Siemens-Argonaut reactor was substituted by an assembly of spherical Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor fuel elements, and the shutdown effect was examined by installing well-defined KLAK nests inside this assembly. The purpose was to develop and prove a calculational procedure for determining criticality values for assemblies of large fuel spheres and small absorbing spheres

  1. Porosity effects in the neutron total cross section of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R; Dawidowski, J; Petriw, S. N

    2009-01-01

    Graphite has been used in nuclear reactors since the birth of the nuclear industry due to its good performance as a neutron moderator material. Graphite is still an option as moderator for generation IV reactors due to its good mechanical and thermal properties at high operation temperatures. So, there has been renewed interest in a revision of the computer libraries used to describe the neutron cross section of graphite. For sub-thermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a larger total cross section (between 4 and 8 barns) than predicted by existing theoretical models (0.2 barns). In order to investigate the origin of this discrepancy we measured the total cross section of graphite samples of three different origins, in the energy range from 0.001 eV to 10 eV. Different experimental arrangements and sample treatments were explored, to identify the effect of various experimental parameters on the total cross section measurement. The experiments showed that the increase in total cross section is due to neutrons scattered around the forward direction. We associate these small-angle scattered neutrons (SANS) to the porous structure of graphite, and formulate a very simple model to compute its contribution to the total cross section of the material. This results in an analytic expression that explicitly depends on the density and mean size of the pores, which can be easily incorporated in nuclear library codes. [es

  2. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  3. New insights into canted spiro carbon interstitial in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The self-interstitial carbon is the key to radiation damage in graphite moderator nuclear reactor, so an understanding of its behavior is essential for plant safety and maximized reactor lifetime. The density functional theory is applied on four different graphite unit cells, starting from of 64 carbon atoms up to 256 carbon atoms, using AIMPRO code to obtain the energetic, athermal and mechanical properties of carbon interstitial in graphite. This study presents first principles calculations of the energy of formation that prove its high barrier to athermal diffusion (1.1 eV) and the consequent large critical shear stress (39 eV-50 eV) necessary to shear graphite planes in its presence. Also, for the first time, the gamma surface of graphite in two dimensions is calculated and found to yield the critical shear stress for perfect graphite. Finally, in contrast to the extensive literature describing the interstitial of carbon in graphite as spiro interstitial, in this work the ground state of interstitial carbon is found to be canted spiro interstitial.

  4. Fabrication of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles by a freeze drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Jin, E-mail: lee@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Mokpo National University, Muan 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Min-Woo [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Mokpo National University, Muan 534-729 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles were successfully fabricated by using a freeze drying process. The Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} slurry was prepared using a commercial powder of particle size 0.5–1.5 μm and the pebble pre-form was prepared by dropping the slurry into liquid nitrogen through a syringe needle. The droplets were rapidly frozen, changing their morphology to spherical pebbles. The frozen pebbles were dried at −10 °C in vacuum. To make crack-free pebbles, some glycerin was employed in the slurry, and long drying time and a low vacuum condition were applied in the freeze drying process. In the process, the solid content in the slurry influenced the spheroidicity of the pebble green body. The dried pebbles were sintered at 1200 °C in an air atmosphere. The sintered pebbles showed almost 40% shrinkage. The sintered pebbles revealed a porous microstructure with a uniform pore distribution and the sintered pebbles were crushed under an average load of 50 N in a compressive strength test. In the present study, a freeze drying process for fabrication of spherical Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles is introduced. The processing parameters, such as solid content in the slurry and the conditions of freeze drying and sintering, are also examined.

  5. Tritium release and retention properties of highly neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles from HIDOBE-01 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A.; Klimenkov, M.; Kolb, M.; Vladimirov, P.; Kurinskiy, P.; Schneider, H.-C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Til, S. van; Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The current helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) tritium breeding blanket concept for fusion reactors includes a bed of 1 mm diameter beryllium pebbles to act as a neutron multiplier. Beryllium pebbles, fabricated by the rotating electrode method, were neutron irradiated in the HFR in Petten within the HIDOBE-01 experiment. This study presents tritium release and retention properties and data on microstructure evolution of beryllium pebbles irradiated at 630, 740, 873, 948 K up to a damage dose of 18 dpa, corresponding to a helium accumulation of about 3000 appm. The measured cumulative released activity from the beryllium pebbles irradiated at 948 K was found to be significantly lower than the calculated value. After irradiation at 873 and 948 K scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed large pores or bubbles in the bulk and oxide films with a thickness of up to 8 μm at the surface of the beryllium pebbles. The radiation-enhanced diffusion of tritium and the formation of open porosity networks accelerate the tritium release from the beryllium pebbles during the high-flux neutron irradiation.

  6. Mechanical compression tests of beryllium pebbles after neutron irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Compression tests of highly neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles have been performed. • Irradiation hardening of beryllium pebbles decreases the steady-state strain-rates. • The steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles exceed their swelling rates. - Abstract: Results: of mechanical compression tests of irradiated and non-irradiated beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 and 2 mm are presented. The neutron irradiation was performed in the HFR in Petten, The Netherlands at 686–968 K up to 1890–2950 appm helium production. The irradiation at 686 and 753 K cause irradiation hardening due to the gas bubble formation in beryllium. The irradiation-induced hardening leads to decrease of steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles compared to non-irradiated ones. In contrary, after irradiation at higher temperatures of 861 and 968 K, the steady-state strain-rates of the pebbles increase because annealing of irradiation defects and softening of the material take place. It was shown that the steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles always exceed their swelling rates.

  7. Numerical and experimental characterization of ceramic pebble beds under cycling mechanical loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pupeschi, S., E-mail: pupeschi.simone@hotmail.it [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Knitter, R.; Kamlah, M. [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Gan, Y. [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006 (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The effect of cyclic loading on the mechanical response of pebble beds was assessed. • Numerical simulations were performed with KIT-DEM code. • The numerical simulations were compared with the experimental outcomes. • A good qualitative agreement between experimental and simulation results was found. • The pebble size distribution affects the mechanical response of the assemblies. - Abstract: All solid breeder concepts considered to be tested in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), make use of lithium-based ceramics in the form of pebble-packed beds as tritium breeder. A thorough understanding of the thermal and mechanical properties of the ceramic pebble beds under fusion relevant conditions is essential for the design of the breeder blanket modules of future fusion reactors. In this study, the effect of cyclic loading on the mechanical behaviour of pebble bed assemblies was investigated using a Discrete Element Method (DEM) code. The numerical simulations were compared with the experimental outcomes. The results of numerical simulations show that the pebble size distribution affects noticeably the stress-strain behaviour of the assemblies. A good qualitative agreement between experimental and simulation results was found in terms of difference between residual strains of consecutive cycles. An increase of the oedometric modulus with the compressive load was observed for all investigated compositions in both experimental and DEM simulations. The numerical results show an increase of the oedometric modulus (E) with progressive compaction of the assemblies due to the cycling loading, while no significant influence of the pebbles size distribution was observed.

  8. Particle flow of ceramic breeder pebble beds in bi-axial compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsmeyer, S.; Reimann, J.

    2002-01-01

    Pebble beds of Tritium breeding ceramic material are investigated within the framework of developing solid breeder blankets for future nuclear fusion power plants. For the thermo-mechanical characterisation of such pebble beds, bed compression experiments are the standard tools. New bi-axial compression experiments on 20 and 30 mm high pebble beds show pebble flow effects much more pronounced than in previous 10 mm beds. Owing to the greater bed height, conditions are reached where the bed fails in cross direction and unhindered flow of the pebbles occurs. The paper presents measurements for the orthosilicate and metatitanate breeder materials that are envisaged to be used in a solid breeder blanket. The data are compared with calculations made with a Drucker-Prager soil model within the finite-element code ABAQUS, calibrated with data from other experiments. It is investigated empirically whether internal bed friction angles can be determined from pebble beds of the considered heights, which would simplify, and broaden the data base for, the calibration of the Drucker-Prager pebble bed models

  9. Status of the in-pile test of HCPB pebble-bed assemblies in the HFR Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der; Fokkens, J.H.; Hofmans, H.E.; Jong, M.; Magielsen, A.J.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Stijkel, M.P. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands); Conrad, R. [JRC, Inst. for Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Malang, S.; Reimann, J. [FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Roux, N. [CEA Saclay (France)

    2002-06-01

    In the framework of developing the helium cooled pebble-bed (HCPB) blanket an irradiation test of pebble-bed assemblies is prepared at the HFR Petten. The test objective is to concentrate on the effect of neutron irradiation on the thermal-mechanical behaviour of the HCPB breeder pebble-bed at DEMO representative levels of temperature and defined thermal-mechanical loads. The basic test elements are EUROFER-97 cylinders with a horizontal bed of ceramic breeder pebbles sandwiched between two beryllium beds. The pebble beds are separated by EUROFER-97 steel plates. The heat flow is managed such as to have a radial temperature distribution in the ceramic breeder pebble-bed as flat as reasonably possible. The paper reports on the project status, and presents the results of pre-tests, material characteristics, the manufacturing of the pebble-bed assemblies, and the nuclear and thermo-mechanical loading parameters. (orig.)

  10. Characterization, treatment and conditioning of radioactive graphite from decommissioning of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator and reflector of neutrons in more than 100 nuclear power plants and in many research and plutonium-production reactors. It is used primarily as a neutron reflector or neutron moderator, although graphite is also used for other features of reactor cores, such as fuel sleeves. Many of the graphite-moderated reactors are now quite old, with some already shutdown. Therefore radioactive graphite dismantling and the management of radioactive graphite waste are becoming an increasingly important issue for a number of IAEA Member States. Worldwide, there are more than 230 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite which will eventually need to be managed as radioactive waste. Proper management of radioactive graphite waste requires complex planning and the implementation of several interrelated operations. There are two basic options for graphite waste management: (1) packaging of non-conditioned graphite waste with subsequent direct disposal of the waste packages, and (2) conditioning of graphite waste (principally either by incineration or calcination) with separate disposal of any waste products produced, such as incinerator ash. In both cases, the specific properties of graphite - such as Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility, and radioactive gases released from waste graphite - have a potential impact on the safety of radioactive graphite waste management and need to be carefully considered. Radioactive graphite waste management is not specifically addressed in IAEA publications. Only general and limited information is available in publications dealing with decommissioning of nuclear reactors. This report provides a comprehensive discussion of radioactive graphite waste characterization, handling, conditioning and disposal throughout the operating and decommissioning life cycle. The first draft report was prepared at a meeting on 23-27 February 1998. A technical meeting (TM) was held in October 1999 in coincidence with the Seminar on

  11. Graphite behaviour in relation to the fuel element design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Manzel, R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Blackstone, R. [Reactor Centrum, Petten (Netherlands); Delle, W. [Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich (Germany); Lungagnani, V. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands); Krefeld, R. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands)

    1969-09-01

    The first designs of H.T.R. power reactors will probably use a Gilsocarbon based graphite for both the moderator/carrier blocks and for the fuel tubes. The initial physical properties and changes of dimensions, thermal expansion coefficient, Young*s modulus, and thermal conductivity on irradiation of Gilsocarbon graphites to typical reactor dwell-time fast neutron doses of 4 * 1021 cm -2 Ni dose Dido equivalent are given and values for the irradiation creep constant are presented. The influence of these property changes and those of chemical corrosion are considered briefly in relation to the present fuel element designs. The selection of an eventual less costly replacement graphite for Gilsocarbon graphite is discussed in terms of materials properties.

  12. Thermal strain measurements in graphite using electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamulevicius, S.; Augulis, L.; Augulis, R.; Zabarskas, V.; Levinskas, R.; Poskas, P.

    2001-01-01

    Two 1500 MW(e) RBMK Units are operated at Ignalina NPP in Lithuania. Due to recent decision of the Parliament on the earlier closure of Unit 1, preparatory work for decommissioning have been initiated. Preferred decommissioning strategy is based on delayed dismantling after rather long safe enclosure period. Since graphite is one of the basic and probably the most voluminous components of the reactor internals, a sufficient information on status and behaviour of graphite moderator and reflector during long time safe enclosure period is of special significance. In this context, thermal strain in graphite is one of the parameters requiring particular interest. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry has been proposed and successfully tested to control this parameter using the real samples of graphite from Ignalina NPP Units. (author)

  13. Pebble-isolation mass: Scaling law and implications for the formation of super-Earths and gas giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Johansen, Anders; Lega, Elena; Lambrechts, Michiel; Crida, Aurélien

    2018-04-01

    The growth of a planetary core by pebble accretion stops at the so-called pebble isolation mass, when the core generates a pressure bump that traps drifting pebbles outside its orbit. The value of the pebble isolation mass is crucial in determining the final planet mass. If the isolation mass is very low, gas accretion is protracted and the planet remains at a few Earth masses with a mainly solid composition. For higher values of the pebble isolation mass, the planet might be able to accrete gas from the protoplanetary disc and grow into a gas giant. Previous works have determined a scaling of the pebble isolation mass with cube of the disc aspect ratio. Here, we expand on previous measurements and explore the dependency of the pebble isolation mass on all relevant parameters of the protoplanetary disc. We use 3D hydrodynamical simulations to measure the pebble isolation mass and derive a simple scaling law that captures the dependence on the local disc structure and the turbulent viscosity parameter α. We find that small pebbles, coupled to the gas, with Stokes number τf gap at pebble isolation mass. However, as the planetary mass increases, particles must be decreasingly smaller to penetrate the pressure bump. Turbulent diffusion of particles, however, can lead to an increase of the pebble isolation mass by a factor of two, depending on the strength of the background viscosity and on the pebble size. We finally explore the implications of the new scaling law of the pebble isolation mass on the formation of planetary systems by numerically integrating the growth and migration pathways of planets in evolving protoplanetary discs. Compared to models neglecting the dependence of the pebble isolation mass on the α-viscosity, our models including this effect result in higher core masses for giant planets. These higher core masses are more similar to the core masses of the giant planets in the solar system.

  14. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  15. Characterisation and radiolysis of modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with noble metal impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Zariņš, A.; Valtenbergs, O.

    2017-01-01

    Modified lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide (TiO2) are suggested as an alternative tritium breeding ceramic for the European solid breeder test blanket module. The noble metals – platinum (Pt), gold (Au) and rhodium (Rh), can be introduced into the modified...... Li4SiO4 pebbles during the melt-based process, due to the corrosion of Pt-Rh and Pt-Au alloy crucible components. In this study, the surface microstructure, chemical and phase composition of the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of the noble metals was analysed. The influence...

  16. Optimization of mass-production conditions for tritium breeder pebbles based on slurry droplet wetting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yi-Hyun, E-mail: yhpark@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyung-Mi; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon; Lee, Young-Min [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Jin; Danish, Rehan; Lim, Chul-Hwan; Jo, Yong-Dae [IVT Co., Ltd., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • An automatic dispensing system was developed to improve uniformity and production rate of breeder pebbles. • The production rate of this system for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was estimated at 50 kg/year. • The optimization of dispensing and sintering conditions for the mass-production of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was conducted. • Integrity of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was able to be ensured during mass-production process, especially during batch process. - Abstract: Lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) is being considered as tritium breeding material for solid-type breeding blanket, which are used in pebble-bed form. The total amount of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles in Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is approximately 80 kg. Furthermore, DEMO reactor requires a great deal of breeder pebbles. Therefore, the development of mass-production system for breeder pebbles is necessary. The slurry droplet wetting method was adopted in the mass-production process for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles, which had been developed in Korea. In this method, an automatic slurry dispensing system is one of the key apparatuses because the uniformity of pebbles and production rate are able to be improved. The system was successfully manufactured, which was consisted of a dispensing unit for instillation of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} slurry, a glycerin bath for hardening of droplets, and an automatic maintaining unit for constant distance between syringe needle and glycerin surface. The production rate of this system for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was estimated at 50 kg/year. In this study, it was investigated that the effect of dispensing and sintering conditions on the mass-production of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles.

  17. Year One Summary of X-energy Pebble Fuel Development at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McMurray, Jake W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jolly, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trammell, Michael P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Daniel R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blamer, Brandon J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reif, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Howard T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Concepts X-energy (ARC-Xe) Pebble Fuel Development project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has successfully completed its first year, having made excellent progress in accomplishing programmatic objectives. The primary focus of research at ORNL in support of X-energy has been the training of X-energy fuel fabrication engineers and the establishment of US pebble fuel production capabilities able to supply the Xe-100 pebble-bed reactor. These efforts have been strongly supported by particle fuel fabrication and characterization expertise present at ORNL from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program.

  18. An analytical evaluation for spatial-dependent intra-pebble Dancoff factor and escape probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Songhyun; Kim, Hong-Chul; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Soon Young; Noh, Jae Man

    2009-01-01

    The analytical evaluation of spatial-dependent intra-pebble Dancoff factors and their escape probabilities is pursued by the model developed in this study. Intra-pebble Dancoff factors and their escape probabilities are calculated as a function of fuel kernel radius, number of fuel kernels, and fuel region radius. The method in this study can be easily utilized to analyze the tendency of spatial-dependent intra-pebble Dancoff factor and spatial-dependent fuel region escape probability for the various geometries because it is faster than the MCNP method as well as good accuracy. (author)

  19. An Experiment on the Carbonization of Fuel Compact Matrix Graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Cho, Moon Sung

    2012-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a properly prepared matrix graphite powder, pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact, and finally heat-treated at about 1800 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, over coating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K, In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is of extreme importance to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the carbonization condition, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the carbonization behavior of green compact samples prepared from the matrix graphite powder mixtures with different binder materials was investigated in order to elucidate the behavior of binders during the carbonization heat treatment by analyzing the change in weight, density and its

  20. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Because of its high strength and stability at very high temperature, as well as very low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, graphite has been widely used as a structural material in Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR). Recently, many countries are developing the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) because of the potentials of hydrogen production, as well as its safety and viable economics. In VHTR, helium gas serves as the primary coolant. Graphite will be used as a reflector, moderator and core structural materials. The life time of graphite is determined from dimensional changes due to neutron irradiation, which closely relates to the changes of crystal structure. The changes of both lattice parameter and crystallite size can be easily measured by X-ray diffraction method. However, due to high cost and long time of neutron irradiation test, ion irradiation test is being performed instead in KAERI. Therefore, it is essential to develop the technique for measurement of ion irradiation damage of nuclear graphite. Fracture toughness of nuclear grade graphite is one of the key properties in the design and development of VHTR. It is important not only to evaluate the various properties of candidate graphite but also to assess the integrity of nuclear grade graphite during operation. Although fracture toughness tests on graphite have been performed in many laboratories, there have been wide variations in values of the calculated fracture toughness, due to the differences in the geometry of specimens and test conditions. Hence, standard test method for nuclear graphite is required to obtain the reliable fracture toughness values. Crack growth behavior of nuclear grade graphite shows rising R-curve which means the increase in crack growth resistance as the crack length increases. Crack bridging and microcracking have been proposed to be the dominant mechanisms of rising R-curve behavior. In this paper, the technique to measure the changes of crystallite size and

  1. Spectral zone selection methodology for pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mphahlele, Ramatsemela; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology is developed for determining boundaries of spectral zones for pebble bed reactors. A spectral zone is defined as a region made up of a number of nodes whose characteristics are collectively similar and that are assigned the same few-group diffusion constants. The spectral zones are selected in such a manner that the difference (error) between the reference transport solution and the diffusion code solution takes a minimum value. This is achieved by choosing spectral zones through optimally minimizing this error. The objective function for the optimization algorithm is the total reaction rate error, which is defined as the sum of the leakage, absorption and fission reaction rates errors in each zone. The selection of these spectral zones is such that the core calculation results based on diffusion theory are within an acceptable tolerance as compared to a proper transport reference solution. Through this work, a consistent approach for identifying spectral zones that yield more accurate diffusion results is introduced.

  2. Pebble bed reactor with one-zone core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Frank, U.; Lohnert, G.

    1977-01-01

    The claim deals with measures to differentiate the flow rate and to remove spherical fuel elements in the core of a pebble bed reactor. Hence the vertical rate of the fuel elements in the border region is for example twice as much as in the centre. A central funnel-shaped outlet on the floor of the core container over which a conical body is placed with its peak pointing upwards, or also the forming of several outlets can be used to adjust to a certain exit rate for the fuel elements. The main target of the invention is a radially extensively constant coolant outlet temperature at the outlet of the core which determines the effectiveness of the connected heat exchanger and thus contributes to economy. (UA) [de

  3. Uranium deposits in Proterozoic quartz-pebble conglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report is the result of an effort to gather together the most important information on uranium deposits in Proterozoic quartz-pebble conglomerates in the United States of America, Canada, Finland, Ghana, South Africa and Australia. The paper discusses the uranium potential (and in some cases also the gold potential in South Africa, Western Australia and Ghana) in terms of ores, sedimentation, mineralization, metamorphism, placers, geologic formations, stratigraphy, petrology, exploration, tectonics and distribution. Geologic history and application of geologic models are also discussed. Glacial outwash and water influx is also mentioned. The uranium deposits in a number of States in the USA are covered. The Witwatersrand placers are discussed in several papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Tightly Coupled Multiphysics Algorithm for Pebble Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, HyeongKae; Knoll, Dana; Gaston, Derek; Martineau, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a tightly coupled multiphysics simulation tool for the pebble-bed reactor (PBR) concept, a type of Very High-Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR). The simulation tool, PRONGHORN, takes advantages of the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment library, and is capable of solving multidimensional thermal-fluid and neutronics problems implicitly with a Newton-based approach. Expensive Jacobian matrix formation is alleviated via the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method, and physics-based preconditioning is applied to minimize Krylov iterations. Motivation for the work is provided via analysis and numerical experiments on simpler multiphysics reactor models. We then provide detail of the physical models and numerical methods in PRONGHORN. Finally, PRONGHORN's algorithmic capability is demonstrated on a number of PBR test cases.

  5. 'Once through' cycles in the pebble bed HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuchert, E.

    1977-12-01

    In the pebble bed HTR the 'Once Through' cycles achieve a favorable conservation of uranium resources due to their high burnup and due to the relatively low fissile inventory. A detailed study is given for cycles with highly enriched uranium and thorium, 20% enriched uranium and thorium, and for the low (approximately 8%) enriched cycle. The recommended cycle is based on the known THTR fuel element in the Th/U (93%) cycle. The variant with separate Seed elements and Breed elements presents the best pioneer in view of later recycling and thermal breeding. The minimum proliferation risk is achieved in the Th/U (20%) cycle basing on the fuel element type of the AVR, due to the low amount and high denaturization of the disloaded plutonium. (orig.) [de

  6. Water-ingress analysis for the 200 MWe pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yanhua; Shi Lei; Wang Yan

    2010-01-01

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor adopting steam-turbine cycle, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction, as well as the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and reflector structure material. Besides, increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The analysis of such a kind of important and particular accident is significant to verify the inherent safety characteristics of the modular HTR plants. Based on the preliminary design of the 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM), the design basis accident of a double-ended guillotine break of one heating tube and the beyond design basis accident of a large break of the main steam collection plate have been analyzed by using TINTE code, which is a special transient analysis program for high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Some safety relevant concerns, such as the fuel temperature, the primary loop pressure, the graphite corrosion, the water gas releasing amount, as well as the natural convection influence on the condition of failing to close the blower flaps, have been studied in detail. The calculation results indicate that even under some severe hypothetical postulates, the HTR-PM is able to keep the inherent safeties of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor and has a relatively good natural plant response, which will not result in environmental radiation hazard.

  7. A microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; McEnaney, B.; Tucker, M.O.; Rose, A.P.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports a new microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in three nuclear graphites: (i) PGA, the moderator material in UK Magnox reactors; (ii) IMl-24, the moderator material in UK Advanced gas cooled reactors (AGR); and (iii) a pitch coke graphite, which is used in the fabrication of AGR fuel sleeves. The fracture mechanisms in nuclear graphites are initiated by microcrack formation at low stresses. Typically, microcracks form in regions of well-aligned binder or at favourably-oriented pores, where stress is concentrated. With increasing applied loads, microcracks propagate taking advantage of easy cleavage paths or linking with pores. Eventually, coalescence of such cracks and inherent porosity produces a crack of critical length for fast fracture. (orig./MM)

  8. Derivation of a radionuclide inventory for irradiated graphite-chlorine-36 inventory determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.J.; Palmer, J.D.; Wood, P.

    2001-01-01

    The irradiation of materials in nuclear reactors results in neutron activation of component elements. Irradiated graphite wastes arise from their use in UK gas-cooled research and commercial reactor cores, and in fuel element components, where the graphite has acted as the neutron moderator. During irradiation the residual chlorine, which was used to purify the graphite during manufacture, is activated to chlorine-36. This isotope is long-lived and poorly retarded by geological barriers, and may therefore be a key radionuclide with respect to post-closure disposal facilities performance. United Kingdom Nirex Limited, currently responsible for the development of a disposal route for intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK, carried out a major research programme to support an overall assessment of the chlorine-36 activity of all wastes including graphite reactor components. The various UK gas cooled reactors reactors have used a range of graphite components made from diverse graphite types; this has necessitated a systematic programme to cover the wide range of graphite and production processes. The programme consisted of: precursor measurements - on the surface and/or bulk of representative samples of relevant materials, using specially developed methods; transfer studies - to quantify the potential for transfer of Cl-36 into and between waste streams during irradiation of graphite; theoretical assessments - to support the calculational methodology; actual measurements - to confirm the modelling. For graphite, a total of 458 measurements on samples from 57 batches were performed, to provide a detailed understanding of the composition of nuclear graphite. The work has resulted in the generation of probability density functions (PDF) for the mean chlorine concentration of three classes of graphite: fuel element graphite; Magnox moderator and reflector graphite and AGR reflector graphite; AGR moderator graphite. Transfer studies have shown that a significant

  9. Temperature control of the graphite stack of the reactor RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnoj, S.

    1998-01-01

    The paper includes general information about RBMK-1500 reactor, construction features and main technical data; graphite moderator stack, temperature channel, thermocouple TXA-1379, its basic technical and metrologic parameters as well as its advantages and disadvantages

  10. Analysis of impact of mixing flow on the pebble bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Chen; Li Fu; Guo Jiong

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the mixing flow in the pebble flow on pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) was analyzed in the paper. New code package MFVSOP which can simulate the mixing flow was developed. The equilibrium core of HTR-PM was selected as reference case, the impact of the mixing flow on the core parameters such as core power peak factor, power distribution was analyzed with different degree of mixing flow, and uncertainty analysis was carried out. Numerical results showed that the mixing flow had little impact on key parameters of pebble bed HTR, and the multiple-pass-operation-mode in pebble bed HTR can reduce the uncertainty arouse from the mixing flow. (authors)

  11. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  12. From Core to Capture: Graphite Management by Gasification and Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, J.; Bradbury, D.; Black, S.; Tomlinson, T.; Livesey, B.; Robinson, J.; Lindberg, M.; Newton, C.; Jones, A.; Wickham, A.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive graphite waste arises principally from the moderators of graphite/gas-cooled reactors at the end of life of the reactors. Commercial power producing reactors (for example, Magnox, AGR and RBMK) have graphite moderators, each containing several thousand tonnes of graphite, with the UK having the largest inventory of over 90,000 tonnes. Additionally, there are smaller quantities of graphite arising from other sources such as fuel element components. The current long term strategy for management of reactor graphite in the UK is for these wastes to be conditioned for disposal followed by transfer to a geological disposal facility (GDF). With this baseline position, these wastes will account for about 30% of the ILW inventory in a GDF. As the volume of the graphite waste is so large, it is not currently economic to retrieve and process the graphite in advance of the availability of a geological disposal facility. Recent work by the NDA has ascribed a much smaller “incremental” volume of 2% due to graphite, calculated on the basis that the GDF has to be a certain size anyway in order to dissipate the decay heat from high level waste

  13. Pebble fabrication and tritium release properties of an advanced tritium breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: hoshino.tsuyoshi@jaea.go.jp [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuch, Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Edao, Yuki [Tritium Technology Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata, Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kawamura, Yoshinori [Blanket Technology Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [BA Project Coordination Group, Department of Fusion Power Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuch, Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} with excess Li (Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y}) pebble as an advanced tritium breeders was fabricated using emulsion method. • Grain size of Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles was controlled to be less than 5 μm. • Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles exhibited good tritium release properties similar to that of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles. - Abstract: Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} with excess Li (Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y}) has been developed as an advanced tritium breeder. With respect to the tritium release characteristics of the blanket, the optimum grain size after sintering was less than 5 μm. Therefore, an emulsion method was developed to fabricate pebbles with this target grain size. The predominant factor affecting grain growth was assumed to be the presence of binder in the gel particles; this remaining binder was hypothesized to react with the excess Li, thereby generating Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, which promotes grain growth. To inhibit the generation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, calcined Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles were sintered under vacuum and subsequently under a 1% H{sub 2}–He atmosphere. The average grain size of the sintered Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles was less than 5 μm. Furthermore, the tritium release properties of Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles were evaluated, and deuterium–tritium (DT) neutron irradiation experiments were performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. To remove the tritium produced by neutron irradiation, 1% H{sub 2}–He purge gas was passed through the Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles. The Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles exhibited good tritium release properties, similar to those of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles. In particular, the released amount of tritiated hydrogen gas for easier tritium handling was greater than the released amount of tritiated water.

  14. Development of a safeguards system for the THTR pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, H.

    1978-08-01

    This report provides a survey of the technical possibilities of safeguarding the THTR-300 pebble bed reactor in accordance with the NPT. Description of the reactor system, the operational mode, and the operator's material control system are presented in Sections 2, 3 and 4. A suggested safeguards approach which is based on an item counting of pebble elements with containment and surveillance as a supplementary measure is described in the Sections 5 and 6

  15. Preliminary Neutronic Design of High Burnup OTTO Cycle Pebble Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Setiadipura, T; Irwanto, D; Zuhair, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR) which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor ...

  16. Study on Characteristic of Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity for Plutonium Core of Pebbled Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhair; Suwoto; Setiadipura, T.; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    As a part of the solution searching for possibility to control the plutonium, a current effort is focused on mechanisms to maximize consumption of plutonium. Plutonium core solution is a unique case in the high temperature reactor which is intended to reduce the accumulation of plutonium. However, the safety performance of the plutonium core which tends to produce a positive temperature coefficient of reactivity should be examined. The pebble bed inherent safety features which are characterized by a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity must be maintained under any circumstances. The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristic of temperature coefficient of reactivity for plutonium core of pebble bed reactor. A series of calculations with plutonium loading varied from 0.5 g to 1.5 g per fuel pebble were performed by the MCNPX code and ENDF/B-VII library. The calculation results show that the k eff curve of 0.5 g Pu/pebble declines sharply with the increase in fuel burnup while the greater Pu loading per pebble yields k eff curve declines slighter. The fuel with high Pu content per pebble may reach long burnup cycle. From the temperature coefficient point of view, it is concluded that the reactor containing 0.5 g-1.25 g Pu/pebble at high burnup has less favorable safety features if it is operated at high temperature. The use of fuel with Pu content of 1.5 g/pebble at high burnup should be considered carefully from core safety aspect because it could affect transient behavior into a fatal accident situation.

  17. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  18. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  19. {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C behaviour in UNGG graphite during leaching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, C.; Guy, C.; Comte, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - C.E.A., Laboratoire d' Analyses Radiochimiques et Chimiques (L.A.R.C.) 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator in Natural Uranium Graphite Gas reactors. Among the radionuclides, the long-lived activation product {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C, which are abundant in graphite after irradiation can be the main contributors to the dose during disposal. This paper deals with the first results obtained on irradiated graphite from French G2 reactor. Both leaching and diffusion experiments have been performed in order to understand and quantify the radionuclides behaviour. Chlorine leaching seems to be controlled by diffusion transport through graphite matrix. On the contrary {sup 14}C leaching is very low, probably because after irradiation, the remaining {sup 14}C was produced from {sup 13}C activation in the crystalline structure of graphite. (authors)

  20. Steamworlds: Atmospheric Structure and Critical Mass of Planets Accreting Icy Pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, John

    2017-01-01

    In the core accretion model, gas-giant planets first form a solid core, which then accretes gas from a protoplanetary disk when the core exceeds a critical mass. Here, we model the atmosphere of a core that grows by accreting ice-rich pebbles. The ice fraction of pebbles evaporates in warm regions of the atmosphere, saturating it with water vapor. Excess water precipitates to lower altitudes. Beneath an outer radiative region, the atmosphere is convective, following a moist adiabat in saturated regions due to water condensation and precipitation. Atmospheric mass, density, and temperature increase with core mass. For nominal model parameters, planets with core masses (ice + rock) between 0.08 and 0.16 Earth masses have surface temperatures between 273 and 647 K and form an ocean. In more massive planets, water exists as a supercritical convecting fluid mixed with gas from the disk. Typically, the core mass reaches a maximum (the critical mass) as a function of the total mass when the core is 2–5 Earth masses. The critical mass depends in a complicated way on pebble size, mass flux, and dust opacity due to the occasional appearance of multiple core-mass maxima. The core mass for an atmosphere of 50% hydrogen and helium may be a more robust indicator of the onset of gas accretion. This mass is typically 1–3 Earth masses for pebbles that are 50% ice by mass, increasing with opacity and pebble flux and decreasing with pebble ice/rock ratio.

  1. Steamworlds: Atmospheric Structure and Critical Mass of Planets Accreting Icy Pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, John, E-mail: jchambers@carnegiescience.edu [Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    In the core accretion model, gas-giant planets first form a solid core, which then accretes gas from a protoplanetary disk when the core exceeds a critical mass. Here, we model the atmosphere of a core that grows by accreting ice-rich pebbles. The ice fraction of pebbles evaporates in warm regions of the atmosphere, saturating it with water vapor. Excess water precipitates to lower altitudes. Beneath an outer radiative region, the atmosphere is convective, following a moist adiabat in saturated regions due to water condensation and precipitation. Atmospheric mass, density, and temperature increase with core mass. For nominal model parameters, planets with core masses (ice + rock) between 0.08 and 0.16 Earth masses have surface temperatures between 273 and 647 K and form an ocean. In more massive planets, water exists as a supercritical convecting fluid mixed with gas from the disk. Typically, the core mass reaches a maximum (the critical mass) as a function of the total mass when the core is 2–5 Earth masses. The critical mass depends in a complicated way on pebble size, mass flux, and dust opacity due to the occasional appearance of multiple core-mass maxima. The core mass for an atmosphere of 50% hydrogen and helium may be a more robust indicator of the onset of gas accretion. This mass is typically 1–3 Earth masses for pebbles that are 50% ice by mass, increasing with opacity and pebble flux and decreasing with pebble ice/rock ratio.

  2. Experimental measurement of effective thermal conductivity of packed lithium-titanate pebble bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, D.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Vinjamur, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium titanate is a promising solid breeder material for the fusion reactor blanket. Packed lithium titanate pebble bed is considered for the blanket. The thermal energy; that will be produced in the bed during breeding and the radiated heat from the reactor core absorbed must be removed. So, the experimental thermal property data are important for the blanket design. In past, a significant amount of works were conducted to determine the effective thermal conductivity of packed solid breeder pebble bed, in helium atmosphere, but no flow of gas was considered. With increase in gas flow rate, effective thermal conductivity of pebble bed increases. Particle size and void fraction also affect the thermal properties of the bed significantly. An experimental facility with external heat source was designed and installed. Experiments were carried out with lithium-titanate pebbles of different sizes at variable gas flow rates and at different bed wall temperature. It was observed that effective thermal conductivity of pebble bed is a function of particle Reynolds number and temperature. From the experimental data two correlations have been developed to estimate the effective thermal conductivity of packed lithium-titanate pebble bed for different particle Reynolds number and at different temperatures. The experimental details and results are discussed in this paper.

  3. CFD study on the supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dali, E-mail: ydlmitd@outlook.com; Peng, Minjun; Wang, Zhongyi

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • An innovation concept of supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor is proposed. • Body-centered cuboid (BCCa) arrangement is adopted for the pebbles. • S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor. - Abstract: The thermal hydraulic study of using supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}), a superior fluid state brayton cycle medium, in pebble bed type nuclear reactor is assessed through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. Preliminary concept design of this S-CO{sub 2} cooled pebble bed reactor (PBR) is implemented by the well-known KTA heat transfer correlation and Ergun pressure drop equation. Eddy viscosity transport turbulence model is adopted and verified by KTA calculated results. Distributions of the temperature, velocity, pressure and Nusselt (Nu) number of the coolant near the surface of the middle spherical fuel element are obtained and analyzed. The conclusion of the assessment is that S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor due primarily to its good heat transfer characteristic and large mass density, which could lead to achieve lower pressure drop and higher power density.

  4. Arc plasma assisted rotating electrode process for preparation of metal pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, T.; Tripathi, B.M.; Mahata, T.; Sinha, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Spherical beryllium pebbles of size ranging from 0.2-2 mm are required as neutron multiplying material in solid Test Blanket Module (TBM) of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Rotating electrode process (REP) has been identified as a suitable technique for preparation of beryllium pebbles. In REP, arc plasma generated between non-consumable electrode (cathode) and rotating metal electrode (anode) plays a major role for continuous consumption of metal electrode and preparation of spherical metal pebbles. This paper focuses on description of the process, selection of sub-systems for development of REP experimental set up and optimization of arc parameters, such as, cathode geometry, arc current, arc voltage, arc gap and carrier gas flow rate for preparation of required size spherical metal pebbles. Other parameters which affect the pebbles sizes are rotational speed, metal electrode diameter and physical properties of the metal. As beryllium is toxic in nature its surrogate metals such as stainless steel (SS) and Titanium (Ti) were selected to evaluate the performance of the REP equipment. Several experiments were carried out using SS and Ti electrode and process parameters have been optimized for preparation of pebbles of different sizes. (author)

  5. Cyclic loading tests on ceramic breeder pebble bed by discrete element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Guo, Haibing; Shi, Tao [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Huang, Hongwen, E-mail: hhw@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Zhenghong, E-mail: inpcnyb@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Methods of cyclic loading tests on the pebble beds were developed in DEM. • Size distribution and sphericity of the pebbles were considered for the specimen. • Mechanical responses of the pebble beds under cyclic loading tests were assessed. - Abstract: Complex mechanics and packing instability can be induced by loading operation on ceramic breeder pebble bed for its discrete nature. A numerical approach using discrete element method (DEM) is applied to study the mechanical performance of the ceramic breeder pebble bed under quasi-static and cyclic loads. A preloaded specimen can be made with servo-control mechanism, the quasi-static and dynamic stress-strain performances are studied during the tests. It is found that the normalized normal contact forces under quasi-static loads have the similar distributions, and increase with increasing loads. Furthermore, the relatively low volumetric strain can be absorbed by pebble bed after several loading and unloading cycles, but the peak normal contact force can be extremely high during the first cycle. Cyclic loading with target pressure is recommended for densely packing, irreversible volume reduction gradually increase with cycles, and the normal contact forces decrease with cycles.

  6. Cyclic loading tests on ceramic breeder pebble bed by discrete element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hao; Guo, Haibing; Shi, Tao; Ye, Minyou; Huang, Hongwen; Li, Zhenghong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Methods of cyclic loading tests on the pebble beds were developed in DEM. • Size distribution and sphericity of the pebbles were considered for the specimen. • Mechanical responses of the pebble beds under cyclic loading tests were assessed. - Abstract: Complex mechanics and packing instability can be induced by loading operation on ceramic breeder pebble bed for its discrete nature. A numerical approach using discrete element method (DEM) is applied to study the mechanical performance of the ceramic breeder pebble bed under quasi-static and cyclic loads. A preloaded specimen can be made with servo-control mechanism, the quasi-static and dynamic stress-strain performances are studied during the tests. It is found that the normalized normal contact forces under quasi-static loads have the similar distributions, and increase with increasing loads. Furthermore, the relatively low volumetric strain can be absorbed by pebble bed after several loading and unloading cycles, but the peak normal contact force can be extremely high during the first cycle. Cyclic loading with target pressure is recommended for densely packing, irreversible volume reduction gradually increase with cycles, and the normal contact forces decrease with cycles.

  7. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  8. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  9. Irradiated graphite studies prior to decommissioning of G1, G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonal, J.P.; Vistoli, J.Ph.; Combes, C.

    2005-01-01

    G1 (46 MW th ), G2 (250 MW th ) and G3 (250 MW th ) are the first French plutonium production reactors owned by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). They started to be operated in 1956 (G1), 1959 (G2) and 1960 (G3); their final shutdown occurred in 1968, 1980 and 1984 respectively. Each reactor used about 1200 tons of graphite as moderator, moreover in G2 and G3, a 95 tons graphite wall is used to shield the rear side concrete from neutron irradiation. G1 is an air cooled reactor operated at a graphite temperature ranging from 30 C to 230 C; G2 and G3 are CO 2 cooled reactors and during operation the graphite temperature is higher (140 C to 400 C). These reactors are now partly decommissioned, but the graphite stacks are still inside the reactors. The graphite core radioactivity has decreased enough so that a full decommissioning stage may be considered. Conceming this decommissioning, the studies reported here are: (i) stored energy in graphite, (ii) graphite radioactivity measurements, (iii) leaching of radionuclide ( 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 60 Co, 3 H) from graphite, (iv) chlorine diffusion through graphite. (authors)

  10. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  11. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  12. Changes in the physical and mechanical properties of graphite on irradiation in ditolylmethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilin, A.I.; Lebedev, I.G.; Sudakova, N.V.; Rizvanov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from the irradiation and mechanical and structural testing of four grades of graphite - GMZ, VPG, MPG-6, and PG-50 - for use as moderator materials in organic cooled and graphite moderated reactors. Irradiation was carried out in the ARBUS-AST-1 reactor. Photomicrography was used to determine pore structure and ultimate strength in bending and compression was determined mechanically. Irradiation was found to increase the strength of GMZ, PMG-6, and PG-50 considerably, due to the healing of microdefects as a result of the pores filling with radiolysis products from the coolant, ditolylmethane. Conversely, VPG graphite, which has closed porosity, lost strength on irradiation

  13. Risk-informed design of a pebble bed gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritterbusch, Stanley; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Simic Zdenko; Savkina Marina

    2003-01-01

    One of the major challenges to the successful deployment of new nuclear plants in the United States is the regulatory process, which is largely based on water-reactor design technology and operating experience. While ongoing and expected efforts to license new LWR designs are based primarily on current regulations, guidance, and past experience, the pre-application review of the gas-cooled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) has shown that efforts are being made to provide additional 'risk-informed' improvements to the licensing process. These improvements are aimed at resolving new design and regulatory issues using a plant-wide integrated evaluation method - state-of-the-art Probabilistic Risk Assessment - which addresses all significant design features and operating modes. The integrated PRA evaluation is supported by the usual deterministic design analyses, engineering judgments, and margins added to address uncertainties (i.e., defense-in-depth). The work performed for this paper was completed as part of the United States Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. The purpose of this particular project was to develop the methods for a new 'highly risk-informed' design and regulatory process. In this work. PRA techniques were applied in order to provide an integrated and systematic analysis of the plant design, to quantify uncertainties and explicitly account for defense-in-depth features. This work concentrates on the application of the risk-informed principles to a new plant design such as the PBMR. The implementation example completed for this project included specification of the design configuration, use of the PRA to evaluate the design, and iterations to identify design changes that improve the overall level of safety and system reliability. This paper summarizes the new 'highly risk-informed' design process, the design of the PBMR, and the results obtained. These results, consistent with the known inherent safety features of a pebble

  14. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  15. Engineering solutions for a reflector change concept in the high-temperature reactor with pebble bed core and OTTO-fueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, K.J.

    1975-06-01

    In the field of reactor engineering an increasing tendency is visible towards a 'repairable reactor'. In the construction of the HTR with spherical fuel elements this fact should already be taken into account at an early stage. Additionally it is possible that in connection with the OTTO-fueling load conditions for the graphite reflector could result which are locally not far away from limiting values. Therefore the removability of the reflector is included in the reactor construction as an accompanying technical step of the physical lay-out of the core. The core arrangements, realized for HTR until recently, are discussed as well as the properties of the graphites used and the operating conditions in the reactors are stated. At the example of the PR 3,000 proposals are offered for the construction of a removable side and top reflector for a pebble bed reactor. Hereby a solution was found which, on one hand allows the changing of the reflector and on the other hand requires no significant increase of the costs for the reactor assembly. Moreover the requirements of reactor operation and of repairability are satisfied in an optimal manner. (orig.) [de

  16. Criticality calculations of the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor with SCALE6/CSAS6 and MCNP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Meng-Jen; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Peir, Jinn-Jer; Liang, Jenq-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparisons of the HTR-10 criticality calculations with SCALE6/CSAS6 and MCNP5 were performed. • The DOUBLEHET unit-cell treatment provides the best k eff estimation among PBR criticality calculations using SCALE6. • The continuous-energy SCALE6 calculations present a non-negligible discrepancy with MCNP5 in three PBR cases. - Abstract: HTR-10 is a 10 MWt prototype pebble-bed reactor (PBR) that presents a doubly heterogeneous geometry for neutronics calculations. An appropriate unit-cell treatment for the associated fuel elements is vital for creating problem-dependent multigroup cross sections. Considering four unit-cell options for resonance self-shielding correction in SCALE6, a series of HTR-10 core models were established using the CSAS6 sequence to systematically investigate how they affected the computational accuracy and efficiency of PBR criticality calculations. Three core configurations, which ranged from simplified infinite lattices to a detailed geometry, were examined. Based on the same ENDF/B-VII.0 cross-section library, multigroup results were evaluated by comparing with continuous-energy SCALE6/CSAS6 and MCNP5 calculations. The comparison indicated that the INFHOMMEDIUM results overestimated the effective multiplication factor (k eff ) by about 2800 pcm, whereas the LATTICECELL and MULTIREGION treatments overestimated k eff values with similar biases at approximately 470–680 pcm. The DOUBLEHET results attained further improvement, reducing the k eff overestimation to approximately 280 pcm. The comparison yielded two unexpected problems from using SCALE6/CSAS6 in HTR-10 criticality calculations. In particular, the continuous-energy CSAS6 calculations in this study present a non-negligible discrepancy with MCNP5, potentially causing a k eff value overestimate of approximately 680 pcm. Notably, using a cell-weighted mixture instead of an explicit model of individual TRISO particles in the pebble fuel zone does not shorten the

  17. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  18. Test-element assembly and loading parameters for the in-pile test of HCPB ceramic pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der E-mail: vanderlaan@nrg-nl.com; Boccaccini, L.V.; Conrad, R.; Fokkens, J.H.; Jong, M.; Magielsen, A.J.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Reimann, J.; Stijkel, M.P.; Malang, S

    2002-11-01

    In the framework of developing the helium cooled pebble-bed (HCPB) blanket an irradiation test of pebble-bed assemblies is prepared at the HFR Petten. The test objective is to concentrate on the effect of neutron irradiation on the thermal-mechanical behaviour of the HCPB breeder pebble-bed at DEMO representative levels of temperature and defined thermal-mechanical loads. The paper reports on the project status, and presents the results of pre-tests, material characteristics, the manufacturing of the pebble-bed assemblies, and the nuclear and thermo-mechanical loading parameters.

  19. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  20. Advanced modularity design for the MIT pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadak, Andrew C. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 24-202 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)]. E-mail: kadak@mit.edu; Berte, Marc V. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 24-202 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)]. E-mail: mvberte@yahoo.com

    2006-03-15

    The future of all reactors will depend on whether they can be economically built and operated. One of the major impediments to new nuclear construction is the capital cost due in large part to the length of construction time and complexity of the plant. Pebble bed reactors offer the opportunity to reduce the complexity of the plant because the number of safety systems required is significantly reduced due to the inherent safety of the technology. However, because of its small size, the capital cost per kilowatt is likely to be large if traditional construction approaches are followed. This strongly suggests the need for innovative construction concepts to reduce the construction time and cost. MIT has proposed a modularity approach in which the plant is pre-built in space-frame type modules which are built in factories. These space frames would contain all the equipment contained in a given volume. Once equipment in the space frame is installed, the space frame would then be shipped to the site and assembled 'lego-style.' Studies presently underway have demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. Thermal stress analysis has been performed and an integrated design with the space frames has been developed. It is expected that this modularity approach will significantly shorten construction time and expense. This paper proposes a concept for further development, not a final design for the entire plant.

  1. Advanced modularity design for the MIT pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.

    2006-01-01

    The future of all reactors will depend on whether they can be economically built and operated. One of the major impediments to new nuclear construction is the capital cost due in large part to the length of construction time and complexity of the plant. Pebble bed reactors offer the opportunity to reduce the complexity of the plant because the number of safety systems required is significantly reduced due to the inherent safety of the technology. However, because of its small size, the capital cost per kilowatt is likely to be large if traditional construction approaches are followed. This strongly suggests the need for innovative construction concepts to reduce the construction time and cost. MIT has proposed a modularity approach in which the plant is pre-built in space-frame type modules which are built in factories. These space frames would contain all the equipment contained in a given volume. Once equipment in the space frame is installed, the space frame would then be shipped to the site and assembled 'lego-style.' Studies presently underway have demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. Thermal stress analysis has been performed and an integrated design with the space frames has been developed. It is expected that this modularity approach will significantly shorten construction time and expense. This paper proposes a concept for further development, not a final design for the entire plant

  2. Effective thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pupeschi, S., E-mail: simone.pupeschi@kit.edu; Knitter, R.; Kamlah, M.

    2017-03-15

    As the knowledge of the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds under fusion relevant conditions is essential for the development of solid breeder blanket concepts, the EU advanced and reference lithium orthosilicate material were investigated with a newly developed experimental setup based on the transient hot wire method. The effective thermal conductivity was investigated in the temperature range RT–700 °C. Experiments were performed in helium and air atmospheres in the pressure range 0.12–0.4 MPa (abs.) under a compressive load up to 6 MPa. Results show a negligible influence of the chemical composition of the solid material on the bed’s effective thermal conductivity. A severe reduction of the effective thermal conductivity was observed in air. In both atmospheres an increase of the effective thermal conductivity with the temperature was detected, while the influence of the compressive load was found to be small. A clear dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on the pressure of the filling gas was observed in helium in contrast to air, where the pressure dependence was drastically reduced.

  3. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  4. Preliminary neutronic design of high burnup OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiadipura, T.; Zuhair; Irwanto, D.

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR) which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM) loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble. (author)

  5. Preliminary Neutronic Design of High Burnup OTTO Cycle Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Setiadipura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble

  6. Study of graphite reactivity worth on well-defined cores assembled on LR-0 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Košťál, Michal; Rypar, Vojtěch; Milčák, Ján; Juříček, Vlastimil; Losa, Evžen; Forget, Benoit; Harper, Sterling

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A light water critical facility for graphite reactivity worth measurements. • Comparison of calculated and measured k eff . • Effect of graphite description on k eff . - Abstract: Graphite is an often-used moderating material on the basis of its good moderating power and very low absorption cross section. This small absorption cross section permits the use of natural or low-enriched uranium in graphite moderated reactors. Graphite is now being considered as the moderator for Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR). The critical moderator level was measured for various graphite block configurations in an experimental dry assembly of the LR-0 reactor. Comparisons with experiments were performed between Monte Carlo simulation tools for which satisfactory agreement was obtained with the exception of some systematic discrepancies. The larger discrepancies were observed when using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. To decrease the uncertainties, based on conservative assumptions, relative comparisons were done. The results provided by the different nuclear data libraries are within 3 sigma interval of experimental uncertainties. It has been determined that differences between the results of calculations are caused by variations in the (n,n), (n,n′), (n,g) reactions and also by various angular distributions, while the (n,g) cross section variations play only a minor role for these configurations.

  7. Detection system for location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongbing, E-mail: liuhb07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Du, Dong, E-mail: dudong@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, An; Chang, Baohua; Han, Zandong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); He, Ayada [Shanghai Electric Power Generation Group Shanghai Generator Works, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A detection system for locations of pebbles transported in pipes is introduced. • The detection system is based on vibration signal processing, which is original. • The characteristics of the vibration signals of the pipe are analyzed. • The experiment shows that the detection results are accurate. • The research provides an important basis for the design of the reactor. - Abstract: Pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors have many advantages such as inherent safety, high efficiency, etc., and have been considered as a candidate for Generation IV nuclear reactors. During the operation of the reactor, there are thousands of fuel pebbles transported in the pipes outside the core by gravity and helium flow. The pattern of the pipes which consist of straight and arc sections is very complex. When a fuel pebble is transported, it will constantly collide with the pipes, especially in the arc sections. The collisions will lead to the vibration of the pipes. This paper aims to provide a detection system for the location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing. Before the reactor is running, the system acquires the vibration signals of several key sections by sensors. Then the frequency characteristics of the signals are obtained by joint time–frequency analysis. When the reactor is running, the system detects the signals and processes them based on their frequency characteristics in real time. According to the results of the processing, the system can correctly judge whether the fuel pebble has passed through the section and records the time of the passing. The experiment validates the accuracy and reliability of the detection results. In this way, the operational condition of the reactor can be monitored so that the normal running of the reactor can be ensured. Additionally, the detection data are of great significance to the evaluation and optimization of the reactor performance

  8. Detection system for location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Du, Dong; Huang, An; Chang, Baohua; Han, Zandong; He, Ayada

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A detection system for locations of pebbles transported in pipes is introduced. • The detection system is based on vibration signal processing, which is original. • The characteristics of the vibration signals of the pipe are analyzed. • The experiment shows that the detection results are accurate. • The research provides an important basis for the design of the reactor. - Abstract: Pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors have many advantages such as inherent safety, high efficiency, etc., and have been considered as a candidate for Generation IV nuclear reactors. During the operation of the reactor, there are thousands of fuel pebbles transported in the pipes outside the core by gravity and helium flow. The pattern of the pipes which consist of straight and arc sections is very complex. When a fuel pebble is transported, it will constantly collide with the pipes, especially in the arc sections. The collisions will lead to the vibration of the pipes. This paper aims to provide a detection system for the location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing. Before the reactor is running, the system acquires the vibration signals of several key sections by sensors. Then the frequency characteristics of the signals are obtained by joint time–frequency analysis. When the reactor is running, the system detects the signals and processes them based on their frequency characteristics in real time. According to the results of the processing, the system can correctly judge whether the fuel pebble has passed through the section and records the time of the passing. The experiment validates the accuracy and reliability of the detection results. In this way, the operational condition of the reactor can be monitored so that the normal running of the reactor can be ensured. Additionally, the detection data are of great significance to the evaluation and optimization of the reactor performance

  9. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  10. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of decommissioning of water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, a large amount of rad-waste in the form of graphite stack fragments is generated (on average 1500-2000 tons per reactor). That is why it is essentially important, although complex from the technical point of view, to develop advanced technologies based on up-to-date remotely-controlled systems for unmanned dismantling of the graphite stack containing highly-active long-lived radionuclides and for conditioning of irradiated graphite (IG) for the purposes of transportation and subsequent long term and ecologically safe storage either on NPP sites or in special-purpose geological repositories. The main characteristics critical for radiation and nuclear hazards of the graphite stack are as follows: the graphite stack is contaminated with nuclear fuel that has gotten there as a result of the accidents; the graphite mass is 992 tons, total activity -6?104 Ci (at the time of unit shutdown); the fuel mass in the reactor stack amounts to 100-140 kg, as estimated by IPPE and RDIPE, respectively; γ-radiation dose rate in the stack cells varies from 4 to 4300 R/h, with the prevailing values being in the range from 50 to 100 R/h. In this paper the traditional methods of rad-waste handling as bituminization technology, cementing technology are discussed. In terms of IG handling technology two lines were identified: long-term storage of conditioned IG and IG disposal by means of incineration. The specific cost of graphite immobilization in a radiation-resistant polymeric matrix amounts to -2600 USD per 1 t of graphite, whereas the specific cost of immobilization in slag-stone containers with an inorganic binder (cement) is -1400 USD per 1 t of graphite. On the other hand, volume of conditioned IG rad-waste subject for disposal, if obtained by means of the first technology, is 2-2.5 times less than the volume of rad-waste generated by means of the second technology. It can be concluded from the above that

  11. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  12. The mechanical behavior and reliability prediction of the HTR graphite component at various temperature and neutron dose ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xiang; Yu, Suyuan; Wang, Haitao; Li, Chenfeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical behavior of graphite component in HTRs under high temperature and neutron irradiation conditions is simulated. • The computational process of mechanical analysis is introduced. • Deformation, stresses and failure probability of the graphite component are obtained and discussed. • Various temperature and neutron dose ranges are selected in order to investigate the effect of in-core conditions on the results. - Abstract: In a pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR), nuclear graphite serves as the main structural material of the side reflectors. The reactor core is made up of a large number of graphite bricks. In the normal operation case of the reactor, the maximum temperature of the helium coolant commonly reaches about 750 °C. After around 30 years’ full power operation, the peak value of in-core fast neutron cumulative dose reaches to 1 × 10 22 n cm −2 (EDN). Such high temperature and neutron irradiation strongly impact the behavior of graphite component, causing obvious deformation. The temperature and neutron dose are unevenly distributed inside a graphite brick, resulting in stress concentrations. The deformation and stress concentration can both greatly affect safety and reliability of the graphite component. In addition, most of the graphite properties (such as Young's modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion) change remarkably under high temperature and neutron irradiations. The irradiation-induced creep also plays a very important role during the whole process, and provides a significant impact on the stress accumulation. In order to simulate the behavior of graphite component under various in-core conditions, all of the above factors must be considered carefully. In this paper, the deformation, stress distribution and failure probability of a side graphite component are studied at various temperature points and neutron dose levels. 400 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C and 750 °C are selected as the

  13. Conceptual design of a passively safe thorium breeder Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wols, F.J.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work proposes three possible designs for a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor. • A high-conversion PBR (CR > 0.96), passively safe and within practical constraints. • A thorium breeder PBR (220 cm core) in practical regime, but not passively safe. • A passively safe breeder, requiring higher fuel reprocessing and recycling rates. - Abstract: More sustainable nuclear power generation might be achieved by combining the passive safety and high temperature applications of the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) design with the resource availability and favourable waste characteristics of the thorium fuel cycle. It has already been known that breeding can be achieved with the thorium fuel cycle inside a Pebble Bed Reactor if reprocessing is performed. This is also demonstrated in this work for a cylindrical core with a central driver zone, with 3 g heavy metal pebbles for enhanced fission, surrounded by a breeder zone containing 30 g thorium pebbles, for enhanced conversion. The main question of the present work is whether it is also possible to combine passive safety and breeding, within a practical operating regime, inside a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor. Therefore, the influence of several fuel design, core design and operational parameters upon the conversion ratio and passive safety is evaluated. A Depressurized Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) is considered the worst safety scenario that can occur within a PBR. So, the response to a DLOFC with and without scram is evaluated for several breeder PBR designs using a coupled DALTON/THERMIX code scheme. With scram it is purely a heat transfer problem (THERMIX) demonstrating the decay heat removal capability of the design. In case control rods cannot be inserted, the temperature feedback of the core should also be able to counterbalance the reactivity insertion by the decaying xenon without fuel temperatures exceeding 1600 °C. Results show that high conversion ratios (CR > 0.96) and passive safety can be combined in

  14. Penn State geoPebble system: Design,Implementation, and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Bilen, S. G.; Fleishman, A.; Burkett, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Penn State geoPebble system is a new network of wirelessly interconnected seismic and GPS sensor nodes with flexible architecture. This network will be used for studies of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, as well as to investigate mountain glaciers. The network will consist of ˜150 geoPebbles that can be deployed in a user-defined spatial geometry. We present our design methodology, which has enabled us to develop these state-of- the art sensors using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware combined with custom-designed hardware and software. Each geoPebble is a self- contained, wirelessly connected sensor for collecting seismic measurements and position information. Key elements of each node encompasses a three-component seismic recorder, which includes an amplifier, filter, and 24- bit analog-to-digital converter that can sample up to 10 kHz. Each unit also includes a microphone channel to record the ground-coupled airwave. The timing for each node is available from GPS measurements and a local precision oscillator that is conditioned by the GPS timing pulses. In addition, we record the carrier-phase measurement of the L1 GPS signal in order to determine location at sub-decimeter accuracy (relative to other geoPebbles within a few kilometers radius). Each geoPebble includes 16 GB of solid-state storage, wireless communications capability to a central supervisory unit, and auxiliary measurements capability (including tilt from accelerometers, absolute orientation from magnetometers and temperature). A novel aspect of the geoPebble is a wireless charging system for the internal battery (using inductive coupling techniques). The geoPebbles include all the sensors (geophones, GPS, microphone), communications (WiFi), and power (battery and charging) internally, so the geoPebble system can operate without any cabling connections (though we do provide an external connector so that different geophones can be used). We report initial field-deployment results and

  15. Single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble-bed channels with internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xianke; Sun Zhongning; Xu Guangzhan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The core of the water-cooled pebble bed reactor is the porous channels which stacked with spherical fuel elements. The gaps between the adjacent fuel elements are complex because they are stochastic and often shift. We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, we get the rule of power distribution and the rule of heat transfer coefficient with particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re number. Highlights: ► We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed to be the internal heat source. ► The ball diameter is smaller, the effect of the heat transfer is better. ► With Re number increasing, heat transfer coefficient is also increasing and eventually tends to stabilize. ► The changing of heat power makes little effect on the heat transfer coefficient of pebble bed channels. - Abstract: The reactor core of a water-cooled pebble bed reactor includes porous channels that are formed by spherical fuel elements. This structure has notably improved heat transfer. Due to the variability and randomness of the interstices in pebble bed channels, heat transfer is complex, and there are few studies regarding this topic. To study the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat sources, oxidized stainless steel spheres with diameters of 3 and 8 mm and carbon steel spheres with 8 mm diameters are used in a stacked pebble bed. Distilled water is used as a refrigerant for the experiments, and the electromagnetic induction heating method is used to heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental results, we obtain the governing rules for the power distribution and the heat transfer coefficient with respect to particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid Re number. From fitting of the experimental data, we obtain the dimensionless average

  16. An Investigation of Reverse Flotation Separation of Sericite from Graphite by Using a Surfactant: MF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangshuai Qiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a surfactant, atlox4862 (formaldehyde condensate of methyl naphthalene sulfonic sodium salt (MF, was introduced as a depressant for reverse flotation separation of sericite from graphite. Natural flake graphite has a strong hydrophobic property. After interacting with MF, the graphite became moderately hydrophilic. The flotation results showed that MF had a depressing ability for both sericite and graphite and that the flotation separation of sericite from graphite was attributed to the different declining levels of recovery between graphite and sericite with increased MF concentration. For a pulp pH of 8 and a MF concentration of 250 mg/L, the recovery rates of sericite and graphite were 89.7% and 11.3%, respectively. The results of the FTIR spectra and zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the interaction of MF with graphite and sericite is mainly through electrostatic attraction. MF was preferred to adsorb on the surface of graphite, decreasing its zeta potential and improving its hydrophilicity more than that of sericite.

  17. Improvement of burnup analysis for pebble bed reactors with an accumulative fuel loading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanullang, Irwan Liapto; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Given the limitations of natural uranium resources, innovative nuclear power plant concepts that increase the efficiency of nuclear fuel utilization are needed. The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) shows some potential to achieve high efficiency in natural uranium utilization. To simplify the PBR concept, PBR with an accumulation fuel loading scheme was introduced and the Fuel Handling System (FHS) removed. In this concept, the pebble balls are added little by little into the reactor core until the pebble balls reach the top of the reactor core, and all pebble balls are discharged from the core at the end of the operation period. A code based on the MVP/MVP-BURN method has been developed to perform an analysis of a PBR with the accumulative fuel loading scheme. The optimum fuel composition was found using the code for high burnup performance. Previous efforts provided several motivations to improve the burnup performance: First, some errors in the input code were corrected. This correction, and an overall simplification of the input code, was implemented for easier analysis of a PBR with the accumulative fuel loading scheme. Second, the optimum fuel design had been obtained in the infinite geometry. To improve the optimum fuel composition, a parametric survey was obtained by varying the amount of Heavy Metal (HM) uranium per pebble and the degree of uranium enrichment. Moreover, an entire analysis of the parametric survey was obtained in the finite geometry. The results show that improvements in the fuel composition can lead to more accurate analysis with the code. (author)

  18. Comparison of Several Thermal Conductivity Constants for Thermal Hydraulic Calculation of Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, Dwi; Setiadipura, Topan; Pramutadi, Asril

    2017-07-01

    There are two type of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR), prismatic and pebble bed. Pebble Bed type has unique configuration because the fuels are randomly distributed inside the reactor core. In term of safety features, Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is one of the most promising reactor type in avoiding severe nuclear accidents. In order to analyze heat transfer and safety of this reactor type, a computer code is now under development. As a first step, calculation method proposed by Stroh [1] is adopted. An approach has been made to treat randomly distributed pebble balls contains fissile material inside the reactor core as a porous medium. Helium gas act as coolant on the reactor system are carrying heat flowing in the area between the pebble balls. Several parameters and constants are taken into account in the new developed code. Progress of the development of the code especially comparison of several thermal conductivity constants for a certain PBR-case are reported in the present study.

  19. THE ROLE OF PEBBLE FRAGMENTATION IN PLANETESIMAL FORMATION. II. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Karl Wahlberg; Johansen, Anders [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Syed, Mohtashim Bukhari; Blum, Jürgen [Technische Universität Braunschweig, Institut für Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik, Mendelssohnstraße 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-01-20

    Some scenarios for planetesimal formation go through a phase of collapse of gravitationally bound clouds of millimeter- to centimeter-size pebbles. Such clouds can form, for example, through the streaming instability in protoplanetary disks. We model the collapse process with a statistical model to obtain the internal structure of planetesimals with solid radii between 10 and 1000 km. During the collapse, pebbles collide, and depending on their relative speeds, collisions have different outcomes. A mixture of particle sizes inside a planetesimal leads to better packing capabilities and higher densities. In this paper we apply results from new laboratory experiments of dust aggregate collisions (presented in a companion paper) to model collision outcomes. We find that the internal structure of a planetesimal is strongly dependent on both its mass and the applied fragmentation model. Low-mass planetesimals have no/few fragmenting pebble collisions in the collapse phase and end up as porous pebble piles. The number of fragmenting collisions increases with increasing cloud mass, resulting in wider particle size distributions and higher density. The collapse is nevertheless “cold” in the sense that collision speeds are damped by the high collision frequency. This ensures that a significant fraction of large pebbles survive the collapse in all but the most massive clouds. Our results are in broad agreement with the observed increase in density of Kuiper Belt objects with increasing size, as exemplified by the recent characterization of the highly porous comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

  20. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of mono-sized pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • One new method to couple the contact area with bed strain is developed. • The constant coefficient to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined. • This model is valid for various cases, and its advantages are showed obviously. - Abstract: A model is presented here to predict the effective thermal conductivity of porous medium packed with mono-sized spherical pebbles, and it is valid when pebbles’ size is far less than the characteristic length of porous medium just like the fusion pebble beds. In this model, the influences of parameters such as properties of pebble and gas materials, bed porosity, pebble size, gas flow, contact area, thermal radiation, contact resistance, etc. are all taken into account, and one method to couple the contact areas with bed strains is also developed and implemented preliminarily. Compared with available theoretical models, CFD numerical simulations and experimental data, this model is verified to be successful to forecast the bed effective thermal conductivity in various cases and its advantages are also showed obviously. Especially, the convection in pebble beds is focused on and a constant coefficient C to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined for the fully developed region of beds by numerical simulation, which is close to some experimental data.

  1. The importance of the AVR pebble-bed reactor for the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.

    2006-01-01

    The AVR pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) at Juelich (Germany)) operated from 1967 to 1988 and was certainly the most important HTGR project of the past. The reactor was the mass test bed for all development steps of HTGR pebble fuel. Some early fuel charges failed under high temperature conditions and contaminated the reactor. An accurate pebble measurement (Cs 137) allowed to clean the core from unwanted pebbles after 1981. The coolant activity went down and remained very low for the remaining reactor operation. A melt-wire experiment in 1986 revealed max. coolant temperatures of >1280 deg. C and fuel temperatures of >1350 deg. C, explained by under-estimated bypasses. The fuel still in the core achieved high burn-ups and showed under the extreme temperature conditions excellent fission product retention. Thus, the AVR operation qualified the HTGR fuel, and an average discharge burn-up of 112% fifa revealed an excellent fuel economy of the pebble-bed reactor. Furthermore, the AVR operation offers many meaningful data for code-to-experiment comparisons. (authors)

  2. Features and validation of discrete element method for simulating pebble flow in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yong; Li Yanjie

    2005-01-01

    The core of a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is composed of big number of fuel pebbles, their kinetic behaviors are of great importance in estimating the path and residence time of individual pebble, the evolution of the mixing zone for the assessment of the efficiency of a reactor. Numerical method is highlighted in modern reactor design. In view of granular flow, the Discrete Element Model based on contact mechanics of spheres was briefly described. Two typical examples were presented to show the capability of the DEM method. The former is piling with glass/steel spheres, which provides validated evidences that the simulated angles of repose are in good coincidence with the experimental results. The later is particle discharge in a flat- bottomed silo, which shows the effects of material modulus and demonstrates several features. The two examples show the DEM method enables to predict the behaviors, such as the evolution of pebble profiles, streamlines etc., and provides sufficient information for pebble flow analysis and core design. In order to predict the cyclic pebble flow in a HTGR core precisely and efficiently, both model and code improvement are needed, together with rational specification of physical properties with proper measuring techniques. Strategic and methodological considerations were also discussed. (authors)

  3. Effect of a flow-corrective insert on the flow pattern in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tu, Jiyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne 3083, VIC (Australia); Jiang, Shengyao, E-mail: shengyaojiang@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Effect of an insert on improving flow uniformity and eliminating stagnant zone is studied. • Three values concerned with the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence are used. • Outlet diameter is a critical parameter that determines balancing mechanism of the insert. • Height/location is varied to let the insert work in unbalanced region and avoid adverse effect. - Abstract: A flow-corrective insert is adopted in the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to improve flow performance of the pebble flow for the first time. 3D discrete element method (DEM) modeling is employed to study this slow and dense granular flow. It is verified that locating a properly designed insert in the bed can help transform unsatisfactory flow field to the preferred flow pattern for pebble bed reactors. Three characteristic values on the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence of pebble flow are defined to evaluate uniformity of the overall flow field quantitatively. The results demonstrate that the pebble bed equipped with an insert performs better than normal beds from all these three aspects. Moreover, based on numerical experiments, several universal tips for insert design on height, location and outlet diameter are suggested.

  4. Stability and convergence analysis of the quasi-dynamics method for the initial pebble packing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Ji, W.

    2012-01-01

    The simulation for the pebble flow recirculation within Pebble Bed Reactors (PBRs) requires an efficient algorithm to generate an initial overlap-free pebble configuration within the reactor core. In the previous work, a dynamics-based approach, the Quasi-Dynamics Method (QDM), has been proposed to generate densely distributed pebbles in PBRs with cylindrical and annular core geometries. However, the stability and the efficiency of the QDM were not fully addressed. In this work, the algorithm is reformulated with two control parameters and the impact of these parameters on the algorithm performance is investigated. Firstly, the theoretical analysis for a 1-D packing system is conducted and the range of the parameter in which the algorithm is convergent is estimated. Then, this estimation is verified numerically for a 3-D packing system. Finally, the algorithm is applied to modeling the PBR fuel loading configuration and the convergence performance at different packing fractions is presented. Results show that the QDM is efficient in packing pebbles within the realistic range of the packing fraction in PBRs, and it is capable in handling cylindrical geometry with packing fractions up to 63.5%. (authors)

  5. A comparative study on the effective thermal conductivity of a single size beryllium pebble bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Sena, A.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.

    2004-01-01

    Solid breeder blankets generally use beryllium-helium pebble beds to ensure sufficient tritium breeding. The data of the effective thermal conductivity, k eff , of beryllium pebble beds is important to the design of fusion blankets. It serves as a database for benchmarking the models of pebble beds. The objective of this paper is to review and compare the available data (obtained by several studies) of the effective thermal conductivity of beryllium pebble beds in order to address the current status of these data. Two comparisons are presented: one for the data of k eff versus bed mean temperature and the second one for the data of k eff versus external applied pressures. The data (k eff versus bed temperature) reported by Enoeda et al., Dalle Donne et al., and UCLA, have a similar particle size and packing fraction. Despite their similarity, the standard deviation values of their data are around 32%. Also, the data of the effective thermal conductivity as a function of mechanical pressure have standard deviation values of ∼50%. From the presented comparisons, significant discrepancies among the available data of k eff of the beryllium pebble beds were observed. These discrepancies may be attributed to the apparent differences among available studies, such as experiment technique, packing fraction, particle characteristics, bed dimensions, and temperature range and gradient across the bed. (author)

  6. Graphite coated PVA fibers as the reinforcement for cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhipeng; Liu, Zhichao

    2018-02-01

    A new preconditioning method was developed to PVA fibers as the reinforcement in cement-based materials. Virgin PVA fibers exhibits limited adhesion to graphite powders due to the presence of oil spots on the surface. Mixing PVA fibers with a moderately concentrated KMnO4-H2SO4 solution can efficiently remove the oil spots by oxidation without creating extra precipitate (MnO2) associated with the reduction reaction. This enhances the coating of graphite powders onto fiber surface and improves the mechanical properties of PVA fiber reinforced concrete (PVA-FRC). Graphite powders yields better fiber distribution in the matrix and reduces the fiber-matrix bonding, which is beneficial in uniformly distributing the stress among embedded fibers and creating steady generation and propagation of tight microcracks. This is evidenced by the significantly enhanced strain hardening behavior and improved flexural strength and toughness.

  7. Management of graphite material: a key issue for High Temperature Gas Reactor system (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdeloie, C.; Marimbeau, P.; Robin, J.C.; Cellier, F.

    2005-01-01

    Graphite material is used in nuclear High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR, Fig.1) as moderator, thermal absorber and also as structural components of the core (Fig.2). This type of reactor was selected by the Generation IV forum as a potential high temperature provider for supplying hydrogen production plants and is under development in France in the frame of the AREVA ANTARES program. In order to select graphite grades to be used in these future reactors, the requirements for mechanical, thermal, physical-chemical properties must match the internal environment of the nuclear core, especially with regard to irradiation effect. Another important aspect that must be addressed early in design is the waste issue. Indeed, it is necessary to reduce the amount of nuclear waste produced by operation of the reactor during its lifetime. Preliminary assessment of the nuclear waste output for an ANTARES type 280 MWe HTGR over 60 year-lifetime gives an estimated 6000 m 3 of activated graphite waste. Thus, reducing the graphite waste production is an important issue for any HTGR system. First, this paper presents a preliminary inventory of graphite waste fluxes coming from a HTGR, in mass and volume, with magnitudes of radiological activities based on activation calculations of graphite during its stay in the core of the reactor. Normalized data corresponding to an output of 1 GWe.year electricity allows comparison of the waste production with other nuclear reactor systems. Second, possible routes to manage irradiated graphite waste are addressed in both the context of French nuclear waste management rules and by comparison to other national regulations. Routes for graphite waste disposal studied in different countries (concerning existing irradiated graphite waste) will be discussed with regard to new issues of large graphite waste from HTGR. Alternative or complementary solutions aiming at lowering volume of graphite waste to be managed will be presented. For example

  8. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  9. Nonlinear seismic analysis of a graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laframboise, W.L.; Desmond, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Design and construction of the Department of Energy's N-Reactor located in Richland, Washington was begun in the late 1950s and completed in the early 1960s. Since then, the reactor core's structural integrity has been under review and is considered by some to be a possible safety concern. The reactor core is moderated by graphite. The safety concern stems from the degradation of the graphite due to the effects of long-term irradiation. To assess the safety of the reactor core when subjected to seismic loads, a dynamic time-history structural analysis was performed. The graphite core consists of 89 layers of numerous graphite blocks which are assembled in a 'lincoln-log' lattice. This assembly permits venting of steam in the event of a pressure tube rupture. However, such a design gives rise to a highly nonlinear structure when subjected to earthquake loads. The structural model accounted for the nonlinear interlayer sliding and for the closure and opening of gaps between the graphite blocks. The model was subjected to simulated earthquake loading, and the time-varying response of selected elements critical to safety were monitored. The analytically predicted responses (displacements and strains) were compared to allowable responses to assess margins of safety. (orig.)

  10. Inert annealing of irradiated graphite by inductive heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzem, W.; Woerner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Fission neutrons change physical properties of graphite being used in nuclear reactors as moderator and as structural material. The understanding of these effects on an atomic model is expressed by dislocations of carbon atoms within the graphite and the thereby stored energy is known as Wigner Energy. The dismantling of the Pile 1 core may necessitate the thermal treatment of the irradiated but otherwise undamaged graphite. This heat treatment - usually called annealing - initiates the release of stored Wigner Energy in a controlled manner. This energy could otherwise give rise to an increase in temperature under certain conditions during transport or preparation for final storage. In order to prevent such an effect it is intended to anneal the major part of Pile 1 graphite before it is packed into boxes suitable for final disposal. Different heating techniques have been assessed. Inductive heating in an inert atmosphere was selected for installation in the Pile 1 Waste Processing Facility built for the treatment and packaging of the dismantled Pile 1 waste. The graphite blocks will be heated up to 250 deg. C in the annealing ovens, which results in the release of significant amount of the stored energy. External heat sources in a final repository will never heat up the storage boxes to such a temperature. (author)

  11. Study of the fracture behavior of mortar and concretes with crushed rock or pebble aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare the fracture energy of mortar and concretes produced with crushed rock and pebble aggregates using zero, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of aggregates mixed with standard mortar and applying the wedge splitting method to achieve stable crack propagation. The samples were cast in a special mold and cured for 28 days, after which they were subjected to crack propagation tests by the wedge splitting method to determine the fracture energies of the mortar and concrete. The concretes showed higher fracture energy than the mortar, and the concretes containing crushed rock showed higher resistance to crack propagation than all the compositions containing pebbles. The fracture energy varied from 38 to 55 J.m-2. A comparison of the number of aggregates that separated from the two concrete matrices with the highest fracture energies indicated that the concrete containing pebbles crumbled more easily and was therefore less resistant to crack propagation.

  12. Progress on pebble bed experimental activity for the HE-FUS3 mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orco, G.; Sansone, L.; Simoncini, M.; Zito, D.

    2002-01-01

    The EU Long Term for DEMO Programme foresees the qualification of the reference design of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) - test blanket module (TBM) to be tested in ITER Reactor. In this frame, FZK and ENEA have launched many experimental activities for the evaluation of the interactions between the Tritium breeder and neutron multiplier pebble beds and the steel containment walls. Main aim of these activities is the measuring the pebble bed effective thermal conductivity, the wall heat transfer coefficient as well as their dependency from the mechanical constraints. The paper presents the progress of the testing activity and results of the tests on two mock-up, called Tazza and Helichetta, carried out on the HE-FUS3 facility at ENEA Brasimone. (orig.)

  13. Numerical characterization of thermo-mechanical performance of breeder pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Zhiyong; Ying, Alice; Abdou, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    A numerical approach using the discrete element method (DEM) has been applied to study the thermo-mechanical properties of ceramic breeder pebble beds. This numerical scheme is able to predict the inelastic behavior observed in a loading and unloading operation. In addition, it demonstrates that the average value of contact force increases linearly with overall pressure, but at a much faster rate, about 3.4 times the overall pressure increase rate. In this paper, the thermal creep properties of two different ceramic breeder pebble materials, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 O, are also examined by the current numerical code. The difference found in the properties of candidate materials is reflected numerically in the overall strain in the pebble bed when the stress magnitude becomes smaller. (author)

  14. Consideration of emergency source terms for pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Liu; Jun, Zhao; Jiejuan, Tong; Jianzhu, Cao

    2009-01-01

    Being the last barrier in the nuclear power plant defense-in-depth strategy, emergency planning (EP) is an integrated project. One of the key elements in this process is emergency source terms selection. Emergency Source terms for light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) have been introduced in many technical documents, and advanced NPP emergency planning is attracting attention recently. Commercial practices of advanced NPP are undergoing in the world, pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant is under construction in China which is considered as a representative of advanced NPP. The paper tries to find some pieces of suggestion from our investigation. The discussion of advanced NPP EP will be summarized first, and then the characteristics of pebble-bed HTGR relating to EP will be described. Finally, PSA insights on emergency source terms selection and current pebble-bed HTGR emergency source terms suggestions are proposed

  15. Revision of Drucker-Prager cap creep modelling of pebble beds in fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, D.; Kamlah, M.; Hermsmeyer, S.

    2004-01-01

    A continuum model commonly used in soil mechanics analysis is compiled by use of a finite element software and has been used to simulate the thermomechanical behaviour of pebble beds. The Drucker-Prager Cap theory accounts for inelastic volume change, cap hardening, nonlinear elasticity and pressure dependent shear failure. The hardening mechanism allows for defining the hydrostatic pressure yield stress as a function of the volumetric inelastic strain. Volumetric creep is considered in order to simulate the pebble bed behaviour at high temperatures. Here, the strain hardening option has been used for the consolidation creep mechanism. The model has been calibrated using the fitting curves of the oedometric test given by Reimann et al. The fitted data has been used to calculate a pebble bed with simplified boundary conditions loaded by non-uniform volumetric heating. This calculation demonstrated that the model is capable of representing creep behaviour under volumetric heating conditions. (author)

  16. Numerical characterization of thermo-mechanical performance of breeder pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Zhiyong; Ying, Alice; Abdou, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    A numerical approach using the discrete element method (DEM) has been applied to study the thermo-mechanical properties of ceramic breeder pebble beds. This numerical scheme is able to predict the inelastic behavior observed in a loading and unloading operation. In addition, it demonstrates that the average value of contact force increases linearly with overall pressure, but at a much faster rate, about 3.4 times the overall pressure increase rate. In this paper, the thermal creep properties of two different ceramic breeder pebble materials, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 O, are also examined by the current numerical code. The difference found in the properties of candidate materials is reflected numerically in the overall strain in the pebble bed when the stress magnitude becomes smaller

  17. DEM-CFD simulation of purge gas flow in a solid breeder pebble bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Zhenghong [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Guo, Haibing [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Huang, Hongwen, E-mail: inpclane@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Solid tritium breeding blanket applying pebble bed concept is promising for fusion reactors. Tritium bred in the pebble bed is purged out by inert gas. The flow characteristics of the purge gas are important for the tritium transport from the solid breeder materials. In this study, a randomly packed pebble bed was generated by Discrete Element Method (DEM) and verified by radial porosity distribution. The flow parameters of the purge gas in channels were solved by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The results show that the normalized velocity magnitudes have the same damped oscillating patterns with radial porosity distribution. Besides, the bypass flow near the wall cannot be ignored in this model, and it has a slight increase with inlet velocity. Furthermore, higher purging efficiency becomes with higher inlet velocity and especially higher in near wall region.

  18. Measurement of flow field in the pebble bed type high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sa Ya; Lee, Jae Young

    2008-01-01

    In this study, flow field measurement of the Pebble Bed Reactor(PBR) for the High Temperature Gascooled Reactor(HTGR) was performed. Large number of pebbles in the core of PBR provides complicated flow channel. Due to the complicated geometries, numerical analysis has been intensively made rather than experimental observation. However, the justification of computational simulation by the experimental study is crucial to develop solid analysis of design method. In the present study, a wind tunnel installed with pebbles stacked was constructed and equipped with the Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). We designed the system scaled up to realize the room temperature condition according to the similarity. The PIV observation gave us stagnation points, low speed region so that the suspected high temperature region can be identified. With the further supplementary experimental works, the present system may produce valuable data to justify the Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) simulation method

  19. Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Chengjian; Gao, Xiaoling; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kawasaki, Kiyotaka; Uchimura, Hiromichi; Toda, Kensuke; Kang, Chunmei; Chen, Xiaojun; Wang, Heyi; Peng, Shuming; Wang, Xiaolin; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence was studied by out-of-pile annealing experiments. It was found that the tritium produced in Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles was mainly released as tritiated water vapor (HTO). The apparent desorption activation energy of tritium on the pebble surface was consistent with the diffusion activation energy of tritium in the crystal grains, indicating that tritium release was mainly controlled by diffusion process. The diffusion coefficients of tritium in the crystal grains at temperatures ranging from 450 K to 600 K were obtained by isothermal annealing tests, and the Arrhenius relation was determined to be D = 1 × 10 −7.0 exp (−40.3 × 10 3 /RT) cm 2 s −1

  20. Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Chengjian; Gao, Xiaoling [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-214, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Kobayashi, Makoto; Kawasaki, Kiyotaka; Uchimura, Hiromichi; Toda, Kensuke [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-1, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Kang, Chunmei; Chen, Xiaojun; Wang, Heyi; Peng, Shuming [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-214, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Wang, Xiaolin, E-mail: xlwang@caep.ac.cn [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-1, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji [Radiochemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence was studied by out-of-pile annealing experiments. It was found that the tritium produced in Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles was mainly released as tritiated water vapor (HTO). The apparent desorption activation energy of tritium on the pebble surface was consistent with the diffusion activation energy of tritium in the crystal grains, indicating that tritium release was mainly controlled by diffusion process. The diffusion coefficients of tritium in the crystal grains at temperatures ranging from 450 K to 600 K were obtained by isothermal annealing tests, and the Arrhenius relation was determined to be D = 1 × 10{sup −7.0} exp (−40.3 × 10{sup 3}/RT) cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}.

  1. Electrical behaviour of ceramic breeder blankets in pebble form after γ-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4 ceramics in from of pebble bed is the European candidate for ITER testing HCPB (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed breeding modules. The breeder function and the shielding role of this material, represent the areas upon which attention is focused. Electrical measurements are proposed for monitoring the modification created by ionizing radiation and at the same time provide information on lithium movement in this ceramic structure. The electrical tests are performed on pebbles fabricated by Spray-dryer method before and after gamma-irradiation through a 60Co source to a fluence of 4.8 Gy/s till a total dose of 5 ∗ 105 Gy. The introduction of thermal annealing treatments during the electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements points out the recombination effect of the temperature on the γ-induced defects.

  2. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurinskiy, P., E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA.

  3. 3D Nondestructive Visualization and Evaluation of TRISO Particles Distribution in HTGR Fuel Pebbles Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonuniform distribution of tristructural isotropic (TRISO particles within a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR pebble may lead to excessive thermal gradients and nonuniform thermal expansion during operation. If the particles are closely clustered, local hotspots may form, leading to excessive stresses on particle layers and an increased probability of particle failure. Although X-ray digital radiography (DR is currently used to evaluate the TRISO distributions in pebbles, X-ray DR projection images are two-dimensional in nature, which would potentially miss some details for 3D evaluation. This paper proposes a method of 3D visualization and evaluation of the TRISO distribution in HTGR pebbles using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT: first, a pebble is scanned on our high-resolution CBCT, and 2D cross-sectional images are reconstructed; secondly, all cross-sectional images are restructured to form the 3D model of the pebble; then, volume rendering is applied to segment and display the TRISO particles in 3D for visualization and distribution evaluation. For method validation, several pebbles were scanned and the 3D distributions of the TRISO particles within the pebbles were produced. Experiment results show that the proposed method provides more 3D than DR, which will facilitate pebble fabrication research and production quality control.

  4. The seismic assessment of radially keyed graphite moderator cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, A.G.; Payne, J.F.B.

    1996-01-01

    The modelling of AGR and Magnox cores has to deal with the very large number of components that make up the core, and the non-linear response due to the clearances in the keying system. This paper examines the conditions under which it is permissible to linearise the response. By comparing the results of discrete and continuum models of the core, the paper also shows that the number of components in the core is sufficiently large that the core can be approximated satisfactorily by an anisotropic solid material. The material has unusual properties, but these can be handled within the standard framework for the description of the elastic properties of an anisotropic solid. This description of the core by an equivalent solid material can readily be incorporated into finite element models of the reactor internal structure. Such models have been set up for both AGR and Magnox reactors. The models are being used to assess the seismic response of these reactors. (author). 5 refs, 6 figs

  5. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  6. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  7. Challenges in forming the solar system's giant planet cores via pebble accretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretke, K. A.; Levison, H. F.

    2014-01-01

    Though ∼10 M ⊕ mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of 'pebbles', objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an 'oligarchic' type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  8. Experimental study of flow field characteristics on bed configurations in the pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Xinlong; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jia, Haijun; Jiang, Shengyao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PTV study of flow fields of pebble bed reactor with different configurations are carried out. • Some criteria are proposed to quantify vertical velocity field and flow uniformity. • The effect of different pebble bed configurations is also compared by the proposed criteria. • The displacement thickness is used analogically to analyze flow field characteristics. • The effect of mass flow variation in the stagnated region of the funnel flow is measured. - Abstract: The flow field characteristics are of fundamental importance in the design work of the pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The different effects of bed configurations on the flow characteristics of pebble bed are studied through the PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) experiment. Some criteria, e.g. flow uniformity (σ) and mass flow level (α), are proposed to estimate vertical velocity field and compare the bed configurations. The distribution of the Δθ (angle difference between the individual particle velocity and the velocity vector sum of all particles) is also used to estimate the resultant motion consistency level. Moreover, for each bed configuration, the thickness of displacement is analyzed to measure the effect of the funnel flow zone based on the boundary layer theory. Detailed information shows the quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects on flow uniformity and other characteristics; and the sequence of levels of each estimation criterion is obtained for all bed configurations. In addition, a good design of the pebble bed configuration is suggested and these estimation criteria can be also applied and adopted in testing other geometry designs of pebble bed.

  9. Observations in the statistical analysis of NBG-18 nuclear graphite strength tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindley, Michael P.; Mitchell, Mark N.; Blaine, Deborah C.; Groenwold, Albert A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Statistical analysis of NBG-18 nuclear graphite strength test. ► A Weibull distribution and normal distribution is tested for all data. ► A Bimodal distribution in the CS data is confirmed. ► The CS data set has the lowest variance. ► A Combined data set is formed and has Weibull distribution. - Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to report on the selection of a statistical distribution chosen to represent the experimental material strength of NBG-18 nuclear graphite. Three large sets of samples were tested during the material characterisation of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor and Core Structure Ceramics materials. These sets of samples are tensile strength, flexural strength and compressive strength (CS) measurements. A relevant statistical fit is determined and the goodness of fit is also evaluated for each data set. The data sets are also normalised for ease of comparison, and combined into one representative data set. The validity of this approach is demonstrated. A second failure mode distribution is found on the CS test data. Identifying this failure mode supports the similar observations made in the past. The success of fitting the Weibull distribution through the normalised data sets allows us to improve the basis for the estimates of the variability. This could also imply that the variability on the graphite strength for the different strength measures is based on the same flaw distribution and thus a property of the material.

  10. Interim report on core physics and fuel cycle analysis of the pebble bed reactor power plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1977-12-01

    Calculations were made to predict the performance of a pebble bed reactor operated in a mode to produce fissile fuel (high conversion or breeding). Both a one pebble design and a design involving large primary feed pebbles and small fertile pebbles were considered. A relatively short residence time of the primary pebbles loaded with 233 U fuel was found to be necessary to achieve a high breeding ratio, but this leads to relatively high fuel costs. A high fissile inventory is associated with a low C/Th ratio and a high thorium loading, causing the doubling time to be long, even though the breeding ratio is high, and the fuel cost of electrical product to be high. Production of 233 U fuel from 235 U feed was studied and performances of the converter and breeder reactor concepts were examined varying the key parameters

  11. Research and application of packing density for pebble bed in HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Fujiang; Xie Fei; Sun Ximing

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor is one of the major types of reactors developed by Chinese nuclear technology. The statistical analysis for packing density in the pebble bed is an important issue of physical-thermal calculation and safety analysis. Aimed to this problem, a new kind of method was set up to solve this problem. Compared with the traditional lattice-fill method and the experiment, its efficiency and accuracy were verified, while helping to find out the best length of unit in the traditional lattice-fill method. This method was used to analyze the boundary effects observed by experiments. (authors)

  12. Optimization of a radially cooled pebble bed reactor - HTR2008-58117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, B.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D.; Van Der Hagen, T. H. J. J.; Van Dam, H.

    2008-01-01

    By altering the coolant flow direction in a pebble bed reactor from axial to radial, the pressure drop can be reduced tremendously. In this case the coolant flows from the outer reflector through the pebble bed and finally to flow paths in the inner reflector. As a consequence, the fuel temperatures are elevated due to the reduced heat transfer of the coolant. However, the power profile and pebble size in a radially cooled pebble bed reactor can be optimized to achieve lower fuel temperatures than current axially cooled designs, while the low pressure drop can be maintained. The radial power profile in the core can be altered by adopting multi-pass fuel management using several radial fuel zones in the core. The optimal power profile yielding a flat temperature profile is derived analytically and is approximated by radial fuel zoning. In this case, the pebbles pass through the outer region of the core first and each consecutive pass is located in a fuel zone closer to the inner reflector. Thereby, the resulting radial distribution of the fissile material in the core is influenced and the temperature profile is close to optimal. The fuel temperature in the pebbles can be further reduced by reducing the standard pebble diameter from 6 cm to a value as low as I cm. An analytical investigation is used to demonstrate the effects on the fuel temperature and pressure drop for both radial and axial cooling. Finally, two-dimensional numerical calculations were performed, using codes for neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and fuel depletion analysis, in order to validate the results for the optimized design that were obtained from the analytical investigations. It was found that for a radially cooled design with an optimized power profile and reduced pebble diameter (below 3.5 cm) both a reduction in the pressure drop (Δp = -2.6 bar), which increases the reactor efficiency with several percent, and a reduction in the maximum fuel temperature (ΔT = -50 deg. C) can be achieved

  13. Pebble pile-up and planetesimal formation at the snow line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazkowska, J.

    2017-09-01

    The planetesimal formation stage represents a major gap in our understanding of planet formation process. Because of this, the late-stage planet accretion models typically make arbitrary assumptions about planetesimals and pebbles distribution, while the state-of-the-art dust evolution models predict no or little planetesimal formation. With this contribution, I present a step toward bridging the gap between the early and late stages of planet formation by models that connect dust coagulation and planetesimal formation. With the aid of evaporation, outward diffusion, and re-condensation of water vapor, pile-up of large pebbles is formed outside of the snow line that facilitates planetesimal formation by streaming instability.

  14. Acceleration of coupled granular flow and fluid flow simulations in pebble bed energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanheng; Ji, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fast simulation of coupled pebble flow and coolant flow in PBR systems is studied. ► Dimension reduction based on axisymmetric geometry shows significant speedup. ► Relaxation of coupling frequency is investigated and an optimal range is determined. ► A total of 80% efficiency increase is achieved by the two fast strategies. ► Fast strategies can be applied to simulating other general fluidized bed systems. -- Abstract: Fast and accurate approaches to simulating the coupled particle flow and fluid flow are of importance to the analysis of large particle-fluid systems. This is especially needed when one tries to simulate pebble flow and coolant flow in Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) energy systems on a routine basis. As one of the Generation IV designs, the PBR design is a promising nuclear energy system with high fuel performance and inherent safety. A typical PBR core can be modeled as a particle-fluid system with strong interactions among pebbles, coolants and reactor walls. In previous works, the coupled Discrete Element Method (DEM)-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach has been investigated and applied to modeling PBR systems. However, the DEM-CFD approach is computationally expensive due to large amounts of pebbles in PBR systems. This greatly restricts the PBR analysis for the real time prediction and inclusion of more physics. In this work, based on the symmetry of the PBR geometry and the slow motion characteristics of the pebble flow, two acceleration strategies are proposed. First, a simplified 3D-DEM/2D-CFD approach is proposed to speed up the DEM-CFD simulation without loss of accuracy. Pebble flow is simulated by a full 3D DEM, while the coolant flow field is calculated with a 2D CFD simulation by averaging variables along the annular direction in the cylindrical and annular geometries. Second, based on the slow motion of pebble flow, the impact of the coupling frequency on the computation accuracy and efficiency is

  15. Acceleration of coupled granular flow and fluid flow simulations in pebble bed energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanheng, E-mail: liy19@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States); Ji, Wei, E-mail: jiw2@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Fast simulation of coupled pebble flow and coolant flow in PBR systems is studied. ► Dimension reduction based on axisymmetric geometry shows significant speedup. ► Relaxation of coupling frequency is investigated and an optimal range is determined. ► A total of 80% efficiency increase is achieved by the two fast strategies. ► Fast strategies can be applied to simulating other general fluidized bed systems. -- Abstract: Fast and accurate approaches to simulating the coupled particle flow and fluid flow are of importance to the analysis of large particle-fluid systems. This is especially needed when one tries to simulate pebble flow and coolant flow in Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) energy systems on a routine basis. As one of the Generation IV designs, the PBR design is a promising nuclear energy system with high fuel performance and inherent safety. A typical PBR core can be modeled as a particle-fluid system with strong interactions among pebbles, coolants and reactor walls. In previous works, the coupled Discrete Element Method (DEM)-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach has been investigated and applied to modeling PBR systems. However, the DEM-CFD approach is computationally expensive due to large amounts of pebbles in PBR systems. This greatly restricts the PBR analysis for the real time prediction and inclusion of more physics. In this work, based on the symmetry of the PBR geometry and the slow motion characteristics of the pebble flow, two acceleration strategies are proposed. First, a simplified 3D-DEM/2D-CFD approach is proposed to speed up the DEM-CFD simulation without loss of accuracy. Pebble flow is simulated by a full 3D DEM, while the coolant flow field is calculated with a 2D CFD simulation by averaging variables along the annular direction in the cylindrical and annular geometries. Second, based on the slow motion of pebble flow, the impact of the coupling frequency on the computation accuracy and efficiency is

  16. Absorber rod for nuclear reactors in a pebble bed of spherical operating elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinstein, D.; Gnutzmann, H.

    1978-01-01

    The claim refers to the constructional configuration of an absorber rod, whose and penetrating into the pebble bed has an opening to reduce the fracture rate, so that the operating elements can escape into a channel within the absorber rod. To suit this to the direction of movement of the elements a part of the end of the rod is flexibly connected to the hollow absorber rod via a joint. In this way the mechanical load of the element particles is reduced and simultaneously one achieves that much lower force is required to insert the absorber rod into the pebble bed. (UA) [de

  17. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  18. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  19. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  20. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  1. Ageing Management of Beryllium and Graphite Blocks in Research Reactor MARIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golab, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    In the paper the phenomenon of beryllium moderator poisoning by thermal neutron absorption and the method and results of this phenomenon control is presented. Also the phenomenon of graphite blocks damage due to fast neutrons accumulation and the methods and results of this process supervising is described. These methods refer especially to: visual inspection of their state and radiography of graphite blocks. Special attention is paid to permanent estimate of fast neutron fluency accumulated in blocks and methods of their shuffling in the reactor core. The shuffling makes possible to increase the lifetime of beryllium and graphite blocks and decrease the cost of reactor operation.

  2. Differences in the irradiation effects of IG-110 and IG-430 nuclear graphites : effects of coke difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Gen Chan; Kim, Eung Seon; Hong, Jin Ki; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    In the high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), graphite acts as a moderator and reflector as well as a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and shut down, and thermal and neutron shielding. During a reactor operation, many of the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of these graphite components are significantly modified as a function of the temperature, environment, and an irradiation. On the other hand, currently, all the nuclear graphites are being manufactured from two types of cokes, i.e., petroleum and coal-tar pitch coke, and it has been understood that the type of coke plays the most critical role determining the properties of a specific graphite grade. To investigate the effects of coke types on the irradiation response of a graphite, two graphites of different cokes were irradiated by 3 MeV C+ ions and the differences in the response of ion-irradiation were investigated

  3. Assessment of different mechanisms of C-14 production in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narkunas, Ernestas; Smaizys, Arturas; Poskas, Povilas; Kilda, Raimondas

    2010-01-01

    Two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite-moderated channel-type power reactors at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) are under decommissioning now. The total mass of irradiated graphite in the cores of both units is more than 3600 tons. The main source of uncertainty in the numerical assessment of graphite activity is the uncertainty of the initial impurities content in graphite. Nitrogen is one of the most important impurities, having a large neutron capture cross-section. This impurity may become the dominant source of C-14 production. RBMK reactors graphite stacks operate in the cooling mixture of helium-nitrogen gases and this may additionally increase the quantity of the nitrogen impurity. In this paper the results of the numerical modelling of graphite activation for the INPP Unit I reactor are presented. In order to evaluate the C-14 activity dependence on the nitrogen impurity content, several cases with different nitrogen content were modelled taking into account initial nitrogen impurity quantities in the graphite matrix and possible nitrogen quantities entrapped in the graphite pores from cooling gases. (orig.)

  4. Recent progress in the modelling of helium and tritium behaviour in irradiated beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabaglino, E.; Ronchi, C.; Cardella, A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues of the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed blanket is the behaviour under irradiation of beryllium pebbles, which have the function of neutron multiplier. An intense production of helium occurs in-pile, as well as a non negligible generation of tritium. Helium bubbles induce swelling and a high tritium inventory is a safety issue. Extensive studies for a better understanding, characterisation and modelling of the behaviour of helium and tritium in irradiated beryllium pebbles are being carried out, with the final aim to enable a reliable prediction of gas release and swelling in the full range of operating and accidental conditions of a Fusion Power Reactor. The general strategy consists in integrating studies on macroscopic phenomena (gas release) with the characterisation of corresponding microscopic diffusion phenomena (bubble kinetics) and the assessment of some fundamental diffusion parameter for the models (gas atomic diffusion coefficients). The present work gives a summary of the latest achievements in this context. By an inverse analysis of experimental out-of-pile gas release from weakly irradiated pebbles, coupled to the study of the characteristics of bubble population, it has been possible to assess the thermal diffusion coefficients of helium and tritium in and to improve and validate the classical model of gas precipitation into bubbles inside the grain. The improvement of the description of gas atomic diffusion and precipitation is the first step to enable a more reliable prediction of gas release

  5. Drucker-Prager-Cap creep modelling of pebble beds in fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, D.; Kamlah, M.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of thermal and mechanical behaviour of pebble beds for fusion blankets is an important issue to understand the interaction of solid breeder and beryllium pebble beds with the surrounding structural material. Especially the differing coefficients of thermal expansion of these materials cause high stresses and strains during irradiation induced volumetric heating. To describe this process, the coupled thermomechanical behaviour of both pebble bed materials has to be modelled. Additionally, creep has to be considered contributing to bed deformations and stress relaxation. Motivated by experiments, we use a continuum mechanical approach called Drucker-Prager/Cap theory to model the macroscopic pebble bed behaviour. The model accounts for pressure dependent shear failure, inelastic hardening, and volumetric creep. The elastic part is described by a nonlinear elasticity law. The model has been implemented by user-defined routines in the commercial finite-element code ABAQUS. To check the numerics, the implementation is compared to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the Drucker-Prager/Cap tool is applied to a single ceramic breeder bed subject to creep under volumetric heating

  6. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the

  7. A solid target for SINQ based on a Pb-shot Pebble-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, F.; Heidenreich, G.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results from scoping calculations examining the possibilities of implementing a Pebble-bed of Pb-shot as a target for SINQ are presented. The primary design objects are set out and estimates of heating and activation given. Cooling circuit parameters are discussed and estimates for operating conditions presented. A short discussion of problems associated with a realisation is included. (author)

  8. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  9. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  10. Growing Pebbles and Conceptual Prisms - Understanding the Source of Student Misconceptions about Rock Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnick, Judi

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes narrative essays--stories of rock formation--written by pre-service elementary school teachers. Reports startling misconceptions among preservice teachers on pebbles that grow, human involvement in rock formation, and sedimentary rocks forming as puddles as dry up, even though these students had completed a college level course on Earth…

  11. Discussion on Design Transients of Pebble-bed High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Fu; Zheng Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    In order to assure high quality for the components and their supports in the reactor coolant system, etc., some thermal-hydraulic transient conditions will be selected and researched for equipment design evaluation to satisfy the requirements ASME code, which are based on the conservative estimates of the magnitude and frequency of the temperature and pressure transients resulting from various operating conditions in the plant. In the mature design on pressurized water reactor, five conditions are considered. For the developing advanced pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR), its design and operation has much difference with other reactors, so the transients of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor have distinctive characteristics. In this paper, the possible design transients of the pebble-bed HTGR will be discussed, and the frequency of design transients for equipment fatigue analysis and stress analysis due to cyclic stresses is also studied. The results will provide support for the design and construct of the pebble-bed HTGR. (author)

  12. Computational Investigation of On-Line Interrogation of Pebble Bed Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawari, A. I.; Chen, Jianwei

    2005-10-01

    Pebble bed reactors are characterized by multipass fuel systems in which spherical fuel pebbles are circulated through the core until they reach a proposed burnup limit (80000-100000 MWD/MTU). For such reactors, the fuel is assayed on-line to ensure that the burnup limit is not breached. We considered assaying the fuel using an HPGe detector to perform passive gamma-ray spectrometry of fission products. Since neither fresh nor irradiated fuel is readily available, computer simulations were utilized to identify the radionuclides that can be used as burnup indicators, and to visualize the gamma-ray spectra at various levels of burnup. Specifically, we used the ORIGEN-MONTEBURNS-MCNP code system. This allowed the establishment of the burnup dependent one-group gas reactor cross-sections for the radionuclides of interest. Subsequently, ORIGEN was used to simulate in-core pebble depletion to establish the irradiated pebble isotopics. Finally, the codes MCNP and SYNTH were used to simulate the response of the HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The results show that absolute and relative indicators can be used on-line to determine unambiguously the enrichment and burnup on a pebble-by-pebble basis. The activity of Cs-137 or the activity ratio of Co-60/Cs-134 can be combined with the activity ratio of Np-239/I-132 to yield the enrichment and burnup information. To use the relative indicators, a relative efficiency calibration of the gamma-ray spectrometer can be performed using the La-140 gamma lines that are emitted by the irradiated pebble. I-132, Cs-134, Cs-137, La-140, and Np-239 are produced upon the irradiation of the fuel. Co-60 is produced by doping the fuel with a small amount (/spl sim/100 ppm) of Co-59. Using this approach, the uncertainty in burnup determination due to factors such as power history variation, detector efficiency calibration, and counting statistics is expected to remain in the range of /spl plusmn/5% to /spl plusmn/10%.

  13. Measurement of thermal expansion for a Li2TiO3 pebble bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisashi Tanigawa; Mikio Enoeda; Masato Akiba

    2006-01-01

    In the current design of the blanket with ceramic breeders, pebbles of breeding materials are packed into a container and used as a pebble bed. Thermal and mechanical conditions externally loaded on the bed affect thermal and mechanical properties of the bed. It is necessary to analyze thermo-mechanical properties of the bed under controlled thermal and mechanical conditions. In the present paper, thermal expansion of a Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed was investigated. Our apparatus consists of a tensile test-apparatus and a measurement chamber. Pebbles of Li 2 TiO 3 with 2 mm diameter were used. They were packed into a container made of alumina. At first, thermal expansion of the apparatus was calibrated because the measured deformation included thermal expansions of the load rods and the container. Instead of the pebble bed, a column made of copper was installed and thermal expansion of the system was measured for the calibration. Taking into account the estimated thermal expansion of the column, thermal expansion of the rods and the container could be analyzed. Based on the correction, thermal expansion of the pebble bed was measured under compression of 0.1 MPa. Temperature of the bed was regulated from room temperature to 973 K. From the measured expansion of the bed, average thermal expansion coefficient was estimated. For the beds with different packing factors ranging from 65.5 to 68.5 %, thermal expansion coefficients were 1.4 ± 0. 10-5 K -1 . In the first measurement of the beds without pre-loading, expansion coefficients were larger for the cooling process than heating. When the beds were successively heated and cooled, the difference decreased. This means that relocation of the pebbles arises in the first heat treatment and progress of compaction is larger in the cooling process than heating. After a few heat treatments, packing states of the beds reach stable and expansion coefficients for both heat and cooling processes are close. In the case of the beds that

  14. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ammar, M.R. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Université Orléans, CS90055, F-45071 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Rouzaud, J.N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, UMR CNRS ENS 8538, F-75231 Paris cedex 5 (France)

    2016-03-15

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges R{sub p} of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200–1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower

  15. Fabrication of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles by a sol-gel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xiangwei [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wen Zhaoyin [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)], E-mail: zywen@mail.sic.ac.cn; Xu Xiaogang; Liu Yu [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2010-04-15

    Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles are considered as candidate ceramic breeder materials in many blanket designs. In this work, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with adequate sphericity were fabricated by a water-based sol-gel process using LiOH and SiO{sub 2} (aerosil) as the raw materials, which has not been reported for fabrication of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles previously. Thermal analysis, phase analysis and morphological observations were carried out systematically. The effects of LiOH/C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7} molar ratios and sintering temperature on the microstructure and density of the pebbles were discussed. Experimental results showed that when the LiOH/C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7} molar ratio was 3, the microstructure of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles was the most favorable. While sintered at 900 deg. C for 4 h, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with about 1.2 mm in diameter were obtained and the density of the pebbles achieved about 74%.

  16. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modelling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMange, P.; Marian, J.; Caro, M.; Caro, A.

    2009-01-01

    Concept designs for the laser inertial fusion/fission energy (LIFE) engine include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a reliable and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermo-mechanical behaviour under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence and fast fluxes on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 deg. C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling. Under these circumstances, we estimate the pebble lifetime to be at least 16 months if uncoated, and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  17. Random geometry capability in RMC code for explicit analysis of polytype particle/pebble and applications to HTR-10 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shichang; Li, Zeguang; Wang, Kan; Cheng, Quan; She, Ding

    2018-01-01

    Highlights: •A new random geometry was developed in RMC for mixed and polytype particle/pebble. •This capability was applied to the full core calculations of HTR-10 benchmark. •Reactivity, temperature coefficient and control rod worth of HTR-10 were compared. •This method can explicitly model different packing fraction of different pebbles. •Monte Carlo code with this method can simulate polytype particle/pebble type reactor. -- Abstract: With the increasing demands of high fidelity neutronics analysis and the development of computer technology, Monte Carlo method is becoming more and more attractive in accurate simulation of pebble bed High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (HTR), owing to its advantages of the flexible geometry modeling and the use of continuous-energy nuclear cross sections. For the double-heterogeneous geometry of pebble bed, traditional Monte Carlo codes can treat it by explicit geometry description. However, packing methods such as Random Sequential Addition (RSA) can only produce a sphere packing up to 38% volume packing fraction, while Discrete Element Method (DEM) is troublesome and also time consuming. Moreover, traditional Monte Carlo codes are difficult and inconvenient to simulate the mixed and polytype particles or pebbles. A new random geometry method was developed in Monte Carlo code RMC to simulate the particle transport in polytype particle/pebble in double heterogeneous geometry systems. This method was verified by some test cases, and applied to the full core calculations of HTR-10 benchmark. The reactivity, temperature coefficient and control rod worth of HTR-10 were compared for full core and initial core in helium and air atmosphere respectively, and the results agree well with the benchmark results and experimental results. This work would provide an efficient tool for the innovative design of pebble bed, prism HTRs and molten salt reactors with polytype particles or pebbles using Monte Carlo method.

  18. Investigation of effective thermal conductivity for pebble beds by one-way coupled CFD-DEM method for CFETR WCCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chen, Youhua [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Huang, Kai [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A CFD-DEM coupled numerical model is built based on the prototypical blanket pebble bed. • The numerical model can be applied to simulate heat transfer of a pebble bed and estimate effective thermal conductivity. • The numerical model agrees well with the theoretical SZB model. • Effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds for WCCB is estimated by the current model. - Abstract: The mono-sized beryllium pebble bed and the multi-sized Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}/Be{sub 12}Ti mixed pebble bed are the main schemes for the Water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). And the effective thermal conductivity (k{sub eff}) of the pebble beds is important to characterize the thermal performance of WCCB. In this study, a one-way coupled CFD-DEM method was employed to simulate heat transfer and estimate k{sub eff}. The geometric topology of a prototypical blanket pebble bed was produced by the discrete element method (DEM). Based on the geometric topology, the temperature distribution and the k{sub eff} were obtained by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The current numerical model presented a good performance to calculate k{sub eff} of the beryllium pebble bed, and according to the modeling of the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}/Be{sub 12}Ti mixed pebble bed, k{sub eff} was estimated with values ranged between 2.0 and 4.0 W/(m∙K).

  19. A 3-D inelastic analysis of HTR graphite structures and a comparison with A 2-D approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willaschek, J.

    1979-01-01

    In High Temperature Reactor Cores (HTR) a large number of elements are constructed of nuclear graphite. The dimensions of the graphite components are limited by stresses and strains resulting from thermal loads, irradiation induced dimensional changes and stress-dependent irradiation creep. Therefore it is necessary to examine the feasibility of design concepts with regard to the structural integrity of the material. This paper presents an analysis of a radial reflector concept for use in a 3000 MWth HTR for process heat production. This concept of a pebble bed reactor (OTTO cycle) requires reflector dimensions and shapes which have previously not been used and which may exceed acceptable stress limits. Graphite reflector elements in a HTR are subject to a high fluence of fast neutrons. The fluence varies spatially within an element. Irradiation-induced strains occur which in turn vary non-linearly with the fluence. At low fluences the graphite shrinks. With increasing fluence shrinkage is saturated and after a 'turn-around' point the graphite begins to swell. The net effect of fluence gradient and irradiation-induced strain is a 'necking' of the element which moves radially outwards with time. In this paper a three-dimensional inelastic analysis of a graphite block with the above deformation history is described. The influence of irradiation on dimensional stability and other material properties was taken into account. Numerical results were obtained with the finite-element computer code ADINA, modified at INTERATOM for the task in hand. The radial reflector block was modelled using 21-node three-dimensional continuum elements of elastic-creep material. The element stiffness matrices were calculated using the standard 2x2x2 Gauss integration; material nonlinearities with quadratic displacement functions and linearised initial strains were employed. (orig.)

  20. A study on Monte Carlo analysis of Pebble-type VHTR core for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Chul

    2005-02-01

    In order to pursue exact the core analysis for VHTR core which will be developed in future, a study on Monte Carol method was carried out. In Korea, pebble and prism type core are under investigation for VHTR core analysis. In this study, pebble-type core was investigated because it was known that it should not only maintain the nuclear fuel integrity but also have the advantage in economical efficiency and safety. The pebble-bed cores of HTR-PROTEUS critical facility in Swiss were selected for the benchmark model. After the detailed MCNP modeling of the whole facility, calculations of nuclear characteristics were performed. The two core configurations, Core 4.3 and Core 5 (reference state no. 3), among the 10 configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS cores were chosen to be analyzed in order to treat different fuel loading pattern and modeled. The former is a random packing core and the latter deterministic packing core. Based on the experimental data and the benchmark result of other research groups for the two different cores, some nuclear characteristics were calculated. Firstly, keff was calculated for these cores. The effect for TRIO homogeneity model was investigated. Control rod and shutdown rod worths also were calculated and the sensitivity analysis on cross-section library and reflector thickness was pursued. Lastly, neutron flux profiles were investigated in reflector regions. It is noted that Monte Carlo analysis of pebble-type VHTR core was firstly carried out in Korea. Also, this study should not only provide the basic data for pebble-type VHTR core analysis for hydrogen production but also be utilized as the verified data to validate a computer code for VHTR core analysis which will be developed in future

  1. Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration, Part-II: Temperature field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, A.; Roelofs, F.; Komen, E.M.J.; Baglietto, E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNSs) of a pebble bed configuration have been performed. ► This q-DNS database may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. ► A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data throughout the computational domain has been generated. ► Results for mean, RMS of temperature and respective turbulent heat fluxes are extensively reported in this paper. -- Abstract: Good prediction of the flow and heat transfer phenomena in the pebble bed core of a high temperature reactor (HTR) is a challenge for available turbulence models, which still require to be validated. While experimental data are generally desirable in this validation process, due to the complex geometric configuration and measurement difficulties, a very limited amount of data is currently available. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is considered an accurate simulation technique, which may serve as an alternative for validating turbulence models. In the framework of the present study, quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a single face cubic centered pebble bed is performed, which will serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches in order to perform calculations for a randomly arranged pebble bed. These simulations were performed at a Reynolds number of 3088, based on pebble diameter, with a porosity level of 0.42. Results related to flow field (mean, RMS and covariance of velocity) have been presented in Part-I, whereas, in the present article, we focus our attention to the analysis of the temperature field. A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data for the thermal field (mean, RMS and turbulent heat flux) has been generated

  2. Inside-out Planet Formation. IV. Pebble Evolution and Planet Formation Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Chatterjee, Sourav; Birnstiel, Tilman; Youdin, Andrew N.; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2018-04-01

    Systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs) are very common. Chatterjee & Tan proposed Inside-out Planet Formation (IOPF), an in situ formation theory, to explain these planets. IOPF involves sequential planet formation from pebble-rich rings that are fed from the outer disk and trapped at the pressure maximum associated with the dead zone inner boundary (DZIB). Planet masses are set by their ability to open a gap and cause the DZIB to retreat outwards. We present models for the disk density and temperature structures that are relevant to the conditions of IOPF. For a wide range of DZIB conditions, we evaluate the gap-opening masses of planets in these disks that are expected to lead to the truncation of pebble accretion onto the forming planet. We then consider the evolution of dust and pebbles in the disk, estimating that pebbles typically grow to sizes of a few centimeters during their radial drift from several tens of astronomical units to the inner, ≲1 au scale disk. A large fraction of the accretion flux of solids is expected to be in such pebbles. This allows us to estimate the timescales for individual planet formation and the entire planetary system formation in the IOPF scenario. We find that to produce realistic STIPs within reasonable timescales similar to disk lifetimes requires disk accretion rates of ∼10‑9 M ⊙ yr‑1 and relatively low viscosity conditions in the DZIB region, i.e., a Shakura–Sunyaev parameter of α ∼ 10‑4.

  3. First results of the post-irradiation examination of the Ceramic Breeder materials from the Pebble Bed Assemblies Irradiation for the HCPB Blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegeman, J.; Magielsen, A.J.; Peeters, M.; Stijkel, M.P.; Fokkens, J.H.; Laan, J.G. van der

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of developing the European Helium Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) blanket an irradiation test of pebble-bed assemblies is performed in the HFR Petten. The experiment is focused on the thermo-mechanical behavior of the HCPB type breeder pebble-bed at DEMO representative levels of temperature and defined thermal-mechanical loads. To achieve representative conditions a section of the HCPB is simulated by EUROFER-97 cylinders with a horizontal bed of ceramic breeder pebbles sandwiched between two beryllium beds. Floating Eurofer-97 steel plates separate the pebble-beds. The structural integrity of the ceramic breeder materials is an issue for the design of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed concept. Therefore the objective of the post irradiation examination is to study deformation of pebbles and the pebble beds and to investigate the microstructure of the ceramic pebbles from the Pebble Bed Assemblies. This paper concentrates on the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the four ceramic pebble beds that have been irradiated in the Pebble Bed Assembly experiment for the HCPB blanket concept. Two assemblies with Li 4 SiO 4 pebble-beds are operated at different maximum temperatures of approximately 600 o C and 800 o C. Post irradiation computational analysis has shown that both have different creep deformation. Two other assemblies have been loaded with a ceramic breeder bed of two types of Li 2 TiO 3 beds having different sintering temperatures and consequently different creep behavior. The irradiation maximum temperature of the Li 2 TiO 3 was 800 o C. To support the first PIE result, the post irradiation thermal analysis will be discussed because thermal gradients have influence on the pebble-bed thermo-mechanical behavior and as a result it may have impact on the structural integrity of the ceramic breeder materials. (author)

  4. Thermodynamic Simulation of Equilibrium Composition of Reaction Products at Dehydration of a Technological Channel in a Uranium-Graphite Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavliuk, A. O.; Zagumennov, V. S.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.; Bespala, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    The problems of accumulation of nuclear fuel spills in the graphite stack in the course of operation of uranium-graphite nuclear reactors are considered. The results of thermodynamic analysis of the processes in the graphite stack at dehydration of a technological channel, fuel element shell unsealing and migration of fission products, and activation of stable nuclides in structural elements of the reactor and actinides inside the graphite moderator are given. The main chemical reactions and compounds that are produced in these modes in the reactor channel during its operation and that may be hazardous after its shutdown and decommissioning are presented. Thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition is performed using the specialized code TERRA. The results of thermodynamic simulation of the equilibrium composition in different cases of technological channel dehydration in the course of the reactor operation show that, if the temperature inside the active core of the nuclear reactor increases to the melting temperature of the fuel element, oxides and carbides of nuclear fuel are produced. The mathematical model of the nonstationary heat transfer in a graphite stack of a uranium-graphite reactor in the case of the technological channel dehydration is presented. The results of calculated temperature evolution at the center of the fuel element, the replaceable graphite element, the air gap, and in the surface layer of the block graphite are given. The numerical results show that, in the case of dehydration of the technological channel in the uranium-graphite reacto