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Sample records for graphite interface studies

  1. A first principles study of adhesion and electronic structure at Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yangzhen; Xing, Jiandong; Li, Yefei, E-mail: yefeili@126.com; Sun, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • The surface energy of graphite (0001) and Fe (110) has been calculated and the number of layers of graphite slab and Fe slab has been estimated. • The work of adhesion of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface with different interfacial separation d{sub 0} (1.7–3 Å) has been systematically discussed. • The total electron density and electron density difference of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are used to study the bonding characteristics. • The Interfacial energy and fracture toughness of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are estimated. - Abstract: Using first–principles calculations, we discuss the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite and that of the surface, the work of adhesion, and the electronic structure of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface. In this study, the experimental results of the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite reveal that our adopted parameters are reliable. Moreover, the results of surface energy demonstrate that nine atomic layers of graphite (0001) and five atomic layers of Fe (110) exhibit bulk–like interiors. The lattice mismatch of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface is about 6%. The results also exhibit that the Fe atom residing on top of the second layer of graphite slab (HCP structure) is the preferred stacking sequence. The work of adhesion (W{sub ad}) of the optimized Fe/graphite interface of HCP structure is 1.36 J/m{sup 2}. Electronic structures indicate that the bonding characteristics are a mixture of covalent and ionic bonds in the HCP interface. Moreover, the magnetic moment of atoms at the interface was studied using the spin polarized density of states.

  2. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  3. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm{sup -3} LiClO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface. (author)

  4. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K.

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm -3 LiClO 4 ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li +, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface.

  5. Ab Initio Metadynamics Study of the VO2+/VO2+ Redox Reaction Mechanism at the Graphite Edge/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhen; Klyukin, Konstantin; Alexandrov, Vitaly

    2018-06-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are promising electrochemical energy storage systems, for which development is impeded by a poor understanding of redox reactions occurring at electrode/electrolyte interfaces. Even for the conventional all-vanadium RFB chemistry employing V 2+ /V 3+ and VO 2 + /VO 2+ couples, there is still no consensus about the reaction mechanism, electrode active sites, and rate-determining step. Herein, we perform Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics-based metadynamics simulations to unravel the mechanism of the VO 2 + /VO 2+ redox reaction in water at the oxygen-functionalized graphite (112̅0) edge surface serving as a representative carbon-based electrode. Our results suggest that during the battery discharge aqueous VO 2 + /VO 2+ species adsorb at the surface C-O groups as inner-sphere complexes, exhibiting faster adsorption/desorption kinetics than V 2+ /V 3+ , at least at low vanadium concentrations considered in our study. We find that this is because (i) VO 2 + /VO 2+ conversion does not involve the slow transfer of an oxygen atom, (ii) protonation of VO 2 + is spontaneous and coupled to interfacial electron transfer in acidic conditions to enable VO 2+ formation, and (iii) V 3+ found to be strongly bound to oxygen groups of the graphite surface features unfavorable desorption kinetics. In contrast, the reverse process taking place upon charging is expected to be more sluggish for the VO 2 + /VO 2+ redox couple because of both unfavorable deprotonation of the VO 2+ water ligands and adsorption/desorption kinetics.

  6. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  7. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of damage cascade creation in SiC composites containing SiC/graphite interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Joseph; Chen, Di; Wang, Jing; Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu

    2013-07-15

    Silicon carbide composites have been investigated for their use as structural materials for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Although the composites have significantly enhanced mechanical properties and structure integrity, there is little known about the behavior of defects in the presence of a graphite-silicon carbide interface. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations have been used to model defect creation and clustering in a composite containing a SiC/graphite interface. Evolution of displacements as a function of time were studied and compared to bulk SiC. The results show that the first a few SiC atomic layers closest to the interface are easily damaged. However, beyond these first few atomic layers the system appears to be unaffected by the SiC interface.

  9. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  10. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  11. Study on graphite samples for nuclear usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.M.; Silva Roseira, M. da

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The graphite, due to its properties (mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, high-temperature stability, machinability etc.) have many industrial applications, and consequently, an important strategic value. In the nuclear area, it has been used as moderator and reflector of neutrons in the fission process of uranium. The graphite can be produced from many types of carbonaceous materials by a variety of process dominated by the manufactures. This is the reason why there are in the world market a lot of graphite types with different physical and mechanical properties. The present investigation studies some physical characteristics of the graphite samples destined to use in a nuclear reactor. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  12. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  13. The coherent interlayer resistance of a single, rotated interface between two stacks of AB graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, K. M. Masum, E-mail: khabib@ee.ucr.edu; Sylvia, Somaia S.; Neupane, Mahesh; Lake, Roger K., E-mail: rlake@ee.ucr.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521-0204 (United States); Ge, Supeng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521-0204 (United States)

    2013-12-09

    The coherent, interlayer resistance of a misoriented, rotated interface between two stacks of AB graphite is determined for a variety of misorientation angles. The quantum-resistance of the ideal AB stack is on the order of 1 to 10 mΩ μm{sup 2}. For small rotation angles, the coherent interlayer resistance exponentially approaches the ideal quantum resistance at energies away from the charge neutrality point. Over a range of intermediate angles, the resistance increases exponentially with cell size for minimum size unit cells. Larger cell sizes, of similar angles, may not follow this trend. The energy dependence of the interlayer transmission is described.

  14. The coherent interlayer resistance of a single, rotated interface between two stacks of AB graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, K. M. Masum; Sylvia, Somaia S.; Neupane, Mahesh; Lake, Roger K.; Ge, Supeng

    2013-01-01

    The coherent, interlayer resistance of a misoriented, rotated interface between two stacks of AB graphite is determined for a variety of misorientation angles. The quantum-resistance of the ideal AB stack is on the order of 1 to 10 mΩ μm 2 . For small rotation angles, the coherent interlayer resistance exponentially approaches the ideal quantum resistance at energies away from the charge neutrality point. Over a range of intermediate angles, the resistance increases exponentially with cell size for minimum size unit cells. Larger cell sizes, of similar angles, may not follow this trend. The energy dependence of the interlayer transmission is described

  15. Formation of Reversible Solid Electrolyte Interface on Graphite Surface from Concentrated Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Dongping; Tao, Jinhui; Yan, Pengfei; Henderson, Wesley A.; Li, Qiuyan; Shao, Yuyan; Helm, Monte L.; Borodin, Oleg; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong-Min; Engelhard, Mark; Zhang, Ji-Guang; De Yoreo, James J.; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2017-02-10

    Interfacial phenomena have always been key determinants for the performance of energy storage technologies. The solid electrolyte interfacial (SEI) layer, pervasive on the surfaces of battery electrodes for numerous chemical couples, directly affects the ion transport, charge transfer and lifespan of the entire energy system. Almost all SEI layers, however, are unstable resulting in the continuous consumption of the electrolyte. Typically, this leads to the accumulation of degradation products on/restructuring of the electrode surface and thus increased cell impedance, which largely limits the long-term operation of the electrochemical reactions. Herein, a completely new SEI formation mechanism has been discovered, in which the electrolyte components reversibly self-assemble into a protective surface coating on a graphite electrode upon changing the potential. In contrast to the established wisdom regarding the necessity of employing the solvent ethylene carbonate (EC) to form a protective SEI layer on graphite, a wide range of EC-free electrolytes are demonstrated for the reversible intercalation/deintercalation of Li+ cations within a graphite lattice, thereby providing tremendous flexibility in electrolyte tailoring for battery couples. This novel finding is broadly applicable and provides guidance for how to control interfacial reactions through the relationship between ion aggregation and solvent decomposition at polarized interfaces.

  16. Floatability study of graphite ore from southeast Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florena, Fenfen Fenda; Syarifuddin, Fahmi; Hanam, Eko Sulistio; Trisko, Nici; Kustiyanto, Eko; Enilisiana, Rianto, Anton; Arinton, Ghenadi

    2016-02-01

    Graphite ore obtained from Kolaka Regency, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia have been succesfully investigated for beneficiation by froth flotation technique. Preliminary study have been done to determine the minerals types, fixed carbon content and liberation size of the graphite. Graphite is naturally floatable due to its hydrophobic property. Some suitable reagents are usually added to increase effectiveness of recovery. In this article, enrichment of graphite by froth flotation was studied by investigating the effect of reagents concentrations, rotation speed and particle size on the carbon grade and recovery of the concentrate. The carbon grade increased from 3.00% to 60.00% at the optimum flotation conditions.

  17. A study on wear behaviour of Al/6101/graphite composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Sharma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research work scrutinizes aluminium alloy 6101-graphite composites for their mechanical and tribological behaviour in dry sliding environments. The orthodox liquid casting technique had been used for the manufacturing of composite materials and imperilled to T6 heat treatment. The content of reinforcement particles was taken as 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 wt.% of graphite to ascertain it is prospective as self-lubricating reinforcement in sliding wear environments. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength of cast Al6101 metal matrix and manufactured composites were evaluated. Hardness, tensile strength and flexural strength decreases with increasing volume fraction of graphite reinforcement as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix. Wear tests were performed on pin on disc apparatus to assess the tribological behaviour of composites and to determine the optimum volume fraction of graphite for its minimum wear rate. Wear rate reduces with increase in graphite volume fraction and minimum wear rate was attained at 4 wt.% graphite. The wear was found to decrease with increase in sliding distance. The average co-efficient of friction also reduces with graphite addition and its minimum value was found to be at 4 wt.% graphite. The worn surfaces of wear specimens were studied through scanning electron microscopy. The occurrence of 4 wt.% of graphite reinforcement in the composites can reveal loftier wear possessions as compared to cast Al6101 metal matrix.

  18. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M; Shames, A I; Sergeev, N A; Olszewski, M; McDonough, J K; Mochalin, V N; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1 H, 13 C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp 2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  19. A TEM Study on the Microstructure of Fine Flaky Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Horsewell, Andy

    In this investigation the microstructure of the graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. Based on this information, growth models for the platelets in the fine graphite flakes in cast iron are considered. Detailed crystallographic analysis...... of the defects observed such as multiple twin boundaries and possible spiral growth configurations are required...

  20. Bias voltage dependence of molecular orientation of dialkyl ketone and fatty acid alkyl ester at the liquid–graphite interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibino, Masahiro, E-mail: hibino@mmm.muroran-it.ac.jp [Department of Applied Sciences, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto-cho, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 18-pentatriacontanone (as ketone) and stearyl stearate (as ester) were formed on a graphite surface at the liquid–solid interface. • Orientations of the molecules in SAMs on the substrate were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. • A perpendicular carbon skeleton-plane orientation with the CO pointing up on the surface is favorable for a substrate with negative charge and vice versa. - Abstract: Molecular orientations of self-assembled 18-pentatriacontanone (as ketone) and stearyl stearate (as ester) monolayers adsorbed on a graphite surface were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the liquid–solid interface. At a positive sample bias, the central areas of the dialkyl ketone and fatty acid alkyl ester molecules in the STM images appeared as two bright regions on both sides of a dim spot and a bright region on one side of a dim spot, whereas at a negative sample bias, the areas appeared dim. This contrast variation indicates that a perpendicular carbon skeleton-plane orientation with the CO pointing down on the surface is favorable for a substrate with positive charge and vice versa because of the greater electronegativity of the oxygen atom. Upon the bias voltage reversal, the delay time for the STM image contrast change in the region was observed on a time scale of minutes. The difference between the delay time lengths for the direction of bias polarity change indicates that the perpendicular configuration with CO pointing up is more stable than that with CO pointing down. These results indicate that the use of an electric field along a direction vertical to the monolayer on the substrate provides control over the orientations of the molecules between two stable states at the liquid–solid interface.

  1. Nickel-Graphite Composite Compliant Interface and/or Hot Shoe Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdosy, Samad A.; Chun-Yip Li, Billy; Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Caillat, Thierry; Anjunyan, Harut

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation high-temperature thermoelectric-power-generating devices will employ segmented architectures and will have to reliably withstand thermally induced mechanical stresses produced during component fabrication, device assembly, and operation. Thermoelectric materials have typically poor mechanical strength, exhibit brittle behavior, and possess a wide range of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. As a result, the direct bonding at elevated temperatures of these materials to each other to produce segmented leg components is difficult, and often results in localized microcracking at interfaces and mec hanical failure due to the stresses that arise from the CTE mismatch between the various materials. Even in the absence of full mechanical failure, degraded interfaces can lead to increased electrical and thermal resistances, which adversely impact conversion efficiency and power output. The proposed solution is the insertion of a mechanically compliant layer, with high electrical and thermal conductivity, between the low- and high-temperature segments to relieve thermomechanical stresses during device fabrication and operation. This composite material can be used as a stress-relieving layer between the thermoelectric segments and/or between a thermoelectric segment and a hot- or cold-side interconnect material. The material also can be used as a compliant hot shoe. Nickel-coated graphite powders were hot-pressed to form a nickel-graphite composite material. A freestanding thermoelectric segmented leg was fabricated by brazing the compliant pad layer between the high-temperature p- Zintl and low-temperature p-SKD TE segments using Cu-Ag braze foils. The segmented leg stack was heated in vacuum under a compressive load to achieve bonding. The novelty of the innovation is the use of composite material that re duces the thermomechanical stresses en - countered in the construction of high-efficiency, high-temperature therm - o-electric devices. The

  2. Efficient simulations of the aqueous bio-interface of graphitic nanostructures with a polarisable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Zak E.; Tomásio, Susana M.; Walsh, Tiffany R.

    2014-04-01

    To fully harness the enormous potential offered by interfaces between graphitic nanostructures and biomolecules, detailed connections between adsorbed conformations and adsorption behaviour are needed. To elucidate these links, a key approach, in partnership with experimental techniques, is molecular simulation. For this, a force-field (FF) that can appropriately capture the relevant physics and chemistry of these complex bio-interfaces, while allowing extensive conformational sampling, and also supporting inter-operability with known biological FFs, is a pivotal requirement. Here, we present and apply such a force-field, GRAPPA, designed to work with the CHARMM FF. GRAPPA is an efficiently implemented polarisable force-field, informed by extensive plane-wave DFT calculations using the revPBE-vdW-DF functional. GRAPPA adequately recovers the spatial and orientational structuring of the aqueous interface of graphene and carbon nanotubes, compared with more sophisticated approaches. We apply GRAPPA to determine the free energy of adsorption for a range of amino acids, identifying Trp, Tyr and Arg to have the strongest binding affinity and Asp to be a weak binder. The GRAPPA FF can be readily incorporated into mainstream simulation packages, and will enable large-scale polarisable biointerfacial simulations at graphitic interfaces, that will aid the development of biomolecule-mediated, solution-based graphene processing and self-assembly strategies.To fully harness the enormous potential offered by interfaces between graphitic nanostructures and biomolecules, detailed connections between adsorbed conformations and adsorption behaviour are needed. To elucidate these links, a key approach, in partnership with experimental techniques, is molecular simulation. For this, a force-field (FF) that can appropriately capture the relevant physics and chemistry of these complex bio-interfaces, while allowing extensive conformational sampling, and also supporting inter

  3. Study of the thermal drop at the uranium-can interface for fuel elements in gas-graphite reactors; Etude de la chute thermique au contact uranium-gaine pour des elements combustibles de reacteur de la filiere graphite-gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faussat, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Levenes, G; Michel, M [Societe Industrielle de Combustible Nucleaire (France)

    1964-07-01

    The report reviews the tests now under way at the CEA, for determining the thermal contact resistance at the uranium-can interface for fuel elements used in gas-graphite type reactors. These are laboratory tests carried out with equipment based on the principle of a heat flow across a stack of test pieces having planar contact surfaces. The following points emerge from this work: - for a metallic uranium element canned in magnesium, of the type G-2 or EDF-2, a value of 0.2 deg C/W/cm{sup 2} seems reasonable for can temperatures of 400 deg C and above. - this value is independent of the micro-geometric state of the uranium surface in a range of roughness which easily includes those observed on tubes and rods produced industrially. - for the internal cans of elements cooled internally and externally, the value of the contact resistance for temperatures of under 400 deg C as a function of the stresses in the can has not yet been measured exactly. (authors) [French] Le rapport fait le point des essais actuellement en cours au CEA pour determiner la resistance thermique de contact uranium-gaine pour des reacteurs de la filiere graphite-gaz. Ces essais sont effectues en laboratoire sur des appareils bases sur le principe d'une circulation de flux de chaleur a travers un empilement d'eprouvettes dont les faces en contact sont planes. De l'etude, il ressort essentiellement que: - pour un element a uranium metallique et gaine de magnesium type G-2 ou EdF-2, on peut admettre la valeur de 0,2 deg C/W/cm{sup 2} pour des temperatures de gaines de 400 deg C et plus. - cette valeur ne depend pas de l'etat de surface microgeometrique de l'uranium pour un domaine de rugosites couvrant largement celles que l'on observe sur des tubes et barreaux fabriques en serie. - pour les gaines internes d'elements a refroidissement interne et externe la valeur de la resistance de contact reste a preciser pour les temperatures inferieures a 400 deg C, en fonction des contraintes existant dans les

  4. Study of hot corrosion of flakes of non purified graphite and of purified graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boule, Michel

    1967-01-01

    The author reports the study of hot corrosion of the Ticonderoga graphite. He reports the study of the defects of graphite flakes (structure defects due to impurities), the dosing of these impurities, and then their removal by purification. Flakes have then been oxidised by means of a specially designed apparatus. Based on photographs taken by optical and electronic microscopy, the author compares the oxidation features obtained in dry air and in humid air, between purified and non purified flakes. He also reports the study of the evolution of oxidation with respect to the initial rate of impurities, and the study of the evolution of oxidation features in humid air during oxidation. All these comparisons are made while taking the oxidation rate into account [fr

  5. Research on the phenomenon of graphitization. Crystallographic study - Study of bromine sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, Jacques

    1967-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the mechanism of graphitization of carbon by using X-ray diffraction analysis and the physical and chemical study of lamellar reactions between carbon and bromine. The author first presents generalities and results of preliminary studies (meaning of graphitization, presentation of the various carbon groups and classes), and then reports the study of the graphitization of compact carbons (soft carbons). More precisely, he reports the crystallographic study of partially graphitized carbons: methods and principles, experimental results and their analysis, discussion of the graphitization mechanism. In the next part, the author reports the study of bromine sorption on carbons: experimental method, isotherms of a natural graphite and of a graphitized carbon, structure of carbon-bromine complexes, isotherms of graphitizable carbons and of all other carbons, distribution of bromine layers in partially graphitized carbons, bromine sorption and Fermi level

  6. Scanning tunnelling microscopy of a foldamer prototype at the liquid/solid interface : water/Au(111) versus 1-octanol/graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klymchenko, Andrey S.; Schuurmans, Norbert; van der Auweraer, Mark; Feringa, Ben L.; van Esch, Jan; De Feyter, Steven

    2006-01-01

    We report the design and synthesis of a catechol based foldamer containing amide functionalized alkyl chains, and its monolayer formation at the liquid/solid interface. By scanning tunnelling microscopy, both at the 1-octanol/graphite interface as well as at the water/Au( 111) interface, the

  7. Study by electronic microscopy of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation (air, 620 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodon de Villeroche, Suzanne

    1968-01-01

    The author reports the study of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation in the air at 620 C. It is based on observations made by electronic microscopy. This study comes after another one dedicated to oxidation features obtained by hot corrosion of natural graphite, and aims at comparing pyrolytic graphite before and after irradiation in an atomic pile, and at performing tests on a graphite processed with ozone. After a recall of generalities about natural graphite and of some issues related to hot corrosion of natural graphite, the author presents some characteristics and features of irradiated and non-irradiated pyrolytic graphite. He reports the study of the oxidation of samples of pyrolytic graphite: production of thin lamellae, production of glaze-carbon replicates, oxidation of irradiated and of non-irradiated graphite, healing of irradiation defects, and oxidation of ozone-processed natural graphite [fr

  8. Study of the carbon material / electrolyte interface; Etude de l`interface materiau carbone / electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genies, S.; Yazami, R. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d`Electrochimie et d`Electrometallurgie, 38 - Saint-Martin-d`Heres (France); Frison, J.C. [CNET, Centre de Recherches de Lannion, 22 (France); Ledran, J. [CNET, 92 - Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1996-12-31

    The aim of this work is the comparative study of the properties of the natural graphite/liquid organic electrolyte interface by impedance spectroscopy with respect to different lithium salts (LiX with X = ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, BF{sub 4}{sup -}, CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup -}, N(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}{sup -}, PF{sub 6}{sup -}). The evolution of the interface properties during the first electrochemical reduction suggests different mechanisms of formation of passivation films. A more stable, thin and homogenous film seems to develop when the LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2} or LiPF{sub 6} lithium salts are used. The chemical diffusion coefficient of lithium in graphite has been determined by impedance spectroscopy. (J.S.) 16 refs.

  9. Study of the carbon material / electrolyte interface; Etude de l`interface materiau carbone / electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genies, S; Yazami, R [Ecole Nationale Superieure d` Electrochimie et d` Electrometallurgie, 38 - Saint-Martin-d` Heres (France); Frison, J C [CNET, Centre de Recherches de Lannion, 22 (France); Ledran, J [CNET, 92 - Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work is the comparative study of the properties of the natural graphite/liquid organic electrolyte interface by impedance spectroscopy with respect to different lithium salts (LiX with X = ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, BF{sub 4}{sup -}, CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup -}, N(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}{sup -}, PF{sub 6}{sup -}). The evolution of the interface properties during the first electrochemical reduction suggests different mechanisms of formation of passivation films. A more stable, thin and homogenous film seems to develop when the LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2} or LiPF{sub 6} lithium salts are used. The chemical diffusion coefficient of lithium in graphite has been determined by impedance spectroscopy. (J.S.) 16 refs.

  10. A microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; McEnaney, B.; Tucker, M.O.; Rose, A.P.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports a new microstructural study of dynamic crack propagation in three nuclear graphites: (i) PGA, the moderator material in UK Magnox reactors; (ii) IMl-24, the moderator material in UK Advanced gas cooled reactors (AGR); and (iii) a pitch coke graphite, which is used in the fabrication of AGR fuel sleeves. The fracture mechanisms in nuclear graphites are initiated by microcrack formation at low stresses. Typically, microcracks form in regions of well-aligned binder or at favourably-oriented pores, where stress is concentrated. With increasing applied loads, microcracks propagate taking advantage of easy cleavage paths or linking with pores. Eventually, coalescence of such cracks and inherent porosity produces a crack of critical length for fast fracture. (orig./MM)

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Fluorine-Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A.M.; Goren, S.D.; Nakajima, T.; Vieth, H.-M.; Privalov, A.

    1998-01-01

    To study the origin of semimetal-metal and metal-insulator transformations, localization effects and C-E bonding in fluorine-intercalated graphite C x F, 13 C and 19 F NMR investigations have been carried out for a wide range of fluorine content, 3.8 8, are attributed to mobile fluorine acceptor species which are responsible for the increase of electric conductivity in the dilute compound. When increasing the fluorine content to x ∼ 8 corresponding to the maximum electric conductivity, covalent C-P bonds start to oc- cur. The number of these bonds grows with fluorine content resulting in the decrease in conductivity which is caused by a percolation mechanism rather than by a change in bond length. A difference in 19 F chemical shift for fluorine-intercalated graphite C x F and covalent graphite fluoride (CF) n has been observed and is attributed to different C-P bonding in these compounds

  12. Study on practical of eddy current testing of core and core support graphite components in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ooka, Norikazu; Shindo, Yoshihisa; Kawae, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Motomitsu; Kambe, Mamoru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Ide, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    Core and core support graphite components in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) are mainly made of nuclear-grade IG-110 and PGX graphites. Nondestructive inspection with Eddy Current Testing (ECT) is planned to be applied to these components. The method of ECT has been already established for metallic components, however, cannot be applied directly to the graphite ones, because the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from those of metals. Therefore, ECT method and condition were studied for the application of the ECT to the graphite components. This paper describes the study on practical method and conditions of ECT for above mentioned graphite structures. (author)

  13. Low-energy electron observation of graphite and molybdenite crystals. Application to the study of graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.

    1969-01-01

    The LEED study of cleaved (0001) faces of crystals having a layered structure allowed to investigate flakes free of steps on graphite and molybdenite, to show twinning on natural graphite. By intensity measurements and computation in the case of a kinematical approximation it has been possible to determine an inner potential of 19 eV for graphite and to identify the direction of the Mo-S bond of the surface layer of molybdenite. The oxidation of graphite has been studied by observing changes, in symmetry of the diffraction patterns and by mass spectrometry of the gases evolved during the oxidation. No surface compounds have been detected and the carbon layers appeared to be peeled off one after the other. The oxidation took place at temperatures higher than 520 C under an oxygen pressure of 10 -5 torr. (author) [fr

  14. Moessbauer study of small amounts of iron in graphite, around the diamond-graphite pressure-temperature stability region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.L.S. de; Silva, M.T.X.; Vasquez, A.; Jornada, J.A.H. da

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the Fe-C system in the C rich region, prepared by high pressure-high temperature treatment near the graphite-diamond stability line, was made. The results obtained for the different processing conditions give no evidence of Fe intercalation in graphite. The presence of some water in the cell produced hydrated Fe complexes, which can explain the deleterious effect of water or hydrogen in the high pressure diamond synthesis. (orig.)

  15. Contribution to the study of internal friction in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, J.

    1969-03-01

    A study has been made of the internal friction in different graphites between -180 C and +500 C using a torsion pendulum; the graphites had been previously treated thermo-mechanically, by neutron irradiation and subjected to partial annealings. It has been shown that there occurs: a hysteretic type dissipation of energy, connected with interactions between dislocations and other defects in the matrix; a dissipation having a partially hysteretic character which can be interpreted by a Granato-Luke type formalism and which is connected with the presence of an 'ultra-micro porosity'; a dissipation by a relaxation mechanism after a small dose of irradiation; this is attributed to the reorientation of bi-interstitials; a dissipation having the characteristics of a solid state transformation, this during an annealing after irradiation. It is attributed to the reorganization of interstitial defects. Some information has thus been obtained concerning graphites, in particular: their behaviour at low mechanical stresses, the nature of irradiation defects and their behaviour during annealing, the structural changes occurring during graphitization, the relationship between internal friction and macroscopic mechanical properties. (author) [fr

  16. Combined friction force microscopy and quantum chemical investigation of the tribotronic response at the propylammonium nitrate-graphite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Atkin, R; Page, A J

    2015-06-28

    The energetic origins of the variation in friction with potential at the propylammonium nitrate-graphite interface are revealed using friction force microscopy (FFM) in combination with quantum chemical simulations. For boundary layer lubrication, as the FFM tip slides energy is dissipated via (1) boundary layer ions and (2) expulsion of near-surface ion layers from the space between the surface and advancing tip. Simulations reveal how changing the surface potential changes the ion composition of the boundary and near surface layer, which controls energy dissipation through both pathways, and thus the friction.

  17. Growth mechanism and interface magnetic properties of Co nanostructures on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, P.K.J.; de Jong, Machiel Pieter; Leonardus, L.; Siekman, Martin Herman; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard

    2011-01-01

    We investigated structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Co adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Distribution and atomic sites of 3d transition-metal Co nanoislands and adatoms on HOPG were experimentally investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic

  18. Preliminary design study of a large scale graphite oxidation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epel, L.G.; Majeski, S.J.; Schweitzer, D.G.; Sheehan, T.V.

    1979-08-01

    A preliminary design study of a large scale graphite oxidation loop was performed in order to assess feasibility and to estimate capital costs. The nominal design operates at 50 atmospheres helium and 1800 F with a graphite specimen 30 inches long and 10 inches in diameter. It was determined that a simple single walled design was not practical at this time because of a lack of commercially available thick walled high temperature alloys. Two alternative concepts, at reduced operating pressure, were investigated. Both were found to be readily fabricable to operate at 1800 F and capital cost estimates for these are included. A design concept, which is outside the scope of this study, was briefly considered

  19. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of graphite edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Y.; Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the electronic local density of states (LDOS) near single-step edges at the surface of exfoliated graphite. In scanning tunneling microscopy measurements, we observed the (3x3)R30 o and honeycomb superstructures extending over 3-4-bar nm both from the zigzag and armchair edges. Calculations based on a density-functional-derived non-orthogonal tight-binding model show that these superstructures can coexist if the two types of edges admix each other in real graphite step edges. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements near the zigzag edge reveal a clear peak in the LDOS at an energy below the Fermi energy by 20-bar meV. No such a peak was observed near the armchair edge. We concluded that this peak corresponds to the 'edge state' theoretically predicted for graphene ribbons, since a similar prominent LDOS peak due to the edge state is obtained by the first principles calculations

  20. Surface analysis of model systems: From a metal-graphite interface to an intermetallic catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwolek, Emma J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    This thesis summarizes research completed on two different model systems. In the first system, we investigate the deposition of the elemental metal dysprosium on highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and its resulting nucleation and growth. The goal of this research is to better understand the metal-carbon interactions that occur on HOPG and to apply those to an array of other carbon surfaces. This insight may prove beneficial to developing and using new materials for electronic applications, magnetic applications and catalysis.

  1. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  2. Fundamental studies of graphene/graphite and graphene-based Schottky photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaochang

    In the carbon allotropes family, graphene is one of the most versatile members and has been extensively studied since 2004. The goal of this dissertation is not only to investigate the novel fundamental science of graphene and its three-dimensional sibling, graphite, but also to explore graphene's promising potential in modern electronic and optoelectronic devices. The first two chapters provide a concise introduction to the fundamental solid state physics of graphene (as well as graphite) and the physics at the metal/semiconductor interfaces. In the third chapter, we demonstrate the formation of Schottky junctions at the interfaces of graphene (semimetal) and various inorganic semiconductors that play dominating roles in today's semiconductor technology, such as Si, SiC, GaAs and GaN. As shown from their current-voltage (I -V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, the interface physics can be well described within the framework of the Schottky-Mott model. The results are also well consist with that from our previous studies on graphite based Schottky diodes. In the fourth chapter, as an extension of graphene based Schottky work, we investigate the photovoltaic (PV) effect of graphene/Si junctions after chemically doped with an organic polymer (TFSA). The power conversion efficiency of the solar cell improves from 1.9% to 8.6% after TFSA doping, which is the record in all graphene based PVs. The I -V, C-V and external quantum efficiency measurements suggest 12 that such a significant enhancement in the device performance can be attributed to a doping-induced decrease in the series resistance and a simultaneous increase in the built-in potential. In the fifth chapter, we investigate for the first time the effect of uniaxial strains on magneto-transport properties of graphene. We find that low-temperature weak localization effect in monolayer graphene is gradually suppressed under increasing strains, which is due to a strain-induced decreased intervalley

  3. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.

    2007-07-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage (≥200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed (∼ 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect (∼ 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  4. Study on "1"4C content in post-irradiation graphite spheres of HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shouang; Pi Yue; Xie Feng; Li Hong; Cao Jianzhu

    2014-01-01

    Since the production mechanism of the "1"4C in spherical fuel elements was similar to that of fuel-free graphite spheres, in order to obtain the amount of "1"4C in fuel elements and graphite spheres of HTR-10, the production mechanism of the "1"4C in graphite spheres was studied. The production sources of the "1"4C in graphite spheres and fuel elements were summarized, the amount of "1"4C in the post-irradiation graphite spheres was calculated, the decomposition techniques of graphite spheres were compared, and experimental methods for decomposing the graphite spheres and preparing the "1"4C sample were proposed. The results can lay the foundation for further experimental research and provide theoretical calculations for comparison. (authors)

  5. SOFC interface studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse; West, Keld

    performance and inductive hysteresis phenomena often observed in SOFC kinetic studies (\\ref{TJ01}). Fig.\\,\\ref{cath_laser} shows the YSZ surface developed below a Pt point electrode polarised at -0.10\\, V at $1000^\\circ$C for a period of 85 days. The structural as well as the compositional changes...

  6. Irradiated graphite studies prior to decommissioning of G1, G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonal, J.P.; Vistoli, J.Ph.; Combes, C.

    2005-01-01

    G1 (46 MW th ), G2 (250 MW th ) and G3 (250 MW th ) are the first French plutonium production reactors owned by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). They started to be operated in 1956 (G1), 1959 (G2) and 1960 (G3); their final shutdown occurred in 1968, 1980 and 1984 respectively. Each reactor used about 1200 tons of graphite as moderator, moreover in G2 and G3, a 95 tons graphite wall is used to shield the rear side concrete from neutron irradiation. G1 is an air cooled reactor operated at a graphite temperature ranging from 30 C to 230 C; G2 and G3 are CO 2 cooled reactors and during operation the graphite temperature is higher (140 C to 400 C). These reactors are now partly decommissioned, but the graphite stacks are still inside the reactors. The graphite core radioactivity has decreased enough so that a full decommissioning stage may be considered. Conceming this decommissioning, the studies reported here are: (i) stored energy in graphite, (ii) graphite radioactivity measurements, (iii) leaching of radionuclide ( 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 60 Co, 3 H) from graphite, (iv) chlorine diffusion through graphite. (authors)

  7. Photoemission studies of fluorine functionalized porous graphitic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganegoda, Hasitha; Jensen, David S.; Olive, Daniel; Cheng, Lidens; Segre, Carlo U.; Linford, Matthew R.; Terry, Jeff

    2012-03-01

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) has unique properties desirable for liquid chromatography applications when used as a stationary phase. The polar retention effect on graphite (PREG) allows efficient separation of polar and non-polar solutes. Perfluorinated hydrocarbons however lack polarizabilty and display strong lipo- and hydrophobicity, hence common lipophilic and hydrophilic analytes have low partition coefficiency in fluorinated stationary phases. Attractive interaction between fluorinated stationary phase and fluorinated analytes results in strong retention compared to non-fluorinated analytes. In order to change the selectivities of PGC, it is necessary to develop a bonded PGC stationary phase. In this study, we have synthesized perfluorinated, PGC using hepatadecafluoro-1-iodooctane, under different temperature conditions. Surface functionalization of the raw material was studied using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results indicate the existence of fluorine containing functional groups, -CF, -CF2 along with an intercalated electron donor species. Multiple oxygen functional groups were also observed, likely due to the presence of oxygen in the starting material. These oxygen species may be responsible for significant modifications to planer and tetrahedral carbon ratios.

  8. Photoemission studies of fluorine functionalized porous graphitic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganegoda, Hasitha; Olive, Daniel; Cheng, Lidens; Segre, Carlo U.; Terry, Jeff [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Jensen, David S.; Linford, Matthew R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) has unique properties desirable for liquid chromatography applications when used as a stationary phase. The polar retention effect on graphite (PREG) allows efficient separation of polar and non-polar solutes. Perfluorinated hydrocarbons however lack polarizabilty and display strong lipo- and hydrophobicity, hence common lipophilic and hydrophilic analytes have low partition coefficiency in fluorinated stationary phases. Attractive interaction between fluorinated stationary phase and fluorinated analytes results in strong retention compared to non-fluorinated analytes. In order to change the selectivities of PGC, it is necessary to develop a bonded PGC stationary phase. In this study, we have synthesized perfluorinated, PGC using hepatadecafluoro-1-iodooctane, under different temperature conditions. Surface functionalization of the raw material was studied using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results indicate the existence of fluorine containing functional groups, -CF, -CF{sub 2} along with an intercalated electron donor species. Multiple oxygen functional groups were also observed, likely due to the presence of oxygen in the starting material. These oxygen species may be responsible for significant modifications to planer and tetrahedral carbon ratios.

  9. Contribution to the study of internal friction in graphites; Contribution a l'etude du frottement interieur des graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlin, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    A study has been made of the internal friction in different graphites between -180 C and +500 C using a torsion pendulum; the graphites had been previously treated thermo-mechanically, by neutron irradiation and subjected to partial annealings. It has been shown that there occurs: a hysteretic type dissipation of energy, connected with interactions between dislocations and other defects in the matrix; a dissipation having a partially hysteretic character which can be interpreted by a Granato-Luke type formalism and which is connected with the presence of an 'ultra-micro porosity'; a dissipation by a relaxation mechanism after a small dose of irradiation; this is attributed to the reorientation of bi-interstitials; a dissipation having the characteristics of a solid state transformation, this during an annealing after irradiation. It is attributed to the reorganization of interstitial defects. Some information has thus been obtained concerning graphites, in particular: their behaviour at low mechanical stresses, the nature of irradiation defects and their behaviour during annealing, the structural changes occurring during graphitization, the relationship between internal friction and macroscopic mechanical properties. (author) [French] L'etude du coefficient de frottement interieur au moyen d'un pendule de torsion entre -180 C et +500 C a ete realisee pour differents graphites apres des traitements thermo-mecaniques, des irradiations neutroniques et des guerisons partielles. Il a ete mis en evidence: une dissipation d'energie a caractere hysteretique, reliee aux interactions des dislocations avec les autres defauts de la matrice; une dissipation a caractere partiellement hysteretique, interpretable par un formalisme type Granato-Lucke et reliee a la presence d'une ''ultra-microporosite''; une dissipation par un mecanisme de relaxation, apres irradiation a faible dose, attribuee a la reorientation de di-interstitiels; une dissipation presentant les caracteristiques d

  10. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  11. Studies of the role of molten materials in interactions with UO2 and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Heiberger, J.J.; Leibowitz, L.

    1979-01-01

    Graphite, which is being considered as a lower reactor shield in gas-cooled fast reactors, would be contacted by core debris during a core disruptive accident. Information on the interaction of graphite, UO 2 , and stainless steel is needed in assessing the safety of the GCFR. In an ongoing study of the interaction of graphite, UO 2 , and stainless steel, the effects of the steel components have been investigated by electron microprobe scans, x-ray diffraction, and reaction-rate measurements. Experiments to study the role of the reaction product, FeUC 2 , in the interaction suggested that FeUC 2 promotes the interaction by acting as a carrier to bring graphite to the reaction site. Additional experiments using pyrolytic graphite show that while the reaction rate is decreased at 2400 K, at higher temperatures the rate is similar to that using other grades of graphite

  12. Interaction of boron with graphite: A van der Waals density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen; Liang, Tongxiang; Lai, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A van der Waals density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. • VdW-DF functionals give fair agreement of crystal parameters with experiments. • The π electron approaches boron while adsorbing on graphite surface. • The hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. • PBE cannot describe the interstitial boron in graphite because of the ignoring binding of graphite sheets. - Abstract: Boron doping has been widely investigated to improve oxidation resistance of graphite. In this work the interaction of boron with graphite is investigated by a van der Waals density-functional approach (vdW-DF). The traditional density-functional theory (DFT) is well accounted for the binding in boron-substituted graphite. However, to investigate the boron atom on graphite surface and the interstitial impurities require use of a description of graphite interlayer binding. Traditional DFT cannot describe the vdW physics, for instance, GGA calculations show no relevant binding between graphite sheets. LDA shows some binding, but they fail to provide an accurate account of vdW forces. In this paper, we compare the calculation results of graphite lattice constant and cohesive energy by several functionals, it shows that vdW-DF such as two optimized functionals optB88-vdW and optB86b-vdW give much improved results than traditional DFT. The vdW-DF approach is then applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. Boron adsorption, substitution, and intercalation are discussed in terms of structural parameters and electronic structures. When adsorbing on graphite surface, boron behaves as π electron acceptor. The π electron approaches boron atom because of more electropositive of boron than carbon. For substitution situation, the hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. The B-doped graphite system with the hole has less

  13. Interaction of boron with graphite: A van der Waals density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen [Beijing Key Lab of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang, E-mail: txliang@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lai, Wensheng [Advanced Material Laboratory, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • A van der Waals density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. • VdW-DF functionals give fair agreement of crystal parameters with experiments. • The π electron approaches boron while adsorbing on graphite surface. • The hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. • PBE cannot describe the interstitial boron in graphite because of the ignoring binding of graphite sheets. - Abstract: Boron doping has been widely investigated to improve oxidation resistance of graphite. In this work the interaction of boron with graphite is investigated by a van der Waals density-functional approach (vdW-DF). The traditional density-functional theory (DFT) is well accounted for the binding in boron-substituted graphite. However, to investigate the boron atom on graphite surface and the interstitial impurities require use of a description of graphite interlayer binding. Traditional DFT cannot describe the vdW physics, for instance, GGA calculations show no relevant binding between graphite sheets. LDA shows some binding, but they fail to provide an accurate account of vdW forces. In this paper, we compare the calculation results of graphite lattice constant and cohesive energy by several functionals, it shows that vdW-DF such as two optimized functionals optB88-vdW and optB86b-vdW give much improved results than traditional DFT. The vdW-DF approach is then applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. Boron adsorption, substitution, and intercalation are discussed in terms of structural parameters and electronic structures. When adsorbing on graphite surface, boron behaves as π electron acceptor. The π electron approaches boron atom because of more electropositive of boron than carbon. For substitution situation, the hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. The B-doped graphite system with the hole has less

  14. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  15. Study of graphite sealing for the instrumentation feed through part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Ahn, Sungho; Joung, Changyoung; Kim, Kahye [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Because highly pressurized (15.5 MPa) and highly heated (300 .deg. C) coolant is circulated through the test rig, it needs to seal out the instrumentation feed through part. In this case, general sealing method is brazing and several works have been carried out in nuclear fields. However, because high temperature is induced on the sealing plug and sheaths, it is easy to be broken due to oxidisation of the sheath during brazing process. In addition, because the brazing process is irreversible, if the brazing process fails, the whole inner assembly should be scrapped out. Another approach which uses graphite has been studied to seal out the instrumentation feed through part. In the study, graphite sealing is considered as a sealing method and the improvement of mechanical structure has been studied to improve the workability. To check the sealing performance of the instrumentation feed through part, a hydraulic pressure test and a helium leak test were carried out according to the ASME section III. The criterion of a hydraulic pressure test is 125% of the design pressure. In this study, because the design pressure of the pressure vessel is 17.5 MPa. the sealing criterion should be 21.9 MPa. Also, in a Helium leak test, the criterion is less than 5 Χ 10{sup -9} torr·liter/sec. At first, a Helium leak test was carried out. After eliminating Helium in the pressure vessel by evacuating the internal area of the pressure vessel up to 1 Χ 10{sup -3} torr using ASM 310, Helium detection test was carried out by spraying Helium gas at the top face of the top flange for 5 minutes. Fig. 4 shows the rate of Helium leakage is 2.4 Χ 10{sup -9} torr·liter/sec, and it satisfies the sealing performance criterion. A hydraulic pressure test was also carried out, and there was no leakage or pressure drop when the water in the pressure vessel is pressurized up to 22.5 MPa. The above test results show that graphite powder can seal out the instrumentation feed through part easily with

  16. Study of graphite sealing for the instrumentation feed through part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jintae; Ahn, Sungho; Joung, Changyoung; Kim, Kahye

    2013-01-01

    Because highly pressurized (15.5 MPa) and highly heated (300 .deg. C) coolant is circulated through the test rig, it needs to seal out the instrumentation feed through part. In this case, general sealing method is brazing and several works have been carried out in nuclear fields. However, because high temperature is induced on the sealing plug and sheaths, it is easy to be broken due to oxidisation of the sheath during brazing process. In addition, because the brazing process is irreversible, if the brazing process fails, the whole inner assembly should be scrapped out. Another approach which uses graphite has been studied to seal out the instrumentation feed through part. In the study, graphite sealing is considered as a sealing method and the improvement of mechanical structure has been studied to improve the workability. To check the sealing performance of the instrumentation feed through part, a hydraulic pressure test and a helium leak test were carried out according to the ASME section III. The criterion of a hydraulic pressure test is 125% of the design pressure. In this study, because the design pressure of the pressure vessel is 17.5 MPa. the sealing criterion should be 21.9 MPa. Also, in a Helium leak test, the criterion is less than 5 Χ 10 -9 torr·liter/sec. At first, a Helium leak test was carried out. After eliminating Helium in the pressure vessel by evacuating the internal area of the pressure vessel up to 1 Χ 10 -3 torr using ASM 310, Helium detection test was carried out by spraying Helium gas at the top face of the top flange for 5 minutes. Fig. 4 shows the rate of Helium leakage is 2.4 Χ 10 -9 torr·liter/sec, and it satisfies the sealing performance criterion. A hydraulic pressure test was also carried out, and there was no leakage or pressure drop when the water in the pressure vessel is pressurized up to 22.5 MPa. The above test results show that graphite powder can seal out the instrumentation feed through part easily with the improved

  17. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J.; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Warr, Gregory G.; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-06-01

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level

  18. Study on wear resistance of vanadium alloying compacted/vermicular graphite cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yoon Woo

    1987-01-01

    Wear resistance of the Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast irons was studied by changing the vanadium content in the cast irons. The results obtained in this work are summarized as follows. 1. When the same amount of vanadium was added to the flake graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphitecast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphite cast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron wear resistance decreased in following sequence, that is, flake graphite cast iron> spheroidal graphite cast iron>Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron. 2. Addition of vanadium to the Compacted/Vermicular cast iron leaded to a remarkable increase in hardness because it made the amount of pearlite in matrix increase. 3. Addition of vanadium to the compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron significantly enhanced wear resistance and the maximum resistance was achieved at about 0.36% vanadium. 4. The maximum amount of wear apppeared at sliding speed of about 1.4m/sec and wear mode was considered to be oxidation abrasion from the observation of wear tracks. (Author)

  19. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  20. Interface polymerization synthesis of conductive polymer/graphite oxide@sulfur composites for high-rate lithium-sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiwen; Zhang, Zhian; Yan, Xiaolin; Qu, Yaohui; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid nanostructure that incorporate the merits of conductive polymer nanorods and graphite oxide sheets. • A novel approach based on interface polymerization for synthesizing CP/GO@S ternary composite. • CP/GO@S ternary composite cathode shows enhanced electrochemical properties compared with CP@S binary composite cathode. • PEDOT/GO@S composite is the material system that have best electrochemical performance in all CP/GO@S ternary composites. - Abstract: The novel ternary composites, conductive polymers (CPs)/graphene oxide (GO)@sulfur composites were successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot route and used as cathode materials for Li-S batteries The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/GO and polyaniline (PANI)/GO composites were prepared by interface polymerization of monomers on the surface of GO sheets. Then sulfur was in-situ deposited on the CPs/GO composites in same solution. The component and structure of the composites were characterized by XPS, TGA, FTIR, SEM, TEM and electrochemical measurements. In this structure, the CPs nanostructures are believed to serve as a conductive matrix and an adsorbing agent, while the highly conductive GO will physically and chemically confine the sulfur and polysulfide within cathode. The PEDOT/GO@S composites with the sulfur content of 66.2 wt% exhibit a reversible discharge capacity of 800.2 mAh g −1 after 200 cycles at 0.5 C, which is much higher than that of PANI/GO@S composites (599.1 mAh g −1 ) and PANI@S (407.2 mAh g −1 ). Even at a high rate of 4 C, the PEDOT/GO@S composites still retain a high specific capacity of 632.4 mAh g −1

  1. High-temperature annealing of graphite: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrew; Gillette, Victor

    2018-05-01

    A modified AIREBO potential was developed to simulate the effects of thermal annealing on the structure and physical properties of damaged graphite. AIREBO parameter modifications were made to reproduce Density Functional Theory interstitial results. These changes to the potential resulted in high-temperature annealing of the model, as measured by stored-energy reduction. These results show some resemblance to experimental high-temperature annealing results, and show promise that annealing effects in graphite are accessible with molecular dynamics and reactive potentials.

  2. Feasibility study of fusion breeding blanket concept employing graphite reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young; Lee, Cheol Woo; Kim, Eung Seon; Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin; Lee, Dong Won

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept adopts graphite as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. • Its feasibility was investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. • A nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket. • Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions. • In conclusion, the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition. - Abstract: To obtain high tritium breeding performance with limited blanket thickness, most of solid breeder blanket concepts employ a combination of lithium ceramic as a breeder and beryllium as a multiplier. In this case, considering that huge amount of beryllium are needed in fusion power plants, its handling difficulty and cost can be a major factor to be accounted for commercial use. Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. Its feasibility has been investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. In this paper, a nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket, considering tritium breeding capability and neutron shielding and activation aspects. Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions, resulting in that the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition.

  3. Feasibility study of fusion breeding blanket concept employing graphite reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seungyon, E-mail: sycho@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Woo; Kim, Eung Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept adopts graphite as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. • Its feasibility was investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. • A nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket. • Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions. • In conclusion, the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition. - Abstract: To obtain high tritium breeding performance with limited blanket thickness, most of solid breeder blanket concepts employ a combination of lithium ceramic as a breeder and beryllium as a multiplier. In this case, considering that huge amount of beryllium are needed in fusion power plants, its handling difficulty and cost can be a major factor to be accounted for commercial use. Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. Its feasibility has been investigated in view point of the nuclear performance as well as material-related issues. In this paper, a nuclear analysis is performed under the fusion reactor condition to address the feasibility of graphite reflector in breeding blanket, considering tritium breeding capability and neutron shielding and activation aspects. Also, the chemical stability of the graphite is investigated considering the chemical stability under accident conditions, resulting in that the adaptation of graphite reflector in breeding blanket is intrinsically safe and plausible under fusion reactor condition.

  4. Studies on low-voltage x-ray radiography for graphite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Susumu; Itami, Hiroharu

    1978-09-01

    Low-voltage radiography has been studied to provide optimum technique for graphite less than 50 mm thick. First we determined the exposure conditions under which the most appropriate photographic density can be obtained. By parametric studies, an exposure chart was prepared. Then we studied how the environment of photographing affected the film density. Thirdly, by use of graphite materials with artificial flaws, Image Quality Indicator (I.Q.I.) sensitivity was determined. Detectability of a crack depended on an incidence angle of X-rays onto a crack. Finally, we photographed graphites having natural flaws and gained a useful information. (author)

  5. In situ electrochemical atomic force microscope study on graphite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasawa, K.A.; Sato, Tomohiro; Asahina, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Mori, Shoichiro [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Inashiki, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Center

    1997-04-01

    Interest in the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film on graphite electrodes has increased recently in the quest to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries. Topographic and frictional changes on the surface of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode in 1 M LiCiO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate/ethylmethyl carbonate (1:1) electrolyte were examined during charge and discharge by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy and friction force microscopy simultaneously in real-time. Solid electrolyte interphase film formation commenced at approximately 2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +} and stable film formation with an island-like morphology was observed below approximately 0.9 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Further experiments on a KS-44 graphite/polyvinylidene difluoride binder composite electrode showed similar phenomena.

  6. Studies on the graphite rupture under irradiation induced strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouquet, G.; Berthion, Y.; L'Homme, A.

    1980-01-01

    Following the RMG experiments (failure of graphite by mechanical effect, i.e. under very high temperature gradient) an experimental program called RWG (Failure of Graphite by WIGNER effect) was initiated in 75 at C.E.A. 3 experiments have been already performed in the OSIRIS reactor at Saclay: RWG 01, 02 and 03. A 4th one, RWG04, is scheduled for the end of 79, may be in collaboration with GERMANY. The aim of the RWG experiments is to induce internal stresses in graphite blocks by irradiation at high temperature which would lead or not to their failure so one could bracket, as tightly as possible, the critical value for failure onset in given experimental conditions

  7. Report on the study of erosion and H-recycle/inventory of carbon/graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasz, A.A.; Davis, J.W.

    1990-04-01

    This study investigated the erosion and hydrogen retention capacity of graphite under plasma exposure by performing controlled plasma simulation experiments using a low-energy high-flux mass analyzed ion accelerator. The authors studied radiation-enhanced sublimation (RES) of graphite, the effect of ion angle of incidence on physical sputtering, the effect of oxygen on hydrocarbon formation during O 2 /H 2 impact, chemical erosion of boron carbide, and the effect of thermal atoms on self-sputtering of graphite. The flux dependence of RES is nearly linear (power of .91) for the extended flux range of 10 13 - 10 17 H + /cm 2 s. Physical sputtering yields were enhanced for off-normal angles of incidence, especially for highly-oriented polished surfaces. Oxygen did not appear to have an effect on the hydrocarbon formation rate; however, some erosion through CO formation was observed. Although large transients were observed in hydrocarbon production in B 4 C, steady-state levels were typically about two orders of magnitude below the erosion rate of graphite. To investigate carbon self-sputtering, thermal H 0 atoms were added to impacting C + ions, simulating a condition existing in the tokamak plasma edge. This led to a synergistic enhancement of the chemical erosion process. For C + /H+0 flux ratios of less than about 10 -1 the chemical erosion yield exceeds unity. Work on hydrogen retention concentrated on the study of H + trapping in different types of graphites as a function of flux and fluence of incident H + . The amount of H trapped in the near-surface region of graphite reaches a saturation level, a function of graphite temperature and impacting H + energy. The amount of H trapped in graphite beyond the ion range was found to increase with increasing fluence and varied for different graphites tested. It seems that hydrogen diffuses through grain boundaries and open porosity in the material until trapped by available carbon bonds

  8. An experimental study of dynamic behaviour of graphite-polycarbonatediol polyurethane composites for protective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, C. M.; Culebras, M.; Cantarero, A.; Redondo-Foj, B.; Ortiz-Serna, P.; Carsí, M.; Sanchis, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    Segmented polycarbonatediol polyurethane (PUPH) has been synthesized and modified with different amounts of graphite conductive filler (from 0 to 50 wt%). Thermal and dynamical thermal analysis of the composites clearly indicates changes in the polyurethane relaxations upon addition of graphite. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy has been used to study the dielectric properties of the (PUPH) and one composite in the frequency range from 10-2 to 107 Hz and in the temperature window of -140 to 170 °C. Relaxation processes associated with different molecular motions and conductivity phenomena (Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars and electrode polarization) are discussed and related to the graphite content.

  9. Combined computational and experimental study of Ar beam induced defect formation in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregler, Sharon K.; Hayakawa, Tetsuichiro; Yasumatsu, Hisato; Kondow, Tamotsu; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite, commonly used in nuclear power plants, is known to produce structural damage. Here, experimental and computational methods are used to study defect formation in graphite during Ar irradiation at incident energies of 50 eV. The experimental samples are analyzed with scanning tunneling microscopy to quantify the size distribution of the defects that form. The computational approach is classical molecular dynamic simulations that illustrate the mechanisms by which the defects are produced. The results indicate that defects in graphite grow in concentrated areas and are nucleated by the presence of existing defects

  10. Study by internal friction of curing low temperature irradiation defects in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouby, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Micromechanical properties and anelastic effects of neutrons irradiated graphites at 300 and 77 0 K are investigated by internal friction analysis and elasticity modulus variations. Defects created by irradiation are studied and evolution versus dose and annealing is followed [fr

  11. Studies on design principles and criteria of fuels and graphites for experimental multi-purpose very high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taketoshi; Sato, Sadao; Tani, Yutaro

    1977-12-01

    Design principles and criteria of fuels and graphites have been studied to determine the main design parameters of a reference core MARK-III of the Experimental Multi-purpose Very High Temperature Reactor. The present status of research and development for HTGR fuels and graphites is reviewed from a standpoint of their integrity and safety aspects, and is compared to the specific design requirements for the VHTR fuels and graphites. Consequently, reasonable materials specifications, safety criteria and design analysis methods are presented for coated fuel particle, fuel compact, graphite sleeve, core support graphite and neutron absorber material. These design principles and criteria will be refined by further experimental investigations. (auth.)

  12. Optimization of Sealed Tube Graphitization Method for Environmental C-14 Studies Using MICADAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinyu, Laszlo, E-mail: rinyu@atomki.hu [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Isotoptech Zrt., H-4025 Debrecen (Hungary); Molnar, Mihaly [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Major, Istvan [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Nagy, Tamas; Veres, Mihaly [Isotoptech Zrt., H-4025 Debrecen (Hungary); Kimak, Adam [University of Debrecen, H-4032 Debrecen (Hungary); Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The original sealed tube zinc reduction graphitization process was first developed for rapid low-precision measurements of biomedical tracer samples and later also applied for high precision measurements of not too old samples. In this study we tested the MICADAS (mini radiocarbon dating system [1]) radiocarbon measurements of targets prepared by sealed tube graphitization process. We found the optimal iron catalyst and reagents (TiH{sub 2} and Zn) amount whereby we can reach a relatively low background level, and minimized the overall {delta}{sup 13}C fractionation during the graphitization. Repeated measurements of normalization standards and real samples with known {sup 14}C activities were very well reproduced. Finally, we demonstrated the applicability of the sealed tube graphitization on real environmental samples covering a wide range of {sup 14}C concentrations.

  13. A study of the high temperature behavior of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, H.; Zee, R. H.; Gale, W. F.; Yeh, W.

    1997-01-01

    Poco AXF 5Q graphite coupons were heated at temperatures ranging from 1900 K to 2400 K. A loss in weight was observed in all cases, but there appeared to be no simple relationship between the holding temperature and the weight loss observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed no change in the surface morphology of the samples before and after heating, indicating that the loss of material occurred in a uniform, rather than a localized, fashion. The weight loss per hour, for pre-dried graphite coupons, was in most cases higher with short holding times than for prolonged exposure. Thus, it would appear that the observed weight changes were dominated in most cases by the removal of volatiles rather than by the evaporation of carbon

  14. Some physical methods for study of irradiation effects in graphite; Quelques procedes physiques pour etudier les effets de l'irradiation du graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, G; Lecomte, M; Mattmuller, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    A calibration method for a classical apparatus for differential thermal analysis is described in detail. This method achieves a relative precision of 5 per cent in the measurement of the internal energy release accompanying the annealing of irradiated graphites. Elastic constants of graphites are obtained from the frequencies of the longitudinal modes of vibration; procedures for excitation and detection of these vibrations at any temperature between -190 deg. C and +1500 deg. C are described. A procedure for obtaining easily measured deformations of graphites after relatively little irradiation with thermal neutrons is discussed. An application of this method to the study of the thermal annealing of elongation caused by displaced atoms is indicated. (author) [French] On decrit en detail une methode d'etalonnage pour un appareil classique d'analyse thermique differentielle. Cette methode permet de mesurer avec une precision relative de 5% la liberation d'energie interne qui accompagne le 'recuit' des graphites irradies. On deduit les constantes elastiques des graphites des frequences des vibrations longitudinales et on decrit les procedes pour exciter et detecter ces vibrations a toutes les temperatures comprises entre -190 deg. C et + 1500 deg. C. On discute un procede pour obtenir une des deformations de graphites facilement mesurables apres une irradiation relativement faible a l'aide de neutrons thermiques. Une application de cette methode a l'etude du 'recuit' thermique de l'elongation causee par les atomes deplaces est indiquee. (auteur)

  15. Electrochemical Control of Peptide Self-Organization on Atomically Flat Solid Surfaces: A Case Study with Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Takakazu; So, Christopher R; Page, Tamon R; Starkebaum, David; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2018-02-06

    The nanoscale self-organization of biomolecules, such as proteins and peptides, on solid surfaces under controlled conditions is an important issue in establishing functional bio/solid soft interfaces for bioassays, biosensors, and biofuel cells. Electrostatic interaction between proteins and surfaces is one of the most essential parameters in the adsorption and self-assembly of proteins on solid surfaces. Although the adsorption of proteins has been studied with respect to the electrochemical surface potential, the self-assembly of proteins or peptides forming well-organized nanostructures templated by lattice structure of the solid surfaces has not been studied in the relation to the surface potential. In this work, we utilize graphite-binding peptides (GrBPs) selected by the phage display method to investigate the relationship between the electrochemical potential of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and peptide self-organization forming long-range-ordered structures. Under modulated electrical bias, graphite-binding peptides form various ordered structures, such as well-ordered nanowires, dendritic structures, wavy wires, amorphous (disordered) structures, and islands. A systematic investigation of the correlation between peptide sequence and self-organizational characteristics reveals that the presence of the bias-sensitive amino acid modules in the peptide sequence has a significant effect on not only surface coverage but also on the morphological features of self-assembled structures. Our results show a new method to control peptide self-assembly by means of applied electrochemical bias as well as peptide design-rules for the construction of functional soft bio/solid interfaces that could be integrated in a wide range of practical implementations.

  16. Performance Study of Graphite Anode Slurry in Lithium-ion Flow Battery by Ball Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FENG Cai-mei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphite anode slurry of lithium-ion flow battery was prepared by the method of ball milling. The morphology, conductivity, specific capacity and cycle performance of graphite anode slurry were studied. Results show that the addition of conductive carbon material can improve the suspension stability of the electrode slurry; the ball milling process can not only improve the suspension stability but also reduce the resistivity of the mixed powders of graphite and conductive carbon materials, the ball milling effect is satisfactory when the mass ratio of the balls and the solid particles is 5:1, but too high ratio of the milling ball and the solid materials can destroy the layer structure of the graphite and affect the stability of the slurry. Increasing the fraction of the graphite and conductive carbon materials can form stable electrical network structure in the slurry and improve the reversible capacity; at the premise of keeping the flowability of the electrode slurry, the reversible specific capacity can be more than 40mAh/g. The capacity loss of graphite anode slurry mainly occurs in the first charging-discharging process, as the increase of the cycles, the capacity loss rate decreases, the capacity goes stable after 5 cycles.

  17. Study on efficient methods for removal and treatment of graphite blocks in a gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, S.; Shirakawa, M.; Murakami, T.

    2001-01-01

    Tokai Power Station (GCR, 166 MWe) started its commercial operation on July 1966 and ceased activities at the end of March 1998 after 32 years of operation. The decommissioning plans are being developed, to prepare for near future dismantling. In the study, the methods for removal of the graphite blocks of about 1,600 ton have been developed to carrying it out safely and in a short period of time, and the methods of treatment of graphite have also been developed. All technological items have been identified for which R and D work will be required for removal from the core and treatment for disposal. (1) In order to reduce the programme required for the dismantling of reactor internals, an efficient method for removal of the graphite blocks is necessary. For this purpose the design of a dismantling machine has been investigated which can extract several blocks at a time. The conceptual design has being developed and the model has been manufactured and tested in a mock-up facility. (2) In order to reduce disposal costs, it will be necessary to segment the graphite blocks, maximising the packing density available in the disposal containers. Some of the graphite blocks will be cut into pieces longitudinally by a remote machine. Relevant technical matters have been identified, such as graphite cutting methods, the nature of fine particles arising from the cutting operation, the treatment of fine particles for disposal, and the method of mortar filling inside the waste container. (author)

  18. Understanding the anisotropic strain effects on lithium diffusion in graphite anodes: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Junqian

    2018-06-01

    The lithium diffusion in graphite anode, which is the most widely used commercial electrode material today, affects the charge/discharge performance of lithium-ion batteries. In this study, the anisotropic strain effects on lithium diffusion in graphite anodes are systematically investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals corrections. It is found that the effects of external applied strains along various directions of LixC6 (i.e., perpendicular or parallel to the basal planes of the graphite host) on lithium diffusivity are different. Along the direction perpendicular to the graphite planes, the tensile strain facilitates in-plane Li diffusion by reducing the energy barrier, and the compressive strain hinders in-plane Li diffusion by raising the energy barrier. In contrast, the in-plane biaxial tensile strain (parallel to the graphite planes) hinders in-plane Li diffusion, and the in-plane biaxial compressive strain facilitates in-plane Li diffusion. Furthermore, both in-plane and transverse shear strains slightly influence Li diffusion in graphite anodes. A discussion is presented to explain the anisotropic strain dependence of lithium diffusion. This research provides data for the continuum modelling of the electrodes in the lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Surface studies on graphite furnace platforms covered with Pd, Rh and Ir as modifiers in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry of tellurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedro, Juana [Area de Química Analítica, Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829 (S3000GL.N), Santa Fe (Argentina); Stripekis, Jorge [Laboratorio de Análisis de Trazas, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires, Av. Eduardo Madero 399 (1106), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonivardi, Adrian [Area de Química Analítica, Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829 (S3000GL.N), Santa Fe (Argentina); Tudino, Mabel, E-mail: tudino@qi.fcen.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Análisis de Trazas, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-05-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of correlations between the efficiency of the distribution of the permanent platinum group modifiers Pd, Rh and Ir over the graphite surface with the aim of improving analytical signal of tellurium. Modifier solution was deposited onto the platform and pyrolysed after drying. In the case of Pd, the physical vaporization/deposition technique was also tested. In order to analyze the differences amongst coverings (morphology, topology and distribution), the graphite surfaces were studied with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microscopy. Micrographs for physical vaporization and pyrolytic deposition of Pd were also analyzed in order to explain the lack of signal obtained for tellurium with the first alternative. Similar micrographs were obtained for pyrolytic deposition of Ir and Rh and then, compared to those of Pd. Ir showed the most homogeneous distribution on the graphite surface and the tallest and sharpest transient. With the aim of improving the analytical signal of tellurium, the correlation between the surface studies and the tellurium transient signal (height, area and shape) is discussed. - Highlights: • Distribution of Rh, Pd and Ir onto graphite furnaces is evaluated by SEM and EDX • Micrographs and spectra showed that surface distribution could influence Te signal. • Ir showed the best signal together with the most homogeneous surface distribution. • Pd-PVD micrographs revealed the absence of graphite and no signal for Te.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic property of hybrid graphitic C3N4 and graphitic ZnO nanocomposite: the effects of interface and doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Liang, Shuhua; Sun, Shaodong; Zheng, Xing; Zhang, Jianmin

    2018-05-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we present a potential new way to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of the g-C3N4 sheet by coupling with the g-ZnO sheet to form heterojunction nanostructure followed by the addition of N atom at an atomic level. The result indicates the g-C3N4/g-ZnO heterojunction is a staggered band alignment (type II) structure and a polarized field is generated by the electrons transfer across the interface simultaneously, which facilitate the separation of e‑–h+ pairs and promote the photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, a great difference in energy levels between redox potentials and band edges of the C3N4/g-ZnO nanocomposite ensures that the water splitting/CO2 reduction reaction is energetically favored. In addition, through the incorporation of nitrogen dopant, the g-C3N4/N-g-ZnO nanocomposite displays desirable properties. The N-derived doping peak causes a decrease of the band gap width of the g-C3N4/g-ZnO nanocomposite, resulting in the enhanced optical absorption from UV into visible light. This theoretical predictions provide insightful outlooks in understanding the effects of interface and doping on the enhanced photocatalytic property of the g-C3N4/g-ZnO nanocomposites, which will assist in engineering highly efficient g-C3N4-based photocatalysts.

  1. Contribution to the study of the reactivity of graphite with respect to carbon dioxide and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, M.

    1959-09-01

    The oxidation of nuclear-quality graphite by air and carbon dioxide has been studied at temperatures at which the reaction becomes measurable. These experiments have been carried out on graphites differing in the concentration and nature of their ash, and in their mode of preparation. The reaction velocities measured have been compared in an attempt to correlate these two factors. Ten types of graphite have thus been studied. Since the oxidation reactions are of the type gas-solid, their velocities have also been compared to the BET surface areas of the graphite studied and to the diameter distribution of the pores of this surface. The conclusion is that, even for these low impurity contents, the law relating the reaction velocity to the surface is masked by the impurities which appear to behave as preferential reaction sites. This has been shown by carrying out successive purifications on various types of graphite, which treatment results in an important decrease in the reactivity of all the samples studied. (author) [fr

  2. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study; Nouveaux materiaux graphite/sel pour le stockage d'energie a haute temperature. Etude des proprietes de changement de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J

    2007-07-15

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage ({>=}200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed ({approx} 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect ({approx} 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  3. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Study of wear mechanism of chopped fiber reinforced epoxy composite filled with graphite and bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nitinchand; Prasad, Krishna

    2018-04-01

    The combined effect of graphite and sintered bronze with a short glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites was investigated in this work. A pin on disc wear test was carried out to study the wear behaviour and mechanism of the composites. The objective of this work is to develop an alternate friction resistance material for the application of sliding bearing. It was observed that the addition of sintered bronze improved mechanical and thermal stability of the composites as bronze has low contact resistance with graphite and has high thermal conductivity. It was observed from the test results that increased volume percentage of graphite and presence of bronze are play significant role in wear mechanism of the composites. It was observed from the scanning electronic microscopes (SEM) that the abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism was prominent in this study. It was also evident from the result that the frictional force remains stable irrespective of the applied normal load.

  5. Study of the neutron slowing-down in graphite; Etude du ralentissement des neutrons dans le graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelly, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Duggal, V P [Commission a l' Energie atomique indienne (India)

    1955-07-01

    Study of the slowing-down age of neutrons in graphite. In the aim to eliminate the effect of resonance neutrons on the detector, neutrons captured by cadmium are studied with a classic method consisting of calculating the difference between the activity measured with and without screens. This method is described and screening properties of cadmium and gadolinium are compared. The experimental parameters and detectors details are described. The radioactive source is Ra-{alpha}-Be. The experimental results are given and the experimental distribution is compared with theoretical formula. In a second part, the spatial distribution of resonance neutrons in indium is discussed. Finally, the neutron slowing-down between the indium resonance and the thermal equilibrium is discussed as well as the research for the effective value of slowing-down age. The slowing-down age definition is given before calculating its effective value. It compared the slowing-down law with the experiment and the Gurney theory. (M.P.)

  6. A study of the coefficient of thermal expansion of nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.

    2001-02-01

    This thesis presents the results of a study of the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of two grades of nuclear graphite that are used as the moderator in the Magnox and Advanced Gas-Cooled reactors operated in the UK. This work has two main aims, the first is to characterise those elements of the graphite microstructure that control CTE within these materials and to relate these to the effects induced within the reactor. The second is to develop a microstructural model, of general applicability, that can initially be applied to model the CTE changes within the graphites under reactor conditions (neutron irradiation and radiolytic oxidation). These aims have been met by study in three interlinked areas, theoretical, experimental and modelling. Previous to this study, a loose assembly of single crystals together with changes in small scale nanometric porosity (Mrozowski cracks) were used to describe CTE behaviour of nuclear graphite both as-received and under reactor conditions. Within the experimental part of this thesis the graphite nanostructure was studied using, primarily, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). This work concluded that structure on this scale was complex and that the loose assembly of single crystals was a poor microstructural approximation for modelling the CTE of these materials. Other experimental programmes measured the CTE of highly oxidised samples and simulated the effects of irradiation. The former discovered that CTE remained largely unaffected to high weight losses. This insensitivity was explained by ''The Continuous Network Hypothesis'' that was also related to classical percolation theory. The final part of the thesis modelled an abstraction of the key microstructural features identified in the previous parts of the thesis. This approach has been applied to AGR moderator graphite where it has successfully modelled the thermal expansion behaviour of the as-received, irradiated and oxidised material. (author)

  7. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D; Haering, P; Haas, O; Koetz, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  8. Theoretical study of the porosity effects on the shock response of graphitic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pineau Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a theoretical study of the shock compression of porous graphite by means of combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations using the LCBOPII potential. The results show that the Hugoniostat methods can be used with “pole” properties calculated from porous models to reproduce the experimental Hugoniot of pure graphite and diamond with good accuracy. The computed shock temperatures show a sharp increase for weak shocks which we analyze as the heating associated with the closure of the initial porosity. After this initial phase, the temperature increases with shock intensity at a rate comparable to monocrystalline graphite and diamond. These simulations data can be exploited in view to build a full equation of state for use in hydrodynamic simulations.

  9. Study of a nuclear graphite waste 14C decontamination process by CO2 gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pageot, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The decommissioning of French gas cooled nuclear reactors (UNGG), all arrested since 1994, will generate 23,000 tons of graphite waste classified Low Level and Long Lived and notably containing 14 C. The aim of this thesis is to study a new method for selective extraction of this radionuclide by CO 2 gasification.The multi-scale organization of virgin and irradiated graphite has been studied by a coupling between microspectrometry Raman and transmission electron microscopy. With the neutron fluence, the structure degrades and the nano-structure can be greatly changed. In extreme cases, the lamellar nano-structure nuclear graphite has become nano-porous. Furthermore, these damages are systematically heterogeneous. An orientation effect of 'crystallites', shown experimentally by ion implantation, could be a cause of these heterogeneities.This study also showed that from a specific fluence, there is an important development of nano-porous zones coinciding with a dramatic 14 C concentration increase. This radionuclide could be preferentially concentrated in the nano-porous areas which are potentially more reactive than the remaining laminar areas which could be less rich in 14 C. This process by CO 2 gasification was firstly tested on 'analogous' non-radioactive materials (mechanically milled graphite). These tests confirmed, for temperatures between 950 and 1000 C, the selective and complete elimination of nano-porous areas.Tests were then carried out on graphite waste from Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux A2 and G2 reactors. The results are promising with notably the quarter of 14 C inventory extracted for a weight loss of only few percent. Up to 68 % of 14 C inventory was extracted, but with an important gasification. Thus, this treatment could allow extracting selectively a share of 14 C inventory (mobile or linked to nano-porous areas) and allows imagining alternative scenarios for graphite waste managing. (author) [fr

  10. Molecular-dynamics study of the dynamical excitations in commensurate monolayer films of nitrogen molecules on graphite: A test of the corrugation in the nitrogen-graphite potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical excitations in a commensurate monolayer solid of N2 molecules adsorbed on graphite have been studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Velocity and rotational correlation functions as well as coherent intermediate scattering functions and dynamical structure factors have been ca...

  11. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of the vibrational excitations in ethane monolayers adsorbed on graphite (0001) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Taub, H.

    1987-01-01

    The collective vibrational excitations of two different crystalline monolayer phases of ethane (C2H6) adsorbed on the graphite (0001) surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The monolayer phases studied are the commensurate 7/8 ×4 structure in which the ethane molecules lie...

  13. Electrochemical reduction of graphited materials in LiClO{sub 4}-EC and LiClO{sub 4}-PC media: characterization of interface products by transmission electron microscopy; Reduction electrochimique de materiaux graphites en milieux LiCIO{sub 4}-EC et LiCIO{sub 4}-PC: caracterisation des produits d`interface par microscopie electronique a transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billaud, D.; Naji, A.; Ghanbaja, J. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Willmann, P. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1996-12-31

    The electrochemical intercalation of non-solvated lithium in different graphited materials has been performed in LiClO{sub 4}-ethylene carbonate (EC) medium. The irreversible capacity observed during the first output is mainly due to the formation of a passivation layer made of electrolyte reduction products. These products have been characterized for different electrode reduction potentials using transmission electron microscopy (image, diffraction) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EC reduction on the electrode surface in presence of LiClO{sub 4} leads to the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for potentials close to 0.8 V vs Li{sup +}/Li. For lower potentials, the electrolyte reduction reaction goes on with the formation of different lithium alkyl-carbonates. In LiClO{sub 4}-propylene carbonate (PC) medium, the interface phenomena are different. The reduction of a graphite electrode is characterized by the exfoliation phenomenon which hinders lithium intercalation. On the contrary, the formation of the passivation layer by graphite reduction in LiClO{sub 4}-EC medium allows the cycling of the electrode in the LiClO{sub 4}-PC electrolyte. In this case, the irreversible capacity observed during the first output depends on the experimental conditions of formation of the passivation layer. Abstract only. (J.S.)

  14. Electrochemical reduction of graphited materials in LiClO{sub 4}-EC and LiClO{sub 4}-PC media: characterization of interface products by transmission electron microscopy; Reduction electrochimique de materiaux graphites en milieux LiCIO{sub 4}-EC et LiCIO{sub 4}-PC: caracterisation des produits d`interface par microscopie electronique a transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billaud, D; Naji, A; Ghanbaja, J [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Willmann, P [Centre National d` Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1997-12-31

    The electrochemical intercalation of non-solvated lithium in different graphited materials has been performed in LiClO{sub 4}-ethylene carbonate (EC) medium. The irreversible capacity observed during the first output is mainly due to the formation of a passivation layer made of electrolyte reduction products. These products have been characterized for different electrode reduction potentials using transmission electron microscopy (image, diffraction) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EC reduction on the electrode surface in presence of LiClO{sub 4} leads to the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for potentials close to 0.8 V vs Li{sup +}/Li. For lower potentials, the electrolyte reduction reaction goes on with the formation of different lithium alkyl-carbonates. In LiClO{sub 4}-propylene carbonate (PC) medium, the interface phenomena are different. The reduction of a graphite electrode is characterized by the exfoliation phenomenon which hinders lithium intercalation. On the contrary, the formation of the passivation layer by graphite reduction in LiClO{sub 4}-EC medium allows the cycling of the electrode in the LiClO{sub 4}-PC electrolyte. In this case, the irreversible capacity observed during the first output depends on the experimental conditions of formation of the passivation layer. Abstract only. (J.S.)

  15. An in situ Raman study of the intercalation of supercapacitor-type electrolyte into microcrystalline graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardwick, Laurence J.; Hahn, Matthias; Ruch, Patrick; Holzapfel, Michael; Scheifele, Werner; Buqa, Hilmi; Krumeich, Frank; Novak, Petr; Koetz, Ruediger

    2006-01-01

    An initial Raman study on the effects of intercalation for aprotic electrolyte-based electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) is reported. In situ Raman microscopy is employed in the study of the electrochemical intercalation of tetraethylammonium (Et 4 N + ) and tetrafluoroborate (BF 4 - ) into and out of microcrystalline graphite. During cyclic voltammetry experiments, the insertion of Et 4 N + into graphite for the negative electrode occurs at an onset potential of +1.0 V versus Li/Li + . For the positive electrode, BF 4 - was shown to intercalate above +4.3 V versus Li/Li + . The characteristic G-band doublet peak (E 2g2 (i) (1578 cm -1 ) and E 2g2 (b) (1600 cm -1 )) showed that various staged compounds were formed in both cases and the return of the single G-band (1578 cm -1 ) demonstrates that intercalation was fully reversible. The disappearance of the D-band (1329 cm -1 ) in intercalated graphite is also noted and when the intercalant is removed a more intense D-band reappears, indicating possible lattice damage. For cation intercalation, such irreversible changes of the graphite structure are confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  16. Mineralogical study of uraniferous graphitic ore from Deogpyeong, Mogso and southern part of Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D J; Nam, S K [Korean Inst. of Energy and Resources, Seoul (Republic of Korea)

    1981-11-01

    Uranium minerals of torbernite, metatorbernite, metatyuyamunite and autunite have been identified from the uraniferous ores in graphitic beds of Ogcheon Group in Deogpyeong, Mogso and southern part of Daejeon area. Polarizing and ore microscopic studies, and chemical and X-ray powder diffraction analyses were carried out on the uraniferous graphite and associated materials. Main component minerals of uraniferous samples are graphite and quartz. Minor minerals are calcite, muscovite, sericite, andalusite, barite, kaolinite, hyaline opal, uranium minerals, sulfides such as pyrite, chalcopyrite, zincblende, and pyrrhotite, limonite, zeolite minerals such as laumontite and heulandite. Metatyuyamunite, torbernite, metatorbernite and autunite generally occur together with secondary minerals such as kaolinite, hyaline opal, calcite and limonite. They were found along the minor fissures or on the surface. Secondary uranium minerals described above were formed by supergenetic origin from primary uranium mineral. Uraniferous phosphatic nodule from Deogpyeong area are mainly composed of graphite and fluorapatite. And minor minerals are barite, quartz, muscovite and pyrite. Autoradiograph from uraniferous nodule shows that uranium enrichment in outer part of nodules is much higher than in inner part. This feature coincides with chemical analyses data of this uraniferous nodule.

  17. Polarized-x-ray-absorption studies of graphite intercalated-bromine compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, J.L.; Elam, W.T.; Ehrlich, A.C.; Skelton, E.F.; Dominguez, D.D.; Chung, D.D.L.; Lytle, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Details of both results and data analysis are given in the case of our polarized-x-ray-absorption experiments, using synchrotron radiation, on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)--based and graphite-fiber-based residual-bromine intercalation compounds. The effective angle which nearest-neighbor Br pairs make with crystallite graphite planes in some of these compounds, which was stated to be approx.20 0 in an earlier article, is shown to be 16X(de +- 4X(de: both Br-Br extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and white-line features of the data are the basis of this result. We have also found that, whereas spherical averages of the areas under white-line spectra are independent of the choice of the material among all samples studied (including Br 2 vapor), differences in similarly spherically averaged Br-Br EXAFS amplitudes are evident, especially between Br 2 vapor and Br-graphite samples. We show that the latter differences which correspond to a coordination number less than one in Br-graphite are not due to either Gaussian or non-Gaussian (up to k 4 terms) Debye-Waller effects. In addition, we discuss the extraction of Br-C EXAFS and present results of model calculations of Br-C EXAFS, where several different structural models for the Br sites are considered. We also discuss thermal effects and their relation to known Br sublattice phase-transition behavior, based on our measurements at room temperature, 360 K, and 400 K

  18. Stability of boron-doped graphene/copper interface: DFT, XPS and OSEE studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Kukharenko, A. I.; Slesarev, A. I.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kurmaev, E. Z.

    2018-05-01

    Two different types of boron-doped graphene/copper interfaces synthesized using two different flow rates of Ar through the bubbler containing the boron source were studied. X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE) measurements have demonstrated that boron-doped graphene coating provides a high corrosion resistivity of Cu-substrate with the light traces of the oxidation of carbon cover. The density functional theory calculations suggest that for the case of substitutional (graphitic) boron-defect only the oxidation near boron impurity is energetically favorable and creation of the vacancies that can induce the oxidation of copper substrate is energetically unfavorable. In the case of non-graphitic boron defects oxidation of the area, a nearby impurity is metastable that not only prevent oxidation but makes boron-doped graphene. Modeling of oxygen reduction reaction demonstrates high catalytic performance of these materials.

  19. Analytical and numerical study of graphite IG110 parts in advanced reactor under high temperature and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jinling, E-mail: Jinling_Gao@yeah.net; Yao, Wenjuan, E-mail: wj_yao@yeah.net; Ma, Yudong

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: An analytical model and a numerical procedure are developed to study the mechanical response of IG-110 graphite bricks in HTGR subjected to high temperature and irradiation. The calculation results show great accordance with each other. Rational suggestions on the calculation and design of the IG-110 graphite structure are proposed based on the sensitivity analyses including temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson’s ratio. - Highlights: • Analytical solution of stress and displacement of IG-110 graphite components in HTGR. • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Parameters analysis of mechanical response of graphite components during the whole life of the reflector. - Abstract: Structural design of nuclear power plant project is an important sub-discipline of civil engineering. Especially after appearance of the fourth generation advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor, structural mechanics in reactor technology becomes a popular subject in structural engineering. As basic ingredients of reflector in reactor, graphite bricks are subjected to high temperature and irradiation and the stress field of graphite structures determines integrity of reflector and makes a great difference to safety of whole structure. In this paper, based on assumptions of elasticity, side reflector is regarded approximately as a straight cylinder structure and primary creep strain is ignored. An analytical study on stress of IG110 graphite parts is present. Meanwhile, a finite element procedure for calculating stresses in the IG110 graphite structure exposed in the high temperature and irradiation is developed. Subsequently, numerical solution of stress in IG110 graphite structure is obtained. Analytical solution agrees well with numerical solution, which indicates that analytical derivation is accurate. Finally, influence of temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson

  20. Contribution to the study of the reactivity of pre-graphitic carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrillon, Eric

    1963-01-01

    This research thesis relates to studies of the gasification of solid fuels. After having reported the study of raw materials used for the production of graphite, the author reports the study of a mixing of petroleum coke and coal tar pitch. The author focuses of the intermediary stage of graphite elaboration which is used as an anode in the production of aluminium by electrolytic process. Pitch cokes and petroleum cokes are used as raw materials to study the order of reaction of carbon with carbon dioxide. After having shown that the shape of curves giving the gasification rate related to carbon anhydride with respect to wear was a characteristic of a given type of coke, the author reports some measurements of oxi-reactivity in order to check whether the shape of these curves remains the same when changing the reaction gas

  1. Studies of physicochemical properties of graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewniak Sabina Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experimental research studies was to determine some electrical properties of graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide. The authors tried to interpret the obtained physicochemical results. For that purpose, both resistance measurements and investigation studies were carried out in order to characterize the samples. The resistance was measured at various temperatures in the course of composition changes of gas atmospheres (which surround the samples. The studies were also supported by such methods as: scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy (RS, atomic force microscopy (AFM and thermogravimetry (TG. Moreover, during the experiments also the elemental analyses (EA of the tested samples (graphite oxide and thermally exfoliated/reduced graphene oxide were performed.

  2. Study of Coating Geometries and Photoluminescence Properties of Metal Nanoparticles/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Barone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the results of a study of growth and characterization of metal nanoparticles (Ag, Au, and Co/carbon surfaces. The nanoparticles grew by laser ablation technique and their dimensions were controlled by light scattering study and AFM microscopy before their insertion on graphite surface. Nanoparticles appear randomly disposed on carbon surfaces aggregating to form big particles only in the case of silver. The different behavior of metal nanoparticles on carbon surface was explained in terms of different metal wetting of surface, in agreement with previous theoretical results of He et al. Chemical information, obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the doping process is a simple physisorption while the interfacial interaction between particles and carbon layers causes local defects in graphite structure and the appearance of a strong photoluminescence signal for all composites. Moreover, the visible optical absorption decreases about 10% indicating the progressive metallization of carbon surface.

  3. Photoemission study of Ca-intercalated graphite superconductor CaC6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Rikiya; Iwai, Keisuke; Noami, Kengo; Muro, Takayuki; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Hirai, Masaaki; Tomioka, Fumiaki; Takano, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Asami; Toyoda, Masahiro; Oguchi, Tamio; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have performed resonant photoemission studies of Ca-intercalated graphite superconductor CaC 6 . Using photon energy of the Ca 2p-3d threshold, the photoemission intensity of the peak at Fermi energy (E F ) is resonantly enhanced. This result provides spectroscopic evidence for the existence of Ca 3d states at E F , and strongly supports that Ca 3d state plays a crucial role for the superconductivity of this material with relatively high T c .

  4. Gas Gun Studies of Interface Wear Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tyler; Kennedy, Greg; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of interface wear were studied by performing gas gun experiments at velocities up to 1 km/s. The approach involved developing coefficients of constitutive strength models for Al 6061 and OFHC-Cu, then using those to design die geometry for interface wear gas gun experiments. Taylor rod-on-anvil impact experiments were performed to obtain coefficients of the Johnson-Cook constitutive strength model by correlating experimentally obtained deformed states of impacted samples with those predicted using ANSYS AUTODYN hydrocode. Simulations were used with validated strength models to design geometry involving acceleration of Al rods through a copper concentric cylindrical angular extrusion die. Experiments were conducted using 7.62 mm and 80 mm diameter gas guns. Differences in the microstructure of the interface layer and microhardness values illustrate that stress-strain conditions produced during acceleration of Al through the hollow concentric copper die, at velocities less than 800 m/s, result in formation of a layer via solid state alloying due to severe plastic deformation, while higher velocities produce an interface layer consisting of melted and re-solidified aluminum.

  5. Formation Dynamics of Potassium-Based Graphite Intercalation Compounds: An Ab Initio Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiankai; Song, Bo; Tománek, David

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. We use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the microscopic dynamics of potassium intercalation in graphite. Upon adsorbing on graphite from the vapor phase, K atoms transfer their valence charge to the substrate. K atoms adsorbed on the surface diffuse rapidly along the graphene basal plane and eventually enter the interlayer region following a "U -turn" across the edge, gaining additional energy. This process is promoted at higher coverages associated with higher K pressure, leading to the formation of a stable intercalation compound. We find that the functionalization of graphene edges is an essential prerequisite for intercalation since bare edges reconstruct and reconnect, closing off the entry channels for the atoms.

  6. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  7. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  8. Study of interfaces in organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheshwari, P; Dutta, D; Sudarshan, K; Sharma, S K; Pujari, P K; Samanta, S; Singh, A; Aswal, D K

    2011-01-01

    The defect structure at the organic heterojunctions is studied using slow positron beam. The structural and electronic properties of heterojunctions are of technological and fundamental importance for understanding and optimization of electronic processes in organic devices. Interface trap centres play a significant role in the electrical conduction through the junctions. Depth dependent Doppler broadened annihilation measurements have been carried out in p- and n-type organic semiconductor thin films (30-80 nm) both single as well as multilayers grown on quartz substrate. The objective of the present study is to investigate the defect structure and to understand the behavior of positrons at the charged organic interfaces. Our result shows the sensitivity of positrons to the interfacial disorders that may be a convoluted effect of the presence of defects as well as the influence of the charge dipole in multilayers.

  9. Irradiation-induced defects in graphite and glassy carbon studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kajino, M.; Kuwahara, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kuramoto, E.; Takenaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG, isotropic fine-grained graphites, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 . HOPG showed a marked bimodal ACAR distribution along the c-axis. By irradiation of 1.0 X 10 19 fast neutrons/cm 2 remarkable narrowing in the ACAR curves and disappearance of the bimodal distribution were observed. Lifetime in HOPG increased from 225 psec to 289 psec (positron-lifetime in vacancies and their small clusters) by the irradiation. The irradiation on isotropic graphites and glassy carbons, however, gave slight narrowing in ACAR curves and decrease in lifetimes (360 psec → 300psec). This suggests irradiation-induced vacancy trapping in crystallites. In C 60 /C 70 powder two lifetime components were detected: τ 1 =177psec, τ 2 =403psec (I 2 =58%). The former is less than the bulk lifetime of HOPG, while the latter being very close to lifetimes in the isotropic graphites and glassy carbons. This and recent 2D-ACAR study of HOPG surface [15] strongly suggest free and defect surface states around ''soccer ball'' cages

  10. Study of axial protections of unloading machines of graphite piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, Jacques; Pepin, Pierre; Cabaret, Guy; Dubor, Monique

    1969-10-01

    As previous studies resulted in the development of a simple calculation formula based on experimental results for the calculation of neutron protection thicknesses for loading machines, this study aimed at determining axial protections of these machines which represent a specific problem: scattering of delayed neutrons in the machine inner cavity may result in an important neutron leakage through the upper part, at the level of the winch enclosure. In an experimental part, this study comprises the measurement of the neutron dose in a 2.60 m long and 54 cm diameter cylindrical cavity, and in the thickness of the surrounding concrete protection. In the second part, the authors present a calculation method which uses the Zeus and Mercure codes to interpret the results [fr

  11. A study of the relationship between microstructure and oxidation effects in nuclear graphite at very high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, I.-Hsuan; Tzelepi, Athanasia; Patterson, Eann A.; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang

    2018-04-01

    Graphite is used in the cores of gas-cooled reactors as both the neutron moderator and a structural material, and traditional and novel graphite materials are being studied worldwide for applications in Generation IV reactors. In this study, the oxidation characteristics of petroleum-based IG-110 and pitch-based IG-430 graphite pellets in helium and air environments at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1600 °C were investigated. The oxidation rates and activation energies were determined based on mass loss measurements in a series of oxidation tests. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Although the thermal oxidation mechanism was previously considered to be the same for all temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the significant increases in oxidation rate observed at very high temperatures suggest that the oxidation behavior of the selected graphite materials at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is different. This work demonstrates that changes in surface morphology and in oxidation rate of the filler particles in the graphite materials are more prominent at temperatures above 1200 °C. Furthermore, possible intrinsic factors contributing to the oxidation of the two graphite materials at different temperature ranges are discussed taking account of the dominant role played by temperature.

  12. X-ray study of texture in zirconium alloy tubes and in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsov, V.V.; Alekseev, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray study of texture in zirconium alloy tubes and in graphite has been developed. The method is based on constructing coordinate grid of stereographic projection determining quantity and coordinates of points where measurements should be performed depending on a specimen slope pitch. Complete stereographic projection obtained so is a base both for constructing pole figures showing distribution normales of plane system being studied and for calculating texture coefficients determining property anisotropy in materials under investigation. This method can be applied to study texture in items of any materials independent of the item shape

  13. Development of mercury porosimeter. Application to nuclear graphite studies (1961); Mise au point d'un porosimetre a mercure. Application a l'etude des graphites nucleaires (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocquet, M; Genisson, J; Sailleau, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A mercury porosimeter, model IFP-CEA, has been developed for application to nuclear graphite studies. The apparatus is based on the capillary depression phenomenon. The relationship between the radius of a pore and the pressure at which mercury fills it is pr = -2 {sigma} cos {theta} ( {sigma} is the surface tension, {theta} the angle of contact of the mercury). After some theoretical consideration, the apparatus is described. The mercury pressure is increased step-wise from 0 to 1000 kg/cm{sup 2} thus yielding the complete distribution of pores from 92 {mu} to 75 A. Results are, then presented concerning nuclear graphites which show the evolution of the porous structure under the effect of bitumen impregnation. In general, the volume of the large pores decreases while that of the small pores increases. The structure of impregnated products appears to depend to a certain extent on that of the starting materials. It has also been possible to study other products with this porosimeter; the range of measurements possible is such that it may be used for the study of the majority of porous materials. (authors) [French] Un porosimetre a mercure modele IFP-CEA a ete mis au point en vue de son application a l'etude de graphites nucleaires. Le fonctionnement de l'appareil repose sur le phenomene de depression capillaire. On etablit la relation existant entre le rayon r d'un pore et la pression p pour laquelle le mercure peut y penetrer: pr = -2 {sigma} cos {theta} ( {sigma} tension superficielle, {theta} angle de contact du mercure). Apres quelques considerations theoriques, l'appareil utilise est decrit. Il permet de faire varier par palier la pression du mercure entre 0 et 1000 kg/cm{sup 2} et d'etablir ainsi la distribution complete des rayons de pores compris entre 92 {mu} et 75 A. Les resultats d'une etude faite sur des graphites nucleaires sont alors presentes faisant apparaitre l'evolution de la structure poreuse sous l'effet des impregnations au brai. D'une facon

  14. Low-energy electron observation of graphite and molybdenite crystals. Application to the study of graphite oxidation; Observation au moyen d'electrons de faible energie de cristaux de graphite et de molybdenite. Application a l'etude de l'oxydation du graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The LEED study of cleaved (0001) faces of crystals having a layered structure allowed to investigate flakes free of steps on graphite and molybdenite, to show twinning on natural graphite. By intensity measurements and computation in the case of a kinematical approximation it has been possible to determine an inner potential of 19 eV for graphite and to identify the direction of the Mo-S bond of the surface layer of molybdenite. The oxidation of graphite has been studied by observing changes, in symmetry of the diffraction patterns and by mass spectrometry of the gases evolved during the oxidation. No surface compounds have been detected and the carbon layers appeared to be peeled off one after the other. The oxidation took place at temperatures higher than 520 C under an oxygen pressure of 10{sup -5} torr. (author) [French] L'etude par diffraction des electrons lents des faces (0001) de cristaux ayant une structure en feuillet a permis de mettre en evidence des plages sans gradins sur des clivages de graphite et de molybdenite caracterisees par la symetrie ternaire des diagrammes, de montrer l'existence de macles sur des cristaux de graphite naturel. Un calcul utilisant une approximation cinematique a ete applique aux intensites mesurees des taches de diffraction; il a ete ainsi possible de determiner un potentiel interne de 19 eV pour le graphite et de preciser la direction de la liaison Mo-S du feuillet superficiel de la molybdenite. L'oxydation du graphite a ete etudiee en mettant en relation des changements de symetrie des diagrammes de diffraction avec l'analyse des gaz provenant de la reaction carbone-oxygene. Il a ete montre qu'il n'y avait pas formation de composes de surface et que les couches de carbone etaient enlevees les unes apres les autres. L'oxydation a ete observee sous une pression d'oxygene de 10{sup -5} torr au-dessus de 520 C. (auteur)

  15. Interface study of fiber reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacios, A.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In a composite material that uses fibers as reinforcement, the breakage of the matrix is produced jointly with the separation of the fiber from the matrix. The mechanical behavior of the interface describes how fibers can work stabilizing the cracking process. The interface is the medium that puts the fiber on load, being the mechanical behavior of the interface and the strength of the fiber two important parameters to consider to characterize the general behavior of the composite. The present work studies the effect of several parameters on the behavior of the interface. Those parameters are the type of fiber, its geometry and dimension and the modified matrix and loading rate. An experimental technique was designed to allow testing the same set-up for pull-out tests in a quasistatic machine and Charpy pendulum. Modifications of the matrix by adding a mineral admixture improve the behavior of the interface as much as a 100%. It has been observed that combining the two actions, an improved matrix with crimped fibers, the type of failure can be modified. In this new type of failure, the fiber breaks consequently toughness decreases. Other parameters, as the loading rate and inclination of the fiber also affect the behavior of the interface.

    En un material compuesto que utiliza fibras como refuerzo, la rotura de la matriz se produce conjuntamente con la separación de la fibra de la matriz, por lo que el comportamiento mecánico de la interfase describe hasta que punto las fibras pueden trabajar como estabilizadores en el proceso defisuración. La interfase es el medio que pone en carga a la fibra y, por ello, la resistencia mecánica de la interfase y de la fibra son dos parámetros importantes a considerar para caracterizar el comportamiento general del composite. Este trabajo investiga el efecto de la variación del tipo de fibra, geometría y dimensión de las mismas y las modificaciones de la matriz y la velocidad de desplazamiento

  16. Study of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of expanded graphite gaskets; Etude du comportement et de l`etancheite de joints en graphite expnase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patron, E. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    The poro-mechanical behaviour models developed by O. Coussy permit to consider various phenomena observed experimentally: thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings, plasticity, etc. The aim of this study is to implement the simplest poro-mechanical model (i.e. the isotropic linear poro-elastic model) to model the gasket hydro-mechanical behaviour. First, isotropic poro-elastic characteristics of expanded graphite have been estimated from these tests conducted at Departement Mecanique et Technologie des Composants (MTC) and data from literature. Then, analytical solutions of the tightness tests developed at the MTC Department have been carried out. These calculations provide a first estimation of porosity variations during a tightness tests with metal/metal contact or in elastic recovery, and during a `hot thermal transient`. Thickness controlled numerical calculations have proved the analytical calculations relevance. With regard to simulation of tests with metal/metal contact or `hot thermal transient`, stress controlled numerical calculations have pointed out: - a greater vertical displacement on the inner side of the graphite ring and - a z dependence of the radial displacement and thus a porous differential variation between the upper and lower faces of the ring. (author). 21 refs.

  17. Study of conformation and dynamic of surfactant molecules in graphite oxide via NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, X.Q. [Jiangsu Second Normal University, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Nanjing (China); Ma, L.G. [Nanjing Xiaozhuang University, School of Electronic Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-08-15

    The conformation and dynamic of surfactant in graphite oxide (GO) was investigated by solid-state {sup 13}C magic-angle-spinning NMR and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra. The conformation ordering of the alkyl chains in the confined system shows strong dependence on its orientation. While the alkyl chains parallel to the GO layer in lateral monolayer arrangement are in gauche conformation in addition to a small amount of all-trans conformation, those with orientation radiating away from the GO in paraffin bilayer arrangement is in all-trans conformation in addition to some gauche conformation even though high-order diffraction peaks appears. NMR results suggest that the least mobile segment is located at the GO-surfactant interface corresponding to the N-methylene group. Further from it, the mobility of the alkyl chain increases. The terminal methyl and N-methyl carbon groups have the highest mobile. The chains in all-trans conformational state are characterized as more rigid than chains with gauche conformation; each segment of the confined alkyl chains with the lateral monolayer arrangement exhibits less mobility as compared to that with the paraffin bilayer arrangement. (orig.)

  18. Technetium electrodeposition from aqueous formate solutions at graphite electrode: electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslennikov, A.; Peretroukhine, V.; Masson, M.; Lecomte, M.

    1999-01-01

    Recovery of technetium from aqueous formate buffer solutions of ionic strength μ = 1.0 was studied in the pH interval from 1.6 to 7.5 at graphite cathode in an electrolytic cell with separated compartments was studied, using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and inverse stripping voltammetry (ISV) techniques. It has been shown that Tc electrodeposition process becomes possible at the potentials of graphite cathode E cath. 1/2 = -0.72±0.02 V/SCE and was pH independent in the interval pH = 3.46-7.32. Mechanism of electrodeposition, including Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) reduction in the solution followed by Tc(IV) hydrolysis at the electrode surface with formation of hydrated Tc oxide cathodic deposit has been proposed. The further precision of the Tc(VII) electrochemical reduction mechanism in formate buffer media and optimization of the electrodeposition process seems to be possible using additional analytical facilities except electrochemical methods. (orig.)

  19. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  20. Formation of Ag nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces. A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrusi, Rubén E.; García, Silvana G.; Pronsato, María E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining silver nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces theoretically, using density functional theory calculations. Three layer slabs are used to model graphite surfaces with and without defects. Adsorption energies for Ag atoms on graphite surfaces were calculated showing the preference of Ag adatoms to locate on the steps, forming linear structures like nanowires. An analysis of the charge densities and projected densities of states for different structures is also performed.

  1. Transmission electron-microscopic studies of structural changes in polycrystalline graphite after high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Karpukhin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Transmission electron-microscopic investigation of polycrystalline graphite before and after irradiation is carried out. The direct use of graphite samples after ion thinning, as an inquiry subject is the basic peculiarity of the work. Main structural components of MPG-6 graphite before and after irradiation are revealed, the structural mechanism of the reactor graphite destruction under irradiation is demonstrated. The mean values of L αm and L cm crystallite dimensions are determined. Radiation defects, occuring in some crystallites after irradiation are revealed by the dark-field electron microscopy method

  2. An ab initio study on the transition paths from graphite to diamond under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Xiao; Zhou Xiangfeng; Wang Huitian; Qian Guangrui; Zhao Zhisheng; Tian Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    We calculate and compare the transition paths from graphite to two types of diamond using the variable cell nudged elastic band method. For the phase transition from graphite to cubic diamond, we analyze in detail how the π bonds transit to the σ bonds in an electronic structure. Meanwhile, a new transition path with a lower energy barrier for the transformation from graphite to hexagonal diamond is discovered. The path has its own peculiar sp 2 –sp 3 bonding configurations, serving as a transition state. Further calculation suggests that the sp 2 –sp 3 transition state represents an expected general phenomenon for cold-compressed graphite. (paper)

  3. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  4. X-ray absorption studies of graphite intercalates and metal-ammonia solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, A.S.

    1979-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to study the arsenic fluorocomplexes, including the AsF 5 and AsF 6 - intercalates of graphite, and rubidium metal-ammonia solutions. The As-F distances obtained for AsF 3 and AsF 5 gas are both in excellent agreement with electron diffraction data (within 0.004 A). A superior measurement which is significantly shorter than the accepted value of the bond distance in an undistorted AsF 6 - octahedra is reported. Both the XAES and EXAFS data presented support the hypothesis that the AsF 5 oxidizes graphite upon intercalation to produce AsF 6 - and AsF 3 intercalant species. Changes in the Rb K-edge features which are consistent with the known properties of Rb-NH 3 are correlated with conductivity and delocalization of the solvated electrons. In the XAES region, intensity and position changes of absorption transitions are explained. In the EXAFS region, the Rb-N bond distance and the relative number of nitrogen atoms in the first shell are measured. XAS has been shown to provide unique information about the nature of the metal-ammonia phase separation, phase transition, and density fluctuations

  5. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm -3 ) and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 2 bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense 'amorphous' carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 3 bonding fractions

  6. Study on disposal method of graphite blocks and storage of spent fuel for modular gas-cooled reactor. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tsuchie, Yasuo; Urakami, Masao [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the result of study on disposal method of graphite blocks in future block-type reactor. Present study was carried out within a framework of joint research, ''Research of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (No. 3)'', between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO), in 2000. In this study, activities in fuel and reflector graphite blocks were evaluated and were compared with the disposal limits defined as low-level of radioactive waste. As a result, it was found that the activity for only C-14 was higher than disposal limits for the low-level of radioactive waste and that the amount of air in the graphite is important to evaluate precisely of C-14 activity. In addition, spent fuels can be stored in air-cooled condition at least after two years cooling in the storage pool. (author)

  7. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  8. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  9. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Separation Behavior at the Interface between PVDF Binder and Copper Current Collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungjun Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Li-ion batteries, the mechanical strengths at the interfaces of binder/particle and binder/current collector play an important role in maintaining the mechanical integrity of the composite electrode. In this work, the separation behaviors between polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF binders and copper current collectors are studied in the opening and sliding modes using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The simulation shows that the separation occurs inside the PVDF rather than at the interface due to the strong adhesion between PVDF and copper. This fracture behavior is different from the behavior of the PVDF/graphite basal plane that shows a clear separation at the interface. The results suggest that the adhesion strength of the PVDF/copper is stronger than that of the PVDF/graphite basal plane. The methodology used in MD simulation can directly evaluate the adhesion strength at the interfaces of various materials between binders, substrates, and particles at the atomic scales. The proposed method can therefore provide a guideline for the design of the electrode in order to enhance the mechanical integrity for better battery performance.

  10. Study of the morphology of corrosion features of natural graphite oxidised by dry and humid air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senevat, Jean

    1965-12-01

    The author reports a study which aimed at highlighting the morphology differences between corrosion features which affect flakes of natural graphite oxidised by dry air and by humid air. The study is based on observations made by optical and transmission electronic microscopy, this last one being performed on replicates. As the so-called 'Hennig' replicates did not result in a sufficient resolution of corrosion feature details, another method has been developed. Three classes of samples (in relationship with the rate of impurities present in samples) have been studied. Flakes have thus been sorted and each flake has then been oxidised at different wear rates. This highlights the influence of damages created by impurities in the lattice [fr

  11. Adsorption and Electronic Structure of Sr and Ag Atoms on Graphite Surfaces: a First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Feng; Fang, Chao; Li, Xin; Lai, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Li-Feng; Liang, Tong-Xiang

    2013-06-01

    The adsorption behaviors of radioactive strontium and silver nuclides on the graphite surface in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are studied by first-principles theory using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local density approximation (LDA) pseudo-potentials. It turns out that Sr prefers to be absorbed at the hollow of the carbon hexagonal cell by 0.54 eV (GGA), while Ag likes to sit right above the carbon atom with an adsorption energy of almost zero (GGA) and 0.45 eV (LDA). Electronic structure analysis reveals that Sr donates its partial electrons of the 4p and 5s states to the graphite substrate, while Ag on graphite is a physical adsorption without any electron transfer.

  12. Experimental study on air ingress during a primary pipe rupture accident with a graphite reactor core simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki; Hishida, Makoto; Baba, Shinichi

    1991-11-01

    When a primary coolant pipe of a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) ruptures, helium gas in the reactor core blows out into the container, and the primary cooling system reduces the pressure. After the pressures are balanced between the reactor and the container, air is expected to enter into the reactor core from the breach. It seems to be probable that the graphite structures is oxidized by air. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the air ingress process and the behavior of the generating gases by the oxidation reactions. The previous experimental study is performed on the molecular diffusion and natural convection of the two component gas mixtures using a test model simulating simply the reactor. Objective of the study was to investigate the air ingress process during the early stage of the primary pipe rupture accident. However, since the model did not have any kind of graphite components, the reaction between graphite and oxygen was not simulated. The present model includes the reactor core and the high temperature plenum simulators made of graphite. The major results obtained in the present study are summarized in the followings: (1) The air ingress process with graphite oxidation reaction is similar to that without the reaction qualitatively. (2) When the reactor core simulator is maintained at low temperatures (lower than 450degC), the initiation time of the natural circulation of air is almost equal to that of the natural circulation of nitrogen. On the other hand, when the temperature of the reactor core simulator is high (more than 500degC), the initiation time of the natural circulation of air is earlier than that of nitrogen. (3) When the temperature of the reactor core simulator is higher than 600degC, oxygen is almost dissipated by the graphite structures. When the temperature of the reactor core simulator is below 700degC, carbon dioxide mainly is generated by the oxidation reactions. (author)

  13. Microstructural study of the mechanical response of compacted graphite iron : An experimental and numerical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pina, J.C.; Kouznetsova, V.; Shafqat, S.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Graphite is an important microstructural constituent in cast irons, which plays a key role in determining the material performance. This work aims at understanding the microstructural phenomena taking place in compacted graphite cast iron (CGI), and in particular the effect of the anisotropy of

  14. Studies on the development of special graphite for use in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, G.; Aggarwal, R.K.; Saha, M.; Sengupta, P.R.; Mishra, A. [National Physical Lab., New Delhi (India). Carbon Technology Unit

    2002-07-01

    Special graphite is considered as a critical component of the present-day tokamaks wherein it acts as the armour material for plasma-facing components. This graphite is required to possess, besides other characteristics, high values of bulk density, bending strength and electrical and thermal conductivities and a low value of ash content. Since such graphite was not commercially available in the country, efforts to develop it were initiated at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi. The basic approach to develop this graphite was based on green coke method of making the high density graphite, wherein the green coke was modified by incorporating in it small amounts of conducting carbon materials, i.e. needle coke, synthetic graphite and natural graphite. The resulting graphites were characterized with respect to various physical characteristics, namely, green density, weight loss, volume shrinkage, linear shrinkage, bulk density, bending strength, Young's modulus and electrical resistivity, etc. The results are described and discussed in the present paper. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. An Electron Microscopy Study of Graphite Growth in Nodular Cast Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffont, L.; Jday, R.; Lacaze, J.

    2018-04-01

    Growth of graphite during solidification and high-temperature solid-state transformation has been investigated in samples cut out from a thin-wall casting which solidified partly in the stable (iron-graphite) and partly in the metastable (iron-cementite) systems. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize graphite nodules in as-cast state and in samples having been fully graphitized at various temperatures in the austenite field. Nodules in the as-cast material show a twofold structure characterized by an inner zone where graphite is disoriented and an outer zone where it is well crystallized. In heat-treated samples, graphite nodules consist of well-crystallized sectors radiating from the nucleus. These observations suggest that the disoriented zone appears because of mechanical deformation when the liquid contracts during its solidification in the metastable system. During heat-treatment, the graphite in this zone recrystallizes. In turn, it can be concluded that nodular graphite growth mechanism is the same during solidification and solid-state transformation.

  16. Study on paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhengguo; Fang Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    A paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material was prepared by absorbing the paraffin into an expanded graphite that has an excellent absorbability. In such a composite, the paraffin serves as a latent heat storage material and the expanded graphite acts as the supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin from its porous structure due to the capillary and surface tension forces. The inherent structure of the expanded graphite did not change in the composite material. The solid-liquid phase change temperature of the composite PCM was the same as that of the paraffin, and the latent heat of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite material was equivalent to the calculated value based on the mass ratio of the paraffin in the composite. The heat transfer rate of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite was obviously higher than that of the paraffin due to the combination with the expanded graphite that had a high thermal conductivity. The prepared paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change material had a large thermal storage capacity and improved thermal conductivity and did not experience liquid leakage during its solid-liquid phase change

  17. Contribution to the study of the reactivity of graphite with respect to carbon dioxide and air; Contribution a l'etude de la reactivite du graphite vis-a-vis du gaz corbonique et de l'air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-09-15

    The oxidation of nuclear-quality graphite by air and carbon dioxide has been studied at temperatures at which the reaction becomes measurable. These experiments have been carried out on graphites differing in the concentration and nature of their ash, and in their mode of preparation. The reaction velocities measured have been compared in an attempt to correlate these two factors. Ten types of graphite have thus been studied. Since the oxidation reactions are of the type gas-solid, their velocities have also been compared to the BET surface areas of the graphite studied and to the diameter distribution of the pores of this surface. The conclusion is that, even for these low impurity contents, the law relating the reaction velocity to the surface is masked by the impurities which appear to behave as preferential reaction sites. This has been shown by carrying out successive purifications on various types of graphite, which treatment results in an important decrease in the reactivity of all the samples studied. (author) [French] On a etudie l'oxydation de graphites de qualites nucleaires par l'air et par le gaz carbonique, a des temperatures telles que la reaction commence a etre mesurable. Ces essais ont porte sur des graphites differents aux points de vue de la concentration et de la nature des cendres, et differents par le mode de preparation. Les vitesses de reaction mesurees ont ete comparees afin de tenter de les relier a ces deux facteurs. Dix qualites de graphite ont ainsi ete etudiees. Les reactions d'oxydation etant des reactions gaz-solide, les vitesses ont ete egalement comparees aux surfaces specifiques B.E.T. des echantillons de graphite etudies et a la repartition par diametres des pores de cette surface. La conclusion est que, meme a ces teneurs faibles en impuretes, la loi de variation de la vitesse de reaction en fonction de la surface est masquee par les impuretes qui paraissent jouer le role de sites privilegies de reaction comme l'ont montre les

  18. Surface and Interface Studies with Radioactive Ions

    CERN Multimedia

    Weber, A

    2002-01-01

    Investigations on the atomic scale of magnetic surfaces and magnetic multilayers were performed by Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. The unique combination of the Booster ISOLDE facility equipped with a UHV beamline and the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) is ideally suited for such microscopic studies. Main advantages are the choice of problem-oriented radioactive probes and the purity of mass-separated beams. The following results were obtained: $\\,$i) Magnetic hyperfine fields (B$_{hf}$) of Se on Fe, Co, Ni surfaces were determined. The results prompted a theoretical study on the B$_{hf}$ values of the 4sp-elements in adatom position on Ni and Fe, confirming our results and predicting unexpected behaviour for the other elements. $\\,$ii) Exemplarily we have determined B$_{hf}$ values of $^{111}$Cd at many different adsorption sites on Ni surfaces. We found a strong dependence on the coordination number of the probes. With decreasing coordination nu...

  19. First-Principles Study of Lithium and Sodium Atoms Intercalation in Fluorinated Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengya Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution of fluorinated graphite (CFx upon the Li/Na intercalation has been studied by first-principles calculations. The Li/Na adsorption on single CF layer and intercalated into bulk CF have been calculated. The better cycling performance of Na intercalation into the CF cathode, comparing to that of Li intercalation, is attributed to the different strength and characteristics of the Li-F and Na-F interactions. The interactions between Li and F are stronger and more localized than those between Na and F. The strong and localized Coulomb attraction between Li and F atoms breaks the C−F bonds and pulls the F atoms away, and graphene sheets are formed upon Li intercalation.

  20. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities.

  1. Adsorption and manipulation of carbon onions on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite studied with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianfeng; Shen Ziyong; Hou Shimin; Zhao Xingyu; Xue Zengquan; Shi Zujin; Gu Zhennan

    2007-01-01

    Carbon onions produced by DC arc discharge method were deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface and their adsorption and manipulation was studied using an atomic force microscopy (AFM). Well-dispersed adsorption of carbon onions on HOPG surface was obtained and aggregations of onions were not observed. The van der Waals interaction between the onion and HOPG surface and that between two onions, were calculated and discussed using Hamaker's theory. The manipulation of adsorbed onions on HOPG surface was realized using the AFM in both the raster mode and the vector mode. The controllability and precision of two manipulation modes were compared and the vector mode manipulation was found superior, and is a useful technique for the construction of nano-scale devices based on carbon onions

  2. Fundamental studies of low velocity impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T/sub G/ and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. Linear polymers, which contain no active groups for cross-linking, do not toughen composites because the fiber-matrix interfacial bond is not of sufficient strength to prevent interfacial failure from occurring. Toughness must be built into the basic polymer backbone and cross-linking structure

  3. Synchrotron X-Ray Study of Melting in Submonolayer Ar and other Rare-Gas Films on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McTague, J. P.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bohr, Jakob

    1982-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of the (10) peak of Ar on the (001) surface of ZYX graphite show a sharp but continuous broadening of the Bragg peak with increasing temperature. Below a coverage of ∼ 1 Ar atom per six surface carbon atoms (ρ=1) the onset of this transition occurs...

  4. Studies on the behavior of graphite structures irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.; Ridealgh, F.

    1971-11-15

    Design data for the physical and mechanical property changes which occur in graphite structural and fuel body components irradiated in an HTR are largely obtained from small specimens tested in the laboratory and in materials test reactors. A brief data summary is given. This graphite physics data can be used to predict dimensional changes, internal stress generation and strength changes in the graphite materials of HTR fuel elements irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. In this paper, the results which have been obtained from post-irradiation examination of a number of fuel pins, are compared with prediction.

  5. Ionic liquids at the surface of graphite: Wettability and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Emilie; Douce, Laurent; Quitevis, Edward L.; Pádua, Agílio A. H.; Costa Gomes, Margarida

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a better understanding of the interface between graphite and different molecular and ionic liquids. Experimental measurements of the liquid surface tension and of the graphite-liquid contact angle for sixteen ionic liquids and three molecular liquids are reported. These experimental values allowed the calculation of the solid/liquid interfacial energy that varies, for the ionic liquids studied, between 14.5 mN m-1 for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide and 37.8 mN m-1 for 3-dodecyl-1-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium tetrafluoroborate. Imidazolium-based ionic liquids with large alkyl side-chains or functionalized with benzyl groups seem to interact more favourably with freshly peeled graphite surfaces. Even if the interfacial energy seems a good descriptor to assess the affinity of a liquid for a carbon-based solid material, we conclude that both the surface tension of the liquid and the contact angle between the liquid and the solid can be significant. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the ordering of the ions near the graphite surface. We conclude that the presence of large alkyl side-chains in the cations increases the ordering of ions at the graphite surface. Benzyl functional groups in the cations lead to a large affinity towards the graphite surface.

  6. X-ray scattering studies of surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Here we shall briefly review the basics and some applications of x-ray specular reflectivity and diffuse scattering techniques. These x-ray scattering techniques are uniquely suited to study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces at atomic resolutions as they are nondestructive and can probe even interfaces which are buried. The study of structure of surfaces and interfaces is not only required in understanding physics in reduced dimensions but is also essential in developing technologically important materials

  7. The electrochemical oxidation of organic waste and activated graphite by Ag2+ in nitric acid: a literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Alsenoy, V.; Rahier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Organic wastes and activated moderator graphite can be processed by means of combustion, but the incineration of organic waste poses emission problems. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has experience with the treatment of organic wastes. Moreover, the treatment of radioactive graphite will be required since the BR-1 reactor is moderated with 492 tons of graphite. The strong oxidising properties of Ag 2+ are already used in the chemical and nuclear industry to destroy organic waste. We aim to apply the process on radioactive graphite, organic resins and effluents. The reaction mechanisms will be studied, taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the different reactions involved. As a first step, this document gives a literature study of the electrochemical oxidation using Ag 2+ . This document presents a thorough literature study, and shows that the oxidative properties of the Ag 2+ ion, which can easily be formed in nitric acid by means of electrolysis, make it an ideal candidate to oxidize organic molecules into carbon dioxide and water on a perfectly well controlled manner. The process has already been used to destroy explosives and toxic organic waste in the nuclear and chemical industry. Chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of some of the reactions involved are already known and described, other reaction mechanisms are still unknown. On the basis of the information collected so far, the Research and Development group of the Radioactive Waste and Cleanup unit has proposed to start a research programme to define, test, demonstrate and finally apply a safe process for the treatment of radioactive organic material and graphite by electrochemical oxidation using Ag 2+ . Available data confirm that the oxidation of organic material can be carried out safely, leading to the formation of water and carbon dioxide

  8. The electrochemical oxidation of organic waste and activated graphite by Ag{sup 2+} in nitric acid: a literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Alsenoy, V.; Rahier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Organic wastes and activated moderator graphite can be processed by means of combustion, but the incineration of organic waste poses emission problems. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has experience with the treatment of organic wastes. Moreover, the treatment of radioactive graphite will be required since the BR-1 reactor is moderated with 492 tons of graphite. The strong oxidising properties of Ag{sup 2+} are already used in the chemical and nuclear industry to destroy organic waste. We aim to apply the process on radioactive graphite, organic resins and effluents. The reaction mechanisms will be studied, taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the different reactions involved. As a first step, this document gives a literature study of the electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. This document presents a thorough literature study, and shows that the oxidative properties of the Ag{sup 2+} ion, which can easily be formed in nitric acid by means of electrolysis, make it an ideal candidate to oxidize organic molecules into carbon dioxide and water on a perfectly well controlled manner. The process has already been used to destroy explosives and toxic organic waste in the nuclear and chemical industry. Chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of some of the reactions involved are already known and described, other reaction mechanisms are still unknown. On the basis of the information collected so far, the Research and Development group of the Radioactive Waste and Cleanup unit has proposed to start a research programme to define, test, demonstrate and finally apply a safe process for the treatment of radioactive organic material and graphite by electrochemical oxidation using Ag{sup 2+}. Available data confirm that the oxidation of organic material can be carried out safely, leading to the formation of water and carbon dioxide.

  9. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  10. Growth of carbon nanotubes in arc plasma treated graphite disc: microstructural characterization and electrical conductivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B. B.; Sahu, R. K.; Dash, T.; Pradhan, S.

    2018-03-01

    Circular graphite discs were treated in arc plasma by varying arcing time. Analysis of the plasma treated discs by field emission scanning electron microscope revealed globular grain morphologies on the surfaces, but when the same were observed at higher magnification and higher resolution under transmission electron microscope, growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes of around 2 nm diameter was clearly seen. In situ growth of carbon nanotube bundles/bunches consisting of around 0.7 nm tube diameter was marked in the case of 6 min treated disc surface. Both the untreated and the plasma treated graphite discs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectra of X-ray, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro Raman spectroscopy and BET surface area measurement. From Raman spectra, BET surface area and microstructure observed in transmission electron microscope, growth of several layers of graphene was identified. Four-point probe measurements for electrical resistivity/conductivity of the graphite discs treated under different plasma conditions showed significant increase in conductivity values over that of untreated graphite conductivity value and the best result, i.e., around eightfold increase in conductivity, was observed in the case of 6 min plasma treated sample exhibiting carbon nanotube bundles/bunches grown on disc surface. By comparing the microstructures of the untreated and plasma treated graphite discs, the electrical conductivity increase in graphite disc is attributed to carbon nanotubes (including bundles/bunches) growth on disc surface by plasma treatment.

  11. Study of graphite reactivity worth on well-defined cores assembled on LR-0 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Košťál, Michal; Rypar, Vojtěch; Milčák, Ján; Juříček, Vlastimil; Losa, Evžen; Forget, Benoit; Harper, Sterling

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A light water critical facility for graphite reactivity worth measurements. • Comparison of calculated and measured k eff . • Effect of graphite description on k eff . - Abstract: Graphite is an often-used moderating material on the basis of its good moderating power and very low absorption cross section. This small absorption cross section permits the use of natural or low-enriched uranium in graphite moderated reactors. Graphite is now being considered as the moderator for Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR). The critical moderator level was measured for various graphite block configurations in an experimental dry assembly of the LR-0 reactor. Comparisons with experiments were performed between Monte Carlo simulation tools for which satisfactory agreement was obtained with the exception of some systematic discrepancies. The larger discrepancies were observed when using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. To decrease the uncertainties, based on conservative assumptions, relative comparisons were done. The results provided by the different nuclear data libraries are within 3 sigma interval of experimental uncertainties. It has been determined that differences between the results of calculations are caused by variations in the (n,n), (n,n′), (n,g) reactions and also by various angular distributions, while the (n,g) cross section variations play only a minor role for these configurations.

  12. Connected Lighting System Interoperability Study Part 1: Application Programming Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidon, Clement [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poplawski, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    First in a series of studies that focuses on interoperability as realized by the use of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), explores the diversity of such interfaces in several connected lighting systems; characterizes the extent of interoperability that they provide; and illustrates challenges, limitations, and tradeoffs that were encountered during this exploration.

  13. Positron annihilation study of graphite, glassy carbon and C60/C70 fullerene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Masayuki; Kajino, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Sadae; Iwata, Tadao; Kuramoto, Eiichi; Takenaka, Minoru.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR (Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation) and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite), isotropic fine-grained graphite, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 powder. HOPG showed marked bimodality along the c-axis and anisotropy in ACAR momentum distribution, which stem from characteristic annihilation between 'interlayer' positrons and π-electrons in graphite. ACAR curves of the isotropic graphite and glassy carbons are even narrower than that of HOPG perpendicular to the c-axis. Positron lifetime of 420 and 390 - 480 psec, much longer than that of 221 psec in HOPG, were observed for the isotropic graphite and glassy carbons respectively, which are due to positron trapping in structural voids in them. Positron lifetime and ACAR width (FWHM) can be well correlated to void sizes (1.7 to 5.0 nm) of glassy carbons which have been determined by small angle neutron (SAN) scattering measurements. ACAR curves and positron lifetime of C 60 /C 70 powder agree well with those of glassy carbons. This shows that positron wave functions extend, as in the voids of glassy carbons, much wider than open spaces of the octahedral interstices of the face-centered cubic (FCC) structure of C 60 crystal and strongly suggests positron trapping in the 'soccer ball' vacancy. Possible positron states in the carbon materials are discussed with a simple model of void volume-trapping. Preliminary results on neutron irradiation damage in HOPG are also presented. (author)

  14. Study on thermal conductivity of HTR spherical fuel element matrix graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kaihong; Liu Xiaoxue; Zhao Hongsheng; Li Ziqiang; Tang Chunhe

    2014-01-01

    Taking the spherical fuel element matrix graphite ball samples as an example, this paper introduced the principle and method of laser thermal conductivity meter, as well as the specific heat capacity, and analyzed the effects of different test methods and sampling methods on the thermal conductivities at 1000 ℃ of graphite material. The experimental results show that the thermal conductivities of graphite materials tested by synchronous thermal analyzer combining with laser thermal conductivity meter were different from that directly by laser thermal conductivity meter, the former was more reliable and accurate than the later; When sampling from different positions, central samples had higher thermal conductivities than edging samples, which was related to the material density and porosity at the different locations; the thermal conductivities had obvious distinction between samples from different directions, which was because the layer structure of polycrystalline graphite preferred orientation under pressure, generally speaking, the thermal conductivities perpendicular to the molding direction were higher than that parallel to the molding direction. Besides this, the test results show that the thermal conductivities of all the graphite material samples were greater than 30 W/(m (K), achieving the thermal performance index of high temperature gas cooled reactor. (authors)

  15. A GCMC simulation and experimental study of krypton adsorption/desorption hysteresis on a graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Luisa; Horikawa, Toshihide; Phadungbut, Poomiwat; Johnathan Tan, Shiliang; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats of krypton on a highly graphitized carbon black, Carbopack F, have been studied with a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and high-resolution experiments at 77K and 87K. Our investigation sheds light on the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed, horizontal hysteresis loop in the first layer, and the vertical hysteresis-loop in the second layer, and is found to be in agreement with our recent Monte Carlo simulation study (Diao et al., 2015). From detailed analysis of the adsorption isotherm, the latter is attributed to the compression of an imperfect solid-like state in the first layer, to form a hexagonally packed, solid-like state, immediately following the first order condensation of the second layer. To ensure that capillary condensation in the confined spaces between microcrystallites of Carbopack F does not interfere with these hysteresis loops, we carried out simulations of krypton adsorption in the confined space of a wedge-shaped pore that mimics the interstices between particles. These simulations show that, up to the third layer, any such interference is negligible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Superlubricity of Graphite Induced by Multiple Transferred Graphene Nanoflakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinjin; Gao, Tianyang; Luo, Jianbin

    2018-03-01

    2D or 3D layered materials, such as graphene, graphite, and molybdenum disulfide, usually exhibit superlubricity properties when sliding occurs between the incommensurate interface lattices. This study reports the superlubricity between graphite and silica under ambient conditions, induced by the formation of multiple transferred graphene nanoflakes on the asperities of silica surfaces after the initial frictional sliding. The friction coefficient can be reduced to as low as 0.0003 with excellent robustness and is independent of the surface roughness, sliding velocities, and rotation angles. The superlubricity mechanism can be attributed to the extremely weak interaction and easy sliding between the transferred graphene nanoflakes and graphite in their incommensurate contact. This finding has important implications for developing approaches to achieve superlubricity of layered materials at the nanoscale by tribointeractions.

  17. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  18. Mechanical Degradation of Graphite/PVDF Composite Electrodes: A Model-Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K; Higa, K; Mair, S; Chintapalli, M; Balsara, N; Srinivasan, V

    2015-12-11

    Mechanical failure modes of a graphite/polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) composite electrode for lithium-ion batteries were investigated by combining realistic stress-stain tests and mathematical model predictions. Samples of PVDF mixed with conductive additive were prepared in a similar way to graphite electrodes and tested while submerged in electrolyte solution. Young's modulus and tensile strength values of wet samples were found to be approximately one-fifth and one-half of those measured for dry samples. Simulations of graphite particles surrounded by binder layers given the measured material property values suggest that the particles are unlikely to experience mechanical damage during cycling, but that the fate of the surrounding composite of PVDF and conductive additive depends completely upon the conditions under which its mechanical properties were obtained. Simulations using realistic property values produced results that were consistent with earlier experimental observations.

  19. Studies of lithiumization and boronization of ATJ graphite PFCs for NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Javier; Bedoya, Felipe; Krstic, Predrag; Allain, Jean Paul; Neff, Anton; Luitjohan, Kara

    2016-10-01

    We examine and compare the effects of boron and lithium conditioning on ATJ graphite surfaces bombarded by low-energy deuterium atoms on deuterium retention and chemical sputtering. We use atomistic simulations and compare them with experimental in-situ ex-tempore studies with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), to understand the effects of deuterium exposure on the chemistry in lithiated, boronized and oxidized amorphous carbon surfaces. Our results are validated qualitatively by comparison with experiments and with classical-quantum molecular dynamic simulations. We explain the important role of oxygen in D retention for lithiated surfaces and the suppression of the oxygen role by boron in boronized surfaces. The calculated increase of the oxygen role in deuterium uptake after D accumulation in a B-C-O surface configuration is discussed. The sputtering yield per low-energy D impact is significantly smaller in boronized surfaces than in lithiated surfaces. This work was supported by the USDOE Grants DE-SC0013752 (PSK), DE-SC0010717 (JPA and FB) and DE-SC0010719 (AN) and by National council for Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACyT) through postdoctoral fellowship # 267898 (JD).

  20. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  1. SUMC/MPOS/HAL interface study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponaro, J. A.; Kosmala, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    The implementation of the HAL/S language on the IBM-360, and in particular the mechanization of its real time, I/O, and error control statements within the OS-360 environment is described. The objectives are twofold: (1) An analysis and general description of HAL/S real time, I/O, and error control statements and the structure required to mechanize these statements. The emphasis is on describing the logical functions performed upon execution of each HAL statement rather than defining whether it is accomplished by the compiler or operating system. (2) An identification of the OS-360 facilities required during execution of HAL/S code as implemented for the current HAL/S-360 compiler; and an evaluation of the aspects involved with interfacing HAL/S with the SUMC operating system utilizing either the HAL/S-360 compiler or by designing a new HAL/S-SUMC compiler.

  2. Study of graphitic microstructure formation in diamond bulk by pulsed Bessel beam laser writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Sotillo, B.; Chiappini, A.; Ramponi, R.; Di Trapani, P.; Eaton, S. M.; Jedrkiewicz, O.

    2017-11-01

    The advantages of using Bessel beams for the generation of graphitic structures in diamond bulk are presented. We show that by irradiating the sample with a pulsed Bessel beam whose non-diffracting zone is of the same order of the sample thickness, it is possible to produce without any sample translation straight graphitic through-microstructures, whose size depends on the input pulse energy. The microstructure growth is investigated as a function of the number of irradiating pulses, and the femtosecond and picosecond regimes are contrasted.

  3. Study on in-service visual inspection using TV camera for core support graphite components in the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Shibata, Taiju; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mogi, Haruyoshi

    1999-01-01

    To maintain the structural integrity of graphite components during plant operation a visual inspection using a TV camera as an in-service inspection is planned in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. In order to verify the in-service inspection method a preliminary analytical and experimental studies were performed. In the analytical study the harmful flaw size was determined from a viewpoint of structural integrity based on the fracture mechanics approach. Furthermore, the visible flaw size was determined by the TV camera performance test with graphite test specimens having several kinds of artificial flaws. This paper presents the analytical result on the harmful flaw size and the experimental result on the visible flaw size. From both results the applicability on the visual inspection by the TV camera as the in-service inspection is discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  5. Ab initio study of friction of graphene flake on graphene/graphite or SiC surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulseren, Oguz; Tayran, Ceren; Sayin, Ceren Sibel

    Recently, the rich dynamics of graphene flake on graphite or SiC surfaces are revealed from atomic force microcopy experiments. The studies toward to the understanding of microscopic origin of friction are getting a lot of attention. Despite the several studies of these systems using molecular dynamics methods, density functional theory based investigations are limited because of the huge system sizes. In this study, we investigated the frictional force on graphene flake on graphite or SiC surfaces from pseudopotential planewave calculations based on density functional theory. In both cases, graphene flake (24 C) on graphite or SiC surface, bilayer flake is introduced by freezing the top layer as well as the bottom layer of the surface slab. After fixing the load with these frozen layers, we checked the relative motion of the flake over the surface. A minimum energy is reached when the flake is moved on graphene to attain AB stacking. We also conclude that edge reconstruction because of the finite size of the flake is very critical for frictional properties of the flake; therefore the saturation of dangling bonds with hydrogen is also addressed. Not only the symmetric configurations remaining parameter space is extensively studied. Supported by TUBITAK Project No: 114F162. This work is supported by TUBITAK Project No: 114F162.

  6. Study of the influence of air exposure on graphite implanted by low energy high density deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, V.; Bardon, J.; Palmari, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the influence of air exposure on the content of Deuterium implanted graphite was done for different exposure durations and different gas exposures. Important reduction of the D 2 thermodesorbed is shown to result from the formation of deuterated compounds during the desorption, the total amount of deuterium desorbed remaining unchanged. Some informations on the mechanisms of the interactions can be obtained by the comparison of the different experiments

  7. QCM-D studies on polymer behavior at interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    QCM-D Studies on Polymer Behavior at Interfaces reviews the applications of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) in polymer research, including the conformational change of grafted polymer chains, the grafting kinetics of polymer chains, the growth mechanism of polyelectrolyte multilayers, and the interactions between polymers and phospholipid membranes. It focuses on how QCM-D can be applied to the study of polymer behavior at various solid-liquid interfaces. Moreover, it clearly reveals the physical significance of the changes in frequency and dissipation associated with the different polymer behaviors at the interfaces.

  8. Study of the strength of the internal can for internally and externally cooled fuel elements intended for gas graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudouresque, B.; Courcon, P.; Lestiboubois, G.

    1964-01-01

    The cartridge of an internally and externally cooled annular fuel element used in gas-graphite reactors is made up of an uranium fuel tube, an external can and an internal can made of magnesium alloy. For the thermal exchange between the internal can and the fuel to be satisfactory, it is necessary for the can to stay in contact with the uranium under all temperature conditions. This report, based on a theoretical study, shows how the internal can fuel gap varies during the processes of canning, charging into the reactor and thermal cycling. The following parameters are considered: tube diameter, pressure of the heat carrying gas, gas entry temperature, plasticity of the can alloy. It is shown that for all operating conditions the internal can of a 77 x 95 element, planned for a gas-graphite reactor with a 40 kg/cm 2 gas pressure, should remain in contact with the fuel. (authors) [fr

  9. Neutron Scattering Study of Nitrogen Adsorbed on Basal Plane Oriented Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Passell, L.; Taub, H.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal-neutron scattering has been used to investigate the structure of nitrogen films adsorbed on Grafoil, a basal-plane-oriented graphite. Diffraction scans were made at coverages between 1/3 of a monolayer and 7/4 monolayers over a temperature range from 10 to 90 K. The observed line shapes...

  10. Physicochemical characterization, and relaxometry studies of micro-graphite oxide, graphene nanoplatelets, and nanoribbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna S Paratala

    Full Text Available The chemistry of high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents remains an active area of research. In this work, we demonstrate that the potassium permanganate-based oxidative chemical procedures used to synthesize graphite oxide or graphene nanoparticles leads to the confinement (intercalation of trace amounts of Mn(2+ ions between the graphene sheets, and that these manganese intercalated graphitic and graphene structures show disparate structural, chemical and magnetic properties, and high relaxivity (up to 2 order and distinctly different nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles compared to paramagnetic chelate compounds. The results taken together with other published reports on confinement of paramagnetic metal ions within single-walled carbon nanotubes (a rolled up graphene sheet show that confinement (encapsulation or intercalation of paramagnetic metal ions within graphene sheets, and not the size, shape or architecture of the graphitic carbon particles is the key determinant for increasing relaxivity, and thus, identifies nano confinement of paramagnetic ions as novel general strategy to develop paramagnetic metal-ion graphitic-carbon complexes as high relaxivity MRI contrast agents.

  11. Neutron scattering study of 36 Ar monolayer films adsorbed on graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taub, H.; da Costa Carneiro, Kim; Kjems, Jørgen

    1977-01-01

    Diffraction of neutrons from 36 Ar monolayers adsorbed on graphite basal planes indicates that an ordered, two-dimensional (2D) triangular lattice is formed at low temperature. The lattice constant is found to be slightly larger than that of the bulk 3D solid but significantly smaller than that o...

  12. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  13. A study of mechanical sealing methods using graphite powder for high pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, H. Y.; Hong, J. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Joung, C. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The Fuel Test Loop (FTL) is a facility that can conduct fuel irradiation tests at the HANARO (High flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor). The FTL simulates commercial NPP operating conditions such as pressure, temperature and neutron flux levels to conduct irradiation and thermo hydraulic tests. It is composed of an In Pile test Section (IPS) and an Out Pile System (OPS). The OPS contains a pressurizer, cooler, pump, heater and purification system, which are necessary to maintain the proper fluid conditions. In addition, the OPS contains engineered safety systems that can safely shutdown both HANARO and FTL if an accident occurs. The IPS accommodating fuel pins has a loaded IP 1 hole in HANARO, and a double pressure vessel for the design conditions of 350 .deg. C, 17.5MPa and is composed of an outer assembly and inner assembly. It has instruments such as a thermocouple, LVDT and SPND to measure the fuel performances during the test. FTL coolant is supplied to the IPS at the core of commercial nuclear power plants at the same temperature, pressure and flow conditions. Sensors are installed on the inside of the IPS to send signal transmission MI Cables to the outside for instrumentation through the pressure boundary. Therefore, the pressure boundary should be maintained in the sealing performance. Currently, the sealing of the IPS of the the FTL is maintained through a brazing method. However, A brazing method has disadvantages that can occur owing to thermal deformation or breakage in the instrumentation Mi cable. IPS inner assembly is a very long design length (approximately 5.29m), so it is difficult to perform in a vacuum chamber. Therefore, an easy and reliable way to assemble the instrumentation Mi cable mechanical sealing method has been studied. In this study, criteria tests at the pressure boundary were performed using universally applicable graphite powder for the instrumentation MI cable of various sizes.

  14. A study of mechanical sealing methods using graphite powder for high pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H. Y.; Hong, J. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Joung, C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Fuel Test Loop (FTL) is a facility that can conduct fuel irradiation tests at the HANARO (High flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor). The FTL simulates commercial NPP operating conditions such as pressure, temperature and neutron flux levels to conduct irradiation and thermo hydraulic tests. It is composed of an In Pile test Section (IPS) and an Out Pile System (OPS). The OPS contains a pressurizer, cooler, pump, heater and purification system, which are necessary to maintain the proper fluid conditions. In addition, the OPS contains engineered safety systems that can safely shutdown both HANARO and FTL if an accident occurs. The IPS accommodating fuel pins has a loaded IP 1 hole in HANARO, and a double pressure vessel for the design conditions of 350 .deg. C, 17.5MPa and is composed of an outer assembly and inner assembly. It has instruments such as a thermocouple, LVDT and SPND to measure the fuel performances during the test. FTL coolant is supplied to the IPS at the core of commercial nuclear power plants at the same temperature, pressure and flow conditions. Sensors are installed on the inside of the IPS to send signal transmission MI Cables to the outside for instrumentation through the pressure boundary. Therefore, the pressure boundary should be maintained in the sealing performance. Currently, the sealing of the IPS of the the FTL is maintained through a brazing method. However, A brazing method has disadvantages that can occur owing to thermal deformation or breakage in the instrumentation Mi cable. IPS inner assembly is a very long design length (approximately 5.29m), so it is difficult to perform in a vacuum chamber. Therefore, an easy and reliable way to assemble the instrumentation Mi cable mechanical sealing method has been studied. In this study, criteria tests at the pressure boundary were performed using universally applicable graphite powder for the instrumentation MI cable of various sizes

  15. Experimental and numerical study of heat transfer performance of nitrate/expanded graphite composite PCM for solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.; Zhang, P.; Li, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity of nitrate/EG composite was accurately measured by considering thermal contact resistance. • Heat storage and retrieval tests were conducted with binary nitrates and nitrates/EG composites. • A comprehensive model was built to interpret the heat transfer characteristics. - Abstract: Eutectic molten salt can be used as the latent thermal energy storage medium in solar energy applications. Nitrates and their binary mixtures are suitable phase change material (PCM) for solar energy applications in middle-temperature-range of 200–300 °C. In the present study, binary nitrate (50 wt.% NaNO_3, 50 wt.% KNO_3) with a melting temperature of about 220 °C was employed as the PCM, and expanded graphite (EG) with the mass fraction of 5%, 10% or 20% was used to enhance the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivities of pure nitrates and nitrate/EG shape-stabilized composites were measured with a steady-state test rig firstly. Results showed that the addition of EG significantly enhanced the thermal conductivities, e.g., the thermal conductivities of sodium nitrate/20 wt.% EG composite PCM were measured to be 6.66–7.70 W/(m K) in the temperature range of 20–120 °C, indicating about seven times larger than those of pure sodium nitrate. Furthermore, pure binary nitrate and nitrate/EG composite PCM were encapsulated in a cylindrical storage unit with a diameter of 70.0 mm and a length of 280.0 mm. Heat storage and retrieval tests were conducted extensively at different heating temperatures of 250 °C, 260 °C and 270 °C, and different cooling temperatures of 30 °C, 70 °C and 110 °C. Time-durations from temperature evolutions showed that both the melting and solidification processes were accelerated by EG, and the heat transfer characteristics were interpreted by the numerical analysis based on enthalpy–porosity and volume-of-fluid models. The evolution of nitrate/air interface caused by volume expansion ascended gradually

  16. Experimental study of multilayer solid epitaxy: two-dimensional critical behavior of a quantum solid/superfluid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, S.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis constitutes the first precise, quantitative experimental study of layering transitions, two-dimensional critical temperatures, and their relation to surface roughening. The experiments used superfluid fourth sound to probe the liquid solid 4 He interface, by coupling with surface waves unique to this interface. An annular resonator with electric transducers was used to measure the fourth sound velocity c 4 in an exfoliated graphite (Grafoil) superleak. Measurements of the pressure dependence of the fourth sound resonance frequencies (and attenuation) from ∼6 bar to ∼26 bar were made along eight isotherms from 1.0 K to 1.7 K. Plots of fourth sound resonance frequency versus coverage clearly indicate layer-by-layer solid nucleation and epitaxal growth of hcp solid 4 He on the basal plane of graphite. Further analysis yielded solid adsorption isotherms and a kinetic growth coefficient for the 4 He crystal surface and also indicated the existence of a critical temperature region and also indicated the existence of a critical temperature region around 1.0-1.2 K (the region of a bulk roughening transition). The acoustical theory for the experimental system was worked out using a parallel waveguide model; Landau's thermohydrodynamic equations were reformulated by including the mass- and heat-exchange effects occurring in the system; the equations were solved to obtain expressions for the velocity of sound propagation and attenuation

  17. Theoretical study of the generation of terahertz radiation by the interaction of two laser beams with graphite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri Javan, N.; Rouhi Erdi, F.

    2017-12-01

    In this theoretical study, we investigate the generation of terahertz radiation by considering the beating of two similar Gaussian laser beams with different frequencies of ω1 and ω2 in a spatially modulated medium of graphite nanoparticles. The medium is assumed to contain spherical graphite nanoparticles of two different configurations: in the first configuration, the electric fields of the laser beams are parallel to the normal vector of the basal plane of the graphite structure, whereas in the second configuration, the electric fields are perpendicular to the normal vector of the basal plane. The interaction of the electric fields of lasers with the electronic clouds of the nanoparticles generates a ponderomotive force that in turn leads to the creation of a macroscopic electron current in the direction of laser polarizations and at the beat frequency ω1-ω2 , which can generate terahertz radiation. We show that, when the beat frequency lies near the effective plasmon frequency of the nanoparticles and the electric fields are parallel to the basal-plane normal, a resonant interaction of the laser beams causes intense terahertz radiation.

  18. Buried interfaces - A systematic study to characterize an adhesive interface at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubrich, Jan; Löbbecke, Miriam; Watermeyer, Philipp; Wilde, Fabian; Requena, Guillermo; da Silva, Julio

    2018-03-01

    A comparative study of a model adhesive interface formed between laser-pretreated Ti15-3-3-3 and the thermoplastic polymer PEEK has been carried out in order to characterize the interfaces' structural details and the infiltration of the surface nano-oxide by the polymer at multiple scales. Destructive approaches such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy of microsections prepared by focused ion beam, and non-destructive imaging approaches including laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy of pretreated surfaces as well as synchrotron computed tomography techniques (micro- and ptychographic tomographies) were employed for resolving the large, μm-sized melt-structures and the fine nano-oxide substructure within the buried interface. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the fine, open-porous nano-oxide homogeneously covers the larger macrostructure features which in turn cover the joint surface. The open-porous nano-oxide forming the interface itself appears to be fully infiltrated and wetted by the polymer. No voids or even channels were detected down to the respective resolution limits of scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  20. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  1. A comparative study of electrochemical performance of graphene sheets, expanded graphite and natural graphite as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Li-Zhong; Zhao, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Tai-Ming; Xie, Wei-Gang; Zhang, Ji-Ming; Shen, Zeng-Min

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene sheets (GSs), expanded graphite (EG) and natural graphite (NG) were comparatively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. • The reversible capacity of GS electrode was almost twice that of EG electrode and three times that of NG electrode. • The first-cycle coulombic efficiency and capacity retention of NG were much bigger than those of GSs and EG. • GS and EG electrodes exhibited higher electrochemical activity and more favorable kinetic properties. -- Abstract: Three kinds of carbon materials, i.e., graphene sheets (GSs), expanded graphite (EG) and natural graphite (NG) were comparatively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries via scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. The test results showed that the reversible capacities of GS electrode were 1130 and 636 mA h g −1 at the current densities of 0.2 and 1 mA cm −2 , respectively, which were almost twice those of EG electrode and three times those of NG electrode. The first-cycle coulombic efficiency and capacity retention of NG were much bigger than those of GSs and EG. The notable capacity fading observed in GSs and EG may be ascribed to the disorder-induced structure instability. The larger voltage hysteresis in GS and EG electrodes was not only related to the surface functional groups, but also to the active defects in GSs and EG, which results in greater hindrance and higher overvoltage during lithium extraction from electrode. The kinetics properties of GSs, EG and NG electrodes were compared by AC impedance measurements. GS and EG electrodes exhibited higher electrochemical activity and more favorable kinetic properties during charge and discharge process

  2. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  3. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  4. Graphitized biogas-derived carbon nanofibers as anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuesta, Nuria; Cameán, Ignacio; Ramos, Alberto; García, Ana B.

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical performance as potential anodes for lithium-ion batteries of graphitized biogas-derived carbon nanofibers (BCNFs) is investigated by galvanostatic cycling versus Li/Li + at different electrical current densities. These graphitic nanomaterials have been prepared by high temperature treatment of carbon nanofibers produced in the catalytic decomposition of biogas. At low current density, they deliver specific capacities comparable to that of oil-derived micrometric graphite, the capacity retention values being mostly in the range 70-80% and cycling efficiency ∼ 100%. A clear tendency of the anode capacity to increase alongside the BCNFs crystal thickness was observed. Besides the degree of graphitic tri-dimensional structural order, the presence of loops between the adjacent edges planes on the graphene layers, the mesopore volume and the active surface area of the graphitized BCNFs were found to influence on battery reversible capacity, capacity retention along cycling and irreversible capacity. Furthermore, provided that the development of the crystalline structure is comparable, the graphitized BCNFs studied show better electrochemical rate performance than micrometric graphite. Therefore, this result can be associated with the nanometric particle size as well as the larger surface area of the BCNFs which, respectively, reduces the diffusion time of the lithium ions for the intercalation/de-intercalation processes, i.e. faster charge-discharge rate, and increases the contact area at the anode active material/electrolyte interface which may improve the Li + ions access, i.e. charge transfer reaction.

  5. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  6. Strategy Study on Treatment and Disposal of the Radioactive Graphite Waste of HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junfeng; Ma Tao; Wang Jianlong

    2014-01-01

    The possible options to change HTGR spent fuel into an acceptable form for repository disposal were discussed. The progresses of physical, chemical, and electrochemical separation of graphite from the HTGR fuel elements were reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were listed out. The total waste volume of each method was compared. The preferred option depends on the waste acceptance criteria for the repository, availability of low level waste disposal for graphite, overall economics, and overall risks. The minimum processing that yields an acceptable waste form also gives the lowest costs as well as the simplest process and the least risk. The options that could be used for treating HTGR spent fuels were listed out. The strategy for treating HTGR spent fuels and the packages needed for repository were discussed. (author)

  7. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  8. Porous (Swiss-Cheese Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Abrahamson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous graphite was prepared without the use of template by rapidly heating the carbonization products from mixtures of anthracene, fluorene, and pyrene with a CO2 laser. Rapid CO2 laser heating at a rate of 1.8 × 106 °C/s vaporizes out the fluorene-pyrene derived pitch while annealing the anthracene coke. The resulting structure is that of graphite with 100 nm spherical pores. The graphitizablity of the porous material is the same as pure anthracene coke. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces between graphitic layers and the pore walls are unimpeded. Traditional furnace annealing does not result in the porous structure as the heating rates are too slow to vaporize out the pitch, thereby illustrating the advantage of fast thermal processing. The resultant porous graphite was prelithiated and used as an anode in lithium ion capacitors. The porous graphite when lithiated had a specific capacity of 200 mAh/g at 100 mA/g. The assembled lithium ion capacitor demonstrated an energy density as high as 75 Wh/kg when cycled between 2.2 V and 4.2 V.

  9. Studies of mechanical properties and irradiation damage nucleation of HTGR graphites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, P.A.

    1981-05-01

    Since the submission of the last report (COO-2712-6) work has concentrated on the examination of the effects of oxidation on the compressive strengths of graphites doped with iron, vanadium and calcium. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative effects of the impurities on the rates of oxidation in air, CO 2 and H 2 O and the resultant reduction in compressive strength

  10. Interface thermal characteristics of flip chip packages - A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, Ravi; Mujumdar, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Flip chip ball grid array (FC-BGA) packages are commonly used for high inputs/outputs (I/O) ICs; they have been proven to provide good solutions for a variety of applications to maximize thermal and electrical performance. A fundamental limitation to such devices is the thermal resistance at the top of the package, which is characterized θ JC parameter. The die-to-lid interface thermal resistance is identified as a critical issue for the thermal management of electronic packages. This paper focuses on the effect of the interface material property changes on the interface thermal resistance. The effect of package's junction to case (Theta-JC or θ JC ) thermal performance is investigated for bare die, flat lid and cup lid packages using a validated thermal model. Thermal performance of a cup or flat lid attached and bare die packages were investigated for different interface materials. Improved Theta-JC performance was observed for the large die as compared to the smaller die. Several parametric studies were carried out to understand the effects of interface bond line thickness (BLT), different die sizes, the average void size during assembly and thermal conductivity of interface materials on package thermal resistance

  11. Surfactants, interfaces and pores : a theoretical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huinink, H.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of surfactants in porous media by theoretical means. The influence of curvature of a surface on the adsorption has been studied with a mean field lattice (MFL) model, as developed by Scheutjens and Fleer. An analytical theory has been

  12. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  13. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  14. Influence of alkyl chain length and anion species on ionic liquid structure at the graphite interface as a function of applied potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hua; Wood, Ross J; Atkin, Rob; Endres, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements elucidate the effect of cation alkyl chain length and the anion species on ionic liquid (IL) interfacial structure at highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces as a function of potential. Three ILs are examined: 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([HMIM] FAP), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([EMIM] FAP), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM] TFSA). The step-wise force-distance profiles indicate the ILs adopt a multilayered morphology near the surface. When the surface is biased positively or negatively versus Pt quasireference electrode, both the number of steps, and the force required to rupture each step increase, indicating stronger interfacial structure. At all potentials, push-through forces for [HMIM] FAP are the highest, because the long alkyl chain results in strong cohesive interactions between cations, leading to well-formed layers that resist the AFM tip. The most layers are observed for [EMIM] FAP, because the C 2 chains are relatively rigid and the dimensions of the cation and anion are similar, facilitating neat packing. [EMIM] TFSA has the smallest push-through forces and fewest layers, and thus the weakest interfacial structure. Surface-tip attractive forces are measured for all ILs. At the same potential, the attractions are the strongest for [EMIM] TFSA and the weakest for [HMIM] FAP because the interfacial layers are better formed for the longer alkyl chain cation. This means interfacial forces are stronger, which masks the weak attractive forces. (paper)

  15. Atomistic simulations of contact area and conductance at nanoscale interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Martini, Ashlie

    2017-11-09

    Atomistic simulations were used to study conductance across the interface between a nanoscale gold probe and a graphite surface with a step edge. Conductance on the graphite terrace was observed to increase with load and be approximately proportional to contact area calculated from the positions of atoms in the interface. The relationship between area and conductance was further explored by varying the position of the contact relative to the location of the graphite step edge. These simulations reproduced a previously-reported current dip at step edges measured experimentally and the trend was explained by changes in both contact area and the distribution of distances between atoms in the interface. The novel approach reported here provides a foundation for future studies of the fundamental relationships between conductance, load and surface topography at the atomic scale.

  16. Brain-computer interfacing under distraction: an evaluation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Stephanie; Frølich, Laura; Höhne, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Objective. While motor-imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been studied over many years by now, most of these studies have taken place in controlled lab settings. Bringing BCI technology into everyday life is still one of the main challenges in this field of research. Approach...

  17. A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from a Highly Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite Block.

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Seung S; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation from a highly oriented pyrolyzed graphite block and placed on an insulating substrate, with the resulting field emission behavior investigated using a nanomanipulator operating inside a scanning electron microscope. A pair of tungsten tips controlled by the nanomanipulator enabled electric connection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted current from the graphene layers was 170 nA and the turn-on voltage was 12.1 V.

  18. A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from a Highly Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite Block.

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2009-07-12

    This paper describes an experimental study on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation from a highly oriented pyrolyzed graphite block and placed on an insulating substrate, with the resulting field emission behavior investigated using a nanomanipulator operating inside a scanning electron microscope. A pair of tungsten tips controlled by the nanomanipulator enabled electric connection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted current from the graphene layers was 170 nA and the turn-on voltage was 12.1 V.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of pyrolytically coated graphite platforms submitted to simulated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Frine; Benzo, Zully; Quintal, Manuelita; Garaboto, Angel; Albornoz, Alberto; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2006-01-01

    The present work is part of an ongoing project aiming to a better understanding of the mechanisms of atomization on graphite furnace platforms used for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). It reports the study of unused pyrolytic graphite coated platforms of commercial origin, as well as platforms thermally or thermo-chemically treated under simulated ETAAS analysis conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the elements present at the surfaces of the platforms. New, unused platforms showed the presence of molybdenum, of unknown origin, in concentrations up to 1 at.%. Species in two different oxidations states (Mo 6+ and Mo 2+ ) were detected by analyzing the Mo 3d spectral region with high resolution XPS. The analysis of the C 1s region demonstrated the presence of several signals, one of these at 283.3 eV related to the presence of Mo carbide. The O 1s region showed also various peaks, including a signal that can be attributed to the presence of MoO 3 . Some carbon and oxygen signals were consistent with the presence of C=O and C-O- (probably C-OH) groups on the platforms surfaces. Upon thermal treatment up to 2900 deg. C, the intensity of the Mo signal decreased, but peaks due to Mo oxides (Mo 6+ and Mo 5+ ) and carbide (Mo 2+ ) were still apparent. Thermo-chemical treatment with 3 vol.% HCl solutions and heating up to 2900 deg. C resulted in further diminution of the Mo signal, with complete disappearance of Mo carbide species. Depth profiling of unused platforms by Ar + ion etching at increasing time periods demonstrated that, upon removal of several layers of carbonaceous material, the Mo signal disappears suggesting that this contamination is present only at the surface of the pyrolytic graphite platform

  20. Study of new structures adapted to gas-graphite and gas-heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    The experience acquired as a result of the operation of the Marcoule reactors and of the construction and start-up of the E.D.F. reactors on the one hand, and the conclusions of research and tests carried out out-of-pile on the other hand, lead to a considerable change in the general design of reactors of the gas-graphite type. The main modifications envisaged are analysed in the paper. The adoption of an annular fuel element and of a down-current cooling will make it possible to increase considerably the specific power and the power output of each channel; as a result there will be a considerable reduction in the number of the channels and a corresponding increase in the size of the unit cell. The graphite stack will have to be adapted to there new conditions. For security reasons, the use of prestressed concrete for the construction of the reactor vessel is becoming more widespread; they could lead to the exchangers and the fuel-handling apparatus becoming integrated inside the vessel (the so-called 'attic' device). A full-size mode) of this attic has been built at Saclay with the participation of EURATOM; the operational results obtained are presented as well as a new original design for the control rods. As for as the gas-heavy-water system is concerned, the research is carried out on two points of design; the first, which retains the use of horizontal pressure tubes, takes into account the experience acquired during the construction of the EL 4 reactor of which it will constitute an extrapolation; the second, arising from the research carried out on the gas-graphite system, will use a pre-stressed concrete vessel for holding the pressure, the moderator being almost at the same pressure as the cooling fluid and the fuel being placed in vertical channels. The relative merits of these two variants are analysed in the present paper. (authors) [fr

  1. A comparative study of size distribution of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation of graphite and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marton, Zs.; Landstroem, L.; Boman, M.; Heszler, P.

    2003-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were generated by ArF excimer laser ablation of graphite and tungsten targets in N 2 ambient at atmospheric pressure. The size distribution of the particles was monitored in situ by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) system, based on differential mobility analyser. The experimental conditions made possible to record the size distributions in the 7-133-nm diameter range and results are presented for different laser fluences, repetition rates and ablated areas, respectively. Material analysis was performed by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, X ray diffraction and SEM

  2. Study on structural recovery of graphite irradiated with swift heavy ions at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellemoine, F., E-mail: pellemoi@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Avilov, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bender, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Ewing, R.C. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Fernandes, S. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lang, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Li, W.X. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Mittig, W. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Schein, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Severin, D. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Tomut, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Laboratory of Magnetism and Superconductivity, National Institute for Materials Physics NIMP, Bucharest (Romania); Trautmann, C. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Dept. of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-12-15

    Thin graphite foils bombarded with an intense high-energy (8.6 MeV/u) gold beam reaching fluences up to 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} lead to swelling and electrical resistivity changes. As shown earlier, these effects are diminished with increasing irradiation temperature. The work reported here extends the investigation of beam induced changes of these samples by structural analysis using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. A nearly complete recovery from swelling at irradiation temperatures above about 1500 °C is identified.

  3. Synchrotron radiation studies of inorganic-organic semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.A.; Steiner, H.J.; Vearey-Roberts, A.R.; Bushell, A.; Cabailh, G.; O'Brien, S.; Wells, J.W.; McGovern, I.T.; Dhanak, V.R.; Kampen, T.U.; Zahn, D.R.T.; Batchelor, D.

    2003-01-01

    Organic semiconductors (polymers and small molecules) are widely used in electronic and optoelectronic technologies. Many devices are based on multilayer structures where interfaces play a central role in device performance and where inorganic semiconductor models are inadequate. Synchrotron radiation techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW) provide a powerful means of probing the structural, electronic and chemical properties of these interfaces. The surface-specificity of these techniques allows key properties to be monitored as the heterostructure is fabricated. This methodology has been directed at the growth of hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductor interfaces involving copper phthalocyanine as the model organic material and InSb and GaAs as the model inorganic semiconductor substrates. Core level PES has revealed that these interfaces are abrupt and chemically inert due to the weak bonding between the molecules and the inorganic semiconductor. NEXAFS studies have shown that there is a preferred orientation of the molecules within the organic semiconductor layers. The valence band offsets for the heterojunctions have been directly measured using valence level PES and were found to be very different for copper phthalocyanine on InSb and GaAs (0.7 and -0.3 eV respectively) although an interface dipole is present in both cases

  4. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  5. Experimental Study on the Force-Bearing Performance of Masonry Structures with a Marble-Graphite Slide Seismic Isolator at the Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suizi Jia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of the search for a seismic isolator for low-rise buildings, this paper proposes a marble-graphite slide seismic isolation system composed of marble-graphite slides, an upper foundation beam, the lower counterpart of the upper beam, and the corresponding stop blocks, with the stop blocks consisting of restrictive screws, positioning plates, nut connectors and stop holes linking the two foundation beams. To provide the desired isolation performance, plain mortar bars can be included at the beam interface to better control the initiating loads for foundation slippage. Tests of low-reversed cyclic loading were performed on four different masonry specimens: a recycled brick wall, a clay brick wall, an integrated recycled brick wall with flay ash blocks sandwiched between, and its clay brick counterpart. The four specimens were provided with marble-graphite slide isolators placed at the foundations. The isolator thickness was 20 mm, and the graphite and the marble served as a lubricant and a bearing, respectively. This paper then analyses all of the specimens in terms of the damage that occurred, the initiating load for slippage, the hysteretic performance, the bearing capacity and the performance of the stop blocks. The results indicate that mortar bars embedded in the marble-graphite slide isolator offer effective control of the initiating load, and the isolation system delivers good hysteretic performance. The stop blocks are capable of withstanding a large-magnitude earthquake and are a good choice for constraining the slippage displacement. Damage or failure of the specimens occurs only when the low-reversed cyclic loading continues after slippage takes place. The design is shown to be an outstanding and flexible seismic scheme for use in low-rise buildings.

  6. A comparative study of graphene and graphite-based field effect transistor on flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Kapil; Rani, Cheenu; Vaid, Monika; Kapoor, Ankit; Kumar, Pramod; Kumar, Sandeep; Shriwastawa, Shilpi; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Randhir; Tripathi, C. C.

    2018-06-01

    In the present era, there has been a great demand of cost-effective, biodegradable, flexible and wearable electronics which may open the gate to many applications like flexible displays, RFID tags, health monitoring devices, etc. Due to the versatile nature of plastic substrates, they have been extensively used in packaging, printing, etc. However, the fabrication of electronic devices requires specially prepared substrates with high quality surfaces, chemical compositions and solutions to the related fabrication issues along with its non-biodegradable nature. Therefore, in this report, a cost-effective, biodegradable cellulose paper as an alternative dielectric substrate material for the fabrication of flexible field effect transistor (FET) is presented. The graphite and liquid phase exfoliated graphene have been used as the material for the realisation of source, drain and channel on cellulose paper substrate for its comparative analysis. The mobility of fabricated FETs was calculated to be 83 cm2/V s (holes) and 33 cm2/V s (electrons) for graphite FET and 100 cm2/V s (holes) and 52 cm2/V s (electrons) for graphene FET, respectively. The output characteristic of the device demonstrates the linear behaviour and a comprehensive increase in conductance as a function of gate voltages. The fabricated FETs may be used for strain sensing, health care monitoring devices, human motion detection, etc.

  7. XPS Studies of LSCF Interfaces after Cell Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco DiGiuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The motivation of this investigation is to explore the possibility of using the depth profile capability of XPS to study interfaces after SOFC button cell testing. The literature uses XPS to study various cathode materials but has devoted little to the understanding of various cathode interfaces especially after testing. In this work, an SOFC button cell is first tested, and then, the LSCF cathode, barrier layer, and electrolyte are sputtered away to study the behavior of different interfaces. This work has shown that some elements have moved into other layers of the SOFC cell. It is argued that the migration of the elements is partly due to a redeposition mechanism after atoms are sputtered away, while the rest is due to interdiffusion between the SDC and YSZ layers. However, additional work is needed to better understand the mechanism by which atoms move around at different interfaces. The cell electrochemical performance is also discussed in some details but is not the focus.

  8. Cathodoluminescence study of Si/SiO2 interface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamoryarskaya, M.V.; Sokolov, V.I.; Plotnikov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of interface of thermal silicon oxide on p- and n-silicon with different content of activators (boron and phosphorus) was studied by using the method of the local cathodoluminescence (CL). The results of the CL study of the thick silicon oxide layers on silicon show that the content of the defects related with oxygen deficit decreases near the interface. In the same time, new bands in green and red range appear in CL spectra. The CL spectra of the layer with thickness 5-15 nm near interface are analogous to CL spectra of a composite of silicon nanoclusters and silicon oxide. The comparison of CL spectra of silicon oxide grown on p- and n-silicon shows that the film on p-silicon is characterized by higher concentration of silicon-deficit defects and silicon 'islands' near the surface. It may be the cause why the electrical hardness of silicon oxide on p-silicon is lower than the one on n-silicon. The integral electro-physical characteristics of silicon oxide also were measured. The bulk charge and the density of interface states of silicon oxide on p-silicon are higher than for oxide on n-silicon. The oxidization of n-silicon with nanostructure surface leads to the appearance of the CL bands related with oxygen deficit and silicon 'islands' in silicon oxide

  9. Experimental observation of the layering and wetting of multilayer liquid helium-4 films on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.

    1987-01-01

    The multilayer adsorption of liquid 4 He on graphite was studied by using third sound, a substrate-induced surface wave in a superfluid film, to probe the 4 He film-vapor interface. The third-sound velocity decreases with increasing film thickness and can be used to monitor the film growth. Graphite, forms of which have large areas of atomic uniformity, is an ideal substrate for the study of film growth and layering. An annular resonator made out of graphite fibers was used for the experiments. Such a resonator avoids problems such as capillary condensation present in earlier resonance experiments with graphite foam and vapor sound interference present in time-of-flight experiments with highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). Measurements of film growth were made between temperatures of 0.35 and 1.25 K. The third-sound resonance frequency, which is proportional to the third-sound velocity, was used to follow the film growth. Simultaneous measurements of the third-sound velocity on glass provide an independent measure of the film thickness. Results obtained show continuous film growth up to at least 25 to 30 layers on graphite. Oscillations of the third-sound velocity for low film coverages shown evidence of layering of the film

  10. Ab initio study on stacking sequences, free energy, dynamical stability and potential energy surfaces of graphite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, P; Valsakumar, M C; Chandra, Sharat; Panigrahi, B K

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio simulations have been performed to study the structure, energetics and stability of several plausible stacking sequences in graphite. These calculations suggest that in addition to the standard structures, graphite can also exist in AA-simple hexagonal, AB-orthorhombic and ABC-hexagonal type stacking. The free energy difference between these structures is very small (∼1 meV/atom), and hence all the structures can coexist from purely energetic considerations. Calculated x-ray diffraction patterns are similar to those of the standard structures for 2θ ⩽ 70°. Shear elastic constant C 44 is negative in AA-simple hexagonal, AB-orthorhombic and ABC-hexagonal structures, suggesting that these structures are mechanically unstable. Phonon dispersions show that the frequencies of some modes along the Γ–A direction in the Brillouin zone are imaginary in all of the new structures, implying that these structures are dynamically unstable. Incorporation of zero point vibrational energy via the quasi-harmonic approximation does not result in the restoration of dynamical stability. Potential energy surfaces for the unstable normal modes are seen to have the topography of a potential hill for all the new structures, confirming that all of the new structures are inherently unstable. The fact that the potential energy surface is not in the form of a double well implies that the structures are linearly as well as globally unstable. (paper)

  11. Studies on synthesis and hydrogenation behaviour of graphitic nanofibres prepared through palladium catalyst assisted thermal cracking of acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Tiwari, R.S.; Srivastava, O.N.

    2004-01-01

    The nano-variants of carbon including graphitic nanofibres (GNF) have recently been considered to be exotic (light weight, high storage capacity) hydrogen storage materials. In the present paper, we report growth of aligned bundles of GNF. The length and width of cross-section of the bundles is ∼50 and ∼25 μm, respectively. The length of individual GNF is ∼50 μm and diameter ∼0.25 μm. The GNFs have been synthesized through thermal decomposition of acetylene using palladium (Pd) sheets as catalyst. This represents a new form of catalyst. The GNFs bundles grown by the present method are easier to hydrogenate. They adsorb hydrogen at a lower pressure of ∼80 atm as against ∼120 atm for the GNF grown in the earlier studies. The storage capacity obtained in the present investigation is ∼17 wt.%. Electron microscopic investigations reveal that as against the as grown GNF, the hydrogenated version embodies microstructures exhibiting fragmentation of graphitic layer bundles. The reasons for the growth of GNF in the form of aligned bundles, the ease of hydrogenation and relevance of GNF fragmentation after hydrogenation have been outlined

  12. Study on the adsorption performance of composite adsorbent of CaCl2 and expanded graphite with ammonia as adsorbate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.L.; Wu, J.Y.; Xia, Z.Z.; Wang, R.Z.

    2009-01-01

    A novel constant volume test unit was built to study the adsorption performance of a new type composite adsorbent. This test unit can measure the adsorption isosteres of the working pairs. The adsorption isosteres are the curves of the adsorption pressure variation with the adsorption temperatures at constant adsorption quantities. Compared to the former test results of isothermals and isobars, the isosteres are better for the calculation of the adsorption heat, desorption heat and the selection the adsorption working pairs. Three experimental results were obtained: the first result was that the expanded graphite powders were superior to the expandable graphite powders to facilitate the transportation of working fluid in the composite adsorbent. The second one was that the composite adsorbent treated by solution is more homogeneous than the simple mixed composite adsorbent and the treated composite adsorbent has a better mass transfer performance. The last one was that the adsorption isosteres was the same one not only in the heating process but also in the cooling process and this performance was not relevant to the homogeneity of the composite adsorbent

  13. Studies on synthesis and hydrogenation behaviour of graphitic nanofibres prepared through palladium catalyst assisted thermal cracking of acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Tiwari, R.S.; Srivastava, O.N

    2004-11-03

    The nano-variants of carbon including graphitic nanofibres (GNF) have recently been considered to be exotic (light weight, high storage capacity) hydrogen storage materials. In the present paper, we report growth of aligned bundles of GNF. The length and width of cross-section of the bundles is {approx}50 and {approx}25 {mu}m, respectively. The length of individual GNF is {approx}50 {mu}m and diameter {approx}0.25 {mu}m. The GNFs have been synthesized through thermal decomposition of acetylene using palladium (Pd) sheets as catalyst. This represents a new form of catalyst. The GNFs bundles grown by the present method are easier to hydrogenate. They adsorb hydrogen at a lower pressure of {approx}80 atm as against {approx}120 atm for the GNF grown in the earlier studies. The storage capacity obtained in the present investigation is {approx}17 wt.%. Electron microscopic investigations reveal that as against the as grown GNF, the hydrogenated version embodies microstructures exhibiting fragmentation of graphitic layer bundles. The reasons for the growth of GNF in the form of aligned bundles, the ease of hydrogenation and relevance of GNF fragmentation after hydrogenation have been outlined.

  14. Study on the property of low friction complex graphite-like coating containing tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoping; Feng, Lajun; Shen, Wenning

    2018-03-01

    In order to enhance equipment lifetime under low oil or even dry conditions, tantalum was introduced into the graphite-like coating (GLC) by sputtering mosaic targets. The results showed that the introduction of Ta obviously reduced the friction coefficient and hardness of the GLC, while improved the wearability. When the atomic percentage of Ta was larger than 3%, the steady friction coefficient was lower than 0.01, suggesting the coating exhibited super lubricity. When the content of Ta was about 5.0%, the average friction coefficient was 0.02 by a sliding friction test under load of 20 N in unlubricated condition. Its average friction coefficient reduced by 75%, compared with that of control GLC (0.0825).

  15. A study on pore-opening behaviors of graphite nanofibers by a chemical activation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Joo; Lee, Young-Seak; Park, Soo-Jin

    2007-02-15

    In this work, porous graphite nanofibers (GNFs) were prepared by a KOH activation method in order to manufacture porous carbon nanofibers. The process was conducted in the activation temperature range of 900-1100 degrees C, and the KOH:GNFs ratio was fixed at 3.5:1. The textural properties of the porous carbons were analyzed using N2 adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The BET, D-R, and BJH equations were used to observe the specific surface areas and the micro- and mesopore structures, respectively. From the results, it was found that the textural properties, including the specific surface area and the pore volumes, were proportionally enhanced with increasing activation temperatures. However, the activation mechanisms showed quite significant differences between the samples activated at low and high temperatures.

  16. RBS study of Ti/ZnO interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.M.A.; Narusawa, T.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the interface stability of the Ti(overlayer)/ZnO(substrate) system. Ti thin film was grown on the Zn face of single crystal ZnO(0 0 0 1) substrate by the vacuum deposition technique. The Ti film thickness was typically 16 nm. Then the samples were annealed in air at 300 and 400 deg. C for 15 min, respectively. The deposition and annealing effects on the interface structure were investigated with Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectroscopy using 2 MeV He + ion beam. After Ti deposition the minimum yield from the ZnO substrate increased from 2% to 7%. This suggests severe damage caused by deposition, i.e. the interface reaction between Ti and ZnO (even at room temperature). A significant amount of Zn (approximately 6.4 x 10 16 atoms/cm 2 ) moved onto the surface after post-annealing at 400 deg. C. Since Ti has a stronger tendency to react with O than Zn, it is expected that Ti reacts with substrate oxygen leaving behind free Zn atoms, which can easily migrate onto the surface. We discuss how the Ti/ZnO interface reaction in detail, and seek to find another good metallic contact for ZnO devices, which are attracting much attention recently for practical applications as well as scientific aspects

  17. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of graphite materials prepared by high-temperature treatment of unburned carbon concentrates from combustion fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel Cabielles; Jean-Nol Rouzaud; Ana B. Garcia [Instituto Nacional del Carbn (INCAR), Oviedo (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used in this work to study the microstructural (structure and microtexture) changes occurring during the high-temperature treatment of the unburned carbon concentrates from coal combustion fly ashes. Emphasis was placed on two aspects: (i) the development of graphitic carbon structures and (ii) the disordered carbon forms remaining in the graphitized samples. In addition, by coupling HRTEM with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, the transformations with the temperature of the inorganic matter (mainly iron- and silicon-based phases) of the unburned carbon concentrates were evidenced. The HRTEM results were compared to the averaged structural order of the materials as evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. As indicated by XRD and Raman parameters, more-ordered materials were obtained from the unburned carbon concentrates with higher mineral/inorganic matter, thus inferring the catalytic effect of some of their components. However, the average character of the information provided by these instrumental techniques seems to be inconclusive in discriminating between carbon structures with different degrees of order (stricto sensu graphite, graphitic, turbostratic, etc.) in a given graphitized unburned carbon. Unlike XRD and Raman, HRTEM is a useful tool for imaging directly the profile of the polyaromatic layers (graphene planes), thus allowing the sample heterogeneity to be looked at, specifically the presence of disordered carbon phases. 49 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J; Scott, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK's first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600-1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment.

  19. Study of solute segregation at interfaces using Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial segregation, often confined to within a few atomic distances of the interface, can strongly influence the processing and properties of metals and ceramics. The thinness of such solute-enriched regions can cause them to be particularly suitable for study using surface sensitive microanalytical techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The application of AES to studies of interfacial segregation in metals and ceramics is briefly reviewed, and several examples are presented. 43 references, 14 figures

  20. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  1. Study of the oxidation process of disperse Fe-C containing waste in order to obtain graphite intercalation compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Олександрович Маслов

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Graphite processing into intercalation compounds followed by thermoshock heating is known in literature. The result is an ultra-light dispersed graphite (thermographenit used in lots of industries. Graphite intercalation compounds are formed as a result of the introduction of atomic and molecular layers of different chemical particles between the layers of graphite plates. The object of this work is to obtain a new material by intercalation of graphite followed by thermoshock heating, which could be used for products protecting biological and technical facilities from electromagnetic and thermal radiation. In the present work the parameters of oxidation and of graphite thermoshock expansion in order to obtain graphite intercalation compounds and thermographenit were investigated. The experiments were performed under laboratory non-isothermal conditions. Graphite GAK-2 obtained from metallurgical wastes was used. First the fraction of +0,16 mm with the ash content of 0,3% was extracted by scattering. The oxidation of graphite was carried out by potassium bichromate dissolved in concentrated sulphuric acid. The original sample of graphite was mixed with finely grounded potassium bichromate. Then this mass was poured over with 98% concentrated sulphuric acid when being actively stirred and kept. Then the capacitance for oxidation was filled with distilled water. Decantation was carried out until pH=7 in the waste water was got. Separation of the oxidized graphite from the main mass of water was carried out by means of a suction filter until pH=7 was got. Experiments were performed at different ratios of potassium bichromate, sulphuric acid and graphite. The optimum ratio of the components (sulphuric acid : (dichromate of potash : (graphite = 2,8 : 0,15 : 1 was found. The oxidation time was 4–5 minutes. The oxidized graphite turned into thermographenit with bulk density of 2,7–9,5 kg/m3.upon subsequent heating up to 1000oC within the regime of

  2. Study of Ag and PE interface after plasma treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Bočan, Jiří; Švorčík, V.; Pavlík, J.; Strýhal, Z.; Sajdl, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2008), s. 964-967 ISSN 1862-6351. [9th International workshop on plasma based ion implantation and deposition. Leipzig, 02.09.2007-06.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : RBS and AFM study * metal-polymer interface * plasma treatment Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  3. In-situ electrochemical coating of Ag nanoparticles onto graphite electrode with enhanced performance for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Yan; Gao, Tian; Zheng, Huiyuan; Shen, Ming; Qu, Qunting; Zheng, Honghe

    2015-01-01

    The effects of silver hexafluorophosphate (AgPF 6 ) as an electrolyte additive on the electrochemical behaviors of graphite anode are systematically studied by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The surface structure and composition of graphite electrode after electrochemical cycles are investigated through scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that Ag nanoparticles derived from electrochemical reduction of Ag + are homogenously distributed on the graphite surface. Significant improvements on the discharge capacity, rate behavior, and low-temperature performance of graphite electrode are obtained. The reasons are associated with the decreased resistances of solid-electrolyte interface and charge-transfer process, which improve the electrode kinetics for Li + intercalation/deintercalation

  4. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  5. A structural study of solid electrolyte interface on negative electrode of lithium-Ion battery by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Watanabe, Jiro; Nakao, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Seiichi

    2014-11-01

    For the last decades, the performance of the lithium-ion battery (LIB) has been significantly improved and its applications have been expanding rapidly. However, its performance has yet to be enhanced.In the lithium-ion battery development, it is important to elucidate the electrode structure change in detail during the charge and discharge cycling. In particular, solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed by decomposition of the electrolytes on the graphite negative electrode surface should play an important role for battery properties. Therefore, it is essential to control the structure and composition of SEI to improve the battery performance. Here, we conducted a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) study to elucidate the structures of the SEI during the charge and discharge process using LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 [1] cathode and graphite anode. [2] Since SEI is a lithium-containing compound with high activity, it was observed without being exposed to the atmosphere. The electrodes including SEI were sampled after dismantling batteries with cutoff voltages of 3V and 4.2V for the charge process and 3V for the discharge process. Fig.1 shows SEM images of the graphite electrode surface during the charge and discharge process. The change of the SEI structure during the process was clearly observed. Further, TEM images showed that the SEI grew thicker during the charge process and becomes thinner when discharged. These results with regard to the reversible SEI structure could give a new insight for the battery development.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i21/DFU056F1F1DFU056F1Fig. 1.SEM images of the graphite electrode surface:(a) before charge process;(b) with charge-cutoff voltage of 3.0V; (c) with charge-cutoff voltage of 4.2V; (d) with discharge-cutoff voltage of 3.0V. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A PIV Study of Drop-interface Coalescence with Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Dong, Teng; Angeli, Panagiota

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the coalescence of a drop with an aqueous-organic interface was studied by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The effect of surfactants on the drop surface evolution, the vorticity field and the kinetic energy distribution in the drop during coalescence were investigated. The coalescence took place in an acrylic rectangular box with 79% glycerol solution at the bottom and Exxsol D80 oil above. The glycerol solution drop was generated through a nozzle fixed at 2cm above the aqueous/oil interface and was seeded with Rhodamine particles. The whole process was captured by a high-speed camera. Different mass ratios of non-ionic surfactant Span80 to oil were studied. The increase of surfactant concentration promoted deformation of the interface before the rupture of the trapped oil film. At the early stages after film rupture, two counter-rotating vortices appeared at the bottom of the drop which then travelled to the upper part. The propagation rates, as well as the intensities of the vortices decreased at high surfactant concentrations. At early stages, the kinetic energy was mainly distributed near the bottom part of the droplet, while at later stages it was distributed near the upper part of the droplet. Programme Grant MEMPHIS, Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC).

  7. Study on the mechanism of deoxidization and purification for Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} molten salt via graphite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Meng-ya [Shanghai University, Department of Chemistry, Shanghai 200444 (China); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, Li [Shanghai University, Department of Chemistry, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ding, Ya-ping, E-mail: wdingyp@sina.com [Shanghai University, Department of Chemistry, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhang, Guo-xin, E-mail: zgxstone@hotmail.com [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Graphite nanoparticles originated from high purity graphite crucible were used for deoxidization and purification of Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} molten salt containing a bit of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}BeF{sub 4} under high temperature vacuum condition. And the mechanism of deoxidization and purification via graphite nanoparticles was put forward based on analysis of sample characterization and chemical reaction Gibbs free energy calculation. The morphology, particle size, chemical composition and crystal structure of graphite nanoparticles in Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} molten salt were characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM, SAED and EDS). Phase analysis, total oxygen content, full elemental and anion concentration for as-prepared Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} products were studied by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), LECO nitrogen-oxygen analyzer, Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Ion Chromatography (IC), respectively. The results of sample characterization showed that graphite nanoparticles in Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} molten salt were the poly-crystal round sheet shape with an average diameter of <100 nm. The concentration of total oxygen, sulfur and nickel in as-prepared Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} molten salt after treatment were 548 ppm, <0.6 ppm and <0.4 ppm, respectively. Experiment and calculation all showed that SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and NO{sub 3}{sup −} could react with carbon at 700 °C. And vacuum degassing play an excellent role in deoxidization and purification for Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} molten salt via graphite nanoparticles.

  8. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenço, Ana; Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo; Kacperek, Andrzej; Vondracek, Vladimir; Royle, Gary; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  9. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenço, Ana, E-mail: am.lourenco@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Kacperek, Andrzej [National Eye Proton Therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Vondracek, Vladimir [Proton Therapy Center, Budinova 1a, Prague 8 CZ-180 00 (Czech Republic); Royle, Gary [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and Medical Physics Group, EBG MedAustron GmbH, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  10. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianqiu, E-mail: jianqiu@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hin, Celine [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road-MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen release process at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface has been investigated. • A mathematical model that estimates the hydrogen release potential has been proposed. • Al atoms, Al−O bonds, and Si−Al bonds are the major hydrogen traps at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Hydrogen atoms are primarily release from Al−H and O−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. - Abstract: The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Al−Si bonds, passivating a Si sp{sup 3} orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Al−O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Al−H−Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated O−H, Si−H and Al−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the O−H and Si−H bonds, but strengthens the Al−H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Al−H bonds and O−H bonds are more important than Si−H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  11. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  12. First principles studies of complex oxide surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, Claudine; Finocchi, Fabio; Goniakowski, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    Oxides enter our everyday life and exhibit an impressive variety of physical and chemical properties. The understanding of their behaviour, which is often determined by the electronic and atomic structures of their surfaces and interfaces, is a key question in many fields, such as geology, environmental chemistry, catalysis, thermal coatings, microelectronics, and bioengineering. In the last decade, first principles methods, mainly those based on the density functional theory, have been frequently applied to study complex oxide surfaces and interfaces, complementing the experimental observations. In this work, we discuss some of these contributions, with emphasis on several issues that are especially important when dealing with oxides: the local electronic structure at interfaces, and its connection with chemical reactivity; the charge redistribution and the bonding variations, in relation to screening properties; and the possibility of bridging the gap between model and real systems by taking into account the chemical environments and the effect of finite temperatures, and by performing simulations on systems of an adequate (large) size

  13. Temperature and irradiation effects on the behaviour of 14C and its precursor 14N in nuclear graphite. Study of a decontamination process using steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbermann, Gwennaelle

    2013-01-01

    The dismantling of UNGG reactors in France will generate about 23 000 tons of radioactive graphite wastes. To manage these wastes, the radiological inventory and data on radionuclides (RN) location and speciation should be determined. 14 C was identified as an important RN for disposal due to its high initial activity and the risk of release of a mobile organic fraction in environment, after water ingress into the disposal. Hence, the objective of this thesis, carried out in partnership with EDF is to implement experimental studies to simulate and evaluate the impact of temperature, irradiation and graphite radiolytic corrosion on the in reactor behavior of 14 C and its precursor, 14 N. The obtained data are then used to study the thermal decontamination of graphite in presence of water vapor. The experimental approach aims at simulating the presence of 14 C and 14 N by the respective ion implantation of 13 C and 14 N or 15 N in virgin graphite. This study shows that, in the temperature range reached during reactor operation, (100-500 C) and without radiolytic corrosion, 13 C is thermally stable whatever the initial graphite structure. Moreover, irradiation experiments were performed on heated graphite (500 C) put in contact with a gas representative of the radiolized coolant gas. They show the synergistic role played by the oxidative species and the graphite structure disorder on the enhancement of 13 C mobility resulting in the gasification of the graphite surface and/or the selective oxidation of 13 C more weakly bound than 12 C. Concerning the pristine nitrogen, we showed first that the surface concentration reaches several hundred ppm (≤500 ppm at) and decreases at deeper depths to about 160 ppm at.. Unlike implanted 13 C, implanted nitrogen migrates at 500 C when the graphite is highly disordered (about 8 dpa) while remaining stable for a lower disorder rate (0.14 dpa). Experiments also show the synergistic role by electronic excitations and temperature

  14. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  15. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A.N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite exhibits

  16. A Neutron-Diffraction Study of the Solid Layers at the Liquid Solid Boundary in 4He-Films Adsorbed on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Costa Carneiro, Kim; Passell, L.; Thomlinson, W.

    1981-01-01

    A neutron scattering study of the structure of 4He films adsorbed on graphite is reported. Diffraction from helium monolayers at a temperature of 1.2K shows the formation of an incommensurate, triangular-lattice solid of high density. As the coverage is increased above two layers, the diffraction...

  17. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  18. Study and simulation of human interface; Human interface kenkyu to simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitani, H. [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Nara (Japan)

    1996-10-05

    Validation researches have begun about the interrelationship between systems and human beings using a virtual-reality plant environment. This article introduces some recent studies about the human interface in an operation control system in a virtual-reality environment. The evaluation of a system from the viewpoint of ease of use is called a usability test, to which a psychological protocol analysis is applied for finding out problematic points by carefully observing the operator actually operating the system. For instance, in a boiler plant simulator constructed for DCS training, the operator is given some tasks, such as the prediction as to how a certain event will develop, probing of the cause of anomalies, and execution of related operations. Video cameras are installed at various spots for the minute observation of facial expressions and behavior of the operator, and the operator`s recognition, thought, behavior, and utterances, expressed by the operator facially or verbally, are recorded and analyzed, and the results are utilized for system improvement and operator training. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Study of physicochemical stability of the copper/polyphenylquinoxaline interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, R.; Palleau, J.; Oberlin, J. C.; Pantel, R.; Laviale, D.; Templier, F.; Torres, J.; Giustiniani, R.; Cros, A.

    Thin film technologies are now applied in building up multilayered chip to chip interconnections to achieve agressive requirement such as high electrical performance or extreme compactness. Copper as conductor and a new polymeric material, a poly phenyl quinoxaline, as dielectric have been chose to fulfill demanding electrical and physical conditions. Thermal stability at the interface Cu/polymer and polymer/Cu during polymer curing process is very important to preserve good adhesion between the conductor and dielectric materials. We have studied in this work the interfacial behavior as a function of annealing temperature and of annealing atmosphere.

  20. 2008 ULTRASONIC BENCHMARK STUDIES OF INTERFACE CURVATURE--A SUMMARY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerr, L. W.; Huang, R.; Raillon, R.; Mahaut, S.; Leymarie, N.; Lonne, S.; Song, S.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Spies, M.; Lupien, V.

    2009-01-01

    In the 2008 QNDE ultrasonic benchmark session researchers from five different institutions around the world examined the influence that the curvature of a cylindrical fluid-solid interface has on the measured NDE immersion pulse-echo response of a flat-bottom hole (FBH) reflector. This was a repeat of a study conducted in the 2007 benchmark to try to determine the sources of differences seen in 2007 between model-based predictions and experiments. Here, we will summarize the results obtained in 2008 and analyze the model-based results and the experiments.

  1. Improvement on the electrochemical characteristics of graphite anodes by coating of the pyrolytic carbon using tumbling chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Young-Soo; Lee, Jai-Young

    2003-01-01

    The electrochemical characteristics of graphite coated with pyrolytic carbon materials using tumbling chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process have been studied for the active material of anodes in lithium ion secondary batteries. Coating of pyrolytic carbons on the surface of graphite particles, which tumble in a rotating reactor tube, was performed through the pyrolysis of liquid propane gas (LPG). The surface morphology of these graphite particles coated with pyrolytic carbon has been observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface of graphite particles can well be covered with pyrolytic carbon by tumbling CVD. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image of these carbon particles shows that the core part is highly ordered carbon, while the shell part is disordered carbon. We have found that the new-type carbon obtained from tumbling CVD has a uniform core (graphite)-shell (pyrolytic carbon) structure. The electrochemical property of the new-type carbons has been examined using a charge-discharge cycler. The coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite can effectively reduce the initial irreversible capacity by 47.5%. Cyclability and rate-capability of theses carbons with the core-shell structure are much better than those of bare graphite. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) spectra, it is found that the coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite causes the decrease of the contact resistance in the carbon electrodes, which means the formation of solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer is suppressed. We suggest that coating of pyrolytic carbon by the tumbling CVD is an effective method in improving the electrochemical properties of graphite electrodes for lithium ion secondary batteries

  2. Proposal of adaptive human interface and study of interface evaluation method for plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Hiroshi; Kubota, Ryuji.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, a new concept of human interface adaptive to plant operators' mental model, cognitive process and psychological state which change with time is proposed. It is composed of a function to determine information which should be indicated to operators based on the plant situation, a function to estimate operators' internal conditions, and a function to arrange the information amount, position, timing, form etc. based on their conditions. The method to evaluate the fitness of the interface by using the analysis results based on cognitive science, ergonomics, psychology and physiology is developed to achieve such an interface. Fundamental physiological experiments have been performed. Stress and workload can be identified by the ratio of the power average of the α wave fraction of a brain wave and be distinguished by the ratio of the standard deviation of the R-R interval in test and at rest, in the case of low stress such as mouse operation, calculation and walking. (author)

  3. Proposal of adaptive human interface and study of interface evaluation method for plant operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujita, Hiroshi [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Research Lab.; Kubota, Ryuji

    1994-07-01

    In this report, a new concept of human interface adaptive to plant operators' mental model, cognitive process and psychological state which change with time is proposed. It is composed of a function to determine information which should be indicated to operators based on the plant situation, a function to estimate operators' internal conditions, and a function to arrange the information amount, position, timing, form etc. based on their conditions. The method to evaluate the fitness of the interface by using the analysis results based on cognitive science, ergonomics, psychology and physiology is developed to achieve such an interface. Fundamental physiological experiments have been performed. Stress and workload can be identified by the ratio of the power average of the [alpha] wave fraction of a brain wave and be distinguished by the ratio of the standard deviation of the R-R interval in test and at rest, in the case of low stress such as mouse operation, calculation and walking. (author).

  4. Space station automation and robotics study. Operator-systems interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    This is the final report of a Space Station Automation and Robotics Planning Study, which was a joint project of the Boeing Aerospace Company, Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, and Boeing Computer Services Company. The study is in support of the Advanced Technology Advisory Committee established by NASA in accordance with a mandate by the U.S. Congress. Boeing support complements that provided to the NASA Contractor study team by four aerospace contractors, the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and the California Space Institute. This study identifies automation and robotics (A&R) technologies that can be advanced by requirements levied by the Space Station Program. The methodology used in the study is to establish functional requirements for the operator system interface (OSI), establish the technologies needed to meet these requirements, and to forecast the availability of these technologies. The OSI would perform path planning, tracking and control, object recognition, fault detection and correction, and plan modifications in connection with extravehicular (EV) robot operations.

  5. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on thermal conductivity of the graphite/aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.B. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zhe.chen@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhong, S.Y.; Wu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ji, G. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59655 (France); Wang, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Various graphite fillers, such as graphite particles, graphite fibers, graphite flakes and porous graphite blocks, have been successfully incorporated into an Al alloy by squeeze casting in order to fabricate graphite/Al composites with enhanced thermal conductivity (TC). Microstructural characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy has revealed a tightly-adhered, clean and Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}-free interface between the graphite fillers and the Al matrix in all the as-fabricated composites. Taking the microstructural features into account, we generalized the corresponding predictive models for the TCs of these composites with the effective medium approximation and the Maxwell mean-field scheme, which both show good agreement with the experimental data. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on the TCs of the composites were further discussed. - Highlights: • The thermal enhancement of various graphite fillers with different topology structures. • Predictive models for the thermal conductivity of different topology structures. • Oriented flakes alignment has the high potentials for thermal enhancement.

  6. First Principle simulations of electrochemical interfaces - a DFT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Rizwan

    for the whole system to qualify as a proper electrochemical interface. I have also contributed to the model, which accounts for pH in the first principle electrode-electrolyte interface simulations. This is an important step forward, since electrochemical reaction rate and barrier for charge transfer can......In this thesis, I have looked beyond the computational hydrogen electrode (CHE) model, and focused on the first principle simulations which treats the electrode-electrolyte interfaces explicitly. Since obtaining a realistic electrode-electrolyte interface was difficult, I aimed to address various...... challenges regarding first principle electrochemical interface modeling in order to bridge the gap between the model interface used in simulations and real catalyst at operating conditions. Atomic scale insight for the processes and reactions that occur at the electrochemical interface presents a challenge...

  7. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  8. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  9. Degradation Mechanisms of Electrochemically Cycled Graphite Anodes in Lithium-ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sandeep

    This research is aimed at developing advanced characterization methods for studying the surface and subsurface damage in Li-ion battery anodes made of polycrystalline graphite and identifying the degradation mechanisms that cause loss of electrochemical capacity. Understanding microstructural aspects of the graphite electrode degradation mechanisms during charging and discharging of Li-ion batteries is of key importance in order to design durable anodes with high capacity. An in-situ system was constructed using an electrochemical cell with an observation window, a large depth-of-field digital microscope and a micro-Raman spectrometer. It was revealed that electrode damage by removal of the surface graphite fragments of 5-10 mum size is the most intense during the first cycle that led to a drastic capacity drop. Once a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer covered the electrode surface, the rate of graphite particle loss decreased. Yet, a gradual loss of capacity continued by the formation of interlayer cracks adjacent to SEI/graphite interfaces. Deposition of co-intercalation compounds, LiC6, Li2CO3 and Li2O, near the crack tips caused partial closure of propagating graphite cracks during cycling and reduced the crack growth rate. Bridging of crack faces by delaminated graphite layers also retarded crack propagation. The microstructure of the SEI layer, formed by electrochemical reduction of the ethylene carbonate based electrolyte, consisted of ˜5-20 nm sized crystalline domains (containing Li2CO3, Li2O 2 and nano-sized graphite fragments) dispersed in an amorphous matrix. During the SEI formation, two regimes of Li-ion diffusion were identified at the electrode/electrolyte interface depending on the applied voltage scan rate (dV/dt). A low Li-ion diffusion coefficient ( DLi+) at dV/dt microscopic information to the electrochemical performance, novel Li2CO3-coated electrodes were fabricated that were durable. The SEI formed on pre-treated electrodes reduced

  10. Body machine interfaces for neuromotor rehabilitation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierella, Camilla; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Pedersen, Jessica; Chen, David; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Casadio, Maura

    2014-01-01

    High-level spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors face every day two related problems: recovering motor skills and regaining functional independence. Body machine interfaces (BoMIs) empower people with sever motor disabilities with the ability to control an external device, but they also offer the opportunity to focus concurrently on achieving rehabilitative goals. In this study we developed a portable, and low-cost BoMI that addresses both problems. The BoMI remaps the user's residual upper body mobility to the two coordinates of a cursor on a computer monitor. By controlling the cursor, the user can perform functional tasks, such as entering text and playing games. This framework also allows the mapping between the body and the cursor space to be modified, gradually challenging the user to exercise more impaired movements. With this approach, we were able to change the behavior of our SCI subject, who initially used almost exclusively his less impaired degrees of freedom - on the left side - for controlling the BoMI. At the end of the few practice sessions he had restored symmetry between left and right side of the body, with an increase of mobility and strength of all the degrees of freedom involved in the control of the interface. This is the first proof of concept that our BoMI can be used to control assistive devices and reach specific rehabilitative goals simultaneously.

  11. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  12. Nanostructured interfaces for enhancing mechanical properties of composites: Computational micromechanical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Computational micromechanical studies of the effect of nanostructuring and nanoengineering of interfaces, phase and grain boundaries of materials on the mechanical properties and strength of materials and the potential of interface nanostructuring to enhance the materials properties are reviewed....

  13. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  14. Chemical sputtering of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, N.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Y.V.

    1976-01-01

    In a study of the sputtering coefficient S for the sputtering of graphite by 10-keV H + ions as a function of the graphite temperature during the bombardment, it is found that at T> or =750degreeC the coefficient S is independent of the target temperature and has an anomalously high value, S=0.085 atom/ion. The high rate of sputtering of graphite by atomic hydrogen ions is shown to be due to chemical sputtering of the graphite, resulting primarily in the formation of CH 4 molecules. At T=1100degreeC, S falls off by a factor of about 3. A model for the chemical sputtering of graphite is proposed

  15. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m −2 and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface

  16. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India); Rao, M. S. Ramachandra [Department of Physics and Nano-Functional Materials Technology Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India); Nanda, B. R. K., E-mail: nandab@iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  17. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions in physisorbed monolayers of rare gases on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, J.

    1984-01-01

    This study is an investigation of phase transition in monoatomic layers adsorbed on graphite. Such effects can be considered physical realizations of two-dimensional systems. The experimental technique used is synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Systems which have been investigated include the commensurate-incommensurate phase transition in krypton monolayer. By adjusting the spreading pressure in the krypton layer by means of a coadsorbent deuterium gas it has been unambiguously demonstrated that at low temperatures the phase transition is of first order. A melting study of incommensurate argon monolayers demonstrates an experimental verification of the possibility for having a continuous melting transition in two-dimensions. Mixtures of two-components have been investigated for their phases. No (chemical) order-disorder transition is seen. A discussion is given on this lack of a chemical order. This lack is utilized to study the commensurate-incommensurate phase transition driven by average particle size. Finally, a special low-temperature phase is identified in a xenon monlayer which is diluted with freon. (Auth.)

  18. Transition between scanning tunneling microscopy images of alkane derivatives on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibino, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAMs of dialkyl sulfides form at the liquid–graphite interface. • STM contrast of molecules change reversibly between zigzag and aligned bright spot patterns. • The free energy for contrast change is smaller than the thermal energy (RT). • STM contrast change is caused by electronic effects and registry of the alkyl chains. - Abstract: Self-assembled monolayers of alkylated sulfides containing two alkyl chains and a sulfur atom positioned at the center of the molecules were studied on a graphite surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). STM images of the closed-packed alkyl chains that extend linearly from the sulfur atoms change reversibly between a zigzag pattern and an aligned bright spot pattern on a time scale of minutes. The observation times of the zigzag and aligned bright spot patterns indicate that the difference between the free energies of these two stable molecular configurations with respect to the graphite surface is smaller than their thermal energies in the presence of a solvent, and 10 times smaller than the theoretical free energy between parallel and perpendicular configurations of the alkyl chains on graphite under vacuum. The change in the contrast of the STM images occurred owing to the electronic effects that depend on the registry of the alkyl chains on the graphite surface, and not by the classical observation of transfer between parallel and perpendicular orientations of alkyl chains on the surface.

  19. A study on amphiphilic fluorinated block copolymer in graphite exfoliation using supercritical CO2 for stable graphene dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hyun; Lee, Hyang Moo; Choi, Sung Wook; Cheong, In Woo

    2018-01-15

    In this study, poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PTFEMA-b-PVP) was synthesized by stepwise reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization for the preparation of graphene by the exfoliation of graphite nanoplatelets (GPs) in supercritical CO 2 (SCCO 2 ). Two different block copolymers (low and high molecular weights) were prepared with the same block ratio and used at different concentrations in the SCCO 2 process. The amount of PTFEMA-b-PVP adsorbed on the GPs and the electrical conductivity of the SCCO 2 -treated GP samples were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and four-point probe method, respectively. All GP samples treated with SCCO 2 were then dispersed in methanol and the dispersion stability was investigated using online turbidity measurements. The concentration and morphology of few-layer graphene stabilized with PTFEMA-b-PVP in the supernatant solution were investigated by gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Destabilization study of the graphene dispersions revealed that the longer block copolymer exhibited better affinity for graphene, resulting in a higher yield of stable graphene with minimal defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidation behavior of IG and NBG nuclear graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woong-Ki; Kim, Byung-Joo [Jeonju Institute of Machinery and Carbon Composites Palbokdong-2ga, 817, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Seon; Chi, Se-Hwan [Dept. of Nuclear Hydrogen Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.k [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha Univ., 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Water contact angles on nuclear graphite before and after oxidation treatments: the pictures show the contact angles obtained under deionized water on oxidation-treated and untreated nuclear graphite. The water contact angles are decreased after oxidation due to the increase in the hydrophilic. Display Omitted Research highlights: The average pore size of graphites shows an increase after the oxidation treatments. They also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. - Abstract: This work studies the oxidation-induced characteristics of four nuclear graphites (NBG-17, NBG-25, IG-110, and IG-430). The oxidation characteristics of the nuclear graphites were measured at 600 {sup o}C. The surface properties of the oxidation graphites were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle methods. The N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherm characteristics, including the specific surface area and micropore volume, were investigated by means of BET and t-plot methods. The experimental results show an increase in the average pore size of graphites; they also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. For example the surface area of NBG-17 increases slightly whereas the surface area of IG-110 increases significantly. This result confirms that the original surface state of each graphite is unique.

  1. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  2. Studies of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphite Oxide in the Aspect of Their Possible Application in Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Sabina; Muzyka, Roksana; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz; Kotyczka-Morańska, Michalina; Setkiewicz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations on resistance structures based on graphite oxide (GRO) and graphene oxide (rGO). The subject matter of the investigations was thaw the sensitivity of the tested structures was affected by hydrogen, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide. The experiments were performed at a temperature range from 30 °C to 150 °C in two carrier gases: nitrogen and synthetic air. The measurements were also aimed at characterization of the graphite oxide and graphene oxide. In our measurements we used (among others) techniques such as: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM); Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); Raman Spectroscopy (RS); Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Microscopy (XPS). The data resulting from the characterizations of graphite oxide and graphene oxide have made it possible to interpret the obtained results from the point of view of physicochemical changes occurring in these structures. PMID:26784198

  3. Studies of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphite Oxide in the Aspect of Their Possible Application in Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Sabina; Muzyka, Roksana; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz; Kotyczka-Morańska, Michalina; Setkiewicz, Maciej

    2016-01-15

    The paper presents the results of investigations on resistance structures based on graphite oxide (GRO) and graphene oxide (rGO). The subject matter of the investigations was thaw the sensitivity of the tested structures was affected by hydrogen, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide. The experiments were performed at a temperature range from 30 °C to 150 °C in two carrier gases: nitrogen and synthetic air. The measurements were also aimed at characterization of the graphite oxide and graphene oxide. In our measurements we used (among others) techniques such as: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM); Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); Raman Spectroscopy (RS); Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Microscopy (XPS). The data resulting from the characterizations of graphite oxide and graphene oxide have made it possible to interpret the obtained results from the point of view of physicochemical changes occurring in these structures.

  4. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  5. Ab initio study of the effects of thin CsI coatings on the work function of graphite cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Vasilios; Booske, John H.; Morgan, Dane

    2007-10-01

    Cesium-iodide (CsI)-coated graphite cathodes are promising electron sources for high power microwave generators, but the mechanism driving the improved emission is not well understood. Therefore, an ab initio modeling investigation on the effects of thin CsI coatings on graphite has been carried out. It is demonstrated that the CsI coatings reduce the work function of the system significantly through a mechanism of induced dipoles. The results suggest that work function modification is a major contribution to the improved emission seen when CsI coatings are applied to C.

  6. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  7. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  8. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  9. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  10. Molecular modeling studies of structural properties of polyvinyl alcohol: a comparative study using INTERFACE force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosinski, Lukasz; Labus, Karolina

    2017-10-05

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a material with a variety of applications in separation, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Using combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, we present an extensive comparative study of second- and third-generation force fields Universal, COMPASS, COMPASS II, PCFF, and the newly developed INTERFACE, as applied to this system. In particular, we show that an INTERFACE force field provides a possibility of composing a reliable atomistic model to reproduce density change of PVA matrix in a narrow temperature range (298-348 K) and calculate a thermal expansion coefficient with reasonable accuracy. Thus, the INTERFACE force field may be used to predict mechanical properties of the PVA system, being a scaffold for hydrogels, with much greater accuracy than latter approaches. Graphical abstract Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo studies indicate that it is possible to predict properties of the PVA in narrow temperature range by using the INTERFACE force field.

  11. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  12. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  13. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  14. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  15. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  16. Thermodynamic Studies of Decane on Boron Nitride and Graphite Substrates Using Synchrotron Radiation and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Nicholas; Arnold, Thomas; Forster, Matthew; Parker, Julia; Larese, J. Z.; Diamond Light Source Collaboration; University of Tennessee Team

    2014-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has a lattice structure similar to that of graphite with a slightly larger lattice parameter in the basal plane. This, among other properties, makes it an excellent substrate in place of graphite, eliciting some important differences. This work is part of a larger effort to examine the interaction of alkanes with magnesium oxide, graphite, and boron nitride surfaces. In our current presentation, we will discuss the interaction of decane with these surfaces. Decane exhibits a fully commensurate structure on graphite and hBN at monolayer coverages. In this particular experiment, we have examined the monolayer structure of decane adsorbed on the basal plane of hBN using synchrotron x-ray radiation at Diamond Light Source. Additionally, we have examined the system experimentally with volumetric isotherms as well as computationally using molecular dynamics simulations. The volumetric isotherms allow us to calculate properties which provide important information about the adsorbate's interaction with not only neighboring molecules, but also the interaction with the adsorbent boron nitride.

  17. Thermal stability study of semimetal graphite n-InP and n-GaN Schottky diodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 5 (2013) ISSN 0268-1242 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12014 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Gallium nitride * Schottky barrier diodes * Graphite Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.206, year: 2013

  18. Adsorbed Layers of D2, H2, O2, and 3He on Graphite Studied by Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; McTague, J. P.; Ellenson, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    The phase diagrams of adsorbed monolayers of D2, H2, O2, and 3He on graphite have been measured by neutron diffraction. H2 and D2-layers have a registered √3 structure at low coverages, and at monolayer completion they have a dense triangular structure, which is incommensurate with the substrate...

  19. Morphological changes of porphine films on graphite by perchloric and phosphoric electrolytes. An electrochemical-AFM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yivlialin, Rossella; Penconi, Marta; Bussetti, Gianlorenzo; Biroli, Alessio Orbelli; Finazzi, Marco; Duò, Lamberto; Bossi, Alberto

    2018-06-01

    Organic molecules have been proposed as promising candidates for electrode protection in acidic electrolytes. The use of tetraphenyl-porphines (H2TPP) as graphite surface-protecting agents in sulphuric acid (H2SO4) is one of the newest. With the aim of unveiling the mechanism of such a protective effect, in this paper we test the stability of a H2TPP thin film immersed in perchloric and phosphoric acid solutions that differently interact with porphyrins. The protective role of H2TPP is tested in the electrochemical potential range where the pristine graphite undergoes an oxidation process that erodes the surface and eventually exfoliate the stratified crystal. The electrochemical analysis is performed in a three-electrode cell, while the surface morphology is monitored ex-situ and in-situ by atomic force microscopy. Electrospray mass analysis is also employed to investigate the presence of H2TPP fragments in the solution. We find that the organic film is not stable in perchloric solution, while it is stable and avoids graphite surface corrosion in phosphoric acid solution. These results provide a rationale for the role played by free-base porphines in graphite protection.

  20. Modeling to study the role of catalyst in the formation of graphitic shells during carbon nanofiber growth subjected to reactive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2018-04-01

    An analytical model to study the role of a metal catalyst nanofilm in the nucleation, growth, and resulting structure of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) in low-temperature hydrogen diluted acetylene plasma has been developed. The model incorporates the nanostructuring of thin catalyst films, growth of CNF, restructuring of catalyst nanoparticles during growth, and its repercussion on the resulting structure (alignment of rolled graphene sheets around catalyst nanoparticles) by taking into account the plasma sheath formalization, kinetics of neutrals and positively charged species in the reactive plasma, flux of plasma species onto the catalyst front surface, and numerous surface reactions for carbon generation. In order to examine the influence of the catalyst film on the growth of CNFs, the numerical solutions of the model equations have been obtained for experimentally determined initial conditions and glow discharge plasma parameters. From the solutions obtained, we found that nanostructuring of thin films leads to the formation of small nanoparticles with high surface number density. The CNF nucleates over these small-sized nanoparticles grow faster and attain early saturation because of the quick poisoning of small-sized catalyst particles, and contain only a few graphitic shells. However, thick nanofilms result in shorter CNFs with large diameters composed of many graphitic shells. Moreover, we found that the inclination of graphitic shells also depends on the extent up to which the catalyst can reconstruct itself during the growth. The small nanoparticles show much greater elongation along the growth axis and also show a very small difference between their tip and base diameter during the growth due to which graphitic shells align at very small angles as compared to the larger nanoparticles. The present study is useful to synthesize the thin and more extended CNFs/CNTs having a smaller opening angle (inclination angle of graphene layers) as the opening angle has a

  1. Nuclear graphite waste's behaviour under disposal conditions: Study of the release and repartition of organic and inorganic forms of carbon 14 and tritium in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vende, L.

    2012-01-01

    23000 tons of graphite wastes will be generated during dismantling of the first generation of French reactors (9 gas cooled reactors). These wastes are classified as Long Lived Low Level wastes (LLW-LL). As requested by the law, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) is studying concepts of low-depth disposals.In this work we focus on carbon 14, the main long-lived radionuclide in graphite waste (5730 y), but also on tritium, which is the main contributor to the radioactivity in the short term. Carbon 14 and tritium may be released from graphite waste in many forms in gaseous phase ( 14 CO 2 , HT...) or in solution ( 14 CO 3 2- , HTO...). Their speciation will strongly affect their migration from the disposal site to the environment. Leaching experiments, in alkaline solution (0.1 M NaOH simulating repository conditions) have been performed on irradiated graphite, from Saint-Laurent A2 and G2 reactors, in order to quantify their release and characterize their speciation. The studies show that carbon 14 exists in both gaseous and aqueous phases. In the gaseous phase, release is weak (≤0.1%) and corresponds to oxidizable species. Carbon 14 is mainly released into liquid phase, as both inorganic and organic species. 65% of released fraction is inorganic and 35% organic carbon. Two tritiated species have been identified in gaseous phase: HTO and HT/Organically Bond Tritium. More than 90% of tritium in that phase corresponds to HT/OBT. But release is weak (≤0.1%). HTO is mainly in the liquid phase. (author)

  2. A study of speech interfaces for the vehicle environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Over the past few years, there has been a shift in automotive human machine interfaces from : visual-manual interactions (pushing buttons and rotating knobs) to speech interaction. In terms of : distraction, the industry views speech interaction as a...

  3. Some numerical studies of interface advection properties of level set ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    explicit computational elements moving through an Eulerian grid. ... location. The interface is implicitly defined (captured) as the location of the discontinuity in the ... This level set function is advected with the background flow field and thus ...

  4. Experimental study of an isochorically heated heterogeneous interface. A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Outline of the presentation: Studying possible mix / interface motion between heterogeneous low/high Z interfaces driven by 2-fluid or kinetic plasma effects (Heated to few eV, Sharp (sub µm) interface); Isochoric heating to initialize interface done with Al quasimonoenergetic ion beams on Trident; Have measured isochoric heating in individual materials intended for compound targets; Fielded experiments on Trident to measure interface motion (Gold-diamond, tin-aluminium); Measured heated-sample temperature with streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) (UT Austin led (research contract), SOP tests → heating uniformity Vs thickness on Al foils. Results are being analyzed.

  5. Brain-computer interfacing under distraction: an evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Stephanie; Frølich, Laura; Höhne, Johannes; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Samek, Wojciech

    2016-10-01

    Objective. While motor-imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been studied over many years by now, most of these studies have taken place in controlled lab settings. Bringing BCI technology into everyday life is still one of the main challenges in this field of research. Approach. This paper systematically investigates BCI performance under 6 types of distractions that mimic out-of-lab environments. Main results. We report results of 16 participants and show that the performance of the standard common spatial patterns (CSP) + regularized linear discriminant analysis classification pipeline drops significantly in this ‘simulated’ out-of-lab setting. We then investigate three methods for improving the performance: (1) artifact removal, (2) ensemble classification, and (3) a 2-step classification approach. While artifact removal does not enhance the BCI performance significantly, both ensemble classification and the 2-step classification combined with CSP significantly improve the performance compared to the standard procedure. Significance. Systematically analyzing out-of-lab scenarios is crucial when bringing BCI into everyday life. Algorithms must be adapted to overcome nonstationary environments in order to tackle real-world challenges.

  6. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  7. Hydrophilization of graphite using plasma above/in a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shuhei; Kawahara, Kazuma; Takeuchi, Nozomi

    2018-01-01

    A hydrophilization method for graphite is required for applications such as conductive ink. In typical chemical oxidation methods for graphite have the problems of producing many defects in graphite and a large environmental impact. In recent years, the plasma treatment has attracted attention because of the high quality of the treated samples and the low environmental impact. In this study, we proposed an above-solution plasma treatment with a high contact probability of graphite and plasma since graphite accumulates on the solution surface due to its hydrophobicity, which we compared with a so-called solution plasma treatment. Graphite was hydrophilized via reactions with OH radicals generated by the plasma. It was confirmed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were modified to the graphite and the dispersibility was improved. The above-solution plasma achieved more energy-efficient hydrophilization than the solution plasma and it was possible to enhance the dispersibility by increasing the plasma-solution contact area.

  8. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  9. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  10. High-energy photoemission studies of oxide interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    The interfaces of complex oxide heterostructures can host novel quantum phases not existing in the bulk of the constituents, with the high-mobility 2D electron system (2DES) in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) representing a prominent example. Despite extensive research the origin of the 2DES and its unusual properties - including the supposed coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism - are still a matter of intense debate. Photoelectron spectroscopy, recently extended into the soft (SX-ARPES) and hard (HAXPES) X-ray regime, is a powerful method to provide detailed insight into the electronic structure of these heterostructures and, in particular, of the buried interface. This includes the identification of the orbital character of the 2DES as well as the determination of vital band structure information, such as band alignment, band bending, and even k-resolved band dispersions and Fermi surface topology. Moreover, resonant photoemission at the Ti L-edge reveals the existence of two different species of Ti 3d states, localized and itinerant, which can be distinguished and identified by their different resonance behavior. The role of oxygen vacancies is studied by controlled in-situ oxidation, which allows us to vary the composition from fully stoichiometric to strongly O-deficient. By comparison to free STO surfaces we can thus demonstrate that the metallicity of the heteointerfaces is intrinsic, i . e . it persists even in the absence of O defects. I will discuss our photoemission results on LAO/STO heterostructures in both (100) and (111) orientation as well as on the related system γ-Al2O3/STO(100), which also hosts a 2DES with an even higher mobility. Work in collaboration with J. Mannhart (MPI-FKF, Stuttgart), N. Pryds (TU Denmark), G. Rijnders (U Twente), S. Suga (U Osaka), M. Giorgoi (BESSY, HZB), W. Drube (DESY Photon Science), V.N. Strocov (Swiss Light Source), J. Denlinger (Advanced Light Source, LBNL), and T.-L. Lee (Diamond Light Source). Support by

  11. Study of damage of graphite/epoxy composites submitted to repeated quasi-static shear loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadhraoui-Lattreche, Malika

    1984-01-01

    Quasi static loading tests on composite materials with organic matrix allow the behaviour of the materials under repeated loadings to be studied while avoiding viscoelastic effects. In this research thesis, the author reports the study of one-directional composite samples submitted to static pure shear loadings which represent the most severe stress state for this type of material. The material behaviour has been determined by application of loads greater than the yield strength, and of zero torque unloads. This allowed cumulative residual deformations to be monitored, and the increasing evolution of this parameter to be studied with respect to the number of applied cycles. The author deduces from these results a characteristic law for the material which introduces a decoupling between the stress and the cumulative residual deformation. Thus, a method of prediction of cumulative residual deformations is developed. Besides, a brief application to another material seems to confirm this type of law, and suggests that its generalisation should be studied [fr

  12. Tools to Study Interfaces for Superconducting, Thermoelectric, and Magnetic Materials at the University of Houston

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0303 Tools to Study Interfaces for Superconducting ,Thermoelectric, and Magnetic Materials Paul C. W. Chu UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON...8/28/2014 - 8/27/2016 Title: Tools to Study Interfaces for Superconducting , Thermoelectric, and Magnetic Materials at the University of Houston...effort. Tools to Study Interfaces for Superconducting , Thermoelectric, and Magnetic Materials at the University of Houston Grant/Contract Number AFOSR

  13. Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids in bainite during graphitization annealing of a medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.X.; Wei, B.Q.; Li, D.D.; He, K.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in bainite during graphitization annealing at 680 °C of Jominy-quenched bars of an Al-Si bearing medium carbon (0.4C wt%) steel has been studied and compared with that in martensite by using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the graphitization process in bainite is different from that in martensite in many aspects such as the initial carbon state, the behavior of cementite, the nucleation-growth feature and kinetics of formation of graphite spheroids during graphitization annealing, and the shape, size and distribution of these graphite spheroids. The fact that the graphitization in bainite can produce more homogeneous graphite spheroids with more spherical shape and finer size in a shorter annealing time without the help of preexisting coring particles implies that bainite should be a better starting structure than martensite for making graphitic steel. - Highlights: • This article presents a microstructural characterization of formation of graphite spheroids in bainite. • Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids formed in bainite and martensite are compared. • Bainite should be a better starting structure for making graphitic steel as results show.

  14. Capability Study For Using the Impulse Graphite Reactor For Activation Analysis of Geological Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarov, V.A.; Silaev, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The IGR reactor facility available in the Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK is mainly used for testing the going and newly developed fuel compositions and reactor materials. In connection with a decrease of the demand in investigations like that there was considered the capability to use the reactor for solving another research and, particularly, applied problems. A mineral exploration is one of the urgent objectives in the Republic of Kazakstan, and in Semipalatinsk region in particular. To perform the exploration like that it's required, in addition to rough field investigations, the methods of analysis for element composition of geological materials, the difference of which is in their effectiveness, quality and low first cost. Activation methods of analysis allow to provide with a high analysis quality and effectiveness. Therefore, there was proposed to study the capability to use the IGR reactor for the activation analysis of geological materials. To solve this goal the following activity in three basic trends is required: 1. To create the needed theoretical and, on its basis, the methodical base for performing the analytical activity; 2. To create the experimental and technical and organizational infrastructure for the investigations, providing with a high productivity and low prime cost of work; 3. To conduct works on marketing and to use the going methodical and technical base on the market of services. Major objectives for the creation of the theoretical and methodical base for analysis are: a) the study of neutron and physical IGR reactor characteristics under various operation modes; b) the study of the radiation effect on the results of activation analysis; c) the simulation of the temperature mode for irradiation of samples in the reactor and experimental model survey; d) the study of the capability to use non-traditional elements and materials as neutron reactor flux monitors; e) the development of the technique for the experimental and computational

  15. Positron annihilation lifetime study of interfaces in ternary polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meghala, D; Ramya, P; Pasang, T; Raj, J M; Ranganathaiah, C; Williams, J F

    2013-01-01

    A new method based on positron lifetime spectroscopy is developed to characterize individual interfaces in ternary polymer blends and hence determine the composition dependent miscibility level. The method owes its origin to the Kirkwood-Risemann-Zimm (KRZ) model for the evaluation of the hydrodynamic interaction parameters (α ij ) which was used successfully for a binary blend with a single interface. The model was revised for the present work for ternary polymer blends to account for three interfaces. The efficacy of this method is shown for two ternary blends namely poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly (ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and polycaprolactone /poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(vinyl chloride) (PCL/SAN/PVC) at different compositions. An effective hydrodynamic interaction parameter, α eff , was introduced to predict the overall miscibility of ternary blends.

  16. Study on the adsorption isosteres of the composite adsorbent CaCl2 and expanded graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.L.; Wu, J.Y.; Xia, Z.Z.; Wang, R.Z.

    2011-01-01

    A test setup was built to study the adsorption performance of the composite adsorbent used in the adsorption system. The isovolume measurement method is adopted in the test setup to measure the adsorption isosteres of the composite adsorbent and ammonia working pair. The adsorption isosteres are the curves of the adsorption pressures variation with adsorption temperatures at constant adsorption quantity, which are convenient for the calculation of the adsorption heat and selection of the adsorption working pairs. The adsorption heats were calculated according to the adsorption isosteres, three clear crest values indicate that there were three types of reaction during the reaction processes of ammoniate calcium chloride and ammonia. The kinetic model of adsorption isosteres is obtained by the Temkin model, it is useful to estimate the adsorption performance of the working pairs and useful to guide the design of adsorption system.

  17. Discrete Element study of granular material - Bumpy wall interface behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Cheikh, Khadija; Rémond, Sébastien; Pizette, Patrick; Vanhove, Yannick; Djelal, Chafika

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a DEM study of a confined granular material sheared between two parallel bumpy walls. The granular material consists of packed dry spherical particles. The bumpiness is modeled by spheres of a given diameter glued on horizontal planes. Different bumpy surfaces are modeled by varying diameter or concentration of glued spheres. The material is sheared by moving the two bumpy walls at fixed velocity. During shear, the confining pressure applied on each bumpy wall is controlled. The effect of wall bumpiness on the effective friction coefficient and on the granular material behavior at the bumpy walls is reported for various shearing conditions. For given bumpiness and confining pressure that we have studied, it is found that the shear velocity does not affect the shear stress. However, the effective friction coefficient and the behavior of the granular material depend on the bumpiness. When the diameter of the glued spheres is larger than about the average grains diameter of the medium, the latter is uniformly sheared and the effective friction coefficient remains constant. For smaller diameters of the glued spheres, the effective friction coefficient increases with the diameter of glued spheres. The influence of glued spheres concentration is significant only for small glued spheres diameters, typically half of average particle diameter of the granular material. In this case, increasing the concentration of glued spheres leads to a decrease in effective friction coefficient and to shear localization at the interface. For different diameters and concentrations of glued spheres, we show that the effect of bumpiness on the effective friction coefficient can be characterized by the depth of interlocking.

  18. Electronic effects and fundamental physics studied in molecular interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Thomas; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-Jun; Hofer, Werner A

    2018-05-29

    Scanning probe instruments in conjunction with a very low temperature environment have revolutionized the ability of building, functionalizing, and analysing two dimensional interfaces in the last twenty years. In addition, the availability of fast, reliable, and increasingly sophisticated methods to simulate the structure and dynamics of these interfaces allow us to capture even very small effects at the atomic and molecular level. In this review we shall focus largely on metal surfaces and organic molecular compounds and show that building systems from the bottom up and controlling the physical properties of such systems is no longer within the realm of the desirable, but has become day to day reality in our best laboratories.

  19. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  20. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  1. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  2. Friction and wear studies of graphite and a carbon-carbon composite in air and in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Sheehan, J.E.

    1980-10-01

    Sliding friction and wear tests were conducted on a commercial isotropic graphite and a carbon-carbon composite in air, purified helium, and a helium environment containing controlled amounts of impurities simulating the primary coolant chemistry of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The friction and wear characteristics of the materials investigated were stable and were found to be very sensitive to the testing temperature. In general, friction and wear decreased with increasing temperature in the range from ambient to 950 0 C. This temperature dependence is concluded to be due to chemisorption of impurities to form lubricating films and oxidation at higher temperatures, which reduce friction and wear. Graphite and carbon-carbon composites are concluded to be favorable candidate materials for high-temperature sliding service in helium-cooled reactors

  3. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  4. Energy evaluations, graphite corrosion in Bugey I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Fiche, C.

    1967-01-01

    Bugey I presents a problem of radiolytic corrosion of the graphite by the CO 2 under pressure at high temperature. This report aims to evaluate the energy transferred to the gas by a Bugey I core cell, in normal operating conditions. The water, the carbon oxides and the hydrogen formed quantities are deduced as the consumed graphite and methane. Experimental studies are realized in parallel to validate the presented results. (A.L.B.)

  5. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  6. Synchrotron X-ray studies of liquid-vapor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The density profile ρ(z) across a liquid-vapor interface may be determined by the reflectivity R(θ) of X-rays at grazing angle incidence θ. The relation between R(θ) and ρ(z) is discussed, and experimental examples illustrating thermal roughness of simple liquids and smectic layering of liquid...

  7. The Work-Study Interface: Similarities and Differences between Ethnic Minority and Ethnic Majority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuwisse, Marieke; de Meijer, Lonneke A.; Born, Marise Ph.; Severiens, Sabine E.

    2017-01-01

    Given the poorer academic outcomes of non-Western ethnic minority students compared to ethnic majority students, we investigated whether differences exist in work-study interface between ethnic groups. We tested a work-study interface model, in which the work-related factors work-study congruence, job control, job demands, work hours, job…

  8. Study of elastic and thermal parameters of a composite material fluoro-plastic - thermo-exfoliated graphite by photothermoacoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozachenko, V.V.; Kucherov, I.Ya.; Revo, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The composite materials (CM) with success are widely used in a science and in an industry. From the practical point of view important for CM the mechanical and thermal properties are. Therefore, study of these properties for them is the important problem. At change of a temperature state of materials of their property in many cases are featured by combinations of elastic and thermal parameters E/1-σ=E n and χ/ρc=D T , where E, -σ, ρ and c are the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal conductivity coefficient, density and specific heat of materials, respectively. Now for examination of substances in various aggregate states has received development a photothermoacoustic (PTA) method. As shown in this work, use a PTA method with piezoelectric detection of a PTA signal from a layered plate, under certain conditions, allows immediately determining the reduced Young's modulus E n and thermal diffusivity D T . Therefore, the purpose of this work was study the PTA effect with piezoelectric detection of an informative signal from CM. Were explored steel-copper CM such as 'sandwich' and fluoro plastic-thermo exfoliated graphite FP-TEG CM. Explored triplex structure as a plate made of a CM sample and a two-layer piezoelectric transducer. The surface of a CM is uniformly irradiated with a modulated light flux. The sample is heated and the thermal waves are generated. In the sample, the temperature field of thermal waves generates, due to the thermoelastic effect, acoustic vibration and waves that are registered by a piezoelectric. The rather low frequencies of modulation are considered, at which length of ultrasonic waves is much more than the reference sizes of structure (quasi-static approach). The amplitudes ratio and phase difference of voltages oscillations taken from separate layer of piezoelectric transducer, as functions of physical and geometrical parameters of structure and a frequency of a light flux modulation is found. Experimentally the

  9. The utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture for irradiated graphite incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, G.; Perotin, J.P.; Charlot, P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the interest of the utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture in the incineration of irradiated graphite. The aqueous phase comes in the form of a three-dimensional system that traps pressurized oxygen, the pulverulent solid being dispersed at the liquid/gas interfaces. These three-phasic formulations give the following advantages: reduction of the apparent viscosity of the mixture in comparison with a solid/liquid mixture at the same solid concentration; reduction of the solid/liquid interactions; self-pulverizability. thus promoting reduction of the flame length utilization of conventional burners; reduction of the flue gas flow rate; complete thermal destruction of graphite. (author)

  10. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  11. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  12. Adhesion properties of Cu(111)/α-quartz (0001) interfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wenshan, E-mail: wenshan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Lianping; Shen, Shengping, E-mail: sshen@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2017-05-17

    The fundamental properties of Cu/SiO{sub 2} interface are worth studying because they impact the quality and performance of silicon-based microelectronics and related devices. Using the charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential in this study, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of the structural, adhesive and electronic properties of Cu(111)/α-quartz SiO{sub 2} (0001) interfaces with two different crystalline orientations and various terminations by double-oxygens (OO), single-oxygen(O) and silicon(Si). For the equilibrated interfaces, the largest adhesion energies correspond to the oxygen richest OO-terminated interface in which the oxidation level of Cu is highest due to the largest charge transfer across the interface. In particular, we also investigate the properties of a series of nonequilibrated OO-, O- and Si-terminated interfaces that are created from their equilibrated counterparts by introducing vacancies of different numbers and different types. It is found that the adhesion energies of interfaces mostly decrease upon vacancy introductions only except for Si vacancies added in the Si-terminated interface. For all nonequilibrated interfaces of different terminations, we found a linear correlation between adhesive energy and area average excess charge transfer in Cu.

  13. The Importance of Interfaces: A HW/SW Codesign Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dan C. Raun; Madsen, Jan; Pedersen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a codesign case study in image analysis. The main objective is to stress the importance of handling HW/SW interfaces more precisely at the system level. In the presented case study, there is an intuitive and simple HW/SW interface, which is based upon the functional modules...

  14. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  15. Surface and interface strains studied by x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Koichi; Emoto, Takashi; Ichimiya, Ayahiko

    1998-01-01

    The authors have developed a technique of X-ray diffraction in order to measure strain fields near semiconductor surface and interface. The diffraction geometry is using the extremely asymmetric Bragg-case bulk reflection of a small incident angle to the surface and a large angle exiting from the surface. The incident angle of the X-rays is set near critical angle of total reflection by tuning X-ray energy of synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory, Japan. For thermally grown-silicon oxide/Si(100) interface, the X-ray intensity of the silicon substrate 311 reflection has been measured. From comparison of the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of X-ray rocking curves of various thickness of silicon oxides, it has been revealed that silicon substrate lattice is highly strained in the thin (less than about 5 nm) silicon oxide/silicon system. In order to know the original silicon surface strain, the authors have also performed the same kind of measurements in the ultra-high vacuum chamber. A clean Si(111) 7x7 surface gives sharper X-ray diffraction peak than that of the native oxide/Si(111) system. From these measurements, it is concluded that the thin silicon oxide film itself gives strong strain fields to the silicon substrates, which may be the reason of the existence of the structural transition layer at the silicon oxide/Si interface

  16. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  17. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  18. Neutron study of fast neutron reactor systems by exponential experiments on Harmonie - Graphite program HUG-PHUG - Oxide program PHRIXOS - Uranium program UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desprets, Alain.

    1977-12-01

    Exponential experiments allow to obtain the fundamental characteristics of a lattice (material buckling, reaction rate ratios) more economically than critical experiments. This report describes the experimental techniques and the methods of analysis used for this type of experiments. The results obtained with three programs performed with the source reactor HARMONIE are given: graphite-lattices program (3 U-fueled and 3 Pu-fueled lattices); oxide-fuel program (4 PuO 2 -UO 2 lattices); pure uranium program (one lattice). Some of these lattices were also studied in critical experiments. The coherence of the results obtained by the two types of experiments is established [fr

  19. Dependence of strength on particle size in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.P.; Kennedy, C.R.

    The strength to particle size relationship for specially fabricated graphites has been demonstrated and rationalized using fracture mechanics. In the past, similar studies have yielded empirical data using only commercially available material. Thus, experimental verification of these relationships has been difficult. However, the graphites of this study were fabricated by controlling the particle size ranges for a series of isotropic graphites. All graphites that were evaluated had a constant 1.85 g/cm 3 density. Thus, particle size was the only variable. This study also considered the particle size effect on other physical properties; coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), electrical resistivity, fracture strain, and Young's modulus

  20. Calculated bond properties of K adsorbed on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjortstam, O.; Wills, J.M.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the chemical bond of K adsorbed on a graphite(0001) surface have been studied for different coverages, by means of a full-potential slab method. Specific modifications of the Hamiltonian are performed in order to make it possible to study K on graphite in the disperse phase (dilute limit). It is found that K forms a metallic state when covering a graphite surface with a (2x2) coverage. For a (3x3) coverage as well as in the disperse phase K is found to form an ionic bond with graphite. It is shown that in the disperse phase, the hybridization between the K 4s level and graphite is weak. Our findings are consistent with recent experiments. Furthermore the cohesive energies of K adsorption on graphite are found to be larger in the (2x2) coverage compared to the (3x3) coverage. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  1. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  2. Application of neutron activation analysis to the study of impurities in molybdenum, tungsten and nuclear graphite; Application de l'analyse par activation neutronique a l'etude des impuretes dans le molybdene, le tungstene et le graphite nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinte, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-10-15

    A neutron activation method is described for the analysis of a maximum number of foreign elements in molybdenum, tungsten and graphite. The various elements are isolated using a systematic separation programme; the elements are subsequently analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using {gamma}-spectrometry. By this method are dosed 27 elements in molybdenum and tungsten, and 20 elements in graphite to which can be added those elements which are already the object of routine analysis: V, Mn, Si, P, S, Cl and 14 rare earths. (author) [French] On decrit une methode d'analyse par activation neutronique permettant de doser un maximum d'elements etrangers dans le molybdene, le tungstene et le graphite. En suivant un schema de separation systematique, on isole les differents elements dont les analyses qualitatives et quantitatives sont ensuite effectuees par spectrometrie {gamma}. Par cette methode, on dose 27 elements dans le molybdene et le tungstene, 20 elements dans le graphite, auxquels on peut encore ajouter les elements doses couramment: V, Mn, Si, P, S, Cl et 14 Terres Rares. (auteur)

  3. Report on a comprehensive research study (home welfare apparatus system - interface); Sogo chosa kenkyu (zaitaku fukushi kiki system - interface) hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    In the light of the increasing role of welfare at home with the advance of the aging society, the paper conducted an investigational study on the R and D of the home welfare apparatus system - interface. In the study, making the most of the leading home care apparatus systems (welfare technohouses) installed at seven places in the country, the paper carried out a stay experiment on how the life is in the welfare house into which home welfare apparatus is integrated, and an experiment to assess biological data on aged people. Especially as to the support apparatus used for smooth life motions in houses such as movement, excretion and bathing, examined were the linkage with house bodies, care apparatus used, mutual interface with welfare apparatus, etc. By the experiments to assess these home welfare apparatus, an analytical study was conducted on the points to be improved in welfare apparatus and housing equipment, and at the same time on the course of the research/development. Concerning a system for the research study, a research promotion committee was established in Technology Research Association of Medical and Welfare Apparatus, the members of which are learned persons from the industrial circle, the government and universities. 111 figs., 36 tabs.

  4. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  5. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  6. THE EFFECT OF APPLIED STRESS ON THE GRAPHITIZATION OF PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg, R H; Crooks, D D; Fenn, Jr, R W; Hammond, M L

    1963-06-15

    Metallographic and x-ray diffraction studies were made of the effect of applied stress at high temperature on the structure of pyrolytic graphite (PG). The dominant factor was whether the PG was above or below its graphitization temperature, which, in turn, was not strongly dependent on applied stress. Below the graphitization temperature, the PG showed a high proportion of disordered layers (0.9), a fairly large mean tilt angle (20 deg ) and a small crystailite size (La --150 A). Fracture occurred at low stress and strain and the materiai exhibited a high apparent Young's modulus ( approximates 4 x 10/sup 6/ psi). Above the graphitization temperature, graphitization was considerably enhanced by strain up to about 8%. The disorder parameter was decreased from a zero strain value of 0.3 to 0.l5 with strain, the mean tilt angle was decreased to 4 deg , and a fivefold increase in crystallite size occurred. When the strainenhanced graphitization was complete, the material exhibited a low apparent modulus ( approximates 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ psi) and large plastic strains (>100%) for a constant stress ( approximates 55 ksi). Graphitization was shown to be a spontaneous process that is promoted by breaking cross-links thermally, and the process is furthered by chemical attack and plastic strain. (auth)

  7. Elastic properties of surfactant monolayers at liquid-liquid interfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2000-01-01

    Using a simple molecular model based on the Lennard-Jones potential, we systematically study the elastic properties of liquid-liquid interfaces containing surfactant molecules by means of extensive and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The main elastic constants of the interface, corres...

  8. Waterjet cutting of periprosthetic interface tissue in loosened hip prostheses: an in vitro feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Gert; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; Dankelman, Jenny; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Valstar, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Waterjet cutting technology is considered a promising technology to be used for minimally invasive removal of interface tissue surrounding aseptically loose hip prostheses. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of waterjet cutting of interface tissue membrane. Waterjets with 0.2

  9. Studies on interfaces between immiscible polymers by neutron reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikai, Naoya; Noda, Ichiro; Matsushita, Yushu; Tasaki, Seiji; Ebisawa, Toru; Karim, Alamgir; Han, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    Segment distributions of partially deuterium-labeled styrene-2-vinylpyridine block copolymers in lamellar microphase-separated structure were investigated by neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements. Each component lamellae were alternatively stacked in spin-coated thin films and interfacial thickness between those lamellae was about 45 A. Also, it was found that the segments of block chains near a chemical junction point connecting different component blocks are strongly localized in the vicinity of lamellar interface, while those on the free ends are localized at the center of lamellar microdomain with a fairly wide distribution. (author)

  10. Studies on interfaces between immiscible polymers by neutron reflectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torikai, Naoya; Noda, Ichiro [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering; Matsushita, Yushu; Tasaki, Seiji; Ebisawa, Toru; Karim, Alamgir; Han, C.C.

    1995-06-01

    Segment distributions of partially deuterium-labeled styrene-2-vinylpyridine block copolymers in lamellar microphase-separated structure were investigated by neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements. Each component lamellae were alternatively stacked in spin-coated thin films and interfacial thickness between those lamellae was about 45 A. Also, it was found that the segments of block chains near a chemical junction point connecting different component blocks are strongly localized in the vicinity of lamellar interface, while those on the free ends are localized at the center of lamellar microdomain with a fairly wide distribution. (author).

  11. A Simulation Study of the Virtual Interface Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tan Chang; Stans, Leonard; Tarman, Thomas D.

    1999-01-01

    The Virtual Interface Architecture (VIA) is an emerging standard for interconnecting commodity computing nodes into a cluster. Since VIA protocol. operations are implemented outside the operating system kernel (often, entirely in hardware), VIA transfers can be performed at very low delay, high throughput, and minimal CPU overhead. This makes VIA ideal when building large clusters that perform complex simulations of physical events, However, the scaling properties of VIA are less clear. This paper describes the design and results of a simulation model developed in OPNET to investigate VIA's ability to scale to clusters of> 1000 nodes

  12. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  13. SXPS study of model GaAs(100)/electrolyte interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Mikhail V. [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mankel, Eric; Mayer, Thomas; Jaegermann, Wolfram [Institute of Material Sciences, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Model GaAs(100)/electrolyte interfaces are prepared in vacuum by co-adsorption of Cl{sub 2} and 2-propanol molecules at LN{sub 2} temperature. On adsorption of Cl{sub 2} molecules gallium chlorides, elemental arsenic and arsenic chlorides are formed. Co-adsorption of 2-propanol causes formation of additional GaCl{sub 3} and AsCl, as well as soluble/volatile As-based complexes, which are released from the surface depleting the sur- face by arsenic. Comparison of the As 3d and Ga 3d spectra obtained after heating the model interface to room temperature with the corresponding spectra obtained after emersion of the GaAs(100) surface from HCl/2-propanol solution allows to conclude that in HCl solution Cl{sup -} ions attack gallium sites and H{sup +} ions mostly attack arsenic sites. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  15. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  16. Effect of gamma radiation on graphite - PTFE dry lubrication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sachin; Tyagi, Mukti; Seshadri, Geetha; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2017-12-01

    An effect of gamma radiation on lubrication behavior of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system has been studied using (TR-TW-30L) tribometer with thrust washer attachment in plane contact. Different compositions of graphite and PTFE were prepared and irradiated by gamma rays. Gamma radiation exposure significantly improves the tribological properties indicated by decrease in coefficient of friction and wear properties of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system. SEM and XRD analysis confirm the physico-chemical modification of graphite-PTFE on gamma radiation exposure leading to a novel dry lubrication system with good slip and anti friction properties.

  17. Release enhancement of tritium from graphite by addition of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Masakatsu; Masaki, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release behavior of tritium from graphite was studied in pure He and He + H 2 atmosphere. The release from powdered graphite was significantly enhanced in hydrogen environment. Apparent diffusion coefficients of tritium in graphite also became much higher in an atmosphere containing hydrogen than values obtained in pure helium atmosphere. A careful investigation of the release processes resulted in the conclusion that the most important process of tritium behaviour in graphite was diffusion, but the desorption process of tritium from the surface played a significant role. The enhancement of the desorption process was controlled by atomic hydrogen. (orig.)

  18. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 angstrom Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 angstrom, 500 angstrom, and 300 angstrom per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 angstrom/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 angstrom/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study

  19. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  20. Microstructural studies on degradation of interface between LSM–YSZ cathode and YSZ electrolyte in SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yi-Lin; Hagen, Anke; Barfod, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    The changes in the cathode/electrolyte interface microstructure have been studied on anode-supported technological solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that were subjected to long-term (1500 h) testing at 750 °C under high electrical loading (a current density of 0.75 A/cm2). These cells exhibit...... different cathode degradation rates depending on, among others, the composition of the cathode gas, being significantly smaller in oxygen than in air. FE-SEM and high resolution analytical TEM were applied for characterization of the interface on a submicron- and nano-scale. The interface degradation has...... to decrease further due to the more pronounced formation of insulating zirconate phases that are present locally and preferably in LSM/YSZ electrolyte contact areas. The effects of the cathode gas on the interface degradation are discussed considering the change of oxygen activity at the interface, possible...

  1. A experimental system for the checking of the absorption of E.C.A.G. graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Vidal, R.

    1958-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the mean absorption cross section in thermal neutrons of graphite. This system consists of a graphite stack containing a Ra-Be source and a BF3 counter. A cavity in the stack receives the graphite to be studied or the graphite standard. By comparing the counting rates their absorption ratio can be deduced. The measurement is performed on graphite rods which have been machined before being placed in the pile. It provides the possibility of detecting over a batch of 1 ton of graphite, in a single measurement, a difference in absorption of 0.1 milli barn. (author) [fr

  2. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept

  3. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  4. Deducing 2D Crystal Structure at the Solid/Liquid Interface with Atomic Resolution by Combined STM and SFG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Arthur; Ahn, Seokhoon; Matzger, Adam J.; Chen, Zhan

    2009-03-01

    Supplemented by computed models, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) can provide detailed structure of 2D crystals formed at the liquid/solid interface with atomic resolution. However, some structural information such as functional group orientations in such 2D crystals needs to be tested experimentally to ensure the accuracy of the deduced structures. Due to the limited sensitivity, many other experimental techniques such as Raman and infrared spectroscopy have not been allowed to provide such structural information of 2D crystals. Here we showed that Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (SFG) can measure average orientation of functional groups in such 2D crystals, or physisorbed monolayers, providing key experimental data to aid in the modeling and interpretation of the STM images. The usefulness of combining these two techniques is demonstrated with a phthalate diesters monolayer formed at the 1-phenyloctane/ highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) interface. The spatial orientation of the ester C=O of the monolayer was successfully determined using SFG.

  5. Molecular dynamics studies of the melting of butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on the basal-plane surface of graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Newton, J. C.; Taub, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of molecular steric properties on the melting of quasi-two-dimensional solids is investigated by comparing results of molecular dynamics simulations of the melting of butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on the basal-plane surface of graphite. These molecules differ only in their length......, being members of the n-alkane series [CH3(CH2)n−2CH3] where n=4 for butane and n=6 for hexane. The simulations employ a skeletal model, which does not include the hydrogen atoms explicitly, to represent the intermolecular and molecule–substrate interactions. Nearest-neighbor intramolecular bonds...... are fixed in length, but the molecular flexibility is preserved by allowing the bend and dihedral torsion angles to vary. The simulations show a qualitatively different melting behavior for the butane and hexane monolayers consistent with neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. The melting of the low...

  6. The nucleation and growth of uranium on the basal plane of graphite studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tench, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    For the first time, nanometer scale uranium clusters were created on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by laser ablation under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The physical and chemical properties of these clusters were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as standard surface science techniques. Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies found the uranium deposit to be free of contamination and showed that no carbide had formed with the underlying graphite. Clusters with sizes ranging from 42 Angstrom 2 to 630 Angstrom 2 were observed upon initial room temperature deposition. Surface diffusion of uranium was observed after annealing the substrate above 800 K, as evidenced by the decreased number density and the increased size of the clusters. Preferential depletion of clusters on terraces near step edges as a result of annealing was observed. The activation energy for diffusion deduced from these measurements was found to be 15 Kcal/mole. Novel formation of ordered uranium thin films was observed for coverages greater than two monolayers after annealing above 900 K. These ordered films displayed islands with hexagonally faceted edges rising in uniform step heights characteristic of the unit cell of the P-phase of uranium. In addition, atomic resolution STM images of these ordered films indicated the formation of the β-phase of uranium. The chemical properties of these surfaces were investigated and it was shown that these uranium films had a reduced oxidation rate in air as compared to bulk metal and that STM imaging in air induced a polarity-dependent enhancement of the oxidation rate

  7. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D it (E), and density D it,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on

  8. Capillary-based micro-battery cell for in situ X-ray powder diffraction studies of working batteries: a study of the initial intercalation and deintercalation of lithium into graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Rune; Norby, Poul

    2013-01-01

    –charging cycle show that the structure of the graphite changes from an intergrown structure of graphite 2H and graphite 3R to a nearly ideal graphite 2H structure. DIFFaX+ was also used to refine a model of the stacking disorder in an apparent stage III compound with AαAB- and AαAC-type slabs....

  9. Electrostatic Manipulation of Graphene On Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Verdu, Carmen; Saenz-Arce, Giovanni; Martinez-Asencio, Jesús; Milan, David C.; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan J.; Caturla, Maria Jose

    2015-03-01

    Here we report the use of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) under ambient and vacuum conditions to study the controlled exfoliation of the last layer of a graphite surface when an electrostatic force is applied from a STM tip. In this work we have focused on the study of two parameters: the applied voltage needed to compensate the graphite interlayer attractive force and the one needed to break atomic bonds to produce folded structures. Additionally, we have studied the influence of edge structure in the breaking geometry. Independently of the edge orientation the graphite layer is found to tear through the zig-zag direction and the lifled layer shows a zig-zag folding direction. Molecular Dinamics simulations and DFT calculations have been performed to understand our results, showing a strong correlation with the experiments. Comunidad Valenciana through Prometeo project.

  10. Wave analysis at frictional interface: A case wise study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Akanksha; Chattopadhyay, Amares; Singh, Pooja; Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    2018-03-01

    The present article deals with the propagation of a Stoneley wave and with the reflection as well as refraction of an incident P -wave at the frictional bonded interface between an initially stressed isotropic viscoelastic semi-infinite superstratum and an initially stressed isotropic substratum as case I and case II, respectively. The complex form of the velocity equation has been derived in closed form for the propagation of a Stoneley wave in the said structure. The real and imaginary parts of the complex form of the velocity equation correspond to the phase velocity and damped velocity of the Stoneley wave. Phase and damped velocity have been analysed against the angular frequency. The expressions of the amplitude ratios of the reflected and refracted waves are deduced analytically. The variation of the amplitude ratios is examined against the angle of incidence of the P -wave. The influence of frictional boundary parameters, initial stress, viscoelastic parameters on the phase and damped velocities of the Stoneley wave and the amplitude ratios of the reflected as well as refracted P - and SV -wave have been revealed graphically through numerical results.

  11. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Daar, E. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libya); Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z<15 such as Na and F whereas elements with z>15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  12. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaabar, W.; Daar, E.; Bunk, O.; Farquharson, M.J.; Laklouk, A.; Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C.; Gundogdu, O.; Bradley, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z 15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  13. Humans, Intelligent Technology, and Their Interface: A Study of Brown’s Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    INTELLIGENT TECHNOLOGY , AND THEIR INTERFACE: A STUDY OF BROWN’S POINT by Jackie L. J. White December 2017 Thesis Advisor: Carolyn Halladay...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HUMANS, INTELLIGENT TECHNOLOGY , AND THEIR INTERFACE: A STUDY OF BROWN’S POINT...with the technology before and during the accident. I combined the findings from the accident investigation with various heuristics regarding the human

  14. Revisiting the description of Protein-Protein interfaces. Part II: Experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Cazals , Frédéric; Proust , Flavien

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed experimental study of an interface model developed in the companion article F. Cazals and F. Proust, Revisiting the description of Protein-Protein interfaces. Part I: algorithms. Our experimental study is concerned with the usual database of protein-protein complexes, split into five families (Proteases, Immune system, Enzyme Complexes, Signal transduction, Misc.) Our findings, which bear some contradictions with usual statements are the following: (i)Connectivi...

  15. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  16. A experimental system for the checking of the absorption of E.C.A.G. graphite; Empilement pour le controle du graphite E.C.A.G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raievski, V; Vidal, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    A system is described for measuring the mean absorption cross section in thermal neutrons of graphite. This system consists of a graphite stack containing a Ra-Be source and a BF3 counter. A cavity in the stack receives the graphite to be studied or the graphite standard. By comparing the counting rates their absorption ratio can be deduced. The measurement is performed on graphite rods which have been machined before being placed in the pile. It provides the possibility of detecting over a batch of 1 ton of graphite, in a single measurement, a difference in absorption of 0.1 milli barn. (author) [French] On decrit un dispositif permettant de mesurer la section efficace moyenne d'absorption en neutrons thermiques du graphite. Ce dispositif est constitue par un empilement de graphite contenant une source de Ra-Be et un compteur a BF3. Une cavite menagee dans l'empilement peut recevoir le graphite a etudier ou le graphite etalon. Par comparaison des taux de comptage, on en deduit leur rapport d'absorption. La mesure est effectuee sur des barres de graphite usinees avant leur mise en place dans la pile. Elle permet de deceler sur un lot de graphite de 1 tonne, en une seule mesure, une difference d'absorption de 0,1 millibarn. (auteur)

  17. Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S.S.; Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A.; Hendricks, M.R.; Nieto-Perez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium as a plasma-facing component has many attractive features in fusion devices. We investigated chemical properties of the lithiated graphite surfaces during deposition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In this study we try to address some of the known issues during lithium deposition, viz., the chemical state of lithium on graphite substrate, oxide layer formation mechanisms, Li passivation effects over time, and chemical change during exposure of the sample to ambient air. X-ray photoelectron studies indicate changes in the chemical composition with various thickness of lithium on graphite during deposition. An oxide layer formation is noticed during lithium deposition even though all the experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum. The metal oxide is immediately transformed into carbonate when the deposited sample is exposed to air.

  18. Characterizing water-metal interfaces and machine learning potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczko, Kevin

    In this thesis, we first discuss the fundamentals of ab initio electronic structure theory and density functional theory (DFT). We also discuss statistics related to computing thermodynamic averages of molecular dynamics (MD). We then use this theory to analyze and compare the structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water next to prototypical metals including platinum, graphite, and graphene. Our results are built on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) generated using density functional theory (DFT) which explicitly include van der Waals (vdW) interactions within a first principles approach. All calculations reported use large simulation cells, allowing for an accurate treatment of the water-electrode interfaces. We have included vdW interactions through the use of the optB86b-vdW exchange correlation functional. Comparisons with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange correlation functional are also shown. We find an initial peak, due to chemisorption, in the density profile of the liquid water-Pt interface not seen in the liquid water-graphite interface, liquid watergraphene interface, nor interfaces studied previously. To further investigate this chemisorption peak, we also report differences in the electronic structure of single water molecules on both Pt and graphite surfaces. We find that a covalent bond forms between the single water molecule and the platinum surface, but not between the single water molecule and the graphite surface. We also discuss the effects that defects and dopants in the graphite and graphene surfaces have on the structure and dynamics of liquid water. Lastly, we introduce artificial neural networks (ANNs), and demonstrate how they can be used to machine learn electronic structure calculations. As a proof of principle, we show the success of an ANN potential energy surfaces for a dimer molecule with a Lennard-Jones potential.

  19. A study of usability principles and interface design for mobile e-books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Ming; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    This study examined usability principles and interface designs in order to understand the relationship between the intentions of mobile e-book interface designs and users' perceptions. First, this study summarised 4 usability principles and 16 interface attributes, in order to conduct usability testing and questionnaire survey by referring to Nielsen (1993), Norman (2002), and Yeh (2010), who proposed the usability principles. Second, this study used the interviews to explore the perceptions and behaviours of user operations through senior users of multi-touch prototype devices. The results of this study are as follows: (1) users' behaviour of operating an interactive interface is related to user prior experience; (2) users' rating of the visibility principle is related to users' subjective perception but not related to user prior experience; however, users' ratings of the ease, efficiency, and enjoyment principles are related to user prior experience; (3) the interview survey reveals that the key attributes affecting users' behaviour of operating an interface include aesthetics, achievement, and friendliness. This study conducts experiments to explore the effects of users’ prior multi-touch experience on users’ behaviour of operating a mobile e-book interface and users’ rating of usability principles. Both qualitative and quantitative data analyses were performed. By applying protocol analysis, key attributes affecting users’ behaviour of operation were determined.

  20. Graphite target for the spiral project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J.; Loiselet, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author)

  1. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, J; Theuwissen, K; Laffont, L; Véron, M

    2016-01-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions. (paper)

  2. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-09-01

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes.

  3. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  4. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  5. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  6. Linear expansion of products out of thermal splitting graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishina, E.A.; Kurnevich, G.I.

    1994-01-01

    Linear expansion of thermally split graphite in the form of foil and pressed items of different density was studied. It is ascertained that the extreme character of temperature dependence of linear expansion factor of pressed samples of thermally split graphite is determined by the formation of closed pores containing air in the course of their production. 3 refs., 2 figs

  7. Ab initio study of 3C-SiC/M (M = Ti or Al) nano-hetero interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Kohyama, Masanori

    2003-01-01

    Ab initio pseudopotential calculation of 3C-SiC(1 1 1)/Al nano-hetero interfaces have been performed and interface atom species dependence (IASD) and interface orientation dependence (IOD) of nano-hetero interfaces between 3C-SiC ((1 1 1) or (0 0 1) orientation) and metal (Ti or Al) have been studied systematically. Stable atomic configurations of the 3C-SiC(1 1 1)/Al interfaces are quite different from those of the 3C-SiC(1 1 1)/Ti interfaces. Two terminated, Si-terminated (Si-TERM) and C-terminated (C-TERM), 3C-SiC(1 1 1)/Al interfaces have covalent bonding nature. In 3C-SiC/M (M = Ti or Al) nano-hetero interfaces, the C-terminated interface has relative strong, covalent and ionic C-Ti or C-Al bonds as TiC or SiC while the Si-terminated interface has various type of bonding nature, relative weak Si-Ti or Si-Al bonds from metallic character at the (0 0 1) interface to covalent character at the (1 1 1) interface. Adhesive energy (AE) shows strong IASD and IOD. The AE of the C-terminated interface is larger than that of the Si-terminated one. In the C-terminated interface, the AE of the (1 1 1) interface is smaller than that of the (0 0 1) one while in the Si-terminated interface there exists opposite interrelation. Schottky barrier height (SBH) also shows strong IASD and IOD. The SBH of the C-terminated interface is smaller than that of the Si-terminated one. The C-terminated SiC/Al interfaces have extremely small SBHs. In comparison with some experimental SBH, the present result is reliable as the difference of SBH between the two terminated interfaces and qualitative properties

  8. Study for the determination of samarium, europium,terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in gadolinium oxide matrix by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caires, A.C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A study for determination of samarium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in a gadolinium oxide matrix by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace is presented. The best charrring and atomization conditions were estabilished for each element, the most convenient ressonance lines being selected as well. The study was carried out for the mentioned lanthanides both when pure and when in binary mixtures with gadolinium, besides those where all for them were together with gadolinium. The determination limits for pure lanthanides were found to be between 1.3 and 9.6 ng assuming a 20% relative standard deviation as acceptable. The detection limits were in the range 0.51 and 7.5 ng, assuming as positive any answer higher than twofold the standard deviation. (author) [pt

  9. Molecular dynamics studies of fluid/oil interfaces for improved oil recovery processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara, Lucas S; Michelon, Mateus F; Miranda, Caetano R

    2012-12-20

    In our paper, we study the interface wettability, diffusivity, and molecular orientation between crude oil and different fluids for applications in improved oil recovery (IOR) processes through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD). The salt concentration, temperature, and pressure effects on the physical chemistry properties of different interfaces between IOR agents [brine (H(2)O + % NaCl), CO(2), N(2), and CH(4)] and crude oil have been determined. From the interfacial density profiles, an accumulation of aromatic molecules near the interface has been observed. In the case of brine interfaced with crude oil, our calculations indicate an increase in the interfacial tension with increasing pressure and salt concentration, which favors oil displacement. On the other hand, with the other fluids studied (CO(2), N(2), and CH(4)), the interfacial tension decreases with increasing pressure and temperature. With interfacial tension reduction, an increase in fluid diffusivity in the oil phase is observed. We also studied the molecular orientation properties of the hydrocarbon and fluids molecules in the interface region. We perceived that the molecular orientation could be affected by changes in the interfacial tension and diffusivity of the molecules in the interface region with the increased pressure and temperature: pressure (increasing) → interfacial tension (decreasing) → diffusion (increasing) → molecular ordering. From a molecular point of view, the combination of low interfacial tension and high diffusion of molecules in the oil phase gives the CO(2) molecules unique properties as an IOR fluid compared with other fluids studied here.

  10. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    significant abrasion of the graphite pebble. This study provides an excellent explanation for the abrasion behavior of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the pebble-bed HTR.

  11. High voltage/high resolution studies of metal and semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmacott, K.H.; Dahmen, U.

    1989-11-01

    The application of high resolution transmission electron microscopy to the study of homo- or hetero-phase interface structures requires specimens that meet stringent criteria. In some systems the necessary geometric imaging conditions are established naturally, thus greatly simplifying the analysis. This is illustrated for a diamond-hexagonal/diamond-cubic interface in deformed silicon, a Σ99 tilt boundary in a pure aluminum bicrystal, and a germanium precipitate in an aluminum matrix. 13 refs., 5 figs

  12. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  13. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  14. Sensing capabilities of graphite based MR elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, T F; Li, W H; Deng, Y M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents both experimental and theoretical investigations of the sensing capabilities of graphite based magnetorheological elastomers (MREs). In this study, eight MRE samples with varying graphite weight fractions were fabricated and their resistance under different magnetic fields and external loadings were measured with a multi-meter. With an increment of graphite weight fraction, the resistance of MRE sample decreases steadily. Higher magnetic fields result in a resistance increase. Based on an ideal assumption of a perfect chain structure, a mathematical model was developed to investigate the relationship between the MRE resistance with external loading. In this model, the current flowing through the chain structure consists of both a tunnel current and a conductivity current, both of which depend on external loadings. The modelling parameters have been identified and reconstructed from comparison with experimental results. The comparison indicates that both experimental results and modelling predictions agree favourably well

  15. Study of new structures adapted to gas-graphite and gas-heavy water reactors; Etude de structures nouvelles adaptees aux reacteurs graphite-gaz et eau lourde-gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R; Roche, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The experience acquired as a result of the operation of the Marcoule reactors and of the construction and start-up of the E.D.F. reactors on the one hand, and the conclusions of research and tests carried out out-of-pile on the other hand, lead to a considerable change in the general design of reactors of the gas-graphite type. The main modifications envisaged are analysed in the paper. The adoption of an annular fuel element and of a down-current cooling will make it possible to increase considerably the specific power and the power output of each channel; as a result there will be a considerable reduction in the number of the channels and a corresponding increase in the size of the unit cell. The graphite stack will have to be adapted to there new conditions. For security reasons, the use of prestressed concrete for the construction of the reactor vessel is becoming more widespread; they could lead to the exchangers and the fuel-handling apparatus becoming integrated inside the vessel (the so-called 'attic' device). A full-size mode) of this attic has been built at Saclay with the participation of EURATOM; the operational results obtained are presented as well as a new original design for the control rods. As for as the gas-heavy-water system is concerned, the research is carried out on two points of design; the first, which retains the use of horizontal pressure tubes, takes into account the experience acquired during the construction of the EL 4 reactor of which it will constitute an extrapolation; the second, arising from the research carried out on the gas-graphite system, will use a pre-stressed concrete vessel for holding the pressure, the moderator being almost at the same pressure as the cooling fluid and the fuel being placed in vertical channels. The relative merits of these two variants are analysed in the present paper. (authors) [French] L'experience acquise par l'exploitation des reacteurs de MARCOULE, la construction et le demarrage des reacteurs d

  16. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  17. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  18. Influence of the Interaction Between Graphite and Polar Surfaces of ZnO on the Formation of Schottky Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, R.; Grym, J.

    2018-03-01

    We show that the interaction between graphite and polar surfaces of ZnO affects electrical properties of graphite/ZnO Schottky junctions. A strong interaction of the Zn-face with the graphite contact causes interface imperfections and results in the formation of laterally inhomogeneous Schottky contacts. On the contrary, high quality Schottky junctions form on the O-face, where the interaction is significantly weaker. Charge transport through the O-face ZnO/graphite junctions is well described by the thermionic emission model in both forward and reverse directions. We further demonstrate that the parameters of the graphite/ZnO Schottky diodes can be significantly improved when a thin layer of ZnO2 forms at the interface between graphite and ZnO after hydrogen peroxide surface treatment.

  19. London forces in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Poperenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with terrace steps was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy with high spatial resolution. Spots with positive and negative charges were found in the vicinity of the steps. Values of the charges depended both on the microscope needle scan velocity and on its motion direction. The observed effect was theoretically explained with account of London forces that arise between the needle tip and the graphite surface. In this scheme, a terrace step works as a nanoscale diode for surface electric currents.

  20. Online time-differential perturbed angular correlation study with an 19O beam - Residence sites of oxygen atoms in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, W.; Ueno, H.; Watanabe, H.; Miyoshi, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Kameda, D.; Ito, T.; Shimada, K.; Kaihara, J.; Suda, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shinohara, A.; Ohkubo, Y.; Asahi, K.

    2008-01-01

    The online time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method was applied to a study of the physical states of a probe 19 F, the β - decay product of 19 O (t 1/2 = 26.9 s), implanted in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The observed magnitude of the electric field gradient at the probe nucleus, |V zz | = 2.91(17) x 10 22 V m -2 , suggests that the incident 19 O atoms are stabilized at an interlayer position with point group C 3v . Exhibiting observed TDPAC spectra having a clear sample-to-detector configuration dependence, we demonstrate the applicability of the present online method with a short-lived radioactive 19 O beam

  1. Online time-differential perturbed angular correlation study with an 19O beam - Residence sites of oxygen atoms in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, W.; Ueno, H.; Watanabe, H.; Miyoshi, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Kameda, D.; Ito, T.; Shimada, K.; Kaihara, J.; Suda, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shinohara, A.; Ohkubo, Y.; Asahi, K.

    2008-01-01

    The online time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method was applied to a study of the physical states of a probe 19F, the β- decay product of 19O (t1/2 = 26.9 s), implanted in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The observed magnitude of the electric field gradient at the probe nucleus, ∣Vzz∣ = 2.91(17) × 1022 V m-2, suggests that the incident 19O atoms are stabilized at an interlayer position with point group C3v. Exhibiting observed TDPAC spectra having a clear sample-to-detector configuration dependence, we demonstrate the applicability of the present online method with a short-lived radioactive 19O beam.

  2. A study of graphite-epoxy laminate failures due to high transverse shear strains using the multi-span-beam shear test procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1989-01-01

    The multi-span-beam shear test procedure is used to study failure mechanisms in graphite-epoxy laminates due to high transverse shear strains induced by severe local bending deformations in test specimens. Results of a series of tests on specimens with a variety of stacking sequences, including some with adhesive interleaving, are presented. These results indicate that laminates with stacking sequences with several + or - 45 and 90 deg plies next to each other are more susceptible to failures due to high transverse shear strains than laminates with + or - 45 and 0 deg plies next to each other or with + or - 45 deg plies next to layers of adhesive interleaving. Results of these tests are compared with analytical results based on finite elements.

  3. Synthesis and CO2 adsorption study of modified MOF-5 with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and expandable graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, Sami; Bustam, M. A.; Shariff, A. M.; Elkhalifah, Ali E. I.; Murshid, G.; Riaz, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    MOF-5 was synthesized by solvothermal method and its reactivation under anhydrous conditions. This research is conducted to investigate the effect of MOF-5 and MOF-5 modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and expandable graphite (EG) on the performance of CO 2 adsorption. The synthesized MOFs were characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for surface morphology, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for thermal stability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystals plane, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) for surface area and CO 2 adsorption. The result had showed that the modified MOF-5 enhanced the CO 2 adsorption compared to the pure MOF-5. The increment in the CO 2 uptake capacities of MOF materials was attributed to the decrease in the pore size and enhancement of micropore volume of MOF-5 by multi-walled carbon nanotube and EG incorporation. The BET surface area of the synthesized MOF-5@MWCNTs is more than MOF-5. The CO 2 sorption capacities of MOF-5 and MOF-5@MWCNTs were observed to increase from 0.00008 to 0.00048 mol g-1 at 298 K and 1 bar. The modified MOF-5@MWCNTs resulted in the highest CO 2 adsorption followed by the modified MOF-5@ EG and lastly, MOF-5

  4. Determination of the properties of composite interfaces by an ultrasonic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mal, A K; Karim, M R [Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA); Bar-Cohen, Y [Douglas Aircraft Co., McDonnell Douglas Corp., Long Beach, CA (USA)

    1990-06-15

    The feasibility of using a recently developed ultrasonic technique to determine certain macroscopic properties of the interface zones of composite laminates is studied. The strong influence of the elastic properties and the thickness of the interface zone on the phase velocity of guided waves is demonstrated by means of a simple model of a single fiber embedded in a layer of the matrix material. The overall dynamic elastic moduli of a unidirectional graphite-epoxy composite laminate are determined through inversion of guided wave dispersion data obtained by the leaky Lamb wave experiment. The thickness and elastic properties of the interlaminar interface zone in a cross-ply graphite-epoxy laminate are also estimated by the same approach. (orig.).

  5. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  6. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  7. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  8. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angermann, Heike, E-mail: angermann@helmholtz-berlin.de

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D{sub it}(E), and density D{sub it,min} of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly

  9. On the low-field Hall coefficient of graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Esquinazi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Hall coefficient (RH in three, several micrometer long multigraphene samples of thickness between ∼9 to ∼30 nm in the temperature range 0.1 to 200 K and up to 0.2 T field. The temperature dependence of the longitudinal resistance of two of the samples indicates the contribution from embedded interfaces running parallel to the graphene layers. At low enough temperatures and fields RH is positive in all samples, showing a crossover to negative values at high enough fields and/or temperatures in samples with interfaces contribution. The overall results are compatible with the reported superconducting behavior of embedded interfaces in the graphite structure and indicate that the negative low magnetic field Hall coefficient is not intrinsic of the ideal graphite structure.

  10. Experimental approaches for probing interfaces and grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, E.V.; Marcus, H.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses its attention on several research efforts performed by the authors and colleagues whose primary aim is probing interfacial and grain boundary properties. The first investigations described pertain to impurity segregation induced embrittlement which were modeled using thermodynamic considerations and were characterized by fracture testing using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Localized interface chemical characterization is essential in this research. The second investigation focuses on interface/impurity interaction determination. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), a structure characterization tool, was used to determine the local environment of impurities in metal-impurity-metal laminate composites, where the impurities were in monolayer to submonolayer interface concentrations. The third study pertains to the interface fracture in metal-matrix (metal/metal oxide/graphite) composites where a correlation was made between electronic states and fracture path

  11. Design of the Graphite Reflectors in Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Haeng; Cho, Yeong Garp; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Graphite is often used as one of reflector materials for research reactors because of its low neutron absorption cross-section, good moderating properties, and relatively low and stable price. In addition, graphite has excellent properties at high temperatures, so it is widely used as a core material in high temperature reactors. However, its material characteristics such as strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, dimensional change, and thermal conductivity sensitively depend on neutron fluence, temperature, and its manufacturing process. In addition, the Wigner energy and the treatment of the graphite waste such as C-14 should also be considered. For the design of the graphite reflectors, it is therefore essential to understand the material characteristics of chosen graphite materials at given conditions. Especially, the dimensional changes and the thermal conductivity are very important factors to design the nuclear components using graphite as a nonstructural material. Hence, in this study, the material characteristics of graphite are investigated via some experiments in literature. Improving design methods for graphite reflectors in research reactors are then suggested to minimize the problems, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are also discussed

  12. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of TiB2 on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, H.O.; Randich, E.; Mattox, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of the coating of graphite with TiB 2 by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using the hydrogen reduction of BCl 3 and TiCl 4 at 925 0 C and 1 atm. Reasonable matching of the thermal expansion of TiB 2 and graphite was necessary to eliminate cracking. A suitable graphite was POCO DFP-1. Adhesion was improved by having a slightly rough graphite surface. Heat treatment at 2000 0 C and above resulted in a certain degree of diffusion. No melting or solid phases other than TiB 2 and graphite were detected up to 2400 0 C. The coatings showed no failure when repeatedly submitted to an electron beam pulse of 2 KW/cm 2 for 0.8 sec

  14. Scaled-Up Production and Transport Applications of Graphitic Carbon Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviers, Kimberly R.

    Graphitic carbon nanomaterials enhance the performance of engineered systems for energy harvesting and storage. However, commercial availability remains largely cost-prohibitive due to technical barriers to mass production. This thesis examines both the scaled-up production and energy transport applications of graphitic materials. Cost driven-production of graphitic petals is developed, carbon nanotube array thermal interface materials enhance waste heat energy harvesting, and microsupercapacitors are visually examined using a new electroreflectance measurement method. Graphitic materials have previously been synthesized using batch-style processing methods with small sample sizes, limiting their commercial viability. In order to increase production throughput, a roll-to-roll radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition method is employed to continuously deposit graphitic petals on carbon fiber tow. In consideration of a full production framework, efficient and informative characterization methods in the form of electrical resistance and electrochemical capacitance are highlighted. To co-optimize the functional characteristics of the material, the processing conditions are comprehensively varied using a data-driven predictive design of experiments method. Repeatable and reliable production of graphitic materials will enable a host of creative graphene-based devices to emerge into the marketplace. Two such applications are discussed in the remaining chapters. Waste heat is most efficiently harvested at high temperatures, such as vehicle exhaust systems near 600°C. However, the resistance to heat flux at the interfaces between the harvesting device and its surroundings is detrimental to the system-level performance. To study the performance of thermal interface materials up to 700°C, a reference bar measurement method was designed. Design considerations are discussed and compared to past implementations, particularly regarding radiation heat flux and thermal

  15. Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies at mineral-water interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarello, R.P.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques provide a powerful tool for the in situ study of atomic scale processes occurring at solid-liquid interfaces. We have applied these techniques to characterize and study reactions at mineral-water interfaces. Here we present two examples. The first is the characterization of the calcite (CaCO 3 ) (10 bar 14) cleavage surface, in equilibrium with deionized water, by crystal truncation rod measurements. The second is the in situ study of the heteroepitaxial growth of otavite (CdCO 3 ) on the calcite (10 bar 14) cleavage surface. The results of such studies will lead to significant progress in understanding mineral-water interface geochemistry

  16. Contribution to study of interfaces instabilities in plane, cylindrical and spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, Nathalie

    1996-12-01

    This thesis proposes several experiments of hydrodynamical instabilities which are studied, numerically and theoretically. The experiments are in plane and cylindrical geometry. Their X-ray radiographies show the evolution of an interface between two solid media crossed by a detonation wave. These materials are initially solid. They become liquide under shock wave or stay between two phases, solid and liquid. The numerical study aims at simulating with the codes EAD and Ouranos, the interfaces instabilities which appear in the experiments. The experimental radiographies and the numerical pictures are in quite good agreement. The theoretical study suggests to modelise a spatio-temporal part of the experiments to obtain the quantitative development of perturbations at the interfaces and in the flows. The models are linear and in plane, cylindrical and spherical geometry. They preceed the inoming study of transition between linear and non linear development of instabilities in multifluids flows crossed by shock waves.

  17. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  18. US graphite reactor D ampersand D experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE)

  19. Analysis of a T-10 graphite limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Laux, M.; Lingertat, J.; Pech, P.; Reiner, H.D.; Strusny, H.; Wolff, H.

    1981-01-01

    Parts of a T-10 graphite limiter used during ohmic heated discharges have been investigated. Erosion and deposition phenomena have been studied by morphological and elemental surface analysis methods. From the results estimates of the plasma parameters near the limiter surface have been made. (orig.)

  20. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  1. Synthesis and characterization of SiC based composite materials for immobilizing radioactive graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Teng, Yuancheng; Wu, Lang; Zhang, Kuibao; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuang

    2018-06-01

    In order to immobilize high-level radioactive graphite, silicon carbide based composite materials{ (1-x) SiC· x MgAl2O4 (0.1 ≤ x≤0.4) } were fabricated by solid-state reaction at 1370 °C for 2 h in vacuum. Residual graphite and precipitated corundum were observed in the as-synthesized product, which attributed to the interface reaction of element silicon and magnesium compounds. To further understand the reasons for the presence of graphite and corundum, the effects of mole ratio of Si/C, MgAl2O4 content and non-stoichiometry of MgAl2O4 on the synthesis were investigated. To immobilize graphite better, residual graphite should be eliminated. The target product was obtained when the mole ratio of Si/C was 1.3:1, MgAl2O4 content was x = 0.2, and the mole ratio of Al to Mg in non-stoichiometric MgAl2O4 was 1.7:1. In addition, the interface reaction between magnesium compounds and silicon not graphite was displayed by conducting a series of comparative experiments. The key factor for the occurrence of interface reaction is that oxygen atom is transferred from magnesium compound to SiO gas. Infrared and Raman spectrum revealed the increased disorders of graphite after being synthesized.

  2. Solid state {sup 13}C NMR study on the synthesis of graphite oxide from different graphitic precursors; Estudo atravéS de RMN de {sup 13}C no estado sólido sobre a síntese de oxido de grafite utilizando diferentes precursores grafíticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Mariana A.; Frasson, Carolina Maria R.; Costa, Tainara Luiza G.; Cipriano, Daniel F.; Schettino Junior, Miguel A.; Cunha, Alfredo G.; Freitas, Jair C.C., E-mail: marianaarpini@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Carbonosos e Cerâmicos

    2017-10-15

    The influence of the structural and microstructural characteristics of graphitic precursors on the production of graphite oxide (GO) is investigated in the present work. Six different graphitic precursors were used to produce GO following a modified Hummers method, namely: natural graphite, commercial lubricant graphite, milled graphite, graphite flakes, high-purity graphite and graphite recycled from Li-ion batteries. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry, solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). {sup 13}C NMR spectra revealed the presence of epoxy, hydroxyl, carbonyl and lactol groups in the synthesized GOs. However, the oxidation degree of each product was found to be dependent on the average crystallite size (Lc) and particle size of the graphitic precursors, with the best GO samples being produced from the milled graphite and the graphite recycled from ion-Li batteries. These results were rationalized in terms of the structural and microstructural differences among the graphitic precursors, as revealed by the XRD patterns and SEM images, evidencing the importance of the correct choice of the precursor aiming the achievement of a well-developed structure for the GO product. (author)

  3. Adaptive support for user interface customization : a study in radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Cnossen, Fokie; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of adaptive customization support in a natural work environment: the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) in radiology. Methods: Adaptive support was given in the form of customization suggestions, generated based on behavioral

  4. Interfaces study of all-polysaccharide composite films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimkovic, I.; Kelnar, Ivan; Mendichi, R.; Tracz, A.; Filip, J.; Bertók, T.; Kasák, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 3 (2018), s. 711-718 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : all-polysaccharide composites * elemental analysis * film properties study Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  5. Study of lithium glassy solid electrolyte/electrode interface by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux – C.N.R.S. et Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie et de ... chemically very stable with the different types of electrodes studied here. ... tigated to improve the battery performance.

  6. Interface chemistry of CdZnTe films studied by a peel-off approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Jun; Xu, Haitao; Zhang, Yuelu; Ji, Huanhuan; Xu, Run, E-mail: runxu@staff.shu.edu.cn; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Jijun; Liang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Ke; Wang, Linjun, E-mail: ljwang@shu.edu.cn

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • A peel-off approach is adopted to study the interface chemistry of CdZnTe films. • A thick mixed interlayer above 84 nm is found at a low growth temperature of 200 °C. • A reaction-limited model is suggested to explain the formation of mixed interlayer. - Abstract: CdZnTe films with thickness above 50 μm were deposited at temperatures of 200–500 °C by Close Space Sublimation method. A peel-off approach has been adopted to study the interface chemistry of CdZnTe thick films. For all the CdZnTe films, the scanning electron microscopy images show the small and round-like grains formed at interface in contrast to the large ordered grains at surface. For CdZnTe films grown at a low substrate temperature of 200 °C, the interface layer between CdZnTe and substrate is mixed with Te and CdTe, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. The thickness of the interface layer can be estimated to be 84 nm by depth profile using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In contrast, a thin interface layer less than 14 nm is found at a high substrate temperature of 500 °C. The limited reaction of Te{sub 2} and Cd (Zn) to CdZnTe at a low growth temperature is responsible for the formation of the thick interface layer and a slow deposition rate at the nucleation stage.

  7. Water liquid-vapor interface subjected to various electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Mohammadreza; Azimian, Ahmad Reza; Rezaei, Majid; Nikzad, Safoora

    2017-11-01

    Investigation of the effects of E-fields on the liquid-vapor interface is essential for the study of floating water bridge and wetting phenomena. The present study employs the molecular dynamics method to investigate the effects of parallel and perpendicular E-fields on the water liquid-vapor interface. For this purpose, density distribution, number of hydrogen bonds, molecular orientation, and surface tension are examined to gain a better understanding of the interface structure. Results indicate enhancements in parallel E-field decrease the interface width and number of hydrogen bonds, while the opposite holds true in the case of perpendicular E-fields. Moreover, perpendicular fields disturb the water structure at the interface. Given that water molecules tend to be parallel to the interface plane, it is observed that perpendicular E-fields fail to realign water molecules in the field direction while the parallel ones easily do so. It is also shown that surface tension rises with increasing strength of parallel E-fields, while it reduces in the case of perpendicular E-fields. Enhancement of surface tension in the parallel field direction demonstrates how the floating water bridge forms between the beakers. Finally, it is found that application of external E-fields to the liquid-vapor interface does not lead to uniform changes in surface tension and that the liquid-vapor interfacial tension term in Young's equation should be calculated near the triple-line of the droplet. This is attributed to the multi-directional nature of the droplet surface, indicating that no constant value can be assigned to a droplet's surface tension in the presence of large electric fields.

  8. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  9. Theoretical study of reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halley, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Electron transfer rates are predicted by numerical methods, in collaboration with ANL. Emphasis is on electron transfer involving ions known to be important in enhancing stress corrosion cracking in light water reactors and on electron transfer at oxide surfaces. We have completed studies of the ferrous-ferric electron transfer rate in which effects of electric field, entropic effects in the free energy and quantum effects are included for the first time in the calculation of the rate of an electrochemical (heterogeneous) reaction rate. These new results confirm assumptions made in earlier calculations. The ferric ion has been modelled in a dissociable polarizable model showing the six-fold coordination of this ion in aqueous solution is stabilized by the three body interactions arising from the polarizability of water. In our studies of oxides, we have completed a Hartree self consistent calculation of the electronic structure of fayalite. The calculation utilizes a new method which takes phenomenological account of local electron correlations which have plagued electronic structure calculations of oxides for a long time. No electronic structure calculation of fayalite has been previously reported to our knowledge. Similar methods have been used to calculate the electronic structure of a vacancy in rutile (TiO 2 ). Results show that the screening donor electrons are anisotropically distributed around the vacancy

  10. Modeling of environmentally significant interfaces: Two case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williford, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    When some parameters cannot be easily measured experimentally, mathematical models can often be used to deconvolute or interpret data collected on complex systems, such as those characteristic of many environmental problems. These models can help quantify the contributions of various physical or chemical phenomena that contribute to the overall behavior, thereby enabling the scientist to control and manipulate these phenomena, and thus to optimize the performance of the material or device. In the first case study presented here, a model is used to test the hypothesis that oxygen interactions with hydrogen on the catalyst particles of solid oxide fuel cell anodes can sometimes occur a finite distance away from the triple phase boundary (TPB), so that such reactions are not restricted to the TPB as normally assumed. The model may help explain a discrepancy between the observed structure of SOFCs and their performance. The second case study develops a simple physical model that allows engineers to design and control the sizes and shapes of mesopores in silica thin films. Such pore design can be useful for enhancing the selectivity and reactivity of environmental sensors and catalysts. This paper demonstrates the mutually beneficial interactions between experiment and modeling in the solution of a wide range of problems

  11. Arsenic Removal from Water by Adsorption on Iron-Contaminated Cryptocrystalline Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Yang, Lang; Song, Shaoxian; Xia, Ling

    This work aimed to study the feasibility of using iron-contaminated graphite as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was prepared by grinding graphite concentrate with steel ball. The study was performed through the measurements of adsorption capacity, BET surface area and XPS analysis. The experimental results showed that the iron-contaminated graphite exhibited significantly high adsorption capacity of As(V). The higher the iron contaminated on the graphite surface, the higher the adsorption capacity of As(V) on the material obtained. It was suggested that the ion-contaminated graphite was a good adsorbent for As(V) removal.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and morphologic studies of Ru nanoparticles deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavand, R.; Yelon, A.; Sacher, E.

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) function as effective catalysts in specific reactions, such as methanation and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses. It is our purpose to physicochemically characterize their surfaces, at which catalysis occurs, by surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), using the symmetric peak component anaylsis technique developed in our laboratory to reveal previously hidden components. Ru NPs were deposited by evaporation (0.25-1.5 nm nominal deposition range) onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). In addition to their surfaces being characterized by XPS, an indication of morphology was obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our use of symmetric peak component XPS analysis has revealed detailed information on a previously unidentified surface oxide initially formed, as well as on the valence electronic structure and its variation with NP size, information that is of potential importance in the use of these NPs in catalysis. Each of the several Ru core XPS spectra characterized (3d, 3p and 3s) was found to be composed of three symmetric components. Together with two metal oxide O1s components, these give evidence of a rather complex, previously unidentified oxide that is initially formed. The Ru valence band (4d and 5s) spectra clearly demonstrate a loss of metallicity, a simultaneous increase of the Kubo gap, and an abrupt transfer in valence electron density from the 4d to the 5s orbitals (known as electron spill-over), as the NP size decreases below 0.5 nm. TEM photomicrographs, as a function of deposition rate, show that, at a rate that gives insufficient time for the NP condensation energy to dissipate, the initially well-separated NPs are capable of diffusing laterally and aggregating. This indicates weak NP bonding to the HOPG substrate. Carbide is formed, at both high and low deposition rates, at Ru deposition thicknesses greater than 0.25 nm, its formation explained by Ru NPs reacting with residual

  13. Integrating Virtual Worlds with Tangible User Interfaces for Teaching Mathematics: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Graciela; Ayala, Andrés; Mateu, Juan; Casades, Laura; Alamán, Xavier

    2016-10-25

    This article presents a pilot study of the use of two new tangible interfaces and virtual worlds for teaching geometry in a secondary school. The first tangible device allows the user to control a virtual object in six degrees of freedom. The second tangible device is used to modify virtual objects, changing attributes such as position, size, rotation and color. A pilot study on using these devices was carried out at the "Florida Secundaria" high school. A virtual world was built where students used the tangible interfaces to manipulate geometrical figures in order to learn different geometrical concepts. The pilot experiment results suggest that the use of tangible interfaces and virtual worlds allowed a more meaningful learning (concepts learnt were more durable).

  14. Integrating Virtual Worlds with Tangible User Interfaces for Teaching Mathematics: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Guerrero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a pilot study of the use of two new tangible interfaces and virtual worlds for teaching geometry in a secondary school. The first tangible device allows the user to control a virtual object in six degrees of freedom. The second tangible device is used to modify virtual objects, changing attributes such as position, size, rotation and color. A pilot study on using these devices was carried out at the “Florida Secundaria” high school. A virtual world was built where students used the tangible interfaces to manipulate geometrical figures in order to learn different geometrical concepts. The pilot experiment results suggest that the use of tangible interfaces and virtual worlds allowed a more meaningful learning (concepts learnt were more durable.

  15. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  16. A case study on better iconographic design in electronic medical records' user interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasa, Umut Burcu; Ozcan, Oguzhan; Yantac, Asim Evren; Unluer, Ayca

    2008-06-01

    It is a known fact that there is a conflict between what users expect and what user interface designers create in the field of medical informatics along with other fields of interface design. The objective of the study is to suggest, from the 'design art' perspective, a method for improving the usability of an electronic medical record (EMR) interface. The suggestion is based on the hypothesis that the user interface of an EMR should be iconographic. The proposed three-step method consists of a questionnaire survey on how hospital users perceive concepts/terms that are going to be used in the EMR user interface. Then icons associated with the terms are designed by a designer, following a guideline which is prepared according to the results of the first questionnaire. Finally the icons are asked back to the target group for proof. A case study was conducted with 64 medical staff and 30 professional designers for the first questionnaire, and with 30 medical staff for the second. In the second questionnaire 7.53 icons out of 10 were matched correctly with a standard deviation of 0.98. Also, all icons except three were matched correctly in at least 83.3% of the forms. The proposed new method differs from the majority of previous studies which are based on user requirements by leaning on user experiments instead. The study demonstrated that the user interface of EMRs should be designed according to a guideline that results from a survey on users' experiences on metaphoric perception of the terms.

  17. Structural stability of characteristic interface for NiTi/Nb Nanowire: First-Principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. F.; Zheng, H. Z.; Shu, X. Y.; Peng, P.

    2016-01-01

    Compared with some other conventional interface models, the interface of NiTi(211)/Nb(220) in NiTiNb metal nanocomposite had been simulated and analyzed carefully. Results show that only several interface models, i.e., NiTi(100)/Nb(100)(Ni⃡Nb), NiTi(110)/Nb(110) and NiTi(211)/Nb(220), can be formed accordingly with their negative formation enthalpy. Therein the cohesive energy Δ E and Griffith rupture work W of NiTi(211)/Nb(220) interface model are the lowest among them. Density of states shows that there exists only one electronic bonding peak for NiTi(211)/Nb(220) interface model at -2.5 eV. Electron density difference of NiTi(211)/ Nb(220) shows that the Nb-Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb-Ni bonding characters seem like so peaceful as a fabric twisting every atom, which is different from conventional metallic bonding performance. Such appearance can be deduced that the metallic bonding between Nb-Nb, Nb-Ti and Nb-Ni in NiTi(211)/Nb(220) may be affected by its nanostructure called nanometer size effect. Thus, our findings open an avenue for detailed and comprehensive studies of nanocomposite.

  18. Experimental Study on Bond Behavior of FRP-Concrete Interface in Hygrothermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the technique of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP composite material strengthened reinforced concrete structures is widely used in the field of civil engineering, durability of the strengthened structures has attracted more attention in recent years. Hygrothermal environment has an adverse effect on the bond behavior of the interface between FRP and concrete. This paper focuses on the bond durability of carbon fiber laminate- (CFL- concrete interface in hygrothermal condition which simulates the climate characteristic in South China. Twenty 100 mm × 100 mm × 720 mm specimens were divided into 6 groups based on different temperature and humidity. After pretreatment in hygrothermal environment, the specimens were tested using double shear method. Strain gauges bonded along the CFL surface and linear variation displacement transducers (LVDTs were used to measure longitudinal strains and slip of the interface. Failure mode, ultimate capacity, load-deflection relationship, and relative slip were analyzed. The bond behavior of FRP-concrete interface under hygrothermal environment was studied. Results show that the ultimate bearing capacity of the interface reduced after exposure to hygrothermal environments. The decreasing ranges were up to 27.9% after exposure at high temperature and humidity (60°C, 95% RH. The maximum strains (εmax of the specimens pretreated decreased obviously which indicated decay of the bond behavior after exposure to the hygrothermal environment.

  19. Theoretical study of heat transfer with moving phase-change interface in thawing of frozen food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, M; Ching, W H; Leung, D Y C; Lam, G C K

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical solution was obtained for a transient phase-change heat transfer problem in thawing of frozen food. In the physical model, a sphere originally at a uniform temperature below the phase-change temperature is suddenly immersed in a fluid at a temperature above the phase-change temperature. As the body temperature increases, the phase-change interface will be first formed on the surface. Subsequently, the interface will absorb the latent heat and move towards the centre until the whole body undergoes complete phase change. In the mathematical formulation, the nonhomogeneous problem arises from the moving phase-change interface. The solution in terms of the time-dependent temperature field was obtained by use of Green's function. A one-step Newton-Raphson method was specially designed to solve for the position of the moving interface to satisfy the interface condition. The theoretical results were compared with numerical results generated by a finite difference model and experimental measurements collected from a cold water thawing process. As a good agreement was found, the theoretical solution developed in this study was verified numerically and experimentally. Besides thawing of frozen food, there are many other practical applications of the theoretical solution, such as food freezing, soil freezing/thawing, metal casting and bath quenching heat treatment, among others

  20. Theoretical study of heat transfer with moving phase-change interface in thawing of frozen food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, M.; Ching, W. H.; Leung, D. Y. C.; Lam, G. C. K.

    2005-02-01

    A theoretical solution was obtained for a transient phase-change heat transfer problem in thawing of frozen food. In the physical model, a sphere originally at a uniform temperature below the phase-change temperature is suddenly immersed in a fluid at a temperature above the phase-change temperature. As the body temperature increases, the phase-change interface will be first formed on the surface. Subsequently, the interface will absorb the latent heat and move towards the centre until the whole body undergoes complete phase change. In the mathematical formulation, the nonhomogeneous problem arises from the moving phase-change interface. The solution in terms of the time-dependent temperature field was obtained by use of Green's function. A one-step Newton-Raphson method was specially designed to solve for the position of the moving interface to satisfy the interface condition. The theoretical results were compared with numerical results generated by a finite difference model and experimental measurements collected from a cold water thawing process. As a good agreement was found, the theoretical solution developed in this study was verified numerically and experimentally. Besides thawing of frozen food, there are many other practical applications of the theoretical solution, such as food freezing, soil freezing/thawing, metal casting and bath quenching heat treatment, among others.

  1. Structural strength of core graphite bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Futakawa, M.

    1987-01-01

    A HTR core consists of fuel, hot plenum, reflector and thermal barrier blocks. Each graphite block is supported by three thin cylindrical graphite bars called support post. Static and dynamic core loads are transmitted by the support posts to the thermal barrier blocks and a support plate. These posts are in contact with the blocks through hemispherical post seats to absorb the relative displacement caused by seismic force and the difference of thermal expansion of materials at the time of the start-up and shutdown of a reactor. The mixed fracture criterion of principal stress and modified Mohr-Coulomb's theory as well as the fracture criterion of principal stress based on elastic stress analysis was discussed in connection with the application to HTR graphite components. The buckling fracture of a support post was taken in consideration as one of the fracture modes. The effect that the length/diameter ratio of a post, small rotation and the curvature of post ends and seats exerted on the fracture strength was studied by using IG-110 graphite. Contacting stress analysis was carried out by using the structural analysis code 'COSMOS-7'. The experimental method, the analysis of buckling strength and the results are reported. The fracture of a support post is caused by the mixed mode of bending deformation, split fracture and shearing fracture. (Kako, I.)

  2. Study of ion beam sputtered Fe/Si interfaces as a function of Si layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Brajpuriya, Ranjeet; Singh, Priti

    2018-01-01

    The exchange interaction in metal/semiconductor interfaces is far from being completely understood. Therefore, in this paper, we have investigated the nature of silicon on the Fe interface in the ion beam deposited Fe/Si/Fe trilayers keeping the thickness of the Fe layers fixed at 3 nm and varying the thickness of the silicon sandwich layer from 1.5 nm to 4 nm. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy techniques were used, respectively, to study the structural and morphological changes in the deposited films as a function of layer thickness. The structural studies show silicide formation at the interfaces during deposition and better crystalline structure of Fe layers at a lower spacer layer thickness. The magnetization behavior was investigated using magneto-optical Kerr effect, which clearly shows that coupling between the ferromagnetic layers is highly influenced by the semiconductor spacer layer thickness. A strong antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for a value of tSi = 2.5 nm but above this value an unexpected behavior of hysteresis loop (step like) with two coercivity values is recorded. For spacer layer thickness greater than 2.5 nm, an elemental amorphous Si layer starts to appear in the spacer layer in addition to the silicide layer at the interfaces. It is observed that in the trilayer structure, Fe layers consist of various stacks, viz., Si doped Fe layers, ferromagnetic silicide layer, and nonmagnetic silicide layer at the interfaces. The two phase hysteresis loop is explained on the basis of magnetization reversal of two ferromagnetic layers, independent of each other, with different coercivities. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy technique was also used to study interfaces characteristics as a function of tSi.

  3. Graphite-graphite oxide composite electrode for vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenyue; Liu Jianguo; Yan Chuanwei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new composite electrode is designed for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). → The graphite oxide (GO) is used as electrode reactions catalyst. → The excellent electrode activity is attributed to the oxygen-containing groups attached on the GO surface. → A catalytic mechanism of the GO towards the redox reactions is presumed. - Abstract: A graphite/graphite oxide (GO) composite electrode for vanadium redox battery (VRB) was prepared successfully in this paper. The materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area was measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. The redox reactions of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ were studied with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicated that the electrochemical performances of the electrode were improved greatly when 3 wt% GO was added into graphite electrode. The redox peak currents of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ couples on the composite electrode were increased nearly twice as large as that on the graphite electrode, and the charge transfer resistances of the redox pairs on the composite electrode are also reduced. The enhanced electrochemical activity could be ascribed to the presence of plentiful oxygen functional groups on the basal planes and sheet edges of the GO and large specific surface areas introduced by the GO.

  4. Strategy for Handling and Treatment of INPP RBMK-1500 Irradiated Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oryšaka, A.

    2016-01-01

    There are two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite-moderated channel-type power reactors at Ignalina NPP. After the final shutdown of the INPP, radioactive i-graphite dismantling, handling, conditioning, storage and disposal is an important part of the decommissioning activities. The core of the INPP unit 1 and 2 contains about 3600 tons of i-graphite. Formation of activation products strongly depends on the contents of impurities, operational mode and concentration of impurities in the graphite. The case study for INPP envisages the analysis of possibilities of graphite handling and treatment in the context of immediate decommissioning. (author)

  5. Manufacturing of a graphite calorimeter at Yazd Radiation Processing Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziaie, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a few quasi-adiabatic graphite calorimeters of different dimensions are described. The calorimeters have been manufactured by ourselves and studied for accurate absorbed dose measurements in 10 MeV electron beam. In order to prove the accuracy and reliability of dose measurements with the use of self designed graphite calorimeters (SCD), an inter comparison study was performed on these calorimeters and Risoe graphite calorimeters (SC,standard calorimeter) at different doses by using Rhodothron accelerator. The comparison shows conclusively of the optimal size, the results agreeing with those obtained with the Sc within 1%. (author)

  6. Green, Innovative, and Profitable: A Case Study of Managerial Capabilities at Interface Inc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommi Lampikoski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the pioneering green-innovation management practices of a resource-intensive corporation, Interface Inc., which is a globally operating carpet manufacturer. Even during the current economic downturn, many companies remain committed to advancing their green business agendas. However, recent research suggests that most of these companies are far from reaching substantial competitive advantage from this commitment because they lack the connection between their green agendas and core innovation-management activities. This study illustrates how Interface succeeded with radical green innovations by investing in managerial capabilities that allowed it to conduct research, recognize opportunities, and revolutionize the carpeting industry. These capabilities enabled Interface to continuously challenge and disrupt well-established management recipes, existing knowledge, and proven industrial practices, and they enabled it to create a sustainable competitive advantage through a winning portfolio of radical green innovations.

  7. In-Situ TEM Study of Interface Sliding and Migration in an Ultrafine Lamellar Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, L M

    2005-12-06

    The instability of interfaces in an ultrafine TiAl-({gamma})/Ti{sub 3}Al-({alpha}{sub 2}) lamellar structure by straining at room temperature has been investigated using in-situ straining techniques performed in a transmission electron microscope. The purpose of this study is to obtain experimental evidence to support the creep mechanisms based upon the interface sliding in association with a cooperative movement of interfacial dislocations previously proposed to interpret the nearly linear creep behavior observed from ultrafine lamellar TiAl alloys. The results have revealed that both the sliding and migration of lamellar interfaces can take place simultaneously as a result of the cooperative movement of interfacial dislocations.

  8. Crystalline silicon films sputtered on molybdenum A study of the silicon-molybdenum interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinig, P.; Fenske, F.; Fuhs, W.; Schoepke, A.; Selle, B

    2003-04-15

    Polycrystalline silicon films were grown on molybdenum (Mo)-coated substrates at high deposition rate using the pulsed magnetron sputtering technique. Our study investigates the silicon-molybdenum interface of these films to elucidate stimulating mechanisms for an ordered crystalline silicon thin film growth. Both Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering reveal that at a substrate temperature as low as T{sub S}=450 deg. C during the deposition process intermixing of Si and Mo at the Si-Mo interface takes place leading to a compositional ratio Mo:Si of about 1:2. By Raman spectroscopy hexagonal {beta}-MoSi{sub 2} could be identified as the dominant phase in this intermixed region. The dependence of the resulting thickness of the reacted interface layer on the deposition conditions is not fully understood yet.

  9. Crystalline silicon films sputtered on molybdenum A study of the silicon-molybdenum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinig, P.; Fenske, F.; Fuhs, W.; Schoepke, A.; Selle, B.

    2003-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon films were grown on molybdenum (Mo)-coated substrates at high deposition rate using the pulsed magnetron sputtering technique. Our study investigates the silicon-molybdenum interface of these films to elucidate stimulating mechanisms for an ordered crystalline silicon thin film growth. Both Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering reveal that at a substrate temperature as low as T S =450 deg. C during the deposition process intermixing of Si and Mo at the Si-Mo interface takes place leading to a compositional ratio Mo:Si of about 1:2. By Raman spectroscopy hexagonal β-MoSi 2 could be identified as the dominant phase in this intermixed region. The dependence of the resulting thickness of the reacted interface layer on the deposition conditions is not fully understood yet

  10. Thermal annealing studies of GeTe-Sb2Te3 alloys with multiple interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Bragaglia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A high degree of vacancy ordering is obtained by annealing amorphous GeTe-Sb2Te3 (GST alloys deposited on a crystalline substrate, which acts as a template for the crystallization. Under annealing the material evolves from amorphous to disordered rocksalt, to ordered rocksalt with vacancies arranged into (111 oriented layers, and finally converts into the stable trigonal phase. The role of the interface in respect to the formation of an ordered crystalline phase is studied by comparing the transformation stages of crystalline GST with and without a capping layer. The capping layer offers another crystallization interface, which harms the overall crystalline quality.

  11. Layered interfaces between immiscible liquids studied by density-functional theory and molecular-dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geysermans, P; Elyeznasni, N; Russier, V

    2005-11-22

    We present a study of the structure in the interface between two immiscible liquids by density-functional theory and molecular-dynamics calculations. The liquids are modeled by Lennard-Jones potentials, which achieve immiscibility by suppressing the attractive interaction between unlike particles. The density profiles of the liquids display oscillations only in a limited part of the simple liquid-phase diagram (rho,T). When approaching the liquid-vapor coexistence, a significant depletion appears while the layering behavior of the density profile vanishes. By analogy with the liquid-vapor interface and the analysis of the adsorption this behavior is suggested to be strongly related to the drying transition.

  12. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    lattice parameter of graphite due to the ion irradiation damage is developed. The effects of the testing variables on the measured fracture toughness are evaluated on the isotropic graphite. Through the microstructural observations, the various toughening mechanisms of the isotropic graphite are studied. Based on the test results and analyses, a reliable test method is proposed.

  13. Design Procedure of Graphite Components by ASME HTR Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Jo, Chang Keun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, design procedure for graphite components of HTRs was reviewed and the differences from metal materials were remarked. The Korean VHTR has a prismatic core which is made of multiple graphite blocks, reflectors, and core supports. One of the design issues is the assessment of the structural integrity of the graphite components because the graphite is brittle and shows quite different behaviors from metals in high temperature environment. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the latest edition of the code for the high temperature reactors (HTR) in 2015. In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, Graphite Materials was reviewed and the special features were remarked. Due the brittleness of graphites, the damage-tolerant design procedures different from the conventional metals were adopted based on semi-probabilistic approaches. The unique additional classification, SRC, is allotted to the graphite components and the full 3-D FEM or equivalent stress analysis method is required. In specific conditions, the oxidation and viscoelasticity analysis of material are required. The fatigue damage rule has not been established yet

  14. Design Procedure of Graphite Components by ASME HTR Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji-Ho; Jo, Chang Keun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, design procedure for graphite components of HTRs was reviewed and the differences from metal materials were remarked. The Korean VHTR has a prismatic core which is made of multiple graphite blocks, reflectors, and core supports. One of the design issues is the assessment of the structural integrity of the graphite components because the graphite is brittle and shows quite different behaviors from metals in high temperature environment. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the latest edition of the code for the high temperature reactors (HTR) in 2015. In this study, the ASME B and PV Code, Subsection HH, Subpart A, Graphite Materials was reviewed and the special features were remarked. Due the brittleness of graphites, the damage-tolerant design procedures different from the conventional metals were adopted based on semi-probabilistic approaches. The unique additional classification, SRC, is allotted to the graphite components and the full 3-D FEM or equivalent stress analysis method is required. In specific conditions, the oxidation and viscoelasticity analysis of material are required. The fatigue damage rule has not been established yet.

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and morphologic studies of Ru nanoparticles deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavand, R.; Yelon, A.; Sacher, E., E-mail: edward.sacher@polymtl.ca

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Ru nanoparticle 3d, 3p, and 3s core XPS spectra were found to be composed of three symmetric components. The first component, Ru1, is due to zerovalent R, while components Ru2 and Ru3 are attributed to surface oxide species. • The nanoparticle surface additionally possesses a carbon-rich surface, from residual gas hydrocarbons present in the vacuum. • TEM photomicrographs show the aggregation and partial coalescence of nanoparticles deposited at high deposition rates, provoked by the high rate of release of the heat of condensation, indicating weak bonding to the HOPG substrate. • The analysis of the valence band indicates an increase of the Kubo gap with decreasing NP size, accompanied by an abrupt electron spill-over from the 4d to the 5s orbital. - Abstract: Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) function as effective catalysts in specific reactions, such as methanation and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses. It is our purpose to physicochemically characterize their surfaces, at which catalysis occurs, by surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), using the symmetric peak component anaylsis technique developed in our laboratory to reveal previously hidden components. Ru NPs were deposited by evaporation (0.25–1.5 nm nominal deposition range) onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). In addition to their surfaces being characterized by XPS, an indication of morphology was obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our use of symmetric peak component XPS analysis has revealed detailed information on a previously unidentified surface oxide initially formed, as well as on the valence electronic structure and its variation with NP size, information that is of potential importance in the use of these NPs in catalysis. Each of the several Ru core XPS spectra characterized (3d, 3p and 3s) was found to be composed of three symmetric components. Together with two metal oxide O1s components, these give evidence of a rather complex

  16. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  17. Evaluation of a novel Conjunctive Exploratory Navigation Interface for consumer health information: a crowdsourced comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Licong; Carter, Rebecca; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-02-10

    Numerous consumer health information websites have been developed to provide consumers access to health information. However, lookup search is insufficient for consumers to take full advantage of these rich public information resources. Exploratory search is considered a promising complementary mechanism, but its efficacy has never before been rigorously evaluated for consumer health information retrieval interfaces. This study aims to (1) introduce a novel Conjunctive Exploratory Navigation Interface (CENI) for supporting effective consumer health information retrieval and navigation, and (2) evaluate the effectiveness of CENI through a search-interface comparative evaluation using crowdsourcing with Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT). We collected over 60,000 consumer health questions from NetWellness, one of the first consumer health websites to provide high-quality health information. We designed and developed a novel conjunctive exploratory navigation interface to explore NetWellness health questions with health topics as dynamic and searchable menus. To investigate the effectiveness of CENI, we developed a second interface with keyword-based search only. A crowdsourcing comparative study was carefully designed to compare three search modes of interest: (A) the topic-navigation-based CENI, (B) the keyword-based lookup interface, and (C) either the most commonly available lookup search interface with Google, or the resident advanced search offered by NetWellness. To compare the effectiveness of the three search modes, 9 search tasks were designed with relevant health questions from NetWellness. Each task included a rating of difficulty level and questions for validating the quality of answers. Ninety anonymous and unique AMT workers were recruited as participants. Repeated-measures ANOVA analysis of the data showed the search modes A, B, and C had statistically significant differences among their levels of difficulty (Pconsumer health information retrieval and

  18. Oxide surfaces and metal/oxide interfaces studied by grazing incidence X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Gilles

    important physical properties such as superconductivity or magnetism is also briefly reviewed. The strengths and limitations of the technique, such as the need for single crystals and surfaces of high crystalline quality are discussed. Finally, an outlook of future prospects in the field is given, such as the study of more complex oxide surfaces, vicinal surfaces, reactive metal/oxide interfaces, metal oxidation processes, the use of surfactants to promote wetting of a metal deposited on an oxide surface or the study of oxide/liquid interfaces in a non-UHV environment.

  19. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  20. Design and usability study of an iconic user interface to ease information retrieval of medical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffon, Nicolas; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Hamek, Saliha; Hassler, Sylvain; Boog, César; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Venot, Alain; Darmoni, Stéfan J

    2014-10-01

    Doc'CISMeF (DC) is a semantic search engine used to find resources in CISMeF-BP, a quality controlled health gateway, which gathers guidelines available on the internet in French. Visualization of Concepts in Medicine (VCM) is an iconic language that may ease information retrieval tasks. This study aimed to describe the creation and evaluation of an interface integrating VCM in DC in order to make this search engine much easier to use. Focus groups were organized to suggest ways to enhance information retrieval tasks using VCM in DC. A VCM interface was created and improved using the ergonomic evaluation approach. 20 physicians were recruited to compare the VCM interface with the non-VCM one. Each evaluator answered two different clinical scenarios in each interface. The ability and time taken to select a relevant resource were recorded and compared. A usability analysis was performed using the System Usability Scale (SUS). The VCM interface contains a filter based on icons, and icons describing each resource according to focus group recommendations. Some ergonomic issues were resolved before evaluation. Use of VCM significantly increased the success of information retrieval tasks (OR=11; 95% CI 1.4 to 507). Nonetheless, it took significantly more time to find a relevant resource with VCM interface (101 vs 65 s; p=0.02). SUS revealed 'good' usability with an average score of 74/100. VCM was successfully implemented in DC as an option. It increased the success rate of information retrieval tasks, despite requiring slightly more time, and was well accepted by end-users. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Analysis of electrochemical disintegration process of graphite matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lifang; Wen Mingfen; Chen Jing

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical method with ammonium nitrate as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from the simulative fuel elements for high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The influences of process parameters, including salt concentration, system temperature and current density, on the disintegration rate of graphite fragments were investigated in the present work. The experimental results showed that the disintegration rate depended slightly on the temperature and salt concentration. The current density strongly affected the disintegration rate of graphite fragments. Furthermore, the content of introduced oxygen in final graphite fragments was independent of the current density and the concentration of electrolyte. Moreover, the structural evolution of graphite was analyzed based on the microstructural parameters determined by X-ray diffraction profile fitting analysis using MAUD (material analysis using diffraction) before and after the disintegration process. It may safely be concluded that the graphite disintegration can be ascribed to the influences of the intercalation of foreign molecules in between crystal planes and the partial oxidation involved. The disintegration process was described deeply composed of intercalate part and further oxidation part of carbon which effected together to lead to the collapse of graphite crystals.

  2. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  3. New insights into canted spiro carbon interstitial in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The self-interstitial carbon is the key to radiation damage in graphite moderator nuclear reactor, so an understanding of its behavior is essential for plant safety and maximized reactor lifetime. The density functional theory is applied on four different graphite unit cells, starting from of 64 carbon atoms up to 256 carbon atoms, using AIMPRO code to obtain the energetic, athermal and mechanical properties of carbon interstitial in graphite. This study presents first principles calculations of the energy of formation that prove its high barrier to athermal diffusion (1.1 eV) and the consequent large critical shear stress (39 eV-50 eV) necessary to shear graphite planes in its presence. Also, for the first time, the gamma surface of graphite in two dimensions is calculated and found to yield the critical shear stress for perfect graphite. Finally, in contrast to the extensive literature describing the interstitial of carbon in graphite as spiro interstitial, in this work the ground state of interstitial carbon is found to be canted spiro interstitial.

  4. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  5. Feasibility study for an engineering concept of a stainless steel/copper divertor plate protected by W-5 Re alloy or graphite armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, V.; Federici, G.; Papa, L.

    1988-01-01

    The latest Joint Research Centre (JRC)-Ispra proposal is presented to support the design of a divertor concept that has long been considered the most crucial component of the plasma impurity control system for the Next Europen Torus (NET) tokamak fusion reactor. Because of the harsh tokamak environment, the divertor panel is the plasma facing component that suffers the most severe loading conditions, such as high thermal stresses, thermal fatigue, severe erosion rates and neutron damage. An analysis of a new divertor panel concept has evolved from the previous studies carried out at JRC-Ispra. The materials considered in this study are AISI 316 stainless steel for the cooling tubes, pure copper for the heat sink, and W-5 Re alloy or graphite for the protective armor. The panel is cooled by pressurized water circulation in U-tubes. A preliminary thermo-hydraulic analysis has been carried out to evaluate a set of reference parameters, such as optimum coolant velocity, maximum outlet water temperature, convective heat exchange coefficient, and the expected pressure drops in the channels. Thermal and mechanical calculations, performed by using the finite element technique, showed encouraging results about the engineering feasibility of the pressure boundary of the divertor for loading conditions similar to those of NET double null, assumed as the reference mainframe

  6. Effects of graphite on rheological and conventional properties of bituminous binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Erkuş

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphite used for developing the rheological and conventional properties of bitumen were investigated using various bituminous binder tests. Penetration, softening point, rotational viscosity (RV, dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR tests were applied to bituminous binders modified with four different proportions of graphite by bitumen weight. The penetration values declined while softening point values increased with rising graphite content. While graphite induced 8 °C increases in mixing-compacting temperature by increasing the viscosity values, it also increased the rutting parameter. According to the BBR test, the deformation and stiffness values changed significantly with increasing graphite content, but the m-values did not change significantly. These results showed that graphite generally used for improving the thermal properties can improve to high temperature performance of mixtures. Keywords: Graphite, Bitumen, Conventional properties, Rheological properties

  7. Assessment of the radiological inventory of EDF's graphite waste through an assimilation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, B.

    2014-01-01

    The definitive disposal of graphite from the decommissioned UNGG reactors (Chinon A3, Saint-Laurent A1, Saint-Laurent A2 and Bugey 1) has required a radiological inventory of the irradiated graphite. This study focuses on Cl 36 that is produced by neutron absorption on Cl 35 that was present initially in graphite as an impurity (about 80 mg/t of Cl initially in Bugey 1 graphite)). It appears that the changes of Cl 36 concentration along the height of a stack of graphite do neither fit the changes in the neutron flux nor the changes in the graphite temperature. This fact is explained by the high level of purity of the graphite and the nugget effect. Challenged by the absence of spatial correlation of the Cl 36 concentration, an EDF's team has developed an assimilation method based on comparisons between calculations and measurements in order to get a conservative inventory. (A.C.)

  8. Evaluation of microstructures and oxidation behaviors of graphite for core support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Jin; Bae, Kyung Min

    2010-03-01

    This work studies the oxidation-induced characteristics of five nuclear graphites (NBG-17, NBG-18, NBG-25, IG-110, and IG-430). The oxidation characteristics of the nuclear graphites were measured at 600 .deg. C. The surface properties of the oxidation graphites were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle methods. The N2/77K adsorption isotherm characteristics, including the specific surface area and micropore volume, were investigated by means of BET and t-plot methods. The experimental results show an increase in the average pore size of graphites; they also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. For example the surface area of NBG-17 increases slightly whereas the surface area of IG-110 increases significantly. This result confirms that the original surface state of each graphite is unique

  9. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  10. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  11. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  12. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  13. Density functional theory based study of chlorine doped WS2-metal interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanana, Anuja; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)-metal interface is essential for the effective functioning of monolayer TMD based field effect transistors. In this work, we employ the Density Functional Theory calculations to analyze the modulation of the electronic structure of monolayer WS 2 with chlorine doping and the relative changes in the contact properties when interfaced with gold and palladium. We initially examine the atomic and electronic structures of pure and doped monolayer WS 2 supercell and explore the formation of midgap states with band splitting near the conduction band edge. Further, we analyze the contact nature of the pure supercell with Au and Pd. We find that while Au is physiosorbed and forms n-type contact, Pd is chemisorped and forms p-type contact with a higher valence electron density. Next, we study the interface formed between the Cl-doped supercell and metals and observe a reduction in the Schottky barrier height (SBH) in comparison to the pure supercell. This reduction found is higher for Pd in comparison to Au, which is further validated by examining the charge transfer occurring at the interface. Our study confirms that Cl doping is an efficient mechanism to reduce the n-SBH for both Au and Pd, which form different types of contact with WS 2 .

  14. Density functional theory based study of chlorine doped WS{sub 2}-metal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, Anuja; Mahapatra, Santanu, E-mail: santanu@dese.iisc.ernet.in [NanoScale Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, Karnataka 560012 (India)

    2016-03-07

    Investigation of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)-metal interface is essential for the effective functioning of monolayer TMD based field effect transistors. In this work, we employ the Density Functional Theory calculations to analyze the modulation of the electronic structure of monolayer WS{sub 2} with chlorine doping and the relative changes in the contact properties when interfaced with gold and palladium. We initially examine the atomic and electronic structures of pure and doped monolayer WS{sub 2} supercell and explore the formation of midgap states with band splitting near the conduction band edge. Further, we analyze the contact nature of the pure supercell with Au and Pd. We find that while Au is physiosorbed and forms n-type contact, Pd is chemisorped and forms p-type contact with a higher valence electron density. Next, we study the interface formed between the Cl-doped supercell and metals and observe a reduction in the Schottky barrier height (SBH) in comparison to the pure supercell. This reduction found is higher for Pd in comparison to Au, which is further validated by examining the charge transfer occurring at the interface. Our study confirms that Cl doping is an efficient mechanism to reduce the n-SBH for both Au and Pd, which form different types of contact with WS{sub 2}.

  15. Experimental Study on Fatigue Behaviour of BFRP-Concrete Bond Interfaces under Bending Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhe Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP composites are increasingly being used to retrofit concrete structures by external bonding. For such strengthened members, the BFRP-concrete interface plays the crucial role of transferring stresses. This study aims to investigate the fatigue behaviour of the interface under bending load. A series of tests were conducted on BFRP-concrete bonded joint, including static, fatigue, and postfatigue loading. The fatigue failure modes, the development of deflection, the evolution of BFRP strains, and the propagation of interfacial cracks were analysed. In addition, the debonding-induced fatigue life of BFRP-concrete bonded joints was studied. Finally, a new model of fatigue life was proposed by defining the effective fatigue bond stress. The results showed that the fatigue experience has a significant effect on the BFRP strength especially near the root of concrete transverse crack and on the bond performance of the adhesive near the interface crack tip. There are two main fatigue failure modes: BFRP rupture and BFRP debonding. The fatigue damage development of the bond interface has three stages: rapid, stable, and unstable growth. The proposed model for the debonding-induced fatigue life is more conservative for the BFRP-concrete bonded joints under pure shear load than for those under bending load.

  16. Structural superlubricity of platinum on graphite under ambient conditions: The effects of chemistry and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özoǧul, Alper; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2017-11-01

    An investigation of the frictional behavior of platinum nanoparticles laterally manipulated on graphite has been conducted to answer the question of whether the recent observation of structural superlubricity under ambient conditions [E. Cihan, S. İpek, E. Durgun, and M. Z. Baykara, Nat. Commun. 7, 12055 (2016)] is exclusively limited to the gold-graphite interface. Platinum nanoparticles have been prepared by e-beam evaporation of a thin film of platinum on graphite, followed by post-deposition annealing. Morphological and structural characterization of the nanoparticles has been performed via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, revealing a crystalline structure with no evidence of oxidation under ambient conditions. Lateral manipulation experiments have been performed via atomic force microscopy under ambient conditions, whereby results indicate the occurrence of structural superlubricity at mesoscopic interfaces of 4000-75 000 nm2, with a noticeably higher magnitude of friction forces when compared with gold nanoparticles of similar contact areas situated on graphite. Ab initio simulations of sliding involving platinum and gold slabs on graphite confirm the experimental observations, whereby the higher magnitude of friction forces is attributed to stronger energy barriers encountered by platinum atoms sliding on graphite, when compared with gold. On the other hand, as predicted by theory, the scaling power between friction force and contact size is found to be independent of the chemical identity of the sliding atoms, but to be determined by the geometric qualities of the interface, as characterized by an average "sharpness score" assigned to the nanoparticles.

  17. Simple synthesis of mesoporous FeNi/graphitic carbon nanocomposite catalysts and study on their activities in catalytic cracking of toluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yangang, E-mail: ygwang8136@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Chen, Yuting; Yao, Mingcui [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Qin, Hengfei; Kang, Shifei; Li, Xi [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zuo, Yuanhui; Zhang, Xiaodong [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Cui, Li-Feng, E-mail: lifeng.cui@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2015-11-01

    Mesoporous FeNi alloy/graphitic carbon nanocomposite catalysts with different Fe/Ni molar ratios have been synthesized through a simple solid–liquid grinding/templating method using mesoporous silica SBA-15 as the template. Metal nitrates and natural soybean oil were respectively used as the magnetic particle precursors and carbon source, which can be infiltrated into the silica template after simple impregnation, grinding and subsequent heat treatment. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis techniques were used to characterize the samples. It is observed that high contents of FeNi alloy nanoparticles with the sizes of 3–6 nm are well dispersed into the walls of graphitic mesoporous carbon matrix, and the resulting nanocomposites have a uniform mesostructure with a high specific surface area and large pore volume. Because of these properties, the obtained FeNi/graphitic carbon nanocomposites can be used as novel catalysts for the catalytic cracking of toluene and exhibit a higher activity and stability than FeNi/commercial activated carbon (AC) catalyst. After a period of 810 min reaction at 700 °C, the toluene conversion on the FeNi/graphitic carbon nanocomposites can be maintained at a level of more than 75% and this value is 2.5 times as high as that of the FeNi/AC catalyst. - Highlights: • Mesoporous FeNi alloy/graphitic carbon nanocomposites (FeNi/GCN) were synthesized. • High contents of FeNi alloy nanoparticles are well embedded into the graphitic carbon walls. • The obtained FeNi/GCN catalysts have a high surface area and uniform mesostructure. • The FeNi/GCN catalysts exhibited excellent catalytic performance in the cracking of toluene.

  18. Studies on layer growth and interfaces on Ta-base thin layers by means of XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zier, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis studies on the growth and on the formation of the interfaces of Ta and TaN layers on Si and SiO 2 were performed. In the system TaN on SiO 2 no reaction on the interface could be found. As the system with the mostly disturbed interface Ta on SiO 2 was proved. Here a reduction of the SiO 2 at simultaneous oxidation of the Ta was to be observed. Additionally tantalum silicide was formed to be considered concerning the bonding state as Ta 5 Si 3 , from which a double layer of a tantalum silicide and a tantalum suboxide resulted. A whole thickness of the double layer of above 1 nm resulted. In the system Ta on Si at the deposition of the film on the interface a tantalum silicide was formed to be characterized concerning the bonding state as TaSi 2 . The thickness of the interlayer growed thereby up to 0.8 nm in form of islands. Finally in the system TaN on Si a silicon nitride formation during the deposition was observed, which was attributed to the insertion of adsorbed nitrogen from the sputtering atmosphere by recoil implantation of the sputtered Ta atoms. The silicon nitride interlayer growed thereby up to a thickness of 0.8 nm

  19. Study on user interface of pathology picture archiving and communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dasueran; Kang, Peter; Yun, Jungmin; Park, Sung-Hye; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Park, Peom

    2014-01-01

    It is necessary to improve the pathology workflow. A workflow task analysis was performed using a pathology picture archiving and communication system (pathology PACS) in order to propose a user interface for the Pathology PACS considering user experience. An interface analysis of the Pathology PACS in Seoul National University Hospital and a task analysis of the pathology workflow were performed by observing recorded video. Based on obtained results, a user interface for the Pathology PACS was proposed. Hierarchical task analysis of Pathology PACS was classified into 17 tasks including 1) pre-operation, 2) text, 3) images, 4) medical record viewer, 5) screen transition, 6) pathology identification number input, 7) admission date input, 8) diagnosis doctor, 9) diagnosis code, 10) diagnosis, 11) pathology identification number check box, 12) presence or absence of images, 13) search, 14) clear, 15) Excel save, 16) search results, and 17) re-search. And frequently used menu items were identified and schematized. A user interface for the Pathology PACS considering user experience could be proposed as a preliminary step, and this study may contribute to the development of medical information systems based on user experience and usability.

  20. Waterjet cutting of periprosthetic interface tissue in loosened hip prostheses: an in vitro feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaij, Gert; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Dankelman, Jenny; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Valstar, Edward R

    2015-02-01

    Waterjet cutting technology is considered a promising technology to be used for minimally invasive removal of interface tissue surrounding aseptically loose hip prostheses. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of waterjet cutting of interface tissue membrane. Waterjets with 0.2 mm and 0.6 mm diameter, a stand-off distance of 5 mm, and a traverse speed of 0.5 mm/s were used to cut interface tissue samples in half. The water flow through the nozzle was controlled by means of a valve. By changing the flow, the resulting waterjet pressure was regulated. Tissue sample thickness and the required waterjet pressures were measured. Mean thickness of the samples tested within the 0.2 mm nozzle group was 2.3 mm (SD 0.7 mm) and within the 0.6 mm nozzle group 2.6 mm (SD 0.9 mm). The required waterjet pressure to cut samples was between 10 and 12 MPa for the 0.2 mm nozzle and between 5 and 10 MPa for the 0.6 mm nozzle. Cutting bone or bone cement requires about 3 times higher waterjet pressure (30-50 MPa, depending on used nozzle diameter) and therefore we consider waterjet cutting as a safe technique to be used for minimally invasive interface tissue removal. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-Robot Interfaces and Operator Situational Awareness: Study of the Impact of Immersion and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Tapia, Elena; Martín-Barrio, Andrés; Olivares-Méndez, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-robot missions are a challenge for operators in terms of workload and situational awareness. These operators have to receive data from the robots, extract information, understand the situation properly, make decisions, generate the adequate commands, and send them to the robots. The consequences of excessive workload and lack of awareness can vary from inefficiencies to accidents. This work focuses on the study of future operator interfaces of multi-robot systems, taking into account relevant issues such as multimodal interactions, immersive devices, predictive capabilities and adaptive displays. Specifically, four interfaces have been designed and developed: a conventional, a predictive conventional, a virtual reality and a predictive virtual reality interface. The four interfaces have been validated by the performance of twenty-four operators that supervised eight multi-robot missions of fire surveillance and extinguishing. The results of the workload and situational awareness tests show that virtual reality improves the situational awareness without increasing the workload of operators, whereas the effects of predictive components are not significant and depend on their implementation. PMID:28749407

  2. Improving the interface between informal carers and formal health and social services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, K M; Kayes, N K; Moloczij, N; Cummins, C

    2014-03-01

    Reports about the impact of caring vary widely, but a consistent finding is that the role is influenced (for better or worse) by how formal services respond to, and work with informal carers and of course the cared for person. We aimed to explore the connection between informal and formal cares and identify how a positive connection or interface might be developed and maintained. We undertook a qualitative descriptive study with focus groups and individual interviews with informal carers, formal care service providers and representatives from carer advocacy groups. Content analysis was used to identify key factors impacting on the interface between informal and formal carers and propose specific recommendations for service development. Community setting including urban and rural areas of New Zealand. Seventy participants (the majority informal carers) took part in 13 focus groups and 22 individual interviews. Four key themes were derived: Quality of care for the care recipient; Knowledge exchange (valuing carer perspectives); One size does not fit all (creating flexible services); and A constant struggle (reducing the burden services add). An optimum interface to address these key areas was proposed. In addition to ensuring quality care for the care recipient, specific structures and processes to support a more positive interface appear warranted if informal carers and services are to work well together. An approach recognising the caring context and carer expertise may decrease the additional burden services contribute, and reduce conflicting information and resultant confusion and/or frustration many carers experience. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental study on the shear behavior of the interface between cushion materials and the concrete raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaokun; Han, Xiaolei; Galal, Khaled; Ji, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Cushion is a layer of granular materials between the raft and the ground. The shear behavior of the interface between the cushion and the raft may influence the seismic performance of the superstructure. In order to quantify such influences, horizontal shear tests on the interfaces between different cushion materials and concrete raft under monotonic and cyclic loading were carried out. The vertical pressure P v, material type and cushion thickness h c were taken as variables. Conclusions include: 1) under monotonic loading, P v is the most significant factor; the shear resistance P hmax increases as P v increases, but the normalized factor of resistance μ n has an opposite tendency; 2) for the materials used in this study, μ n varies from 0.40 to 0.70, the interface friction angle δ s varies from 20° to 35°, while u max varies from 3 mm to 15 mm; 3) under cyclic loading, the interface behavior can be abstracted as a "three-segment" back-bone curve, the main parameters include μ n, the displacement u 1 and stiffness K 1 of the elastic stage, the displacement u 2 and stiffness K 2 of the plastic stage; 4) by observation and statistical analysis, the significance of different factors, together with values of K 1, K 2 and μ n have been obtained.

  4. Multi-Robot Interfaces and Operator Situational Awareness: Study of the Impact of Immersion and Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Juan Jesús; Peña-Tapia, Elena; Martín-Barrio, Andrés; Olivares-Méndez, Miguel A; Del Cerro, Jaime; Barrientos, Antonio

    2017-07-27

    Multi-robot missions are a challenge for operators in terms of workload and situational awareness. These operators have to receive data from the robots, extract information, understand the situation properly, make decisions, generate the adequate commands, and send them to the robots. The consequences of excessive workload and lack of awareness can vary from inefficiencies to accidents. This work focuses on the study of future operator interfaces of multi-robot systems, taking into account relevant issues such as multimodal interactions, immersive devices, predictive capabilities and adaptive displays. Specifically, four interfaces have been designed and developed: a conventional, a predictive conventional, a virtual reality and a predictive virtual reality interface. The four interfaces have been validated by the performance of twenty-four operators that supervised eight multi-robot missions of fire surveillance and extinguishing. The results of the workload and situational awareness tests show that virtual reality improves the situational awareness without increasing the workload of operators, whereas the effects of predictive components are not significant and depend on their implementation.

  5. Experimental and numerical study of the migration of gas bubbles through an interface between two liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhomme, R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to predict the evolution of a hypothetical accident in pressurized water nuclear reactors, this study aims to understand the dynamics of gas bubbles ascending in a stratified mixture made of two superimposed liquids. To this aim, an experimental device equipped with two high-speed video cameras was designed, allowing us to observe isolated air bubbles and bubble trains crossing a horizontal interface separating two Newtonian immiscible liquids initially at rest. The size of the bubbles and the viscosity contrast between the two liquids were varied by more than one and four orders of magnitude respectively, making it possible to observe a wide variety of flow regimes. In some situations, small millimetric bubbles remain trapped at the liquid-liquid interface, whereas larger bubbles succeed in crossing the interface and tow a significant column of lower fluid behind them. After the influence of the physical parameters was qualitatively established thanks to simple models, direct numerical simulations of several selected experimental situations were performed with two different approaches. These are both based on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, one making use of an interface capturing technique, the other of a diffuse Cahn-Hilliard description. Comparisons between experimental and numerical results confirmed the reliability of the computational approaches in most situations but also highlighted the need for improvements to capture small-scale physical phenomena especially those related to film drainage. (author)

  6. Multi-Robot Interfaces and Operator Situational Awareness: Study of the Impact of Immersion and Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesús Roldán

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-robot missions are a challenge for operators in terms of workload and situational awareness. These operators have to receive data from the robots, extract information, understand the situation properly, make decisions, generate the adequate commands, and send them to the robots. The consequences of excessive workload and lack of awareness can vary from inefficiencies to accidents. This work focuses on the study of future operator interfaces of multi-robot systems, taking into account relevant issues such as multimodal interactions, immersive devices, predictive capabilities and adaptive displays. Specifically, four interfaces have been designed and developed: a conventional, a predictive conventional, a virtual reality and a predictive virtual reality interface. The four interfaces have been validated by the performance of twenty-four operators that supervised eight multi-robot missions of fire surveillance and extinguishing. The results of the workload and situational awareness tests show that virtual reality improves the situational awareness without increasing the workload of operators, whereas the effects of predictive components are not significant and depend on their implementation.

  7. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  8. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  9. Molecular dynamics study on condensation/evaporation coefficients of chain molecules at liquid-vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Takematsu, Masaki; Mizuguchi, Hirotaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2015-07-07

    The structure and thermodynamic properties of the liquid-vapor interface are of fundamental interest for numerous technological implications. For simple molecules, e.g., argon and water, the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior depends strongly on their translational motion and the system temperature. Existing molecular dynamics (MD) results are consistent with the theoretical predictions based on the assumption that the liquid and vapor states in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface are isotropic. Additionally, similar molecular condensation/evaporation characteristics have been found for long-chain molecules, e.g., dodecane. It is unclear, however, whether the isotropic assumption is valid and whether the molecular orientation or the chain length of the molecules affects the condensation/evaporation behavior at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, MD simulations were performed to study the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior of the straight-chain alkanes, i.e., butane, octane, and dodecane, at the liquid-vapor interface, and the effects of the molecular orientation and chain length were investigated in equilibrium systems. The results showed that the condensation/evaporation behavior of chain molecules primarily depends on the molecular translational energy and the surface temperature and is independent of the molecular chain length. Furthermore, the orientation at the liquid-vapor interface was disordered when the surface temperature was sufficiently higher than the triple point and had no significant effect on the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior. The validity of the isotropic assumption was confirmed, and we conclude that the condensation/evaporation coefficients can be predicted by the liquid-to-vapor translational length ratio, even for chain molecules.

  10. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  11. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  12. Study of the physicochemical properties of the interface between titanium dioxide and various aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazilier, C.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of ion exchange capacity of titanium dioxide in view of high temperature water purification and radioactive effluent processing because of its resistance to heat and radiations. Titanium dioxide is obtained by alkaline hydrolysis of an aqueous solution of Ti (IV) and is characterized by analytical physical chemistry methods. Interface between Ti0 2 and simple aqueous solutions (electrolytes) is more particularly studied by potentiometry [fr

  13. Design development of graphite primary structures enables SSTO success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagiotti, V. A.; Yahiro, J. S.; Suh, Daniel E.; Hodges, Eric R.; Prior, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a graphite composite wing and a graphite composite intertank primary structure for application toward Single-Stage to Orbit space vehicles such as those under development in NASA's X-33/Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program. The trade study and designs are based on a Rockwell vertical take-off and horizontal landing (VTHL) wing-body RLV vehicle. Northrop Grumman's approach using a building block development technique is described. Composite Graphite/Bismaleimide (Gr/BMI) material characterization test results are presented. Unique intertank and wing composite subcomponent test article designs are described and test results to date are presented. Wing and intertank Full Scale Section Test Article (FSTA) objectives and designs are outlined. Trade studies, supporting building block testing, and FSTA demonstrations combine to develop graphite primary structure composite technology that enables developing X-33/RLV design programs to meet critical SSTO structural weight and operations performance criteria.

  14. The characteristics of TiC and oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of TiC coated graphite under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Oku, Tatsuo; Ioka, Ikuo; Umekawa, Shokichi.

    1982-07-01

    Core region of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) consists mainly of polycrystalline graphite whose mechanical properties degradated by corrosion resulting from such impurities as O 2 , H 2 O, and CO 2 in coolant He gas. Mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of TiC coated graphite under corrosive condition were examined in order to evaluate the effects of TiC coating on preventing the graphite from its degradation in service condition of the VHTR. Characteristics of TiC coating was also examined using EPMA. Holding the specimen at 1373 K for 6 hr produced strong interface between TiC coating and the graphite, however, microcracks on TiC coating was observed, the origin of which is ascribed to mismatch in thermal expansion between TiC coating and the graphite. Oxidation rate of TiC coated graphite was one-thirds of that of uncoated graphite, which demonstrated that TiC coating on the graphite improved the oxidation resistance of the graphite. However, debonding of TiC coating layer at the interface was observed after heating for 3 to 4 hr in the oxidation condition. Changes in Young's modulus of TiC coated graphite were a half of that of uncoated graphite. Flexural strength of TiC coated graphite remained at the original value up to about 4 hr oxidation, therafter it decreased abruptly as was the trend of uncoated graphite. It is concluded that TiC coating on graphite materials is very effective in improving oxidation resistance and suppressing degradation of mechanical properties of the graphite. (author)

  15. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  16. Adsorption of naphthalene and ozone on atmospheric air/ice interfaces coated with surfactants: a molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2012-03-15

    The adsorption of gas-phase naphthalene and ozone molecules onto air/ice interfaces coated with different surfactant species (1-octanol, 1-hexadecanol, or 1-octanal) was investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Naphthalene and ozone exhibit a strong preference to be adsorbed at the surfactant-coated air/ice interfaces, as opposed to either being dissolved into the bulk of the quasi-liquid layer (QLL) or being incorporated into the ice crystals. The QLL becomes thinner when the air/ice interface is coated with surfactant molecules. The adsorption of both naphthalene and ozone onto surfactant-coated air/ice interfaces is enhanced when compared to bare air/ice interface. Both naphthalene and ozone tend to stay dissolved in the surfactant layer and close to the QLL, rather than adsorbing on top of the surfactant molecules and close to the air region of our systems. Surfactants prefer to orient at a tilted angle with respect to the air/ice interface; the angular distribution and the most preferred angle vary depending on the hydrophilic end group, the length of the hydrophobic tail, and the surfactant concentration at the air/ice interface. Naphthalene prefers to have a flat orientation on the surfactant coated air/ice interface, except at high concentrations of 1-hexadecanol at the air/ice interface; the angular distribution of naphthalene depends on the specific surfactant and its concentration at the air/ice interface. The dynamics of naphthalene molecules at the surfactant-coated air/ice interface slow down as compared to those observed at bare air/ice interfaces. The presence of surfactants does not seem to affect the self-association of naphthalene molecules at the air/ice interface, at least for the specific surfactants and the range of concentrations considered in this study.

  17. Study of Surface States at the Semiconductor/electrolyte Interface of Liquid-Junction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripala, Withana P.

    The existence of surface states at the semiconductor electrolyte interface of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells plays a major role in determining the performance of the device in regard to the potential distribution and transport mechanisms of photogenerated carriers at the interface. We have investigated the n-TiO(,2)/electrolyte interface using three experimental techniques: relaxation spectrum analysis, photocurrent spectroscopy, and electrolyte electroreflectance (EER) spectroscopy. The effect of Fermi level pinning at the CdIn(,2)SE(,4)/aqueous-polysulfide interface was also studied using EER. Three distinct surface states were observed at the n-TiO(,2)/aqueous-electrolyte interface. The dominant state, which tails from the conduction band edge, is primarily responsible for the surface recombination of photocarriers at the interface. The second surface state, observed at 0.8 eV below the conduction band of TiO(,2), originates in the dark charge transfer intermediates (TiO(,2)-H). It is proposed that the sub-bandgap (SBG) photocurrent-potential behavior is a result of the mechanism of dynamic formation and annihilation of these surface states. The third surface state was at 1.3 eV below the conduction band of TiO(,2), and the SBG EER measurements show this state is "intrinsic" to the surface. These states were detected with SBG EER and impedance measurements in the presence of electrolytes that can adsorb on the surface of TiO(,2). Surface concentration of these states was evaluated with impedance measurements. EER measurements on a CdIn(,2)Se(,4)/polysulfide system have shown that the EER spectrum is sensitive to the surface preparation of the sample. The EER signal was quenched as the surface was driven to strong depletion, owing to Fermi level pinning at the interface in the presence of a high density of surface states. The full analysis of this effect enables us to measure the change in the flatband potential, as a function of the electrode potential, and

  18. Studies in RF power communication, SAR, and temperature elevation in wireless implantable neural interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Zhao

    Full Text Available Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements.

  19. Calculation of reactivity of control rods in graphite moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1978-01-01

    A study about the method of calculation for the reactivity of control rods in graphite-moderated critical assemblies, is presented. The result of theoretical calculation, developed by super celles and Nordheim-Scalettar methods are compared with experimental results for the critical Assembly of General Atomic. The two methods are then applicable to reactivity calculation of the control rods of graphite moderated critical assemblies [pt

  20. Study of the strength of the internal can for internally and externally cooled fuel elements intended for gas graphite reactors; Etude de la tenue de la gaine interne pour-element combustible a refroidissement interne et externe d'un reacteur graphite-gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudouresque, B; Courcon, P; Lestiboubois, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The cartridge of an internally and externally cooled annular fuel element used in gas-graphite reactors is made up of an uranium fuel tube, an external can and an internal can made of magnesium alloy. For the thermal exchange between the internal can and the fuel to be satisfactory, it is necessary for the can to stay in contact with the uranium under all temperature conditions. This report, based on a theoretical study, shows how the internal can fuel gap varies during the processes of canning, charging into the reactor and thermal cycling. The following parameters are considered: tube diameter, pressure of the heat carrying gas, gas entry temperature, plasticity of the can alloy. It is shown that for all operating conditions the internal can of a 77 x 95 element, planned for a gas-graphite reactor with a 40 kg/cm{sup 2} gas pressure, should remain in contact with the fuel. (authors) [French] La cartouche d'un element combustible annulaire, a refroidissement interne et externe pour reacteur graphite-gaz, est composee d'un tube combustible en uranium, d'une gaine externe et d'une gaine interne en alliage de magnesium. Pour que l'echange thermique entre la gaine interne et le combustible soit bon, il faut que la gaine reste appliquee sur l'uranium quel que soit le regime de temperature. Cette note a pour but de montrer comment, d'apres une etude theorique, le jeu combustible-gaine interne varie au cours des operations de gainage, de chargement dans le reacteur, et des cyclages thermiques. Les parametres suivants sont etudies: diametres de tube, pression du gaz caloporteur, temperature d'entree du gaz, plasticite de l'alliage de gaine. Il est montre que, quel que soit le regime de fonctionnement, la gaine interne d'un element 77 x 95, en projet pour un reacteur graphite-gaz sous pression de 40 kg/cm{sup 2}, doit rester appliquee sur le combustible. (auteurs)

  1. Study of film graphene/graphene oxide obtained by partial reduction chemical of oxide graphite; Estudo de filme de grafeno/oxido de grafeno obtido por reducao quimica parcial do oxido de grafite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascho, J.L.S.; Costa, S.F.; Hoepfner, J.C.; Pezzin, S.H., E-mail: juliagascho@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the morphology of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained by partial chemical reduction of graphite oxide (OG) as well as its resistance to solvents. Films of graphene/graphene oxide are great candidates for replacement of indium oxide doped with tin (ITO) in photoelectric devices. The OG was obtained from natural graphite, by Hummer's method modified, and its reduction is made by using sodium borohydride. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of Fourier transform (FTIR), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution (SEM/FEG) for the characterization of graphene/graphene oxide film obtained were performed. This film proved to be resilient, not dispersing in any of the various tested solvents (such as ethanol, acetone and THF), even under tip sonication, this resistance being an important property for the applications. Furthermore, the film had a morphology similar to that obtained by other preparation methods.(author)

  2. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  3. Determination of chlorine in graphite by combustion-ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lianzhong; Watanabe, Kazuo; Itoh, Mitsuo.

    1995-09-01

    A combustion/ion chromatographic method has been studied for the sensitive determination of chlorine in graphite. A graphite sample was burnt at 900degC in a silica reaction tube at an oxygen flow rate of 200 ml/min. Chlorine evolved was absorbed in 20 ml of a 0.1 mM sodium carbonate solution. The solution was evaporated to dryness. The residue was dissolved with a small volume of water. Chlorine in the solution was determined using ion chromatography. The method was applied to JAERI graphite certified reference materials and practical graphite materials. The detection limit was about 0.8 μgCl/g for a 2.0 g sample. The precision was about 2.5% (relative standard deviation) for samples with chlorine content of 70 μg/g level. The method is also usable for coal samples. (author)

  4. Evaluation of coke microstructure and its effects on graphite fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotourehchian, S.; Ahmadi, S.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of applications for cokes (metallurgy, petroleum, etc.) have been defined in parallel to the new industrial technology growth. Coke is rich in carbon and has the main role in manufacturing carbonaceous materials such as graphite, steel, silicon carbide, titanium carbide, etc. Among the most important applications of different variety of cokes is their usage for different graphite fabrications. The crystalline structure of graphite (hexagonal with sp 2 hybrid) is based upon the microstructure of coke and it causes anisotropy in properties of produced graphite. Thus, the study of macrostructure and anisotropy degree of cokes is of importance. There are several theoretical and experimental methods to determine the Coke's microstructure and anisotropy. Numerous tests have been conducted on different variety of cokes based on the used method. Here, it is attempted to introduce an applied method to determine the microstructure and anisotropy degree of cokes based upon the kind of application

  5. Spin-density wave state in simple hexagonal graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoyan, K. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    Simple hexagonal graphite, also known as AA graphite, is a metastable configuration of graphite. Using tight-binding approximation, it is easy to show that AA graphite is a metal with well-defined Fermi surface. The Fermi surface consists of two sheets, each shaped like a rugby ball. One sheet corresponds to electron states, another corresponds to hole states. The Fermi surface demonstrates good nesting: a suitable translation in the reciprocal space superposes one sheet onto another. In the presence of the electron-electron repulsion, a nested Fermi surface is unstable with respect to spin-density-wave ordering. This instability is studied using the mean-field theory at zero temperature, and the spin-density-wave order parameter is evaluated.

  6. Coalescence in an interface-modified polymer blend as studied by light-scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, K.; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    the requirement is the BC to reside at the interface. In the present study the block chain lengths were chosen shorter than the corresponding homopolymers as a starting point. For selected model systems it was found that symmetrical diblock copolymers with phi(bc) greater than or equal to 1% were most effective......The influence of B-B diblock copolymers on coalescence in A:B blends has been studied by rheo-optical measurements and electron microscopy. Divergent criteria and experimental evidence appear in the literature on the block copolymer (BC) molecular weight (M(W)) and volume fraction (phi(bc)) when...... is discussed based on various mechanisms: shear-induced mutual compatibility between components, squeeze-out/drainage of the interfacial layer, frictional pull-out of BC chains, collision-induced entrapment of BC between interfaces, encapsulation of the BC based on the concept of elastic interfacial curvature....

  7. A simulation study of interface mixing during ion-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzhi Li; Fuzhai Cui; Yi Liao; Hengde Li

    1990-01-01

    Ion-beam assisted deposition (IAD) can produce strong film to substrate adhesion. The adhesion depends heavily on atom mixing near the interface. In order to study the dependence of the width of the mixed interface on the experimental parameters, a Monte Carlo study has been made using the dynamic simulation code TCIS-6. The simulation mode and calculational procedure are described. Simulation calculations indicate that the mixing increases with the bombarding energies and a saturation width appears at high energies. There is a strong relationship between the amount of mixing and the ion-to-atom arrival ratio. Some comparisons of the calculations with experimental data in the literature are also presented. (author)

  8. Study on cord/rubber interface at elevated temperatures by H-pull test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M.; Afshar, F.; Mohammadi, N.; Pourmahdian, S.

    2005-08-01

    Cords are used as reinforcing materials in rubber compounds. To increase cord/rubber interfacial adhesion, they are coated by an adhesive (usually based on resorcinol-formaldehyde-latex). These composites are used in many sectors such as tire and belt industries. Cord/rubber adhesion strength is an important aspect to determine the durability of system. Due to temperature increase during running tires, the adhesion energy becomes different from initial one. To study cord/rubber interface at elevated temperatures, H-adhesion test method was used. H-pull test is a simple method for adhesion evaluation at ambient temperature, so it is usually used for material quality control. In this research, cord/rubber systems were vulcanized at different temperatures and H-adhesion of samples were evaluated at elevated temperatures. Also cord/rubber interface was studied by ATR analyze to determine interfacial interactions kind.

  9. Interfacial Effects on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Graphite/Copper Composites. Final Contractor Report Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devincent, Sandra Marie

    1995-01-01

    Graphite surfaces are not wet by pure copper. This lack of wetting has been responsible for a debonding phenomenon that has been found in continuous graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites subjected to elevated temperatures. By suitably alloying copper, its ability to wet graphite surfaces can be enhanced. Information obtained during sessile drop testing has led to the development of a copper-chromium alloy that suitably wets graphite. Unidirectionally reinforced graphite/copper composites have been fabricated using a pressure infiltration casting procedure. P100 pitch-based fibers have been used to reinforce copper and copper-chromium alloys. X-ray radiography and optical microscopy have been used to assess the fiber distribution in the cast composites. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy analyses were conducted to study the distribution and continuity of the chromium carbide reaction phase that forms at the fiber/matrix interface in the alloyed matrix composites. The effects of the chromium in the copper matrix on the mechanical and thermal properties of P100Gr/Cu composites have been evaluated through tensile testing, three-point bend testing, thermal cycling and thermal conductivity calculations. The addition of chromium has resulted in an increased shear modulus and essentially zero thermal expansion in the P100Gr/Cu-xCr composites through enhanced fiber/matrix bonding. The composites have longitudinal tensile strengths in excess of 700 MPa with elastic moduli of 393 GPa. After 100 hr at 760 deg C 84 percent of the as-cast strength is retained in the alloyed matrix composites. The elastic moduli are unchanged by the thermal exposure. It has been found that problems with spreading of the fiber tows strongly affect the long transverse tensile properties and the short transverse thermal conductivity of the P100Gr/Cu-xCr composites. The long transverse tensile strength is limited by rows of touching fibers which are paths of

  10. A study of the electrode/solution interface during electrochemical reactions by digital holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENHAO CHEN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Digital holography was used to study in situ the dynamic changes of the electrode/solution interface and the solution near the electrode during the anodic process of iron in a sulfuric acid solution. The effects of chloride, bromide and iodine ions on this process were also investigated. The magnetic field also has effects on the process. The effects are discussed in combination with SEM results.

  11. Photoemission study of the development of the Ti/GaAs(110) interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruckman, M.W.; del Giudice, M.; Joyce, J.J.; Weaver, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Photoemission spectra of the Ga and As 3d core levels, the Ti 3p core levels, and the valence bands have been used to study the formation of the Ti/GaAs(110) interface. These results indicate that a multicomponent interfacial zone forms with reaction initiated at ultralow coverage and a rapid shift of E/sub F/ as the Schottky barrier forms (core-level shift 625 meV). After the onset of reaction, the Ga 3d core level shifts continuously to lower binding energy with increasing coverage (total shift of 1.66 eV by roughly-equal60 A Ti deposition). The As core-level profile indicates immediate reaction, the formation of two Ti: As bonding configurations at low coverage, and the appearance of another which persists to very high Ti coverage (> or =160 A) and is characteristic of a Ti-metal-rich environment. Core-level intensity profiles show preferential out-diffusion of As at every stage of interface formation. Core studies of the evolving Ti 3p emission show gradual convergence to bulk Ti as the overlayer becomes increasingly Ti rich. Likewise, valence-band studies reveal predominantly As-derived states below metal d states at E/sub F/. Comparison to previous results for Cr, V, Ce, and Sm overlayers on GaAs shows parallel trends in interface formation with differences related to the metal overlayer

  12. Electrochemical behaviour of rhenium-graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varypaev, V.N.; Krasikov, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of combination electrode from graphite with electrodeposited thin coating of electrolytic rhenium is studied. Solution of 0.5 m NaCl+0.04 m AlCl 3 served as an electrolite. Polarization galvanostatic curves of hydrogen evolution upon electrodes with conditional rhenium thickness of 3.5 and 0.35 μm, 35 and 3.5 nm are obtained. Possibility of preparation of rhenium-graphite cathode with extremely low rhenium consume, electro-chemical properties of which are simu-lar to purely rhenium cathode is shown. Such electrode is characterized with stable in time low cathode potential of hydrogen evolution in chloride electrolyte and during cathode polarization it is not affected by corrosion

  13. Preparation of nanoporous carbons from graphite nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung-Joo [Department of Green Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, PO Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-14

    In this study we manufactured highly porous graphite nanofibres (GNFs) by physical activation in order to develop promising energy storage materials. The activation was performed at activation temperatures in the range of 800-1050 deg. C. The pore structures of the porous GNFs were analysed using N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. After the activation, the porous GNFs showed a decrease in diameter and scratches on their surfaces, resulting from surface oxidation and the opening of the graphitic layers, respectively. It was found that the specific surface area of the porous GNFs prepared at 1050 deg. C was more than 2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} without loss of their fibre shape or serious increase in electrical resistivity. This result indicates that porous GNFs prepared under optimal conditions can have a much higher specific surface area and are promising materials for energy storage technologies.

  14. Structure and phase transitions of monolayers of intermediate-length n-alkanes on graphite studied by neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diama, A.; Matthies, B.; Herwig, K. W.; Hansen, F. Y.; Criswell, L.; Mo, H.; Bai, M.; Taub, H.

    2009-08-01

    We present evidence from neutron diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three different monolayer phases of the intermediate-length alkanes tetracosane (n-C24H50 denoted as C24) and dotriacontane (n-C32H66 denoted as C32) adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. Our measurements indicate that the two monolayer films differ principally in the transition temperatures between phases. At the lowest temperatures, both C24 and C32 form a crystalline monolayer phase with a rectangular-centered (RC) structure. The two sublattices of the RC structure each consists of parallel rows of molecules in their all-trans conformation aligned with their long axis parallel to the surface and forming so-called lamellas of width approximately equal to the all-trans length of the molecule. The RC structure is uniaxially commensurate with the graphite surface in its [110] direction such that the distance between molecular rows in a lamella is 4.26 Å=√3 ag, where ag=2.46 Å is the lattice constant of the graphite basal plane. Molecules in adjacent rows of a lamella alternate in orientation between the carbon skeletal plane being parallel and perpendicular to the graphite surface. Upon heating, the crystalline monolayers transform to a "smectic" phase in which the inter-row spacing within a lamella expands by ˜10% and the molecules are predominantly oriented with the carbon skeletal plane parallel to the graphite surface. In the smectic phase, the MD simulations show evidence of broadening of the lamella boundaries as a result of molecules diffusing parallel to their long axis. At still higher temperatures, they indicate that the introduction of gauche defects into the alkane chains drives a melting transition to a monolayer fluid phase as reported previously.

  15. Analysis of graphite gasification by water vapor at different conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaowei, Luo; Xiaoyu, Yu; Suyuan, Yu; Jean-Charles, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite was gasified at different conversions. • The reaction temperature influences on the dimensionless the reaction rate. • The thickness or radius influence on the dimensionless reaction rate. - Abstract: The gasification rate of porous solids varies with the conversions with the rate increasing to a maximum and then decreasing. Many graphite gasification experiments have illustrated that the maximum gasification rates occur at different conversions for different temperatures and sample geometries. Thus, the gasification rate is related to the conversion, temperature and geometry of the graphite. The influences of those factors were studied for the graphite gasification by water vapor. A theoretical analysis was done on the basis of several logical assumptions. The influence of temperatures on the reaction rate was investigated for plate-like and cylindrical graphite. The effects of thickness for a plate-like graphite sample and of radius for a cylindrical sample on the reaction rate were also studied theoretically. The results reveal that the maximum dimensionless reaction rate decreases with reaction temperature. The plate thickness or the cylinder radius also affects the maximum dimensionless reaction rate

  16. Deducing 2D crystal structure at the liquid/solid interface with atomic resolution: a combined STM and SFG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Arthur A; Ahn, Seokhoon; Matzger, Adam J; Chen, Zhan

    2009-11-17

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) has been applied to study two-dimensional (2D) crystals formed by an isophthalic acid diester on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, providing complementary measurements to scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and computational modeling. SFG results indicate that both aromatic and C=O groups in the 2D crystal tilt from the surface. This study demonstrates that a combination of SFG and STM techniques can be used to gain a more complete picture of 2D crystal structure, and it is necessary to consider solvent-2D crystal interactions and dynamics in the computer models to achieve an accurate representation of interfacial structure.

  17. A study of the cosmic-ray neutron field near interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Sheu, R J; Jiang, S H

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of the cosmic-ray neutron field near air/ground and air/water interfaces with an emphasis on the angular distribution. Two sets of high-efficiency neutron detecting systems were used. The first one, called the Bonner Cylinders, was used for measurements of the energy information. The other one, referred to as the eight-channel neutron detector (8CND), was used to characterize the angular information of the neutron field. The measured results were used to normalize and confirm one-dimensional transport calculations for cosmic-ray neutrons below 20 MeV in the air/ground and air/water media. Annual sea level cosmic-ray neutron doses were then determined based on the obtained characteristics of low-energy cosmic-ray neutrons near interfaces and estimated contribution from high-energy neutrons.

  18. A comparative study of the thermal interface materials with graphene and boron nitride fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, F.; Salgado, R.; Legedza, S.; Renteria, J.; Balandin, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of an experimental study that compares the performance of graphene and boron nitride flakes as fillers in the thermal interface materials. The thickness of both fillers varied from a single atomic plane to about a hundred. The measurements have been conducted using a standard TIM tester. Our results show that the addition of a small fraction of graphene (f=4 wt%) to a commercial thermal interface material increases the resulting apparent thermal conductivity substantially stronger than the addition of boron nitride. The obtained data suggest that graphene and fewlayer graphene flakes couple better to the matrix materials than the boron nitride fillers. A combination of both fillers can be used to increase the thermal conductivity while controlling the electrical conduction.

  19. INS study of intermolecular interaction at the silicone-fumed silica interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheka, E.F.; Natkaniec, I.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The paper presents results related to the interface formed between finned silica particles and polydimethylsiloxane polymers, presented in the study by a five-member cyclic oligomer SiS. The substrate surface is terminated by either hydroxyl units or by trimethylsiloxy ones. When the interface is formed, methyl units are the main constituents providing neutron scattering. Protium/deuterium exchange has been used to distinguish the latter belonging to either adsorbate or substrate. A detailed analysis of the intermolecular interaction impact on both adsorbed molecule and substrate has been performed. The observed features are supported by the vibrational spectra calculations performed on the basis of a modem quantum-chemical approach and supplemented by the solution of the inverse spectral problem. (author)

  20. Studies of electrochemical interfaces by TOF neutron reflectometry at the IBR-2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. I.; Gapon, I. V.; Rulev, A. A.; Ushakova, E. E.; Kataev, E. Yu; Yashina, L. V.; Itkis, D. M.; Avdeev, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The operation performance of electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems such as supercapacitors and batteries depends on the processes occurring at the electrochemical interfaces, where charge separation and chemical reactions occur. Here, we report about the tests of the neutron reflectometry cells specially designed for operando studies of structural changes at the electrochemical interfaces between solid electrodes and liquid electrolytes. The cells are compatible with anhydrous electrolytes with organic solvents, which are employed today in all lithium ion batteries and most supercapacitors. The sensitivity of neutron reflectometry applied at the time-of-flight (TOF) reflectometer at the pulsed reactor IBR-2 is discussed regarding the effect of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation on metal electrode surface.