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Sample records for graphite fibers effects

  1. Effects of anomalies on fracture processes of graphite fiber reinforced aluminum composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, J.; Wu, G.H.; Li, Y.; Gou, H.S.; Chen, G.H.; Xiu, Z.Y.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effects of anomalies on fracture processes of graphite fiber reinforced aluminum composite (Gr f /Al), unidirectional Gr f /Al specimens embedded with inclusions and aluminum-rich areas (Al-rich) were chosen for bending test. Fracture processes and fracture surfaces of anomaly-embedded specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy in situ observation. The micromechanisms of fracture process are as following: interface layer between inclusions and composite is fractured by stress concentration in front of crack tip, and cracks connect voids in inclusions, resulting in failure of inclusion-embedded specimens immediately. However, Al-rich eases stress concentration in bending specimens and crack is blunted by Al-rich/composite interface debonding and friction during fracture process.

  2. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  3. Effect of High Energy Radiation on Mechanical Properties of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Composites. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranong, N.

    1980-01-01

    The flexural strength and average modulus of graphite fiber reinforced composites were tested before and after exposure to 0.5 Mev electron radiation and 1.33 Mev gamma radiation by using a three point bending test (ASTM D-790). The irradiation was conducted on vacuum treated samples. Graphite fiber/epoxy (T300/5208), graphite fiber/polyimide (C6000/PMR 15) and graphite fiber/polysulfone (C6000/P1700) composites after being irradiated with 0.5 Mev electron radiation in vacuum up to 5000 Mrad, show increases in stress and modulus of approximately 12% compared with the controls. Graphite fiber/epoxy (T300/5208 and AS/3501-6), after being irradiated with 1.33 Mev gamma radiation up to 360 Mrads, show increases in stress and modulus of approximately 6% at 167 Mrad compared with the controls. Results suggest that the graphite fiber composites studied should withstand the high energy radiation in a space environment for a considerable time, e.g., over 30 years.

  4. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  5. Structures and Performance of Graphene/Polyimide Composite Graphite Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry-wet spinning process was used to gain graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers, then graphene/polyimide composite carbon and graphite fibers were obtained through carbonized and graphitized. Different graphene oxide contents of the composite carbon and graphite fibers were measured by thermal gravimetric analysis, Raman, mechanical properties, electrical properties,SEM and so on. The results show that when the GO content is 0.3%(mass fraction,the same below, the thermal property of the graphene oxide/polyimide composite fibers is the best. The mechanical and electrical properties are obriously improved by the addition of GO, graphitization degree also increases. When the composite carbon fibers are treated at 2800℃, GO content increases to 2.0%, the thermal conductivity of the composite graphite fibers reaches 435.57W·m-1·K-1 and cross-section structures of carbon fibers are more compact.

  6. Graphite coated PVA fibers as the reinforcement for cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhipeng; Liu, Zhichao

    2018-02-01

    A new preconditioning method was developed to PVA fibers as the reinforcement in cement-based materials. Virgin PVA fibers exhibits limited adhesion to graphite powders due to the presence of oil spots on the surface. Mixing PVA fibers with a moderately concentrated KMnO4-H2SO4 solution can efficiently remove the oil spots by oxidation without creating extra precipitate (MnO2) associated with the reduction reaction. This enhances the coating of graphite powders onto fiber surface and improves the mechanical properties of PVA fiber reinforced concrete (PVA-FRC). Graphite powders yields better fiber distribution in the matrix and reduces the fiber-matrix bonding, which is beneficial in uniformly distributing the stress among embedded fibers and creating steady generation and propagation of tight microcracks. This is evidenced by the significantly enhanced strain hardening behavior and improved flexural strength and toughness.

  7. Surface analysis of graphite fiber reinforced polyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messick, D. L.; Progar, D. J.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Several techniques have been used to establish the effect of different surface pretreatments on graphite-polyimide composites. Composites were prepared from Celion 6000 graphite fibers and the polyimide LARC-160. Pretreatments included mechanical abrasion, chemical etching and light irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in the analysis. Contact angle of five different liquids of varying surface tensions were measured on the composites. SEM results showed polymer-rich peaks and polymer-poor valleys conforming to the pattern of the release cloth used durng fabrication. Mechanically treated and light irradiated samples showed varying degrees of polymer peak removal, with some degradation down to the graphite fibers. Minimal changes in surface topography were observed on concentrations of surface fluorine even after pretreatment. The light irradiation pretreatment was most effective at reducing surface fluorine concentrations whereas chemical pretreatment was the least effective. Critical surface tensions correlated directly with the surface fluorine to carbon ratios as calculated from XPS.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of tantalum on graphite cloth for making hot pressed fiber reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Davidson, K.V.; Radosevich, C.L.; Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Conditions for the CVD of a uniform coating of Ta on fibers of a woven graphite cloth were established. The effect of gas composition, pressure, and temperature were investigated, and the conditions that gave the desired results are presented. Several layers of the coated cloth were hot pressed to produce a TaC--C composite having uniformly dispersed, fine-grained TaC in graphite. Three compositions were hot pressed: 15, 25, and 40 volume percent carbide. 8 figures, 2 tables

  9. Measurements of print-through in graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Jeunnette, Timothy T.; Anzic, Judith M.

    1989-01-01

    High-reflectance accurate-contour mirrors are needed for solar dynamic space power systems. Graphite fiber epoxy composites are attractive candidates for such applications owing to their high modulus, near-zero coefficient of thermal expansion, and low mass. However, mirrors prepared from graphite fiber epoxy composite substrates often exhibit print-through, a distortion of the surface, which causes a loss in solar specular reflectance. Efforts to develop mirror substrates without print-through distortion require a means of quantifying print-through. Methods have been developed to quantify the degree of print-through in graphite fiber epoxy composite specimens using surface profilometry.

  10. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  11. Nitrile crosslinked polyphenyl-quinoxaline/graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were performed to reduce the 600 F thermoplasticity of polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) matrix resins by introducing crosslinking by the reaction of terminal nitrile groups. Seven solvents and solvent mixtures were studied as the crosslinking catalysts and used to fabricate crosslinked PPQ/HMS graphite fiber composites. The room temperature and 600 F composite mechanical properties after short time and prolonged 600 F air exposure and the 600 F composite weight loss were determined and compared to those properties of high molecular weight, linear PPQ/HMS graphite fiber composites.

  12. Electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes on a carbon fiber surface with different index graphitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, E.C.; Baldan, M.R.; Ferreira, N.G.; Edwards, E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this work is to examine the electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes powder on carbon fibers, produced at different heat treatments temperatures. Besides, a systematic study of the effects of graphitization index from substrate on the structure and morphology of CNTs has been available. Carbon fibers were produced from polyacrylonitrile at three different heat treatments temperatures, 1000, 1500 and 2000 deg C. The carbon fibers microstructure or its graphitization index may be controlled by the heat treatments temperatures. The electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes was obtained with the powder of carbon nanotubes dispersed in water by ultrasonication to obtain dispersions of 0.05 mg/mL. The carbon fibers were immersed in the nanotube dispersion, and a positive potential of 10 V/cm was applied. Morphology and microstructure of carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers were obtained by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (author)

  13. Graphite fiber/copper composites prepared by spontaneous infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbao; Tao, Zechao; Li, Xiangfen; Yan, Xi; Liu, Zhanjun; Guo, Quangui

    2018-05-01

    The major bottleneck in developing graphite fiber reinforced copper (GF/Cu) composites is the poor wettability of Cu/graphite system. Alloying element of chromium (Cr) is introduced to improve the wettability of liquid copper on graphite. Sessile drop method experiments illustrate that the contact angle of liquid Cu-Cr (1.0 wt.%) alloy on graphite substrate decreases to 43° at 1300 °C. The improvement of wettability is related to the formation of chromium carbide layer at interface zone. Based on the wetting experiment, a spontaneous infiltration method for preparing GF/Cu composites is proposed. Unidirectional GF preforms are infiltrated by Cu-Cr alloys without external pressure in a tubular furnace. Results reveal that the GF preform can be fully infiltrated by Cu-Cr alloy (8 wt.%) spontaneously when fiber volume fraction is 40%. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of GF/Cu-Cr (8.0 wt.%) composites is 4.68 × 10-6/K along the longitudinal direction.

  14. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on the Mechanical and Structural Properties of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kay Woodroof

    1982-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) and graphite/polyimide composites (C6000/PMR 15) were exposed to various levels of 0.5 MeV electron radiation with the maximum dose being 10,000 Mrad. A three point bending test was used to evaluate the ultimate stress and modulus of the composites. In all composites except transverse samples of C6000/PMR 15 ultimate stress values remained approximately constant or increased slightly. The modulus values remained approximately constant for all composite types regardless of the radiation level. Interfacial aspects of composites were studied. Interlaminar shear tests were performed on T300/5208 and C6000/PMR 15 composites irradiated to 10,000 Mrad. There was an initial increase in interlaminar shear strength (up to 1,000 Mrad) followed by a sharp decrease with further radiation exposure. Using scanning electron microscopy no visual differences in the mode of fracture could be detected between ruptured control samples and those exposed to various levels of radiation. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) revealed little change in the surface elements present in control and highly irradiated T300/5208 composite samples.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD on Graphite Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Due to the superior electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT), synthesizing CNT on various substances for electronics devices and reinforced composites have been engaged in many efforts for applications. This presentation will illustrate CNT synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal CVD. On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles as catalysts for CNT growth are coated. The growth temperature ranges from 600 to 1000 C and the pressure ranges from 100 Torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than or equal to 900 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in the rough fiber surface without any CNT grown on it. When the growth temperature is relative low (650-800 C), CNT with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends are fabricated on the graphite surface. (Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis.) (By measuring the samples) Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), depending on growth concentrations, are found. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  16. Time dependent micromechanics in continuous graphite fiber/epoxy composites with fiber breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao Hui

    Time dependent micromechanics in graphite fiber/epoxy composites around fiber breaks was investigated with micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and two shear-lag based composite models, a multi-fiber model (VBI) and a single fiber model (SFM), which aim at predicting the strain/stress evolutions in the composite from the matrix creep behavior and fiber strength statistics. This work is motivated by the need to understand the micromechanics and predict the creep-rupture of the composites. Creep of the unfilled epoxy was characterized under different stress levels and at temperatures up to 80°C, with two power law functions, which provided the modeling parameters used as input for the composite models. Both the VBI and the SFM models showed good agreement with the experimental data obtained with MRS, when inelasticity (interfacial debonding and/or matrix yielding) was not significant. The maximum shear stress near a fiber break relaxed at t-alpha/2 (or as (1+ talpha)-1/2) and the load recovery length increased at talpha/2(or (1+ talpha)1/2) following the model predictions. When the inelastic zone became non-negligible, the viscoelastic VBI model lost its competence, while the SFM with inelasticity showed good agreement with the MRS measurements. Instead of using the real fiber spacing, an effective fiber spacing was used in model predictions, taking into account of the radial decay of the interfacial shear stress from the fiber surface. The comparisons between MRS data and the SFM showed that inelastic zone would initiate when the shear strain at the fiber end exceeds a critical value gammac which was determined to be 5% for this composite system at room temperature and possibly a smaller value at elevated temperatures. The stress concentrations in neighboring intact fibers played important roles in the subsequent fiber failure and damage growth. The VBI model predicts a constant stress concentration factor, 1.33, for the 1st nearest intact fiber, which is in good

  17. Study of wear mechanism of chopped fiber reinforced epoxy composite filled with graphite and bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nitinchand; Prasad, Krishna

    2018-04-01

    The combined effect of graphite and sintered bronze with a short glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites was investigated in this work. A pin on disc wear test was carried out to study the wear behaviour and mechanism of the composites. The objective of this work is to develop an alternate friction resistance material for the application of sliding bearing. It was observed that the addition of sintered bronze improved mechanical and thermal stability of the composites as bronze has low contact resistance with graphite and has high thermal conductivity. It was observed from the test results that increased volume percentage of graphite and presence of bronze are play significant role in wear mechanism of the composites. It was observed from the scanning electronic microscopes (SEM) that the abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism was prominent in this study. It was also evident from the result that the frictional force remains stable irrespective of the applied normal load.

  18. Further investigation on boric acid catalytic graphitization of polyacrylonitrile carbon fibers: Mechanism and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Ya; Lu, Yonggen; Xiao, Hao; Qin, Xianying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The modulus of carbon fiber was improved by boric acid at the temperature range of 1500–2900 °C. ► 2300 °C is a key temperature degree from which the boron began to benefit fiber strength. ► The fiber strength was affected by the boron reaction and related to the boron states. -- Abstract: Catalytic graphitization of polyacrylonitrile based carbon fibers by boric acid doping was studied and the dependence of fiber tensile strength on the boron content and temperature was discussed. It was found that there existed a key temperature point for the boron to take effect. When the fibers were modified with 7.0 wt.% boric acid solution, with increasing temperature, the tensile strength was lower than that of the unmodified ones below 2300 °C, but a reverse thing happened above 2300 °C. Moreover, when being heated at 2500 °C, the modified fibers showed an increasing tensile modulus and strength with increasing boron content till maximums of 404 GPa and 2.46 GPa, 26% and 16% higher than those of unmodified ones. The mechanical properties of the fibers were affected by the interaction of carbon and boron, and also related with boron states. The decomposition of boron acid and its interaction with carbon brought defects on fiber surface, degrading the mechanical properties below 1300 °C. With further heat treatment, the boron diffused into the fibers and divided into two states: substitutional and interstitial. At a temperature over 2300 °C with an appreciate boron content, the substitutional would be formed predominantly, which removed the structural defects and relaxed the distortions, so as to benefit the mechanical properties.

  19. In situ polymerization of monomers for polyphenylquinoxaline-graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    In situ polymerization of monomers was used to prepare graphite-fiber-reinforced polyphenylquinoxaline composites. Six different monomer combinations were investigated. Composite mechanical property retention characteristics were determined at 316 C (600 F) over an extended time period.

  20. Visible Light Neural Stimulation on graphitic-Carbon Nitride/Graphene Photocatalytic Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhongyang; Xu, Ruodan; Wang, Zegao

    2017-01-01

    conversion, was for the first time investigated. Specifically, g-C3N4 was combined with graphene oxide (GO) in a 3D manner on the surfaces of electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin (PG) fibers and functioned as a biocompatible interface for visible-light stimulating neuronal differentiation. The enhanced......Light stimulation allows remote and spatiotemporally accurate operation that has been applied as effective, non-invasive means of therapeutic interventions. Here, visible light neural stimulation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), an emerging photocatalyst with visible-light optoelectronic...... was confirmed by the Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, live dead staining and colorimetric cell viability assay CCK-8. Under a bidaily, monochromatic light stimulation at a wavelength of 450 nm at 10mW/cm2, a 18.5-fold increase of neurite outgrowth of PC12 was found on g-C3N4 coated fibers; while AA reduced GO...

  1. Fundamental studies of low velocity impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T/sub G/ and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. Linear polymers, which contain no active groups for cross-linking, do not toughen composites because the fiber-matrix interfacial bond is not of sufficient strength to prevent interfacial failure from occurring. Toughness must be built into the basic polymer backbone and cross-linking structure

  2. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  3. In situ polymerization of monomers for polyphenylquinoxaline/graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Methods currently used to prepare fiber reinforced, high temperature resistant polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) composites employ extremely viscous, low solids content solutions of high molecular weight PPQ polymers. An improved approach, described in this report, consists of impregnating the fiber with a solution of the appropriate monomers instead of a solution of previously synthesized high molecular weight polymer. Polymerization of the monomers occurs in situ on the fiber during the solvent removal and curing stages. The in situ polymerization approach greatly simplifies the fabrication of PPQ graphite fiber composites. The use of low viscosity monomeric type solutions facilitates fiber wetting, permits a high solids content, and eliminates the need for prior polymer synthesis.

  4. Metal-Embedded Porous Graphitic Carbon Fibers Fabricated from Bamboo Sticks as a Novel Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Zhong, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Xia, Yang; Wang, Donghuang; Zhou, Cheng'ao; Tang, Wangjia; Wang, Xiuli; Wu, J B; Tu, Jiangping

    2018-04-25

    Lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs) are deemed to be among the most prospective next-generation advanced high-energy batteries. Advanced cathode materials fabricated from biological carbon are becoming more popular due to their unique properties. Inspired by the fibrous structure of bamboo, herein we put forward a smart strategy to convert bamboo sticks for barbecue into uniform bamboo carbon fibers (BCF) via a simple hydrothermal treatment proceeded in alkaline solution. Then NiCl 2 is used to etch the fibers through a heat treatment to achieve Ni-embedded porous graphitic carbon fibers (PGCF/Ni) for LSBs. The designed PGCF/Ni/S electrode exhibits improved electrochemical performances including high initial capacity (1198 mAh g -1 at 0.2 C), prolonged cycling life (1030 mAh g -1 at 0.2 C after 200 cycles), and improved rate capability. The excellent properties are attributed to the synergistic effect of 3D porous graphitic carbon fibers with highly conductive Ni nanoparticles embedded.

  5. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Beringer, Woody; Gleason, Brian; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from four suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used a nickel braze allow to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. Initial results on sample blocks indicate that this approach should be repeatable and scalable with good strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  6. Electrochemical properties of carbon nanocoils and hollow graphite fibers as anodes for rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liyong; Liu, Zhanjun; Guo, Quangui; Wang, Guizhen; Yang, Jinhua; Li, Peng; Wang, Xianglei; Liu, Lang

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanocoils (CNCs) have been used as anode materials for preparation of lithium ion batteries. As pure carbon material without any chemical modification, the graphitized CNCs anode exhibited larger capacities with good Coulombic efficiency, a higher rate capability, and better reversibility than the hollow graphite fibers (HGFs) anode. The excellent performance of the CNCs was possibly ascribed to the special structure and the high degree of graphitization. As a result, the CNCs anode exhibited high reversible capacity of 385.5 mA h g"−"1 at 50 mA g"−"1, 104.7% reversible capacity retention after 105 cycles, and superior reversible capability of 177.4 mA h g"−"1 at 1 A g"−"1 after 100 cycles. This result indicated that CNCs could be an attractive choice as anode material for high-energy density and high-power lithium-ion batteries.

  7. Effect of total pressure on graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.; Hoot, C.G.

    1983-04-01

    Graphite corrosion in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is calculated using two key assumptions: (1) the kinetic, catalysis, and transport characteristics of graphite determined by bench-scale tests apply to large components at reactor conditions and (2) the effects of high pressure and turbulent flow are predictable. To better understand the differences between laboratory tests and reactor conditions, a high-pressure test loop (HPTL) has been constructed and used to perform tests at reactor temperature, pressure, and flow conditions. The HPTL is intended to determine the functional dependence of oxidation rate and characteristics on total pressure and gas velocity and to compare the oxidation results with calculations using models and codes developed for the reactor

  8. Mechanical and physical properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2007-09-01

    Mechanical properties and quality of fiber/matrix adhesion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based materials, reinforced with carbon-graphite (CG) fibers that are able to remain in a plastic state until polymerization, were examined. Tubes of cleaned braided CG fibers were treated with a sizing resin. Two resin mixtures, resin A and resin B, stable in the fluid state and containing different cross-linking agents, were reinforced with CG fiber loadings of 24, 36, and 47 wt% (20, 29, and 38 vol.%). In addition, resin B was reinforced with 58 wt% (47 vol.%). After heat-polymerization, flexural strength and modulus were evaluated, both dry and after water storage. Coefficient of thermal expansion, longitudinally and in the transverse direction of the specimens, was determined. Adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were similar for both fiber composites. With increased fiber loading, flexural properties increased. For 47 wt% fibers in polymer A the flexural strength was 547.7 (28.12) MPa and for polymer B 563.3 (89.24) MPa when water saturated. Linear coefficient of thermal expansion was for 47 wt% CG fiber-reinforced polymers; -2.5 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 longitudinally and 62.4 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 in the transverse direction of the specimens. SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix. More porosity was observed with fiber loading of 58 wt%. The fiber treatment and the developed resin matrices resulted in good adhesion between CG fibers and matrix. The properties observed indicate a potential for implant-retained prostheses.

  9. Method of adhering bone to a rigid substrate using a graphite fiber reinforced bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoell, A. C.; Maxwell, H. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for adhering bone to the surface of a rigid substrate such as a metal or resin prosthesis using an improved surgical bone cement. The bone cement has mechanical properties more nearly matched to those of animal bone and thermal curing characteristics which result in less traumatization of body tissues and comprises a dispersion of short high modulus graphite fibers within a bonder composition including polymer dissolved in reactive monomer such as polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in methylmethacrylate monomer.

  10. High thermal conductivity of graphite fiber silicon carbide composites for fusion reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Balden, M.; Causey, R.A.; Atsumi, H.

    2002-01-01

    The benefits of using CVI SiC/graphite fiber composites as low tritium retaining, high thermal conductivity composites for fusion applications are presented. Three-dimensional woven composites have been chemically vapor infiltrated with SiC and their thermophysical properties measured. One material used an intermediate grade graphite fiber in all directions (Amoco P55) while a second material used very high thermal conductive fiber (Amoco K-1100) in the high fiber density direction. The overall void was less than 20%. Strength as measured by four-point bending was comparable to those of SiC/SiC composite. The room temperature thermal conductivity in the high conductivity direction was impressive for both materials, with values >70 W/m K for the P-55 and >420 W/m K for the K-1100 variant. The thermal conductivity was measured as a function of temperature and exceeds the highest thermal conductivity of CVD SiC currently available at fusion relevant temperatures (>600 deg. C). Limited data on the irradiation-induced degradation in thermal conductivity is consistent with carbon fiber composite literature

  11. The Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Woven Pristine and Intercalated Graphite Fiber-Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Vandenburg, Yvonne Yoder; Berkebile, Steven; Stueben, Heather; Balagadde, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    A series of woven fabric laminar composite plates and narrow strips were fabricated from a variety of pitch-based pristine and bromine intercalated graphite fibers in an attempt to determine the influence of the weave on the electrical and thermal conduction. It was found generally that these materials can be treated as if they are homogeneous plates. The rule of mixtures describes the resistivity of the composite fairly well if it is realized that only the component of the fibers normal to the equipotential surface will conduct current. When the composite is narrow with respect to the fiber weave, however, there is a marked angular dependence of the resistance which was well modeled by assuming that the current follows only along the fibers (and not across them in a transverse direction), and that the contact resistance among the fibers in the composite is negligible. The thermal conductivity of composites made from less conductive fibers more closely followed the rule of mixtures than that of the high conductivity fibers, though this is thought to be an artifact of the measurement technique. Electrical and thermal anisotropy could be induced in a particular region of the structure by weaving together high and low conductivity fibers in different directions, though this must be done throughout all of the layers of the structure as interlaminar conduction precludes having only the top layer carry the anisotropy. The anisotropy in the thermal conductivity is considerably less than either that predicted by the rule of mixtures or the electrical resistivity.

  12. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  13. THE EFFECT OF APPLIED STRESS ON THE GRAPHITIZATION OF PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg, R H; Crooks, D D; Fenn, Jr, R W; Hammond, M L

    1963-06-15

    Metallographic and x-ray diffraction studies were made of the effect of applied stress at high temperature on the structure of pyrolytic graphite (PG). The dominant factor was whether the PG was above or below its graphitization temperature, which, in turn, was not strongly dependent on applied stress. Below the graphitization temperature, the PG showed a high proportion of disordered layers (0.9), a fairly large mean tilt angle (20 deg ) and a small crystailite size (La --150 A). Fracture occurred at low stress and strain and the materiai exhibited a high apparent Young's modulus ( approximates 4 x 10/sup 6/ psi). Above the graphitization temperature, graphitization was considerably enhanced by strain up to about 8%. The disorder parameter was decreased from a zero strain value of 0.3 to 0.l5 with strain, the mean tilt angle was decreased to 4 deg , and a fivefold increase in crystallite size occurred. When the strainenhanced graphitization was complete, the material exhibited a low apparent modulus ( approximates 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ psi) and large plastic strains (>100%) for a constant stress ( approximates 55 ksi). Graphitization was shown to be a spontaneous process that is promoted by breaking cross-links thermally, and the process is furthered by chemical attack and plastic strain. (auth)

  14. Effect of graphite reflector on activation of fusion breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young-Ouk; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphite reflector concept has been applied in the design of the Korea HCCR TBM for ITER and this concept is also a candidate design option for Korea Demo. • In the graphite reflector, C-14, B-11 and Be-10 are produced after an irradiation. Impurities in both case of beryllium and graphite is dominant in the shutdown dose after an irradiation. • Based on the evaluation, the graphite reflector is a good alternative of the beryllium multiplier in the view of induced activity and shutdown dose. But C-14 produced in the graphite reflector should be considered carefully in the view of radwaste management. - Abstract: Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. In this paper, activity analysis was performed and the effect of graphite reflector in the view of activation was compared to the beryllium multiplier. As a result, it is expected that using the graphite reflector instead of the beryllium multiplier decreases total activity very effectively. But the graphite reflector produces C-14 about 17.2 times than the beryllium multiplier. Therefore, C-14 produced in the graphite reflector is expected as a significant nuclide in the view of radwaste management.

  15. Effect of gamma radiation on graphite - PTFE dry lubrication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sachin; Tyagi, Mukti; Seshadri, Geetha; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2017-12-01

    An effect of gamma radiation on lubrication behavior of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system has been studied using (TR-TW-30L) tribometer with thrust washer attachment in plane contact. Different compositions of graphite and PTFE were prepared and irradiated by gamma rays. Gamma radiation exposure significantly improves the tribological properties indicated by decrease in coefficient of friction and wear properties of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system. SEM and XRD analysis confirm the physico-chemical modification of graphite-PTFE on gamma radiation exposure leading to a novel dry lubrication system with good slip and anti friction properties.

  16. A simple method for the preparation of activated carbon fibers coated with graphite nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Joo; Park, Soo-Jin

    2007-11-15

    A simple method is described for the preparation of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) coated with graphite nanofibers (GNFs). Low-pressure-plasma mixed-gas (Ar/O2) treatment of the ACFs led to the growth of GNFs on their surface. The growth was greater at higher power inputs, and from TEM observations the GNFs were seen to be of herringbone type. It was found that the N2 adsorption capacity of the ACFs did not sharply decrease, and that volume resistivity of the ACFs enhanced as a result of this treatment.

  17. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  18. Exploration of coal-based pitch precursors for ultra-high thermal conductivity graphite fibers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, G.V. [Amoco Performance Products, Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

    1996-12-27

    Goal was to explore the utility of coal-based pitch precursors for use in ultra high thermal conductivity carbon (graphite) fibers. From graphite electrode experience, it was established that coal-based pitches tend to form more highly crystalline graphite at lower temperatures. Since the funding was limited to year 1 effort of the 3 year program, the goal was only partially achieved. The coal-base pitches can form large domain mesophase in spite of high N and O contents. The mesophase reactivity test performed on one of the variants of coal-based pitch (DO84) showed that it was not a good candidate for carbon fiber processing. Optimization of WVU`s isotropic pitch process is required to tailor the pitch for carbon fiber processing. The hetero atoms in the coal pitch need to be reduced to improve mesophase formation.

  19. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Fan; Wu Zucheng; Tao Ping; Cong Yanqing

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 μg L -1 , the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35619 μg L -1 with good linearity (R 2 = 0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds

  20. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fan; Wu, Zucheng; Tao, Ping; Cong, Yanqing

    2009-01-05

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 microg L(-1), the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35,619 microg L(-1) with good linearity (R(2)=0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds.

  1. Scattering of Lamb waves by cracks in a composite graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, Robert; Datta, Subhendu K.; Shah, Arvind

    1990-01-01

    Recent investigations of space construction techniques have explored the used of composite materials in the construction of space stations and platforms. These composites offer superior strength to weight ratio and are thermally stable. For example, a composite material being considered is laminates of graphite fibers in an epoxy matrix. The overall effective elastic constants of such a medium can be calculated from fiber and matrix properties by using an effective modulus theory as shown in Datta, el. al. The investigation of propagation and scattering of elastic waves in composite materials is necessary in order to develop an ability to characterize cracks and predict the reliability of composite structures. The objective of this investigation is the characterization of a surface breaking crack by ultrasonic techniques. In particular, the use of Lamb waves for this purpose is studied here. The Lamb waves travel through the plate, encountering a crack, and scatter. Of interest is the modeling of the scattered wave in terms of the Lamb wave modes. The direct problem of propagation and scattering of Lamb waves by a surface breaking crack has been analyzed. This would permit an experimentalist to characterize the crack by comparing the measured response to the analytical model. The plate is assumed to be infinite in the x and y directions with a constant thickness in the z direction. The top and bottom surfaces are traction free. Solving the governing wave equations and using the stress-free boundary conditions results in the dispersion equation. This equation yields the guided modes in the homogeneous plate. The theoretical model is a hybrid method that combines analytical and finite elements techniques to describe the scattered displacements. A finite region containing the defects is discretized by finite elements. Outside the local region, the far field solution is expressed as a Fourier summation of the guided modes obtained from the dispersion equation

  2. Standard Test Methods for Properties of Continuous Filament Carbon and Graphite Fiber Tows

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the preparation and tensile testing of resin-impregnated and consolidated test specimens made from continuous filament carbon and graphite yarns, rovings, and tows to determine their tensile properties. 1.2 These test methods also cover the determination of the density and mass per unit length of the yarn, roving, or tow to provide supplementary data for tensile property calculation. 1.3 These test methods include a procedure for sizing removal to provide the preferred desized fiber samples for density measurement. This procedure may also be used to determine the weight percent sizing. 1.4 These test methods include a procedure for determining the weight percent moisture adsorption of carbon or graphite fiber. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of t...

  3. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  4. Determination of Arsenic in Soil Alkali by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometery Using Modified Corn Silk Fiber as Adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Ju, S.; Liu, M.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A safe, rapid, simple and environmentally friendly method based modified corn silk fiber (MC), chemical modified with succinic anhydride (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O/sub 3/), was developed for the extraction and preconcentration of As(III) in food additives soil alkali sample prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) analysis. The structure and properties of VC (unmodified corn silk fiber) and MC were analyzed and discussed by means of FTIR, SEM and TG, and the effect of adsorbent amount, pH, soil alkali solution concentration, adsorption time and adsorption temperature were carefully optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the relative standard deviations (RSD, n=6) were 1.27-3.05%, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0-100 meu g/ L and the limits of detection (LOD) was 0.13 meu g/L. The surface of MC became loose and porous which increased the adsorption area. Comparing with VC, carboxy groups were measured in MC and the increase of negative electron group in fiber molecular made its coordination combining ability with As(III) enhanced; In comparison with the removal arsenic rate of VC, MC's significantly increased by 2.86 fold. The recovery rate of soil alkali, treated by VC and MC, reached to 96.85% and 94.32%, and it did not affected the function of soil alkali. (author)

  5. Development of Embedded Fiber-Optic Evanescent Wave Sensors for Optical Characterization of Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, AbdulRahman; Nieva, Patricia; Yu, Aiping; Khajepour, Amir

    2017-11-29

    The development, fabrication, and embedment of fiber-optic evanescent wave sensors (FOEWSs) to monitor the state of charge (SOC) and the state of health (SOH) of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are presented. Etching of FOEWSs is performed using a solution of 40 wt % ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F) and 49 wt % hydrofluoric acid (HF) (6:1), which is found to be superior to an etching solution containing just 49 wt % HF. FOEWSs were characterized using glycerol and found to have the highest sensitivity in a lithium-ion battery when they lose 92% of their transmittance in the presence of glycerol on their sensing region. The physical effect that the FOEWS has on the graphite anode is also investigated and is found to be much more significant in Swagelok cells compared to that in in-house-fabricated pouch cells, mainly due to pressure variation. The FOEWS was found to be most sensitive to the changes in the LIB when it was completely embedded using a slurry of graphite anode material within a pouch cell. The optimized fabrication process of the embedded FOEWS demonstrates the potential of using such sensors commercially for real-time monitoring of the SOC and SOH of LIBs while in operation.

  6. High-performance wearable supercapacitors fabricated with surface activated continuous filament graphite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dedong; Yu, Xin; Chen, Tinghan; Wang, Shu; Tan, Hua; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Li, Linlin

    2017-08-01

    Generally, carbon or graphite fibers (GFs) are used as the supporting materials for the preparation of flexible supercapacitors (SCs) by assembling various electrochemically active nanomaterials on them. A facile and rapid electrochemical oxidation method with a voltage of 3 V in a mixed H2SO4-HNO3 solution for 2-15 min is proposed to active continuous filament GFs. Detailed structural characterization, SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman and XPS demonstrate that the GFs-8 (oxidized for 8 min) possessing high specific surface area which provided numerous electrochemical sites and a large number of oxygen-containing functional groups producing pseudocapacitance. Cyclic voltammetric (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are conducted to test the capacitive of GFs and activated GFs. The capacitance of GFs-8 reaches as high as 570 mF cm-1 at the current density of 1 mA cm-1 in LiCl electrolyte, a 1965-fold enhancement with respect to the pristine GFs (0.29 mF cm-1). The fabricated fiber solid-state supercapacitors (SSCs) provide high energy density of 0.68 mWh cm-3 at the power density 3.3 W cm-3 and have excellent durability with 90% capacitance retention after 10000 cycles. In addition, such fiber SSCs features flexibility and mechanical stability, which may have wide applications in wearable electronic devices.

  7. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  8. Effect of various dopant elements on primary graphite growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, N; Theuwissen, K; Lacaze, J; Sertucha, J

    2012-01-01

    Five spheroidal graphite cast irons were investigated, a usual ferritic grade and four pearlitic alloys containing Cu and doped with Sb, Sn and Ti. These alloys were remelted in a graphite crucible, leading to volatilization of the magnesium added for spheroidization and to carbon saturation of the liquid. The alloys were then cooled down and maintained at a temperature above the eutectic temperature. During this step, primary graphite could develop showing various features depending on the doping elements added. The largest effects were that of Ti which greatly reduces graphite nucleation and growth, and that of Sb which leads to rounded agglomerates instead of lamellar graphite. The samples have been investigated with secondary ion mass spectrometry to enlighten distribution of elements in primary graphite. SIMS analysis showed almost even distribution of elements, including Mg and Al (from the inoculant) in the ferritic grade, while uneven distribution was evident in all doped alloys. Investigations are going on to clarify if the uneven distribution is associated with structural defects in the graphite precipitates.

  9. Graphite fiber/copper matrix composites for space power heat pipe fin applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcdanels, D.L.; Baker, K.W.; Ellis, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    High specific thermal conductivity (thermal conductivity divided by density) is a major design criterion for minimizing system mass for space power systems. For nuclear source power systems, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offer good potential as a radiator fin material operating at service temperatures above 500 K. Specific thermal conductivity in the longitudinal direction is better than beryllium and almost twice that of copper. The high specific thermal conductivity of Gr/Cu offers the potential of reducing radiator mass by as much as 30 percent. Gr/Cu composites also offer the designer a range of available properties for various missions and applications. The properties of Gr/Cu are highly anisotropic. Longitudinal elastic modulus is comparable to beryllium and about three times that of copper. Thermal expansion in the longitudinal direction is near zero, while it exceeds that of copper in the transverse direction. 5 refs

  10. Fabrication and Testing of Carbon Fiber, Graphite-Epoxy Panels for Submillimeter Telescope Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, H.; Helwig, G.; Parks, R. E.; Ulich, B. L.

    1983-12-01

    An experimental carbon-fiber, graphite-epoxy, aluminum Flexcore sandwich panel roughly 1-m square was made by Dornier System, Friedrichshafen, West Germany. The panel was a pre-prototype of the panels to be used in the dish of the 10-m diameter Sub-Millimeter Telescope, a joint project of the Max-Planck-Institute fur Radioastronomie, Bonn, West Germany, and Steward Observatory, the University of Arizona in Tucson. This paper outlines the fabrication process for the panel and indicates the surface accuracy of the panel replication process. To predict the behavior of the panel under various environmental loads, the panel was modeled structurally using anisotropic elements for the core material. Results of this analysis along with experimental verification of these predictions are also given.

  11. The effective neutron temperature in heated graphite sleeves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J A; Small, V G [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-08-15

    In a series of oscillator measurements carried out in the reactor NERO the variation of the relative reaction rates of cadmium and boron absorbers has been used to determine the effective neutron temperature inside heated graphite sleeves. This work extends the scope of similar oscillator measurements previously carried out in DIMPLE, in that the bulk moderator is now graphite as opposed to D{sub 2}O in the former case. (author)

  12. Free-standing nano-scale graphite saturable absorber for passively mode-locked erbium doped fiber ring laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y-H; Lin, G-R

    2012-01-01

    The free-standing graphite nano-particle located between two FC/APC fiber connectors is employed as the saturable absorber to passively mode-lock the ring-type Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL). The host-solvent-free graphite nano-particles with sizes of 300 – 500 nm induce a comparable modulation depth of 54%. The interlayer-spacing and lattice fluctuations of polished graphite nano-particles are observed from the weak 2D band of Raman spectrum and the azimuth angle shift of –0.32 ° of {002}-orientation dependent X-ray diffraction peak. The graphite nano-particles mode-locked EDFL generates a 1.67-ps pulsewidth at linearly dispersion-compensated regime with a repetition rate of 9.1 MHz. The time-bandwidth product of 0.325 obtained under a total intra-cavity group-delay-dispersion of –0.017 ps 2 is nearly transform-limited. The extremely high stability of the nano-scale graphite saturable absorber during mode-locking is observed at an intra-cavity optical energy density of 7.54 mJ/cm 2 . This can be attributed to its relatively high damage threshold (one order of magnitude higher than the graphene) on handling the optical energy density inside the EDFL cavity. The graphite nano-particle with reduced size and sufficient coverage ratio can compete with other fast saturable absorbers such as carbon nanotube or graphene to passively mode-lock fiber lasers with decreased insertion loss and lasing threshold

  13. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  14. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Fan [Department of Environmental Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Key Laboratory of Polluted Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, MOE, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu Zucheng [Department of Environmental Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Key Laboratory of Polluted Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, MOE, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: wuzc@zju.edu.cn; Tao Ping [Institute of Structural Mechanics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Cong Yanqing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China)

    2009-01-05

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 {mu}g L{sup -1}, the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35619 {mu}g L{sup -1} with good linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds.

  15. Porosity effects in the neutron total cross section of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R; Dawidowski, J; Petriw, S. N

    2009-01-01

    Graphite has been used in nuclear reactors since the birth of the nuclear industry due to its good performance as a neutron moderator material. Graphite is still an option as moderator for generation IV reactors due to its good mechanical and thermal properties at high operation temperatures. So, there has been renewed interest in a revision of the computer libraries used to describe the neutron cross section of graphite. For sub-thermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a larger total cross section (between 4 and 8 barns) than predicted by existing theoretical models (0.2 barns). In order to investigate the origin of this discrepancy we measured the total cross section of graphite samples of three different origins, in the energy range from 0.001 eV to 10 eV. Different experimental arrangements and sample treatments were explored, to identify the effect of various experimental parameters on the total cross section measurement. The experiments showed that the increase in total cross section is due to neutrons scattered around the forward direction. We associate these small-angle scattered neutrons (SANS) to the porous structure of graphite, and formulate a very simple model to compute its contribution to the total cross section of the material. This results in an analytic expression that explicitly depends on the density and mean size of the pores, which can be easily incorporated in nuclear library codes. [es

  16. The 'compensation effect' in the graphite/CO2 reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, W.J.

    1983-08-01

    The compensation effect is the often observed linear relationship between the activation energy and pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius equations of a series of related reactions. Previously reported studies of the graphite/CO 2 reaction at different total pressures and CO 2 /CO ratios are used as an example of the compensation effect. The effect is shown in general to be an artefact produced by a strong correlation between the parameter estimates in the conventional Arrhenius plot. A transformation of the Arrhenius plot to minimise the overall correlation between estimates and thus enable detection of a true compensation effect is presented. The results of this transformation on the kinetic data for the graphite/CO 2 reaction are consistent with previous analyses of the reaction system. They show that there is only a limited compensation effect within this study and demonstrate the influence of the approach to equilibrium of the graphite/CO 2 reaction. (author)

  17. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  18. Gravity Effects on the Free Vibration of a Graphite Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Dong-Ok; Kim, Jong-Bum; Park, Keun-Bae; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The gravity effects on the free vibration of a graphite column are studied. Graphite block is a key component of a HTGR (High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor). The major core elements, such as the fuel blocks and neutron reflector blocks, of HTTR (High Temperature Test Reactor, Japan) and GT-MHR (Gas Turbine- Modular Helium Reactor, USA) consist of stacked hexagonal graphite blocks forming a group of columns. The vibration of the columns induced by earthquakes may lead to solid impacts between graphite blocks and structural integrity problems. The study of free vibration characteristics of the graphite block column is the first step in the core internal structure dynamic analysis. Gravity force bring a negative stiffness term to the transverse vibration analysis of heavy long column structures, and results in natural frequency reductions. Generally it is not considered in the not so tall structure cases, because the gravity term makes the analysis and design complicated. Therefore it is important to check whether the gravity effect is severe or not

  19. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  20. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  1. Hygrothermal effects on the mechanical behaviour of graphite fibre-reinforced epoxy laminates beyond initial failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishai, O.; Garg, A.; Nelson, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The critical load levels and associated cracking beyond which a multidirectional laminate can be considered as structurally failed has been determined by loading graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy laminates to different strain levels up to ultimate failure. Transverse matrix cracking was monitored by acoustic and optical methods. The residual stiffness and strength parallel and perpendicular to the cracks were determined and related to the environmental/loading history. Within the range of experimental conditions studied, it is concluded that the transverse cracking process does not have a crucial effect on the structural performance of multidirectional composite laminates.

  2. Estimation of Wear Behavior of Polyphenylene Sulphide Composites Reinforced with Glass/Carbon Fibers, Graphite and Polytetrafluoroethylene, by Pin-on-disc Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.C. Besnea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wear behavior of polyphenylene sulphide composites was investigated according to load and test speed. Two types of materials were studied: first, with 40 wt% glass fiber, and second, with 10 wt% carbon fiber, 10 wt% graphite and 10 wt%. Tribological tests were performed on the universal tribometer UMT-2, using a pin-on-disc device. The friction coefficient and wear rate for the composites were analyzed. As a result of experimental tests, it was established that polymer composite with polyphenylene sulphide matrix, carbon fibers, graphite and polytetrafluorethylene exhibit good wear behavior under operating conditions.

  3. Interfacial Effects on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Graphite/Copper Composites. Final Contractor Report Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devincent, Sandra Marie

    1995-01-01

    Graphite surfaces are not wet by pure copper. This lack of wetting has been responsible for a debonding phenomenon that has been found in continuous graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites subjected to elevated temperatures. By suitably alloying copper, its ability to wet graphite surfaces can be enhanced. Information obtained during sessile drop testing has led to the development of a copper-chromium alloy that suitably wets graphite. Unidirectionally reinforced graphite/copper composites have been fabricated using a pressure infiltration casting procedure. P100 pitch-based fibers have been used to reinforce copper and copper-chromium alloys. X-ray radiography and optical microscopy have been used to assess the fiber distribution in the cast composites. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy analyses were conducted to study the distribution and continuity of the chromium carbide reaction phase that forms at the fiber/matrix interface in the alloyed matrix composites. The effects of the chromium in the copper matrix on the mechanical and thermal properties of P100Gr/Cu composites have been evaluated through tensile testing, three-point bend testing, thermal cycling and thermal conductivity calculations. The addition of chromium has resulted in an increased shear modulus and essentially zero thermal expansion in the P100Gr/Cu-xCr composites through enhanced fiber/matrix bonding. The composites have longitudinal tensile strengths in excess of 700 MPa with elastic moduli of 393 GPa. After 100 hr at 760 deg C 84 percent of the as-cast strength is retained in the alloyed matrix composites. The elastic moduli are unchanged by the thermal exposure. It has been found that problems with spreading of the fiber tows strongly affect the long transverse tensile properties and the short transverse thermal conductivity of the P100Gr/Cu-xCr composites. The long transverse tensile strength is limited by rows of touching fibers which are paths of

  4. Diffusion of graphite. The effect of cylindrical canals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.; Clouet d'Orval, C.; Martelly, J.; Mazancourt, T. de; Sagot, M.; Lattes, R.; Teste du Bailler, A.

    1957-01-01

    Experiments on thermal neutron diffusion in the graphite used as moderator in the pile G1 have been carried out. The object of these experiments is to determine: - the intrinsic quality of this graphite, characterised by its diffusion length L or its Laplacian 1/L 2 - the effect of the canals, which modifies anisotropically the macroscopic diffusion equation and is characterized by two principal diffusion regions (or two principal Laplacian), valid respectively for the diffusion in the direction of the canals and in a perpendicular direction. In order to determine them two experiments are necessary, in which the second derivatives of the flux in relation to the space coordinates are very different. These experiments form the object of the first two parts. Part 1: Diffusion along the axis of a flux coming from the pile source, and limited radially by a quasi cylindrical screen of cadmium bars. This screen, or Faraday cage is designed to give to the thermal flux produced the same radius of extrapolation to zero as that of the pile source. The determination of L (with the graphite full) has been made under the same conditions. The measurements have been interpreted in two ways. The influence of the brackets holding the detectors is discussed. Part 2: Radial diffusion in the graphite surrounding the 'long' cylindrical pile. This is well described by a sum of Bessel functions. Part 3: Results (valid for d = 1.61 t = 17 deg. C). For the graphite without cavity L = 52.7 ± 0.4 cm. The effect of the canals on the diffusion area and its anisotropy are in excellent agreement with the theory of Behrens: L(parallel) = 64.6 cm and L(perpendicular) 62.2 cm. Appendix: Theory of the Faraday cage. (author) [fr

  5. The effect of radiolytically induced gas pressure on the CO2/CO/graphite system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, A.R.; Faircloth, R.L.; Norwood, K.S.

    1980-03-01

    When radiolysed, carbon dioxide corrodes graphite to produce carbon monoxide, which can blow gas out of the graphite pores. This memorandum demonstrates how to calculate this effect, both analytically and numerically with FACSIMILE, and shows how it depends on dose rate, gas composition, specimen size and graphite diffusivity, for cylindrical geometry. The effect is very small for all cases of interest. (author)

  6. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assesseed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  7. A Nanotube Surface Reinforced Graphite Fiber Exhibiting Significantly Enhanced Properties, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The completed Phase I work was directed at the application of nanotechnology to graphite/epoxy composites. A novel approach to the application of the nanotubes onto...

  8. Performance of brazed graphite, carbon-fiber composite, and TZM materials for actively cooled structures: qualification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Watson, R. D.; Linke, J.; Cardella, A.; Bolt, H.; Reheis, N.; Kny, E.

    1995-01-01

    The divertor of a near-term fusion device has to withstand high heat fluxes, heat shocks, and erosion caused by the plasma. Furthermore, it has to be maintainable through remote techniques. Above all, a good heat removal capability across the interface (low-Z armor/heat sink) plus overall integrity after many operational cycles are needed. To meet all these requirements, an active metal brazing technique is applied to bond graphite and carbon-fiber composite materials to a heat sink consisting of a Mo-41Re coolant tube through a TZM body. Plain brazed graphite and TZM tiles are tested for their fusion-relevant properties. The interfaces appear undamaged after thermal cycling when the melting point of the braze joint is not exceeded and when the graphite armor is > 4 mm thick. High heat flux tests are performed on three actively cooled divertor targets. The braze joints show no sign of failure after exposure to thermal loads ∼ 25 % higher than the design value surface heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 . (author)

  9. Superlattice Effects in Graphite Intercalation Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-15

    away from ;le[ Isy.st,.mns (r lin( nl :; atars ) and look for nonlinear dynamical effects -. m,,5,: U~ i,: ,1 : s y’t, rns, a3iioh m i Josephson...Intercalation Coaanm, Chemistry Dept., Northeast(.rn,, February 25, 1935. ( iv) "Giant Magnetic Interaction and Domain Dynamics in Twe -. "Dimensions," hoston

  10. Pressure and graphite effects on electrical conductivity in pyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Liu, T.; Shen, K.; Li, B.

    2017-12-01

    The geophysical observations including magnetotelluric (MT) and geomagnetic deep sounding show the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Earth's interior. The laboratory-based conductivity measurements of minerals and rocks are usually used to interpret the geophysical observations. Pyroxene is the second most abundant components in the upper mantle, and the electrical conductivity of pyroxene is important to understanding the bulk electrical conductivity. The electrical conductivity of a mineral is affected by many factors, such as its chemical composition, temperature, pressure. Here we report the effects of pressure and graphite on the electrical conductivity of pyroxene and applied to interpretation of MT observation. The starting materials are natural of orthopyroxene and clinopyroxe crystals. A powder sample with grain size 10 um was packed in a Mo capsule and hot-pressed at high pressures and temperatures using a 1000-ton Walker-type uniaxial split-cylinder apparatus. A mixture of pyroxene and a few percent of diamond was annealed at high pressure and temperature. All the hot-pressed samples before and after electrical conductivity measurements, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. High pressure conductivity experiments were carried out in a Walker-type multi-anvil apparatus using a 14/8 assembly. We use a Solartron 1260 Impedance/Gain -phase analyzer with 1V applied voltage within a frequency range of 1M-0.1 Hz to collect data. Complex impedance data on were collected in several heating and cooling cycles The electrical conductivity of pyroxene was made at 4,7,10 GPa, and electrical conductivity of the graphite-bearing pyroxene was measured at 4GPa. The results show the electrical conductivity decrease with the increasing of pressure, which may correspond to the transform from orthopyroxene to clinopyroxene. The results can be used to explain a drop of the electrical conductivity in

  11. Effects of graphite on rheological and conventional properties of bituminous binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Erkuş

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphite used for developing the rheological and conventional properties of bitumen were investigated using various bituminous binder tests. Penetration, softening point, rotational viscosity (RV, dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR tests were applied to bituminous binders modified with four different proportions of graphite by bitumen weight. The penetration values declined while softening point values increased with rising graphite content. While graphite induced 8 °C increases in mixing-compacting temperature by increasing the viscosity values, it also increased the rutting parameter. According to the BBR test, the deformation and stiffness values changed significantly with increasing graphite content, but the m-values did not change significantly. These results showed that graphite generally used for improving the thermal properties can improve to high temperature performance of mixtures. Keywords: Graphite, Bitumen, Conventional properties, Rheological properties

  12. Evaluation of Graphite Fiber/Polyimide PMCs from Hot Melt vs Solution Prepreg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.; Eakin, Howard; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda; Scheiman, Dan; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Thesken, John; Fink, Jeffrey E.

    2002-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced high temperature polymer matrix composites (PMC) have been extensively investigated as potential weight reduction replacements of various metallic components in next generation high performance propulsion rocket engines. The initial phase involves development of comprehensive composite material-process-structure-design-property-in-service performance correlations and database, especially for a high stiffness facesheet of various sandwich structures. Overview of the program plan, technical approaches and current multi-team efforts will be presented. During composite fabrication, it was found that the two large volume commercial prepregging methods (hot-melt vs. solution) resulted in considerably different composite cure behavior. Details of the process-induced physical and chemical modifications in the prepregs, their effects on composite processing, and systematic cure cycle optimization studies will be discussed. The combined effects of prepregging method and cure cycle modification on composite properties and isothermal aging performance were also evaluated.

  13. Evaluation of Graphite Fiber/Polyimide PMCs from Hot Melt versus Solution Prepreg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eugene E.; Sutter, James K.; Eakin, Howard; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda; Scheiman, Dan; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Thesken, John; Fink, Jeffrey E.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced high temperature polymer matrix composites (PMC) have been extensively investigated as potential weight reduction replacements of various metallic components in next generation high performance propulsion rocket engines. The initial phase involves development of comprehensive composite material-process-structure-design-property in-service performance correlations and database, especially for a high stiffness facesheet of various sandwich structures. Overview of the program plan, technical approaches and current multi-team efforts will be presented. During composite fabrication, it was found that the two large volume commercial prepregging methods (hot-melt vs. solution) resulted in considerably different composite cure behavior. Details of the process-induced physical and chemical modifications in the prepregs, their effects on composite processing, and systematic cure cycle optimization studies will be discussed. The combined effects of prepregging method and cure cycle modification on composite properties and isothermal aging performance were also evaluated.

  14. Effect of structural disorder on quantum oscillations in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, B. C., E-mail: b.c-camargo@yahoo.com.br; Kopelevich, Y. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Usher, A.; Hubbard, S. B. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-18

    We have studied the effect of structural disorder on the de Haas van Alphen and Shubnikov de Haas quantum oscillations measured in natural, Kish, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples at temperatures down to 30 mK and at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The measurements were performed on different samples characterized by means of x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy techniques. Our results reveal a correlation between the amplitude of quantum oscillations and the sample surface roughness.

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of fast effects in uranium graphite lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardwood, J.E.; Tyror, J.G.

    1962-12-01

    Details are given of the results of a series of computations of fast neutron effects in natural uranium metal/graphite cells. The computations were performed using the Monte Carlo code SPEC. It is shown that neutron capture in U238 is conveniently discussed in terms of a capture escape probability ζ as well as the conventional probability p. The latter is associated with the slowing down flux and has the classical exponential dependence on fuel-to-moderator volume ratio whilst the former is identified with the component of neutron flux above 1/E. (author)

  16. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Shaoan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of brush anodes and glass fiber (GF1) separators, and plastic mesh supporters were used here for the first time to create a scalable microbial fuel cell architecture. Separators prevented short circuiting of closely

  17. Degradation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer and Graphite by Laser Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Nicholas C. Herr, BS, MS Captain...ensuring good thermal contact between the sample and its holder (by using sample powders, pellets, or thin films ). The sample temperature is also...carbon nanotube and carbon-containing thin- film manufacturing [82–84] as well as cleaning graphite surfaces in experimental fusion reactors [83

  18. Redistribution and Effect of Various Elements on the Morphology of Primary Graphite in Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lacaze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown repeatedly that many elements present as traces or at low level can affect graphite shape in cast irons. As part of a long term project aimed at clarifying the growth and the alteration of spheroidal graphite, a study on the effect of a few elements (Cu, Sn, Sb, and Ti on primary graphite growth was undertaken and analysed with reference to an alloy without any such additions. This work was performed by remelting alloys in graphite crucibles thus saturating the melt in carbon and enabling primary graphite to grow by controlled cooling of the melt above the eutectic temperature. Primary graphite growth in the reference alloy was observed to be lamellar, while the added elements were found to affect bulk graphite and to modify its outer shape, with Sb leading eventually to rounded agglomerates together with wavy lamellae. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to analyze the distribution of elements, and no build-up of trace elements at the graphite surface could be observed. Instead, it is established that the perturbation of bulk graphite is associated with inhomogeneous distribution of metallic elements inside graphite precipitates.

  19. Photobleaching effect in image fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Shotaro; Wada, Yukio; Chigusa, Yoshiki; Fujiwara, Kunio; Hattori, Yasuji.

    1985-01-01

    The photobleaching effect in two types of image fibers is investigated using various light sources, light intensities, radiation dose rates and environmental temperatures. It is shown that the use of a xenon lamp, He-Cd laser or deuterium lamp can cause the photobleaching effect on the induced loss in an image fiber in the ultraviolet region. Of these light sources, a xenon lamp is found to have the greatest effect. This effectiveness appears to arise from the fact that this light source possesses a spectrum over the range from 0.3 to 0.36 μm. It is also revealed that when an image fiber is used for spectroscopic analysis under irradiation of gamma rays at a dose rate of 300 R/h, the available period of the fiber can be increase by 4 - 8 times with the aid of the photobleaching effect caused by a xenon lamp. In addition, the photobleaching effect is found to be dependent on temperature. It is inferred that this temperature dependence occur because electrons first excited to a level by the light energy tend to be further excited more easily at higher temperatures. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Diffusion of graphite. The effect of cylindrical canals; Longueur de diffusion du graphite effet des canaux cylindriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, R; Clouet d' Orval, C; Martelly, J; Mazancourt, T de; Sagot, M; Lattes, R; Teste du Bailler, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Dir. Industrielle, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Robert, C [Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France)

    1957-07-01

    Experiments on thermal neutron diffusion in the graphite used as moderator in the pile G1 have been carried out. The object of these experiments is to determine: - the intrinsic quality of this graphite, characterised by its diffusion length L or its Laplacian 1/L{sup 2} - the effect of the canals, which modifies anisotropically the macroscopic diffusion equation and is characterized by two principal diffusion regions (or two principal Laplacian), valid respectively for the diffusion in the direction of the canals and in a perpendicular direction. In order to determine them two experiments are necessary, in which the second derivatives of the flux in relation to the space coordinates are very different. These experiments form the object of the first two parts. Part 1: Diffusion along the axis of a flux coming from the pile source, and limited radially by a quasi cylindrical screen of cadmium bars. This screen, or Faraday cage is designed to give to the thermal flux produced the same radius of extrapolation to zero as that of the pile source. The determination of L (with the graphite full) has been made under the same conditions. The measurements have been interpreted in two ways. The influence of the brackets holding the detectors is discussed. Part 2: Radial diffusion in the graphite surrounding the 'long' cylindrical pile. This is well described by a sum of Bessel functions. Part 3: Results (valid for d = 1.61 t = 17 deg. C). For the graphite without cavity L = 52.7 {+-} 0.4 cm. The effect of the canals on the diffusion area and its anisotropy are in excellent agreement with the theory of Behrens: L(parallel) = 64.6 cm and L(perpendicular) 62.2 cm. Appendix: Theory of the Faraday cage. (author) [French] Des experiences de diffusion des neutrons thermiques dans le graphite constituant le moderateur de la pile G1 ont ete effectuees. Elles ont pour objet de determiner: - la qualite intrinseque de ce graphite, caracterisee par sa longueur de diffusion L ou son

  1. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization...

  2. Friction and wear of carbon-graphite materials for high energy brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Caliper-type brakes simulation experiments were conducted on seven different carbon-graphite material formulations against a steel disk material and against a carbon-graphite disk material. The effects of binder level, boron carbide (B4C) additions, graphite fiber additions, and graphite cloth reinforcement on friction and wear behavior were investigated. Reductions in binder level and additions of B4C each resulted in increased wear. The wear rate was not affected by the addition of graphite fibers. Transition to severe wear and high friction was observed in the case of graphite-cloth-reinforced carbon sliding against a disk of similar composition. This transition was related to the disruption of a continuous graphite shear film that must form on the sliding surfaces if low wear is to occur. The exposure of the fiber structure of the cloth constituent is believed to play a role in the shear film disruption.

  3. Huge magnetoresistance effect of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Youwei; Wang Zhiming; Ni Gang; Xing Dingyu; Xu Qingyu

    2004-01-01

    Graphite is a quasi-two-dimensional semimetal. However, for usual graphite the magnetoresistance is not so high due to its small crystal size and no preferred orientation. Huge positive magnetoresistance up to 85300% at 4.2 K and 4950% at 300 K under 8.15 T magnetic field was found in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The mechanism of huge positive magnetoresistance is not only due to ordinary magnetoresistance but also due to magnetic-field-driven semimetal-insulator transition

  4. Characterization of High Thermal Conductivity Carbon Fibers and a Self-Reinforced Graphite Panel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, P

    1998-01-01

    ... (XRD) and high-resolution field emission (FE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Of the four experimental fibers, two were produced from Amoco's standard petroleum pitch, and two were produced from an Amoco experimental pitch precursor...

  5. Effect of Residence Time of Graphitisation on Thermal Conductivity of Molded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedy Artsanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of residence time of graphitisation on thermal conductivity of molded graphite has been examined. The examination has been conducted by varying residence time of graphitisation of molded carbon with petroleum coke as raw material and coal tar pitch. Graphitisation has been conducted by heating molded graphite at 2500 °C in argon atmosphere with residention time of 10, 30 and 90 minutes. Graphitisation degree, density, shrinking mass and porosity of molded graphite were examined and so was its thermal conductivity. The result showed that the decrease of porosity and the increase of graphitisation degree due to the increasing of residention time of graphitisation will increase the thermal conductivity of graphite. Molded graphite graphitisized with residence time for 90 minutes residention time gave thermal conductivity of 2.134 Watt/mK and graphitization degree 0.718.

  6. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  7. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of brush anodes and glass fiber (GF1) separators, and plastic mesh supporters were used here for the first time to create a scalable microbial fuel cell architecture. Separators prevented short circuiting of closely-spaced electrodes, and cathode supporters were used to avoid water gaps between the separator and cathode that can reduce power production. The maximum power density with a separator and supporter and a single cathode was 75±1W/m3. Removing the separator decreased power by 8%. Adding a second cathode increased power to 154±1W/m3. Current was increased by connecting two MFCs connected in parallel. These results show that brush anodes, combined with a glass fiber separator and a plastic mesh supporter, produce a useful MFC architecture that is inherently scalable due to good insulation between the electrodes and a compact architecture. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Fabrication and Evaluation of Graphite Fiber-Reinforced Polyimide Composite Tube Forms Using Modified Resin Transfer Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exum, Daniel B.; Ilias, S.; Avva, V. S.; Sadler, Bob

    1997-01-01

    The techniques necessary for the fabrication of a complex three-dimensional tubular form using a PMR-type resin have been developed to allow for the construction of several tubes with good physical and mechanical properties. Employing established resin transfer molding practices, the relatively non-hazardous AMB-21 in acetone formulation was used to successfully impregnate four layers of AS4 braided graphite fiber preform previously loaded around an aluminum cylindrical core in an enclosed mold cavity. Using heat and vacuum, the solvent was evaporated to form a prepreg followed by a partial imidization and removal of condensation products. The aluminum core was replaced by a silicone rubber bladder and the cure cycle continued to the final stage of 550 F with a bladder internal pressure of 200 lbs/sq in while simultaneously applying a strong vacuum to the prepreg for removal of any additional imidization products. A combination of several modifications to the standard resin transfer molding methodology enabled the mold to 'breathe', allowing the imidization products a pathway for escape. AMB-21 resin was chosen because of the carcinogenic nature of the primary commercial polyimide PMR-15. The AMB-21 resin was formulated using commercially available monomers or monomer precursors and dissolved in a mixture of methyl alcohol and acetone. The viscosity of the resulting monomer solution was checked by use of a Brookfield rheometer and adjusted by adding acetone to an easily pumpable viscosity of about 600 cP. In addition, several types of chromatographic and thermal analyses were of the braids, and excess handling of the preforms broke some of the microscopic fibers, needlessly decreasing the strength of the finished part. In addition, three dimensional braided preforms with fibers along the length of the tube will be significantly stronger in tension than the braided preforms used in this study.

  9. Effect of Graphite on the Properties of Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda jabber Braihi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber-graphite composites (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 pphr graphite were prepared on a laboratory two-roll mill. Swelling measurements were used to evaluate the impacts of graphite on the properties of natural rubber. Swelling results showed that the volume fraction of natural rubber in the swollen gel, the interaction parameter, and the cross-link density decreased by increasing graphite loadings, while the average molecular weight of natural rubber between cross-links increased. Vulcanization results showed that only scorch time parameter increased with increasing graphite loadings, while other parameters (Max. torque, Min. torque, cure rate and cure rate index decreased. Both thermal and AC conductivities increased.

  10. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  11. Synthesis and stability of Br2, ICl and IBr intercalated pitch-based graphite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessbecher, Dorothy E.; Forsman, William C.; Gaier, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The intercalation of halogens in pitch-based fiber is studied as well as the stability of the resultant intercalation compounds. It is found that IBr intercalates P-100 to yield a high-sigma GIC with attractive stability properties. During ICl intercalation, the presence of O2 interferes with the reaction and necessitates a higher threshold pressure for intercalation.

  12. Isotropic nuclear graphites; the effect of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.; Buscaillon, A.; Mottet, P.; Micaud, G.

    1977-01-01

    Several isotropic graphites have been manufactured using different forming processes and fillers such as needle coke, regular coke, or pitch coke. Their properties are described in this paper. Specimens of these products have been irradiated in the fast reactor Rapsodie between 400 to 1400 0 C, at fluences up to 1,7.10 21 n.cm -2 PHI.FG. The results show an isotropic behavior under neutron irradiation, but the induced dimensional changes are higher than those of isotropic coke graphites although they are lower than those of conventional extruded graphites made with the same coke

  13. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  14. Evaluation of coke microstructure and its effects on graphite fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotourehchian, S.; Ahmadi, S.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of applications for cokes (metallurgy, petroleum, etc.) have been defined in parallel to the new industrial technology growth. Coke is rich in carbon and has the main role in manufacturing carbonaceous materials such as graphite, steel, silicon carbide, titanium carbide, etc. Among the most important applications of different variety of cokes is their usage for different graphite fabrications. The crystalline structure of graphite (hexagonal with sp 2 hybrid) is based upon the microstructure of coke and it causes anisotropy in properties of produced graphite. Thus, the study of macrostructure and anisotropy degree of cokes is of importance. There are several theoretical and experimental methods to determine the Coke's microstructure and anisotropy. Numerous tests have been conducted on different variety of cokes based on the used method. Here, it is attempted to introduce an applied method to determine the microstructure and anisotropy degree of cokes based upon the kind of application

  15. Effect of gamma radiation on graphite – PTFE dry lubrication system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sachin; Tyagi, Mukti; Seshadri, Geetha; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2017-01-01

    An effect of gamma radiation on lubrication behavior of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system has been studied using (TR-TW-30L) tribometer with thrust washer attachment in plane contact. Different compositions of graphite and PTFE were prepared and irradiated by gamma rays. Gamma radiation exposure significantly improves the tribological properties indicated by decrease in coefficient of friction and wear properties of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system. SEM and XRD analysis confirm the physico-chemical modification of graphite-PTFE on gamma radiation exposure leading to a novel dry lubrication system with good slip and anti friction properties. - Highlights: • Novel dry lubrication system of graphite -PTFE using gamma radiation. • Gamma radiation processing. • Reduction in coefficient of friction, frictional torque and wear loss of developed dry lubrication system.

  16. Effect of the Heat Treatment on the Graphite Matrix of Fuel Element for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chungyong; Lee, Seungjae; Suh, Jungmin; Jo, Youngho; Lee, Youngwoo; Cho, Moonsung

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the cylinder-formed fuel element for the block type reactor is focused on, which consists of the large part of graphite matrix. One of the most important properties of the graphite matrix is the mechanical strength for the high reliability because the graphite matrix should be enabled to protect the TRISO particles from the irradiation environment and the impact from the outside. In this study, the three kinds of candidate graphites and Phenol as a binder were chosen and mixed with each other, formed and heated for the compressive strength test. The objective of this research is to optimize the kinds and composition of the mixed graphite and the forming process by evaluating the compressive strength before/after heat treatment (carbonization of binder). In this study, the effect of heat treatment on graphite matrix was studied in terms of the density and the compressive strength. The size (diameter and length) of pellet is increased by heat treatment. Due to additional weight reduction and swelling (length and diameter) of samples the density of graphite pellet is decreased from about 2.0 to about 1.7g/cm 3 . From the mechanical test results, the compressive strength of graphite pellets was related to the various conditions such as the contents of binder, the kinds of graphite and the heat treatment. Both the green pellet and the heat treated pellet, the compressive strength of G+S+P pellets is relatively higher than that of R+S+P pellets. To optimize fuel element matrix, the effect of Phenol and other binders, graphite composition and the heat treatment on the mechanical properties will be deeply investigated for further study

  17. Delamination in surface plies of graphite/epoxy caused by the edge trimming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colligan, K.; Ramulu, M.

    Delamination in surface plies of graphite/epoxy laminates caused by edge trimming using polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and carbide cutters is investigated. The effect of several machining variables on formation of delaminations in the surface plies of a graphite fiber reinforced composite material is presented. Machining tests were performed to assess the impact of cutter geometry, feedrate, rotation direction, and graphite fiber orientation. Three typical delamination modes were observed and documented. Feedrate was found to have a significant effect on surface ply delamination in graphite/epoxy composite materials.

  18. Friction and wear of carbon-graphite materials for high-energy brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Caliper type brake simulation experiments were conducted on seven different carbon graphite materials formulations against a steel disk material and against a carbon graphite disk material. The effects of binder level, boron carbide (B4C) additions, SiC additions, graphite fiber additions, and graphite cloth reinforcement on friction and wear behavior were investigated. Reductions in binder level, additions of B4C, and additions of SiC each resulted in increased wear. The wear rate was not affected by the addition of graphite fibers. Transition to severe wear and high friction was observed in the case of graphite-cloth-reinforced carbon sliding against a disk of similar composition. The transition was related to the disruption of a continuous graphite shear film that must form on the sliding surfaces if low wear is to occur.

  19. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  20. EFFECTS OF REACTOR CONDITIONS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas pr...

  1. Differences in the irradiation effects of IG-110 and IG-430 nuclear graphites : effects of coke difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Gen Chan; Kim, Eung Seon; Hong, Jin Ki; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    In the high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), graphite acts as a moderator and reflector as well as a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and shut down, and thermal and neutron shielding. During a reactor operation, many of the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of these graphite components are significantly modified as a function of the temperature, environment, and an irradiation. On the other hand, currently, all the nuclear graphites are being manufactured from two types of cokes, i.e., petroleum and coal-tar pitch coke, and it has been understood that the type of coke plays the most critical role determining the properties of a specific graphite grade. To investigate the effects of coke types on the irradiation response of a graphite, two graphites of different cokes were irradiated by 3 MeV C+ ions and the differences in the response of ion-irradiation were investigated

  2. Effect of a Central Graphite Column on a Pebble Flow in a Pebble Bed Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, W. K.; Lee, W. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    A pebble bed reactor(PBR) uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. The pebble bed core is configured as cylindrical or annular depending on the reactor power. It is well known that an annular core can increase a cores' thermal power. The annular inner core zone is typically filled with movable graphite balls or a fixed graphite column. The first problem with this conventional annular core is that it is difficult to maintain a boundary between the central graphite ball zone and the outer fuel zone. The second problem is that it is expensive to replace the central fixed graphite column after several tens of years of reactor operation. In order to resolve these problems, a PBR with a central graphite column in a low core is invented. This paper presents the effect of the central graphite column on a pebble flow by using the computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-10

  3. Novel approach to microwave-assisted extraction and micro-solid-phase extraction from soil using graphite fibers as sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Lee, Hian Kee

    2008-05-30

    A single-step extraction-cleanup procedure involving microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction (micro-SPE) has been developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil samples. Micro-SPE is a relatively new extraction procedure that makes use of a sorbent enclosed within a sealed polypropylene membrane envelope. In the present work, for the first time, graphite fiber was used as a sorbent material for extraction. MAE-micro-SPE was used to cleanup sediment samples and to extract and preconcentrate five PAHs in sediment samples prepared as slurries with addition of water. The best extraction conditions comprised of microwave heating at 50 degrees C for a duration of 20 min, and an elution (desorption) time of 5 min using acetonitrile with sonication. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detection (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the PAHs ranged between 2.2 and 3.6 ng/g. With GC-mass spectrometry (MS), LODs were between 0.0017 and 0.0057 ng/g. The linear ranges were between 0.1 and 50 or 100 microg/g for GC-FID analysis, and 1 and 500 or 1000 ng/g for GC-MS analysis. Granular activated carbon was also used for the micro-SPE device but was found to be not as efficient in the PAH extraction. The MAE-micro-SPE method was successfully used for the extraction of PAHs in river and marine sediments, demonstrating its applicability to real environmental solid matrixes.

  4. Multifunctionality in epoxy/glass fibers composites with graphene interphase

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Haroon

    2017-01-01

    In this project, the synergetic effect of a graphene interphase in epoxy/glass fibers composites was investigated by coating glass fibers (GF) with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique. Graphite oxide was prepared using modified Hummers method in which raw graphite powder was oxidized using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) in acidic solution. Using ultrasonic technique, the graphite oxide was dispersed homogenously in w...

  5. Understanding the anisotropic strain effects on lithium diffusion in graphite anodes: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Junqian

    2018-06-01

    The lithium diffusion in graphite anode, which is the most widely used commercial electrode material today, affects the charge/discharge performance of lithium-ion batteries. In this study, the anisotropic strain effects on lithium diffusion in graphite anodes are systematically investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals corrections. It is found that the effects of external applied strains along various directions of LixC6 (i.e., perpendicular or parallel to the basal planes of the graphite host) on lithium diffusivity are different. Along the direction perpendicular to the graphite planes, the tensile strain facilitates in-plane Li diffusion by reducing the energy barrier, and the compressive strain hinders in-plane Li diffusion by raising the energy barrier. In contrast, the in-plane biaxial tensile strain (parallel to the graphite planes) hinders in-plane Li diffusion, and the in-plane biaxial compressive strain facilitates in-plane Li diffusion. Furthermore, both in-plane and transverse shear strains slightly influence Li diffusion in graphite anodes. A discussion is presented to explain the anisotropic strain dependence of lithium diffusion. This research provides data for the continuum modelling of the electrodes in the lithium-ion batteries.

  6. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  7. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on thermal conductivity of the graphite/aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.B. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zhe.chen@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhong, S.Y.; Wu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ji, G. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59655 (France); Wang, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Various graphite fillers, such as graphite particles, graphite fibers, graphite flakes and porous graphite blocks, have been successfully incorporated into an Al alloy by squeeze casting in order to fabricate graphite/Al composites with enhanced thermal conductivity (TC). Microstructural characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy has revealed a tightly-adhered, clean and Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}-free interface between the graphite fillers and the Al matrix in all the as-fabricated composites. Taking the microstructural features into account, we generalized the corresponding predictive models for the TCs of these composites with the effective medium approximation and the Maxwell mean-field scheme, which both show good agreement with the experimental data. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on the TCs of the composites were further discussed. - Highlights: • The thermal enhancement of various graphite fillers with different topology structures. • Predictive models for the thermal conductivity of different topology structures. • Oriented flakes alignment has the high potentials for thermal enhancement.

  8. Effects of the temperature and the irradiation on the behaviour of chlorine 37 in nuclear graphite: consequences on the mobility of chlorine 36 in irradiated graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the studies of the management of irradiated graphite wastes issued from the dismantling of the UNGG French reactors. This work focuses on the behavior of 36 Cl. This radionuclide is mainly issued through the neutron activation of 35 Cl by the reaction 35 Cl(n, γ) 36 Cl, pristine chlorine being an impurity of nuclear graphite, present at the level of some at.ppm. 36 Cl is a long lived radionuclide (about 300,000 years) and is highly soluble in water and mobile in concrete and clay. The solubilization of 36 Cl is controlled by the water accessibility into irradiated graphite pores as well as by factors related to 36 Cl itself such as its chemical speciation and its location within the irradiated graphite. Both speciation and chlorine location should strongly influence its behaviour and need to be taken into account for the choice of liable management options. However, data on radioactive chlorine features are difficult to assess in irradiated graphite and are mainly related to detection sensitivity problems. In this context, we simulated and evaluated the impact of the temperature, the irradiation and the radiolytic oxidation on the chlorine 36 behaviour. In order to simulate the presence of 36 Cl, we implanted 37 Cl into virgin nuclear graphite. Ion implantation has been widely used to study the lattice location, the diffusion and the release of fission and activation products in nuclear materials. Our results on the comparative effects of the temperature and the irradiation show that chlorine occurs in irradiated graphite on temperature and electronic and nuclear irradiation improve this effect. (author)

  9. Intercalated Graphite Fiber Conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    melting solders, used as electrical contacts as well as sealants for the glass containers described earlier, and high temperature gold varnish , used on...corrosion resistant to fluorine containing chemicals. Since the moisture permeability of the TFE is much less than that of the FEP, attempts were made to

  10. Investigating the effects of stress on the pore structures of nuclear grade graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Joshua E.L., E-mail: joshua.taylor@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Hall, Graham N., E-mail: graham.n.hall@manchester.ac.uk; Mummery, Paul M., E-mail: paul.m.mummery@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-03-15

    Graphite is used as a moderating material and as a structural component in a number of current generation nuclear reactors. During reactor operation stresses develop in the graphite components, causing them to deform. It is important to understand how the microstructure of graphite affects the material's response to these stresses. A series of experiments were performed to investigate how the pore structures of Pile Grade A and Gilsocarbon graphites respond to loading stresses. A compression rig was used to simulate the build-up of operational stresses in graphite components, and a confocal laser microscope was used to study variation of a number of important pore properties. Values of elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio were calculated and compared to existing literature to confirm the validity of the experimental techniques. Mean pore areas were observed to decrease linearly with increasing applied load, mean pore eccentricity increased linearly, and a small amount of clockwise pore rotation was observed. The response to build-up of stresses was dependent on the orientation of the pores and basal planes and the shapes of the pores with respect to the loading axis. It was proposed that pore closure and pore reorientation were competing processes. Pore separation was quantified using ‘nearest neighbour’ and Voronoi techniques, and non-pore regions were found to shrink linearly with increasing applied load. - Highlights: • Effects of stress on pore structures of Gilsocarbon and PGA graphites were studied. • Application of a compressive load was used to generate stresses in graphite. • Inverse linear relationship between stress and pore area was observed. • Mean pore eccentricity increased, clockwise pore rotation observed. • Separation of pores quantified using Voronoi and ‘nearest-neighbour’ methods.

  11. Effect of nonlinear stress-strain relationship on bending strength of isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taketoshi; Oku, Tatsuo

    1978-05-01

    Four-point bending tests were made on rectangular isotropic 7477PT graphite specimens of different sizes to observe the relation between load and outermost fiber strain. Analytical methods, allowing for nonlinear stress-strain relationships different between tension and compression, were developed for calculating the fiber stress distribution in a beam and the failure probability based on the Weibull statistical theory for bending fracture. With increase of the stress, the stress-strain curves for tension deviate from the linearity and also from those for compression. The true bending strengths of the rectangular bars are 10 -- 20 percent lower than elastic bending strengths. Revised Weibull theory gives failure probability distributions agreeing with measured ones, compared with the theory based on elastic behavior. (auth.)

  12. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-08-18

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored.

  13. Effect of anode polarization on biofilm formation and electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis/graphite felt microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, David; Coradin, Thibaud; Laberty-Robert, Christel

    2018-04-01

    In microbial fuel cells, electricity generation is assumed by bacterial degradation of low-grade organics generating electrons that are transferred to an electrode. The nature and efficiency of the electron transfer from the bacteria to the electrodes are determined by several chemical, physical and biological parameters. Specifically, the application of a specific potential at the bioanode has been shown to stimulate the formation of an electro-active biofilm, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the effect of an applied potential on the formation and electroactivity of biofilms established by Shewanella oneidensis bacteria on graphite felt electrodes in single- and double-chamber reactor configurations in oxic conditions. Using amperometry, cyclic voltammetry, and OCP/Power/Polarization curves techniques, we showed that a potential ranging between -0.3V and +0.5V (vs. Ag/AgCl/KCl sat.) and its converse application to a couple of electrodes leads to different electrochemical behaviors, anodic currents and biofilm architectures. For example, when the bacteria were confined in the anodic compartment of a double-chamber cell, a negative applied potential (-0.3V) at the bioanode favors a mediated electron transfer correlated with the progressive formation of a biofilm that fills the felt porosity and bridges the graphite fibers. In contrast, a positive applied potential (+0.3V) at the bioanode stimulates a direct electron transfer resulting in the fast-bacterial colonization of the fibers only. These results provide significant insight for the understanding of the complex bacteria-electrode interactions in microbial fuel cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  15. Effect of cellulase treatment of long fiber fraction on strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fiber and unbeaten short-fiber fractions. The obtained test results have indicate that the application of enzyme on appropriate fiber fraction have positive effects on the strength properties of the corrugated medium. The short span compression ...

  16. On the ''memory'' effect and its relation to the mechanism of formation of mercury-graphite electrode in inversion voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejman, E.Ya.; Petrova, L.G.; Dolgopolova, G.M.; Ignatov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous discharge ionization of lead-copper and cadmium-copper systems on the surface of mercury-plated graphite and graphite electrodes has been studied. A model is suggested of the preparation process of a mercury-plated graphite electrode obtained in simultaneous electroposition of mercury and elements determined as microimpurities. Processes, which occur on the electrode during relaxation time between electrolysis beginning and formation of the mercury phase, may be probable reasons for mutual effects of elements of the mercury-plated graphite electrode

  17. On the Effect of Pouring Temperature on Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron Solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Escobar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the effect of pouring temperature on the thermal-microstructural response of an eutectic spheroidal graphite cast iron (SGCI. To this end, experiments as well as numerical simulations were carried out. Solidification tests in a wedge-like part were cast at two different pouring temperatures. Five specific locations exhibiting distinct cooling rates along the sample were chosen for temperature measurements and metallographic analysis to obtain the number and size of graphite nodules at the end of the process. The numerical simulations were performed using a multinodular-based model. Reasonably good numerical-experimental agreements were obtained for both the cooling curves and the graphite nodule counts.

  18. Porosity Effect on Thermal Properties of Al-12 wt % Si/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Miguel Molina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion of composites obtained by infiltration of Al-12 wt % Si alloy into graphite particulate preforms has been determined. Highly irregular graphite particles were used to fabricate the preforms. The thermal conductivity of these composites gradually increases with the applied infiltration pressure given the inherent reduction in porosity. A simple application of the Hasselman-Johnson model in a two-step procedure (that accounts for the presence of both graphite particles and voids randomly dispersed in a metallic matrix offers a good estimation of the experimental results. As concerns the coefficient of thermal expansion, the results show a slight increase with saturation being approximately in the range 14.6–15.2 × 10−6 K−1 for a saturation varying from 86% up to 100%. Results lie within the standard Hashin-Strikman bounds.

  19. Porosity Effect on Thermal Properties of Al-12 wt % Si/Graphite Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, José-Miguel; Rodríguez-Guerrero, Alejandro; Louis, Enrique; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Narciso, Javier

    2017-02-14

    The effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion of composites obtained by infiltration of Al-12 wt % Si alloy into graphite particulate preforms has been determined. Highly irregular graphite particles were used to fabricate the preforms. The thermal conductivity of these composites gradually increases with the applied infiltration pressure given the inherent reduction in porosity. A simple application of the Hasselman-Johnson model in a two-step procedure (that accounts for the presence of both graphite particles and voids randomly dispersed in a metallic matrix) offers a good estimation of the experimental results. As concerns the coefficient of thermal expansion, the results show a slight increase with saturation being approximately in the range 14.6-15.2 × 10 -6 K -1 for a saturation varying from 86% up to 100%. Results lie within the standard Hashin-Strikman bounds.

  20. Effect of microstructure on mechanical properties and machinability of spheroidal graphite cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Satoru; Iio, Chinori; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Naito, Daiki; Tomota, Yo; Stefanus, Harjo

    2013-01-01

    Tensile properties, fatigue strength and machinability of spheroidal graphite cast irons with different microstructures were studied. Work-hardening and tensile strength increased with increasing pearlite volume fraction. In situ neutron diffraction during tensile deformation revealed that phase stresses and intergranular stresses are generated with deformation resulting in high work-hardening and high tensile strength with increasing pearlite volume fraction. It was found that graphite grains bear almost no stress, and strongly influence fatigue crack initiation as well as propagation. Therefore graphite refinement is very effective to realize high fatigue strength. The tool life for cutting becomes shorter with increasing pearlite volume fraction. The balance of mechanical properties and machinability was considered. (author)

  1. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and cotto......A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding...

  2. THE EFFECT OF GROUP IIIA TO VIA ELEMENTS AND THEIR OXIDES ON GRAPHITE OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakszawski, J F; Parker, W E

    1963-06-15

    The effect of group IIIA to VIA elements and oxides on graphite oxidation was determined. Additives were molded with spectroscopically pure graphite powder. The concentration was maintained constant at 0.1 mole percent based on the element. The rate of reaction with 1 atm of air was measured at 700 and 800 deg C. Air flow rate from 2000 to 3000 cc/min had no effect on the oxidation rate of the pure graphite at 700, 750, and 800 deg C indicating that reaction was not occurring in Zone III. The calculated Ea of 54 kcal/mole suggested reaction in Zone I. Visual inspection of the rods after reaction substantiated this conclusion. The reaction was first order with respect to oxygen partial pressure at 700 and 800 deg C. B, B/sub 2/O/sub 5/, P, and P/sub 2/ O/sub 6/ inhibited the oxid ation of graphite at 700 and 800 deg C while the other elements and oxides catalyzed the reaction to various degrees. The reaction remained kinetically of the first order when inhibited. A systematic variation in reaction rates appears to follow the diagonals of the periodic relationship of the element from the upper left to the lower right. These variations can be correlated with average ionization energy or electron affinity. (auth)

  3. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  4. Effects of radiation on scintillating fiber performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.L.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Onopienko, D.; Savin, S.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.; Young, K.G.; Carey, R.; Rothman, M.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Parr, H.

    1992-01-01

    Continued rapid improvements in formulations for scintillating fibers require the ability to parameterize and predict effects of radiation on detector performance. Experimental techniques necessary to obtain needed information and calculational procedures used in performing predications for hadron scintillating fiber calorimetry in the Superconducting Supercollider environment are described. The experimental techniques involve control of the testing environment, consideration of dose rate effects, and other factors. These calculations involve the behavior of particle showers in the detector, expected levels of radiation, and parameterization of the radiation effects. A summary of significant work is also presented

  5. Effects of radiation on scintillating fiber performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.G.; Bauer, M.L.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Onopienko, D.; Savin, S.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.; Carey, R.; Rothman, M.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Paar, H.

    1993-01-01

    Continued rapid improvements in formulations for scintillating fibers require the ability to parameterize and predict effects of radiation on detector performance. Experimental techniques necessary to obtain desired information and calculational procedures used in performing predictions for hadron scintillating fiber calorimetry in the Superconducting Supercollider environment are described. The experimental techniques involve control of the testing environment, consideration of dose rate effects, and other factors. The calculations involve the behavior of particle showers in the detector, expected levels of radiation, and parameterization of the radiation effects. A summary of significant work is also presented

  6. Revisiting the effects of organic solvents on the thermal reduction of graphite oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso-Bujans, Fabienne; Fierro, José Luis G.; Alegría, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Retention of organic solvent on graphite oxide interlayer space. ► Decreasing exfoliation temperature. ► Close link between structure and thermal behavior of solvent treated graphite oxide. ► Restacking inhibition of thermally reduced graphite oxide sheets. ► Changes in kinetic mechanisms of thermal reduction. - Abstract: Treatment of graphite oxide (GO) with organic solvents via sorption from either liquid or gas phase, and subsequent desorption, induces profound changes in the layered GO structure: loss of stacking order, retention of trace amounts of solvents and decreasing decomposition temperature. This study presents new evidences of the effect of organic solvents on the thermal reduction of GO by means of thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results reveal a relative higher decrease of the oxygen amounts in solvent-treated GO as compared to untreated GO and the restacking inhibition of the thermally reduced GO sheets upon slow heating. The kinetic experiments evidence changes occurring in the reduction mechanisms of the solvent-treated GO, which support the close link between GO structure and thermal properties.

  7. Effect of Graphite Doped TiO_2 Nanoparticles on Smoke Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshasnorlyza Hazan; Mohamad Shahrizal Md Zain; Natrah Syafiqah Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Secondhand smoke affects in the same way as regular smoker. The best solution is to purify the air efficiently and effectively. In this study, we were successfully doped TiO_2 nanoparticle with graphite to accelerate the degradation of cigarette smoke. The graphite doped and undoped TiO_2 nanoparticles were prepared from synthetic rutile using alkaline fusion method and their photo catalytic activity were investigated under visible light irradiation. The photo catalytic activity of the TiO_2 nanoparticles was analyzed in terms of their particle size analysis, crystallization and optical band gap. TiO_2 nanoparticle act as photo catalyzer by utilization of light energy to excite electron-hole pairs in smoke degradation processes. With the aided from graphite in TiO_2 nanoparticles, the smoke degradation was accelerate up to 44.4 %. In this case, graphite helps to reduce optical band gap of TiO_2 nanoparticle, thus increasing excitation of electron from valence band to conduction band. (author)

  8. Effect of Bi on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve the mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron, bismuth (Bi was introduced into the iron. Five castings with different Bi content from 0 to 0.014 wt.% were prepared; and four positions in the casting from the edge to the center, with different solidification cooling rates, were chosen for microstructure observation and mechanical properties test. The effect of the Bi content on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron were investigated. Results show that the tensile strength, elongation and impact toughness at different positions in the five castings decrease with a decrease in cooling rate. With an increase in Bi content, the graphite morphology and the mechanical properties at the same position are improved, and the improvement of mechanical properties is obvious when the Bi content is no higher than 0.011wt.%. But when the Bi content is further increased to 0.014wt.%, the improvement of mechanical properties is not obvious due to the increase of chunky graphite number and the aggregation of chunky graphite. With an increase in Bi content, the tensile fracture mechanism is changed from brittle to mixture ductile-brittle fracture.

  9. High-temperature irradiation effects on mechnical properties of HTGR graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Eto, Motokuni; Fujisaki, Katsuo

    1978-04-01

    The irradiation effects on stress-strain relation, Young's modulus, tensile strength, bending strength and compressive strength of HTGR graphites were studied in irradiation temperature ranges of 200 - 300 0 C and 800 - 1400 0 C and in neutron fluences up to 7.4 x 10 20 n/cm 2 and 3 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (> 0.18 MeV). Fracture criteria and strain energy to fracture of the unirradiated and the irradiated graphites were also examined. (1) Neutron fluence dependences are similar in Young's modulus, tensile strength and bending strength. (2) The change of compressive strength and of tensile and bending strengths with neutron fluence differ; the former varies with graphite kind. (3) At lower irradiation temperatures the bending fracture strain energy decreases with increasing neutron fluence and at higher irradiation temperatures it increases. (4) The fracture criteria of graphites deviates from the constant strain energy theory (α = 0.5) and the constant strain theory (α = 1), shifting from α asymptotically equals 0.5 to α asymptotically equals 1 with increasing irradiation temperature. (auth.)

  10. Effects of porosity and temperature on oxidation behavior in air of selected nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongyue; Li Zhengcao; Miao Wei; Zhang Zhengjun

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite endures gas oxidation in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), which may threaten the safety of reactor. To study the oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite, weight loss curve is usually measured through Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) method. In this work, three brands of nuclear graphite for HTGR (i.e., HSM-SC, IG-11, and NBG-18) are oxidized under 873 and 1073 K in open air, and their weight loss curves are obtained. The acceleration of oxidizing rate is observed for both HSM-SC and IG-11, and is attributed to the large porosity increase during oxidation process. For HSM-SC, the porosity increase comes from preferential binder oxidation, and thus its binder quality shall be improved to obtain better oxidation resistance. Temperature effects on oxidation for HSM-SC are also studied, which shows that oxidizing gas tends to be exhausted at graphite surface at high temperature instead of penetrate into the interior of bulk. (author)

  11. Retention and effective diffusion of model metabolites on porous graphitic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Daniel B; Yun, Young J; Jorgenson, James W

    2017-12-29

    The study of metabolites in biological samples is of high interest for a wide range of biological and pharmaceutical applications. Reversed phase liquid chromatography is a common technique used for the separation of metabolites, but it provides little retention for polar metabolites. An alternative to C18 bonded phases, porous graphitic carbon has the ability to provide significant retention for both non-polar and polar analytes. The goal of this work is to study the retention and effective diffusion properties of porous graphitic carbon, to see if it is suitable for the wide injection bands and long run times associated with long, packed capillary-scale separations. The retention of a set of standard metabolites was studied for both stationary phases over a wide range of mobile phase conditions. This data showed that porous graphitic carbon benefits from significantly increased retention (often >100 fold) under initial gradient conditions for these metabolites, suggesting much improved ability to focus a wide injection band at the column inlet. The effective diffusion properties of these columns were studied using peak-parking experiments with the standard metabolites under a wide range of retention conditions. Under the high retention conditions, which can be associated with retention after injection loading for gradient separations, D eff /D m ∼0.1 for both the C18-bonded and porous graphitic carbon columns. As C18 bonded particles are widely, and successfully utilized for long gradient separations without issue of increasing peak width from longitudinal diffusion, this suggests that porous graphitic carbon should be amenable for long runtime gradient separations as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Fibers on Mixture Design of Stone Matrix Asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lignin fibers typically influence the mixture performance of stone matrix asphalt (SMA, such as strength, stability, durability, noise level, rutting resistance, fatigue life, and water sensitivity. However, limited studies were conducted to analyze the influence of fibers on the percent voids in mineral aggregate in bituminous mixture (VMA during the mixture design. This study analyzed the effect of different fibers and fiber contents on the VMA in SMA mixture design. A surface-dry condition method test and Marshall Stability test were applied on the SMA mixture with four different fibers (i.e., flocculent lignin fiber, mineral fiber, polyester fiber, blended fiber. The test results indicated that the bulk specific gravity of SMA mixtures and asphalt saturation decreased with the increasing fiber content, whilst the percent air voids in bituminous mixtures (VV, Marshall Stability and VMA increased. Mineral fiber had the most obvious impact on the bulk specific gravity of bituminous mixtures, while flocculent lignin fiber had a minimal impact. The mixture with mineral fiber and polyester fiber had significant effects on the volumetric properties, and, consequently, exhibited better VMA over the conventional SMA mixture with lignin fiber. Modified fiber content range was also provided, which will widen the utilization of mineral fiber and polyester fiber in the applications of SMA mixtures. The mixture evaluation suggested no statistically significant difference between lignin fiber and polyester fiber on the stability. The mineral fiber required a much larger fiber content to improve the mixture performance than other fibers. Overall, the results can be a reference to guide SMA mixture design.

  13. Effect of expansion temperature of expandable graphite on microstructure evolution of expanded graphite during high-energy ball-milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Xueqing; Li Liang; Zhang Ruijun; Zhang Fucheng

    2009-01-01

    Two expanded graphites (EG), marked as EG-1 and EG-2, were prepared by rapid heating of expandable graphite to 600 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, and ball milled in a high-energy mill (planetary-type) under air atmosphere. The microstructure evolution of the ball-milled samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis shows that the evolution degree of the average crystallite thickness along the c-axis (L c ) of EG-2 is lower than that of EG-1 during the milling process. From the HRTEM images of the samples after 100 h ball-milling, slightly curved graphene planes can be frequently observed both in the two EGs, however, EG-1 and EG-2 exhibit sharply curved graphene planes and smoothly curved graphene planes with high bending angles, respectively.

  14. Effects of Boron and Graphite Uncertainty in Fuel for TREAT Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, Kyle; Mausolff, Zander; Gonzalez, Esteban; DeHart, Mark; Goluoglu, Sedat

    2017-03-01

    Advanced modeling techniques and current computational capacity make full core TREAT simulations possible, with the goal of such simulations to understand the pre-test core and minimize the number of required calibrations. But, in order to simulate TREAT with a high degree of precision the reactor materials and geometry must also be modeled with a high degree of precision. This paper examines how uncertainty in the reported values of boron and graphite have an effect on simulations of TREAT.

  15. The retardation effect of structural graphite on the release of fission products in case of hypothetical accidents of HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniotakis, N.; Decken, C.B. von der

    1982-01-01

    In case of a hypothetical core heat up accident of an HTR the structural graphite of the reactor causes under certain circumstances a very important retardation of the release of fission products into the containment building of the plant. A model is presented which describes the transport phenomena in the graphite structure extensively taking into account specially the macro-structure of the graphite. It is shown by parameter variations under which conditions one can expect a large retardation effect and quantitative values of this retardation, which can be very important, are given. (author)

  16. Swift heavy ions induced irradiation effects in monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, J.; Yao, H.J.; Zhang, S.X.; Zhai, P.F.; Duan, J.L.; Sun, Y.M.; Li, G.P.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were irradiated by swift heavy ions ( 209 Bi and 112 Sn) with the fluence between 10 11 and 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Both pristine and irradiated samples were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that D and D′ peaks appear after irradiation, which indicated the ion irradiation introduced damage both in the graphene and graphite lattice. Due to the special single atomic layer structure of graphene, the irradiation fluence threshold Φ th of the D band of graphene is significantly lower ( 11 ions/cm 2 ) than that (2.5 × 10 12 ions/cm 2 ) of HOPG. The larger defect density in graphene than in HOPG indicates that the monolayer graphene is much easier to be damaged than bulk graphite by swift heavy ions. Moreover, different defect types in graphene and HOPG were detected by the different values of I D /I D′ . For the irradiation with the same electronic energy loss, the velocity effect was found in HOPG. However, in this experiment, the velocity effect was not observed in graphene samples irradiated by swift heavy ions

  17. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  18. Effect of epoxy coatings on carbon fibers during manufacture of carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hui; Huang, Yudong; Liu, Li; Shi, Xiaohua

    2010-01-01

    The changes in oxygen and nitrogen during manufacture of the carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites were measured using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The effects of the change in oxygen and nitrogen on the strength of the carbon fibers were investigated and the results revealed that the change of the tensile strength with increasing heat curing temperature was attributed to the change in the surface flaws of the carbon fibers because the carbon fibers are sensitive to the surface flaws. The effect of the surface energy that was calculated using Kaelble's method on the strength of the carbon fibers was investigated. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the carbon fibers was measured using atom force microscopy. The change trend of roughness was reverse to that of the strength, which was because of the brittle fracture of the carbon fibers.

  19. Fiber break location technique utilizing stimulated Brillouin scattering effects in optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakar, A A A; Al-Mansoori, M H; Mahdi, M A; Mohd Azau, M A; Zainal Abidin, M S

    2009-01-01

    A new technique of fiber break detection system in optical communication networks is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. This technique is based-on continuous wave light source rather than pulsed source that is commonly deployed in existing techniques. The nonlinear effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering is manipulated to locate the fiber-break position in optical communication networks. This technique enables the utilization of a less-sensitive photodetector to detect the Brillouin Stokes line since its intensity increases with the fiber length in the detectable region. The fiber break location can be determined with accuracy of more than 98% for fiber length less than 50 km using this technique

  20. Investigation on the Effect of Sulfur and Titanium on the Microstructure of Lamellar Graphite Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Stefanescu, Doru Michael; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to identify the inclusions in lamellar graphite cast iron in an effort to explain the nucleation of the phases of interest. Four samples of approximately the same carbon equivalent but different levels of sulfur and titanium were studied. The Ti/S ratios were from 0...... of complex Al, Ca, Mg oxide. An increased titanium level of 0.35 pct produced superfine interdendritic graphite (~10 μm) at low (0.012 wt pct) as well as at high-S contents. Ti also caused increased segregation in the microstructure of the analyzed irons and larger eutectic grains (cells). TiC did not appear...... to be a nucleation site for the primary austenite as it was found mostly at the periphery of the secondary arms of the austenite, in the last region to solidify. The effect of titanium in refining the graphite and increasing the austenite fraction can be explained through the widening of the liquidus...

  1. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate-incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E A

    2014-10-07

    Commensurate-incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs-Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton-graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton-carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas-solid and solid-solid system.

  2. Graphite-supported platinum catalysts: Effects of gas and aqueous phase treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vleeming, J.H.; Kuster, B.F.M.; Marin, G.B. [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The effects on the platinum particle diameter and the available platinum surface area of a graphite-supported platinum catalyst resulting from pretreatments and from performing a selective oxidation reaction are investigated. In the gas phase considerable catalyst sintering occurs only in the presence of oxygen at 773 K due to extensive carbon burn-off, whereas in an aqueous phase platinum particle growth is limited upon oxidative treatment. A hydrogen treatment in aqueous phase at 363 K causes platinum particle growth, aggregate formation, and covering of metal sites. These phenomena become more important with increasing pH. Platinum particle growth and aggregate formation are attributed to platinum particle rather than platinum adatom mobility and is caused by the destruction of the oxygen-containing surface groups on the graphite support, which serve as anchorage sites for the platinum particles. Site covering is caused by products originating from the graphite support, which are formed as a result of the reductive treatments. When performing the aqueous phase oxidation of methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside at 323 K and a pH of 9, catalyst modifications are small under oxidative conditions. Exposure of the catalyst for several hours to methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside under the same conditions but in the absence of oxygen causes site covering. 50 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate–incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Commensurate–incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs–Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton–graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton–carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas–solid and solid–solid system

  4. Effect of fiber extensibility on the fracture toughness of short fiber or brittle matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, L.K.; Wetherhold, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    A micromechanical model based on probabilistic principles is proposed to determine the effective fracture toughness increment and the bridging stress-crack opening displacement relationship for brittle matrix composites reinforced with short, poorly bonded fibers. Emphasis is placed on studying the effect of fiber extensibility on the bridging stress and the bridging fracture energy, and to determine its importance in cementitious matrix composites. Since the fibers may not be in an ideal aligned or random state, the analysis is placed in sufficiently general terms to consider any prescribable fiber orientation distribution. The model incorporates the snubbing effect observed during pull-out of fibers inclined at an angle to the crack face normal. In addition, the model allows the fibers to break; any fiber whose load meets or exceeds a single-valued failure stress will fracture rather than pull out. The crack bridging results may be expressed as the sum of results for inextensible fibers and an additional term due to fiber extensibility. An exact analysis is given which gives the steady-state bridging toughness G directly, but presents a non-linear problem for the bridging stress-crack opening (σ b -γ) relationship. An approximate analysis is then presented which gives both G and σ b -γ directly. To illustrate the effect extensibility on bridging stress and fracture energy increment due to bridging fibers, a comparison with the inextensible fiber case is provided. It is found that effect of extensibility on fracture energy is negligible for common materials systems. However extensibility may have a significant effect on the bridging stress-crack opening relationship. The effect of other physical and material parameters such as fiber length, fiber orientation and snubbing friction coefficient is also studied. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  5. Effect of PVA fiber content on creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongnan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Weilun

    2018-04-01

    The effect of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber content on the creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns was investigated. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed and the creep prediction model of ACI209 was modified. Controlling the concrete strength as C80, changing the content of PVA fiber (volume fraction 0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% respectively), the creep experiment of PVA fiber reinforced concrete columns was carried out, the creep coefficient of each specimen was calculated to characterize the creep property. The influence of PVA fiber content on the creep property was analyzed based on the creep coefficient and the calculation results of several frequently used creep prediction models. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed to modify the ACI209 creep prediction model.

  6. Effects of the Air Flow Rate on The Oxidation of NBG-18 and 25 Nuclear Graphite Grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan; Jang, Joon-Hee

    2007-01-01

    For a VHTR, graphite oxidation is regarded as a critical phenomenon for degrading the integrity of graphite components under normal or abnormal conditions. The oxidation of a graphite core component can occur by air which may permeate into the primary coolant operation and/or by impurities contained in the He coolant, or by air ingress during a severe accident. It is well known that the oxidation properties of a graphite are highly dependent on the source of raw materials, impurities, microstructures (crystallites, pore structure), and on the processing and environmental parameters, such as the forming methods, the coolant type, moisture and impurity content, temperature, flow rate and the oxygen potential of the coolants. A lot of work has been performed on the oxidation of graphite since the 1960s, and, for example, in the case of the temperature, a widely accepted oxidation model on the effects of a temperature has already been developed. However, in the case of the flow rate, even for its expected effects in a VHTR, for example, as to the expected changes in the bypass flow (10-20 %) during an operation, no systematic works have been performed. In this respect, as a preliminary study, the effects of an air flow rate on the oxidation of NBG-18 and 25 nuclear graphite were investigated

  7. Multilayer core-shell structured composite paper electrode consisting of copper, cuprous oxide and graphite assembled on cellulose fibers for asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Caichao; Jiao, Yue; Li, Jian

    2017-09-01

    An easily-operated and inexpensive strategy (pencil-drawing-electrodeposition-electro-oxidation) is proposed to synthesize a novel class of multilayer core-shell structured composite paper electrode, which consists of copper, cuprous oxide and graphite assembled on cellulose fibers. This interesting electrode structure plays a pivotal role in providing more active sites for electrochemical reactions, facilitating ion and electron transport and shorting their diffusion pathways. This electrode demonstrates excellent electrochemical properties with a high specific capacitance of 601 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 and retains 83% of this capacitance when operated at an ultrahigh current density of 100 A g-1. In addition, a high energy density of 13.4 W h kg-1 at the power density of 0.40 kW kg-1 and a favorable cycling stability (95.3%, 8000 cycles) were achieved for this electrode. When this electrode was assembled into an asymmetric supercapacitor with carbon paper as negative electrode, the device displays remarkable electrochemical performances with a large areal capacitances (122 mF cm-2 at 1 mA cm-2), high areal energy density (10.8 μW h cm-2 at 402.5 μW cm-2) and outstanding cycling stability (91.5%, 5000 cycles). These results unveil the potential of this composite electrode as a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors.

  8. Graphene nanosheets preparation using magnetic nanoparticle assisted liquid phase exfoliation of graphite: The coupled effect of ultrasound and wedging nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Alireza; Zahirifar, Jafar; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Dastbaz, Abolfazl

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to investigate a novel technique to improve the yield of liquid phase exfoliation of graphite to graphene sheets. The method is based on the utilization of magnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles as "particle wedge" to facilitate delamination of graphitic layers. Strong shear forces resulted from the collision of Fe 3 O 4 particles with graphite particles, and intense ultrasonic waves lead to enhanced exfoliation of graphite. High quality of graphene sheets along with the ease of Fe 3 O 4 particle separation from graphene solution which arises from the magnetic nature of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles are the unique features of this approach. Initial graphite flakes and produced graphene sheets were characterized by various methods including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Zeta potential analysis. Moreover, the effect of process factors comprising initial graphite concentration, Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles concentration, sonication time, and sonication power were investigated. Results revealed that graphene preparation yield and the number of layers could be manipulated by the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effective viscous flow properties for fiber suspensions under concentrated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The effective longitudinal and transverse shear viscosities are derived for an aligned fiber suspension. The solutions are valid under very concentrated conditions for a hexagonal arrangement of the single size fibers. The results compliment the classical dilute suspension forms at the other extreme of concentration. Empirical forms are constructed to cover the full range of volume fraction of the fiber phase. Also, single size spherical particle suspensions are given a similar treatment to that of the fiber case

  10. The effect of neutron irradiation on silicon carbide fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nine types of SiC fiber have been exposed to neutron radiation in the Advanced Test Reactor at 250 C for various lengths of time ranging from 83 to 128 days. The effects of these exposures have been initially determined using scanning electron microscopy. The fibers tested were Nicalon trademark CG, Tyranno, Hi-Nicalon trademark, Dow Corning SiC, Carborundum SiC, Textron SCS-6, polymethysilane (PMS) derived SiC from the University of Michigan, and two types of MER SiC fiber. This covers a range of fibers from widely used commercial fibers to developmental fibers. Consistent with previous radiation experiments, Nicalon fiber was severely degraded by the neutron irradiation. Similarly, Tyranno suffered severe degradation. The more advanced fibers which approach the composition and properties of SiC performed well under irradiation. Of these, the Carborundum SiC fiber appeared to perform the best. The Hi-Nicalon and Dow Corning Fibers exhibited good general stability, but also appear to have some surface roughening. The MER fibers and the Textron SCS-6 fibers both had carbon cores which adversely influenced the overall stability of the fibers

  11. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitbrink, William A. [LMK OSH Consulting LLC (United States); Lo, Li-Ming, E-mail: LLo@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10{sup 8} and 2.8 × 10{sup 6} fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC.

  12. Effect of carbon nanotubes upon emissions from cutting and sanding carbon fiber-epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitbrink, William A.; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20–80 % compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9 × 10 8 and 2.8 × 10 6 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC

  13. Effects of stitching on fracture toughness of uniweave textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Sharma, Suresh

    1995-01-01

    The effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and Mode 1 and Mode 2 fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates were studied experimentally. Graphite/epoxy laminates were fabricated from AS4 graphite uniweave textiles and 3501-6 epoxy using Resin Transfer Molding. The cloths were stitched with Kevlar(tm) and glass yarns before resin infusion. Delamination was implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed in a novel fixture to measure Compression After Impact (CAI) strength of stitched laminates. The results show that CAI strength can be improved up to 400% by through-the-thickness stitching. Double Cantilever Beam tests were performed to study the effect of stitching on Mode 1 fracture toughness G(sub 1c). It was found that G(sub 1c) increased 30 times for a low stitching density of 16 stitches/sq in. Mode 2 fracture toughness was measured by testing the stitched beams in End Notch Flexure tests. Unlike in the unstitiched beams, crack propagation in the stitched beams was steady. The current formulas for ENF tests were not found suitable for determining G(sub 2C) for stitched beams. Hence two new methods were developed - one based on crack area measured from ultrasonic C-scanning and the other based on equivalent crack area measured from the residual stiffness of the specimen. The G(sub 2c) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates. The mechanisms by which stitching increases the CAI strength and fracture toughness are discussed.

  14. Effect of fiber content on the properties of glass fiber-phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.Y.; Shahid, M.R.; Subhani, T.; Sharif, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    Glass fiber-Phenolic matrix composite is used for the manufacturing of parts /components related to electronic and aerospace industry due to its high strength, dimensional stability and excellent electrical insulation properties. The evaluation of this composite material is necessary prior to make parts/components of new designs. In the present research, thermosetting phenolic plastic was reinforced with E-glass fiber in different fiber-to-resin ratios to produce composites of different compositions. Mechanical and electrical properties of these composite materials were evaluated with reference to the effect of fiber content variation in phenolic resin. (author)

  15. Effect of ionizing radiation on polypropylene composites reinforced with coconut fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Leila F.; Pereira, Nilson C.; Faldini, Sonia B.; Masson, Terezinha J.; Silveira, Luiz H., E-mail: lfmiranda@sti.com.b [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Curso de Engenharia de Materiais; Silva, Leonardo G. de Andrade e, E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The use of the polymeric composite materials has been increasing but these materials have environmental problems related to the discard. To reduce the discard deleterious effect, coconuts, sisal, as well as sugar cane pulp natural based fiber have been studied to replace the synthetic ones. These fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix plays a similar role as the synthetic ones, in terms of mechanical and thermal properties. The natural fibers are environmentally friendly, easy to recycle and biodegradable. The aim of this work is the study of ionizing radiation effects on the properties of recycled polypropylene composites, reinforced with 10%, 15% and 20% of the coconut fibers, using as coupling agent a substance based on maleic anhydride (MAPP) graphitized polypropylene. The samples were molded by injection, irradiated and submitted to thermal and mechanical tests. The mechanical properties (hardness, impact strength and tensile strength), temperature of thermal distortion (HDT) and Vicat softening temperature of the non irradiated and irradiated composites were determined. The irradiation doses were of 30, 50 and 100kGy in a gamma cell. Regarding the thermal and mechanical properties of non-irradiated samples, the incorporation of coconut fibers to polypropylene resulted in a decrease of impact strength, tensile strength and Vicat softening temperature as well as in an increase in hardness and HDT. This result indicates that the coconut fibers do not act like a reinforcement agent but as biodegradable filler. In the irradiated samples, it was observed a decrease in the impact strength, tensile strength, HDT, and thermal distortion temperature and an increase in the hardness and tensile strength. The Vicat softening temperature shows no change. (author)

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on polypropylene composites reinforced with coconut fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Leila F.; Pereira, Nilson C.; Faldini, Sonia B.; Masson, Terezinha J.; Silveira, Luiz H.

    2009-01-01

    The use of the polymeric composite materials has been increasing but these materials have environmental problems related to the discard. To reduce the discard deleterious effect, coconuts, sisal, as well as sugar cane pulp natural based fiber have been studied to replace the synthetic ones. These fibers embedded in a polymeric matrix plays a similar role as the synthetic ones, in terms of mechanical and thermal properties. The natural fibers are environmentally friendly, easy to recycle and biodegradable. The aim of this work is the study of ionizing radiation effects on the properties of recycled polypropylene composites, reinforced with 10%, 15% and 20% of the coconut fibers, using as coupling agent a substance based on maleic anhydride (MAPP) graphitized polypropylene. The samples were molded by injection, irradiated and submitted to thermal and mechanical tests. The mechanical properties (hardness, impact strength and tensile strength), temperature of thermal distortion (HDT) and Vicat softening temperature of the non irradiated and irradiated composites were determined. The irradiation doses were of 30, 50 and 100kGy in a gamma cell. Regarding the thermal and mechanical properties of non-irradiated samples, the incorporation of coconut fibers to polypropylene resulted in a decrease of impact strength, tensile strength and Vicat softening temperature as well as in an increase in hardness and HDT. This result indicates that the coconut fibers do not act like a reinforcement agent but as biodegradable filler. In the irradiated samples, it was observed a decrease in the impact strength, tensile strength, HDT, and thermal distortion temperature and an increase in the hardness and tensile strength. The Vicat softening temperature shows no change. (author)

  17. A comparative study of graphene and graphite-based field effect transistor on flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Kapil; Rani, Cheenu; Vaid, Monika; Kapoor, Ankit; Kumar, Pramod; Kumar, Sandeep; Shriwastawa, Shilpi; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Randhir; Tripathi, C. C.

    2018-06-01

    In the present era, there has been a great demand of cost-effective, biodegradable, flexible and wearable electronics which may open the gate to many applications like flexible displays, RFID tags, health monitoring devices, etc. Due to the versatile nature of plastic substrates, they have been extensively used in packaging, printing, etc. However, the fabrication of electronic devices requires specially prepared substrates with high quality surfaces, chemical compositions and solutions to the related fabrication issues along with its non-biodegradable nature. Therefore, in this report, a cost-effective, biodegradable cellulose paper as an alternative dielectric substrate material for the fabrication of flexible field effect transistor (FET) is presented. The graphite and liquid phase exfoliated graphene have been used as the material for the realisation of source, drain and channel on cellulose paper substrate for its comparative analysis. The mobility of fabricated FETs was calculated to be 83 cm2/V s (holes) and 33 cm2/V s (electrons) for graphite FET and 100 cm2/V s (holes) and 52 cm2/V s (electrons) for graphene FET, respectively. The output characteristic of the device demonstrates the linear behaviour and a comprehensive increase in conductance as a function of gate voltages. The fabricated FETs may be used for strain sensing, health care monitoring devices, human motion detection, etc.

  18. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  19. Effects of Temperature and X-rays on Plastic Scintillating Fiber and Infrared Optical Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongsoo; Shin, Sang Hun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Yoo, Wook Jae

    2015-05-11

    In this study, we have studied the effects of temperature and X-ray energy variations on the light output signals from two different fiber-optic sensors, a fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) based on a BCF-12 as a plastic scintillating fiber (PSF) and a fiber-optic thermometer (FOT) using a silver halide optical fiber as an infrared optical fiber (IR fiber). During X-ray beam irradiation, the scintillating light and IR signals were measured simultaneously using a dosimeter probe of the FOD and a thermometer probe of the FOT. The probes were placed in a beaker with water on the center of a hotplate, under variation of the tube potential of a digital radiography system or the temperature of the water in the beaker. From the experimental results, in the case of the PSF, the scintillator light output at the given tube potential decreased as the temperature increased in the temperature range from 25 to 60 °C. We demonstrated that commonly used BCF-12 has a significant temperature dependence of -0.263 ± 0.028%/°C in the clinical temperature range. Next, in the case of the IR fiber, the intensity of the IR signal was almost uniform at each temperature regardless of the tube potential range from 50 to 150 kVp. Therefore, we also demonstrated that the X-ray beam with an energy range used in diagnostic radiology does not affect the IR signals transmitted via a silver halide optical fiber.

  20. Effect of sizing on carbon fiber surface properties and fibers/epoxy interfacial adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Zhishuang; Shi Fenghui; Zhang Baoyan; Li Min; Zhang Zuoguang

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to study effect of sizing on surface properties of carbon fiber and the fiber/epoxy interfacial adhesion by comparing sized and desized T300B and T700SC carbon fibers. By means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), activated carbon atoms can be detected, which are defined as the carbon atoms conjunction with oxygen and nitrogen. Surface chemistry analysis shows that the desized carbon fibers present less concentration of activated carbon, especially those connect with the hydroxyl and epoxy groups. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) analysis reveals that the desized carbon fibers have larger dispersive surface energy γ S D and smaller polar component γ S SP than the commercial sized ones. Moreover, micro-droplet test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the desized carbon fiber/epoxy is higher than those of the T300B and T700SC. Variations of the IFSS for both the sized and desized carbon fibers correspond to γ S D /γ S tendency of the fiber surface, however the work of adhesion does not reveal close correlation with IFSS trend for different fiber/epoxy systems.

  1. Effect of reacting surface density on the overall graphite oxidation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang; Kim, Eung; Lim, Jong; Schultz, Richard; Petti, David

    2009-01-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1) Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  2. Temperature and radiolytic corrosion effects on the chlorine behaviour in nuclear graphite: consequences for the disposable of irradiated graphite from UNGG reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudey, C.E.

    2010-10-01

    This work concerns the dismantling of the UNGG reactor which have produced around 23 000 t of graphite wastes that ave to be disposed of according to the French law of June 206. These wastes contain two long-lived radionuclides ( 14 C and 36 Cl) which are the main long term dose contributors. In order to get information about their inventory and their long term behaviour in case of water ingress into the repository, it is necessary to determine their location and speciation in the irradiated graphite after the reactor shutdown. This work concerns the study of 36 Cl. The main objective is to reproduce its behaviour during reactor operation. For that purpose, we have studied the effects of temperature and radiolytic corrosion independently. Our results show a rapid release of around 20% 36 Cl during the first hours of reactor operation whereas a much slower release occurs afterwards. We have put in evidence two types of chlorine corresponding to two different chemical forms (of different thermal stabilities) or to two locations (of different accessibilities). We have also shown that the radiolytic corrosion seems to enhance chlorine release, whatever the irradiation dose. Moreover, the major chemical form of chlorine is inorganic. (author)

  3. Determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Rennan G.O., E-mail: rgoa01@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica Ambiental, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Campus Sao Cristovao, 49.100-000, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Vignola, Fabiola; Castilho, Ivan N.B. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G.; Welz, Bernhard [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Smichowski, Patricia [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-290, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker-Ross, Helmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., Department Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A study has been undertaken to assess the capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using direct solid sampling. The main Hg absorption line at 253.652 nm was used for all determinations. The certified reference material NIST SRM 1648 (Urban Particulate Matter) was used to check the accuracy of the method, and good agreement was obtained between published and determined values. The characteristic mass was 22 pg Hg. The limit of detection (3{sigma}), based on ten atomizations of an unexposed filter, was 40 ng g{sup -1}, corresponding to 0.12 ng m{sup -3} in the air for a typical air volume of 1440 m{sup 3} collected within 24 h. The limit of quantification was 150 ng g{sup -1}, equivalent to 0.41 ng m{sup -3} in the air. The repeatability of measurements was better than 17% RSD (n = 5). Mercury concentrations found in filter samples loaded with APM collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina, were between < 40 ng g{sup -1} and 381 {+-} 24 ng g{sup -1}. These values correspond to a mercury concentration in the air between < 0.12 ng m{sup -3} and 1.47 {+-} 0.09 ng m{sup -3}. The proposed procedure was found to be simple, fast and reliable, and suitable as a screening procedure for the determination of mercury in APM samples.

  4. Hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of methylmercury in human hair and sludge samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hongmei [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu Bin [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)], E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn; Chen Beibei; Zu Wanqing [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2008-07-15

    Two methods, based on hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid (three phase) microextraction (HF-LLLME) and hollow fiber liquid phase (two phase) microextraction (HF-LPME), have been developed and critically compared for the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). In HF-LPME, methylmercury was extracted into the organic phase (toluene) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained as a free species in the sample solution. In HF-LLLME, methylmercury was first extracted into the organic phase (toluene) and then into the acceptor phase (4% thiourea in 1 mol L{sup -1} HCl) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained in the sample solution. The total mercury was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the levels of inorganic mercury in both HF-LLLME and HF-LPME were obtained by subtracting methylmercury from total mercury. The factors affecting the microextraction of methylmercury, including organic solvent, extraction time, stirring rate and ionic strength, were investigated and the optimal extraction conditions were established for both HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME. With a consumption of 3.0 mL of the sample solution, the enrichment factors were 204 and 55 for HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for methylmercury were 0.1 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.4 {mu}g L{sup -1} (as Hg) with precisions (RSDs (%), c = 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} (as Hg), n = 5) of 13% and 11% for HF-LLLPME-GFAAS and HF-LPME-GFAAS, respectively. For ICP-MS determination of total mercury, a limit of detection of 39 ng L{sup -} {sup 1} was obtained. Finally, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was applied to the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge, and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 99-113%. In order to validate the method, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was also applied to the analysis of a certified reference

  5. Effect of carbon black on electrical and rheological properties of graphite nanoplatelets/poly(ethylene-butyl acrylate composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Oxfall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding carbon black on the electrical and rheological properties of graphite nanoplatelets/poly(ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer composites produced via melt or solution mixing was studied. By adding a small amount of low- or high-structured carbon black to the nanocomposite, the electrical percolation threshold decreased and the final conductivity (at higher filler contents increased. The effect on the percolation threshold was significantly stronger in case of the high-structured carbon black where replacing 10 wt% of the total filler content with carbon black instead of graphite nanoplatelets reduced the electrical percolation threshold from 6.9 to 4.6 vol%. Finally, the solution mixing process was found to be more efficient leading to a lower percolation threshold. For the composites containing high-structured carbon black, graphite nanoplatelets and their hybrids there was a quite reasonable correlation between the electrical and rheological percolation thresholds.

  6. Hypolipidemic effect of hemicellulose component of coconut fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhurani, J A; Rajamohan, T

    1998-08-01

    The neutral detergent fiber (NDF) isolated from coconut kernel was digested with cellulase and hemicellulase and the residual fiber rich in hemicellulose (without cellulose) and cellulose (with out hemicellulose) were fed to rats and compared with a fiber free group. The results indicate that hemicellulose rich fiber showed decreased concentration of total cholesterol, LDL + VLDL cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol, while cellulose rich fiber showed no significant alteration. There was increased HMG CoA reductase activity and increased incorporation of labeled acetate into free cholesterol. Rats fed hemicellulose rich coconut fiber produced lower concentration of triglycerides and phospholipids and lower release of lipoproteins into circulation. There was increased concentration of hepatic bile acids and increased excretion of faecal sterols and bile acids. These results indicate that the hemicellulose component of coconut fiber was responsible for the observed hypolipidemic effect.

  7. Effects of graphite surface roughness on bypass flow computations for an HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Yu-Hsin, E-mail: touushin@gmail.com [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, M.S. 3855, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johnson, Richard W., E-mail: Rich.Johnson@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, M.S. 3855, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sato, Hiroyuki, E-mail: sato.hiroyuki09@jaea.go.jp [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, M.S. 3855, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFD calculations are made of bypass flow between graphite blocks in HTGR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several turbulence models are employed to compare to friction and heat transfer correlations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parameters varied include bypass gap width and surface roughness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface roughness causes increases in max fuel and coolant temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface roughness does not cause increase in outlet coolant temperature variation. - Abstract: Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow; it has been suggested that it may be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow [INL Report 2007, INL/EXT-07-13289]. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors for three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U.S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for steady flow in a

  8. Radiation effects on erbium doped optical fibers: on the influence of the fiber composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortech, B.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the erbium-doped fibers (EDF) sensitivity under irradiation and the induced defects. The first chapter presents the state of the art for the EDF under irradiation as well as some radiation generated silica defects. The second chapter details the radiations used in this thesis and the experimental set-ups implemented for the characterization of the fiber responses under irradiation and the radiation induced defects. In the third chapter, we present the response of several erbium-doped fibers irradiated with γ-rays, protons and pulsed X-rays. The erbium doped fibers have higher radiation induced sensitivity than the Telecom fibers (SMF28) or than erbium-doped fibers containing little aluminum. The aluminum presence in the EDF core composition is mainly responsible for the fiber performance degradation. Whatever the irradiation types, the radiation generated defects are related to the host matrix. Our studies also display that the erbium ions are only affected by the interaction with the created defects. The fourth chapter deals with the EDF under UV exposure and shows that the UV rays lead to the same effects than the gamma rays. The last chapter of this thesis presents the study of optical fiber amplifiers under γ irradiation. (author)

  9. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  10. The effect of fiber treatment on abrasive wear properties of palm fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Muhammad Firdaus Abdul; Bakar, Mimi Azlina Abu; Kasolang, Salmiah; Ahmad, Mohamad Ali

    2017-12-01

    Oil palm industries generate at least 30 million tons of lignocellulosic biomass annually in the form of oil palm trunks (OPT), empty fruit bunches (EFB), oil palm fronds (OPF) and palm pressed fibres (PPF). The palm fiber is one of the natural fibers used as reinforcement in composite materials in order to decrease environmental issues and promotes utilization of renewable resources. This paper presents a study on the effect of alkaline treatment on wear properties of palm fiber reinforced epoxy resin composite. Abrasive wear testing was deployed to investigate the wear profile of the composite surfaces. Testing was carried out which focused on the effect of alkaline treatment to the palm fiber under different amounts of fiber loading i.e. 1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt% and 7 wt%. The palm fibers were soaked into 6 % of alkaline solution or natrium hydroxide (NaOH) for 12 hours. The fiber was treated in order to remove amorphous materials such as hemicelluloses, lignins and pectins of the fiber. The wear test samples were fabricated using hand lay-up technique and cured at room temperature for 24 hours. Surface roughness of the composite material was also measured using the surface measuring instrument. Dry sliding wear test was performed at room temperature at a constant velocity of 1.4 m/s with a constant load of 10 N by using the Abrasion Test Machine. Result shows that 5 wt% and 7 wt% treated palm fiber loadings have better specific wear rate compared to lower fiber loadings. The finding of this study contributes towards material development and utilization in promoting `waste into wealth' which is in line with national aspiration.

  11. Ab initio study of the effects of thin CsI coatings on the work function of graphite cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Vasilios; Booske, John H.; Morgan, Dane

    2007-10-01

    Cesium-iodide (CsI)-coated graphite cathodes are promising electron sources for high power microwave generators, but the mechanism driving the improved emission is not well understood. Therefore, an ab initio modeling investigation on the effects of thin CsI coatings on graphite has been carried out. It is demonstrated that the CsI coatings reduce the work function of the system significantly through a mechanism of induced dipoles. The results suggest that work function modification is a major contribution to the improved emission seen when CsI coatings are applied to C.

  12. Measurement and investigation of effects of coal tar pitch fractions in nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatemi, K.; Fatoorehchian, S.; Ahari Hashemi, F.; Ahmadi, Sh.

    2003-01-01

    Coal tar pitch has a complex chemical structure. Determination of α, β, γ fractions, is one of the methods to get information about its properties. In graphite fabrication it plays a role as a binder for coke particles. During the thermal treatment it carbonizes and changes to a secondary coke. This has considerable affects on the graphite properties. In this paper, determination of α, β, γ-1 fraction in three different types of pitches have been carried out. Graphite specimens have been fabricated by using these pitches and anisotropy coke in laboratory scale. The graphite properties have been compared with the nuclear graphite prototype. The comparison of the results showed that the density and compression strength are appreciable while the anisotropy factor of properties is about one. The linear thermal expansion in graphite from Iranian pitch had a better, result, where it stands in the nuclear range of usage. As a result, our studies showed that the graphite properties are affected by properties of pitch fractions, where it can be used as a proper sample for the graphite fabrication

  13. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: → Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. → The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. → A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. → The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  14. Characterization of the Intrinsic Water Wettability of Graphite Using Contact Angle Measurements: Effect of Defects on Static and Dynamic Contact Angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozbial, Andrew; Trouba, Charlie; Liu, Haitao; Li, Lei

    2017-01-31

    Elucidating the intrinsic water wettability of the graphitic surface has increasingly attracted research interests, triggered by the recent finding that the well-established hydrophobicity of graphitic surfaces actually results from airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Currently, static water contact angle (WCA) is often used to characterize the intrinsic water wettability of graphitic surfaces. In the current paper, we show that because of the existence of defects, static WCA does not necessarily characterize the intrinsic water wettability. Freshly exfoliated graphite of varying qualities, characterized using atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, was studied using static, advancing, and receding WCA measurements. The results showed that graphite of different qualities (i.e., defect density) always has a similar advancing WCA, but it could have very different static and receding WCAs. This finding indicates that defects play an important role in contact angle measurements, and the static contact angle does not always represent the intrinsic water wettability of pristine graphite. On the basis of the experimental results, a qualitative model is proposed to explain the effect of defects on static, advancing, and receding contact angles. The model suggests that the advancing WCA reflects the intrinsic water wettability of pristine (defect-free) graphite. Our results showed that the advancing WCA for pristine graphite is 68.6°, which indicates that graphitic carbon is intrinsically mildly hydrophilic.

  15. The effect of graphite precipitates in Ni3Al/C composite on tribological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study shows the results of investigations of the tribological properties of cast Ni3Al/C composite and compares them with the properties of pure intermetallic phases of the Ni3Al type. An inspiration to these studies was a surprising similarity observed between the microstructure of iron-carbon alloys, and specifically of different cast iron grades, and the microstructure of, absolutely different in terms of the chemical composition, nickel-aluminium alloy. Because of carbon present in the alloy, an attempt was made to determine what effect the presence of graphite (acting as a lubricant might have on the abrasive wear behaviour of alloy during lubricated friction test. Tests were made on a Miller apparatus, used for active testing of the abrasive wear resistance. The specimen loss of mass was determined in function of time.

  16. Effect of heat treatment on CO2 adsorption of KOH-activated graphite nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Long-Yue; Park, Soo-Jin

    2010-12-15

    In this work, graphite nanofibers (GNFs) were successfully expanded intercalating KOH followed by heat treatment in the temperature range of 700-1000 °C. The aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the GNFs by increasing the porosity of GNFs. The effects of heat treatment on the pore structures of GNFs were investigated by N(2) full isotherms, XRD, SEM, and TEM. The CO(2) adsorption capacity was measured by CO(2) isothermal adsorption at 25 °C and 1 atm. From the results, it was found that the activation temperature had a major influence on CO(2) adsorption capacity and textural properties of GNFs. The specific surface area, total pore volume, and mesopore volume of the GNFs increased after heat treatment. The CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that G-900 exhibited the best CO(2) adsorption capacity with 59.2 mg/g. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of plasma treatments to graphite nanofibers supports on electrochemical behaviors of metal catalyst electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hochun; Jung, Yongju; Kim, Seok

    2012-02-01

    In the present work, we had studied the graphite nanofibers as catalyst supports after a plasma treatment for studying the effect of surface modification. By controlling the plasma intensity, a surface functional group concentration was changed. The nanoparticle size, loading efficiency, and catalytic activity were studied, after Pt-Ru deposition by a chemical reduction. Pt-Ru catalysts deposited on the plasma-treated GNFs showed the smaller size, 3.58 nm than the pristine GNFs. The catalyst loading contents were enhanced with plasma power and duration time increase, meaning an enhanced catalyst deposition efficiency. Accordingly, cyclic voltammetry result showed that the specific current density was increased proportionally till 200 W and then the value was decreased. Enhanced activity of 40 (mA mg(-1)-catalyst) was accomplished at 200 W and 180 sec duration time. Consequently, it was found that the improved electroactivity was originated from the change of size or morphology of catalysts by controlling the plasma intensity.

  18. Effect of airborne contaminants on the wettability of supported graphene and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiting; Wang, Yongjin; Kozbial, Andrew; Shenoy, Ganesh; Zhou, Feng; McGinley, Rebecca; Ireland, Patrick; Morganstein, Brittni; Kunkel, Alyssa; Surwade, Sumedh P.; Li, Lei; Liu, Haitao

    2013-10-01

    It is generally accepted that supported graphene is hydrophobic and that its water contact angle is similar to that of graphite. Here, we show that the water contact angles of freshly prepared supported graphene and graphite surfaces increase when they are exposed to ambient air. By using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we demonstrate that airborne hydrocarbons adsorb on graphitic surfaces, and that a concurrent decrease in the water contact angle occurs when these contaminants are partially removed by both thermal annealing and controlled ultraviolet-O3 treatment. Our findings indicate that graphitic surfaces are more hydrophilic than previously believed, and suggest that previously reported data on the wettability of graphitic surfaces may have been affected by unintentional hydrocarbon contamination from ambient air.

  19. Solvents effects on electrochemical characteristics of graphite fluoride-lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobuatsu, W.; Hidekazu, T.; Rika, H.; Tsuyoshi, N.

    1982-11-01

    A study was made of the electrochemical characteristics of graphite fluoride-lithium batteries in various non-aqueous solvents. Two types of graphite fluorides (C/sub 2/F) /SUB n/ and (CF) /SUB n/ were used as cathode materials. The discharge characteristics of graphite fluorides were better in dimethylsulfoxide, ..gamma..-butyrolactone, propylene carbonate and sulfolane in that order. The relation between electrod potential of graphite fluoride and solvation energy of lithium ion with each solvent indicates that solvated lithium ion is intercalated into graphite fluoride layers by the electrode reaction. Both the difference in the overpotentials and in the rates of OCV recovery among these solvents further supports the proposed reaction mechanism.

  20. Effect of airborne contaminants on the wettability of supported graphene and graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiting; Wang, Yongjin; Kozbial, Andrew; Shenoy, Ganesh; Zhou, Feng; McGinley, Rebecca; Ireland, Patrick; Morganstein, Brittni; Kunkel, Alyssa; Surwade, Sumedh P; Li, Lei; Liu, Haitao

    2013-10-01

    It is generally accepted that supported graphene is hydrophobic and that its water contact angle is similar to that of graphite. Here, we show that the water contact angles of freshly prepared supported graphene and graphite surfaces increase when they are exposed to ambient air. By using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we demonstrate that airborne hydrocarbons adsorb on graphitic surfaces, and that a concurrent decrease in the water contact angle occurs when these contaminants are partially removed by both thermal annealing and controlled ultraviolet-O3 treatment. Our findings indicate that graphitic surfaces are more hydrophilic than previously believed, and suggest that previously reported data on the wettability of graphitic surfaces may have been affected by unintentional hydrocarbon contamination from ambient air.

  1. The effect of gamma ray irradiation on PAN-based intermediate modulus carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Feng, Yi; Qian, Gang; Zhang, Jingcheng; Zhuang, Zhong; Wang, Xianping

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were conducted on PAN-based intermediate modulus carbon fibers to investigate the structure and surface hydrophilicity of the carbon fibers before and after gamma irradiation. Two methods were used to determine Young’s modulus of the carbon fibers. The results show that gamma ray irradiation improved the degree of graphitization and introduced compressive stress into carbon fiber surface. Gamma ray also improved the carbon fiber surface hydrophilicity through increasing the value of O/C and enhancing the quantity of oxygen functional groups on carbon fibers. No distinct morphology change was observed after gamma ray irradiation. The Young’s modulus of the fibers increased with increasing irradiation dose

  2. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  3. The Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechanical Properties of Cast Irons and ADI with Various Carbon Equivalent and Graphite Morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Gi; Lee, Kyung Sub

    1989-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of cast irons, flake, CV graphite cast iron ductile iron and ADI have been investigated. The effects of various carbon equivalent, graphite morphology and matrix have been analyzed to determine the predominant factor which influences on the hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of various carbon equivalent on the embrittlement was little in the similar graphite morphology. The embrittlement of ferrite matrix changed by heat treatment was less than that of pearlite matrix. In the case of ADI, the tendency of hydrogen embrittlement of lower bainite matrix was less remarkable than that of upper banite matrix. As the result of hydrogen charging, the tendency of interface decohesion between matrix-graphite was increased in flake G.C.I., and the trend from ductile fracture mode to brittle fracture mode was observed in CV G.C.I and ductile iron. Lower bainite in ADI showed the ductile fracture mode. Hydrogen solubility of lower bainite was higher than that of upper bainite

  4. Ion irradiation of {sup 37}Cl implanted nuclear graphite: Effect of the energy deposition on the chlorine behavior and consequences for the mobility of {sup 36}Cl in irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Moncoffre, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Sainsot, P. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, LaMCoS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5259 (France); Rouzaud, J.-N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS), Paris, UMR CNRS-ENS 8538 (France)

    2015-09-15

    Graphite is used in many types of nuclear reactors due to its ability to slow down fast neutrons without capturing them. Whatever the reactor design, the irradiated graphite waste management has to be faced sooner or later regarding the production of long lived or dose determining radioactive species such as {sup 14}C, {sup 3}H or {sup 36}Cl. The first carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors resulted in a huge quantity of irradiated graphite waste for which the management needs a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide’s location and speciation. As the detection limits of usual spectroscopic methods are generally not adequate to detect the low concentration levels (<1 ppm) of the radionuclides, we used an indirect approach based on the implantation of {sup 37}Cl, to simulate the presence of {sup 36}Cl. Our previous studies show that temperature is one of the main factors to be considered regarding the structural evolution of nuclear graphite and chlorine mobility during reactor operation. However, thermal release of chlorine cannot be solely responsible for the depletion of the {sup 36}Cl inventory. We propose in this paper to study the impact of irradiation and its synergetic effects with temperature on chlorine release. Indeed, the collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic collisions. However, a small part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the lattice through electronic excitation. This paper aims at elucidating the effects of the different irradiation regimes (ballistic and electronic) using ion irradiation, on the mobility of implanted {sup 37}Cl, taking into account the initial disorder level of the nuclear graphite.

  5. Effect of biomass concentration on methane oxidation activity using mature compost and graphite granules as substrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, S; O'Dwyer, T; Freguia, S; Pikaar, I; Clarke, W P

    2016-10-01

    Reported methane oxidation activity (MOA) varies widely for common landfill cover materials. Variation is expected due to differences in surface area, the composition of the substratum and culturing conditions. MOA per methanotrophic cell has been calculated in the study of natural systems such as lake sediments to examine the inherent conditions for methanotrophic activity. In this study, biomass normalised MOA (i.e., MOA per methanotophic cell) was measured on stabilised compost, a commonly used cover in landfills, and on graphite granules, an inert substratum widely used in microbial electrosynthesis studies. After initially enriching methanotrophs on both substrata, biomass normalised MOA was quantified under excess oxygen and limiting methane conditions in 160ml serum vials on both substrata and blends of the substrata. Biomass concentration was measured using the bicinchoninic acid assay for microbial protein. The biomass normalised MOA was consistent across all compost-to-graphite granules blends, but varied with time, reflecting the growth phase of the microorganisms. The biomass normalised MOA ranged from 0.069±0.006μmol CH4/mg dry biomass/h during active growth, to 0.024±0.001μmol CH4/mg dry biomass/h for established biofilms regardless of the substrata employed, indicating the substrata were equally effective in terms of inherent composition. The correlation of MOA with biomass is consistent with studies on methanotrophic activity in natural systems, but biomass normalised MOA varies by over 5 orders of magnitude between studies. This is partially due to different methods being used to quantify biomass, such as pmoA gene quantification and the culture dependent Most Probable Number method, but also indicates that long term exposure of materials to a supply of methane in an aerobic environment, as can occur in natural systems, leads to the enrichment and adaptation of types suitable for those conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Effect of friction on oxidative graphite intercalation and high-quality graphene formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Steffen; Halbig, Christian E; Grote, Fabian; Rietsch, Philipp; Börrnert, Felix; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Bernd; Eigler, Siegfried

    2018-02-26

    Oxidative wet-chemical delamination of graphene from graphite is expected to become a scalable production method. However, the formation process of the intermediate stage-1 graphite sulfate by sulfuric acid intercalation and its subsequent oxidation are poorly understood and lattice defect formation must be avoided. Here, we demonstrate film formation of micrometer-sized graphene flakes with lattice defects down to 0.02% and visualize the carbon lattice by transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution. Interestingly, we find that only well-ordered, highly crystalline graphite delaminates into oxo-functionalized graphene, whereas other graphite grades do not form a proper stage-1 intercalate and revert back to graphite upon hydrolysis. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that ideal stacking and electronic oxidation of the graphite layers significantly reduce the friction of the moving sulfuric acid molecules, thereby facilitating intercalation. Furthermore, the evaluation of the stability of oxo-species in graphite sulfate supports an oxidation mechanism that obviates intercalation of the oxidant.

  7. Effects of graphite nanoparticles on nitrification in an activated sludge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Liu, Yanchen; Shi, Hanchang; Huang, Xia

    2017-09-01

    Graphite nanoparticles (GNPs) might result in unexpected effects during their transportation and transformation in wastewater treatment systems, including strong thermo-catalytic and catalytic effects and microbial cytotoxicity. In particular, the effects of GNPs on the nitrification process in activated sludge systems should be addressed. This study aimed to estimate the influence of GNPs on the nitrification process in a short-term nitrification reactor with exposure to different light sources. The results indicated that GNPs could only improve the efficiency of photothermal transformation slightly in the activated sludge system because of its photothermal effects under the standard illuminant (imitating 1 × sun). However, even with better photothermal effects, the nitrification efficiency still decreased significantly with GNP dosing under the standard illuminant, which might result from stronger cytotoxic effects of GNPs on the nitrifying bacteria. The disappearance of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) around bacterial cells was observed, and the total quantity of viable bacteria decreased significantly after GNP exposuring. Variation in bacterial groups primarily occurred in nitrifying microbial communities, including Nitrosomonas sp., Nitrosospira sp., Comamonas sp. and Bradyrhizobiace sp. Nitrifiers significantly decreased, while the phyla Gammaproteobacteria, Deinocccus, and Bacteroidetes exhibited greater stability during GNP treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    , and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties...... such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate......), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts...

  9. Effect of iron and chromium on the graphitization behaviour of sulfur-containing carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyumentsev, V.A.; Belenkov, E.A.; Saunina, S.I.; Podkopaev, S.A.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    Process of transition of carbonaceous material, containing structurally incorporated sulfur, into graphite and impact of iron and chromium additions are studied. It is established that carbonaceous material, containing more than 1.5 mass % S and also 1.5 mass % Cr 2 O 3 is heterogeneous after thermal treatment at 1300-1600 deg C. It consists of large and sufficiency complete areas of coherent scattering having graphite structure and ultra-dispersed matrix. The number of graphite crystals formed in the presence of dispersed iron within this temperature range, decreases by two times [ru

  10. The effect of iron catalyzed graphitization on the textural properties of carbonized cellulose : Magnetically separable graphitic carbon bodies for catalysis and remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Beale, Andrew M.; Soulimani, Fouad; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Van De Kleut, Dirk; Koelewijn, Jacobus M.; Geus, John W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas pyrolysis of pristine microcrystalline cellulose spheres yields nonporous amorphous carbon bodies, pyrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose spheres loaded with iron salts leads to the formation of magnetically separable mesoporous graphitic carbon bodies. The microcrystalline cellulose

  11. Effect of dielectric fluid with surfactant and graphite powder on Electrical Discharge Machining of titanium alloy using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murahari Kolli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Taguchi method was employed to optimize the surfactant and graphite powder concentration in dielectric fluid for the machining of Ti-6Al-4V using Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM. The process parameters such as discharge current, surfactant concentration and powder concentration were changed to explore their effects on Material Removal Rate (MRR, Surface Roughness (SR, Tool wear rate (TWR and Recast Layer Thickness (RLT. Detailed analysis of structural features of machined surface was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM to observe the influence of surfactant and graphite powder on the machining process. It was observed from the experimental results that the graphite powder and surfactant added dielectric fluid significantly improved the MRR, reduces the SR, TWR and RLT at various conditions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and F-test of experimental data values related to the important process parameters of EDM revealed that discharge current and surfactant concentration has more percentage of contribution on the MRR and TWR whereas the SR, and RLT were found to be affected greatly by the discharge current and graphite powder concentration.

  12. The Effect of Novolac and Graphite Polycrystal on the Acetone Penetration and Thermal Resistance of Nanocomposites Based on Nitrile Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Mahboudi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Developments of high diffusive environments in coincidence with emerging fluids with strong ability to destroy polymeric systems have resulted in rapid deformation and destruction of polymeric parts when in contact with such aggressive environments. Therefore, nowadays, there is a great need to develop highly resistant materials towards aggressive chemicals and harsh conditions. In this paper the effect of graphite polycrystal powders and novolac type phenolic resin has been experimentally studied towards acetone diffusion and thermal stability of polyacrylonitrile butadiene rubber/novolac/graphite polycrystal nanocomposites. The results obtained from dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA and swelling in acetone showed that after 32 h samples reached to 94.2% of final swelling state. By using Avrami equation and swelling experimental data, the functionality of Ln(m/m0 to novolac and graphite polycrystal weight fraction and test duration time were evaluated. This theoretical equation evaluated and predicted the amount of Ln(m/m0 with 5.92% error after 32 h. Increases in graphite polycrystal content were followed by decreases in diffusion of acetone and modulus, before glass transition temperature, and increased thermal stability and thermal resistance of the nanocomposites. Increases in novolac content by 35 wt%, decreased glass transition temperature, thermal stability and thermal resistance of the nanocomposites. In nanocomposite, containing 45 wt% of novolac, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA data and scanning electron microscope (SEM images showed phase separation of thermoset and elastomer in the nanocomposite blend.

  13. An Investigation of the Effect of Graphite Degradation on the Irreversible Capacity in Lithium-ion Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Hardwick, Laurence J.; Marcinek, Marek; Beer, Leanne; Kerr, John B.; Kostecki, Robert

    2008-03-03

    The effect of surface structural damage on graphitic anodes, commonly observed in tested Li-ion cells, was investigated. Similar surface structural disorder was artificially induced in Mag-10 synthetic graphite anodes using argon-ion sputtering. Raman microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) measurements confirmed that Ar-ion sputtered Mag-10 electrodes display similar degree of surface degradation as the anodes from tested Li-ion cells. Artificially modified Mag-10 anodes showed double the irreversible charge capacity during the first formation cycle, compared to fresh un-altered anodes. Impedance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on surface modified graphite anodes indicated the formation of a thicker and slightly more resistive SEI layer. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis of solvent extracts from the electrodes detected the presence of new compounds with M{sub w} on the order of 1600 g mol{sup -1} for the surface modified electrode with no evidence of elevated M{sub w} species for the unmodified electrode. The structural disorder induced in the graphite during long-term cycling maybe responsible for the slow and continuous SEI layer reformation, and consequently, the loss of reversible capacity due to the shift of lithium inventory in cycled Li-ion cells.

  14. Simultaneous quantification of arginine, alanine, methionine and cysteine amino acids in supplements using a novel bioelectro-nanosensor based on CdSe quantum dot/modified carbon nanotube hollow fiber pencil graphite electrode via Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Sara; Es'haghi, Zarrin

    2017-11-30

    A number of four amino acids have been simultaneously determined at CdSe quantum dot-modified/multi-walled carbon nanotube hollow fiber pencil graphite electrode in different bodybuilding supplements. CdSe quantum dots were synthesized and applied to construct a modified carbon nanotube hollow fiber pencil graphite electrode. FT-IR, TEM, XRD and EDAX methods were applied for characterization of the synthesized CdSe QDs. The electro-oxidation of arginine (Arg), alanine (Ala), methionine (Met) and cysteine (Cys) at the surface of the modified electrode was studied. Then the Taguchi's method was applied using MINITAB 17 software to find out the optimum conditions for the amino acids determination. Under the optimized conditions, the differential pulse (DP) voltammetric peak currents of Arg, Ala, Met and Cys increased linearly with their concentrations in the ranges of 0.287-33670μM and detection limits of 0.081, 0.158, 0.094 and 0.116μM were obtained for them, respectively. Satisfactory results were achieved for calibration and validation sets. The prepared modified electrode represents a very good resolution between the voltammetric peaks of the four amino acids which makes it suitable for the detection of each in presence of others in real samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Some physical methods for study of irradiation effects in graphite; Quelques procedes physiques pour etudier les effets de l'irradiation du graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, G; Lecomte, M; Mattmuller, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    A calibration method for a classical apparatus for differential thermal analysis is described in detail. This method achieves a relative precision of 5 per cent in the measurement of the internal energy release accompanying the annealing of irradiated graphites. Elastic constants of graphites are obtained from the frequencies of the longitudinal modes of vibration; procedures for excitation and detection of these vibrations at any temperature between -190 deg. C and +1500 deg. C are described. A procedure for obtaining easily measured deformations of graphites after relatively little irradiation with thermal neutrons is discussed. An application of this method to the study of the thermal annealing of elongation caused by displaced atoms is indicated. (author) [French] On decrit en detail une methode d'etalonnage pour un appareil classique d'analyse thermique differentielle. Cette methode permet de mesurer avec une precision relative de 5% la liberation d'energie interne qui accompagne le 'recuit' des graphites irradies. On deduit les constantes elastiques des graphites des frequences des vibrations longitudinales et on decrit les procedes pour exciter et detecter ces vibrations a toutes les temperatures comprises entre -190 deg. C et + 1500 deg. C. On discute un procede pour obtenir une des deformations de graphites facilement mesurables apres une irradiation relativement faible a l'aide de neutrons thermiques. Une application de cette methode a l'etude du 'recuit' thermique de l'elongation causee par les atomes deplaces est indiquee. (auteur)

  16. Elastic representation surfaces of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriz, R.D.; Ledbetter, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites exhibit high elastic anisotropy and unusual geometrical features in their elastic-property polar diagrams. From the five-component transverse-isotropic elastic-stiffness tensor we compute and display representation surfaces for Young's modulus, torsional modulus, linear compressibility, and Poisson's ratios. Based on Christoffel-equation solutions, we describe some unusual elastic-wave-surface topological features. Musgrave considered in detail the differences between phase-velocity and group-velocity surfaces arising from high elastic anisotropy. For these composites, we find effects similar to, but more dramatic than, Musgrave's. Some new, unexpected results for graphite/epoxy include: a shear-wave velocity that exceeds a longitudinal velocity in the plane transverse to the fiber; a wave that changes polarization character from longitudinal to transverse as the propagation direction sweeps from the fiber axis to the perpendicular axis

  17. Effect of different fibers on mechanical properties and ductility of alkali-activated slag cementitious material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Zheng, W. Z.; Qin, C. Z.; Xu, Z. Z.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of different fibers on mechanical properties and ductility of alkali-activated slag cementitious material (AASCM) is studied. The research contents include: fiber type (plant fiber, polypropylene fiber), fiber content, mechanical property index, tensile stress-strain relationship curve, treating time. The test results showed that the compressive strength of two fibers reinforced AASCM was about 90 ~ 110MPa, and the tensile strength was about 3 ~ 5MPa. The reinforcement effect of polypropylene fiber is superior to that of plant fiber, and the mechanical properties of polypropylene fiber reinforced AASCM are superior to those of plant fiber, According to the comparison of SEM pictures, the plant fiber and polypropylene fiber are both closely bound with the matrix, and the transition zones are complete and close. Thus, it is proved that plant fiber and polypropylene fiber delay the crack extension and enhance the ductility of AASCM.

  18. PLASTIC SHRINKAGE CONTROLLING EFFECT BY POLYPROPYLENE SHORT FIBER WITH HYDROPHILY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Akira; Sadatsuki, Yoshitomo; Oshima, Akihiro; Ishii, Akina; Tsubaki, Tatsuya

    The aim of this research is to clarify the mechanism of controlling plastic shrinkage crack by adding small amout of synthetic short fiber, and to propose optimum polypropylene short fiber to control plastic shrinkage crack. In this research, the effect of the hydrophily of polypropylene fiber was investigated in the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar, total area of plastic shrinkage crack, and bond properties between fiber and mortar. The plastic shrinkage test of morar was conducted under high temperature, low relative humidity, and constant wind velocity. When polypropylene fiber had hydrophily, the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained, which was because cement paste in morar was captured by hydrophilic fiber and then bleeding of mortar was restrained. With hydrophily, plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained and bridging effect was improved due to better bond, which led to remarkable reduction of plastic shrinkage crack. Based on experimental results, the way of developing optimum polypropylene short fiber for actual construction was proposed. The fiber should have large hydrophily and small diameter, and should be used in as small amount as possible in order not to disturb workability of concrete.

  19. Pressure effects on the thermal stability of silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Commercially available polymer derived SiC fibers were treated at temperatures from 1000 to 2200 C in vacuum and argon gas pressure of 1 and 1360 atm. Effects of gas pressure on the thermal stability of the fibers were determined through property comparison between the pressure treated fibers and vacuum treated fibers. Investigation of the thermal stability included studies of the fiber microstructure, weight loss, grain growth, and tensile strength. The 1360 atm argon gas treatment was found to shift the onset of fiber weight loss from 1200 to above 1500 C. Grain growth and tensile strength degradation were correlated with weight loss and were thus also inhibited by high pressure treatments. Additional heat treatment in 1 atm argon of the fibers initially treated at 1360 atm argon caused further weight loss and tensile strength degradation, thus indicating that high pressure inert gas conditions would be effective only in delaying fiber strength degradation. However, if the high gas pressure could be maintained throughout composite fabrication, then the composites could be processed at higher temperatures.

  20. Effects of Dietary Fiber and Its Components on Metabolic Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Haub

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fiber and whole grains contain a unique blend of bioactive components including resistant starches, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. As a result, research regarding their potential health benefits has received considerable attention in the last several decades. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrate that intake of dietary fiber and whole grain is inversely related to obesity, type two diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Defining dietary fiber is a divergent process and is dependent on both nutrition and analytical concepts. The most common and accepted definition is based on nutritional physiology. Generally speaking, dietary fiber is the edible parts of plants, or similar carbohydrates, that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the small intestine. Dietary fiber can be separated into many different fractions. Recent research has begun to isolate these components and determine if increasing their levels in a diet is beneficial to human health. These fractions include arabinoxylan, inulin, pectin, bran, cellulose, β-glucan and resistant starch. The study of these components may give us a better understanding of how and why dietary fiber may decrease the risk for certain diseases. The mechanisms behind the reported effects of dietary fiber on metabolic health are not well established. It is speculated to be a result of changes in intestinal viscosity, nutrient absorption, rate of passage, production of short chain fatty acids and production of gut hormones. Given the inconsistencies reported between studies this review will examine the most up to date data concerning dietary fiber and its effects on metabolic health.

  1. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  2. Structural superlubricity of platinum on graphite under ambient conditions: The effects of chemistry and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özoǧul, Alper; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2017-11-01

    An investigation of the frictional behavior of platinum nanoparticles laterally manipulated on graphite has been conducted to answer the question of whether the recent observation of structural superlubricity under ambient conditions [E. Cihan, S. İpek, E. Durgun, and M. Z. Baykara, Nat. Commun. 7, 12055 (2016)] is exclusively limited to the gold-graphite interface. Platinum nanoparticles have been prepared by e-beam evaporation of a thin film of platinum on graphite, followed by post-deposition annealing. Morphological and structural characterization of the nanoparticles has been performed via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, revealing a crystalline structure with no evidence of oxidation under ambient conditions. Lateral manipulation experiments have been performed via atomic force microscopy under ambient conditions, whereby results indicate the occurrence of structural superlubricity at mesoscopic interfaces of 4000-75 000 nm2, with a noticeably higher magnitude of friction forces when compared with gold nanoparticles of similar contact areas situated on graphite. Ab initio simulations of sliding involving platinum and gold slabs on graphite confirm the experimental observations, whereby the higher magnitude of friction forces is attributed to stronger energy barriers encountered by platinum atoms sliding on graphite, when compared with gold. On the other hand, as predicted by theory, the scaling power between friction force and contact size is found to be independent of the chemical identity of the sliding atoms, but to be determined by the geometric qualities of the interface, as characterized by an average "sharpness score" assigned to the nanoparticles.

  3. Effect of graphite particle size and content on the formation mechanism of detonation polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Y.; Cao, Y.; Liu, R.; Shang, S. Y.; Huang, F. L.

    2018-03-01

    The formation mechanism of detonation polycrystalline diamond (DPD) generated from the detonation of a mixed RDX/graphite explosive is investigated. It is found experimentally that the DPD conversion rate decreases with both the content and the particle size of the graphite. Moreover, the particle sizes of the generated DPD powder are analyzed, which shows that, with the decrease in the graphite particle size, the mean number diameter of DPD decreases, but the mean volume diameter increases. In addition, with the help of scanning electron microscopy, it is observed that the in situ phase change occurs in the graphite particles, by which the small particles combine to form numerous large DPD particles. Based on both the experimental data and the classical ZND detonation model, we divide such a DPD synthesis process into two stages: In the first stage, the in situ phase change from graphite to diamond is dominant, supplemented by some coalescence growth at high pressure and temperature, which is affected mainly by the detonation performance of the mixed explosive under consideration. In the second stage, the graphitization of DPD caused by the residual heat is dominant, which is affected mainly by the unloading rate of the particle temperature.

  4. Diffusion of oxygen in nitrogen in the pores of graphite. Preliminary results on the effect of oxidation on diffusivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, G. F.; Sharratt, E. W.

    1962-10-15

    Preliminary results are reported from an experimental study of the effect of burnoff on the diffusivity of oxygen in nitrogen within the pores of graphite. It is found that the ratio of effective diffusivity to ''free gas'' diffusivity changes about four-fold in the range 0-9% total oxidation. The viscous permeability, B0, increases in almost the same proportion over the same range.

  5. Effect of different fibers on dough properties and biscuit quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Canalis, María S; Steffolani, María E; León, Alberto E; Ribotta, Pablo D

    2017-03-01

    This study forms part of a broader project aimed at understanding the role of fibers from different sources in high-fat, high-sugar biscuits and at selecting the best fibers for biscuit quality. The main purpose of this work was to understand the rheological and structural properties involved in fiber-enriched biscuit dough. High-amylose corn starch (RSII), chemically modified starch (RSIV), oat fiber (OF) and inulin (IN) were used at two different levels of incorporation (6 and 12 g) in dough formulation. The influence of fiber on the properties of biscuit dough was studied via dynamic rheological tests, confocal microscopy and spreading behavior. Biscuit quality was assessed by width/thickness factor, texture and surface characteristics, total dietary fiber and sensory evaluation. Main results indicated that IN incorporation increased the capacity of dough spreading during baking and thus improved biscuit quality. OF reduced dough spreading during baking and strongly increased its resistance to deformation. RSII and RSIV slightly affected the quality of the biscuits. Sensory evaluation revealed that the panel liked IN-incorporated biscuits as much as control biscuits. The increase in total dietary fiber modified dough behavior and biscuit properties, and the extent of these effects depended on the type of fiber incorporated. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Effects of Propylene Carbonate Content in CsPF 6 -Containing Electrolytes on the Enhanced Performances of Graphite Electrode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Cao, Ruiguo; Xiang, Hongfa [School of; Engelhard, Mark H.; Polzin, Bryant J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Wang, Chongmin; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Xu, Wu

    2016-02-15

    The effects Of propylene carbonate (PC) content in CsPF6-containing electrolytes on the performances of graphite electrode in lithium half cells and in graphite parallel to LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) full cells are investigated. It is found that the performance of graphite electrode is significantly-affected by PC content in the CsPF6-containing electrolytes. An optimal PC content of 20% by weight in the solvent mixtures is identified. The enhanced electrochemical performance of graphite electrode can be attributed to the synergistic effects of the PC solvent and the Cs+ additive. The synergistic effects of Cs+ additive and appropriate amount of PC enable the formation of a robust, ultrathin, and compact solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer on the surface of graphite electrode, which is only permeable for desolvated Li+ ions and allows fast Li+ ion transport through it. Therefore, this SEI layer effectively suppresses the PC cointercalation and largely alleviates the Li dendrite formation on graphite electrode during lithiation even at relatively high current densities. The presence of low-melting-point PC solvent improves the sustainable operation of graphite parallel to NCA full cells under a wide temperature range. The fundamental findings also shed light On the importance of manipulating/maintaining the electrode/electrolyte interphasial stability in various energy-storage devices.

  7. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  8. An experimental and theoretical approach on the effect of presence of oxygen in milled graphite as lithium storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robledo, C.B.; Thomas, J.E.; Luque, G.; Leiva, E.P.M.; Cámara, O.; Barraco, D.; Visintin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of milling time on the morphology of graphite is characterized by XRD, SEM, BET, FTIR and XPS and the electrochemical response of the resulting materials upon lithium-ion absorption is analyzed using different techniques. As milling time is increased, the particle size diminishes and the amount of oxygen content increases. Concomitantly, the capacity for lithium adsorption also increases because new adsorption sites become available due to more surface area and oxygen functional groups. These effects are interpreted using first-principles calculations, which show that the presence of oxygenated species promotes lithium adsorption at higher potentials. This capacity increase is probably not relevant for lithium-ion batteries since there is no intercalation process but rather an adsorption one, but may be of interest for supercapacitive applications. Diffusion coefficients of lithium for different graphite particle sizes are evaluated. The effects of diffusion, particle size and oxygen content are discussed

  9. Effect of fiber loading on mechanical and morphological properties of cocoa pod husk fibers reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shekeil, Y.A.; Sapuan, S.M.; Algrafi, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Increase in fiber loading increased tensile strength and modulus of the composites. • Tensile strain was decreasing with increase in fiber loading. • Flexural strength and modulus increased with increase in fiber content. • Impact strength was deteriorated with increasing fiber loading. • Morphology observations shown a good adhesion between fibers and matrix. - Abstract: In this study, cocoa (Theobroma cacao) pod husk (CPH) fiber reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) was prepared by melt compounding method using Haake Polydrive R600 internal mixer. The composites were prepared with different fiber loading: 20%, 30% and 40% (by weight), with the optimum processing parameters: 190 °C, 11 min, and 40 rpm for temperature, time and speed, respectively. Five samples were cut from the composite sheet. Mean value was taken for each composite according to ASTM standards. Effect of fiber loading on mechanical (i.e. tensile, flexural properties and impact strength) and morphological properties was studied. TPU/CPH composites showed increase in tensile strength and modulus with increase in fiber loading, while tensile strain was decreasing with increase in fiber loading. The composite also showed increase in flexural strength and modulus with increase in fiber content. Impact strength was deteriorated with increase in fiber loading. Morphology observations using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) showed fiber/matrix good adhesion

  10. Confinement effects of shock waves on laser-induced plasma from a graphite target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Feiling; Liang, Peipei; Yang, Xu; Cai, Hua; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian, E-mail: jsun@fudan.edu.cn [Shanghai Ultra-Precision Optical Manufacturing Engineering Center, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The spatial confinement effects of shock waves on the laser-induced plasma (LIP) from a graphite target in air were studied by probe beam deflection (PBD) measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A clear relationship between the confinement of the LIP by the shock wave and the effects on the LIP emission was observed, and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. PBD monitoring revealed that the laser-ablation induced shock wave could be well analogized to the shock wave generated by a point explosion and would be reflected by a block. OES measurements indicated that the optical emission of the LIP exhibited significant variations with the block placement. A first enhancement and then a fast decay of CN molecular emission as well as a suppression of carbon atomic emission were observed in the presence of the block. The results revealed that the reflected shock wave spatially confined the expansion of the LIP and compressed the LIP after encountering it, pushing back the species of the LIP and changing the density of the LIP species including luminous carbon atoms and CN molecules. It is suggested that the change of the LIP emission is attributed to the density variation of the LIP species due to the compression of the LIP and the reactions occurring in the plasma.

  11. Changes in Effective Thermal Conductivity During the Carbothermic Reduction of Magnetite Using Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Ahmed, Hesham; Viswanathan, Nurni; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the effective thermal diffusivity changes of systems undergoing reactions where heat transfer plays an important role in the reaction kinetics is essential for process understanding and control. Carbothermic reduction process of magnetite containing composites is a typical example of such systems. The reduction process in this case is highly endothermic and hence, the overall rate of the reaction is greatly influenced by the heat transfer through composite compact. Using Laser-Flash method, the change of effective thermal diffusivity of magnetite-graphite composite pellet was monitored in the dynamic mode over a pre-defined thermal cycle (heating at the rate of 7 K/min to 1423 K (1150 °C), holding the sample for 270 minutes at this temperature and then cooling it down to the room temperature at the same rate as heating). These measurements were supplemented by Thermogravimetric Analysis under comparable experimental conditions as well as quenching tests of the samples in order to combine the impact of various factors such as sample dilatations and changes in apparent density on the progress of the reaction. The present results show that monitoring thermal diffusivity changes during the course of reduction would be a very useful tool in a total understanding of the underlying physicochemical phenomena. At the end, effort is made to estimate the apparent thermal conductivity values based on the measured thermal diffusivity and dilatations.

  12. Effects of Particle Size and Surface Chemistry on the Dispersion of Graphite Nanoplates in Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel M. Santos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanoparticles tend to form agglomerates with considerable cohesive strength, depending on particle morphology and chemistry, thus presenting different dispersion challenges. The present work studies the dispersion of three types of graphite nanoplates (GnP with different flake sizes and bulk densities in a polypropylene melt, using a prototype extensional mixer under comparable hydrodynamic stresses. The nanoparticles were also chemically functionalized by covalent bonding polymer molecules to their surface, and the dispersion of the functionalized GnP was studied. The effects of stress relaxation on dispersion were also analyzed. Samples were removed along the mixer length, and characterized by microscopy and dielectric spectroscopy. A lower dispersion rate was observed for GnP with larger surface area and higher bulk density. Significant re-agglomeration was observed for all materials when the deformation rate was reduced. The polypropylene-functionalized GnP, characterized by increased compatibility with the polymer matrix, showed similar dispersion effects, albeit presenting slightly higher dispersion levels. All the composites exhibit dielectric behavior, however, the alternate current (AC conductivity is systematically higher for the composites with larger flake GnP.

  13. Degradation Behavior of Thermal Stabilized Polyacrylonitrile Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Shuai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the temperature range of 300-800℃, 40%-50% of the mass lost during the processing of polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber (PANCF. Understanding the degradation behavior will be valuable in understanding the formation mechanism of pseudo-graphite structure, and providing theoretic basis for producing high performance carbon fiber and increasing the carbonization yield. The simulation of the degradation progress was carried out on the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA, the results show that there are two degradation steps for PAN fiber stabilized in air, and controlled by cyclization coefficient and oxygen content. The cyclization coefficient and oxygen content are effective to the density of carbon fiber by influencing the degradation behavior, which cause defects in the fiber. The higher cyclization coefficient leads to form less structural defects and higher density of the fiber; on the contrary, the higher oxygen content leads to form more structural defects and lower density of the fiber.

  14. Nuclear graphite waste management. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the seminar was to bring together the specialists dealing with various aspects of radioactive graphite waste management to exchange and review information on the decommissioning, characterisation, processing and disposal of irradiated graphite from reactor cores and other graphite waste associated with reactor operation. The seminar covered radioactive graphite characterisation, the effect of irradiation on graphite components, Wigner energy, radioactive graphite waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage and long term disposal options. Individual papers presented at the seminar were indexed separately

  15. Dietary fiber and lipid peroxidation: effect of dietary fiber on levels of lipids and lipid peroxides in high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, B S; Manoj, G; Leelamma, S; Menon, V P

    1991-06-01

    Effect of feeding coconut and blackgram fiber isolated as neutral detergent fiber (NDF) on the levels of lipids and lipid peroxides was studied in rats given a high fat diet. Concentration of cholesterol, free falty acid and phospholipids showed significant decrease in the serum, liver aorta and intestine of coconut and blackgram fiber groups. Concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes was significantly decreased in liver and intestine of both fiber groups, while hydroperoxides showed significant increase in liver and heart of both the fiber groups. SOD and catalase activity was found to be increased in liver, intestine, heart proximal colon and distal colon of both the fiber groups. Serum ceruloplasmin levels showed a slight increase in animals fed coconut and blackgram fiber groups. Glutathione levels in liver, intestine proximal colon, distal colon and heart also showed a significant decrease in the animals of both the fiber groups.

  16. Comparison of sizing effect of T700 grade carbon fiber on interfacial properties of fiber/BMI and fiber/epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lirui; Li Min; Wu Qing; Dai Zhishuang; Gu Yizhuo; Li Yanxia; Zhang Zuoguang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbon fiber sizings can react itself and with resin at high temperature. ► Sizings improve IFSS of carbon fiber/epoxy, but reduce that of BMI matrix. ► IFSS of carbon fiber/epoxy is larger than corresponding carbon fiber/BMI. ► Partially desized carbon fiber shows the effect of polymeric sizing component. ► The results are helpful for optimizing sizing agent of carbon fiber composites. - Abstract: This paper aims to study impact of sizing agents on interfacial properties of two T700 grade high strength carbon fibers with bismaleimide (BMI) and epoxy (EP) resin matrix. The fiber surface roughness and chemical properties are analyzed for sized, desized, and partially desized carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. FTIR analysis indicates that the sizing agents are chemically reactive, and they can react with BMI and EP at high temperatures. The micro-droplet tests exhibit that the desized carbon fibers have lower interfacial strengths with EP than the sized fibers, however, for BMI matrix, opposite trend is revealed. This is consistent with the chemical reactions of the sizing agents with the EP and BMI resins, in which sufficient reactions are observed for the sizing/EP mixture, while only partial reactions are probed for the sizing/BMI mixture. Interestingly, un-extracted epoxy type sizing particles are observed on partially desized carbon fiber surface, which significantly improves the interfacial adhesion with EP matrix.

  17. Kerr ellipticity effect in a birefringent optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiekwene, G.C.; Mensah, S.Y.; Brown, C.S.

    2004-09-01

    An intensity-dependent change in the ellipticity of an input light beam leads to a characteristic shift in polarization instability. Dichroism gives rise to a self-induced ellipticity effect in the polarization state of an intense input light oriented along the fast axis of a birefringent optical fiber. The critical power at which the fiber effective beat length becomes infinite is reduced considerably in the presence of dichroism. (author)

  18. Neutron irradiation effects on high Nicalon silicon carbide fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties and microstructure of SiC and SiC-based fibers is a current focal point for the development of radiation damage resistant SiC/SiC composites. This report discusses the radiation effects on the Nippon Carbon Hi-Nicalon trademark fiber system and also discusses an erratum on earlier results published by the authors on this material. The radiation matrix currently under study is also summarized

  19. Neutron irradiation effects on high Nicalon silicon carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D.; Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties and microstructure of SiC and SiC-based fibers is a current focal point for the development of radiation damage resistant SiC/SiC composites. This report discusses the radiation effects on the Nippon Carbon Hi-Nicalon{trademark} fiber system and also discusses an erratum on earlier results published by the authors on this material. The radiation matrix currently under study is also summarized.

  20. The effect of bed particle size and deposit morphology on the filtration of magnetite through granular graphite beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.R.; Bercovich, E.J.; Liberman, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite filters are of great interest for water purification in nuclear power reactors' primary systems due to their possible operation at high temperature. The influence of the bed particle size on the retention of magnetite from aqueous suspensions at room temperature was studied. The filtration coefficient changes from 0.0 to 0.18 as the mean graphite particle diameter decreases from 1.2 to 0. mm. As the retention increases, there is also an increase in the differential pressure across the bed, so both effects must be considered in order to optimize filter's operation. The specific effective volume of the deposit was calculated with the Blake-Kozeny equation and the experimental specific volumes. These are much larger than the specific volume of solid magnetite. From the results, information regarding the morphology of the deposit in the filter is obtained. (M.E.L) [es

  1. Effect of chemical heterogeneity on photoluminescence of graphite oxide treated with S-/N-containing modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Amani M.; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Montenegro, José María; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) obtained using Hummers method was modified by hydrothermal treatment either with sulfanilic acid or polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate at 100 °C or 85 °C, respectively. Both modifiers contain sulfur in the oxidized forms and nitrogen in the reduced forms. The materials were characterized using FTIR, XPS, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration and SEM. Their photoluminescent properties and their alteration with an addition of Ag+ were also measured. As a result of these modifications nitrogen was introduced to the graphene layers as amines, imides, amides, and sulfur as sulfones and sulfonic acids. Moreover, the presence of polyaniline was detected. This significantly affected the polarity, acid-base character, and conductivity of the materials. Apparently carboxylic groups of GO were involved in the surface reactions. The modified GOs lost their layered structure and the modifications resulted in the high degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity. Photoluminescence in visible light was recorded and linked to the presence of heteroatoms. For the polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate modified sample addition of Ag+ quenched the photoluminescence at low wavelength showing sensitivity as a possible optical detector. No apparent effect was found for the sulfanilic acid modified sample.

  2. Effect of Temperature and Graphite Immersion Method on Carbothermic Reduction of Fayalite Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrašinović, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, graphite flakes were used to reduce fayalite slag originated from the pyrometallurgical copper extraction process. Experiments were conducted with a significantly different contact area between graphite and slag at two temperatures, 1300°C and 1400°C. The process was continuously monitored via the concentration change of CO and CO2 in off-gas. Reduction rate values in experiments where 150-micron-diameter graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and left to float slowly to the top are about four times higher compared with when graphite flakes were dispersed at the top surface of liquid slag. The activation energy for instigating reduction was 302.61 kJ mol-1 and 306.67 kJ mol-1 in the case where graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and dispersed at the surface, respectively. The reduction process is characterized by two distinctive periods: an initial steep increase in the concentration of CO and CO2 controlled by the Boudouard reaction and a subsequent slow decrease of CO and CO2 concentrations in the off-gas controlled by mass transfer of reducible oxides from bulk to the gas-slag interface.

  3. Effects of Propylene Carbonate Content in CsPF6-Containing Electrolytes on the Enhanced Performances of Graphite Electrode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Cao, Ruiguo; Xiang, Hongfa; Engelhard, Mark H.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2016-02-10

    Cesium salt has been demonstrated as an efficient electrolyte additive in suppressing the lithium (Li) dendrite formation and directing the formation of an ultrathin and stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) even in propylene carbonate (PC)-ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolytes. Here, we further investigate the effect of PC content in the presence of CsPF6 additive (0.05 M) on the performances of graphite electrode in Li||graphite half cells and in graphite||LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) full cells. It is found that the performance of graphite electrode is also affected by PC content even though CsPF6 additive is present in the electrolytes. An optimal PC content of 20% by weight in the solvent mixtures is identified. The enhanced electrochemical performance of graphite electrode is attributed to the synergistic effects of the Cs+ additive and the PC solvent. The formation of a robust, ultrathin and compact SEI layer containing lithium-enriched species on the graphite electrode, directed by Cs+, effectively suppresses the PC co-intercalation and thus prevents the graphite exfoliation. This SEI layer is only permeable for de-solvated Li+ ions and allows fast Li+ ion transport through it, which therefore largely alleviates the Li dendrite formation on graphite electrode during lithiation even at high current densities. The presence of low-melting-point PC solvent also enables the sustainable operation of the graphite||NCA full cells under a wide spectrum of temperatures. The fundamental findings of this work shed light on the importance of manipulating/maintaining the electrode/electrolyte interphasial stability in a variety of energy storage devices.

  4. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meals instead of white rice. Add beans (kidney, black, navy, and pinto) to rice dishes for even more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, cooked artichokes, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or ...

  5. Theoretical study of the porosity effects on the shock response of graphitic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pineau Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a theoretical study of the shock compression of porous graphite by means of combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations using the LCBOPII potential. The results show that the Hugoniostat methods can be used with “pole” properties calculated from porous models to reproduce the experimental Hugoniot of pure graphite and diamond with good accuracy. The computed shock temperatures show a sharp increase for weak shocks which we analyze as the heating associated with the closure of the initial porosity. After this initial phase, the temperature increases with shock intensity at a rate comparable to monocrystalline graphite and diamond. These simulations data can be exploited in view to build a full equation of state for use in hydrodynamic simulations.

  6. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  7. Simulation of finite size effects of the fiber bundle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Han, Kui

    2018-01-01

    In theory, the macroscopic fracture of materials should correspond with the thermodynamic limit of the fiber bundle model. However, the simulation of a fiber bundle model with an infinite size is unrealistic. To study the finite size effects of the fiber bundle model, fiber bundle models of various size are simulated in detail. The effects of system size on the constitutive behavior, critical stress, maximum avalanche size, avalanche size distribution, and increased step number of external load are explored. The simulation results imply that there is no feature size or cut size for macroscopic mechanical and statistical properties of the model. The constitutive curves near the macroscopic failure for various system size can collapse well with a simple scaling relationship. Simultaneously, the introduction of a simple extrapolation method facilitates the acquisition of more accurate simulation results in a large-limit system, which is better for comparison with theoretical results.

  8. Effect of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Mohsin, S. M.; Baarimah, A. O.; Jokhio, G. A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of kenaf fibers in reinforced concrete slab with different thickness is discusses and presented in this paper. Kenaf fiber is a type of natural fiber and is added in the reinforced concrete slab to improve the structure strength and ductility. For this study, three types of mixtures were prepared with fiber volume fraction of 0%, 1% and 2%, respectively. The design compressive strength considered was 20 MPa. Six cubes were prepared to be tested at 7th and 28th day. A total of six reinforced concrete slab with two variances of thickness were also prepared and tested under four-point bending test. The differences in the thickness is to study the potential of kenaf fiber to serve as part of shear reinforcement in reinforced concrete slab that was design to fail in shear. It was observed that, addition of kenaf fiber in reinforced concrete slab improves the flexural strength and ductility of the reinforced concrete slab. In the slab with reduction in thickness, the mode of failure change from brittle to ductile with the inclusion of kenaf fiber.

  9. Effects of fatigue and environment on residual strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fatigue, moisture conditioning, and heating on the residual tension strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels were evaluated using specimens made with T300/5208 graphite epoxy in a 16-ply quasi-isotropic layup, with two different buffer strip materials, Kevlar-49 or S-glass. It was found that, for panels subjected to fatigue loading, the residual strengths were not significantly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panels by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results, but increased the residual strengths of the Kevlar-49 buffer strip panels slightly. For both buffer strip materials, the heat increased the residual strengths of the buffer strip panels slightly over the ambient results.

  10. The effect of oxidizing atmosphere on strength loss in HTGR graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.H.; Finfrock, C.C.; Lees, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on studies involving various reactor grade graphites and the possible mechanisms leading to strength loss differences. Compressive and tensile specimens of six reactor grade graphites were oxidized. The compressive or tensile strengths were then determined using a Timus-Olsen Universal testing machine following ASTM standard test specifications. Two possible mechanisms are proposed to explain the differences in strength loss given the same mass loss but different oxidants. One mechanism has the impurity iron located primarily in the filler particles and the second mechanism arranges the iron either uniformly throughout the binder or inhomogeneously dispersed in large pockets in the binder

  11. Radiation Effects on Ytterbium-doped Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-02

    conducted on Er- doped fiber amplifiers (Lezius, et al., 2012; Ahrens, et al., 1999; Ahrens, Jaques , LuValle, DiGiovanni, & Windeler, 2001; Ott, 2004...Ahrens, R. G., Abate, J. A., Jaques , J. J., Presby, H. M., Fields, A. B., DiGiovanni, D. J., LuValle, M. J. (1999). Radiation reliability of rare... Jaques , J. J., LuValle, M. J., DiGiovanni, D. J., & Windeler, R. S. (2001). Radiation effects on optical fibers and amplifiers. Testing, Reliability

  12. High thermoelectric performance of graphite nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van-Truong; Saint-Martin, Jérôme; Dollfus, Philippe; Volz, Sebastian

    2018-02-22

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs) have been demonstrated to be a promising material for hydrogen storage and heat management in electronic devices. Here, by means of first-principles and transport simulations, we show that GNFs can also be an excellent material for thermoelectric applications thanks to the interlayer weak van der Waals interaction that induces low thermal conductance and a step-like shape in the electronic transmission with mini-gaps, which are necessary ingredients to achieve high thermoelectric performance. This study unveils that the platelet form of GNFs in which graphite layers are perpendicular to the fiber axis can exhibit outstanding thermoelectric properties with a figure of merit ZT reaching 3.55 in a 0.5 nm diameter fiber and 1.1 in a 1.1 nm diameter one. Interestingly, by introducing 14 C isotope doping, ZT can even be enhanced up to more than 5, and more than 8 if we include the effect of finite phonon mean free path, which demonstrates the amazing thermoelectric potential of GNFs.

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity of Manville Code 100 glass fibers: Effect of fiber length on human alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones William

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs are inorganic noncrystalline materials widely used in residential and industrial settings for insulation, filtration, and reinforcement purposes. SVFs conventionally include three major categories: fibrous glass, rock/slag/stone (mineral wool, and ceramic fibers. Previous in vitro studies from our laboratory demonstrated length-dependent cytotoxic effects of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages which were possibly associated with incomplete phagocytosis of fibers ≥ 17 μm in length. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fiber length on primary human alveolar macrophages, which are larger in diameter than rat macrophages, using length-classified Manville Code 100 glass fibers (8, 10, 16, and 20 μm. It was hypothesized that complete engulfment of fibers by human alveolar macrophages could decrease fiber cytotoxicity; i.e. shorter fibers that can be completely engulfed might not be as cytotoxic as longer fibers. Human alveolar macrophages, obtained by segmental bronchoalveolar lavage of healthy, non-smoking volunteers, were treated with three different concentrations (determined by fiber number of the sized fibers in vitro. Cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase release and loss of function as indicated by a decrease in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Results Microscopic analysis indicated that human alveolar macrophages completely engulfed glass fibers of the 20 μm length. All fiber length fractions tested exhibited equal cytotoxicity on a per fiber basis, i.e. increasing lactate dehydrogenase and decreasing chemiluminescence in the same concentration-dependent fashion. Conclusion The data suggest that due to the larger diameter of human alveolar macrophages, compared to rat alveolar macrophages, complete phagocytosis of longer fibers can occur with the human cells. Neither incomplete phagocytosis nor length-dependent toxicity was

  14. Effect of Manufacturing Method to Tensile Properties of Hybrid Composite Reinforced by Natural (Agel Leaf Fiber) and Glass Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, A.; Abdurohman, K.; Kusmono; Hestiawan, H.; Jamasri

    2018-04-01

    This paper described the effect of different type of manufacturing method to tensile properties of hybrid composite woven agel leaf fiber and glass fiber as an alternative of LSU structure material. The research was done by using 3 ply of woven agel leaf fiber (ALF) and 3 ply of glass fiber (wr200) while the matrix was using unsaturated polyester. Composite manufacturing method used hand lay-up and vacuum bagging. Tensile test conducted with Tensilon universal testing machine, specimen shape and size according to standard size ASTM D 638. Based on tensile test result showed that the tensile strength of agel leaf fiber composite with unsaturated polyester matrix is 54.5 MPa by hand lay-up and 84.6 MPa with vacuum bagging method. From result of tensile test, hybrid fiber agel composite and glass fiber with unsaturated polyester matrix have potential as LSU structure.

  15. Effect of fiber orientation on tensile and impact properties of Zalacca Midrib fiber-HDPE composites by compression molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasikun, Ariawan, Dody; Surojo, Eko; Triyono, Joko

    2018-02-01

    The research aims to investigate the fiber orientation effect on the tensile and impact properties of zalacca midrib fiber /HDPE composites. The composites were produced by compression molding with pressing temperature at 150°C, pressing pressure at 50 bar, and holding time of 25 minutes. The fiber orientations applied in composites were 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90°, at 10% fiber volume fraction. The samples were evaluated by using: Tensile test and Izod impact test according to ASTM D638 and ASTM D5941, respectively. The result of experiments indicate that the orientation of zalacca midrib fiber influences the characteristics of HDPE composite-zalacca midrib fiber. The composite mechanical strength decline with the increase of orientation fibers from 0° to 90°. The composite failure mode of composites are observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  16. Investigations on birefringence effects in polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xiaolian; Saez-Rodriguez, D.; Bang, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Step-index polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs) and microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) present several attractive features, especially for sensing purposes. In comparison to FBGs written in silica fibers, they are more sensitive to temperature and pressure...... because of the larger thermo-optic coefficient and smaller Young's modulus of polymer materials. (M)POFBGs are most often photowritten in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) materials using a continuous-wave 325 nm HeCd laser. For the first time to the best of our knowledge, we study photoinduced...... birefringence effects in (m)POFBGs. To achieve this, highly reflective gratings were inscribed with the phase mask technique. They were then monitored in transmission with polarized light. For this, (m)POF sections a few cm in length containing the gratings were glued to angled silica fibers. Polarization...

  17. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  18. Effect of an electrolyte salt dissolving in polysiloxane-based electrolyte on passive film formation on a graphite electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hiroshi; Nutt, Steven

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed during the first charge of a graphite/lithium metal test cell to determine the effect of an electrolyte salt on passive film formation in a polysiloxane-based electrolyte. The graphite electrode was separated from the lithium metal electrode by a porous polyethylene membrane immersed in a polysiloxane-based electrolyte with the dissolved lithium bis(oxalato) borate (LiBOB) or lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI). In case of LiTFSI, the conductivity of system decreased at 1.2 V. In contrast, for the case of LiBOB, the conductivity decreased at 1.7 V. The magnitudes of charge transfer resistance and film resistance for LiTFSI were smaller than that for LiBOB. Passive films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) after charging (lithiating) in polysiloxane-based electrolyte were inspected microscopically. Gel-like film and island-like films were observed for LiBOB [H. Nakahara, A. Masias, S.Y. Yoon, T. Koike, K. Takeya, Proceedings of the 41st Power Sources Conference, vol. 165, Philadelphia, June 14-17, 2004; H. Nakahara, S.Y. Yoon, T. Piao, S. Nutt, F. Mansfeld, J. Power Sources, in press; H. Nakahara, S.Y. Yoon, S. Nutt, J. Power Sources, in press]. However, for LiTFSI, there was sludge accumulation on the HOPG surface. Compositional analysis revealed the presence of silicon on both HOPG specimens with LiBOB and with LiTFSI. The electrolyte salt dissolved in the polysiloxane-based electrolyte changed the electrochemical and morphological nature of passive films on graphite electrode.

  19. The effect of compressive stress on the Young's modulus of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, T.; Usui, T.; Ero, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The Young's moduli of unirradiated and high temperature (800 to 1000 0 C) irradiated graphites for HTGR were measured by the ultrasonic method in the direction of applied compressive stress during and after stressing. The Young's moduli of all the tested graphites decreased with increasing compressive stress both during and after stressing. In order to investigate the reason for the decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress, the mercury pore diameter distributions of a part of the unirradiated and irradiated specimens were measured. The change in pore distribution is believed to be associated with structural changes produced by irradiation and compressive stressing. The residual strain, after removing the compressive stress, showed a good correlation with the decrease in Young's modulus caused by the compressive stress. The decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress was considered to be due to the increase in the mobile dislocation density and the growth or formation of cracks. The results suggest, however, that the mechanism giving the larger contribution depends on the brand of graphite, and in anisotropic graphite it depends on the direction of applied stress and the irradiation conditions. (author)

  20. In-situ electric resistance measurements and annealing effects of graphite exposed to swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Sandrina; Pellemoine, Frederique; Tomut, Marilena; Avilov, Mikhail; Bender, Markus; Boulesteix, Marine; Krause, Markus; Mittig, Wolfgang; Schein, Mike; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2013-01-01

    To study the suitability of using graphite as material for high-power targets for rare isotope production at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in the USA and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Germany, thin foils of polycrystalline graphite were exposed to 8.6-MeV/u Au ions reaching a maximum fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Foil irradiation temperatures of up to 1800 °C were obtained by ohmic heating. In-situ monitoring of the electrical resistance of the graphite foils during and after irradiation provided information on beam-induced radiation damage. The rate of electrical resistance increase as a function of fluence was found to decrease with increasing irradiation temperature, indicating a more efficient annealing of the irradiation-produced defects. This is corroborated by the observation that graphite foils irradiated at temperatures below about 800 °C showed cracks and pronounced deformations, which did not appear on the samples irradiated at higher temperatures

  1. Effect of mechanical treatment on the electrical properties of graphite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunasfi; Salim Mustofa

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of electrical properties of graphite materials as the mechanical treatment result with high energy milling (HEM) techniques was carried out. The carbon powder was milled using HEM by varying the milling time from 25 hours to 100 hours, and afterwards the graphite material was formed to a pellet under compaction up to 20 ton/cm"2. The measurements result of electrical properties using LCR (Inductance, Capacitance, Resistance) meter showed that milling process to graphite causes the increasing of conductivity and capacitance values and these values were increasing with the increase of milling times. Before milling, the conductivity value is 3.5976 Siemens/cm and the value of capacitance is 0.2223 μF at 100 kHz frequency. Increasing of conductivity value reached 26 % and capacitance value reached 66 % after milling for 100 hours. These increasing are analyzed due to decreasing of graphite powder particle size causing by longer milling time and result in higher electrical conductivity. (author)

  2. In-situ electric resistance measurements and annealing effects of graphite exposed to swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Sandrina [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Pellemoine, Frederique, E-mail: pellemoi@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Tomut, Marilena [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); National Institute for Materials Physics (NIMP), Bucharest (Romania); Avilov, Mikhail [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bender, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Boulesteix, Marine [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Krause, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität, Darmstadt (Germany); Mittig, Wolfgang [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Schein, Mike [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Severin, Daniel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Trautmann, Christina [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    To study the suitability of using graphite as material for high-power targets for rare isotope production at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in the USA and at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Germany, thin foils of polycrystalline graphite were exposed to 8.6-MeV/u Au ions reaching a maximum fluence of 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Foil irradiation temperatures of up to 1800 °C were obtained by ohmic heating. In-situ monitoring of the electrical resistance of the graphite foils during and after irradiation provided information on beam-induced radiation damage. The rate of electrical resistance increase as a function of fluence was found to decrease with increasing irradiation temperature, indicating a more efficient annealing of the irradiation-produced defects. This is corroborated by the observation that graphite foils irradiated at temperatures below about 800 °C showed cracks and pronounced deformations, which did not appear on the samples irradiated at higher temperatures.

  3. Effect of graphite nanoplatelets on the structure and properties of PA6-elastomer nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thanh, Tran Duy; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Hromádková, Jiřina; Kelnar, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, January (2014), s. 39-45 ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-15255S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite nanoplatelets * polyamide 6 * elastomer Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 3.005, year: 2014

  4. Effect of formation temperature on properties of graphite/stannum composite for bipolar plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selamat, Mohd Zulkefli; Yusuf, Muhammad Yusri Md; Wer, Tio Kok; Sahadan, Siti Norbaya; Malingam, Sivakumar Dhar; Mohamad, Noraiham

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar plates are key components in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. They carry current away from the cell and withstand the clamping force of the stack assembly. Therefore, PEM fuel cell bipolar plates must have high electrical conductivity and adequate mechanical strength, in addition to being light weight and low cost in terms of both applicable materials and production methods. In this research, the raw materials used to fabricate the high performance bipolar plate are Graphite (Gr), Stannum (Sn) and Polypropylene (PP). All materials used was in powder form and Gr and Sn act as fillers and the PP acts as binder. The ratio of fillers (Gr/Sn) and binder (PP) was fixed at 80:20. For the multi-conductive filler, small amount of Sn, which is 10 up to 20wt% (from the total weight of fillers 80%) have been added into Gr/Sn/PP composite. The fillers were mixed by using the ball mill machine. The second stage of mixing process between the mixer of fillers and binder is also carried out by using ball mill machine before the compaction process by the hot press machine. The effect of formation temperatures (160°C-170°C) on the properties of Gr/Sn/PP composite had been studied in detail, especially the electrical conductivity, bulk density, hardness and microstructure analysis of Gr/Sn/PP composite. The result shows that there are significant improvement in the electrical conductivity and bulk density, which are exceeding the US-DoE target with the maximum value of 265.35 S/cm and 1.682g/cm"3 respectively.

  5. Effect of formation temperature on properties of graphite/stannum composite for bipolar plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selamat, Mohd Zulkefli, E-mail: azulkeflis@utem.edu.my; Yusuf, Muhammad Yusri Md, E-mail: yusri.cheras@gmail.com; Wer, Tio Kok, E-mail: to91@hotmail.my; Sahadan, Siti Norbaya, E-mail: norbaya@utem.edu.my; Malingam, Sivakumar Dhar, E-mail: sivakumard@utem.edu.my; Mohamad, Noraiham, E-mail: noraiham@utem.edu.my [Centre of Advanced Research on Energy (CARe), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, UniversitiTeknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia)

    2016-03-29

    Bipolar plates are key components in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. They carry current away from the cell and withstand the clamping force of the stack assembly. Therefore, PEM fuel cell bipolar plates must have high electrical conductivity and adequate mechanical strength, in addition to being light weight and low cost in terms of both applicable materials and production methods. In this research, the raw materials used to fabricate the high performance bipolar plate are Graphite (Gr), Stannum (Sn) and Polypropylene (PP). All materials used was in powder form and Gr and Sn act as fillers and the PP acts as binder. The ratio of fillers (Gr/Sn) and binder (PP) was fixed at 80:20. For the multi-conductive filler, small amount of Sn, which is 10 up to 20wt% (from the total weight of fillers 80%) have been added into Gr/Sn/PP composite. The fillers were mixed by using the ball mill machine. The second stage of mixing process between the mixer of fillers and binder is also carried out by using ball mill machine before the compaction process by the hot press machine. The effect of formation temperatures (160°C-170°C) on the properties of Gr/Sn/PP composite had been studied in detail, especially the electrical conductivity, bulk density, hardness and microstructure analysis of Gr/Sn/PP composite. The result shows that there are significant improvement in the electrical conductivity and bulk density, which are exceeding the US-DoE target with the maximum value of 265.35 S/cm and 1.682g/cm{sup 3} respectively.

  6. Computational model of spalling and effective fibers on toughening in fiber reinforced composites at an early stage of crack formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    Full Text Available This work suggests a computational model that takes account of effective fibers on toughening in FRC at an early stage of crack formation. We derived the distribution of pressure provoked by a random inclined fiber in the matrix and calculated stresses through integrating the pressure and tangent stress along the fiber/matrix interface with the Kelvin's fundamental solution and the Mindlin's complementary solution. The evolution of spalling in the matrix was traced. The percentages of effective fibers were evaluated with variations in strength, interface resistance, diameter and elasticity modulus. The main conclusion is that low elasticity modulus combined high strength of fibers raises dramatically the effective fibers, which would benefit toughening.

  7. Microfabricated disposable nanosensor based on CdSe quantum dot/ionic liquid-mediated hollow fiber-pencil graphite electrode for simultaneous electrochemical quantification of uric acid and creatinine in human samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooshmand, Sara; Es' haghi, Zarrin, E-mail: eshaghi@pnu.ac.ir

    2017-06-15

    In this research, a novel sensitive electrochemical nanosensor based on the cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs)/ionic liquid mediated hollow fiber-pencil graphite electrode (HF-PGE) was prepared and applied for simultaneous determination of uric acid (UA) and creatinine (Crn) in urine and serum samples. The electrocatalytic oxidation of the analytes was investigated via differential pulse (DPV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The experiments were designed, in two different steps, according to Taguchi's method; OA9 L9 (3{sup 3}) and OA9 L9 (3{sup 4}) orthogonal array to optimize experimental runs. The results revealed that the electrode response was initially influenced by the types of sensor and types of ionic liquids and their ratios. The amount of QD, buffer pH, equilibration time and scan rate also influenced electrode response efficiency. According to the results of Taguchi analysis, the amount of tetra phenyl phosphonium chloride (TPPC) and QD were the most influencing parameters on the yield response of the modified electrodes. Linear ranges were obtained between 0.297–2.970 × 10{sup 3} and 0.442–8.840 × 10{sup 3} μM, with the detection limits of 0.083 and 0.229 μM and relative standard deviations (RSD) of 2.4% and 1.8%, for UA and Crn, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was successfully examined for simultaneous determination of UA and Crn in human urine and serum samples. - Highlights: • Sensor based on modified CdSe quantum dot/ionic liquid mediated hollow fiber graphite electrode. • One-step simultaneous purification, pre-concentration, extraction, back-extraction and determination of electroactive analytes. • Target analyte uric acid (UA) and creatinine (Crn) in urine and serum samples. • Disposable nature of sensor reduced risk of carry-over.

  8. Effects of fiber ellipticity and orientation on dynamic stress concentrations in porous fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Sanaei, Roozbeh

    2007-11-01

    Interaction of time harmonic fast longitudinal and shear incident plane waves with an elliptical fiber embedded in a porous elastic matrix is studied. The novel features of Biot dynamic theory of poroelasticity along with the classical method of eigen-function expansion and the pertinent boundary conditions are employed to develop a closed form series solution involving Mathieu and modified Mathieu functions of complex arguments. The complications arising due to the non-orthogonality of angular Mathieu functions corresponding to distinct wave numbers in addition to the problems associated with appearance of additional angular dependent terms in the boundary conditions are all avoided by expansion of the angular Mathieu functions in terms of transcendental functions and subsequent integration, leading to a linear set of independent equations in terms of the unknown scattering coefficients. A MATHEMATICA code is developed for computing the Mathieu functions in terms of complex Fourier coefficients which are themselves calculated by numerically solving appropriate sets of eigen-systems. The analytical results are illustrated with numerical examples in which an elastic fiber of elliptic cross section is insonified by a plane fast compressional or shear wave at normal incidence. The effects of fiber cross sectional ellipticity, angle of incidence (fiber two-dimensional orientation), and incident wave polarization (P, SV, SH) on dynamic stress concentrations are studied in a relatively wide frequency range. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with well-known solutions are established.

  9. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  10. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  11. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  12. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  13. Effect of Graphite Electrode to Surface’s Characteristic of EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muttamara Apiwat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining process (EDM is a process for removing material by the thermal of electrical discharge. Some of the melted and all of the evaporated material is then quenched and flushed away by dielectric liquid and the remaining melt recast on the finished surface. The recast layer is called as white layer. Beneath the recast layer, a heat affected zone is formed. The quality of an EDM product is usually evaluated in terms of its surface integrity, which is characterized by the surface roughness, existence of surface cracks and residual stresses. This paper presents a study of surface’s characteristics by EDM in de-ionized water due to decarbonisation. The machining tests were conducted on mild steel JIS grade SS400 with copper and graphite electrodes. The workpiece surfaces are analyzed by scanning electron microscope and XRD technique. The carbon transfers from graphite electrode to the white layer relating to martensitic phrase of recast layer.

  14. Effects of ultraviolet and electron radiations on graphite-reinforced polysulfone and epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.

    1984-01-01

    Degradation mechanisms have been investigated for graphite/polysulfone and graphite/epoxy laminates exposed to ultraviolet and high-energy electron radiations in vacuum up to 960 equivalent sun hours and 10 9 rads, respectively. Based on GC and combined GC/MS analysis of volatile by-products evolved during irradiation, several free radical mechanisms of composite degradation have been identified. All the composite materials evaluated have shown high electron radiation stability and relatively low ultraviolet stability as indicated by low G values and high quantum yields for gas formation. Mechanical property measurements of irradiated samples did not reveal significant changes, with the possible exception of UV exposed polysulfone laminates. Hydrogen and methane have been identified as the main byproducts of irradiation, along with unexpectedly high levels of CO and CO 2 . Initial G values for methane relative to hydrogen formation are higher in the presence of isopropylidene linkages, which occur in bisphenol-A resins

  15. Nonlinear polarization effects in a birefringent single mode optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiekwene, G.C.; Mensah, S.Y.; Brown, C.S.

    2001-04-01

    The nonlinear polarization effects in a birefringent single mode optical fiber is studied using Jacobi elliptic functions. We find that the polarization state of the propagating beam depends on the initial polarization as well as the intensity of the input light in a complicated way. The Stokes polarization parameters are either periodic or aperiodic depending on the value of the Jacobian modulus. Our calculations suggest that the effective beat length of the fiber can become infinite at a higher critical value of the input power when polarization dependent losses are considered. (author)

  16. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  17. Effect of eccentric location of the RBMK CPS displacer graphite block in the shielding sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostov, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature conditions and accumulation of Wigner energy in the graphite block of the RBMK reactor CPS (control power system) displacer is examined. It is shown, that at eccentric location of the block in the shielding sheath average temperature of the block drops sharply. Due to the design demerit quantity of the stored energy in the block may be so great, that its release will result in melting of the displacer tube. (author)

  18. Research on Lessening of Bonding Effects Between the Metallic and Non-Metallic Surfaces Through the Graphite Films Deposited with Pulsed Electrical Discharges Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, L.; Topala, P.

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental research on the physics of natural graphite film formation, the establishment of chemical composition and functional properties of the graphite films, formed on metal surfaces, as a result of the action of plasma in the air environment, at a normal pressure, under the electrical discharge in impulse conditions (EDI). The researchings were performed in the frame of doctoral thesis “Research on lessening of the bonding effects between the metallic and nonmetallic surfaces through the graphite films” and aimed to identify the phenomena that occur at the interface metal/ film of graphite, and to identify also the technological applications that it may have the surface treatment for submitting the films of graphite on metallic surfaces achieved through an innovative process of electrical pulsed discharges. After the research works from the PhD theme above mentioned, a number of interesting properties of graphite pellicle have been identified ie reducing of metal surface polarity. This led to drastic decreases for the values of adhesion when bonding of metal surfaces was performed using a structural polyurethane adhesive designed by ICECHIM. Following the thermo-gravimetric analysis, performed of the graphite film obtained by process of electrical pulsed discharges, have been also discovered other interesting properties for this, ie reversible mass additions at specific values of the working temperature Chemical and scanning electron microscopy analysis have revealed that on the metallic surface subjected to electrical pulsed discharges process, outside the graphite film, it is also obtained a series of spatial formation composed of carbon atoms fullerenes type which are responsible for the phenomenon of addition of mass.

  19. The effect of temperature deposited on the performance of ZnO-CNT-graphite for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darari, Alfin; Hakim, Istajib S.; Priyono; Subagio, Agus; Pardoyo; Subhan, Achmad

    2017-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphite are now widely studied as the electrodes of supercapacitor, owing to their high conductivity, large surface area, chemical stability, etc. A lot of research has been focused on Carbon/metal oxide nanocomposite electrode for Electrode supercapacitor because it will increase the total capacitance. In this research, ZnO nanoparticles were deposited onto substrate CNT:Graphite in different temperatures such as 300°, 350°, and 400°C. The characterization of the crystal size using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns showed ZnO material peak was detected a ZnO crystallite. The size of ZnO crystallite in 300°, 350°, and 400°C consecutively is 101.1; 103.4; and 116.7 nm. The test results are Electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS) high electrical conductivity values obtained on the composition of ZnO-CNT-graphite with a temperature of 350°C 4.6 (S/m); and (2) the highest value of capacitance in 300°C is 1.23 F/g.

  20. Effect of Graphite Nanosheets on Properties of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Stieven Montagna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different contents, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 wt%, of graphite nanosheets (GNS on the properties of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV nanocomposites obtained by solution casting method has been studied. GNS were prepared by three steps: intercalation (chemical exfoliation, expansion (thermal treatment, and the GNS obtainment (physical treatment by ultrasonic exfoliation. X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM showed that the physical, chemical, and thermal treatments preserved the graphite sheets structure. XRD and Raman results also showed that GNS were dispersed in the PHBV matrix. The degree of crystallinity (Xc of the nanocomposites did not change when the graphite nanosheets were added. However, the GNS acted as nucleation agent for crystallization; that is, in the second heating the samples containing GNS showed two melting peaks. The addition the GNS did not change the thermal stability of the PHBV.

  1. Effects of graphite doping on critical current density and microstructure of MgB2 bulks by an improved Mg-diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, X.F.; Zhao, Y.; Feng, Y.; Yang, Y.; Cheng, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    abstract: A series of graphite-doped MgB 2 bulks with high density have been successfully prepared by an improved Mg-diffusion method in ambient pressure. The effects of graphite doping on lattice parameters, T c , J c and microstructure of MgB 2 have been investigated. The results show that compared to the nano-C-doped or CNTs-doped MgB 2 , C is not easy to substitute B in graphite-doped MgB 2 . However, at the same C content, the graphite-doped MgB 2 has a higher J c . At 10 K and self-field, the J c for MgB 1.985 C 0.015 reaches 0.58 MA/cm 2 . For the MgB 1.945 C 0.055 , at 5 K, 7 T and 10 K, 6 T the J c achieves 10,000 A/cm 2 which is two orders of magnitude higher than that for the undoped sample. In addition to improving electron scattering and intergranular connectivity, the unreacted graphite in the graphite-doped MgB 2 is proposed to be responsible to the excellent J c properties of MgB 2 in high fields, due to depressed grain growth and enhanced grain boundary flux pinning

  2. Effect of carbon fiber addition on the electromagnetic shielding properties of carbon fiber/polyacrylamide/wood based fiberboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Baokang; Chen, Yipeng; Yang, Ning; Chen, Bo; Sun, Qingfeng

    2018-05-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite boards are fabricated by mechanical grind-assisted hot-pressing, and are used for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. CF with an average diameter of 150 nm is distributed on wood fiber, which is then encased by polyacrylamide. The CF/polyacrylamide/wood fiber (CPW) composite exhibits an optimal EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of 41.03 dB compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (0.41 dB), which meets the requirements of commercial merchandise. Meanwhile, the CPW composite also shows high mechanical strength. The maximum modulus of rupture (MOR) and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of CPW composites are 39.52 MPa and 5823.15 MPa, respectively. The MOR and MOE of CPW composites increased by 38% and 96%, respectively, compared to that of polyacrylamide/wood fiber composite (28.64 and 2967.35 MPa).

  3. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of polypropylene/conducting fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Kim, Yeung Keun

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic released from the automotive electronic parts is harmful to human body. Electromagnetic interference (EMT) shielding refers to the reflection and/or adsorption of electromagnetic radiation by a material, which thereby acts as a shield against the penetration of the radiation through the shield. Polypropylene (PP)/conductive micro fiber composites containing various fiber contents and fiber length were injection-molded. The effect of fiber content and length on electrical properties of the composites was studied by electrical resistivity and EMT shielding measurements. The through-plane electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity were obtained by measuring dielectric properties. The EMT shielding effectiveness (SE) was investigated by using S-parameter in the range of 100 ~ 1500 MHz. Reflection, absorption and multiple-reflection are the EMT attenuation mechanisms. From the measurement of S-Parameters, the absorption coefficient, reflection coefficient, and the shielding efficiency of the materials were calculated. The EMT SE of PP/conducing fiber composites is 40 dB over a wide frequency range up to 1.5 GHz, which is higher than that of PP/talc composite used automotive parts, viz. 0 dB.

  4. Enhanced oxidation resistance of carbon fiber reinforced lithium aluminosilicate composites by boron doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Long; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Xueting; Wu, Songsong; Wen, Guangwu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • C f /LAS composites exhibit enhanced oxidation resistance by boron doping. • Boron doping is beneficial to the improvement of graphitization degree of carbon fibers. • Graphitization of carbon fibers together with the decrease of viscosity of LAS matrix is responsible to the enhancement of oxidation resistance of C f /LAS composites. - Abstract: Carbon fiber reinforced lithium aluminosilicate matrix composites (C f /LAS) modified with boron doping were fabricated and oxidized for 1 h in static air. Weight loss, residual strength and microstructure were analyzed. The results indicate that boron doping has a remarkable effect on improving the oxidation resistance for C f /LAS. The synergism of low viscosity of LAS matrix at high temperature and formation of graphite crystals on the surface of carbon fibers, is responsible for excellent oxidation resistance of the boron doped C f /LAS.

  5. Effects of Crystal Orientation on Cellulose Nanocrystals−Cellulose Acetate Nanocomposite Fibers Prepared by Dry Spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si Chen; Greg Schueneman; R. Byron Pipes; Jeffrey Youngblood; Robert J. Moon

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the development of dry spun cellulose acetate (CA) fibers using cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as reinforcements. Increasing amounts of CNCs were dispersed into CA fibers in efforts to improve the tensile strength and elastic modulus of the fiber. A systematic characterization of dispersion of CNCs in the polymer fiber and their effect on the...

  6. The effect of silanated and impregnated fiber on the tensile strength of E-glass fiber reinforced composite retainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niswati Fathmah Rosyida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fiber reinforced composite (FRC is can be used in dentistry as an orthodontic retainer. FRC  still has a limitations because of to  a weak bonding between fibers and matrix. Purpose: This research was aimed to evaluate the effect of silane as coupling agent and fiber impregnation on the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Methods: The samples of this research were classified into two groups each of which consisted of three subgroups, namely the impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane and the non-impregnated fiber group (original, 1x addition of silane, 2x addition of silane. The tensile strength was measured by a universal testing machine. The averages of the tensile strength in all groups then were compared by using Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney post hoc tests. Results: The averages of the tensile strength (MPa in the impregnated fiber group can be known as follow; original impregnated fiber (26.60±0.51, 1x addition of silane (43.38±4.42, and 2x addition of silane (36.22±7.23. The averages of tensile strength (MPa in the non-impregnated fiber group can also be known as follow; original non-impregnated fiber (29.38±1.08, 1x addition of silane (29.38±1.08, 2x addition of silane (12.48±2.37. Kruskal Wallis test showed that there was a significant difference between the impregnated fiber group and the non-impregnated fiber group (p<0.05. Based on the results of post hoc test, it is also known that the addition of silane in the impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the increasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC (p<0.05, while the addition of silane in the non-impregnated fiber group had a significant effect on the decreasing of the tensile strength of E-glass FRC. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the addition of silane in the non-silanated fiber group can increase the tensile strength of E-glass FRC, but the addition of silane in the silanated fiber group can

  7. Effects of simulated nuclear thermal pulses on fiber optic cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, A.J.; Share, S.; Wasilik, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of pulsed thermal radiation on fiber optic cables with a variety of jackets (polyurethane, PVC, fluorocarbon) are presented. Exposure between 27 and 85 cal/cm 2 did not sever the optical fibers, but the radiation did cause disintegration of the jackets and the Kevlar strength members, which resulted in a significant reduction of the cable's ability to survive mechanical stress. Hardening techniques are discussed. The addition of low absorptance materials (white Teflon tape and aluminum foil) under clear or white Teflon jackets prevented some types of cables from being affected at fluences up to 110 cal/cm 2

  8. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  9. Effects of cellulose fiber with different fiber length on rheological properties of wheat dough and quality of baked rolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauková, Michaela; Kohajdová, Zlatica; Karovičová, Jolana; Kuchtová, Veronika; Minarovičová, Lucia; Tomášiková, Lenka

    2017-09-01

    Powdered cellulose is often used in cereal processing industry. The effects of partial replacement (0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5%) of wheat flour by cellulose fiber with different fiber length (80, 120 and 220 µm) on rheological properties of wheat dough and qualitative parameters of baked rolls were studied. Sensory evaluation of baked products was also performed. Mixing and pasting properties of dough were determined by Mixolab. Generally, cellulose-enriched dough was characterized with higher water absorption, dough stability and parameters C2 and C3. Moreover, it was found that parameters C4 and C5 increased with increasing cellulose fiber length. From the results, it was also concluded that the physical parameters of baked rolls containing cellulose were reduced. It was also observed that the incorporation of cellulose fiber with shorter fiber length concluded in lower rolls volume compared to cellulose fiber with long fiber length. Texture analyses showed that the firmness of rolls containing cellulose at the substitution level 5% was significantly higher than those of the control, whereas the springiness of wheat rolls was not significantly affected. It was also recorded that the firmness and cohesiveness of baked rolls were higher after the addition of cellulose fiber with shorter fiber length. Sensory evaluation indicated that baked rolls with cellulose addition up to 1% were comparable with control rolls. Results also showed that higher levels of cellulose significantly decreased crust, taste, color and porosity of rolls.

  10. Investigations on the Broadband Shielding Effectiveness of Metallized Glass Fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coburn, William

    1998-01-01

    ...) is an E-glass fiber metallized with Al and processed into a nonwoven mat. When formed into a mat, the MGFs lead to an effective sample conductivity, sigma eff, which is the parameter of interest for electromagnetic shielding in the RF region...

  11. Nitrogen-doped graphene: effect of graphite oxide precursors and nitrogen content on the electrochemical sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, Monica; Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdenek; Klímová, Kateřina; Pumera, Martin

    2017-06-21

    Graphene, produced via chemical methods, has been widely applied for electrochemical sensing due to its structural and electrochemical properties as well as its ease of production in large quantity. While nitrogen-doped graphenes are widely studied materials, the literature showing an effect of graphene oxide preparation methods on nitrogen quantity and chemical states as well as on defects and, in turn, on electrochemical sensing is non-existent. In this study, the properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials, prepared via hydrothermal synthesis using graphite oxide produced by various classical methods using permanganate or chlorate oxidants Staudenmaier, Hummers, Hofmann and Brodie oxidation methods, were studied; the resulting nitrogen-doped graphene oxides were labeled as ST-GO, HU-GO, HO-GO and BR-GO, respectively. The electrochemical oxidation of biomolecules, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, dopamine, nicotinamide adenine nucleotide and DNA free bases, was carried out using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry techniques. The nitrogen content in doped graphene oxides increased in the order ST-GO graphene followed this trend, as shown in the cyclic voltammograms. This is a very important finding that provides insight into the electrocatalytic effect of N-doped graphene. The nitrogen-doped graphene materials exhibited improved sensitivity over bare glassy carbon for ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine detection. These studies will enhance our understanding of the effects of graphite oxide precursors on the electrochemical sensing properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials.

  12. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  13. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  14. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlMaadeed, M.A.; Labidi, Sami; Krupa, Igor; Karkri, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  15. Effect of high temperature annealing on the microstructure of SCS-6 SiC fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, X. J.; Pirouz, P.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of annealing the SCS-6 SiC fiber for one hour at 2000 C in an argon atmosphere is reported. The SiC grains in the fiber coarsen appreciably and the intergranular carbon films segregate to the grain junctions. It would appear that grain growth in the outer part of the fiber is primarily responsible for the loss in fiber strength and improvement in fiber creep resistance.

  16. Effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact and interlaminar fracture properties of textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suresh K.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and mode I and mode II fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates. Uniweave resin-transfer-molded 48 ply graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) laminates were stitched with Kevlar and glass yarns of different linear densities and stitch spacings. Delaminations were implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed to determine the effects of stitching on the compressive strength. The results showed outstanding improvements of up to 400 percent in the compression strength over the unstitched laminates. In impact and static indentation tests the onset of damage occurred at the same level, but the extent of damage was less in stitched laminates. Mode I fracture toughness of 24 ply Uniweave unidirectional (AS4/3501-6) stitched laminates was measured by conducting double-cantilever-beam tests. The critical strain energy release rate (G(sub Ic)) was found to be up to 30 times higher than the unstitched laminates. Mode II fracture toughness of the Uniweave laminates was measured by performing end-notched-flexure tests. Two new methods to compute the apparent G(sub IIc) are presented. The apparent G(sub IIc) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates.

  17. Electron beam irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced PEEK composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki; Odajima, Tosikazu; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-03-01

    Carbon fiber(CF) reinforced composites, using polyarylether-sulfone (PES) or polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as matrix material, were prepared and their electron beam irradiation effects were studied on the basis of changes in mechanical and dynamic viscoelastic properties and observation of fracture surfaces. The flexural strength of PES-CF composite decreased to 70 % of the initial strength after the irradiation of 3 MGy and 40 % after 15 MGy. The change in the profile of stress-strain (S-S) curves and fractographic observation by electron microscopy indicated that this composite irradiated with over 3 MGy was fractured by delamination caused by to the degradation of matrix polymer. The mechanical properties of PEEK-CF composite were scarcely decreased even after irradiated up to 180 MGy and this composite showed very high radiation resistance. The change in the profile of S-S curves and fractographic observation showed that this composite fractured due to destruction of fiber in the dose range less than 180 MGy, indicating that PEEK was excellent matrix material used in high radiation field. PEEK-PES-CF composite which was composed of the carbon fibers coated with PES solution showed less radiation resistance compared with PEEK-CF composite; the flexural strength decreased to 85 % of the initial value after the irradiation with 90 MGy. It was revealed from the changes in the profile of S-S curve that the specimen irradiated over 120 MGy was fractured due to not only fiber destruction but delamination. Deterioration mechanism of PEEK-PES-CF composite was studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements in connection with the damage on matrix-fiber interface. It was suggested that the deterioration in mechanical properties of this composite was caused by the degradation of PES that coated on the surface of the carbon fibers. (author)

  18. The Effect of Fiber Strength Stochastics and Local Fiber Volume Fraction on Multiscale Progressive Failure of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Jr., Thomas E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous fiber unidirectional polymer matrix composites (PMCs) can exhibit significant local variations in fiber volume fraction as a result of processing conditions that can lead to further local differences in material properties and failure behavior. In this work, the coupled effects of both local variations in fiber volume fraction and the empirically-based statistical distribution of fiber strengths on the predicted longitudinal modulus and local tensile strength of a unidirectional AS4 carbon fiber/ Hercules 3502 epoxy composite were investigated using the special purpose NASA Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC); local effective composite properties were obtained by homogenizing the material behavior over repeating units cells (RUCs). The predicted effective longitudinal modulus was relatively insensitive to small (8%) variations in local fiber volume fraction. The composite tensile strength, however, was highly dependent on the local distribution in fiber strengths. The RUC-averaged constitutive response can be used to characterize lower length scale material behavior within a multiscale analysis framework that couples the NASA code FEAMAC and the ABAQUS finite element solver. Such an approach can be effectively used to analyze the progressive failure of PMC structures whose failure initiates at the RUC level. Consideration of the effect of local variations in constituent properties and morphologies on progressive failure of PMCs is a central aspect of the application of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) principles for composite materials.

  19. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  20. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  1. Characterization and Effects of Fiber Pull-Outs in Hole Quality of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Ashrafi, Sina; Miller, Peter W; Wandro, Kevin M; Kim, Dave

    2016-10-13

    Hole quality plays a crucial role in the production of close-tolerance holes utilized in aircraft assembly. Through drilling experiments of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic composites (CFRP), this study investigates the impact of varying drilling feed and speed conditions on fiber pull-out geometries and resulting hole quality parameters. For this study, hole quality parameters include hole size variance, hole roundness, and surface roughness. Fiber pull-out geometries are quantified by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the mechanically-sectioned CFRP-machined holes, to measure pull-out length and depth. Fiber pull-out geometries and the hole quality parameter results are dependent on the drilling feed and spindle speed condition, which determines the forces and undeformed chip thickness during the process. Fiber pull-out geometries influence surface roughness parameters from a surface profilometer, while their effect on other hole quality parameters obtained from a coordinate measuring machine is minimal.

  2. Effect of graphite loading on the electrical and mechanical properties of Poly (Ethylene Oxide)/Poly (Vinyl Chloride) polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, M. D. S.; Supri, A. G.; Hanif, M. P. M.; Yazid, M. I. M.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, films consisting of a blend of poly (ethylene oxide)/poly (vinyl chloride) (PEO/PVC) and a conductive filler, graphite were prepared and characterized for their mechanical and electrical properties. Solid polymer blend films based on PEO/PVC (50/50 wt%/wt%) with different graphite loading were prepared by using solution casting technique. Electrical conductivity results discovered the conductivity increased with increasing of filler loading. However, increasing amount of graphite loading led to a decreased in tensile strength and young’s modulus of PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films. The dispersion of graphite and mechanism of conductive path in the polymer films were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of the PEO/PVC/Graphite polymer films shows that agglomeration occurred to complete the connection of conductive path, thus improving the conductivity behavior of the polymer films.

  3. Thermal conductivity enhancement of sodium acetate trihydrate by adding graphite powder and the effect on stability of supercooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Berg; Dannemand, Mark; Kong, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    . The graphite powder was stabilized using carboxymetyl cellulose and successfully tested in heating and supercooling cycles with no loss of performance. Thermal conductivity enhancing properties of graphite powder was shown in samples. Since the experiments were conducted in small scale, at 200 g per sample......, large scale experiments are required to validate graphite as a thermo conductivity enhancing agent, suitable for use in seasonal heat storage applications utilizing SAT....

  4. Reflection effects in multimode fiber systems utilizing laser transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Harry E.

    1991-11-01

    A number of optical communication lines are now in use at NASA-Kennedy for the transmission of voice, computer data, and video signals. Now, all of these channels use a single carrier wavelength centered near 1300 or 1550 nm. Engineering tests in the past have given indications of the growth of systematic and random noise in the RF spectrum of a fiber network as the number of connector pairs is increased. This noise seems to occur when a laser transmitter is used instead of a LED. It has been suggested that the noise is caused by back reflections created at connector fiber interfaces. Experiments were performed to explore the effect of reflection on the transmitting laser under conditions of reflective feedback. This effort included computer integration of some of the instrumentation in the fiber optic lab using the Lab View software recently acquired by the lab group. The main goal was to interface the Anritsu Optical and RF spectrum analyzers to the MacIntosh II computer so that laser spectra and network RF spectra could be simultaneously and rapidly acquired in a form convenient for analysis. Both single and multimode fiber is installed at Kennedy. Since most are multimode, this effort concentrated on multimode systems.

  5. Immunomodulatory effects in workers exposed to naturally occurring asbestos fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, Caterina; Costa, Chiara; Matera, Serena; Puglisi, Beatrice; Costanzo, Valentina; Bracci, Massimo; Fenga, Concettina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla

    2017-05-01

    Natural asbestiform fibers are defined 'naturally occurring asbestos' (NOA) and refer to the mineral as a natural component of soils or rocks. The release of NOA fibers into the air from rocks or soils by routine human activities or natural weathering processes represents a risk for human beings. Fluoro-edenite (FE) is a NOA fiber detected in the benmoreitic lava in the area of Biancavilla, South-west slope of Mt. Etna. The aim of the present study was to investigate FE immunotoxicity pathways in a group of 38 occupationally exposed construction workers, in order to find any biological markers of its effect. Subjects underwent respiratory function tests and HRCT total chest scanning. Serum IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were measured. The presence of PPs was significantly greater in subjects exposed than in the control (25 vs. 2). In subjects exposed to FE, IL-1β and TNF-α values were significantly higher than the controls. The previously observed increase of IL-1β and IL-18 showed a probable involvement of the proteic complex defined inflammosome by FE fibers.

  6. Effect of Fiber Reinforcement on the Response of Structural Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Gregor; Li, Victor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a series of investigations on the effect of fiber reinforcement on the response of structural members in direct tension and flexure under reversed cyclic loading conditions. The design approach of the fiber reinforced cementitious composite is based on fracture mechanics...... principles, which will be described in the first part of the paper along with an introduction of the relevant material properties of the resulting engineered cementitious composite (ECC). This class of composites is characterized by strain hardening and multiple cracking properties in uniaxial tension...... and an ultimate tensile strain capacity on the order of several percent. Subsequently, the synergistic effects of composite deformation mechanisms in the ECC and structural members subjected to large shear reversals are identified. Beneficial effects observed in the reinforced ECC structural members as compared...

  7. Effect of Fiber Layers on the Fracture Resistance of Fiber Reinforced Composite Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Fazel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to introduce the fiber reinforced composite bridges and evaluate the most suitable site and position for placement of fibers in order to get maximum strength. Methods: The study included 20 second premolars and 20 second molars selected for fabricating twenty fiber reinforced composite bridges. Twenty specimens were selected for one fiber layer and the remaining teeth for two fiber layers. In the first group, fibers were placed in the inferior third and in the second group, fibers were placed in both the middle and inferior third region. After tooth preparation, the restorations were fabricated, thermocycled and then loaded with universal testing machine in the middle of the pontics with crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data was analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Independent sample t test and Kaplan-Meier test. Mode of failure was evaluated using stereomicroscope. Results: Mean fracture resistance for the first and second groups was 1416±467N and 1349±397N, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the groups (P>0.05.In the first group, 5 specimens had delamintation and 5 specimens had detachment between fibers and resin composite. In the second group, there were 4 and 6 delaminations and detachments, respectively. There was no fracture within the fiber. Conclusion: In the fiber reinforced fixed partial dentures, fibers reinforce the tensile side of the connectors but placement of additional fibers at other sites does not increase the fracture resistance of the restoration.

  8. Effect of high pressure hydrogen on the mechanical characteristics of single carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Koo; Kwon, Oh Heon; Jang, Hoon-Sik; Ryu, Kwon Sang; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2018-02-01

    In this study, carbon fiber was exposed to a pressure of 7 MPa for 24 h in high pressure chamber. The tensile test for carbon fiber was conducted to estimate the effect on the high pressure hydrogen in the atmosphere. To determine the tensile strength and Weibull modulus, approximately thirty carbon fiber samples were measured in all cases, and carbon fiber exposed to high pressure argon was evaluated to verify only the effect of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon fiber samples were annealed at 1950 °C for 1 h for a comparison with normal carbon fiber and then tested under identical conditions. The results showed that the tensile strength scatter of normal carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was relatively wider and the Weibull modulus was decreased. Moreover, the tensile strength of the annealed carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was increased, and these samples indicated a complex Weibull modulus because the hydrogen stored in the carbon fiber influenced the mechanical characteristic.

  9. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  10. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  11. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  12. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Hua [Key Laboratory for Liquid phase chemical oxidation Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Chengguo, E-mail: sduwangchg@gmail.com [Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Shan; Lin Xue [Carbon Fibre Engineering Research Center, Faculty of Materials Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, KClO{sub 3} and silane coupling agent ({gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor

  13. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Hua; Wang Chengguo; Zhang Shan; Lin Xue

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. ► Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. ► Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. ► Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H 2 SO 4 , KClO 3 and silane coupling agent (γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor performance of the resulting fiber/resin composites.

  14. Effects of Crack Measurement Methods on The Determination of Fracture Toughness of IG-110 Isotropic Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Dae Jong; Jang, Chang Heui

    2010-02-01

    This report represents experimental data on the differences in the fracture toughness values due to different crack length measurement methods, i.e. direct current potential drop method (DCPD), traveling microscope method (TM), and dye penetration method (DP). SENB specimens made of IG-11 fine grained isotropic graphite (specimen size: 200(L) x 20(W) x 15(B) mm 3 ) were used. Results on crack length estimation showed that the TM and the DP methods resulted in similar crack length changing behaviors, and the crack length estimated by DCPD was the shortest. Comparisons of crack growth resistance curves (K R curves) showed that the DCPD showed the lowest and a decreasing K R curve with a crack extension. Both the curves from TM and DP showed increasing K R curves with a crack extension, but the curve from DP was unstable. The K R curve estimated from TM appeared to be the most stable one

  15. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers: effect of synthesis catalyst and pretreatment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueking, Angela D; Yang, Ralph T; Rodriguez, Nelly M; Baker, R Terry K

    2004-02-03

    A series of graphite nanofibers (GNFs) that were subjected to various pretreatments were used to determine how modifications in the carbon structure formed during either synthesis or pretreatment steps results in active or inactive materials for hydrogen storage. The nanofibers possessing a herringbone structure and a high degree of defects were found to exhibit the best performance for hydrogen storage. These materials were exposed to several pretreatment procedures, including oxidative, reductive, and inert environments. Significant hydrogen storage levels were found for several in situ pretreatments. Examination of the nanofibers by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after pretreatment and subsequent hydrogen storage revealed the existence of edge attack and an enhancement in the generation of structural defects. These findings suggest that pretreatment in certain environments results in the creation of catalytic sites that are favorable toward hydrogen storage. The best pretreatment resulted in a 3.8% hydrogen release after exposure at 69 bar and room temperature.

  16. Effects of external environments on the short beam shear strength of filament wound graphite/epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, B. G.; Clemons, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Filament wound graphite/epoxy samples were immersed in seawater, deionized water, and toluene at room temperature and 80 deg C for 5, 15, and 43 days, and in methanol at room temperature for 15 and 43 days. The percent weight gains and short beam shear strengths were determined after environmental exposure. Samples immersed in deionized water and seawater had higher percent weight gains than those immersed in toluene at room temperature and 80 deg C. The percent weight gains for samples immersed in methanol at room temperature were comparable to those of deionized water and seawater immersed samples. A comparison of percent decreases in short beam shear strengths could not be made due to a large scatter in data. This may indicate defects in samples due to machining or variations in material properties due to processing.

  17. The effect of mass transport on the graphite/CO2 reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, W.J.

    1984-11-01

    The Graphite/CO 2 reaction is strongly inhibited by the reaction product CO and therefore any model for the influence of mass transport on reaction rate should consider this. The problem of internal mass transport alone has been considered in previous notes. This note extends the models to include external mass transport. Results are compared with simple first order reaction with no volume change. The calculations demonstrate that, for strong CO inhibition, external mass transport limits reaction at a much lower rate than for first order kinetics and that the usual concept of three reaction zones corresponding to chemical control, in-pore diffusion control and boundary layer control can be unrealistically idealised. (U.K.)

  18. Effect of fiber content on flexural properties of glass fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 prepared by injection molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakura, Manamu; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2017-07-26

    The use of non-metal clasp denture (NMCD) materials may seriously affect the remaining tissues because of the low rigidity of NMCD materials such as polyamides. The purpose of this study was to develop a high-rigidity glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (GFRTP) composed of E-glass fiber and polyamide-6 for NMCDs using an injection molding. The reinforcing effects of fiber on the flexural properties of GFRTPs were investigated using glass fiber content ranging from 0 to 50 mass%. Three-point bending tests indicated that the flexural strength and elastic modulus of a GFRTP with a fiber content of 50 mass% were 5.4 and 4.7 times higher than those of unreinforced polyamide-6, respectively. The result showed that the physical characteristics of GFRTPs were greatly improved by increasing the fiber content, and the beneficial effects of fiber reinforcement were evident. The findings suggest that the injection-molded GFRTPs are adaptable to NMCDs because of their excellent mechanical properties.

  19. Effects of dietary fibers with different physiochemical properties on feeding motivation in adult female pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza Da Silva, C.; Borne, van den J.J.G.C.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Kemp, B.; Bolhuis, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    he satiating effects of dietary fiber may depend more on physicochemical properties of the fiber than on total fiber intake. These properties are expected to affect satiety feelings and feeding motivation due to different effects in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the current study was to

  20. Characterization of Fabricated Photonic Crystal Fibers Using Effective Index Method

    OpenAIRE

    Faramarz E. Seraji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), which have been experimentally determined in the last few years in Iran's Telecom Research Center are analyzed and compared theoretically using an effective index method. The PCFs under investigation are fabricated with a high speed drawing process that has not yet been reported elsewhere. It was shown that at higher wavelengths in PCFs; the light field is confined in the core where in shorter wavelengths the field spread...

  1. Irradiation Effects of Electron Beam on Optical Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hong Gu; Oh, Kyung Hwan [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Ho Jin [Nucron Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The surveillance or monitoring systems used in space station, nuclear power plant and nuclear waste repository, are often equipped with optical fibers to remotely locating expensive camera systems so as to protect them from direct irradiation. Especially in nuclear power plant and nuclear waste repository, irradiation by gamma-ray and beta-ray are most concerned. The effective life-time of such surveillance system may depend on the soundness of the optical fiber because it is the component to be exposed the high intensity of radiation field by purpose. Though the degradation of mechanical properties such as hardness and elasticity may occur but the degradation of the optical property such as spectral transmittance is the most possible cause of the effective life-time limitation. Generally 30 % reduction of light signal transmittance is considered as the life-time threshold point of such optical systems. In this paper, we studied irradiation effects on spectral transparency of various commonly-used optical fibers with high energy electron beam to conveniently simulate the both gamma-ray and beta-ray irradiation situation.

  2. Temperature distribution in graphite during annealing in air cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, C.R. de.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the evaluation temperature distributions in graphite during annealing operation in graphite. Moderated an-cooled reactors, is presented. One single channel and one dimension for air and graphite were considered. A numerical method based on finite control volumes was used for partioning the mathematical equations. The problem solution involves the use of unsteady equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for air, and energy conservation for graphite. The source term was considered as stored energy release during annealing for describing energy conservation in the graphite. The coupling of energy conservation equations in air and graphite is performed by the heat transfer term betwen air and graphite. The results agree with experimental data. A sensitivity analysis shown that the termal conductivity of graphite and the maximum inlet channel temperature have great effect on the maximum temperature reached in graphite during the annealing. (author)

  3. Effects of fiber length on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Tiesong; Jia Dechang; He Peigang; Wang Meirong; Liang Defu

    2008-01-01

    A kind of sheet-like carbon fiber preform was developed using short fibers (2, 7 and 12 mm, respectively) as starting materials and used to strengthen a geopolymer. Mechanical properties, fracture behavior, microstructure and toughening mechanisms of the as-prepared composites were investigated by three-point bending test, optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the short carbon fibers disperse uniformly in geopolymer matrix. The C f /geopolymer composites exhibit apparently improved mechanical properties and an obvious noncatastrophic failure behavior. The composite reinforced by the carbon fibers of 7 mm in length shows a maximum flexural strength as well as the highest work of facture, which are nearly 5 times and more than 2 orders higher than that of the geopolymer matrix, respectively. The predominant strengthening and toughening mechanisms are attributed to the apparent fiber bridging and pulling-out effect based on the weak fiber/matrix interface as well as the sheet-like carbon fiber preform

  4. Effect of heat treatment on carbon fiber surface properties and fibers/epoxy interfacial adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Zhishuang; Zhang Baoyan; Shi Fenghui; Li Min; Zhang Zuoguang; Gu Yizhuo

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber surface properties are likely to change during the molding process of carbon fiber reinforced matrix composite, and these changes could affect the infiltration and adhesion between carbon fiber and resin. T300B fiber was heat treated referring to the curing process of high-performance carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites. By means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), activated carbon atoms can be detected, which are defined as the carbon atoms conjunction with oxygen and nitrogen. Surface chemistry analysis shows that the content of activated carbon atoms on treated carbon fiber surface, especially those connect with the hydroxyl decreases with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) analysis reveals that the dispersive surface energy γ S d increases and the polar surface energy γ S sp decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases to 200. Contact angle between carbon fiber and epoxy E51 resin, which is studied by dynamic contact angle test (DCAT) increases with the increasing heat treatment temperature, indicating the worse wettability comparing with the untreated fiber. Moreover, micro-droplet test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the treated carbon fiber/epoxy is lower than that of the untreated T300B fiber which is attributed to the decrement of the content of reactive functional groups including hydrogen group and epoxy group.

  5. Determination of total selenium in nutritional supplements and selenised yeast by Zeeman-effect graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Ekelund, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the determination of total selenium in nutritional supplements and selenised yeast is described. The samples were ashed in nitric acid. Hydrochloric acid was used to prevent precipitation of, in particular, iron salts. After appropriate dilutions, the selenium was determined by Zeeman......-effect background corrected graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A furnace ashing step at 1100 °C was necessary in order to obtain a total recovery of selenium when present in the organic form. Palladium nitrate-magnesium nitrate was used as a matrix modifier. Independent methods were used to determine...... the content of selenium in a selenised yeast check sample. Accuracy was assured using this sample and by recovery experiments. Between-day random error showed a coefficient of variation of 4.2%. Results from the analysis of eight different commercial supplements were in good agreement with declared contents....

  6. The effect of 150μm expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia); Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmadster@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150μm expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 °C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  7. The effect of 150μm expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, Sami; Shariff, A. M.; Bustam, M. A.; Ahmad, Faiz

    2014-01-01

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150μm expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 °C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char

  8. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, Ramani, E-mail: rvg@barc.gov.in [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Roy, Mainak, E-mail: mainak73@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Thomas, Susy [High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Patra, A.K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sathiyamoorthy, D. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Carbon–carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon–carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix–resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d{sub 002} spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp{sup 2}-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d{sub 002} values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ∼85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  9. Effect of covalently bonded polysiloxane multilayers on the electrochemical behavior of graphite electrode in lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Qinmin; Jiang, Yinghua [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Polysiloxane multilayers were covalently bonded to the surface of natural graphite particles via diazonium chemistry and silylation reaction. The as-prepared graphite exhibited excellent discharge-charge behavior as negative electrode materials in lithium ion batteries. The improvement in the electrochemical performance of the graphite electrodes was attributed to the formation of a stable and flexible passive film on their surfaces. It was also revealed that the chemical compositions of the multilayers exerted influence on the electrochemical behavior of the graphite electrodes. The result of this study presents a new strategy to the formation of elastic and strong passive film on the graphite electrode via molecular design. Owing to the diversity of polysilxoane multilayers, this method also enables researchers to control the surface chemistries of carbonaceous materials with flexibility. (author)

  10. Effects of graphite doping on critical current density and microstructure of MgB{sub 2} bulks by an improved Mg-diffusion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, X.F. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: yshao@home.swjtu.edu.cn; Feng, Y. [Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, P.O. Box 51, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710016 (China); Western Superconductivity Technology Company, Xi' an (China); Yang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2008-09-15

    abstract: A series of graphite-doped MgB{sub 2} bulks with high density have been successfully prepared by an improved Mg-diffusion method in ambient pressure. The effects of graphite doping on lattice parameters, T{sub c}, J{sub c} and microstructure of MgB{sub 2} have been investigated. The results show that compared to the nano-C-doped or CNTs-doped MgB{sub 2}, C is not easy to substitute B in graphite-doped MgB{sub 2}. However, at the same C content, the graphite-doped MgB{sub 2} has a higher J{sub c}. At 10 K and self-field, the J{sub c} for MgB{sub 1.985}C{sub 0.015} reaches 0.58 MA/cm{sup 2}. For the MgB{sub 1.945}C{sub 0.055}, at 5 K, 7 T and 10 K, 6 T the J{sub c} achieves 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} which is two orders of magnitude higher than that for the undoped sample. In addition to improving electron scattering and intergranular connectivity, the unreacted graphite in the graphite-doped MgB{sub 2} is proposed to be responsible to the excellent J{sub c} properties of MgB{sub 2} in high fields, due to depressed grain growth and enhanced grain boundary flux pinning.

  11. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon Sub [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Greenhouse Gas Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Moon Gyu [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Croiset, Eric, E-mail: ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Chen, Zhongwei [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L3G1 (Canada); Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung [Greenhouse Gas Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Kwang Bok, E-mail: cosy32@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H{sub 2}S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H{sub 2}S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} on H{sub 2}S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H{sub 2}S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H{sub 2}S since it allows a reducing environment for Zn-O and Zn-S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn{sup 2+}) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}.

  12. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hoon Sub; Park, Moon Gyu; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Yi, Kwang Bok

    2013-09-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H2S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H2S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H2 and CO2 on H2S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H2S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H2S since it allows a reducing environment for Znsbnd O and Znsbnd S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn2+) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H2S and CO2.

  13. Effect of active zinc oxide dispersion on reduced graphite oxide for hydrogen sulfide adsorption at mid-temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon Sub; Park, Moon Gyu; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Nam, Sung Chan; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Yi, Kwang Bok

    2013-01-01

    Composites of Zinc oxide (ZnO) with reduced graphite oxide (rGO) were synthesized and used as adsorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) at 300 °C. Various characterization methods (TGA, XRD, FT-IR, TEM and XPS) were performed in order to link their H 2 S adsorption performance to the properties of the adsorbent's surface. Microwave-assisted reduction process of graphite oxide (GO) provided mild reduction environment, allowing oxygen-containing functional groups to remain on the rGO surface. It was confirmed that for the ZnO/rGO synthesize using the microwave-assisted reduction method, the ZnO particle size and the degree of ZnO dispersion remained stable over time at 300 °C, which was not the case for only the ZnO particles themselves. This stable highly dispersed feature allows for sustained high surface area over time. This was confirmed through breakthrough experiments for H 2 S adsorption where it was found that the ZnO/rGO composite showed almost four times higher ZnO utilization efficiency than ZnO itself. The effect of the H 2 and CO 2 on H 2 S adsorption was also investigated. The presence of hydrogen in the H 2 S stream had a positive effect on the removal of H 2 S since it allows a reducing environment for Zn-O and Zn-S bonds, leading to more active sites (Zn 2+ ) to sulfur molecules. On the other hand, the presence of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) showed the opposite trend, likely due to the oxidation environment and also due to possible competitive adsorption between H 2 S and CO 2 .

  14. The effect of irradiation process on the optical fiber coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zeyu; Xiao, Chun; Rong, Liang; Ji, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Protective fiber coating decides the mechanical strength of an optical fiber as well as its resistance against the influence of environment, especially in some special areas like irradiation atmospheres. According to the experiment in this paper, it was found that the tensile force and peeling force of resistant radiation optical fiber was improved because of the special optical fiber coating.

  15. Effects of aqueous ammonia treatment on fiber's surface morphology and enzymatic digestibility of empty fruit bunch fiber (EFBF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tang Pei; Hassan, Osman

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of aqueous ammonia reflux and soaked treatment on the fiber's surface morphology and enzymatic digestibility of empty fruit bunch fiber (EFBF). The surface morphological changes of the fiber after aqueous ammonia treatment was linked to the sugars yield by enzymatic hydrolysis. The effectiveness of 6.25% aqueous ammonia treatment in improving enzymatic digestibility of EFBF was initially studied in reflux system and by soaking. The results showed that soaked treatment was more effective than reflux system. Further study on soaked treatment of EFBF was carried out by increasing the ammonia concentration to 12.50%. Soaking in aqueous ammonia was conducted at 30°C and 50°C for 24 hours. The results of enzymatic hydrolysis showed that sugar yield from EFBF soaked in 12.50% aqueous ammonia at 50°C was the highest. Approximately 242.91±15.50 mg/g EFBF of xylose and 320.49±28.31 mg/g EFBF of glucose were produced by the action of enzyme Cellic Ctec 2. Results of scanning electron microscopic showed that aqueous ammonia treatment by soaking had caused a more severe structural distortion on the fiber's surface and higher removal of silica bodies that embedded on the fiber than those in reflux system. The changes on the fiber's surface morphology were believed is the contributing factor that improved the enzymatic digestibility of EFBF after aqueous ammonia treatment.

  16. Effective refractive index modulation based optical fiber humidity sensor employing etched fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundendhar, Pathi; Khijwania, Sunil K.

    2015-09-01

    Relative humidity (RH) sensor employing etched fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is reported where RH variations are captured using effective-index-modulation, rather than traditional strain-modulation. Additionly, linear sensor response over wide dynamic range with optimum characteristics is focused. Comprehensive experimental investigation is carried out for the sensor that comprises uniformly etched cladding in the FBG region. Obtained results are observed to be in agreement with the theoretical analysis. Sensor response is observed to be linear over dynamic range 3-94%RH with ~ 0.082 pm/%RH sensitivity, ~0.6%RH resolution, ~ +/-2.5%RH accuracy, ~ +/-0.2 pm average discrepancy and ~ 0.2s response time during humidification/desiccation.

  17. Erbium/ytterbium co-doped double clad fiber amplifier, its applications and effects in fiber optic communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Puneit

    Increased demand for larger bandwidth and longer inter-amplifiers distances translates to higher power budgets for fiber optic communication systems in order to overcome large splitting losses and achieve acceptable signal-to-noise ratios. Due to their unique design ytterbium sensitized erbium doped, double clad fiber amplifiers; offer significant increase in the output powers that can be obtained. In this thesis we investigate, a one-stage, high power erbium and ytterbium co-doped double clad fiber amplifier (DCFA) with output power of 1.4W, designed and built in our lab. Experimental demonstration and numerical simulation techniques have been used to systematically study the applications of such an amplifier and the effects of incorporating it in various fiber optic communication systems. Amplitude modulated subcarrier multiplexed (AM-SCM) CATV distribution experiment has been performed to verify the feasibility of using this amplifier in an analog/digital communication system. The applications of the amplifier as a Fabry-Perot and ring fiber laser with an all-fiber cavity, a broadband supercontinuum source and for generation of high power, short pulses at 5GHz have been experimentally demonstrated. A variety of observable nonlinear effects occur due to the high intensity of the optical powers confined in micron-sized cores of the fibers, this thesis explores in detail some of these effects caused by using the high power Er/Yb double clad fiber amplifier. A fiber optic based analog/digital CATV system experiences composite second order (CSO) distortion due to the interaction between the gain tilt---the variation of gain with wavelength, of the doped fiber amplifier and the wavelength chirp of the directly modulated semiconductor laser. Gain tilt of the Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifier has been experimentally measured and its contribution to the CSO of the system calculated. Theoretical analysis of a wavelength division multiplexed system with closely spaced

  18. Irrigation and cultivar effect on flax fiber and seed yield in the southeast USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is a potential winter crop for the Southeast USA that can be grown for both seed and fiber. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of irrigation on flax straw, fiber, and seed yield of fiber-type and seed-type cultivars at different flax growth stage...

  19. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  20. Heavy irradiation effects in radiation-resistant optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Tatsuo [Tohoku Univ., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Branch, Inst. for Materials Research

    1998-07-01

    Development of a system for optical measurements in a nuclear reactor has been progressing to investigate dynamic changes in a material caused by heavy irradiation. In such system, transfer of optical signals to out-pile measuring systems is being attempted by the use of optical fibers. In this report, the characteristics of optical fibers in the heavy irradiation field were summarized. It has been known that amorphous silica might produce radiolysis and structural defects by the exposure to ionizing radiation. The effects of heavy irradiation on molten silica were extremely complicated. A large intensity of visible light absorption occurred from an early time during start-up of the reactor. The absorption range was limited below 700 nm for the radiation associating fast neutron and the absorption was mostly attributed to non-bridging oxygen hole center. The depletion of optical transferring capacity under the radiation might be related to the internal stress. Therefore, it seems desirable to use optical fibers in the conditions without leading too much stress. (M.N.)

  1. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers surface properties and the mechanical behavior of the resulting carbon fiber-polymer composites has been studied in terms of the contact angle measurements of fibers and the fracture toughness of composites...... in the fiber surface nature and the mechanical interfacial properties between the carbon fiber and epoxy resin matrix of the resulting composites, i.e., the fracture toughness. We suggest that good wetting plays an important role in improving the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and matrices...

  2. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) wer...

  3. Measurements of Chlorine by XPS and SIMS in Nuclear-Grade Graphite. Effect of Treatment by UV, Heat and Moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossiord, C.; Amalric, J.; Rahmani, L.

    2016-01-01

    Pieces of historical nuclear-grade graphite from the same block were submitted to a treatment involving soft or hard UV and heating in moist air. XPS investigations before treatment have shown that – at the geometric surface at least – chlorine binds more commonly by covalent (30 to 100% depending on spots) than ionic bonds. After treatment, bond types are more balanced, though hardly more uniform. Shifts of the ionic peak indicating an oxidised bond were not found. Surface chlorine was measured up to 0.04% atomic. Treatment by hard UV and heating in moist air for 1 ½ hours up to 122°C led to a decrease of surface chlorine by a factor of 2 as measured by ToF and XPS, helped by an etching technique that ensured the accurate positioning of the spots under analysis. Treatment for 8 hours up to 151°C resulted in a decrease of the ToF Cl/ 13 C signal for surface chlorine from 0.73 to 0.20 and of the atomic fraction from 0.02% to 0% as measured by XPS. SIMS investigations reveal that in the first 6 μm from the geometric surface, chlorine, hydrogen and oxygen have a decreasing profile suggestive of diffusion from the surface. In the vicinity to the surface the amounts of all three elements are much greater than in the bulk, possibly due to the availability of dangling bonds. It is speculated that when these are not saturated, back diffusion from the bulk under treatment may increase the quantity of surface chlorine. Treatment in moist air by hard UV for to 1 ½ hours has no marked effect on chlorine in the bulk, although it alters the quantities of hydrogen and oxygen. Treatment for 8 hours decreases chlorine by a factor of about 5 throughout the analysed depth of 6 μm and possibly farther to 15 μm, suggesting its diffusivity to be at least an order greater than 3.10 -16m 2 /s and possibly than 2.10 -15 m²/s, although a range of values is expected owing to the diverse tortuosity and constrictivity of pores. Ratios of hydrogen to oxygen and of chlorine to

  4. Effect of hindlimb unweighting on single soleus fiber maximal shortening velocity and ATPase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, K. S.; Fitts, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of hindlimb unweighting (HU) for 1 to 3 wks on the shortening velocity of a soleus fiber, its ATPase content, and the relative contents of the slow and fast myosin was investigated by measuring fiber force, V(0), ATPase activity, and myosin content in SDS protein profiles of a single rat soleus fiber suspended between a motor arm and a transducer. It was found that HU induces a progressive increase in fiber V(0) that is likely caused, at least in part, by an increase in the fiber's myofibrillar ATPase activity. The HU-induced increases in V(0) and ATPase were associated with the presence of a greater percentage of fast type IIa fibers. However, a large population of fibers after 1, 2, and 3 wks of HU showed increases in V(0) and ATPase but displayed the same myosin protein profile on SDS gels as control fibers.

  5. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    , and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties...... such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate......Intermolecular interaction phenomena occurring between endogenous compounds, such as proteins and bile salts, and electrospun compounds are so far unreported, despite the exposure of fibers to such biorelevant compounds when applied for biomedical purposes, e.g., tissue engineering, wound healing...

  6. Effect of hybrid fiber reinforcement on the cracking process in fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous use of different types of fibers as reinforcement in cementitious matrix composites is typically motivated by the underlying principle of a multi-scale nature of the cracking processes in fiber reinforced cementitious composites. It has been hypothesized that while undergoing...... tensile deformations in the composite, the fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties restrain the propagation and further development of cracking at different scales from the micro- to the macro-scale. The optimized design of the fiber reinforcing systems requires the objective...... materials is carried out by assessing directly their tensile stress-crack opening behavior. The efficiency of hybrid fiber reinforcements and the multi-scale nature of cracking processes are discussed based on the experimental results obtained, as well as the micro-mechanisms underlying the contribution...

  7. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  8. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  9. Effects of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of kenaf fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carada, Paulo Teodoro D. L. [Master’s student in the Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara Miyakodani, Kyotanabe City, Kyoto Prefecture, 610-0394 (Japan); Fujii, Toru; Okubo, Kazuya [Professor in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Tatara Miyakodani, Kyotanabe City, Kyoto Prefecture, 610-0394 (Japan)

    2016-05-18

    Natural fibers are utilized in various ways. One specific application of it, is in the field natural fiber composite (NFC). Considerable amount of researches are conducted in this field due to rising concerns in the harmful effects of synthetic materials to the environment. Additionally, these researches are done in order to overcome the drawbacks which limit the wide use of natural fiber. A way to improve NFC is to look into the reinforcing component (natural fiber). Treatments, which are classified as mechanical or chemical in nature, can be done in order to improve the performance of the natural fiber. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of heat treatment in the mechanical properties of kenaf fiber. In addition, the response of mechanical properties after exposure to high moisture environment of heat-treated kenaf fibers was observed. Heat treatment was done for one hour with the following heating temperatures: 140, 160, 180, and 200 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis was done to calculate the crystallinity index of kenaf fibers after heat treatment. The results showed that increase in tensile strength can be attained when kenaf fibers are heat treated at 140 °C. However, the tensile modulus showed inconsistency with respect to heat treatment temperature. The computed crystallinity index of the fiber matched the tensile strength observed in non-treated and heat-treated kenaf fibers. The results obtained in this study can be used for applications where heat treatment on kenaf fibers is needed.

  10. Chemical Modification Effect on the Mechanical Properties of Coir Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Sultana Mir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber has a vital role as a reinforcing agent due to its renewable, low cost, biodegradable, less abrasive and eco-friendly nature. Whereas synthetic fibers like glass, boron, carbon, metallic, ceramic and inorganic fibers are expensive and not eco-friendly. Coir is one of the natural fibers easily available in Bangladesh and cheap. It is derived from the husk of the coconut (Cocos nucifera. Coir has one of the highest concentrations of lignin, which makes it stronger. In recent years, wide range of research has been carried out on fiber reinforced polymer composites [4-13].The aim of the present research is to characterize brown single coir fiber for manufacturing polymer composites reinforced with characterized fibers. Adhesion between the fiber and polymer is one of factors affecting the strength of manufactured composites. In order to increase the adhesion, the coir fiber was chemically treated separately in single stage (with Cr2(SO43•12(H2O and double stages (with CrSO4 and NaHCO3. Both the raw and treated fibers were characterized by tensile testing, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis, scanning electron microscopic analysis. The result showed that the Young’s modulus increased, while tensile strength and strain to failure decreased with increase in span length. Tensile properties of chemically treated coir fiber was found higher than raw coir fiber, while the double stage treated coir fiber had better mechanical properties compared to the single stage treated coir fiber. Scanning electron micrographs showed rougher surface in case of the raw coir fiber. The surface was found clean and smooth in case of the treated coir fiber. Thus the performance of coir fiber composites in industrial application can be improved by chemical treatment.

  11. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  12. Performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Department of Applied Chemistry, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The effect of negative to positive electrode materials' weight ratio on the electrochemical performance of both activated carbon (AC)/AC and AC/graphite capacitors has been investigated, especially in the terms of capacity and cycle-ability. The limited capacity charge mode has been proposed to improve the cycle performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite. (author)

  13. Effects of alkali treatment on the mechanical and thermal properties of Sansevieria trifasciata fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardiyati, Steven, Rizkiansyah, Raden Reza; Senoaji, A.; Suratman, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, Sansevieria trifasciata fibers were treated by NaOH with concentration 1%,3%, and 5wt% at 100°C for 2 hours. Chesson-Datta methods was used to determine the lignocellulose content of raw sansevieria fibers and to investigate effect of alkali treatment on lignin content of the fiber. Mechanical properties and thermal properties of treated and untreated fibers were measured by means of tensile testing machine and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).The cellulose and lignin contents of raw sansevieria fiber obtained from Chesson-Datta method were 56% and 6% respectively. Mechanical testing of fibers showed the increase of tensile strength from 647 MPa for raw fibers to 902 MPa for 5wt% NaOH treated fibers. TGA result showed the alkali treatment increase the thermal resistance of fibers from 288°C for raw fibers to 307°C for 5% NaOH treated fiber. It was found that alkali treatment affect the mechanical properties and thermal properties of sansevieria fibers.

  14. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  15. Effect of Graphite Concentration on Shear-Wave Speed in Gelatin-Based Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Pamela G.; Rouze, Ned C.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Elasticity-based imaging modalities are becoming popular diagnostic tools in clinical practice. Gelatin-based, tissue mimicking phantoms that contain graphite as the acoustic scattering material are commonly used in testing and validating elasticity-imaging methods to quantify tissue stiffness. The gelatin bloom strength and concentration are used to control phantom stiffness. While it is known that graphite concentration can be modulated to control acoustic attenuation, the impact of graphite concentrationon phantom elasticity has not been characterized in these gelatin phantoms. This work investigates the impact of graphite concentration on phantom shear stiffness as characterized by shear-wave speed measurements using impulsive acoustic-radiation-force excitations. Phantom shear-wave speed increased by 0.83 (m/s)/(dB/(cm MHz)) when increasing the attenuation coefficient slope of the phantom material through increasing graphite concentration. Therefore, gelatin-phantom stiffness can be affected by the conventional ways that attenuation is modulated through graphite concentration in these phantoms. PMID:21710828

  16. A study of the relationship between microstructure and oxidation effects in nuclear graphite at very high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, I.-Hsuan; Tzelepi, Athanasia; Patterson, Eann A.; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang

    2018-04-01

    Graphite is used in the cores of gas-cooled reactors as both the neutron moderator and a structural material, and traditional and novel graphite materials are being studied worldwide for applications in Generation IV reactors. In this study, the oxidation characteristics of petroleum-based IG-110 and pitch-based IG-430 graphite pellets in helium and air environments at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1600 °C were investigated. The oxidation rates and activation energies were determined based on mass loss measurements in a series of oxidation tests. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Although the thermal oxidation mechanism was previously considered to be the same for all temperatures higher than 1000 °C, the significant increases in oxidation rate observed at very high temperatures suggest that the oxidation behavior of the selected graphite materials at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is different. This work demonstrates that changes in surface morphology and in oxidation rate of the filler particles in the graphite materials are more prominent at temperatures above 1200 °C. Furthermore, possible intrinsic factors contributing to the oxidation of the two graphite materials at different temperature ranges are discussed taking account of the dominant role played by temperature.

  17. Effects of different levels of coconut fiber on blood glucose, serum insulin and minerals in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindurani, J A; Rajamohan, T

    2000-01-01

    The effect of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) from coconut kernel (Cocos nucifera L) in rats fed 5%, 15% and 30% level on the concentration of blood glucose, serum insulin and excretion of minerals was studied. Increase in the intake of fiber resulted in significant decrease in the level of blood glucose and serum insulin. Faecal excretion of Cu, Cr, Mn, Mg, Zn and Ca was found to increase in rats fed different levels of coconut fiber when compared to fiber free group. The result of the present investigation suggest that inclusion of coconut fiber in the diet results in significant hypoglycemic action.

  18. Effect of cellulose-based fibers extracted from pineapple (Ananas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New polyurethane foams were fabricated utilizing cellulose-based fibers extracted from pineapple (Ananas comosus) leaf as raw material. The pineapple leaf fibers (PALF) were treated with alkali and subsequently bleached to enhance its fiber-matrix adhesion. Polyurethane composites have been prepared by ...

  19. Effect of Fiber Poisson Contraction on Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical methodology has been developed to investigate the effect of fiber Poisson contraction on matrix multicracking evolution of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The modified shear-lag model incorporated with the Coulomb friction law is adopted to solve the stress distribution in the interface slip region and intact region of the damaged composite. The critical matrix strain energy criterion which presupposes the existence of an ultimate or critical strain energy limit beyond which the matrix fails has been adopted to describe matrix multicracking of CMCs. As more energy is placed into the composite, matrix fractures and the interface debonding occurs to dissipate the extra energy. The interface debonded length under the process of matrix multicracking is obtained by treating the interface debonding as a particular crack propagation problem along the fiber/matrix interface. The effects of the interfacial frictional coefficient, fiber Poisson ratio, fiber volume fraction, interface debonded energy and cycle number on the interface debonding and matrix multicracking evolution have been analyzed. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data of unidirectional SiC/CAS, SiC/CAS-II and SiC/Borosilicate composites.

  20. Effects of bond primers on bending strength and bonding of glass fibers in fiber-embedded maxillofacial silicone prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of three commonly used bond primers on the bending strength of glass fibers and their bond strength to maxillofacial silicone elastomer after 360 hours of accelerated daylight aging. Eighty specimens were fabricated by embedding resin-impregnated fiber bundles (1.5-mm diameter, 20-mm long) into maxillofacial silicone elastomer M511 (Cosmesil). Twenty fiber bundles served as control and did not receive surface treatment with primers, whereas the remaining 60 fibers were treated with three primers (n = 20): G611 (Principality Medical), A-304 (Factor II), and A-330-Gold (Factor II). Forty specimens were dry stored at room temperature (23 ± 1°C) for 24 hours, and the remaining specimens were aged using an environmental chamber under accelerated exposure to artificial daylight for 360 hours. The aging cycle included continuous exposure to quartz-filtered visible daylight (irradiance 760 W/m(2) ) under an alternating weathering cycle (wet for 18 minutes, dry for 102 minutes). Pull-out tests were performed to evaluate bond strength between fiber bundles and silicone using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. A 3-point bending test was performed to evaluate the bending strength of the fiber bundles. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Bonferroni post hoc test, and an independent t-test were carried out to detect statistical significances (p accelerated daylight aging. Treatment with primer and accelerated daylight aging increased bending strength of glass fibers. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Accounting for Fiber Bending Effects in Homogenization of Long Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with homogenized finite-element models of long fiber reinforced composite materials in the context of studying compressive failure modes such as the formation of kink bands and fiber micro-buckling. Compared to finite-element models with an explicit discretization of the ma......The present work deals with homogenized finite-element models of long fiber reinforced composite materials in the context of studying compressive failure modes such as the formation of kink bands and fiber micro-buckling. Compared to finite-element models with an explicit discretization...... of the material micro-structure including individual fibers, homogenized models are computationally more efficient and hence more suitable for modeling of larger and complex structure. Nevertheless, the formulation of homogenized models is more complicated, especially if the bending stiffness of the reinforcing...... fibers is to be taken into account. In that case, so-called higher order strain terms need to be considered. In this paper, important relevant works from the literature are discussed and numerical results from a new homogenization model are presented. The new model accounts for two independent...

  2. Effects of specimen size on the flexural strength and Weibull modulus of nuclear graphite IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Changes in flexural strength and Weibull modulus due to specimen size were investigated for three nuclear graphite grades, IG-110, NBG-18, and PCEA, using four-point-1/3 point (4-1/3) loading with specimens of three different sizes: 3.18 (Thickness) × 6.35 (Width) × 50.8 (Length), 6.50 (T) × 12.0 (W) × 52.0 (L), 18.0 (T) × 16.0 (W) × 64 (L) (mm) (total: 210 specimens). Results showed some specimen size effects were grade dependent: While NBG-18 (a) showed rather significant specimen size effects (37% difference between the 3 T and 18 T), the differences in IG-110 and PCEA were 7.6–15%. The maximum differences in flexural strength due to specimen size were larger in the PCEA and NBG-18 having larger sized coke particles (medium grain size: >300 μm) than the IG-110 with super fine coke particle size (25 μm). The Weibull modulus showed a data population dependency, in that it decreased with increasing numbers of data used for modulus determination. A good correlation between the fracture surface roughness and the flexural strength was confirmed

  3. Graphite nanoplatelets-modified PLA/PCL: Effect of blend ratio and nanofiller localization on structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelnar, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Zhigunov, Alexander; Nevoralová, Martina

    2017-07-01

    Structure and properties of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/poly (ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) influenced by graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were studied in dependence on blend composition. Electron microscopy indicates predominant localization of GNP in PCL. GNP-induced changes in viscosity hinder refinement of PCL inclusions, support PCL continuity in the co-continuous system, and lead to reduction of PLA inclusions size without GNP being present at the interface in the PCL-matrix blend. Negligible differences in crystallinity of both phases indicate that mechanical behaviour is mainly influenced by reinforcement and GNP-induced changes in morphology. Addition of 5 parts of GNP leads to ~40% and ~25% increase of stiffness in the PCL- and PLA-matrix systems, respectively, whereas the reinforcing effect is practically eliminated in the co-continuous systems due to GNP-induced lower continuity of PLA which enhances toughness. Impact resistance of the 80/20 blend shows increase with 5 parts content due to synergistic effect of PCL/GNP stacks, whereas minor increase in the blend of the ductile PCL matrix with brittle PLA inclusions is caused by GNP-modification of the component parameters. Results indicate high potential of GNP in preparing biocompatible systems with wide range of structure and properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of surface relief on the high-dose sputtering of amorphous silicon and graphite by Ar ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulga, V.I.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ion-induced surface relief on high-dose sputtering of amorphous silicon and graphite targets have been studied using binary-collision computer simulation. The relief was modeled as a wavelike surface along two mutually perpendicular surface axes (a 3D hillock-and-valley relief). Most simulations were carried out for normally-incident 30-keV Ar ions. It was shown that the surface relief can both increase and decrease the sputtering yield compared to that for a flat surface. The results of simulations suggest that stabilization of the surface relief is possible even in the absence of any smoothing processes such as surface diffusion of atoms. Effects of a surface relief on the experimentally measurable angular and energy distributions of sputtered atoms are also considered. The fitting parameters of these distributions are shown to be non-monotonic functions of the relief aspect ratio. The angular distribution of atoms sputtered from a relief surface is modulated to a great extent by the shape of the relief. For a rough surface, azimuthal isotropy of the angular distribution of sputtered atoms was found, but at high bombarding energies only

  5. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  6. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  7. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood–plastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migneault, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.migneault@uqat.ca [University of Quebec in Abitibi-Temiscamingue (UQAT), 445 boulevard de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, Québec J9X 5E4 (Canada); Koubaa, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.koubaa@uqat.ca [UQAT (Canada); Perré, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.perre@ecp.fr [École centrale de Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, F-92 295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Riedl, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Riedl@sbf.ulaval.ca [Université Laval, 2425 rue de la Terrasse, Québec City, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed variations of surface chemical characteristics according to fiber origin. • Surface chemical characteristics of fibers could partly explain the differences in mechanical properties of the wood–plastic composites. • Fibers with carbohydrate rich surface led to stronger wood–plastic composites because the coupling between the matrix and fibers using coupling agent is achieved with polar sites mostly available on carbohydrates. • Conversely, lignin or extractives rich surface do not have oxidized functions for the esterification reaction with coupling agent and thus led to wood–plastic composites with lower mechanical properties. • Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfere with the effects of fiber surface chemistry. - Abstract: Because wood–plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same

  8. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood–plastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migneault, Sébastien; Koubaa, Ahmed; Perré, Patrick; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed variations of surface chemical characteristics according to fiber origin. • Surface chemical characteristics of fibers could partly explain the differences in mechanical properties of the wood–plastic composites. • Fibers with carbohydrate rich surface led to stronger wood–plastic composites because the coupling between the matrix and fibers using coupling agent is achieved with polar sites mostly available on carbohydrates. • Conversely, lignin or extractives rich surface do not have oxidized functions for the esterification reaction with coupling agent and thus led to wood–plastic composites with lower mechanical properties. • Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfere with the effects of fiber surface chemistry. - Abstract: Because wood–plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same

  9. In situ polymerization of monomers for polyphenylquinoxaline/graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Methods currently used to prepare fiber reinforced, high temperature resistant polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) composites employ extremely viscous, low solids content solutions of high molecular weight PPQ polymers. An improved approach, described in this report, consists of impregnating the fiber with a solution of the appropriate monomers instead of a solution of previously synthesized high molecular weight polymer. Polymerization of the monomers occurs in situ on the fiber during the solvent removal and curing stages. The in situ polymerization approach greatly simplifies the fabrication of PPQ graphite fiber composites. The use of low viscosity monomeric type solutions facilitates fiber wetting, permits a high solids content, and eliminates the need for prior polymer synthesis.

  10. Effect of natural fibers on mechanical properties of green cement mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Zubaidi, Aseel B.

    2018-05-01

    Natural fibers of banana, reed, palm and coconut were used to reinforce cement composite. Optical microscopy showed that the prepared fibers are different in size and morphology. Nearly equiaxed, ribbon-like and nearly cylindrical morphologies were observed. Each of the utilized natural fibers was incorporated in the cement matrix at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 wt% and cured for 28 days. The scanning electron micrographs for the 1.0 wt% -reinforced composite showed differences in porosity, grain size and shape. Each of the utilized fibers has different effect on the microstructure of the cement composite that depends on the fiber size and morphology. Water absorption, thermal conductivity, bending strength, hardness and compression strengths were measured for the reinforced cement composite. It is found that the final physical and mechanical properties of the set cement composite depend on the fiber content and fiber type through the differences in their sizes and morphologies.

  11. Effect of fiber content on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of hair fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Nanda, Bishnu; Satapathy, Alok

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports on the dielectric and thermal properties of hair fibers reinforced epoxy composites. Hair is an important part of human body which also offers protection to the human body. It is also viewed as a biological waste which is responsible for creating environmental pollution due to its low decomposition rate. But at the same time it has unique microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties. In the present work, epoxy composites are made by solution casting method with different proportions of short hair fiber (SHF). Effects of fiber content on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of epoxy resin are studied. Thermal conductivities of the composites are obtained using a UnithermTM Model 2022 tester. An HIOKI-3532-50 Hi Tester Elsier Analyzer is used for measuring the capacitance of the epoxy-SHF composite, from which dielectric constant (Dk) of the composite are calculated. A reduction in thermal conductivity of the composite is noticed with the increase in wt. % of fiber. The dielectric constant value of the composites also found to be significantly affected by the fiber content.

  12. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  13. Vibration sensing in flexible structures using a distributed-effect modal domain optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Karl M.; Lindner, Douglas K.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    Modal domain optical fiber sensors have recently been employed in the implementation of system identification algorithms and the closed-loop control of vibrations in flexible structures. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor used in these applications, however, only accounted for the effects of strain in the direction of the fiber's longitudinal axis. In this paper, we extend this model to include the effects of arbitrary stress. Using this sensor model, we characterize the sensor's sensitivity and dynamic range.

  14. Effects of addition of different fibers on rheological characteristics of cake batter and quality of cakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ayca; Sumnu, Gulum; Sahin, Serpil

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of addition of dietary fibers on rheological properties of batter and cake quality. Wheat flour was replaced by 5 and 10% (wt%) oat, pea, apple and lemon fibers. All cake batters showed shear thinning behavior. Incorporation of fibers increased consistency index (k), storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″). As quality parameters, specific volume, hardness, weight loss, color and microstructure of cakes were investigated. Cakes containing oat and pea fibers (5%) had similar specific volume and texture with control cakes which contained no fiber. As fiber concentration increased, specific volume decreased but hardness increased. No significant difference was found between weight loss of control cake and cakes with oat, pea and apple fibers. Lemon fiber enriched cakes had the lowest specific volume, weight loss and color difference. When microstructural images were examined, it was seen that control cake had more porous structure than fiber enriched cakes. In addition, lemon and apple fiber containing cakes had less porous crumb structure as compared to oat and pea containing ones. Oat and pea fiber (5%) enriched cakes had similar physical properties (volume, texture and color) with control cakes.

  15. Thermo-optical effects in high-power Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Broeng, Jes

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature gradients in high-power Yb-doped fiber amplifiers by a numerical beam propagation model, which takes thermal effects into account in a self-consistent way. The thermally induced change in the refractive index of the fiber leads to a thermal lensing effect...

  16. Effect of load, area of contact, and contact stress on the tribological properties of polyimide bonded graphite fluoride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A pin-on-disk type of friction and wear apparatus was used to study the effect of load, contact stress and rider area of contact on the friction and wear properties of polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride films. Different rider area contacts were obtained by initially generating flats (with areas of 0.0035, 0.0071, 0.0145, and 0.0240 cm) on 0.476-cm radius hemispherically-tipped riders. Different projected contact stresses were obtained by applying loads of 2.5-to 58.8-N to the flats. Two film wear mechanisms were observed. The first was found to be a linear function of contact stress and was independent of rider area of contact. The second was found to increase exponentially as the stress increased. The second also appeared to be a function of rider contact area. Wear equations for each mechanism were empirically derived from the experimental data. In general, friction coefficients increased with increasing rider contact area and with sliding duration. This was related to the build-up of thick rider transfer films.

  17. Effect of graphite content on magnetic and mechanical properties of TiC-TiN-Mo-Ni cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; Yang, Qingqing; Xiong, Weihao; Huang, Bin; Ruan, Linji; Mao, Qiao; Li, Shengtao

    2018-04-01

    TiC-10TiN-6Mo-xGr-yNi (mol%, Gr represents graphite, x = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and y = 15, 30) cermets were prepared by powder metallurgy method, in order to inverstigate the effect of Gr content on magnetic and mechanical properties of TiC-TiN-Mo-Ni cermets. Room-temperature (RT) saturation magnetization (Ms) and remanence (Mr) of cermets increased with increasing x. This was mainly attributed to that the total content of non-ferromagnetic carbonitride-forming elements Ti and Mo in Ni-based binder phase decreased with increasing x. At the same x, cermets for y = 15 had lower RT Ms and Mr than those for y = 30. Cermets containing more than 2 mol% Gr became ferromagnetic at RT. Bending strength of cermets first increased and then decreased with increasing x. It reached the maximum at x = 2, mainly due to high total content of solutes Ti and Mo in Ni-based binder phase, and moderate thickness of outer rim of Ti(C,N) ceramic grains. Hardness of cermets was not significantly affected by x, mainly due to the combined action of the decrease of the total content of Ti and Mo in binder phase and the increase of the volume fraction of ceramic grains. At the same x, cermets for y = 15 had lower bending strength and higher hardness than those for y = 30.

  18. Effects of resin content and preparing conditions on the properties of polyphenylene sulfide resin/graphite composite for bipolar plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Li-gang; Li, Ai-ju; Yin, Qiang [Key Laboratory for Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Engineering Ceramics, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang, Wei-qiang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Lin, Heng; Zhao, Yi-bo [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2008-03-15

    In the paper, a kind of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) resin/graphite (G) composite for bipolar plate was prepared by using the PPS resin as adhesive and simple hot pressing. The influences of the resin content, the molding temperature and holding time on the conductivity and the bending strength of the PPS/G composite bipolar plate were investigated firstly and then the optimum content and the preparing conditions of the composite were obtained. The experimental results show that the electrical conductivity decreases and the bending strength reveals a serrated variation with increase in PPS resin content; when the holding time is certain, the conductivity decreases and the bending strength increases with the molding temperature increasing. The experimental results further show that the effect of the holding time on the properties of the composite is different at different molding temperatures. The PPS/G composite with 20% PPS resin content has electrical conductivity of 118.9 S cm{sup -1} and bending strength of 52.4 MPa when it molded at 380 C for 30 min, and has electrical conductivity of 105 S cm{sup -1}, bending strength of 55.7 MPa when it molded at 390 C for 30 min. The properties of the composites can meet the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE). (author)

  19. Effects of core models and neutron energy group structures on xenon oscillation in large graphite-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasita, Kiyonobu; Harada, Hiroo; Murata, Isao; Shindo, Ryuichi; Tsuruoka, Takuya.

    1993-01-01

    Xenon oscillations of large graphite-moderated reactors have been analyzed by a multi-group diffusion code with two- and three-dimensional core models to study the effects of the geometric core models and the neutron energy group structures on the evaluation of the Xe oscillation behavior. The study clarified the following. It is important for accurate Xe oscillation simulations to use the neutron energy group structure that describes well the large change in the absorption cross section of Xe in the thermal energy range of 0.1∼0.65 eV, because the energy structure in this energy range has significant influences on the amplitude and the period of oscillations in power distributions. Two-dimensional R-Z models can be used instead of three-dimensional R-θ-Z models for evaluation of the threshold power of Xe oscillation, but two-dimensional R-θ models cannot be used for evaluation of the threshold power. Although the threshold power evaluated with the R-θ-Z models coincides with that of the R-Z models, it does not coincide with that of the R-θ models. (author)

  20. Effects of Fiber Finish on the Performance of Asphalt Binders and Mastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Putman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of finishes applied to polyester fibers on the properties of asphalt binders and mastics. Asphalt binders were mixed with finishes that were extracted from the fibers, and mastics were also made with binder and fibers (with and without finish to isolate the effects of the finish. The results indicated that crude source plays a significant role in how the fiber finish affects the binders and mastics. Additionally different finishes had different effects on binder properties. The major finding of this study is that different polyester fibers, even from the same manufacturer, may not necessarily perform the same in an asphalt mixture. It is important to use fibers that are compatible with the particular asphalt binder that is being used because of the significance of the binder source on the interaction between the finish and the binder.

  1. Modeling thermo-optic effect in large mode area double cladding photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2014-02-01

    The impact of thermally-induced refractive index changes on the single-mode (SM) properties of large mode area (LMA) photonic crystal fibers are thoroughly investigated by means of a full-vector modal solver with integrated thermal model. Three photonic crystal fiber designs are taken into account, namely the 19-cell core fiber, the large-pitch fiber (LPF) and the distributed modal filtering (DMF) fiber, to assess the effects of the interplay between thermal effects and the high-order mode (HOM) suppression mechanisms exploited in order to obtain effectively SM guiding. The results have shown significant differences in the way the SM regime is changed by the increase of heat load, providing useful hints for the design of LMA fibers for high power lasers.

  2. Curaua fiber reinforced high-density polyethylene composites: effect of impact modifier and fiber loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Albano de Morais

    Full Text Available Abstract Short fibers are used in thermoplastic composites to increase their tensile and flexural resistance; however, it often decreases impact resistance. Composites with short vegetal fibers are not an exception to this behavior. The purpose of this work is to produce a vegetal fiber reinforced composite with improved tensile and impact resistance in relation to the polymer matrix. We used poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate, EVA, to recover the impact resistance of high density polyethylene, HDPE, reinforced with Curauá fibers, CF. Blends and composites were processed in a corotating twin screw extruder. The pure polymers, blends and composites were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, tensile mechanical properties and Izod impact resistance. EVA used as impact modifier in the HDPE matrix exhibited a co-continuous phase and in the composites the fibers were homogeneously dispersed. The best combination of mechanical properties, tensile, flexural and impact, were obtained for the formulations of composites with 20 wt. % of CF and 20 to 40 wt. % of EVA. The composite prepared with 20 wt. % EVA and containing 30 wt. % of CF showed impact resistance comparable to pure HDPE and improved tensile and flexural mechanical properties.

  3. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment of graphite and carbon felt electrodes on the anodic current from Shewanella attached cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanio, Monica; Inguva, Saikumar; Kitching, Michael; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The attachment of electrochemically active microorganisms (EAM) on an electrode is determined by both the chemistry and topography of the electrode surface. Pre-treatment of the electrode surface by atmospheric air plasma introduces hydrophilic functional groups, thereby increasing cell attachment and electroactivity in short-term experiments. In this study, we use graphite and carbon felt electrodes to grow the model EAM Shewanella loihica PV-4 at oxidative potential (0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Cell attachment and electroactivity are measured through electrodynamic methods. Atmospheric air plasma pre-treatment increases cell attachment and current output at graphite electrodes by 25%, while it improves the electroactivity of the carbon felt electrodes by 450%. Air plasma pre-treatment decreased the coulombic efficiency on both carbon felt and graphite electrodes by 60% and 80%, respectively. Microbially produced flavins adsorb preferentially at the graphite electrode, and air plasma pre-treatment results in lower flavin adsorption at both graphite and carbon felt electrodes. Results show that air plasma pre-treatment is a feasible option to increase current output in bioelectrochemical systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions)

  5. Simulation of propagation in a bundle of skeletal muscle fibers: Modulation effects of passive fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Kaj-åge; F.A., Roberge

    1997-01-01

    source current (I-ma) enters the passive tissue as a radial load current (I-ep) while the rest flows longitudinally in the cleft between the active and adjacent passive fibers. The conduction velocity of 1.32 m/s was about 30% lower than on an isolated fiber in a Ringer bath, in close agreement...... rate of rise of the action potential upstroke (V-max) from 512 to 503 V/s. Increasing the phase angle of the passive fiber membrane impedence (Z(m)) increases the phase delay between I-ma and I-ep, thereby increasing phi(epp) which in turn slows down propagation and increases V-max....

  6. Influence of ethylene glycol pretreatment on effectiveness of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of polyethylene fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Ying; Li Ranxing; Cai Fang; Fu Kun; Peng Shujing; Jiang Qiuran; Yao Lan; Qiu Yiping

    2010-01-01

    For atmospheric pressure plasma treatments, the results of plasma treatments may be influenced by liquids adsorbed into the substrate. This paper studies the influence of ethylene glycol (EG) pretreatment on the effectiveness of atmospheric plasma jet (APPJ) treatment of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers with 0.31% and 0.42% weight gain after soaked in EG/water solution with concentration of 0.15 and 0.3 mol/l for 24 h, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the surface of fibers pretreated with EG/water solution does not have observable difference from that of the control group. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the oxygen concentration on the surface of EG-pretreated fibers is increased less than the plasma directly treated fibers. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of plasma directly treated fibers to epoxy is increased almost 3 times compared with the control group while that of EG-pretreated fibers to epoxy does not change except for the fibers pretreated with lower EG concentration and longer plasma treatment time. EG pretreatment reduces the water contact angle of UHMWPE fibers. In conclusion, EG pretreatment can hamper the effect of plasma treatment of UHMWPE fibers and therefore longer plasma treatment duration is required for fibers pretreated with EG.

  7. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-02-26

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance.

  8. Retting effect of kenaf bast fiber by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kangm Hyo Kyoung; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) retting were separated from a kenaf bast fiber by a combination of Electron beam irradiation (EBI) and NaOH solution treatment. The methods were based on a 6% NaOH solution treatment after various doses of EBI. FT-IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the content of lignin and hemicellulose in the retted kenaf fibers decreased as the EBI dose increased. Specifically, the lignin in the retted kenaf fiber treated with 300 kGy of EBI was almost completely removed. The morphology of retted kenaf fibers were characterized by SEM image, and the studies showed that the fibrillated degree of retted kenaf fibers treated with various EBI doses and was increased as EBI dose increased. The retted kenaf fibers treated with the EBI at 300 kGy was uniformly fibrillated with 10 {approx} 30 {mu}m diameters.

  9. Retting effect of kenaf bast fiber by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kangm Hyo Kyoung; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) retting were separated from a kenaf bast fiber by a combination of Electron beam irradiation (EBI) and NaOH solution treatment. The methods were based on a 6% NaOH solution treatment after various doses of EBI. FT-IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the content of lignin and hemicellulose in the retted kenaf fibers decreased as the EBI dose increased. Specifically, the lignin in the retted kenaf fiber treated with 300 kGy of EBI was almost completely removed. The morphology of retted kenaf fibers were characterized by SEM image, and the studies showed that the fibrillated degree of retted kenaf fibers treated with various EBI doses and was increased as EBI dose increased. The retted kenaf fibers treated with the EBI at 300 kGy was uniformly fibrillated with 10 ∼ 30 μm diameters

  10. Assessment of effect of chemical treatment to carnauba's fibers straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, T.M.P. de; Carvalho, L.F.M.; Oliveira, R.R. de; Sousa, F.M.S. de; Sousa, R.C. de; Marques, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural fibers in composite materials has been highlighted in the scientific field. However, its application in polymer matrices usually requires surface modifications. The objective of this work was to treat carnauba's straw fibers with NaOH 1 % and NaOH 5% solutions and measure the water absorption. We used the X-ray diffraction (XRD configuration “Bragg- Brentano) for verification of the crystalline phases and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to identify functional groups. The alkali treatment allowed the solubilization of the hemicellulose and lignin without causing changes to cellulose, as indicated by FTIR spectrophotometry and by the increase in crystallinity content. The samples showed the typical peaks of constituents of the fiber. The natural fiber showed an average water absorption of 256 %; fiber treated with NaOH 1%, 315 %; and treated with NaOH 5%, 405 %. Therefore, it is evident improvement in hydrophilicity, fundamental aspect in the interaction fiber / matrix. (author)

  11. Effects of glass fibers on the properties of micro molded plastic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gasparin, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Glass fibers are used to reinforce plastics and to improve their mechanical properties. But plastic filled with glass fibers is a concern for molding of micro scale plastic parts. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of glass fiber on the replication quality and mechanical properties...... of polymeric thin ribs. It investigates the effect of feature size and gate location on distribution of glass fibers inside the molded parts. The results from this work indicate that glass filled plastic materials have poor replication quality and nonhomogeneous mechanical properties due to the nonuniform...

  12. Effect of the refraction factor of a plastic fiber shell on the internal reflection coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pkrksypkin, A.I.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1992-01-01

    Results of pilot studies of the effect of refraction factor of plastic fiber shell on the coefficient of light internal reflection in the fiber are presented. It is pointed, that the shell does not absorb the light, but effects the surface layer of the fiber centre so, that dependence of the coefficient of internal reflection on refraction factor of the shell may be described using Fresnel formulae. It is shown, that coefficient of internal reflection decreases with the increase of refraction factor. Technique to determine volume length of scintillation light absorption in the fiber is suggested

  13. the effect of cooking time on the vitamin c, dietary fiber and mineral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    (Sandra, 1995). Several methods of processing the vegetables are being use without considering the effect on the vitamin C, dietary fiber and minerals components. This study is designed to determine the effect of cooking time on the Vitamin C, dietary fiber. & mineral constituents of T. occidentalis (FP), V. amygdalina (BL),.

  14. Polarization-maintaining performance of large effective area, higher order modes fiber in a coiled configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Raja; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.; Abedin, Kazi S.; Westbrook, Paul S.; Headley, Clifford; Wisk, Patrick W.; Monberg, Eric M.; Yan, Man F.; DiGiovanni, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Scaling the power-level of fiber sources has many practical advantages, while also enabling fundamental studies on the light-matter interaction in amorphous guiding media. In order to scale the power-level of fiber-sources without encountering nonlinear impairments, a strategy is to increase the effective-area of the guided optical-mode. Increasing the effective-area of the fundamental mode in a fiber, however, presents the challenges of increased susceptibility to mode-distortion and effective-area-reduction under the influence of bends. Therefore, higher-order-mode (HOM) fibers, which guide light in large effective-area (Aeff) Bessel-like modes, are a good candidate for scaling the power-level of robust fiber-sources. Many applications of high-power fiber-sources also demand a deterministic control on the polarization-state of light. Furthermore, a polarization-maintaining (PM)-type HOM fiber can afford the added possibility of coherent-beam combination and polarization multiplexing of high-power fiber-lasers. Previously, we reported polarization-maintaining operation in a 1.3 m length of PM-HOM fiber that was held straight. The PM-HOM fiber guided Bessel-like modes with Aeff ranging from 1200-2800 μm2. In this work, we report, for the first time, that the polarization-extinction-ratio (PER) of the HOM exceeds 10 dB in an 8 m long fiber that is coiled down to a diameter of 40 cm. This opens a path towards compact and polarization-controlled high-power fiber-systems.

  15. Effects of Fiber Type and Size on the Heterogeneity of Oxygen Distribution in Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2012-01-01

    The process of oxygen delivery from capillary to muscle fiber is essential for a tissue with variable oxygen demand, such as skeletal muscle. Oxygen distribution in exercising skeletal muscle is regulated by convective oxygen transport in the blood vessels, oxygen diffusion and consumption in the tissue. Spatial heterogeneities in oxygen supply, such as microvascular architecture and hemodynamic variables, had been observed experimentally and their marked effects on oxygen exchange had been confirmed using mathematical models. In this study, we investigate the effects of heterogeneities in oxygen demand on tissue oxygenation distribution using a multiscale oxygen transport model. Muscles are composed of different ratios of the various fiber types. Each fiber type has characteristic values of several parameters, including fiber size, oxygen consumption, myoglobin concentration, and oxygen diffusivity. Using experimentally measured parameters for different fiber types and applying them to the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle, we evaluated the effects of heterogeneous fiber size and fiber type properties on the oxygen distribution profile. Our simulation results suggest a marked increase in spatial heterogeneity of oxygen due to fiber size distribution in a mixed muscle. Our simulations also suggest that the combined effects of fiber type properties, except size, do not contribute significantly to the tissue oxygen spatial heterogeneity. However, the incorporation of the difference in oxygen consumption rates of different fiber types alone causes higher oxygen heterogeneity compared to control cases with uniform fiber properties. In contrast, incorporating variation in other fiber type-specific properties, such as myoglobin concentration, causes little change in spatial tissue oxygenation profiles. PMID:23028531

  16. Effect of ion irradiation on the structure and the surface topography of carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligacheva, E.A.; Galyaeva, L.V.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Belykh, T.A.; Ligachev, A.E.; Sokhoreva, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of C + ion irradiation (40 keV, 10 15 - 10 19 cm -2 ) on the structure and surface topography of high-module carbon fibers is investigated. Interplanar distance and internal stress values are found to be minimal at a radiation dose of 10 17 cm -2 , the height of a layer pack being practically unchanged. The relief of ion irradiated carbon fiber surface constitutes regularly repetitive valleys and ridges spaced parallel with the fiber axis [ru

  17. Cost-Effective Magnetoencephalography Based on Time Encoded Optical Fiber Interferometry for Epilepsy and Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    respectively. A length of dispersive fiber and a computer are used to first “decode” the optical interference signal into dispersed optical wave-packet...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0008 TITLE: Cost-Effective Magnetoencephalography Based on Time-Encoded Optical Fiber Interferometry for Epilepsy...10 Dec 2014 - 9 Jun 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a.16 CONTRACT NUMBER Encoded Optical Fiber Interferometry for Epilepsy and Tinnitus Diagnosis 5b

  18. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  19. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  20. Fermented Fiber Supplements Are No Better Than Placebo for a Laxative Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRorie, Johnson W; Chey, William D

    2016-11-01

    Misconceptions about the effects of dietary fiber and 'functional' fiber on stool parameters and constipation persist in the literature. A comprehensive literature review was conducted with the use of the Scopus and PubMed scientific databases to identify and objectively assess well-controlled clinical studies that evaluated the effects of fiber on stool parameters and constipation. The totality of well-controlled randomized clinical studies show that, to exert a laxative effect, fiber must: (1) resist fermentation to remain intact throughout the large bowel and present in stool, and (2) significantly increase stool water content and stool output, resulting in soft/bulky/easy-to-pass stools. Poorly fermented insoluble fiber (e.g., wheat bran) remains as discreet particles which can mechanically irritate the gut mucosa, stimulating water & mucous secretion if the particles are sufficiently large/coarse. For soluble fibers, some have no effect on viscosity (e.g., inulin, wheat dextrin) while others form high viscosity gels (e.g., β-glucan, psyllium). If the soluble fiber is readily fermented, whether non-viscous or gel-forming, it has no effect on stool output or stool water content, and has no laxative effect. In contrast, a non-fermented, gel-forming soluble fiber (e.g., psyllium) retains its gelled nature and high water-holding capacity throughout the large bowel, resulting in soft/bulky/easy-to-pass stools. When considering a recommendation for a fiber supplement regimen to treat and/or prevent constipation, it is important to consider which fibers have the physical characteristics to exert a laxative effect, and which fiber supplements have rigorous clinical evidence of a significant benefit in patients with constipation.

  1. Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Yarborough, Kenneth D.; Meek, Thomas T.

    2002-01-01

    The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

  2. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  3. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  4. Spaceflight effects on single skeletal muscle fiber function in the rhesus monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Desplanches, D.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to understand how 14 days of weightlessness alters the cellular properties of individual slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey. The diameter of the soleus (Sol) type I, medial gastrocnemius (MG) type I, and MG type II fibers from the vivarium controls averaged 60 +/- 1, 46 +/- 2, and 59 +/- 2 microm, respectively. Both a control 1-G capsule sit (CS) and spaceflight (SF) significantly reduced the Sol type I fiber diameter (20 and 13%, respectively) and peak force, with the latter declining from 0.48 +/- 0.01 to 0.31 +/- 0.02 (CS group) and 0.32 +/- 0.01 mN (SF group). When the peak force was expressed as kiloNewtons per square meter (kN/m(2)), only the SF group showed a significant decline. This group also showed a significant 15% drop in peak fiber stiffness that suggests that fewer cross bridges were contracting in parallel. In the MG, SF but not CS depressed the type I fiber diameter and force. Additionally, SF significantly depressed absolute (mN) and relative (kN/m(2)) force in the fast-twitch MG fibers by 30% and 28%, respectively. The Ca(2+) sensitivity of the type I fiber (Sol and MG) was significantly reduced by growth but unaltered by SF. Flight had no significant effect on the mean maximal fiber shortening velocity in any fiber type or muscle. The post-SF Sol type I fibers showed a reduced peak power and, at peak power, an elevated velocity and decreased force. In conclusion, CS and SF caused atrophy and a reduced force and power in the Sol type I fiber. However, only SF elicited atrophy and reduced force (mN) in the MG type I fiber and a decline in relative force (kN/m(2)) in the Sol type I and MG type II fibers.

  5. The effects of embedded piezoelectric fiber composite sensors on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konka, Hari P.; Wahab, M. A.; Lian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composite sensors (PFCSs) made from micro-sized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers have many advantages over the traditional bulk PZT sensors for embedded sensor applications. PFCSs as embedded sensors will be an ideal choice to continuously monitor the stress/strain levels and health conditions of composite structures. PFCSs are highly flexible, easily embeddable, have high compatibility with composite structures, and also provides manufacturing flexibility. This research is focused on examining the effects of embedding PFCS sensors (macro-fiber composite (MFC) and piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC)) on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminates. The strengths of composite materials with embedded PFCSs and conventional PZT sensors were compared, and the advantages of PFCS sensors over PZTs were demonstrated. Initially a numerical simulation study is performed to understand the local stress/strain field near the embedded sensor region inside a composite specimen. High stress concentration regions were observed near the embedded sensor corner edge. Using PFCS leads to a reduction of 56% in longitudinal stress concentration and 38% in transverse stress concentration, when compared to using the conventional PZTs as embedded sensors. In-plane tensile, in-plane tension-tension fatigue, and short beam strength tests are performed to evaluate the strengths/behavior of the composite specimens containing embedded PFCS. From the tensile test it is observed that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors in the composite structures leads to a reduction in ultimate strength by 3 and 6% respectively. From the fatigue test results it is concluded that both embedded PFCS and PZT sensors do not have a significant effect on the fatigue behavior of the composite specimens. From the short beam strength test it is found that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors leads to a reduction in shear strength by 7 and 15% respectively. Overall the pure PZT sensors

  6. Effects of glass fiber mesh with different fiber content and structures on the compressive properties of complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang-Hui; Cho, Hye-Won; Oh, Seunghan; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2015-06-01

    No study has yet evaluated the strength of complete dentures reinforced with glass fiber meshes with different content and structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the reinforcing effects of glass fiber mesh with different content and structures with that of metal mesh in complete dentures. Two types of glass fiber mesh were used: SES mesh (SES) and glass cloth (GC2, GC3, and GC4). A metal mesh was used for comparison. The complete dentures were made by placing the reinforcement 1 mm away from the tissue surface. A control group was prepared without any reinforcement (n=10). The compressive properties were measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The results were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Duncan multiple range test (α=.05). The fracture resistance of the SES group was significantly higher than that of the control, GC4, and metal groups (asymptotic P=.004), but not significantly different from the GC2 and GC3 groups. The toughness of the SES and GC3 groups was significantly higher than that of the others (asymptotic Pglass fiber mesh seemed more important than the structures. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  8. Silica-air photonic crystal fiber design that permits waveguiding by a true photonic bandgap effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of a novel type of optical fiber is presented. The operation of the fiber relies entirely on wave guidance through the photonic bandgap effect and not on total internal reflection, thereby distinguishing that fiber from all other known fibers, including recently studied...... photonic crystal fibers. The novel fiber has a central low-index core region and a cladding consisting of a silica background material with air holes situated within a honeycomb lattice structure. We show the existence of photonic bandgaps for the silica–air cladding structure and demonstrate how light can...... be guided at the central low-index core region for a well-defined frequency that falls inside the photonic bandgap region of the cladding structure....

  9. Thermo-Plasmonics for Localized Graphitization and Welding of Polymeric Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnaf Usman Zillohu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in modulating the temperature under the illumination of light. As a heat source, metal nanoparticles (NPs have played an important role to pave the way for a new branch of plasmonics, i.e., thermo-plasmonics. While thermo-plasmonics have been well established in photo-thermal therapy, it has received comparatively less attention in materials science and chemistry. Here, we demonstrate the first proof of concept experiment of local chemistry and graphitization of metalized polymeric nanofibers through thermo-plasmonic effect. In particular, by tuning the plasmonic absorption of the nanohybrid through a change in the thickness of the deposited silver film on the fibers, the thermo-plasmonic effect can be adjusted in such a way that high enough temperature is generated enabling local welding and graphitization of the polymeric nanofibers.

  10. The effect of glassfibre, graphite and MoS2 on the tribological performance of a liquid crystalline polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufour, P.R.; de Gee, A.W.J.; Kingma, J.A.; Mens, J.W.M.

    1992-01-01

    A thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) with a high melting point of approximately 400 °C, unfilled and filled with glassfibre, MoS2 or graphitic carbon was tested in dry sliding contact with steel. Three different test methods were applied, i.e. measurement of coefficient of friction and

  11. Effect of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts on hexavalent chromium removal in biocathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiayuan; Tong, Fei; Yong, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Lixiong; Jia, Honghua; Wei, Ping

    2016-05-05

    Two kinds of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts were used as biocathode electrodes in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-reducing microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The one was fabricated through direct modification, and the other one processed by HNO3 pretreatment of graphite felt before modification. The results showed that two NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts are excellent bio-electrode materials for MFCs, and that a large NaX loading mass, obtained by HNO3 pretreatment (the HNO3-NaX electrode), leads to a superior performance. The HNO3-NaX electrode significantly improved the electricity generation and Cr(VI) removal of the MFC. The maximum Cr(VI) removal rate increased to 10.39±0.28 mg/L h, which was 8.2 times higher than that of the unmodified control. The improvement was ascribed to the strong affinity that NaX zeolite particles, present in large number on the graphite felt, have for microorganisms and Cr(VI) ions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron spin resonance in neutron-irradiated graphite. Dependence on temperature and effect of annealing; Resonance paramagnetique du graphite irradie aux neutrons. Variation en fonction de la temperature et experiences de recuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kester, T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Laboratoire de resonance magnetique

    1967-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin resonance signal from neutron irradiated graphite has been studied. The results lead to an interpretation of the nature of the paramagnetic centers created by irradiation. In annealing experiments on graphite samples, which had been irradiated at low temperature, two annealing peaks and one anti-annealing peak were found. Interpretations are proposed for these peaks. (author) [French] Le graphite irradie aux neutrons a ete etudie par resonance paramagnetique electronique en fonction de la temperature. La nature des centres paramagnetiques crees par irradiation est interpretee a l'aide des resultats. Des experiences de recuit sur des echantillons de graphite irradie a 77 deg. K ont permis de mettre en evidence deux pics de recuit et un pic d'anti-recuit, pour lesquels des interpretations sont proposees. (auteur)

  13. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  14. Effectiveness of Fiber Reinforcement on the Mechanical Properties and Shrinkage Cracking of Recycled Fine Aggregate Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jeongsoo; Kim, Gyuyong; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Kim, Hongseop; Choi, Hyeonggil; Kim, Youngduck

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study conducted to investigate the effect of fiber reinforcement on the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking of recycled fine aggregate concrete (RFAC) with two types of fiber—polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and nylon. A small fiber volume fraction, such as 0.05% or 0.1%, in RFAC with polyvinyl alcohol or nylon fibers was used for optimum efficiency in minimum quantity. Additionally, to make a comparative evaluation of the mechanical properties and shrinkage cracking, we examined natural fine aggregate concrete as well. The test results revealed that the addition of fibers and fine aggregates plays an important role in improving the mechanical performance of the investigated concrete specimens as well as controlling their cracking behavior. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength of fiber-reinforced RFAC were slightly better than those of non-fiber-reinforced RFAC. The shrinkage cracking behavior was examined using plat-ring-type and slab-type tests. The fiber-reinforced RFAC showed a greater reduction in the surface cracks than non-fiber-reinforced concrete. The addition of fibers at a small volume fraction in RFAC is more effective for drying shrinkage cracks than for improving mechanical performance. PMID:28773256

  15. THEORETICAL EVALUATION OF NONLINEAR EFFECTS ON OPTICAL WDM NETWORKS WITH VARIOUS FIBER TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASIN M. KARFAA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study is carried out to evaluate the performance of an opticalwavelength division multiplexing (WDM network transmission system in the presenceof crosstalk due to optical fiber nonlinearities. The most significant nonlinear effects inthe optical fiber which are Cross-Phase Modulation (XPM, Four-Wave Mixing (FWM,and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS are investigated. Four types of optical fiber areincluded in the analysis; these are: single-mode fiber (SMF, dispersion compensationfiber (DCF, non-zero dispersion fiber (NZDF, and non-zero dispersion shifted fiber(NZDSF. The results represent the standard deviation of nonlinearity induced crosstalknoise power due to FWM and SRS, XPM power penalty for SMF, DCF, NZDF, andNZDSF types of fiber, besides the Bit Error Rate (BER for the three nonlinear effectsusing standard fiber type (SMF. It is concluded that three significant fiber nonlinearitiesare making huge limitations against increasing the launched power which is desired,otherwise, lower values of launched power limit network expansion including length,distance, covered areas, and number of users accessing the WDM network, unlesssuitable precautions are taken to neutralize the nonlinear effects. Besides, various fibertypes are not behaving similarly towards network parameters.

  16. The Effects of Fiber Inclusion on Pet Food Sensory Characteristics and Palatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri; Monti, Mariana; Gibson, Michael; Alavi, Sajid; Donfrancesco, Brizio Di; Carciofi, Aulus Cavalieri

    2015-02-16

    The objectives of this study were to determine (a) the influence of fiber on the sensory characteristics of dry dog foods; (b) differences of coated and uncoated kibbles for aroma and flavor characteristics; (c) palatability of these dry dog foods; and (d) potential associations between palatability and sensory attributes. A total of eight fiber treatments were manufactured: a control (no fiber addition), guava fiber (3%, 6%, and 12%), sugar cane fiber (9%; large and small particle size), and wheat bran fiber (32%; large and small particle size). The results indicated significant effects of fibers on both flavor and texture properties of the samples. Bitter taste and iron and stale aftertaste were examples of flavor attributes that differed with treatment, with highest intensity observed for 12% guava fiber and small particle size sugar cane fiber treatments. Fracturability and initial crispness attributes were lowest for the sugar cane fiber treatments. Flavor of all treatments changed after coating with a palatant, increasing in toasted, brothy, and grainy attributes. The coating also had a masking effect on aroma attributes such as stale, flavor attributes such as iron and bitter taste, and appearance attributes such as porosity. Palatability testing results indicated that the control treatment was preferred over the sugar cane or the wheat bran treatment. The treatment with large sugarcane fiber particles was preferred over the treatment with small particles, while both of the wheat bran treatments were eaten at a similar level. Descriptive sensory analysis data, especially textural attributes, were useful in pinpointing the underlying characteristics and were considered to be reasons that may influence palatability of dog foods manufactured with inclusion of different fibers.

  17. Wigner effect in graphite stack: G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artozoul, M.; L'Homme, M.

    1982-11-01

    This text describes work carried out between 1978 and 1980 by a COGEMA/CEA team responsible for a report on the feasibility, effectiveness and possible hazards likely to be encountered in the nuclear annealing of G2 and in changing the operating conditions of G3 [fr

  18. Limitations of effective medium theory in multilayer graphite/hBN heterostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, René; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Gjerding, Morten Niklas

    2016-01-01

    We apply effective medium theory (EMT) to metamaterials consisting of a varying number of consecutive sheets of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, and compare this with a full calculation of the permittivity and the reflection based on the tight binding method and the transfer matrix method...

  19. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  20. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  1. Effect of various fiber types and choice feeding of fiber on performance, gut development, humoral immunity, and fiber preference in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Amin; Toghyani, Majid; Gheisari, Abasali

    2015-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of fibrous materials with one single diet or by choice feeding on performance, intestinal morphology, immunity, and fiber preference in broiler chicks. In experiment 1, 240-day-old chicks (Ross 308) were assigned to one of 4 treatments, comprising 5 replicates per treatment in a completely randomized design. Dietary treatments included: a basal diet (control) or 30 g/kg sugar beet pulp (SBP), 30 g/kg rice hull (RH), or 30 g/kg equal combination of them (SBP/RH) added to the basal diet. Results showed SBP and SBP/RH impaired daily weight gain (DWG) in the growing period compared with control (P immunity. In addition, broilers had a tendency to use separate sources of fiber. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Enhanced photocatalytic property of hybrid graphitic C3N4 and graphitic ZnO nanocomposite: the effects of interface and doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Liang, Shuhua; Sun, Shaodong; Zheng, Xing; Zhang, Jianmin

    2018-05-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we present a potential new way to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of the g-C3N4 sheet by coupling with the g-ZnO sheet to form heterojunction nanostructure followed by the addition of N atom at an atomic level. The result indicates the g-C3N4/g-ZnO heterojunction is a staggered band alignment (type II) structure and a polarized field is generated by the electrons transfer across the interface simultaneously, which facilitate the separation of e‑–h+ pairs and promote the photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, a great difference in energy levels between redox potentials and band edges of the C3N4/g-ZnO nanocomposite ensures that the water splitting/CO2 reduction reaction is energetically favored. In addition, through the incorporation of nitrogen dopant, the g-C3N4/N-g-ZnO nanocomposite displays desirable properties. The N-derived doping peak causes a decrease of the band gap width of the g-C3N4/g-ZnO nanocomposite, resulting in the enhanced optical absorption from UV into visible light. This theoretical predictions provide insightful outlooks in understanding the effects of interface and doping on the enhanced photocatalytic property of the g-C3N4/g-ZnO nanocomposites, which will assist in engineering highly efficient g-C3N4-based photocatalysts.

  3. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment condition on adhesion of ramie fibers to polypropylene for composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [College of Material and Textile Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314033 (China); Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Manolache, Sorin [Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); US Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Qiu, Yiping, E-mail: ypqiu@dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Sarmadi, Majid, E-mail: majidsar@wisc.edu [Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The continuous ethanol flow technique can successfully modify ramie fiber surface with an increase in IFSS value up to 50%. • Response surface methodology was applied to design the plasma treatment parameters for ramie fiber modification. • The ethanol flow rate was the most influential treatment parameter in plasma modification process. - Abstract: In order to improve the interfacial adhesion between hydrophilic ramie fibers and hydrophobic polypropylene (PP) matrices, ramie fibers are modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with our continuous ethanol flow technique in helium environment. A central composite design of experiments with different plasma processing parameter combinations (treatment current, treatment time and ethanol flow rate) is applied to find the most influential parameter and to obtain the best modification effect. Field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows the roughened surfaces of ramie fibers from the treated groups due to plasma etching effect. Dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) demonstrates that the wettability of the treated fibers drastically decreases. Microbond pullout test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between treated ramie fibers and PP matrices increases significantly. Residual gas analysis (RGA) confirms the creation of ethyl groups during plasma treatment. This study shows that our continuous ethanol flow technique is effective in the plasma modification process, during which the ethanol flow rate is the most influential parameter but all parameters have simultaneous influence on plasma modification effect of ramie fibers.

  4. Effect of cellulose fiber reinforcement on the temperature dependent mechanical performance of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Tajvidi; Mokhtar Feizmand; Robert H. Falk; Colin Felton

    2009-01-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of pure nylon 6 and its composite with cellulose fibers (containing 25 wt% cellulose fibers), the materials were sampled and tested at three representative temperatures of 256, 296, and 336 K. Flexural and tensile tests were performed and the reductions in mechanical properties were evaluated....

  5. Effect of ionizing radiation on in situ Raman scattering and photoluminescence of silica optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilodeau, T.G.; Ewing, K.J.; Nau, G.M.; Aggarwal, I.D.

    1995-01-01

    Raman fiber optic chemical sensors provide remote situ characterization capability. One application of Raman fiber optic chemical sensors is the characterization of the contents of nuclear waste tanks. In these tanks it is expected that approximately 20 meters of optical fiber will be exposed to radiation levels between 100 and 1,000 rads/hour. In support of this work two silica optical fiber types (one a communications grade fiber and the other nominally radiation resistant) have been tested at the radiation levels expected in the tanks. Luminescence and Raman scattering measurements have been performed in situ with 488-nm excitation on two types of silica optical fiber exposed to a constant low to moderate dose rate of gamma radiation of 880 rads(Si)/hour from a 60 Co source for a total dose of greater than 45 krads. The nominally radiation-resistant fiber was also excited with 514.5-nm and near-infrared 830-nm laser radiation. The rate of the silica Raman signal decrease is more than three times greater for the visible excitation wavelengths than for the 830-nm excitation for the radiation resistant fiber. The behavior of the 650-nm photoluminescence line upon irradiation was different for the two fibers studied, both in terms of the shift of the 650-nm line and rate of increase of the normalized photoluminescence intensity. In all cases the photoluminescence from the fibers was less than the Raman intensity. No radioluminescence was observed in either fiber. The radiation resistant fiber exhibited photo bleaching effects on the Raman transmission when photoannealed with 488-nm laser light

  6. Effect of ionizing radiation on in situ Raman scattering and photoluminescence of silica optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, T. G.; Ewing, K. J.; Nau, G. M.; Aggarwai, I. D.

    1995-02-01

    Raman fiber optic chemical sensors provide remote in situ characterization capability. One application of Raman fiber optic chemical sensors is the characterization of the contents of nuclear waste tanks. In these tanks it is expected that approximately 20 meters of optical fiber will be exposed to radiation levels between 100 and 1000 rads/hour. In support of this work two silica optical fiber types (one a communications grade fiber and the other nominally radiation resistant) have been tested at the radiation levels expected in the tanks. Luminescence and Raman scattering measurements have been performed in situ with 488-nm excitation on two types of silica optical fiber exposed to a constant low to moderate dose rate of gamma radiation of 880 rads(Si)/hour from a /sup 60/Co source for a total dose of greater than 45 krads. The nominally radiation-resistant fiber was also excited with 514.5-nm and near-infrared 830-nm laser radiation. The rate of the silica Raman signal decrease is more than three times greater for the visible excitation wavelengths than for the 830-nm excitation for the radiation resistant fiber. The behavior of the 650-nm photoluminescence line upon irradiation was different for the two fibers studied, both in terms of the shift of the 650-nm line and rate of increase of the normalized photoluminescence intensity. In all cases the photoluminescence from the fibers was less than the Raman intensity. No radioluminescence was observed in either fiber. The radiation resistant fiber exhibited photobleaching effects on the Raman transmission when photoannealed with 488-nm laser light.

  7. Irradiation induced creep in graphite with respect to the flux effect and the high fluence behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundy, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    In accelerated irradiation creep tests, performed in the HFR Petten, in a fast neutron flux of about 2x10 4 cm -2 s -1 and at temperatures of 300 and 500 0 C, a fast neutron fluence in excess of 20x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) has been attained so far. As a supplement to this, an analogous creep test was conducted in a fast neutron flux lower by a factor of four which is more typical for the service conditions in a HTR, with a maximum fast fluence of only 4x10 21 cm -2 (EDN). This experiment was aimed at answering the question if, for equal fast fluence, enhanced irradiation creep and Wigner dimensional change would take place in a reduced fast neutron flux. This problem has more generally been addressed to as the ''flux effect'' or the ''equivalent temperature concept''. (orig./IHOE)

  8. Effect of dietary fibers on physico-chemical, sensory and textural properties of Misti Dahi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, P Narender; Pal, Dharam

    2014-11-01

    Misti dahi, a popular ethnic delicacy of eastern India analogous to caramel coloured set style sweetened yoghurt, besides several therapeutic virtues, contains high fat and sugar. Alike people elsewhere in the world, people in India too are now becoming health conscious and are aware of the relation between diet and health. Hence, high fat and sugar contents are causes of concern for the successful marketing of misti dahi in India. With a view to enhance the health attributes of misti dahi and improve marketability, three commercial dietary fiber preparations (inulin, soy fiber and oat fiber) were incorporated and their effect on the product's quality in terms of physicochemical, sensory and textural quality was assessed. Standard method was followed for the preparation of fiber fortified misti dahi (FFMD). Among the three dietary fibers, inulin significantly decreased viscosity and instrumental firmness and increased lightness (L*), redness (a*), yellowness (b*), syneresis and work of shear values of FFMD. Oat fiber settled at the bottom and gave a poor appearance. Soy fiber did not affect the flavor of FFMD. Although overall acceptability scores of inulin and soy fiber containing FFMD were significantly lower than control, they were still above the minimum acceptable score. Based on the results obtained in the present study, it was concluded that acceptable quality FFMD could be prepared using inulin and soy fiber at 1.5 % level of fortification.

  9. Physico-mechanical properties of coir fiber/LDPE composites: Effect of chemical treatment and compatibilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Nirupama; Agarwal, Vijay Kumar; Sihha, Shishir [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttrakhand (India)

    2015-12-15

    Coir fiber/low density polyethylene (LDPE) composites were fabricated with different fiber loading (10- 30 wt%) using compression molding technique. A fiber loading of 20 wt% was found optimum, with maximum mechanical properties. Further, the effect of fiber treatment (alkali and acrylic acid) and compatibilizer (MA-g-LDPE) incorporation on the mechanical and water absorption properties of the LDPE composites were studied and compared. The results showed that MA-g-LDPE incorporation into untreated and treated fiber composites led to improved mechanical properties and water resistance compared with the same composite formulation without MA-g-LDPE. However, treated fiber composites with MA-g-LDPE showed lower mechanical properties than untreated fiber without MA-g- LDPE, due to the removal of hydroxyl groups from the hemicellulose and lignin region of the fiber and degradation of fibers by chemical attack. From SEM studies on the tensile fractured composite samples, a good relationship has been observed between the morphological and mechanical properties.

  10. Effects of air dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment time on surface properties of PBO fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qian; Chen Ping; Jia Caixia; Chen, Mingxin; Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma treatment time on surface properties of poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) fiber were investigated. The surface characteristics of PBO fiber before and after the plasma treatments were analyzed by dynamic contact angle (DCA) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DCA measurements indicated that the surface wettability of PBO fiber was improved significantly by increasing the fiber surface free energy via air DBD plasma treatments. The results were confirmed by the improvement of adhesion of a kind of thermoplastic resin to PBO fiber which was observed by SEM, showing that more resin was adhering evenly to the fiber surface. AFM measurement revealed that the surface topography of PBO fiber became more complicated and the surface roughness was greatly enhanced after the plasma treatments, and XPS analysis showed that some new polar groups (e.g. -O-C=O) were introduced on plasma treated PBO fiber surface. The results of this study also showed that the surface properties of PBO fiber changed with the elongation of plasma treatment time.

  11. ATMOSPHERE PRESSURE EFFECT ON THE FIBER OPTIC GYROSCOPE OUTPUT SYGNAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya A. Sharkov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research results of the atmospheric pressure effect on the output signal of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG. In the course of experiments, FOG was placed into a hermetic chamber. The atmosphere pressure was varying in the range from 0.8 to 1.5 atm. All the data, including the FOG output signal, temperature, and data from the pressure sensor installed inside the FOG, were synchronously registered with the computer software. The separation of scale factor change from zero offset in the experiment was carried out by setting the sensitive FOG axis at 0°, 90° and 270° relative to the East (the FOG was set perpendicular to the horizon. After the data processing it was concluded that the FOG signal error associated with the pressure affects mainly on the additive component. The pressure effect on the multiplicative component appeared to be negligible at rotational velocities used in the experiment (0 - 130 /h. At the same time, the FOG signal has a high linear correlation coefficient with the derivative of pressure over time (in some cases, more than 0.9. The experiment was repeated several times and the high degree of the drift repeatability was shown. That makes it possible to implement the compensation algorithm. Application of the simplest algorithmic compensation based on the polynomial of the first degree (ax + b enabled to reduce the root-mean-square (RMS and drift of the signal by 2-9 times.

  12. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  13. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  14. Effectiveness of neutral detergent fiber in whole cottonseed and dried distillers grains compared with alfalfa haylage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P W; Armentano, L E

    1993-09-01

    Sixteen Holstein cows in midlactation were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design to determine the effect of replacing alfalfa NDF with NDF from whole, linted cottonseed or dried distillers grains. Low and high fiber control diets (13 and 19% of dietary DM from alfalfa haylage NDF, respectively) were compared with diets designed to contain 13% of DM from alfalfa haylage NDF plus 6% of DM from either cottonseed NDF or distillers grains NDF. Dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk protein yield were lower from the high fiber control diet. Milk fat percentage was lower for the low fiber control diet. The cottonseed diet was equal to the high fiber control diet in stimulating rumination. Rumen acetate to propionate ratio was higher for the high fiber control and cottonseed diets. Replacing alfalfa with either of these high fiber by-product feeds increased feed intake and yields of milk fat and protein. The effectiveness of the NDF in distillers grains and cottonseed was not significantly different from that of alfalfa NDF for maintaining milk fat yield. Whole cottonseed and dried distillers grains appear to be good sources of effective fiber for maintaining milk fat test when they are substituted for alfalfa haylage fiber in lactating cow rations.

  15. Comparison of 3 MeV C+ Ion-Irradiation Effects between The Nuclear Graphites made of Pitch and Petroleum Cokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Se-Hwan, Chi; Gen-Chan, Kim; Jong-Hwa, Chang

    2006-01-01

    Currently, all the commercially available nuclear graphite grades are being made from two different cokes, i.e., petroleum coke or coal-tar pitch coke, and a coal-tar pitch binder. Of these, since the coke composes most of the graphite volume, i.e., > 70 %, it is understood that a physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical property as well as an irradiation-induced property change will be strongly dependent on the type of coke. To obtain first-hand information on the effects of the coke type, i.e., petroleum or pitch, on the irradiation sensitivity of graphite, specimens made of IG-110 of petroleum coke and IG-430 of pitch coke were irradiated up to ∼ 19 dpa by 3 MeV C + at room temperature, and the irradiation-induced changes in the hardness, Young's modulus, Raman spectrum, and oxidation properties were characterized. Results of the TEM show that the size and density of the Mrozowski cracks appeared to be far larger and higher in the IG-110 than the IG-430. Results of the hardness test revealed a slightly higher increase in the IG-430 than the IG-110 by around 10 dpa, and the Raman spectrum measurement showed a higher (FWHM) D /(FWHM) G value for IG-430 for 0.02 ∼ 0.25 dpa. Both the hardness and Raman measurement may imply a higher irradiation sensitivity of the IG-430 than the IG-110. Results of the Young's modulus measurements showed a large data scattering, which prevented us from estimating the differences between the grades. Oxidation experiments using a TG-DTA under a flow of dry air/He = 2.5 % (flow rate: 40 CC/min) at 750 and 1000 deg C show that the IG-110 of the petroleum coke exhibits a far higher oxidation rate than the IG-430. The discrepancy between the oxidation rate of the two grades increased with an increase in the oxidation temperature and the dose. Oxidized surface pore area was larger for IG-110. Judging from the results obtained from the present experimental conditions, the irradiation sensitivity appeared to be dependent on the degree

  16. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  17. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John J.; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B.; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A.; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2011-01-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca2+ sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells. PMID:21828094

  18. Micro-fibers shape effects on gas exchange in Total Artificial Lung

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2014-02-01

    Flow and oxygen transport dynamics of a pulsatile flow past an array of square and circular cross section micro-fiber is numerically investigated in the present work. The study is motivated to optimize the design of an Total Artificial Lung (TAL) under clinical trials. Effects of three non-dimensional parameters: Reynolds number, non-dimensional amplitude of free stream velocity and Keulegan Carpenter number on oxygen transport and total drag (resistance) of both the fibers are studied. Range of parameters investigated corresponds to operating range of TAL. For most of the cases investigated, results show enhanced oxygen transport for square fiber but higher resistance when compare with the circular fiber case under almost all flow conditions. For both fibers, oxygen transfer rate are enhanced at higher Reynolds number, higher velocity amplitude and lower KC values. Overall drag is found to decrease with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing amplitude and is not significantly effected by Keulegan Carpenter number. © 2014 IEEE.

  19. Micro-fibers shape effects on gas exchange in Total Artificial Lung

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan; Guglani, Aditya; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Flow and oxygen transport dynamics of a pulsatile flow past an array of square and circular cross section micro-fiber is numerically investigated in the present work. The study is motivated to optimize the design of an Total Artificial Lung (TAL) under clinical trials. Effects of three non-dimensional parameters: Reynolds number, non-dimensional amplitude of free stream velocity and Keulegan Carpenter number on oxygen transport and total drag (resistance) of both the fibers are studied. Range of parameters investigated corresponds to operating range of TAL. For most of the cases investigated, results show enhanced oxygen transport for square fiber but higher resistance when compare with the circular fiber case under almost all flow conditions. For both fibers, oxygen transfer rate are enhanced at higher Reynolds number, higher velocity amplitude and lower KC values. Overall drag is found to decrease with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing amplitude and is not significantly effected by Keulegan Carpenter number. © 2014 IEEE.

  20. Basic effects of pulp refining on fiber properties--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehkhani, Samira; Sadeghinezhad, Emad; Kazi, Salim Newaz; Yarmand, Hooman; Badarudin, Ahmad; Safaei, Mohammad Reza; Zubir, Mohd Nashrul Mohd

    2015-01-22

    The requirement for high quality pulps which are widely used in paper industries has increased the demand for pulp refining (beating) process. Pulp refining is a promising approach to improve the pulp quality by changing the fiber characteristics. The diversity of research on the effect of refining on fiber properties which is due to the different pulp sources, pulp consistency and refining equipment has interested us to provide a review on the studies over the last decade. In this article, the influence of pulp refining on structural properties i.e., fibrillations, fine formation, fiber length, fiber curl, crystallinity and distribution of surface chemical compositions is reviewed. The effect of pulp refining on electrokinetic properties of fiber e.g., surface and total charges of pulps is discussed. In addition, an overview of different refining theories, refiners as well as some tests for assessing the pulp refining is presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of cold drawing on mechanical properties of biodegradable fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mantia, Francesco Paolo; Ceraulo, Manuela; Mistretta, Maria Chiara; Morreale, Marco

    2017-01-26

    Biodegradable polymers are currently gaining importance in several fields, because they allow mitigation of the impact on the environment related to disposal of traditional, nonbiodegradable polymers, as well as reducing the utilization of oil-based sources (when they also come from renewable resources). Fibers made of biodegradable polymers are of particular interest, though, it is not easy to obtain polymer fibers with suitable mechanical properties and to tailor these to the specific application. The main ways to tailor the mechanical properties of a given biodegradable polymer fiber are based on crystallinity and orientation control. However, crystallinity can only marginally be modified during processing, while orientation can be controlled, either during hot drawing or cold stretching. In this paper, a systematic investigation of the influence of cold stretching on the mechanical and thermomechanical properties of fibers prepared from different biodegradable polymer systems was carried out. Rheological and thermal characterization helped in interpreting the orientation mechanisms, also on the basis of the molecular structure of the polymer systems. It was found that cold drawing strongly improved the elastic modulus, tensile strength and thermomechanical resistance of the fibers, in comparison with hot-spun fibers. The elastic modulus showed higher increment rates in the biodegradable systems upon increasing the draw ratio.

  2. Plasma enhanced modification of TMP fiber and its effect on tensile strength of wood fiber/PP composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangyeob Lee; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-assisted surface treatment on thermomechanical pulp (TMP) fiber and polypropylene (PP) film was investigated to obtain interfacial adhesion at the wood fiber and PP interface. A metal plate between electrodes prevented thermal damage to the TMP fiber handsheets and PP film. Oxygen-plasma treatment provided better surface activation on the TMP fiber and...

  3. Effective length of short Fabry-Perot cavity formed by uniform fiber Bragg gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmenkov, Yuri O; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Torres-Peiró, Salvador; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2006-07-10

    In this paper, we describe the properties of Fabry-Perot fiber cavity formed by two fiber Bragg gratings in terms of the grating effective length. We show that the grating effective length is determined by the group delay of the grating, which depends on its diffraction efficiency and physical length. We present a simple analytical formula for calculation of the effective length of the uniform fiber Bragg grating and the frequency separation between consecutive resonances of a Fabry-Perot cavity. Experimental results on the cavity transmission spectra for different values of the gratings' reflectivity support the presented theory.

  4. Polarized-x-ray-absorption studies of graphite intercalated-bromine compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, J.L.; Elam, W.T.; Ehrlich, A.C.; Skelton, E.F.; Dominguez, D.D.; Chung, D.D.L.; Lytle, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Details of both results and data analysis are given in the case of our polarized-x-ray-absorption experiments, using synchrotron radiation, on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)--based and graphite-fiber-based residual-bromine intercalation compounds. The effective angle which nearest-neighbor Br pairs make with crystallite graphite planes in some of these compounds, which was stated to be approx.20 0 in an earlier article, is shown to be 16X(de +- 4X(de: both Br-Br extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and white-line features of the data are the basis of this result. We have also found that, whereas spherical averages of the areas under white-line spectra are independent of the choice of the material among all samples studied (including Br 2 vapor), differences in similarly spherically averaged Br-Br EXAFS amplitudes are evident, especially between Br 2 vapor and Br-graphite samples. We show that the latter differences which correspond to a coordination number less than one in Br-graphite are not due to either Gaussian or non-Gaussian (up to k 4 terms) Debye-Waller effects. In addition, we discuss the extraction of Br-C EXAFS and present results of model calculations of Br-C EXAFS, where several different structural models for the Br sites are considered. We also discuss thermal effects and their relation to known Br sublattice phase-transition behavior, based on our measurements at room temperature, 360 K, and 400 K

  5. Effect of ultrafine grinding on physicochemical and antioxidant properties of dietary fiber from wine grape pomace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng-Mei; Du, Bin; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Wine grape pomace dietary fiber powders were prepared by superfine grinding, whose effects were investigated on the composition, functional and antioxidant properties of the wine grape pomace dietary fiber products. The results showed that superfine grinding could effectively pulverize the fiber particles to submicron scale. As particle size decrease, the functional properties (water-holding capacity, water-retention capacity, swelling capacity, oil-binding capacity, and nitrite ion absorption capacity) of wine grape pomace dietary fiber were significantly (p fiber components from insoluble to soluble fractions was observed. The antioxidant activities of wine grape pomace and dietary fiber before and after grinding were in terms of DPPH radical scavenging activity, ABTS diammonium salt radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and total phenolic content. Compared with dietary fiber before and after grinding, micronized insoluble dietary fiber showed increased ABTS radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and total phenolic content yet decreased DPPH radical scavenging activity. Positive correlations were detected between ABTS radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and total phenolic content.

  6. Modeling the dispersion effects of contractile fibers in smooth muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtada, Sae-Il; Kroon, Martin; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-structurally based models for smooth muscle contraction are crucial for a better understanding of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, incontinence and asthma. It is meaningful that models consider the underlying mechanical structure and the biochemical activation. Hence, a simple mechanochemical model is proposed that includes the dispersion of the orientation of smooth muscle myofilaments and that is capable to capture available experimental data on smooth muscle contraction. This allows a refined study of the effects of myofilament dispersion on the smooth muscle contraction. A classical biochemical model is used to describe the cross-bridge interactions with the thin filament in smooth muscles in which calcium-dependent myosin phosphorylation is the only regulatory mechanism. A novel mechanical model considers the dispersion of the contractile fiber orientations in smooth muscle cells by means of a strain-energy function in terms of one dispersion parameter. All model parameters have a biophysical meaning and may be estimated through comparisons with experimental data. The contraction of the middle layer of a carotid artery is studied numerically. Using a tube the relationships between the internal pressure and the stretches are investigated as functions of the dispersion parameter, which implies a strong influence of the orientation of smooth muscle myofilaments on the contraction response. It is straightforward to implement this model in a finite element code to better analyze more complex boundary-value problems.

  7. Application of Different Heat Treatment to Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron and its Effect for Damping and Mode Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Dahil, Lutfiye; Karabulut, Abdurrahman

    2017-01-01

    In this study, damping and mode shapes were investigated after boriding and austempering the spheroidal graphite cast iron (SGCI). The samples were boronised and austempered at 900℃ for 2 hours by employing the pack cementation method. The samples were cooled and tempered in a salt bath at 250℃ and 375℃ for 1 hour. Once the boriding and austempering processes were completed, the samples were cooled at room temperature and washed with plenty of water. The modal frequencies, damping ratios and ...

  8. Effect of extensional cyclic strain on the mechanical and physico-mechanical properties of PVC-NBR/graphite composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The variation of electrical resistivity as will as the mechanical properties of PVC (polyvinylchloride-NBR (acrylonitrile butadiene rubber based conductive composites filled with different concentrations of graphite were studied. These samples were studied as function of the constant deformation fatigue test. When the specimen was subjected to a large number of rapidly repeating strain cycles, and different strain amplitudes, the conductivity, σ(T, shows an initial rapid fall followed by dynamic equilibrium. Increasing the number of cycles and strain amplitudes, the conductivity remains almost constant over the temperature range 30–140°C. The equilibrium state between destruction and reconstruction of graphite particles has been detected for all strains of certain values of strain cycles (1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 cycles for 30% strain amplitude. A preliminary study was done to optimize the possibility to use Conductive Polymer Composites (CPC as a strain sensor and to evaluate its performance by an intrinsic physico-mechanical modification measurement. The electromechanical characterization was performed to demonstrate the adaptability and the correct functioning of the sensor as a strain gauge on the fabric. The coefficient of strain sensitivity (K was measured for 50 phr graphite/PVCNBR vulcanized at 3000 number of strain cycles and 30% strain amplitude. There was a broad maximum of K, with a peak value of 82, which was much higher, compared to conventional wire resistors. A slight hysteresis was observed at unloading due to plasticity of the matrix. A good correlation exists between mechanical and electrical response to the strain sensitivity. Mechanical reinforcement was in accordance with the Quemada equation [1] and Guth model [2] attested to good particle-matrix adhesion. It was found that the viscous component of deformation gradually disappeared and the hardening occurred with increasing strain cycles. The modulus, fracture

  9. Improvement of performance of a ductile/brittle polymer system by graphite nanoplatelets: effect of component coupling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kelnar, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Nevoralová, Martina; Janata, Miroslav; Fortelný, Ivan; Zhigunov, Alexander; Dybal, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 59 (2017), s. 37331-37339 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03194S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite nanoplatelets * polyamide 6 * polystyrene Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  10. Graphite nanoplatelets-modified PLA/PCL: effect of blend ratio and nanofiller localization on structure and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kelnar, Ivan; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Zhigunov, Alexander; Nevoralová, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 71, July (2017), s. 271-278 ISSN 1751-6161 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03194S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly (epsilon-caprolactone) * poly (lactic acid) * graphite nanoplatelets Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2016

  11. Investigation on the Effect of Kenaf Core and Stalk Fiber on the Medium Density Fiber Board Properties Made of Poplar Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh SH.Alizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the use of material non-forest resources, in this study the possibility of using the kenaf stalk fibers mixed with poplar fibers in producing medium density fiber board was considered. Variable factors such as density at two levels (0.55, 0.75 g/cm3 and the percentage incorporation of fiber (%50 poplar fibers, - %50 kenaf core fiber, %50 poplar fiber, -% 50 kenaf stalk fiber and %100 poplar fibers were considered. Steaming time and temperature (175°C, 10min, press time and temperature (5 min, 175°C, Pressing pressure (30 kg/cm3, fiber cake moisture (%12 and urea-formaldehyde resin with Concentration of %50 of the study factors were fixed. Results show that adding kenaf core fibers to the poplar fibers increases modulus of elasticity and water absorption but thickness swelling reduces. Increased density in board made with kenaf core has caused increase in bending strength, modulus of elasticity and internal bond strength and their water absorption and thickness swelling after 2 and 24 hours were competitive with poplar (MDF. On the other hand Populus fiber– kenaf stalk board mechanical and physical properties were competitive with (MDF board made of %100 poplar fibers. Finally we can say that according to the statistical analysis, the best treatment in this study was using kenaf core fibers, in making poplar (MDF with 0.75 g/cm3 density.

  12. Distinct positive temperature coefficient effect of polymer-carbon fiber composites evaluated in terms of polymer absorption on fiber surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zheng, Shaodi; Zheng, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhengying; Yang, Wei; Yang, Mingbo

    2016-03-21

    In this article, the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was studied for high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/carbon fiber (CF) composites. All of the samples showed a significant PTC effect during the heating processes without a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect, even at a temperature much higher than the melting point of the polymer matrix. An ever-increasing PTC intensity with increasing thermal cycles was observed in our study that had never been reported in previous research. The absence of a NTC effect resulted from the increased binding force between the matrix and fillers that contributed to the very special structure of CF surface. We incorporated thermal expansion theory and quantum tunneling effects to explain PTC effect. From the SEM micrographs for the HDPE/CF composites before and after the different thermal cycles, we found that the surface of CF was covered with a layer of polymer which resulted in a change in the gap length between CF and HDPE and its distribution. We believed that the gap change induced by polymer absorption on the fiber surface had a great effect on the PTC effect.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of the effect of fiber heads on the mechanical properties of non-continuous basalt fiber reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of basalt fibers, produced by the Junkers technology and used as reinforcement in polymer composites, was modeled on the properties of composites, adapting the statistical fiber mat model of Poisson type. The random distribution was approximated by so-called effective spheres that act as defect sites in composites, reducing their strength. The role of fiber heads in strength reduction and the corresponding failure modes were analyzed theoretically using a model and by experiments performed on specimens containing a single fiber head located at different distances from the crack initiation. The applicability of the model was proven both experimentally and by finite element analysis. Based on all these investigations, the effective cross section reduction, and hence the strength reduction (predicted by the model caused by the presence of fiber heads was proven.

  14. Profile of capillary bridges between two vertically stacked cylindrical fibers under gravitational effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohang; Lee, Hoon Joo; Michielsen, Stephen; Wilusz, Eugene

    2018-05-01

    Although profiles of axisymmetric capillary bridges between two cylindrical fibers have been extensively studied, little research has been reported on capillary bridges under external forces such as the gravitational force. This is because external forces add significant complications to the Laplace-Young equation, making it difficult to predict drop profiles based on analytical approaches. In this paper, simulations of capillary bridges between two vertically stacked cylindrical fibers with gravitational effect taken into consideration are studied. The asymmetrical structure of capillary bridges that are hard to predict based on analytical approaches was studied via a numerical approach based on Surface Evolver (SE). The axial and the circumferential spreading of liquids on two identical fibers in the presence of gravitational effects are predicted to determine when the gravitational effects are significant or can be neglected. The effect of liquid volume, equilibrium contact angle, the distance between two fibers and fiber radii. The simulation results were verified by comparing them with experimental measurements. Based on SE simulations, curves representing the spreading of capillary bridges along the two cylindrical fibers were obtained. The gravitational effect was scaled based on the difference of the spreading on upper and lower fibers.

  15. Measurements of effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I.A.; Lourie, S.L

    2002-11-25

    The results of measurements of the effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes are presented. In these measurements the fibers were stressed and value of the effective noise temperature was obtained by direct observation of oscillations in the fundamental violin modes of several samples. Measured values indicate that effective noise temperature does not exceed the room temperature significantly. This result is important for the design of the advanced gravitational wave antennae.

  16. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  17. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  18. Fracto-emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Fracto-emission (FE) is the emission of particles and photons during and following crack propagation. Electrons (EE), positive ions (PIE), and excited and ground state neutrals (NE) were observed. Results of a number of experiments involving principally graphite/epoxy composites and Kevlar single fibers are presented. The physical processes responsible for EE and PIE are discussed as well as FE from fiber- and particulate-reinforced composites.

  19. Broadband optically controlled switching effect in a microfluid-filled photonic bandgap fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Junqi; Liu, Yan-ge; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Mingming; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xiaoqi; Han, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Broadband optically controlled switching in a microfluid-filled photonic bandgap fiber (MF-PBGF) was observed and investigated. The MF-PBGF was formed by infusing a temperature-sensitive high-index fluid into all of the cladding holes of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF). The fiber was then side pumped with a 532 nm continuous wave laser. An extinction ratio of greater than 20 dB at most of the bandgap wavelengths (more than 200 nm) was obtained with a switching power of ∼147 mW. Theoretical and experimental investigations revealed that the effect originated from changes in the temperature gradient induced by heat absorption of the fiber coating with laser illumination. These investigations offer a new and simple approach to achieve wideband and flexible all-optical fiber switching devices without using any photosensitive materials. (paper)

  20. Examining the Effects of Oxygen Plasma on Physical and Dyeing Properties of Some Cellulose Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilara KOCAK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cotton, Agava Americana and artichoke fibers were treated with plasma with oxygen gas in Diener Vacuum Plasma for 1, 3 and 5 minutes, with 40 kHz low frequency and at 0.3 mbar pressure. After the plasma treatment, fibers' weight loss %, tensile strength, elongation, fiber diameter, surface topography (SEM, colour changes, and light and washing fastness properties were investigated. A positive increase was observed for mechanical and fastness properties after 5 min plasma treatment. The effects of plasma treatments on dyeing properties of fibers were studied. Dyeing properties of plasma treated fibers were improved after 3 min. treatment. SEM results were also proved the improved physical properties and colour changes due to the rough surface structure.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9368

  1. Effect of reinforcement fibers on the collapse potential of clayey sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adjabi Souhila

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The collapse of soils under wetting is a major problem in Geotechnical engineering. The erection of structures on these types of soils, located in arid and semi-arid zones, needs careful treatment of these soils. Soil reinforcement techniques have been rapidly increased during these two decades because of their effectiveness in geotechnical engineering. The aim of this experimental work is to investigate the collapsible soil behaviour in order to improve its characteristics. To achieve this goal, Polyethylene fibers, and Sisal fibers were used as Polyethylene fibers content in mass are varied from 0% (unreinforced samples to 15%; and Sisal fibers content from 0.5% to 1%. The fiber reinforcement is combined with other processing procedures such as compaction and the addition of CPA cement to decrease the collapse potential.

  2. Effect of Chicory Fiber and Smoking on Quality Characteristics of Restructured Sausages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Su; Choi, Hyung-Gyu; Choi, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Jong-Hee; Lee, Ju-Ho; Jung, Eun-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Choi, Yang-Il

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of chicory fiber for the replacement of fat and smoking on quality characteristics of restructured sausages. Treatments were as follows; Control: Pork backfat 20%, T1: Pork backfat 10% + Chicory fiber 10%, T2: Control + Smoking, T3: T1 + Smoking. The addition of chicory fiber significantly reduced the moisture, fat, hardness and pH values, whereas the smoking treatment increased the fat, redness and pH values of restructured sausages (psausages. As a result, although the addition of chicory fiber decreased the quality characteristics of sausage, smoking treatment improved the reduced quality. Therefore, the chicory fiber and smoking treatment is helpful to develop restructured sausage products with reduced fat and compensated quality. PMID:27499674

  3. Effect of test meals of varying dietary fiber content on plasma insulin and glucose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J G; Coffman, K P; Reid, R L; Krall, J M; Albrink, M J

    1981-03-01

    To assess the effect of dietary fiber on glucose tolerance four different meals of varying fiber content but identical protein fat and carbohydrate content were fed to eight healthy men aged 22 to 45. Each meal provided 75 g of carbohydrate as liquid glucose formula, as brown rice, pinto beans, or All Bran. The mean plasma glucose and insulin responses were highest following the formula, and least for All Bran and pinto beans. Rice produced nearly as great a rise in insulin and glucose as did the formula. The rank of each meal by content of neutral detergent fiber was nearly the inverse of the rank by magnitude of the insulin response evoked, fiber content being greatest in All Bran (18 g) and pinto beans (16.2 g), low in rice (2.8 g) and absent from the formula. It was concluded that dietary fiber dampened the insulin response to a high carbohydrate meal.

  4. Effect of Hybrid Fibers on the Mechanical Properties of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid H. Hussein, Saeed K. Rejeb Hayder T. Abd

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, high strength concrete of 75 MPa compressive strength was investigated. The experimental program was designed to study the effect of fibers and hybrid fibers (steel and polypropylene fibers on the fresh (workability and wet density and hardened properties (compressive strength, splitting strength, flexural strength and dry density of high strength concrete. Results show that decreases in slump flow of all concrete mixtures containing steel, polypropylene and hybrid fibers compared with control mix (0% fiber. Hybrid high strength concrete with steel and polypropylene fibers showed superior compressive, splitting, flexural strengths over the others concrete without or with single fibers content. The test results indicate that the maximum increase in compressive and flexural strengths are obtains with the hybridization ratio (70%steel + 30% polypropylene and were equal to 14.54% and 23.34% respectively, compared with the control mix. While, the maximum increase in splitting tensile strength with (100% steel fiber + 0 polypropylene is 21.19%. 

  5. Effect of fiber surface state on mechanical properties of Cf/Si-O-C composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Song; Chen Zhaohui; Ma Qingsong; Hu Haifeng; Zheng Wenwei

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional braided carbon fiber reinforced silicon oxycarbide composites (3D-B C f /Si-O-C) were fabricated via a polysiloxane infiltration and pyrolysis route. The effects of fiber surface state on microstructure and mechanical properties of C f /Si-O-C composites were investigated. The change of carbon fiber surface state was achieved via heat treatment in vacuum. The results showed that heat treatment decreased carbon fiber surface activity due to the decrease of the amount of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. The C f /Si-O-C composites fabricated from the carbon fiber with low surface activity had excellent mechanical properties, which resulted from perfect interfacial bonding and good in situ fiber strength. The flexural strength and fracture toughness of the C f /Si-O-C composites from the treated fiber were 534 MPa and 23.4 MPa m 1/2 , respectively, which were about 7 and 11 times more than those of the composites from the as-received carbon fiber, respectively

  6. Effect of the molecular structure of phenolic novolac precursor resins on the properties of phenolic fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Yong-Gang; Pan, Yan-Ping; Ren, Rui; Dang, Jiang-Min; Liu, Chun-Ling

    2013-01-01

    A series of phenolic resins with different weight-average molecular weights (M w ) and ortho/para (O/P) ratios were prepared. The effect of the phenolic precursor resin structure on the structure and properties of the resulting phenolic fibers was investigated. The structures of the resins and fibers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, melt rheometry, dynamic mechanical analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results show that the O/P ratio, unsubstituted ortho and para carbon ratio (O u /P u ), and M w of the phenolic resins play an important role in determining the properties of the phenolic fibers. The tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with increasing novolac precursor O u /P u ratios, corresponding to low O/P ratios, at comparable resin M w values. Also, the tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with increasing novolac M w values at comparable O/P ratios. Phenolic fibers with high tensile strength and good flame resistance characteristics were generated from a phenolic precursor resin, possessing a high weight-average molecular weight and a low O/P value. - Highlights: • Phenolic resins with different weight-average molecular weights and ortho/para ratios have been prepared. • The tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with reducing novolac O/P ratio. • The tensile strength of the phenolic fibers increases with increasing novolac M w

  7. Effect of Fungal Deterioration on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Hemp and Flax Natural Fiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn Crawford

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The development and application of bio-sourced composites have been gaining wide attention, yet their deterioration due to the growth of ubiquitous microorganisms during storage/manufacturing/in-service phases is still not fully understood for optimum material selection and design purposes. In this study, samples of non-woven flax fibers, hemp fibers, and mats made of co-mingled randomly-oriented flax or hemp fiber (50% and polypropylene fiber (50% were subjected to 28 days of exposure to (i no water-no fungi, (ii water only and (iii water along with the Chaetomium globosum fungus. Biocomposite samples were measured for weight loss over time, to observe the rate of fungal growth and the respiration of cellulose components in the fibers. Tensile testing was conducted to measure mechanical properties of the composite samples under different configurations. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to visualize fungal hyphal growth on the natural fibers, as well as to observe the fracture planes and failure modes of the biocomposite samples. Results showed that fungal growth significantly affects the dry mass as well as the tensile elastic modulus of the tested natural fiber mats and composites, and the effect depends on both the type and the length scale of fibers, as well as the exposure condition and time.

  8. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  9. Analytical relation between effective mode field area and waveguide dispersion in microstructure fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenster, Mathias; Steinmeyer, Günter; Iliew, Rumen; Lederer, Falk; Petermann, Klaus

    2006-11-15

    For optical fibers exhibiting a radially symmetric refractive index profile, there exists an analytical relation that connects waveguide dispersion and the Petermann-II mode field radius. We extend the usefulness of this relation to the nonradially symmetric case of microstructure fibers in the anomalous dispersion regime, yielding a simple relation between dispersion and effective mode field area. Assuming a Gaussian mode distribution, we derive a fundamental upper limit for the effective mode field area that is required to obtain a certain amount of anomalous waveguide dispersion. This relation is demonstrated to show excellent agreement for fiber designs suited for supercontinuum generation and soliton lasers in the near infrared.

  10. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  11. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    graduate student meant that data acquisition with the packed bed systems ended up competing for the graduate student’s available time with the electrodynamic balance redesign and assembly portions of the project. This competition for available time was eventually mitigated to some extent by the later recruitment of an undergraduate student to help with data collection using the packed bed system. It was only the recruitment of the second student that allowed the single particle balance design and construction efforts to proceed as far as they did during the project period. It should be added that some significant time was also spent by the graduate student cataloging previous work involving graphite. This eventually resulted in a review paper being submitted and accepted (“Adsorption of Iodine on Graphite in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems: A Review,” Kyle L. Walton, Tushar K. Ghosh, Dabir S. Viswanath, Sudarshan K. Loyalka, Robert V. Tompson). Our specific revised objectives in this project were as follows: Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using an EDB and a temperature controlled EDB; Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using a packed column bed apparatus; Explore the effect that charge has on the adsorption isotherms of iodine by varying the charges on and the voltages used to suspend the microscopic particles in the EDB; and To interpret these results in terms of the existing models (Langmuir, BET, Freundlich, and others) which we will modify as necessary to include charge related effects.

  12. Residual stress effects on the impact resistance and strength of fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Equations have been derived to predict degradation effects of microresidual stresses on impact resistance of unidirectional fiber composites. Equations also predict lamination residual stresses in multilayered angle ply composites.

  13. Design of an amplifier model accounting for thermal effect in fully aperiodic large pitch fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragni, K.; Molardi, C.; Poli, F.; Dauliat, R.; Leconte, B.; Darwich, D.; du Jeu, R.; Malleville, M. A.; Jamier, R.; Selleri, S.; Roy, P.; Cucinotta, A.

    2018-02-01

    Yb-doped Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) have triggered a significant power scaling into fiber-based lasers. However thermally-induced effects, like mode instability, can compromise the output beam quality. PCF design with improved Higher Order Mode (HOM) delocalization and effective thermal resilience can contain the problem. In particular, Fully- Aperiodic Large-Pitch Fibers (FA-LPFs) have shown interesting properties in terms of resilience to thermal effects. In this paper the performances of a Yb-doped FA-LPF amplifier are experimentally and numerically investigated. Modal properties and gain competition between Fundamental Mode (FM) and first HOM have been calculated, in presence of thermal effects. The main doped fiber characteristics have been derived by comparison between experimental and numerical results.

  14. Cellulose nanowhiskers from coconut husk fibers: effect of preparation conditions on their thermal and morphological behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared by sulfuric acid hydrolysis from coconut husk fibers which had previously been submitted to a delignification process. The effects of preparation conditions on the thermal and morphological behavior of the nanocrystals were investigated. Cellulose nanowhisker sus...

  15. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  16. Effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber packing on deformation of metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T.; Suresh, S.

    1993-01-01

    The combined effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber spatial distribution on the deformation of a 6061 aluminum alloy containing a fixed concentration unidirectional boron fibers have been analyzed using detailed finite element models. The geometrical structure includes perfectly periodic, uniformly space fiber arrangements in square and hexagonal cells, as well as different cells in which either 30 or 60 fibers are randomly placed in the ductile matrix. The model involves an elastic-plastic matrix, elastic fibers, and mechanically bonded interfaces. The results indicate that both fiber packing and thermal residual stresses can have a significant effect on the stress-strain characteristics of the composite. The thermal residual stresses cause pronounced matrix yielding which also influences the apparent overall stiffness of the composite during the initial stages of subsequent far-field loading along the axial and transverse direction. Furthermore, the thermal residual stresses apparently elevate the flow stress of the composite during transverse tension. Such effects can be traced back to the level of constraint imposed on the matrix by local fiber spacing. The implications of the present results to the processing of the composites are also briefly addressed

  17. Effect of discrete glass fibers on the behavior of R.C. Beams exposed to fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Riad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding discrete glass fibers on the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams under different fire and cooling conditions. Eighteen beams with different concrete compressive strengths were tested to study the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams containing discrete glass fibers when exposed to different fire and cooling conditions. Nine beams were prepared from normal strength concrete (NSC with compressive strength equal to 35 MPa while the other beams were prepared from high strength concrete (HSC with compressive strength equal to 60 MPa. The beams contained different contents of discrete glass fibers. The modes of failure of tested specimens show that the crack patterns change according to fire condition and fiber content. Analysis of test results show that adding discrete glass fibers to NSC increased the residual stiffness of the tested specimens after firing and decreased the rate of the deflection gain during firing. Also adding fibers to concrete has a limited positive effect on the ultimate strength of the specimens compared to the control specimens. Its effect on deflection due to fire is more pronounced. Finally, the recommended optimum ratio of discrete glass fibers is not more than 0.5% of the total concrete weight.

  18. Graphite curtain vacuum outgassing and heat transfer. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivel, H.J.; Lang, G.P.; Kipp, H.W.

    1976-12-01

    Thermal conductivity of a bundle of high conductivity graphite fibers (T-50) was measured as a function of temperature, density and fiber orientation at pressures of 10 -4 to 10 -5 torr. All 3 variables had a significant influence on thermal conductivity. The highest conductivity fiber bundle tested had a conductivity significantly less than dense, bulk nuclear grade graphite. The incorporation of heat pipes into a graphite spectral shaper will permit a 2-fold thicker shaper. Heat pipes not only increase the transport of heat within the spectral shaper but can increase heat transfer at the shaper-first wall interface and potentially serve as a means of attaching shaper modules to the first wall. A heat pipe using a liquid metal working fluid was fabricated and tested in magnetic fields of 1 and 2 Tesla. Liquid metal heat pipes can be used in a magnetic field of at least up to 2 Tesla. Much more work needs to be done to establish the capabilities for high performance heat pipes when used in magnetic fields. Four different types of graphite fibers were exposed in EBR-II to a neutron fluence of 3.5 x 10 21 cm -2 EFF at 470 0 C. Large axial shrinkages of 6.6 to 8.6% resulted

  19. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  20. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  1. Effect of nickel introduced by electroplating on pyrocarbon deposition of carbon-fiber preforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yancai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the deposition rate and microstructure of pyrocarbon, nickel was introduced by electroplating on carbon fibers and used as a catalyst during the deposition of pyrocarbon at 1000 °C using methane as a precursor gas. The distribution of nickel catalyst and the microstructure of pyrocarbon were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman micro-spectrometry. Results show that nano-sized nickel particles could be well distributed on carbon fibers and the pyrocarbon deposited catalytically had a smaller d002 value and a higher graphitization degree compared with that without catalyst. In addition, the deposition rate of pyrocarbon in each hour was measured. The deposition rate of pyrocarbon in the first hour was more than 10 times when carbon cloth substrates were doped with nickel catalysts as compared to the pure carbon cloths. The pyrocarbon gained by rapid deposition may include two parts, which are generation directly on the nickel catalyst and formation with the carbon nanofibers as crystal nucleus.

  2. Floatability study of graphite ore from southeast Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florena, Fenfen Fenda; Syarifuddin, Fahmi; Hanam, Eko Sulistio; Trisko, Nici; Kustiyanto, Eko; Enilisiana, Rianto, Anton; Arinton, Ghenadi

    2016-02-01

    Graphite ore obtained from Kolaka Regency, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia have been succesfully investigated for beneficiation by froth flotation technique. Preliminary study have been done to determine the minerals types, fixed carbon content and liberation size of the graphite. Graphite is naturally floatable due to its hydrophobic property. Some suitable reagents are usually added to increase effectiveness of recovery. In this article, enrichment of graphite by froth flotation was studied by investigating the effect of reagents concentrations, rotation speed and particle size on the carbon grade and recovery of the concentrate. The carbon grade increased from 3.00% to 60.00% at the optimum flotation conditions.

  3. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  4. The effect of dietary fiber and other factors on insulin response: role in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, I H; Albrink, M J

    1985-07-01

    Epidemiologic evidence favors the hypothesis that obesity may result from the fiber-depleted diet of industrialized societies. Since hyperinsulinemia is a universal characteristic and perhaps causal of obesity, the possibility is considered that dietary factors causing excess insulin secretion might lead to obesity. Dietary glucose causes a slightly greater insulin rise than cooked starch containing an equal amount of carbohydrate, and high fiber starchy foods cause a much lesser insulin response than does glucose in solution. Doubling the dose of carbohydrate in a meal causes only a small increase in glucose response but a large increase in insulin response. Dietary fiber could act by displacing some of the carbohydrate that would normally be absorbable in the small intestine, or could translocate the carbohydrate to a point lower in the intestinal tract where less effect on insulin secretion would be observed. Evidence is presented that a higher fiber diet is associated with a higher concentration of fasting circulating free fatty acids, a lesser post-cibal decrease in circulating free fatty acids and triglycerides and less chronic increase in fasting triglycerides than a low fiber diet. These differences are associated with a lesser insulin response to high fiber meals. The extreme fluctuations between the fed and fasted states seen with low fiber diets are thus dampened by high fiber diets. The less complete inhibition of lipolysis during the fed state, and more intense lipolysis during fasting, suggested by the above data, might tend to prevent obesity. The mechanisms of the lesser insulin response to high rather than low fiber meals are not known, but the possibility that dietary fiber decreases the GIP response is considered.

  5. Balanced improvement of high performance concrete material properties with modified graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, Amirpasha

    Graphite nanomaterials offer distinct features for effective reinforcement of cementitious matrices in the pre-crack and post-crack ranges of behavior. Thoroughly dispersed and well-bonded nanomaterials provide for effective control of the size and propagation of defects (microcracks) in matrix, and also act as closely spaced barriers against diffusion of moisture and aggressive solutions into concrete. Modified graphite nanomaterials can play multi-faceted roles towards enhancing the mechanical, physical and functional attributes of concrete materials. Graphite nanoplatelets (GP) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were chosen for use in cementitious materials. Experimental results highlighted the balanced gains in diverse engineering properties of high-performance concrete realized by introduction of graphite nanomaterials. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used in order to gain further insight into the effects of nanomaterials on the hydration process and structure of cement hydrates. NMR exploits the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei, and the sensitivity of these properties to local environments to generate data which enables determination of the internal structure, reaction state, and chemical environment of molecules and bulk materials. 27 Al and 29Si NMR spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to evaluate the effects of graphite nanoplatelets on the structure of cement hydrates, and their resistance to alkali-silica reaction (ASR), chloride ion diffusion, and sulfate attack. Results of 29Si NMR spectroscopy indicated that the percent condensation of C-S-H in cementitious paste was lowered in the presence of nanoplatelets at the same age. The extent of chloride diffusion was assessed indirectly by detecting Friedel's salt as a reaction product of chloride ions with aluminum-bearing cement hydrates. Graphite nanoplatelets were found to significantly reduce the concentration of Friedel's salt at different depths after various periods

  6. The effect of α-cellulose fiber on the properties of melamine-formaldehyde molding compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatibi, M. A.; Beheshti, M. A.; Morshedian, J.

    2001-01-01

    Melamine-formaldehyde molding compounds have found different industrial applications. This is due to their good mechanical properties such as hardness, gloss and high modulus and strength. One of the major components of these compounds is α-cellulose fiber and has a major effect on the mechanical properties. Although this fiber is being used in these compounds for a long time, there is not much data available of α-cellulose fibers on the physical and mechanical properties of melamine-formaldehyde molding compounds being investigated. Results show that although the microstructures of these two fibers are quite different from each other, but they do not have any effect on the mechanical properties of the molding. Whereas, it has a significant effect on the wettability (processing condition) and glossiness of the mol dings. Since this latter property is very important in house wares applications, the darker mol dings can not be used in domestic applications

  7. Laser fiber cleaving techniques: effects on tip morphology and power output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassantachart, Janna M; Lightfoot, Michelle; Yeo, Alexander; Maldonado, Jonathan; Li, Roger; Alsyouf, Muhannad; Martin, Jacob; Lee, Michael; Olgin, Gaudencio; Baldwin, D Duane

    2015-01-01

    Proper cleaving of reusable laser fibers is needed to maintain optimal functionality. This study quantifies the effect of different cleaving tools on power output of the holmium laser fiber and demonstrates morphologic changes using microscopy. The uncleaved tips of new 272 μm reusable laser fibers were used to obtain baseline power transmission values at 3 W (0.6 J, 5 Hz). Power output for each of four cleaving techniques-11-blade scalpel, scribe pen cleaving tool, diamond cleaving wheel, and suture scissors-was measured in a single-blinded fashion. Dispersion of light from the fibers was compared with manufacturer specifications and rated as "ideal," "acceptable," or "unacceptable" by blinded reviewers. The fiber tips were also imaged using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Independent samples Kruskal-Wallis test and chi square were used for statistical analysis (αtrend that was highly significant (Ptrend as the power output results (P<0.001). Microscopy showed that the scribe pen produced small defects along the fiber cladding but maintained a smooth, flat core surface. The other cleaving techniques produced defects on both the core and cladding. Cleaving techniques produce a significant effect on the initial power transmitted by reusable laser fibers. The scribe pen cleaving tool produced the most consistent and highest average power output.

  8. Investigating the Effects of Nanoclay and Nylon Fibers on the Mechanical Properties of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Taherkhani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effects of reinforcement by randomly distributed nylon fibers and addition of nanoclay on some engineering properties of a typical asphalt concrete. The properties of asphalt concrete reinforced by different percentages of 25 mm nylon fibers have been compared with those of the mixtures containing different percentages of nanoclay and those in which both the fibers and nanoclay have been included. Engineering properties, including Marshall stability, resilient modulus, dynamic creep and fatigue life have been studied. Nylon fibers have been used in different percentages of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4% (by the weight of total mixture, and nanoclay has been used in 2, 4 and 7% (by the weight of bitumen. It is found that the addition of fibers is more effective than the nanoclay for increasing the resistance against fatigue cracking. However, nanoclay improves the resistance of the mixture against permanent deformation better than the nylon fibers. The results also show that the mixture reinforced by 0.4% of nylon fibers and containing 7% of nanoclay has the highest resilient modulus, Marshall stability and fatigue life. However, the mixture containing only 7% of nanoclay has the highest resistance against permanent deformation.

  9. Modeling of damage in ductile cast iron – The effect of including plasticity in the graphite noduless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper a micro-mechanical model for investigating the stress-strain relation of ductile cast iron subjected to simple loading conditions is presented. The model is based on a unit cell containing a single spherical graphite nodule embedded in a uniform ferritic matrix, under...... the assumption of infinitesimal strains and plane-stress conditions. Despite the latter being a limitation with respect to full 3D models, it allows a direct comparison with experimental investigations of damage evolution on the surface of ductile cast iron components, where the stress state is biaxial in nature...

  10. Effects of moisture on glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    performance of wind turbine blades over their lifetime. Here, environmental moisture conditions were simulated by immersing glass fiber-reinforced polymer specimens in salt water for a period of up to 8 years. The mechanical properties of specimens were analyzed before and after immersion to evaluate...

  11. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  12. Study on the Effect of Straw Fiber on the Performance of Volcanic Slag Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li-guang; Liu, Xi-xu

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of straw fiber on the working performance, mechanical properties and frost resistance of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete were studied. The experimental results show that the straw fiber is subjected to surface carbonization treatment and mixed into the volcanic slag light aggregate concrete. The flexural strength and fracture pressure ratio of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete are improved obviously Improved volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete brittleness improves toughness. Carbonized straw fiber greatly improves the frost resistance of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete. So that the volcanic slag light aggregate concrete freeze-thaw cycle can reach 300 times.

  13. Preventive effect on spalling of UFC using jute fiber at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozawa M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the relationship between spalling behaviour and spalling ratio of UFC with three kinds of short fibers (jute, polypropylene, water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol at high temperature. The heating temperatures were 400 °C and 600 °C. Although the specimen with jute fiber dosage of 0.19% by volume was occurred explosive spalling, the damage of specimen was slightly small. It appears that the addition of jute fiber to UFC is effective for preventing spalling.

  14. BDK-doped core microstructured PMMA optical fiber for effective Bragg grating photo-inscription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xuehao; Woyessa, Getinet; Kinet, Damien

    2017-01-01

    An endlessly single-mode doped microstructured poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) optical fiber is produced for effective fiber Bragg grating (FBG) photo-inscription by means of a 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser and the phase mask technique. The fiber presents a uniform benzyl dimethyl ketal (BDK......) distribution in its core without drastic loss increase. It was produced using the selected center hole doping technique, and the BDK dopant acts as a photoinitiator. In this Letter, we report a rapidly growing process of the grating reflection band. For an 11 mW mean laser power, the FBG reflectivity reaches...

  15. Temperature effects of Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a liquid crystal-filled fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Bo-Yan; Su, Hsien-Pin; Tseng, Yu-Pei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a simple and cost-effective method to fabricate all fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) based on cascading a short section of liquid crystal (LC)-filled hollow-optic fiber (HOF) between two single mode fibers by using automatically splicing technique. The transmission spectra...... of the proposed MZI with different LC-infiltrated length were measured and the temperature-induced wavelength shifts of the interference fringes were recorded. Both blue shift and red shift were observed, depending the temperature range. Based on our experimental results, interference fringe was observed...

  16. Electrospun fibers of layered double hydroxide/biopolymer nanocomposites as effective drug delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yue-E.; Zhu Hong; Chen Dan; Wang Ruiyu [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Tjiu, Weng Weei [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Liu Tianxi, E-mail: txliu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Ibuprofen intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH-IBU)/polycaprolactone (PCL) and LDH-IBU/polylactide (PLA) nanocomposite fibers are electrospun based on a combination of LDH-IBU with two kinds of biopolymers (i.e. PCL and PLA), to act as effective drug delivery systems. Ibuprofen (IBU) is chosen as a model drug, which is intercalated in MgAl-LDH by coprecipitation. Poly(oxyethylene-b-oxypropylene-b-oxyethylene) (Pluronic) is also added into PLA-based fibers as hydrophilicity enhancer and release modulator. LDH-IBU nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed throughout the nanocomposite fibers, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. In vitro drug release studies show that initial IBU liberation from LDH-IBU/PCL composite fibers is remarkably slower than that from IBU/PCL fibers due to the sustained release property of LDH-IBU and heterogeneous nucleation effect of LDH-IBU on PCL chain segments. Surprisingly, the initial IBU release from LDH-IBU/PLA and LDH-IBU/PLA/Pluronic composite fibers is faster than that from the corresponding IBU/PLA and IBU/PLA/Pluronic fibers. This effect can be attributed to the strong interaction between alkyl groups in IBU molecules and methyl substituent groups of PLA as well as the hydrophilicity of LDH-IBU, which lead to an easier diffusion of water with a faster release of IBU from LDH-IBU/PLA and LDH-IBU/PLA/Pluronic composite fibers. - Graphical abstract: Ibuprofen intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH-IBU)/polycaprolactone (PCL) and LDH-IBU/polylactide (PLA) nanocomposite fibers are electrospun based on the combination of LDHs with two kinds of biopolymers (i.e. PCL and PLA). LDH-IBU nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed throughout all the electrospun nanocomposite fibers even at a high loading level of 5 wt%. By combining the tunable drug release property of LDHs and electrospinning technique, the new drug delivery system is anticipated for effective loading and sustained release of drugs

  17. BDK-doped core microstructured PMMA optical fiber for effective Bragg grating photo-inscription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuehao; Woyessa, Getinet; Kinet, Damien; Janting, Jakob; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    An endlessly single-mode doped microstructured poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) optical fiber is produced for effective fiber Bragg grating (FBG) photo-inscription by means of a 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser and the phase mask technique. The fiber presents a uniform benzyl dimethyl ketal (BDK) distribution in its core without drastic loss increase. It was produced using the selected center hole doping technique, and the BDK dopant acts as a photoinitiator. In this Letter, we report a rapidly growing process of the grating reflection band. For an 11 mW mean laser power, the FBG reflectivity reaches 83% in only 40 s.

  18. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on domestic aramid fiber III reinforced bismaleimide composite interfacial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Ping; Feng, Jiayue; Cui, Jinyuan; Yang, Faze

    2017-12-01

    Domestic Aramid Fiber III (DAF III) was modified by oxygen plasma treatment. The fiber surface characteristics was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results showed that oxygen plasma treatment changed surface morphologies. The effects of oxygen plasma treatment on DAF III reinforced bismaleimides (BMI) composite bending and interfacial properties were investigated, respectively. The ILSS value increased from 49.3 MPa to 56.0 MPa (by 13.5%) after oxygen plasma treatment. The bending strength changed a little. Furthermore, the composite rupture mode changed from interfacial rupture to fiber or resin bulk rupture.

  19. Electrospun fibers of layered double hydroxide/biopolymer nanocomposites as effective drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Yue-E.; Zhu Hong; Chen Dan; Wang Ruiyu; Tjiu, Weng Weei; Liu Tianxi

    2012-01-01

    Ibuprofen intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH-IBU)/polycaprolactone (PCL) and LDH-IBU/polylactide (PLA) nanocomposite fibers are electrospun based on a combination of LDH-IBU with two kinds of biopolymers (i.e. PCL and PLA), to act as effective drug delivery systems. Ibuprofen (IBU) is chosen as a model drug, which is intercalated in MgAl-LDH by coprecipitation. Poly(oxyethylene-b-oxypropylene-b-oxyethylene) (Pluronic) is also added into PLA-based fibers as hydrophilicity enhancer and release modulator. LDH-IBU nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed throughout the nanocomposite fibers, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. In vitro drug release studies show that initial IBU liberation from LDH-IBU/PCL composite fibers is remarkably slower than that from IBU/PCL fibers due to the sustained release property of LDH-IBU and heterogeneous nucleation effect of LDH-IBU on PCL chain segments. Surprisingly, the initial IBU release from LDH-IBU/PLA and LDH-IBU/PLA/Pluronic composite fibers is faster than that from the corresponding IBU/PLA and IBU/PLA/Pluronic fibers. This effect can be attributed to the strong interaction between alkyl groups in IBU molecules and methyl substituent groups of PLA as well as the hydrophilicity of LDH-IBU, which lead to an easier diffusion of water with a faster release of IBU from LDH-IBU/PLA and LDH-IBU/PLA/Pluronic composite fibers. - Graphical abstract: Ibuprofen intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH-IBU)/polycaprolactone (PCL) and LDH-IBU/polylactide (PLA) nanocomposite fibers are electrospun based on the combination of LDHs with two kinds of biopolymers (i.e. PCL and PLA). LDH-IBU nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed throughout all the electrospun nanocomposite fibers even at a high loading level of 5 wt%. By combining the tunable drug release property of LDHs and electrospinning technique, the new drug delivery system is anticipated for effective loading and sustained release of drugs

  20. Effects of moisture, elevated temperature, and fatigue loading on the behavior of graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels with center cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fatigue loading combined with moisture and heat on the behavior of graphite epoxy panels with either Kevlar-49 or S-glass buffer strips were studied. Buffer strip panels, that had a slit in the center to represent damage, were moisture conditioned or heated, fatigue loaded, and then tested in tension to measure their residual strength. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading direction and were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with Kevlar-49 epoxy or S-glass epoxy on a 1-for-1 basis. The panels were subjected to a fatigue loading spectrum. One group of panels was preconditioned by soaking in 60 C water to produce a 1 percent weight gain then tested at room temperature. One group was heated to 82 C during the fatigue loading. Another group was moisture conditioned and then tested at 82 C. The residual strengths of the buffer panels were not highly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panel by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results. The moisture conditioning did not have a large effect on the Kevlar-49 panels.

  1. On the effect of the fiber orientation on the flexural stiffness of injection molded short fiber reinforced polycarbonate plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, N.M.; Isdell, G.; Pouzada, A.S.; Powell, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The through-thickness fiber orientation distribution of injection molded polycarbonate plates was experimentally determined by light reflection microscopy and manual digitization of polished cross sections. Fiber length distribution was determined by pyrolysis tests followed by image analysis. A

  2. The effect of alkaline treatment and fiber orientation on impact resistant of bio-composites Sansevieria trifasciata fiber/polypropylene as automotive components material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieddieque, Apang Djafar; Mardiyati, Suratman, Rochim; Widyanto, Bambang

    2018-04-01

    The increasing amount of car usage is causing an escalated amount of fuel consumption and CO2 emission. It implicates demand for the automotive industry to increase the efficiency of their products, One of the most effective ways to solve the issue is to find green weight light material for the interior automotive component. The Aim of this research was to investigate the effect of alkaline treatment and fiber orientation on the impact resistant of material bio- composite sansevieiria trifasciata fiber/Polypropylene. In this research, bio-composites sansevieria trifasciata fiber/Polypropylene was prepared with random fiber orientation and unidirectional orientation by using a hot press method with pressure 140 Bar and temperature 240°C. Fiber was taken from Sansevieria trifasciata by using mechanical retting. In this study, Sansevieria fiber was given alkaline treatment (mercerization) with NaOH 3% (w/w) solution at temperature 100°C for an hour. The fraction of fiber volume that were used in this experiment are 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%. The impact test was conducted based on ASTM D 6110 - 04, and the fracture analysis was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The best result of impact toughness and fracture analysis were achieved by bio composite untreated and unidirectional sansevieria trifasciata fiber/Polypropylene with fiber volume fraction of 15%, which was 48.092kJ/m2 for impact resistant. As compared to the impact toughness standard, which needed for interior automotive component, the impact toughness of sansevieria trifasciata fiber/Polypropylene has fulfilled the standard of the interior material automotive industry. Therefore, this material can be potentially used as materials on the car exterior component.

  3. Thermophysical properties estimation of paraffin/graphite composite phase change material using an inverse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachheb, Mohamed; Karkri, Mustapha; Albouchi, Fethi; Mzali, Foued; Nasrallah, Sassi Ben

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of paraffin/graphite composites by uni-axial compression technique. • Measurement of thermophysical properties of paraffin/graphite using the periodic method. • Measurement of the experimental densities of paraffin/graphite composites. • Prediction of the effective thermal conductivity using analytical models. - Abstract: In this paper, two types of graphite were combined with paraffin in an attempt to improve thermal conductivity of paraffin phase change material (PCM): Synthetic graphite (Timrex SFG75) and graphite waste obtained from damaged Tubular graphite Heat Exchangers. These paraffin/graphite phase change material (PCM) composites are prepared by the cold uniaxial compression technique and the thermophysical properties were estimated using a periodic temperature method and an inverse technique. Results showed that the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are greatly influenced by the graphite addition

  4. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  5. Fracture toughness of titanium–cement interfaces: effects of fibers and loading angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandaker M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Morshed Khandaker,1 Khatri Chhetri Utsaha,1 Tracy Morris21Department of Engineering and Physics, 2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK, USAAbstract: Ideal implant–cement or implant–bone interfaces are required for implant fixation and the filling of tissue defects created by disease. Micron- to nanosize osseointegrated features, such as surface roughness, fibers, porosity, and particles, have been fused with implants for improving the osseointegration of an implant with the host tissue in orthopedics and dentistry. The effects of fibers and loading angles on the interface fracture toughness of implant–cement specimens with and without fibers at the interface are not yet known. Such studies are important for the design of a long-lasting implant for orthopedic applications. The goal of this study was to improve the fracture toughness of an implant–cement interface by deposition of micron- to nanosize fibers on an implant surface. There were two objectives in the study: 1 to evaluate the influence of fibers on the fracture toughness of implant–cement interfaces with and without fibers at the interfaces, and 2 to evaluate the influence of loading angles on implant–cement interfaces with and without fibers at the interfaces. This study used titanium as the implant, poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as cement, and polycaprolactone (PCL as fiber materials. An electrospinning unit was fabricated for the deposition of PCL unidirectional fibers on titanium (Ti plates. The Evex tensile test stage was used to determine the interface fracture toughness (KC of Ti–PMMA with and without PCL fibers at 0°, 45°, and 90° loading angles, referred to in this article as tension, mixed, and shear tests. The study did not find any significant interaction between fiber and loading angles (P>0.05, although there was a significant difference in the KC means of Ti–PMMA samples for the loading angles (P<0

  6. Effects of Cereal, Fruit and Vegetable Fibers on Human Fecal Weight and Transit Time: A Comprehensive Review of Intervention Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan de Vries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cereal fibers are known to increase fecal weight and speed transit time, but far less data are available on the effects of fruits and vegetable fibers on regularity. This study provides a comprehensive review of the impact of these three fiber sources on regularity in healthy humans. We identified English-language intervention studies on dietary fibers and regularity and performed weighted linear regression analyses for fecal weight and transit time. Cereal and vegetable fiber groups had comparable effects on fecal weight; both contributed to it more than fruit fibers. Less fermentable fibers increased fecal weight to a greater degree than more fermentable fibers. Dietary fiber did not change transit time in those with an initial time of <48 h. In those with an initial transit time ≥48 h, transit time was reduced by approximately 30 min per gram of cereal, fruit or vegetable fibers, regardless of fermentability. Cereal fibers have been studied more than any other kind in relation to regularity. This is the first comprehensive review comparing the effects of the three major food sources of fiber on bowel function and regularity since 1993.

  7. Effects of Cereal, Fruit and Vegetable Fibers on Human Fecal Weight and Transit Time: A Comprehensive Review of Intervention Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; Birkett, Anne; Hulshof, Toine; Verbeke, Kristin; Gibes, Kernon

    2016-03-02

    Cereal fibers are known to increase fecal weight and speed transit time, but far less data are available on the effects of fruits and vegetable fibers on regularity. This study provides a comprehensive review of the impact of these three fiber sources on regularity in healthy humans. We identified English-language intervention studies on dietary fibers and regularity and performed weighted linear regression analyses for fecal weight and transit time. Cereal and vegetable fiber groups had comparable effects on fecal weight; both contributed to it more than fruit fibers. Less fermentable fibers increased fecal weight to a greater degree than more fermentable fibers. Dietary fiber did not change transit time in those with an initial time of <48 h. In those with an initial transit time ≥48 h, transit time was reduced by approximately 30 min per gram of cereal, fruit or vegetable fibers, regardless of fermentability. Cereal fibers have been studied more than any other kind in relation to regularity. This is the first comprehensive review comparing the effects of the three major food sources of fiber on bowel function and regularity since 1993.

  8. Effect Of Ethylene Oxide, Autoclave and Ultra Violet Sterilizations On Surface Topography Of Pet Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem DUZYER

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study to investigate the effects of different sterilization methods on electrospun polyester. Ethylene oxide (EO, autoclave (AU and ultraviolet (UV sterilization methods were applied to electrospun fibers produced from polyethylene terephthalate (PET solutions with concentrations of 10, 15 and 20 wt.%. The surface characteristics of the fibers were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM, atomic force microscope (AFM, surface pore size studies and contact angle measurements. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC tests were carried out to characterize the thermal properties. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR tests were performed to analyze the micro structural properties. SEM studies showed that different sterilization methods made significant changes on the surfaces of the fibers depending on the PET concentration. Although the effects were decreased with the increasing polymer concentration, the fiber structure was damaged especially with the EO sterilization. The contact angle values were decreased with the UV sterilization method the most.

  9. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  10. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  11. Trapping interference effects of arsenic, antimony and bismuth hydrides in collection of selenium hydride within iridium-modified transversally-heated graphite tube atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furdikova, Zuzana [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 118, CZ-61200 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, CZ-60200, Brno (Czech Republic); Docekal, Bohumil [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, CZ-60200, Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: docekal@iach.cz

    2009-04-15

    Interference effects of co-generated hydrides of arsenic, antimony and bismuth on trapping behavior of selenium hydride (analyte) within an iridium-modified, transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) were investigated. A twin-channel hydride generation system was used for independent separate generation and introduction of analyte and interferent hydrides, i.e. in a simultaneous and/or sequential analyte-interferent and interferent-analyte mode of operation. The influence of the analyte and modifier mass, interferent amount, trapping temperature and composition of the gaseous phase was studied. A simple approach for the elimination of mutual interference effects by modification of the gaseous phase with oxygen in a substoichiometric ratio to chemically generated hydrogen is proposed and the suppression of these interference effects is demonstrated. A hypothesis on the mechanism of trapping and mutual interference effects is drawn.

  12. Dependence of strength on particle size in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.P.; Kennedy, C.R.

    The strength to particle size relationship for specially fabricated graphites has been demonstrated and rationalized using fracture mechanics. In the past, similar studies have yielded empirical data using only commercially available material. Thus, experimental verification of these relationships has been difficult. However, the graphites of this study were fabricated by controlling the particle size ranges for a series of isotropic graphites. All graphites that were evaluated had a constant 1.85 g/cm 3 density. Thus, particle size was the only variable. This study also considered the particle size effect on other physical properties; coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), electrical resistivity, fracture strain, and Young's modulus

  13. Effect of Forging Parameters on Low Cycle Fatigue Behaviour of Al/Basalt Short Fiber Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Karthigeyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface.

  14. Effect of forging parameters on low cycle fatigue behaviour of Al/basalt short fiber metal matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthigeyan, R; Ranganath, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs) of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10) basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface.

  15. Effects of heat treatment on the microstructure of amorphous boron carbide coating deposited on graphite substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Siwei; Zeng Bin; Feng Zude; Liu Yongsheng; Yang Wenbin; Cheng Laifei; Zhang Litong

    2010-01-01

    A two-layer boron carbide coating is deposited on a graphite substrate by chemical vapor deposition from a CH 4 /BCl 3 /H 2 precursor mixture at a low temperature of 950 o C and a reduced pressure of 10 KPa. Coated substrates are annealed at 1600 o C, 1700 o C, 1800 o C, 1900 o C and 2000 o C in high purity argon for 2 h, respectively. Structural evolution of the coatings is explored by electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that the as-deposited coating is composed of pyrolytic carbon and amorphous boron carbide. A composition gradient of B and C is induced in each deposition. After annealing, B 4 C crystallites precipitate out of the amorphous boron carbide and grow to several hundreds nanometers by receiving B and C from boron-doped pyrolytic carbon. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy proves that the crystallization is controlled by element diffusion activated by high temperature annealing, after that a larger concentration gradient of B and C is induced in the coating. Quantified Raman spectrum identifies a graphitization enhancement of pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy exhibits an epitaxial growth of B 4 C at layer/layer interface of the annealed coatings. Mechanism concerning the structural evolution on the basis of the experimental results is proposed.

  16. Interfacial effects in ZnO nanotubes/needle-structured graphitic diamond nanohybrid for detecting dissolved acetone at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Deepa; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-12-01

    A high-performance ZnO nanotubes (ZNTs)/needle-structured graphitic diamond (NGD) nanohybrid material was prepared and observed the electrochemical sensing properties of liquid acetone in water. Initially, we synthesized NGD film using bias-enhanced growth (BEG) process. Afterwards, a well-etched ZNTs were spatially grown on the NGD film using simple hydrothermal method, and utilized as sensing material for assemble an electrochemical sensor (via EGFET configuration) operating at room temperature. The systematic investigations depict the ultra-high sensing properties attained from ZNTs grown on NGD film. The NGD film mostly have needle or wire shaped diamond grains, which contributes extremely high electrical conductivity. Furthermore, needle shaped diamond grains cover with multi-layer graphitic material generates conduction channels for ZNTs and leads to enhance the oxygen residuals and species. The material stability and conductivity of NGD as well the defects exist with oxygen vacancies in ZNTs offers superior sensing properties. Thus, the interesting combination of these wide band gap semiconductor materials exhibit high sensor response (89 mV/mL), high stability and long-term reliability (tested after 60 days).

  17. Effects of reaction temperature and inlet oxidizing gas flow rate on IG-110 graphite oxidation used in HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Ximing; Dong Yujie; Zhou Yangping; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Zhang Zuoyi; Li Zhengcao

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of a selected nuclear graphite (IG-110) used in Pebble-bed Module High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor was investigated under the condition of air ingress accident. The oblate rectangular specimen was oxidized by oxidant gas with oxygen mole fraction of 20% and flow rates of 125–500 ml/min at temperature of 400–1200°C. Experiment results indicate that the oxidation behavior can also be classified into three regimes according to temperature. The regime I at 400–550°C has lower apparent activation energies of 75.57–138.59 kJ/mol when the gas flow rate is 125–500 ml/min. In the regime II at 600–900°C, the oxidation rate restricted by the oxygen supply to graphite is almost stable with the increase of temperature. In the regime III above 900°C, the oxidation rate increases obviously with the increase of temperature.With the increase of inlet gas flow from 125 to 500 ml/min, the apparent activation energy in regime I is increased and the stableness of oxidation rate in regime II is reduced. (author)

  18. The effect of pineapple core fiber on dough rheology and the quality of mantou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sy-Yu Shiau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of dietary fiber offers the health benefit of lowering the risk of many chronic diseases. Pineapple core fiber (PCF in this study was extracted and incorporated into dough and mantou (i.e., steamed bread. The effects of PCF substitution and fiber size on textural and rheological properties of dough and mantou were evaluated by a texture analyzer. The substitution of wheat flour by PCF resulted in a stiffer and less extensible dough with or without fermentation. The hardness and gumminess of mantou significantly increased as the PCF substitution increased from 0% to 15%, but the cohesiveness, specific volume, and elasticity significantly decreased with the fiber substitution. Ten percent PCF-enriched dough and mantou with various fiber sizes had similar rheological and textural properties, except for the k1 and k2 values. By sensory evaluation, 5% PCF-enriched mantou and the control bread had better acceptability in texture, color, odor, and overall acceptability, compared to mantous enriched with 10% or 15% PCF. Significant correlations existed between the rheological properties of dough and textural parameters of mantou and between the sensory quality and textural parameters of mantou. Therefore, we suggest that fiber-enriched mantou can be prepared with 5% PCF substitution to increase the intake of dietary fiber and maintain the quality of mantou.

  19. Effect of maleic anhydride treatment on the mechanical properties of sansevieria fiber/vinyl ester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, Rangga; Mardiyati, Steven, Purnomo, Ikhsan

    2017-03-01

    Sanseviera trifasciata commonly called mother-in-law tongue also known as snake plant is native to Indonesia, India and Africa. Sansevieria is a new fiber in composite research and has showed promising properties as reinforcement material in polymer matrix composites. Chemical treatment on reinforcing fiber is crucial to reduce hydrophilic tendency and thus improve compatibility with the matrix. In this study, effect of maleic anhydride as chemical treatment on the mechanical properties of Sansevieria fiber/vinyl ester composite was investigated. Sansevieria fibers were immersed by using NaOH 3% for two hours at 100°C and then treated by using maleic anhydrate for two hours at 120°C. Composites were prepared by solution casting with various volume fractions of fiber; 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%. Actual density, volume fraction of void and mechanical properties of composite were conducted according to ASTM standard testing methods D792, D3171 and D3039. It was found that mechanical properties of composites increased as volume fractions of fiber was increased. The highest tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of composites were 57.45 MPa and 3.47 GPa respectively, obtained from composites with volume fraction of fiber 10%.

  20. Effect of Coconut Fillers on Hybrid Coconut Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Jani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This project focuses on the conversion of naturally available coconut fibers and shells into a useful composite. In addition to it, some mechanical properties of the resultant composite is determined and also the effect of coconut shell fillers on the composite is also investigated. The few portion of the composite is incorporated with synthetic Kevlar fiber, thus the coconut fiber is hybridized to enhance the mechanical properties of coconut. In this work two types of composite is fabricate, kevelar coconut fibre (kc composite and kevelarcoco nut fibre coconut shell filler (kccsf composite. Coconut fibers have low weight and considerable properties among the natural fibers, while coconut fillers have a good ductile and impact property. The natural fibers and fillers are treated with Na-OH to make it free of organic impurities. Epoxy resin is used as the polymer matrix. Two composite are produced one with fillers and the other without the fillers using compression molding method. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and water absorption tests are done with ASTM standard. It is observed that that the addition of filler materials improves the adhesiveness of the fibers leading to the increase in the above mentioned properties. The density of the composite is also low hence the strength to weight ratio is very high. The water absorption test also showed that the resultant composite had a small adhesion to water and absorption of water.