WorldWideScience

Sample records for graphite density change

  1. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ?JOYO? fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor "JOYO" to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597°C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens.

  2. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ''JOYO'' fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597 C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (orig.)

  3. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  4. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlMaadeed, M.A.; Labidi, Sami; Krupa, Igor; Karkri, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  5. Dislocation density and graphitization of diamond crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantea, C.; Voronin, G.A.; Zerda, T.W.; Gubicza, J.; Ungar, T.

    2002-01-01

    Two sets of diamond specimens compressed at 2 GPa at temperatures varying between 1060 K and 1760 K were prepared; one in which graphitization was promoted by the presence of water and another in which graphitization of diamond was practically absent. X-ray diffraction peak profiles of both sets were analyzed for the microstructure by using the modified Williamson-Hall method and by fitting the Fourier coefficients of the measured profiles by theoretical functions for crystallite size and lattice strain. The procedures determined mean size and size distribution of crystallites as well as the density and the character of the dislocations. The same experimental conditions resulted in different microstructures for the two sets of samples. They were explained in terms of hydrostatic conditions present in the graphitized samples

  6. Increase of the density of commercial graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, H.; Meyerstein, D.

    1977-12-01

    The increase of the density of commercial graphite of the type ATJ by polymerization of an impregnated monomer, followed by pyrolysis, is described. The monomer which was either styrene or acrylonitrile, was irradiated by a 60 Co source and pyrolized in a standard vacuum system. The irradiation dose for the polymerization of the monomer was determined. Suggestions for the establishment of the optimum conditions are offered

  7. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  8. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  9. Effect of reacting surface density on the overall graphite oxidation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang; Kim, Eung; Lim, Jong; Schultz, Richard; Petti, David

    2009-01-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1) Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  10. The influence of expanded graphite on thermal properties for paraffin/high density polyethylene/chlorinated paraffin/antimony trioxide as a flame retardant phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ping; Song Lei; Lu Hongdian; Wang Jian; Hu Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The influences of expanded graphite (EG) on the thermal properties of chlorinated paraffin (CP) and antimony trioxide (AT) on phase change material which bases on paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) are studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TGA-FTIR), microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC) and cone calorimeter (CONE) were used to evaluate the influence of EG on paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT system. The DSC results indicated that the latent heat value of PCM could be increased when the mass fraction of HDPE was decreased in the PCM, and EG could confine the molecular heat movement of paraffin. EG could improve the thermal stability and increase the char residue at high temperature for paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT hybrid. The volatilized products formed on thermal degradation of paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT with EG showed the release of CO 2 gas was hastened and increased, and the amount of combustible gases were decreased by TGA-FTIR analysis. The MCC and CONE results presented that the flame retardant efficiency of CP/AT could be improved by adding EG in paraffin/HDPE/CP/AT system.

  11. Thermophysical properties estimation of paraffin/graphite composite phase change material using an inverse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachheb, Mohamed; Karkri, Mustapha; Albouchi, Fethi; Mzali, Foued; Nasrallah, Sassi Ben

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of paraffin/graphite composites by uni-axial compression technique. • Measurement of thermophysical properties of paraffin/graphite using the periodic method. • Measurement of the experimental densities of paraffin/graphite composites. • Prediction of the effective thermal conductivity using analytical models. - Abstract: In this paper, two types of graphite were combined with paraffin in an attempt to improve thermal conductivity of paraffin phase change material (PCM): Synthetic graphite (Timrex SFG75) and graphite waste obtained from damaged Tubular graphite Heat Exchangers. These paraffin/graphite phase change material (PCM) composites are prepared by the cold uniaxial compression technique and the thermophysical properties were estimated using a periodic temperature method and an inverse technique. Results showed that the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are greatly influenced by the graphite addition

  12. Spin-density wave state in simple hexagonal graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoyan, K. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    Simple hexagonal graphite, also known as AA graphite, is a metastable configuration of graphite. Using tight-binding approximation, it is easy to show that AA graphite is a metal with well-defined Fermi surface. The Fermi surface consists of two sheets, each shaped like a rugby ball. One sheet corresponds to electron states, another corresponds to hole states. The Fermi surface demonstrates good nesting: a suitable translation in the reciprocal space superposes one sheet onto another. In the presence of the electron-electron repulsion, a nested Fermi surface is unstable with respect to spin-density-wave ordering. This instability is studied using the mean-field theory at zero temperature, and the spin-density-wave order parameter is evaluated.

  13. Modelling property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to predict the irradiation induced property changes in nuclear; graphite, including the effect of a change in irradiation temperature. The currently used method; to account for changes in irradiation temperature, the scaled...

  14. Density functional theory investigation of oxygen interaction with boron-doped graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang, E-mail: txliang@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lai, Wensheng [Advanced Material Laboratory, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of oxygen with boron-doped graphite. • Adsorption and diffusion of oxygen atoms on boron doped graphite surfaces are studied. • Recombination of oxygen is investigated by ER and LH mechanisms. • Low boron concentration facilitates O{sub 2} formation while high boron loading inhibits the recombination. • The presence of B−B bonds due to boron accumulation makes it impossible for oxygen recombination. - Abstract: Boron inserted as impurity by substitution of carbon atoms in graphite is known to change (improve or deteriorate) oxidation resistance of nuclear graphite, but the reason for both catalytic and inhibiting oxidation is still uncertain. As a first step, this work is more specially devoted to the adsorption and diffusion of oxygen atoms on the surface and related to the problem of oxygen retention on the pure and boron-containing graphite surfaces. Adsorption energies and energy barriers associated to the diffusion for molecular oxygen recombination are calculated in the density functional theory framework. The existence of boron modifies the electronic structure of the surface, which results in an increase of the adsorption energy for O. However, low boron loading makes it easier for the recombination into molecular oxygen. For high boron concentration, it induces a better O retention capability in graphite because the presence of B-B bonds decreases recombination of the adsorbed oxygen atoms. A possible explanation for both catalytic and inhibiting effects of boron in graphite is proposed.

  15. Thickness gauge for the measurement of the density of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.; Gasnier, M.; Hours, R.; Jouquet, G.; Rappeneau, J.; Tanguy, J.C.

    1961-01-01

    A thickness gauge was built, based on absorption of Bremsstrahlung generated in a Be target by a ( 90 Sr + 90 Y) β- source. This allows rapid and precise estimation (95 per cent probable error = 0.7 per cent) of the densities in slabs of graphite having a constant thickness of 25 ± 0.05 mm, the diameter of the beam being about 1 cm. Results obtained in this way are presented. (author) [fr

  16. Property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Haag, G.

    1979-07-01

    Design data for irradiated graphite are usually presented as families of isothermal curves showing the change in physical property as a function of fast neutron fluence. In this report, procedures for combining isothermal curves to predict behavior under changing irradiation temperatures are compared with experimental data on irradiation-induced changes in dimensions, Young's modulus, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansivity. The suggested procedure fits the data quite well and is physically realistic

  17. Change in properties of graphite on stake of Obninsk NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgul'ev, Yu.S.; Gundorov, V.V.; Kalyagina, I.P.; Belinskaya, N.T.; Dolgov, V.V.; Komissarov, O.V.; Stuzhnev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of testing the graphite from the AM-1 reactor masonry at the Obninsk NPP for its operation period are discussed. It is shown that the masonry graphite state after 42 years of the reactor operation remains satisfactory in the most cells inspected. Separate cells requiring a repair resulted from oxidation are characterized by strength decreased by several times. The laws of radiation changes in graphite properties are analyzed. The conclusion on possibility of the further masonry operation is drawn

  18. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  19. Interaction of boron with graphite: A van der Waals density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen; Liang, Tongxiang; Lai, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A van der Waals density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. • VdW-DF functionals give fair agreement of crystal parameters with experiments. • The π electron approaches boron while adsorbing on graphite surface. • The hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. • PBE cannot describe the interstitial boron in graphite because of the ignoring binding of graphite sheets. - Abstract: Boron doping has been widely investigated to improve oxidation resistance of graphite. In this work the interaction of boron with graphite is investigated by a van der Waals density-functional approach (vdW-DF). The traditional density-functional theory (DFT) is well accounted for the binding in boron-substituted graphite. However, to investigate the boron atom on graphite surface and the interstitial impurities require use of a description of graphite interlayer binding. Traditional DFT cannot describe the vdW physics, for instance, GGA calculations show no relevant binding between graphite sheets. LDA shows some binding, but they fail to provide an accurate account of vdW forces. In this paper, we compare the calculation results of graphite lattice constant and cohesive energy by several functionals, it shows that vdW-DF such as two optimized functionals optB88-vdW and optB86b-vdW give much improved results than traditional DFT. The vdW-DF approach is then applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. Boron adsorption, substitution, and intercalation are discussed in terms of structural parameters and electronic structures. When adsorbing on graphite surface, boron behaves as π electron acceptor. The π electron approaches boron atom because of more electropositive of boron than carbon. For substitution situation, the hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. The B-doped graphite system with the hole has less

  20. Interaction of boron with graphite: A van der Waals density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen [Beijing Key Lab of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang, E-mail: txliang@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lai, Wensheng [Advanced Material Laboratory, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • A van der Waals density-functional approach is applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. • VdW-DF functionals give fair agreement of crystal parameters with experiments. • The π electron approaches boron while adsorbing on graphite surface. • The hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. • PBE cannot describe the interstitial boron in graphite because of the ignoring binding of graphite sheets. - Abstract: Boron doping has been widely investigated to improve oxidation resistance of graphite. In this work the interaction of boron with graphite is investigated by a van der Waals density-functional approach (vdW-DF). The traditional density-functional theory (DFT) is well accounted for the binding in boron-substituted graphite. However, to investigate the boron atom on graphite surface and the interstitial impurities require use of a description of graphite interlayer binding. Traditional DFT cannot describe the vdW physics, for instance, GGA calculations show no relevant binding between graphite sheets. LDA shows some binding, but they fail to provide an accurate account of vdW forces. In this paper, we compare the calculation results of graphite lattice constant and cohesive energy by several functionals, it shows that vdW-DF such as two optimized functionals optB88-vdW and optB86b-vdW give much improved results than traditional DFT. The vdW-DF approach is then applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. Boron adsorption, substitution, and intercalation are discussed in terms of structural parameters and electronic structures. When adsorbing on graphite surface, boron behaves as π electron acceptor. The π electron approaches boron atom because of more electropositive of boron than carbon. For substitution situation, the hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. The B-doped graphite system with the hole has less

  1. Mechanical properties of low-density polyethylene filled by graphite nanoplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carotenuto, G.; De Nicola, S.; Palomba, M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of GNP/LDPE nanocomposites (graphite nanoplatelets/low density polyethylene) have been investigated, in order to establish the effect of nanoscale reinforcement within the polymer matrix. Results show that the presence of the filler does not involve a change...... in the microscopic structure of the polymer. However, on a macroscopic scale, GNPs limit the mobility of the polymer chains, resulting in an increase in stiffness for the final composite. Orientation of GNPs within the LDPE matrix is also an important issue that affects mechanical properties and it has been...

  2. Production of graphite spheres with a high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherry, V.

    1976-01-01

    It is possible to obtain small spheres with a diameter of approximately 1,000 μm with the help of an automated press fitted with a profiled plunger. The spheres consist of graphite and a binder. Depending on the size of the plunger, 1 + 6 Σn (n = 0,1,2,...) spheres of equivalent diameter may be pressed with one stroke of the plunger. The spheres are bound to each other by a thin burr. The green end product is obtained by breaking the sheets of spheres and deburring them. (orig.) [de

  3. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  4. Mechanical properties of low-density polyethylene filled by graphite nanoplatelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carotenuto, G; Palomba, M; De Nicola, S; Pullini, D; Horsewell, A; Hansen, T W; Nicolais, L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of GNP/LDPE nanocomposites (graphite nanoplatelets/low density polyethylene) have been investigated, in order to establish the effect of nanoscale reinforcement within the polymer matrix. Results show that the presence of the filler does not involve a change in the microscopic structure of the polymer. However, on a macroscopic scale, GNPs limit the mobility of the polymer chains, resulting in an increase in stiffness for the final composite. Orientation of GNPs within the LDPE matrix is also an important issue that affects mechanical properties and it has been evaluated by testing nanocomposites made by different manufacturing techniques (compression moulding and blown extrusion). The comparison between the experimental data and the Halpin–Tsai model shows that the orientation of GNPs due to the extrusion process leads to values of tensile modulus higher than that obtained with the randomly oriented disposition resulting from the compression moulding technique. (paper)

  5. Energy-momentum density of graphite by electron-momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, M.; Fang, Z.; Canney, S.; Kheifets, A.; McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1996-11-01

    The energy-resolved electron momentum density of graphite has been measured along a series of well-defined directions using electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). This is the first measurement of this kind performed on a single-crystal target with a thoroughly controlled orientation which clearly demonstrates the different nature of the σ and π bands in graphite. Good agreement between the calculated density and the measured one is found, further establishing that fact that EMS yields more direct and complete information on the valence electronic structure that any other method. 12 refs., 2 figs

  6. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  7. Crystallization degree change of expanded graphite by milling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qunwei; Wu Jihuai; Sun Hui; Fang Shijun

    2009-01-01

    Expanded graphite was ball milled with a planetary mill in air atmosphere, and subsequently thermal annealed. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in the milling initial stage (less than 12 h), the crystallization degree of the expanded graphite declined gradually, but after milling more than 16 h, a recrystallization of the expanded graphite toke place, and ordered nanoscale expanded graphite was formed gradually. In the annealing initial stage, the non-crystallization of the graphite occurred, but, beyond an annealing time, recrystallizations of the graphite arise. Higher annealing temperature supported the recrystallization. The milled and annealed expanded graphite still preserved the crystalline structure as raw material and hold high thermal stability.

  8. Density separation of combustion-derived soot and petrogenic graphitic black carbon: Quantification and isotopic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veilleux, M-H; Gelinas, Y; Dickens, A F; Brandes, J

    2009-01-01

    The black carbon continuum is composed of a series of carbon-rich components derived from combustion or metamorphism and characterized by contrasting environmental behavior and susceptibility to oxidation. In this work, we present a micro-scale density fractionation method that allows isolating the small quantities of soot-like and graphitic material usually found in natural samples. Organic carbon and δ 13 C mass balance calculations were used to quantify the relative contributions of the two fractions to thermally-stable organic matter from a series of aquatic sediments. Varying proportions of soot-like and graphitic material were found in these samples, with large variations in δ 13 C signatures suggesting important differences in their origin and/or dynamics in the environment.

  9. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.

    2007-07-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage (≥200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed (∼ 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect (∼ 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  10. Study on paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhengguo; Fang Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    A paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change thermal energy storage material was prepared by absorbing the paraffin into an expanded graphite that has an excellent absorbability. In such a composite, the paraffin serves as a latent heat storage material and the expanded graphite acts as the supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin from its porous structure due to the capillary and surface tension forces. The inherent structure of the expanded graphite did not change in the composite material. The solid-liquid phase change temperature of the composite PCM was the same as that of the paraffin, and the latent heat of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite material was equivalent to the calculated value based on the mass ratio of the paraffin in the composite. The heat transfer rate of the paraffin/expanded graphite composite was obviously higher than that of the paraffin due to the combination with the expanded graphite that had a high thermal conductivity. The prepared paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change material had a large thermal storage capacity and improved thermal conductivity and did not experience liquid leakage during its solid-liquid phase change

  11. Corrosion-induced microstructural changes in a US core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Lee, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The results reported here apply to Great Lakes grade H-451 graphite, the core graphite specified for the US HTGR. This graphite is structurally similar to the German reflector grades we have investigated at ORNL, and hence should be applicable to them if similar impurity levels are obtained. Moreover, these results extend and confirm the behavior pattern exhibited by the fuel matrix material A3-3 reported in the previous paper, although the effects are more pronounced in A3-3 presumably due to its resin-type binder and low heat-treatment temperatures

  12. Change of properties after oxidation of IG-11 graphite by air and CO2 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun-Soo; Chi, Se-Hwan; Cho, Kwang-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Artificial graphite is typically manufactured by carbonization of a shaped body of a kneaded mixture using granular cokes as a filler and pitch as a binder. It undergoes a pitch impregnation process if necessary and finally applying graphitization heat treatment. The effect of thermal oxidation in air or a CO 2 atmosphere on IG-11 graphite samples is investigated in this study. The results show a localized oxidation process that progressively reveals the large coke particles with increasing level of overall weight loss in air. The surface of the graphite was peeled off and no change was found in the specific gravity after air oxidation. However, the specific gravity of graphite was continuously decreased by CO 2 oxidation. The decrease in the specific gravity by CO 2 oxidation was due to CO 2 gas that progressed from the surface to the interior. The pore shape after CO 2 oxidation differed from that under air oxidation

  13. Thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material/expanded graphite composite across the phase change temperature range and a novel thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Ziye; Chen, Jiajie; Xu, Tao; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of RT44HC by 20–60 times. • Thermal conductivity of PCM/EG composites keeps constant before/after melting. • Thermal conductivity of PCMs nearly doubled during phase changing. • Thermal conductivity of composite PCM increases with density and percentage of EG. • The simple model predicts thermal conductivity of EG-based composites accurately. - Abstract: This work studies factors that affect the thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material (PCM), RT44HC/expanded graphite (EG) composite, which include: EG mass fraction, composite PCM density and temperature. The increase of EG mass fraction and bulk density will both enhance thermal conductivity of composite PCMs, by up to 60 times. Thermal conductivity of RT44HC/EG composites remains independent on temperature outside the phase change range (40–45 °C), but nearly doubles during the phase change. The narrow temperature change during the phase change allows the maximum heat flux or minimum temperature for heat source if attaching PCMs to a first (constant temperature) or second (constant heat flux) thermal boundary. At last, a simple thermal conductivity model for EG-based composites is put forward, based on only two parameters: mass fraction of EG and bulk density of the composite. This model is validated with experiment data presented in this paper and in literature, showing this model has general applicability to any composite of EG and poor thermal conductive materials

  14. Changes in Effective Thermal Conductivity During the Carbothermic Reduction of Magnetite Using Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Ahmed, Hesham; Viswanathan, Nurni; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the effective thermal diffusivity changes of systems undergoing reactions where heat transfer plays an important role in the reaction kinetics is essential for process understanding and control. Carbothermic reduction process of magnetite containing composites is a typical example of such systems. The reduction process in this case is highly endothermic and hence, the overall rate of the reaction is greatly influenced by the heat transfer through composite compact. Using Laser-Flash method, the change of effective thermal diffusivity of magnetite-graphite composite pellet was monitored in the dynamic mode over a pre-defined thermal cycle (heating at the rate of 7 K/min to 1423 K (1150 °C), holding the sample for 270 minutes at this temperature and then cooling it down to the room temperature at the same rate as heating). These measurements were supplemented by Thermogravimetric Analysis under comparable experimental conditions as well as quenching tests of the samples in order to combine the impact of various factors such as sample dilatations and changes in apparent density on the progress of the reaction. The present results show that monitoring thermal diffusivity changes during the course of reduction would be a very useful tool in a total understanding of the underlying physicochemical phenomena. At the end, effort is made to estimate the apparent thermal conductivity values based on the measured thermal diffusivity and dilatations.

  15. Thickness gauge for the measurement of the density of graphite; Jauge d'epaisseur pour la mesure de la densite du graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P; Gasnier, M; Hours, R; Jouquet, G; Rappeneau, J; Tanguy, J C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A thickness gauge was built, based on absorption of Bremsstrahlung generated in a Be target by a ({sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y) {beta}- source. This allows rapid and precise estimation (95 per cent probable error = 0.7 per cent) of the densities in slabs of graphite having a constant thickness of 25 {+-} 0.05 mm, the diameter of the beam being about 1 cm. Results obtained in this way are presented. (author) [French] On a construit une jauge d'epaisseur basee sur l'absorption de rayonnement de freinage provenant d'une cible de Be sous l'influence d'une source ({sup 90}Sr + {sup 90}Y) {beta}-. Cette jauge permet l'estimation rapide et precise (erreur probable 95 pour cent = 0,7 pour cent) des densites dans des plaques de graphite ayant une epaisseur constante de 25 {+-} 0,05 mm, la largeur du faisceau etant d'environ 1 cm. On donne des resultats obtenus par cette methode. (auteur)

  16. An Facile High-Density Polyethylene - Exfoliated Graphite - Aluminium Hydroxide Composite: Manufacture, Morphology, Structure, Antistatic and Fireproof Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui LI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite intercalation compounds (GIC and exfoliated graphite (EG as raw materials were prepared with flake graphite, concentrated sulphuric acid (H2SO4, potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7 and peracetic acid (CH3CO3H and characterized. Then, high-density polyethylene-exfoliated graphite (HDPE-EG composites were fabricated with HDPE and EG via in situ synthesis technique in the different mass ratio, and their resistivity values (ohms/sq were measured. Based on the resistivity values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG composite with the antistatic property could be fabricated while the mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30. Last, HDPE-EG-aluminium hydroxide (HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composites were manufactured with HDPE, GIC and Al(OH3 via the in situ synthesis-thermal expansion technique, and their resistivity values and limiting oxygen index (LOI values were measured. Based on the resistivity values and LOI values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite with the antistatic and fireproof property could be manufactured while HDPE, GICs and Al(OH3 of mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30 : 1.00. Otherwise, the petal-like morphology and structure of HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite were characterized, which consisted of EG, HDPE and Al(OH3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4275

  17. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of OGL-1 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Minato, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Tobita, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Teruo; Kurobane, Shiro; Adachi, Mamoru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1988-06-01

    Experimental data are summarized on irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of the first to ninth OGL-1 fuel assemblies. The range of fast-neutron fluence is up to 4 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E > 0.18 MeV); and that of irradiation temperature is 900 - 1400 deg C for fuel compacts and 800 - 1050 deg C for graphite sleeves. The dimensional change of the fuel compacts was shrinkage under these test conditions, and the shrinkage fraction increased almost linearly with fast-neutron fluence. The shrinkage fraction of the fuel compacts was larger by 20 % in the axial direction than in the radial direction. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the dimensional-change behavior of the fuel compacts was not observed clearly; presumably the influence was hidden by scatter of the data because of low level of the fast-neutron fluence and the resultant small dimensional changes. (author)

  18. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  19. New graphite/salt materials for high temperature energy storage. Phase change properties study; Nouveaux materiaux graphite/sel pour le stockage d'energie a haute temperature. Etude des proprietes de changement de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J

    2007-07-15

    This work is a contribution to the study of new graphite/salt composites dedicated to high temperature energy storage ({>=}200 C). The aim is to analyse and to understand the influence of both graphite and composite microstructure on the phase change properties of salts. This PhD is carried out within the framework of two projects: DISTOR (European) and HTPSTOCK (French). The major contributions of this work are threefold: 1) An important database (solid-liquid phase change properties) is provided from the DSC analysis of six salts and the corresponding composites. 2) Rigorous modeling of salts melting in confined media in several geometries are proposed to understand why, during the first melting of the compression elaborated composites, problems of salt leakage are observed. These models show that the materials morphology is responsible for these phenomena: the graphite matrix restrains the volume expansion due to salt melting: salt melts under pressure, which leads to a melting on a large temperature range and to a loss of energy density. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (geometric and physic) shows that matrix rigidity modulus is the parameter on which it is necessary to act during the composites elaboration to blur this phenomenon. 3) Finally, this work proposes a thermodynamic formulation of both surface/interface phenomena and the presence of dissolved impurities being able to explain a melting point lowering. It seems that the melting point lowering observed ({approx} 5 C) are mainly due to the presence of dissolved impurities (brought by graphite) in the liquid, along with an additional Gibbs-Thomson effect ({approx} 1 C, related to the size of the clusters crystals). (author)

  20. Thermal characterization of nitrates and nitrates/expanded graphite mixture phase change materials for solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.; Zhang, P.; Li, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of expanded graphite improved apparent thermal conductivity significantly. • The quadratic parallel model was used to predict the effective thermal conductivity. • The melting/freezing temperatures of mixture PCMs shifted slightly with adding of EG. - Abstract: Solar energy storage has become more attractive in recent years. In particular, latent thermal energy storage (LTES) with large energy storage density and isothermal heat storage/retrieval characteristics is a hot research topic. In the present study, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate and their mixture were used as the base materials, and expanded graphite (EG) with high thermal conductivity and thermo-chemical stability was used as an additive to enhance the thermal conductivity. EG with various mass fractions was added to the base materials to form mixture phase change materials (PCMs), and the thermal characteristics of the mixtures were studied extensively. The transient hot-wire tests showed that the addition of EG enhanced the apparent thermal conductivity significantly, e.g. the apparent thermal conductivity of the nitrates/10 wt.% EG mixture PCM was increased by about 30–40%. The test results showed good agreement with theoretical calculations of the quadratic parallel model. Tests with differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) revealed that the melting/freezing temperatures of the mixture PCMs shifted slightly, compared with those of pure nitrates

  1. Changes in porosity of graphite caused by radiolytic gasification by carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdie, Neil; Edwards, I.A.S.; Marsh, Harry

    1986-01-01

    Methods have been developed to study porosity in nuclear grade graphite. The changes induced during the radiolytic gasification of graphite in carbon dioxide have been investigated. Porosity in radiolytically gasified graphite (0-22.8% wt. loss) was examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Each sample was vacuum impregnated with a slow-setting resin containing a fluorescent dye. Optical microscopy was used to study pores >2 μm 2 c.s.a. A semi-automatic image analysis system linked to the optical microscope enabled pore parameter data including cross-sectional areas, perimeters, Feret's diameters and shape factors, to be collected. The results showed that radiolytic gasification produced a large increase in the number of pores 2 c.s.a. New open pores 2 c.s.a. were developed by gasification of existing open porosity into the closed porosity ( 2 c.s.a.) within the binder-coke. Open pores, 2-100 μm 2 c.s.a., which were gasified within the coarse-grained mosaics of the binder-coke. In the gasification process to 22.8% wt. loss, the apparent open pore volume increased from 6.6 to 33.8% and the apparent closed pore volumes decreased from approx. 3% to 0.1%. The increase in apparent open porosity from 6.6% (virgin) to 33.8% resulted from gasification within original open porosity and by the opening and development of closed porosity. There was no evidence for creation of porosity from within the 'bulk' graphite, it being developed from existing fine porosity. The structure of pores > 100 μm 2 c.s.a. showed no change because of the inhibition of oxidation by deposition of carbonaceous species from the CH 4 inhibitor. Such species diffuse to the pore wall and are sacrificially oxidised. (author)

  2. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Beringer, Woody; Gleason, Brian; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from four suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used a nickel braze allow to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. Initial results on sample blocks indicate that this approach should be repeatable and scalable with good strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  3. Effects of graphite doping on critical current density and microstructure of MgB2 bulks by an improved Mg-diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, X.F.; Zhao, Y.; Feng, Y.; Yang, Y.; Cheng, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    abstract: A series of graphite-doped MgB 2 bulks with high density have been successfully prepared by an improved Mg-diffusion method in ambient pressure. The effects of graphite doping on lattice parameters, T c , J c and microstructure of MgB 2 have been investigated. The results show that compared to the nano-C-doped or CNTs-doped MgB 2 , C is not easy to substitute B in graphite-doped MgB 2 . However, at the same C content, the graphite-doped MgB 2 has a higher J c . At 10 K and self-field, the J c for MgB 1.985 C 0.015 reaches 0.58 MA/cm 2 . For the MgB 1.945 C 0.055 , at 5 K, 7 T and 10 K, 6 T the J c achieves 10,000 A/cm 2 which is two orders of magnitude higher than that for the undoped sample. In addition to improving electron scattering and intergranular connectivity, the unreacted graphite in the graphite-doped MgB 2 is proposed to be responsible to the excellent J c properties of MgB 2 in high fields, due to depressed grain growth and enhanced grain boundary flux pinning

  4. Graphite-high density polyethylene laminated composites with high thermal conductivity made by filament winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lv

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The low thermal conductivity of polymers limits their use in numerous applications, where heat transfer is important. The two primary approaches to overcome this limitation, are to mix in other materials with high thermal conductivity, or mechanically stretch the polymers to increase their intrinsic thermal conductivity. Progress along both of these pathways has been stifled by issues associated with thermal interface resistance and manufacturing scalability respectively. Here, we report a novel polymer composite architecture that is enabled by employing typical composites manufacturing method such as filament winding with the twist that the polymer is in fiber form and the filler in form of sheets. The resulting novel architecture enables accession of the idealized effective medium composite behavior as it minimizes the interfacial resistance. The process results in neat polymer and 50 vol% graphite/polymer plates with thermal conductivity of 42 W·m–1·K–1 (similar to steel and 130 W·m–1·K–1 respectively.

  5. Applications of graphite-enabled phase change material composites to improve thermal performance of cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingli; Lin, Zhibin; Wu, Lili; Wang, Jinhui; Gong, Na

    2017-11-01

    Enhancing the thermal efficiency to decrease the energy consumption of structures has been the topic of much research. In this study, a graphite-enabled microencapsulated phase change material (GE-MEPCM) was used in the production of a novel thermal energy storage engineered cementitious composite feathering high heat storage capacity and enhanced thermal conductivity. The surface morphology and particle size of the microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal properties of MEPCM was determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In addition, thermal and mechanical properties of the cementitious mortar with different admixtures were explored and compared with those of a cementitious composite. It was shown that the latent heat of MEPCM was 162 J/g, offering much better thermal energy storage capacity to the cementitious composite. However, MEPCM was found to decrease the thermal conductivity of the composite, which can be effectively solved by adding natural graphite (NG). Moreover, the incorporation of MEPCM has a certain decrease in the compressive strength, mainly due to the weak interfaces between MEPCM and cement matrix.

  6. On the Thermal Conductivity Change of Matrix Graphite Materials after Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Kim, Eung-Seon; Sah, Injin; Park, Daegyu; Kim, Youngjun; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this work, the variations of the thermal conductivity of the A3-3 matrix graphite after neutron irradiation is discussed as well as of the IG-110 graphite for comparison. Neutron irradiation of the graphite specimens was carried out as a part of the first irradiation test of KAERI's coated particle fuel specimens by use of Hanaro research reactor. This work can be summarized as follows: 1) In the evaluation of the specific heat of the graphite materials, various literature data were used and the variations of the specific heat data of all the graphite specimens are observed well agreed, irrespectively of the difference in specimens (graphite and matrix graphite and irradiated and un-irradiated). 2) This implies that it should be reasonable that for both structural graphite and fuel matrix graphite, and even for the neuron-irradiated graphite, any of these specific heat data set be used in the calculation of the thermal conductivity. 3) For the irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity decreased on both directions. On the radial direction, the tendency of variation upon temperature is similar to that of unirradiated specimen, i.e., decreasing as the temperature increases. 4) In the German irradiation experiments with A3-27 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity of the un-irradiated specimen shows a decrease and that of irradiated specimen is nearly constant as the temperature increases. 5) The thermal conductivity of the irradiated IG-110 was considerably decreased compared with that of un-irradiated specimens The difference of the thermal conductivity of un-irradiated and irradiated IG-110 graphite specimens is much larger than that of un-irradiated and irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens.

  7. Effects of graphite doping on critical current density and microstructure of MgB{sub 2} bulks by an improved Mg-diffusion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, X.F. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: yshao@home.swjtu.edu.cn; Feng, Y. [Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, P.O. Box 51, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710016 (China); Western Superconductivity Technology Company, Xi' an (China); Yang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2008-09-15

    abstract: A series of graphite-doped MgB{sub 2} bulks with high density have been successfully prepared by an improved Mg-diffusion method in ambient pressure. The effects of graphite doping on lattice parameters, T{sub c}, J{sub c} and microstructure of MgB{sub 2} have been investigated. The results show that compared to the nano-C-doped or CNTs-doped MgB{sub 2}, C is not easy to substitute B in graphite-doped MgB{sub 2}. However, at the same C content, the graphite-doped MgB{sub 2} has a higher J{sub c}. At 10 K and self-field, the J{sub c} for MgB{sub 1.985}C{sub 0.015} reaches 0.58 MA/cm{sup 2}. For the MgB{sub 1.945}C{sub 0.055}, at 5 K, 7 T and 10 K, 6 T the J{sub c} achieves 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} which is two orders of magnitude higher than that for the undoped sample. In addition to improving electron scattering and intergranular connectivity, the unreacted graphite in the graphite-doped MgB{sub 2} is proposed to be responsible to the excellent J{sub c} properties of MgB{sub 2} in high fields, due to depressed grain growth and enhanced grain boundary flux pinning.

  8. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; McCollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-11-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  9. A nano-graphite/paraffin phase change material with high thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Paraffin and NG formed a nanoscale compound. ► The thermal conductivity increased gradually with the content of NG. ► The thermal conductivity of the material containing 10% NG were 0.9362 W/m K. - Abstract: Nano-graphite (NG)/paraffin composites were prepared as composite phase change materials. NG has the function of improving the thermal conductivity of the composite. The microstructure and thermal properties of the materials were examined with environmental scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicated that the NG layers were randomly dispersed in the paraffin, and the thermal conductivity increased gradually with the content of NG. Thermal conductivity of the material containing 10% NG were 0.9362 W/m K

  10. Transmission electron-microscopic studies of structural changes in polycrystalline graphite after high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Karpukhin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Transmission electron-microscopic investigation of polycrystalline graphite before and after irradiation is carried out. The direct use of graphite samples after ion thinning, as an inquiry subject is the basic peculiarity of the work. Main structural components of MPG-6 graphite before and after irradiation are revealed, the structural mechanism of the reactor graphite destruction under irradiation is demonstrated. The mean values of L αm and L cm crystallite dimensions are determined. Radiation defects, occuring in some crystallites after irradiation are revealed by the dark-field electron microscopy method

  11. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  12. Continuous Carbon Nanotube-Ultrathin Graphite Hybrid Foams for Increased Thermal Conductivity and Suppressed Subcooling in Composite Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmanov, Iskandar; Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Ruoff, Rodney S; Shi, Li

    2015-12-22

    Continuous ultrathin graphite foams (UGFs) have been actively researched recently to obtain composite materials with increased thermal conductivities. However, the large pore size of these graphitic foams has resulted in large thermal resistance values for heat conduction from inside the pore to the high thermal conductivity graphitic struts. Here, we demonstrate that the effective thermal conductivity of these UGF composites can be increased further by growing long CNT networks directly from the graphite struts of UGFs into the pore space. When erythritol, a phase change material for thermal energy storage, is used to fill the pores of UGF-CNT hybrids, the thermal conductivity of the UGF-CNT/erythritol composite was found to increase by as much as a factor of 1.8 compared to that of a UGF/erythritol composite, whereas breaking the UGF-CNT bonding in the hybrid composite resulted in a drop in the effective room-temperature thermal conductivity from about 4.1 ± 0.3 W m(-1) K(-1) to about 2.9 ± 0.2 W m(-1) K(-1) for the same UGF and CNT loadings of about 1.8 and 0.8 wt %, respectively. Moreover, we discovered that the hybrid structure strongly suppresses subcooling of erythritol due to the heterogeneous nucleation of erythritol at interfaces with the graphitic structures.

  13. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  14. Changes in the physical and mechanical properties of graphite on irradiation in ditolylmethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilin, A.I.; Lebedev, I.G.; Sudakova, N.V.; Rizvanov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from the irradiation and mechanical and structural testing of four grades of graphite - GMZ, VPG, MPG-6, and PG-50 - for use as moderator materials in organic cooled and graphite moderated reactors. Irradiation was carried out in the ARBUS-AST-1 reactor. Photomicrography was used to determine pore structure and ultimate strength in bending and compression was determined mechanically. Irradiation was found to increase the strength of GMZ, PMG-6, and PG-50 considerably, due to the healing of microdefects as a result of the pores filling with radiolysis products from the coolant, ditolylmethane. Conversely, VPG graphite, which has closed porosity, lost strength on irradiation

  15. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG.

  16. Properties of unirradiated fuel element graphites H-451 and SO818. [Bulk density, tensile properties, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, G.B.; Johnson, W.R.

    1976-10-08

    Nuclear graphites H-451, lot 440 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation (GLCC)), and SO818 (Airco Speer Division, Air Reduction Corporation (AS)) are described, and physical, mechanical, and chemical property data are presented for the graphites in the unirradiated state. A summary of the mean values of the property data and of data on TS-1240 and H-451, lot 426, is tabulated. A direct comparison of H-451, lot 426, chosen for Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel reload production, TS-1240, and SO818 may be made from the table. (auth)

  17. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/expanded graphite composite phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhang, Ni; Peng, Jing; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Fang, Yutang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EG was obtained by microwave irradiation to prepare the paraffin/EG composite PCM. ► Composite PCM was characterized by XRD to investigate the chemical compatibility. ► Temperature profiles of the composite PCM were obtained during thermal energy storage. -- Abstract: The paraffin/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by absorbing liquid paraffin into EG, in which paraffin was chosen as the PCM. EG was produced by microwave irradiation performed at room temperature. It was found that the EG prepared at 800 W irradiation power for 10 s exhibited the maximum sorption capacity of 92 wt% for paraffin. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that paraffin was uniformly dispersed in the pores of EG. Differential scanning calorimeter analysis indicated that the melting temperature of the composite PCM was close to that of paraffin, and its latent heat was equivalent to the calculated value based on the mass fraction of paraffin in the composite. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the composite PCM was just a combination of paraffin with EG, and no new substance was produced. Thermal energy storage performance of the composite PCM was tested in a latent thermal energy storage (LTES) system. Transients of axial and radial temperature profiles were obtained in the LTES for the composite PCM and paraffin. The thermal energy storage charging duration for the composite PCM was reduced obviously compared to paraffin.

  18. Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Property changes occur in materials subjected to irradiation. The bulk of experimental data and associated empirical models are for isothermal irradiation. The form that these isothermal models take is usually closed form expressions in terms...

  19. Thermal and electrical conductivity enhancement of graphite nanoplatelets on form-stable polyethylene glycol/polymethyl methacrylate composite phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Jiaoqun; Zhou, Weibing; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets (GnPs), obtained by sonicating the expanded graphite, were employed to simultaneously enhance the thermal (k) and electrical (σ) conductivity of organic form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs). Using the method of in situ polymerization upon ultrasonic irradiation, GnPs serving as the conductive fillers and polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as the phase change material (PCM) were uniformly dispersed and embedded inside the network structure of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), which contributed to the well package and self-supporting properties of composite FSPCMs. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated that the GnPs were physically combined with PEG/PMMA matrix and did not participate in the polymerization. The GnPs additives were able to effectively enhance the k and σ of organic FSPCM. When the mass ratio of GnP was 8%, the k and σ of FSPCM changed up to 9 times and 8 orders of magnitude over that of PEG/PMMA matrix, respectively. The improvements in both k and σ were mainly attributed to the well dispersion and large aspect ratio of GnPs, which were endowed with benefit of forming conducting network in polymer matrix. It was also confirmed that all the prepared specimens possessed available thermal storage density and thermal stability. -- Highlights: ► GnPs were employed to simultaneously enhance the k and σ of organic FSPCMs. ► PEG/PMMA/GnPs composite FSPCMs were prepared by in situ polymerization method. ► The composite FSPCMs exhibited well package and self-supporting properties. ► GnPs additives effectively enhanced the k and σ of composite FSPCMs. ► All the composites possessed available thermal storage density and thermal stability.

  20. Study of the influence of air exposure on graphite implanted by low energy high density deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, V.; Bardon, J.; Palmari, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the influence of air exposure on the content of Deuterium implanted graphite was done for different exposure durations and different gas exposures. Important reduction of the D 2 thermodesorbed is shown to result from the formation of deuterated compounds during the desorption, the total amount of deuterium desorbed remaining unchanged. Some informations on the mechanisms of the interactions can be obtained by the comparison of the different experiments

  1. Dislocation density changes in nickel under creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseeva, I.V.; Okrainets, P.N.; Pishchak, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    Variation in dislocation density was studied in the process of nickel creep p at t=900 deg c and σ=2 kgf/mm 2 . The dislocation structure was studied independently by the X-ray technique and transmission electron-microscopy. The e two methods show good conformity of results by comparison. It is concluded that independent determination of dislocation density under creep is possible us sing the X-ray technique

  2. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  3. High-temperature annealing of graphite: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Andrew; Gillette, Victor

    2018-05-01

    A modified AIREBO potential was developed to simulate the effects of thermal annealing on the structure and physical properties of damaged graphite. AIREBO parameter modifications were made to reproduce Density Functional Theory interstitial results. These changes to the potential resulted in high-temperature annealing of the model, as measured by stored-energy reduction. These results show some resemblance to experimental high-temperature annealing results, and show promise that annealing effects in graphite are accessible with molecular dynamics and reactive potentials.

  4. Propulsion Physics Under the Changing Density Field Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will requires new propulsion physics. Specifically a propulsion physics model that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they called Chameleon Cosmology, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. This theory represents a scalar field within and about an object, even in the vacuum. Whereby, these scalar fields can be viewed as vacuum energy fields with definable densities that permeate all matter; having implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties; implying a new force mechanism for propulsion physics. Using Chameleon Cosmology, the author has developed a new propulsion physics model, called the Changing Density Field (CDF) Model. This model relates to density changes in these density fields, where the density field density changes are related to the acceleration of matter within an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to the surrounding density fields. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the coupling to these density fields about an object. Since the model indicates that the density of the density field in an object can be changed by internal mass acceleration, even without exhausting mass, the CDF model implies a new propellant-less propulsion physics model

  5. Graphite core design in UK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    The cores in the first power producing Magnox reactors in the UK were designed with only a limited amount of information available regarding the anisotropic dimensional change behaviour of Pile Grade graphite. As more information was gained it was necessary to make modifications to the design, some minor, some major. As the cores being built became larger, and with the switch to the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) with its much higher power density, additional problems had to be overcome such as increased dimensional change and radiolytic oxidation by the carbon dioxide coolant. For the AGRs a more isotropic graphite was required, with a lower initial open pore volume and higher strength. Gilsocarbon graphite was developed and was selected for all the AGRs built in the UK. Methane bearing coolants are used to limit radiolytic oxidation. (author). 5 figs

  6. Thermal conductivity of partially graphitized biocarbon obtained by carbonization of medium-density fiberboard in the presence of a Ni-based catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T. S.; Parfen'eva, L. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2016-01-01

    The thermal conductivity k and resistivity ρ of biocarbon matrices, prepared by carbonizing medium-density fiberboard at T carb = 850 and 1500°C in the presence of a Ni-based catalyst (samples MDF-C( Ni)) and without a catalyst (samples MDF-C), have been measured for the first time in the temperature range of 5-300 K. X-ray diffraction analysis has revealed that the bulk graphite phase arises only at T carb = 1500°C. It has been shown that the temperature dependences of the thermal conductivity of samples MDFC- 850 and MDF-C-850(Ni) in the range of 80-300 K are to each other and follow the law of k( T) ˜ T 1.65, but the use of the Ni-catalyst leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity by a factor of approximately 1.5, due to the formation of a greater fraction of the nanocrystalline phase in the presence of the Ni-catalyst at T carb = 850°C. In biocarbon MDF-C-1500 prepared without a catalyst, the dependence is k( T) ˜ T 1.65, and it is controlled by the nanocrystalline phase. In MDF-C-1500(Ni), the bulk graphite phase formed increases the thermal conductivity by a factor of 1.5-2 compared to the thermal conductivity of MDF-C-1500 in the entire temperature range of 5-300 K; k( T = 300 K) reaches the values of ˜10 W m-1 K-1, characteristic of biocarbon obtained without a catalyst only at high temperatures of T carb = 2400°C. It has been shown that MDF-C-1500(Ni) in the temperature range of 40‒300 K is characterized by the dependence, k( T) ˜ T 1.3, which can be described in terms of the model of partially graphitized biocarbon as a composite of an amorphous matrix with spherical inclusions of the graphite phase.

  7. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite as composite phase change material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Junbing [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjiner@126.com [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Zhu, Panpan; Wang, Changhong [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Li, Xinxi [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The expanded graphite enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient greatly. • The aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic was utilized to disperse EG. • The combination of composite was physical without chemical reaction. • The reduction on total latent heat was slight after the adding EG. - Abstract: The binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) were prepared via adding different mass rate of EG to binary nitrate salts consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} (6:4) by aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic. The morphology and chemical composition of EG and the composite PCM were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Laser thermal conductivity instrument and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were employed to measure thermo physical properties. Drawing the conclusion from investigation, that EG had enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient which largely increased to 4.884 W/(m K) and reduced total latent heat by mostly 11.0%. The morphology and phase structure results indicated that EG were well dispersed into and physically combined with molten salts. In general, the prepared composite PCM could be a suitable phase change material for thermal energy storage.

  8. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite as composite phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Junbing; Huang, Jin; Zhu, Panpan; Wang, Changhong; Li, Xinxi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The expanded graphite enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient greatly. • The aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic was utilized to disperse EG. • The combination of composite was physical without chemical reaction. • The reduction on total latent heat was slight after the adding EG. - Abstract: The binary nitrate salts/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) were prepared via adding different mass rate of EG to binary nitrate salts consisting of NaNO 3 and KNO 3 (6:4) by aqueous solution method adopting ultrasonic. The morphology and chemical composition of EG and the composite PCM were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Laser thermal conductivity instrument and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were employed to measure thermo physical properties. Drawing the conclusion from investigation, that EG had enhanced thermal conductivity coefficient which largely increased to 4.884 W/(m K) and reduced total latent heat by mostly 11.0%. The morphology and phase structure results indicated that EG were well dispersed into and physically combined with molten salts. In general, the prepared composite PCM could be a suitable phase change material for thermal energy storage

  9. ASSESSMENT OF RANGES OF POSSIBLE CHANGE OF TEMPORARY RESISTANCE OF CAST IRON WITH LAMELLAR AND FLAKED GRAPHITE ON THEIR HARDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Sandomirskii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of ranges of possible change of temporary resistance of sB of castings from ductile and gray cast iron is carried out. The analytical description of ranges of change of sВ depending on casting BH hardness is developed. It is shown that the range of change of sВ of pig-iron castings, wider in comparison with steel, with the measured hardness of BH is caused variations of forms and the amount of graphite inclusions at the considered classes of cast iron and influence of thickness of a wall of casting from gray cast iron on dependence of sВ (HB. The result is intended for determination of the guaranteed casting size sВ without her destruction, when there is no information on sВ of check test pieces.

  10. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  11. A comprehensive tool for measuring mammographic density changes over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mikael; Li, Jingmei; Leifland, Karin; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per

    2018-06-01

    Mammographic density is a marker of breast cancer risk and diagnostics accuracy. Density change over time is a strong proxy for response to endocrine treatment and potentially a stronger predictor of breast cancer incidence. We developed STRATUS to analyse digital and analogue images and enable automated measurements of density changes over time. Raw and processed images from the same mammogram were randomly sampled from 41,353 healthy women. Measurements from raw images (using FDA approved software iCAD) were used as templates for STRATUS to measure density on processed images through machine learning. A similar two-step design was used to train density measures in analogue images. Relative risks of breast cancer were estimated in three unique datasets. An alignment protocol was developed using images from 11,409 women to reduce non-biological variability in density change. The protocol was evaluated in 55,073 women having two regular mammography screens. Differences and variances in densities were compared before and after image alignment. The average relative risk of breast cancer in the three datasets was 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-1.8] per standard deviation of percent mammographic density. The discrimination was AUC 0.62 (CI 0.60-0.64). The type of image did not significantly influence the risk associations. Alignment decreased the non-biological variability in density change and re-estimated the yearly overall percent density decrease from 1.5 to 0.9%, p density measures was not influenced by mammogram type. The alignment protocol reduced the non-biological variability between images over time. STRATUS has the potential to become a useful tool for epidemiological studies and clinical follow-up.

  12. A national and international analysis of changing forest density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aapo Rautiainen

    Full Text Available Like cities, forests grow by spreading out or by growing denser. Both inventories taken steadily by a single nation and other inventories gathered recently from many nations by the United Nations confirm the asynchronous effects of changing area and of density or volume per hectare. United States forests spread little after 1953, while growing density per hectare increased national volume and thus sequestered carbon. The 2010 United Nations appraisal of global forests during the briefer span of two decades after 1990 reveals a similar pattern: A slowing decline of area with growing volume means growing density in 68 nations encompassing 72% of reported global forest land and 68% of reported global carbon mass. To summarize, the nations were placed in 5 regions named for continents. During 1990-2010 national density grew unevenly, but nevertheless grew in all regions. Growing density was responsible for substantially increasing sequestered carbon in the European and North American regions, despite smaller changes in area. Density nudged upward in the African and South American regions as area loss outstripped the loss of carbon. For the Asian region, density grew in the first decade and fell slightly in the second as forest area expanded. The different courses of area and density disqualify area as a proxy for volume and carbon. Applying forestry methods traditionally used to measure timber volumes still offers a necessary route to measuring carbon stocks. With little expansion of forest area, managing for timber growth and density offered a way to increase carbon stocks.

  13. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  14. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  15. Effect of changing polarity of graphite tool/ Hadfield steel workpiece couple on machining performances in die sinking EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özerkan Haci Bekir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, machining performance ouput parameters such as machined surface roughness (SR, material removal rate (MRR, tool wear rate (TWR, were experimentally examined and analyzed with the diversifying and changing machining parameters in (EDM. The processing parameters (input par. of this research are stated as tool material, peak current (I, pulse duration (ton and pulse interval (toff. The experimental machinings were put into practice by using Hadfield steel workpiece (prismatic and cylindrical graphite electrodes with kerosene dielectric at different machining current, polarity and pulse time settings. The experiments have shown that the type of tool material, polarity (direct polarity forms higher MRR, SR and TWR, current (high current lowers TWR and enhances MRR, TWR and pulse on time (ton=48□s is critical threshold value for MRR and TWR were influential on machining performance in electrical discharge machining.

  16. Density Changes in the Optimized CSSX Solvent System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.D.

    2002-11-25

    Density increases in caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) solvent have been observed in separate experimental programs performed by different groups of researchers. Such changes indicate a change in chemical composition. Increased density adversely affects separation of solvent from denser aqueous solutions present in the CSSX process. Identification and control of factors affecting solvent density are essential for design and operation of the centrifugal contactors. The goals of this research were to identify the factors affecting solvent density (composition) and to develop correlations between easily measured solvent properties (density and viscosity) and the chemical composition of the solvent, which will permit real-time determination and adjustment of the solvent composition. In evaporation experiments, virgin solvent was subjected to evaporation under quiescent conditions at 25, 35, and 45 C with continuously flowing dry air passing over the surface of the solvent. Density and viscosity were measured periodically, and chemical analysis was performed on the solvent samples. Chemical interaction tests were completed to determine if any chemical reaction takes place over extended contact time that changes the composition and/or physical properties. Solvent and simulant, solvent and strip solution, and solvent and wash solution were contacted continuously in agitated flasks. They were periodically sampled and the density measured (viscosity was also measured on some samples) and then submitted to the Chemical Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using the virgin solvent as the baseline. Chemical interaction tests showed that solvent densities and viscosities did not change appreciably during contact with simulant, strip, or wash solution. No effects on density and viscosity and no chemical changes in the solvent were noted within

  17. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de, E-mail: Pilar.deLara.Castells@csic.es; Bartolomei, Massimiliano [Instituto de Física Fundamental (C.S.I.C.), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O. [Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, Université Paris-Est, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Stoll, Hermann [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6–7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the

  18. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  19. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  20. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  1. Investigation of space charge distribution of low-density polyethylene/GO-GNF (graphene oxide from graphite nanofiber) nanocomposite for HVDC application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jin; Ha, Son-Tung; Lee, Gun Joo; Nam, Jin Ho; Ryu, Ik Hyun; Nam, Su Hyun; Park, Cheol Min; In, Insik; Kim, Jiwan; Han, Chul Jong

    2013-05-01

    This paper reported a research on space charge distribution in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) nanocomposites with different types of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) at low filler content (0.05 wt%) under high DC electric field. Effect of addition of graphene oxide or graphene, its dispersion in LDPE polymer matrix on the ability to suppress space charge generation will be investigated and compared with MgO/LDPE nanocomposite at the same filler concentration. At an applied electric field of 80 kV/mm, a positive packet-like charge was observed in both neat LDPE, MgO/LDPE, and graphene/LDPE nanocomposites, whereas only little homogenous space charge was observed in GO/LDPE nanocomposites, especially with GO synthesized from graphite nano fiber (GNF) which is only -100 nm in diameter. Our research also suggests that dispersion of graphene oxide particles on the polymer matrix plays a significant role to the performance of nanocomposites on suppressing packet-like space charge. From these results, it is expected that nano-sized GO synthesized from GNF can be a promising filler material to LDPE composite for HVDC applications.

  2. Irradiation behavior of graphite shielding materials for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Kaito, Takeji; Onose, Shoji; Shibahara, Itaru

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597degC. Postirradiation examination was carried out on dimensional change, elastic modulus, and the thermal conductivity. The result of measurement of dimensional change indicated that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased to two to three times of unirradiated values. A large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependency on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, but the change in specific heat was negligibly small. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (author)

  3. Phytoplankton responses to changes in macrophyte density in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of phytoplankton population dynamics to changes in densities of Nymphaea lotus L. and Polygonum limbatum Meisn. was studied in an artificial pond in Zaria, Nigeria, from June to November 2007. Antagonistic effects of these macrophytes on Netrium sp., Staurastrum sp., Ulothrix sp., Marssionella sp. and ...

  4. Strength degradation of oxidized graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheon

    2010-01-01

    Air-ingress events caused by large pipe breaks are important accidents considered in the design of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (VHTRs). A main safety concern for this type of event is the possibility of core collapse following the failure of the graphite support column, which can be oxidized by ingressed air. In this study, the main target is to predict the strength of the oxidized graphite support column. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns, the compressive strength of IG-110 was obtained. The buckling strength of the IG-110 column is expressed using the following empirical straight-line formula: σ cr,buckling =91.34-1.01(L/r). Graphite oxidation in Zone 1 is volume reaction and that in Zone 3 is surface reaction. We notice that the ultimate strength of the graphite column oxidized in Zones 1 and 3 only depends on the slenderness ratio and bulk density. Its strength degradation oxidized in Zone 1 is expressed in the following nondimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.114. We found that the strength degradation of a graphite column, oxidized in Zone 3, follows the above buckling empirical formula as the slenderness of the column changes. (author)

  5. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  6. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  7. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  8. Changing perceptions of hunger on a high nutrient density diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaser Dale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People overeat because their hunger directs them to consume more calories than they require. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in experience and perception of hunger before and after participants shifted from their previous usual diet to a high nutrient density diet. Methods This was a descriptive study conducted with 768 participants primarily living in the United States who had changed their dietary habits from a low micronutrient to a high micronutrient diet. Participants completed a survey rating various dimensions of hunger (physical symptoms, emotional symptoms, and location when on their previous usual diet versus the high micronutrient density diet. Statistical analysis was conducted using non-parametric tests. Results Highly significant differences were found between the two diets in relation to all physical and emotional symptoms as well as the location of hunger. Hunger was not an unpleasant experience while on the high nutrient density diet, was well tolerated and occurred with less frequency even when meals were skipped. Nearly 80% of respondents reported that their experience of hunger had changed since starting the high nutrient density diet, with 51% reporting a dramatic or complete change in their experience of hunger. Conclusions A high micronutrient density diet mitigates the unpleasant aspects of the experience of hunger even though it is lower in calories. Hunger is one of the major impediments to successful weight loss. Our findings suggest that it is not simply the caloric content, but more importantly, the micronutrient density of a diet that influences the experience of hunger. It appears that a high nutrient density diet, after an initial phase of adjustment during which a person experiences "toxic hunger" due to withdrawal from pro-inflammatory foods, can result in a sustainable eating pattern that leads to weight loss and improved health. A high nutrient density diet provides

  9. Electrolysis of acidic sodium chloride solution with a graphite anode. I. Graphite electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.J.J.; Hoogland, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    A graphite anode evolving Cl from a chloride soln. is slowly oxidized to CO and CO2. This oxidn. causes a change in the characteristics of the electrode in aging, comprising a change of the nature of the graphite surface and an increase of the surface area. It appears that a new graphite electrode

  10. Mechanical activation of graphite in air: A way to advanced carbon nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baklanova, O.N., E-mail: baklanova@ihcp.ru; Drozdov, V.A.; Lavrenov, A.V.; Vasilevich, A.V.; Muromtsev, I.V.; Trenikhin, M.V.; Arbuzov, A.B.; Likholobov, V.A.; Gorbunova, O.V.

    2015-10-15

    A high-energy planetary mill AGO-2 was used for mechanical activation of synthetic graphite with the particle size of 25–30 μm and specific surface area S{sub BET} = 3.0 m{sup 2}/g in air for 1–60 min at a 100 g acceleration of milling bodies. The X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy studies showed that the 60 min mechanical activation of graphite decreases the number of graphene layers in graphite crystallites to 8–12 and induces their turbostratic disorder. The size of graphite particles decreases to 6.9 μm after 30 min of mechanical activation and increases to 12.1 μm when the time of mechanical activation is extended to 60 min. Similar changes are observed for the true density of graphite: after 60 min of mechanical activation it becomes equal to 2.48 ⋅ 10{sup 3} kg/m{sup 3}, which is by 10% higher than the true density of graphite not subjected to such treatment. The specific adsorption surface of graphite (S{sub BET}) reaches its maximum values, 427–460 m{sup 2}/g, after 7–12 min of mechanical activation. A further increase in the activation time to 30–60 min decreases S{sub BET} of graphite to 230–250 m{sup 2}/g. Due to attrition of steel milling bodies caused by mechanical activation, iron is accumulated in the samples and its content exceeds 5%. Iron is distributed uniformly in the graphite as the 30–100 and 3–5 nm particles of hematite and iron carbide. The IR spectroscopy study revealed the formation of 0.8 mEq/g of the hydroxyl, phenolic, lactone and carbonyl groups on the graphite surface in the course of mechanical activation. - Highlights: • Graphite was mechanically activated in air at a 100 g acceleration of milling bodies. • The amount of graphenes in graphite crystallites decreases to 8–12. • Graphite transforms into a nanocrystalline X-ray amorphous state. • A metal–graphite composite with the 30–100 and 3–5 nm iron particles is formed. • Oxygen-containing groups in the amount of

  11. Experimental Investigation on Thermal Management of Electric Vehicle Battery Module with Paraffin/Expanded Graphite Composite Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature has to be controlled adequately to maintain the electric vehicles (EVs within a safety range. Using paraffin as the heat dissipation source to control the temperature rise is developed. And the expanded graphite (EG is applied to improve the thermal conductivity. In this study, the paraffin and EG composite phase change material (PCM was prepared and characterized. And then, the composite PCM have been applied in the 42110 LiFePO4 battery module (48 V/10 Ah for experimental research. Different discharge rate and pulse experiments were carried out at various working conditions, including room temperature (25°C, high temperature (35°C, and low temperature (−20°C. Furthermore, in order to obtain the practical loading test data, a battery pack with the similar specifications by 2S∗2P with PCM-based modules were installed in the EVs for various practical road experiments including the flat ground, 5°, 10°, and 20° slope. Testing results indicated that the PCM cooling system can control the peak temperature under 42°C and balance the maximum temperature difference within 5°C. Even in extreme high-discharge pulse current process, peak temperature can be controlled within 50°C. The aforementioned results exhibit that PCM cooling in battery thermal management has promising advantages over traditional air cooling.

  12. Graphite and boron carbide composites made by hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Hagio, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Composites consisting of graphite and boron carbide were made by hot-pressing mixed powders of coke carbon and boron carbide. The change of relative density, mechanical strength and electrical resistivity of the composites and the X-ray parameters of coke carbon were investigated with increase of boron carbide content and hot-pressing temperature. From these experiments, it was found that boron carbide powder has a remarkable effect on sintering and graphitization of coke carbon powder above the hot-pressing temperature of 2000 0 C. At 2200 0 C, electrical resistivity of the composite and d(002) spacing of coke carbon once showed minimum values at about 5 to 10 wt% boron carbide and then increased. The strength of the composite increased with increase of boron carbide content. It was considered that some boron from boron carbide began to diffuse substitutionally into the graphite structure above 2000 0 C and densification and graphitization were promoted with the diffusion of boron. Improvements could be made to the mechanical strength, density, oxidation resistance and manufacturing methods by comparing with the properties and processes of conventional graphites. (author)

  13. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, Ivana; Cigasova, Julia; Stevulova, Nadezda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution) and physically (by ultrasonic procedure) treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  14. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  15. Measurement and investigation of effects of coal tar pitch fractions in nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatemi, K.; Fatoorehchian, S.; Ahari Hashemi, F.; Ahmadi, Sh.

    2003-01-01

    Coal tar pitch has a complex chemical structure. Determination of α, β, γ fractions, is one of the methods to get information about its properties. In graphite fabrication it plays a role as a binder for coke particles. During the thermal treatment it carbonizes and changes to a secondary coke. This has considerable affects on the graphite properties. In this paper, determination of α, β, γ-1 fraction in three different types of pitches have been carried out. Graphite specimens have been fabricated by using these pitches and anisotropy coke in laboratory scale. The graphite properties have been compared with the nuclear graphite prototype. The comparison of the results showed that the density and compression strength are appreciable while the anisotropy factor of properties is about one. The linear thermal expansion in graphite from Iranian pitch had a better, result, where it stands in the nuclear range of usage. As a result, our studies showed that the graphite properties are affected by properties of pitch fractions, where it can be used as a proper sample for the graphite fabrication

  16. Quantifying changes and influences on mottled duck density in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Beth; Haukos, David A.; Walther, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the relative influence of environmental and intrinsic effects on populations is important for managing and conserving harvested species, especially those species inhabiting changing environments. Additionally, climate change can increase the uncertainty associated with management of species in these changing environments, making understanding factors affecting their populations even more important. Coastal ecosystems are particularly threatened by climate change; the combined effects of increasing severe weather events, sea level rise, and drought will likely have non-linear effects on coastal marsh wildlife species and their associated habitats. A species of conservation concern that persists in these coastal areas is the mottled duck (Anas fulvigula). Mottled ducks in the western Gulf Coast are approximately 50% below target abundance numbers established by the Gulf Coast Joint Venture for Texas and Louisiana, USA. Although evidence for declines in mottled duck abundance is apparent, specific causes of the decrease remain unknown. Our goals were to determine where the largest declines in mottled duck population were occurring along the system of Texas Gulf Coast National Wildlife Refuges and quantify the relative contribution of environmental and intrinsic effects on changes to relative population density. We modeled aerial survey data of mottled duck density along the Texas Gulf Coast from 1986–2015 to quantify effects of extreme weather events on an index to mottled duck density using the United States Climate Extremes Index and Palmer Drought Severity Index. Our results indicate that decreases in abundance are best described by an increase in days with extreme 1-day precipitation from June to November (hurricane season) and an increase in drought severity. Better understanding those portions of the life cycle affected by environmental conditions, and how to manage mottled duck habitat in conjunction with these events will likely be key to

  17. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  18. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  19. Osmosensation in vasopressin neurons: changing actin density to optimize function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Bourque, Charles W

    2010-02-01

    The proportional relation between circulating vasopressin concentration and plasma osmolality is fundamental for body fluid homeostasis. Although changes in the sensitivity of this relation are associated with pathophysiological conditions, central mechanisms modulating osmoregulatory gain are unknown. Here, we review recent data that sheds important light on this process. The cell autonomous osmosensitivity of vasopressin neurons depends on cation channels comprising a variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel. Hyperosmotic activation is mediated by a mechanical process where sensitivity increases in proportion with actin filament density. Moreover, angiotensin II amplifies osmotic activation by a rapid stimulation of actin polymerization, suggesting that neurotransmitter-induced changes in cytoskeletal organization in osmosensory neurons can mediate central changes in osmoregulatory gain. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A pore structure model for the gas transport property changes, initial oxidation rates and cumulative weight loss of AGR moderator graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1985-09-01

    A quantitative model has been developed for the gas transport property variation, cumulative weight loss and initial oxidation rates of AGR moderator graphite. The model utilises the theory of dynamic moments of the pore structure to calculate the changes in physical properties brought about by radiolytic corrosion taking place within the graphite porosity. In order to account for the behaviour of the initial rate curves, and the weight loss data obtained it is necessary to invoke the presence of a group of cylindrical pore and a group of small slab-shaped pores. The latter are methane depleted. This is in addition to the pore group involved in gas transport which is best represented by cylinders of mean radius 2.13 μm. The model satisfactorily predicts the experimental weight loss data obtained from experiments in the DIDO 6V3 and BFB loops. (author)

  1. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  2. Morphological changes of porphine films on graphite by perchloric and phosphoric electrolytes. An electrochemical-AFM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yivlialin, Rossella; Penconi, Marta; Bussetti, Gianlorenzo; Biroli, Alessio Orbelli; Finazzi, Marco; Duò, Lamberto; Bossi, Alberto

    2018-06-01

    Organic molecules have been proposed as promising candidates for electrode protection in acidic electrolytes. The use of tetraphenyl-porphines (H2TPP) as graphite surface-protecting agents in sulphuric acid (H2SO4) is one of the newest. With the aim of unveiling the mechanism of such a protective effect, in this paper we test the stability of a H2TPP thin film immersed in perchloric and phosphoric acid solutions that differently interact with porphyrins. The protective role of H2TPP is tested in the electrochemical potential range where the pristine graphite undergoes an oxidation process that erodes the surface and eventually exfoliate the stratified crystal. The electrochemical analysis is performed in a three-electrode cell, while the surface morphology is monitored ex-situ and in-situ by atomic force microscopy. Electrospray mass analysis is also employed to investigate the presence of H2TPP fragments in the solution. We find that the organic film is not stable in perchloric solution, while it is stable and avoids graphite surface corrosion in phosphoric acid solution. These results provide a rationale for the role played by free-base porphines in graphite protection.

  3. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  4. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzova Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution and physically (by ultrasonic procedure treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  5. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  6. The application of the pore population balance method to the calculation of the radiolytic weight loss and gas transport property changes of nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1982-01-01

    A pore population balance equation, previously used to describe the physical property changes of porous carbons during thermal oxidation in carbon dioxide, has been modified to treat the radiolytic oxidation of graphite in CO 2 /CO/CH 4 gas mixtures. Good agreement has been obtained between theory and experiment for the variation in the gas transport coefficients B, K and lambda of gilsonite graphite with absorbed radiation dose. Calculations indicate that the addition of blind pores to the transport porosity, and an allowance for the opening of closed pores with burn-off, do not account for the experimental fractional weight loss curve. An excellent fit is obtained, however, if a small volume of cylindrical pores of a mean radius approximately equal to the diffusion length of oxidising species in the coolant are present in the pore size spectrum. Gilsonite graphite therefore behaves as if the pore size distribution function is trimodal, with mean radii at about 0.5μm, 2.48μm and greater than or equal to 10.57μm. (author)

  7. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  8. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  9. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  10. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  11. Temperature-dependent thermal properties of a paraffin phase change material embedded with herringbone style graphite nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzoha, Ronald J.; Weigand, Rebecca M.; Fleischer, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of a PCM with nanofibers are determined. • The solid-phase thermal conductivity scales exponentially with volume fraction. • The liquid-phase thermal conductivity is only enhanced beyond a critical percolation threshold. • The nanoscale interface resistance depends on the nanoparticle’s dimensionality. • The thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity of the nanoenhanced PCMs are found. - Abstract: In many studies, carbon nanoparticles with high values of thermal conductivity (10–3000 W/m K) have been embedded into phase change thermal energy storage materials (PCMs) in order to enhance their bulk thermal properties. While a great deal of work to date has focused on determining the effect of these nanoparticles on a PCM’s solid phase thermal properties, little is known about their effect on its liquid phase thermal properties. Thus, in this study, the effect of implanting randomly oriented herringbone style graphite nanofibers (HGNF, average diameter = 100 nm, average length = 20 μm) on the bulk thermal properties of an organic paraffin PCM (IGI 1230A, T melt = 329.15 K) in both the solid and liquid phase is quantified. The bulk thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thermal diffusivity of HGNF/PCM nanocomposites are obtained as a function of temperature and HGNF volume loading level. It is found that the property enhancement varies significantly depending on the material phase. In order to explain the difference between solid and liquid phase thermal properties, heat flow at the nanoparticle–PCM and nanoparticle–nanoparticle interfaces is examined as a function of HGNF loading level and temperature. To do this, the solid and liquid phase thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) between the nanoparticles and the surrounding PCM and/or between contacting nanoparticles are found. Results suggest that the TBR at the HGNF–PCM interface is nearly double the TBR across the HGNF–HGNF interface in

  12. Characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated reactor graphite; Karakterizacija neozracenog i ozracenog reaktorskog grafita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report contains three parts: characterization of Yugoslav nuclear graphite development of methods and obtained results, characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated domestic nuclear graphite; calculation of electrical conductivity changes due to vacancies in the graphite crystal lattice.

  13. Tip-induced local strain on Mo S2/graphite detected by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wonhee; Hus, Saban M.; Li, Xufan; Berlijn, Tom; Nguyen, Giang D.; Xiao, Kai; Li, An-Ping

    2018-03-01

    We report the detection of tip-induced local strain applied to the monolayer Mo S2 grown on a graphite substrate by scanning tunneling microscope. Monolayer Mo S2 behaves as both mechanical and tunneling barriers that prevent the tip from contacting the graphite while maintaining the tunneling current. Inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy (IETS) is utilized to probe the phonon modes in graphite. As the tip pushes the sample, IETS reveals a continuous phonon softening in graphite, corroborated by a downward shift of the phonon energy as calculated by density-functional theory. Our results demonstrate a way to apply local mechanical strain and simultaneously detect the induced change in phonon modes by unitizing IETS with two-dimensional materials as a tunneling barrier.

  14. Depleted Hydrocarbon Reservoirs Present a Safe and Practical Burial Solution for Graphite Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution for graphite waste is proposed that combines reliance on thick impermeable host rock that is needed to confine the long-life radioactivity content of most irradiated graphite with low capitalistic and operational unit volume costs that are required to render this bulky waste form manageable. The solution, uniquely applicable to irradiated graphite due to its low dose rates, moderate mechanical strength and light density, consists in three steps: first, graphite is fine-crushed under water; second, it is made in an aqueous suspension; third, the suspension is injected into a deep, disused hydrocarbon reservoir. Each of these steps only involves well mastered techniques. Regulatory changes that may allow this solution to be added to the gamut of available waste routes, geochemical issues, availability of depleted reservoirs and cost projections are presented. (author)

  15. In situ Raman spectroscopic studies on concentration change of electrolyte salt in a lithium ion model battery with closely faced graphite composite and LiCoO2 composite electrodes by using an ultrafine microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Nakagawa, Hiroe; Tsubouchi, Shigetaka; Domi, Yasuhiro; Doi, Takayuki; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-01-01

    The concentration of ions in the electrolyte solution in lithium ion batteries changes during operation, reflecting the resistance to ion migration and the positions of diffusion barriers. The change causes various negative effects on the performance of batteries. Thus, it is important to elucidate how the concentration changes during operation. In this work, the concentration change of ions in the electrolyte solution in deep narrow spaces in a realistic battery was studied by in situ ultrafine microprobe Raman spectroscopy. Graphite composite and LiCoO 2 composite electrodes, which are the most commonly used electrodes in practical batteries, were placed facing each other and their distance was set to 80 μm, which is close to the distance between electrodes in practical batteries. After repeated charge/discharge cycles, the concentration of ions increased and decreased greatly during charging and discharging, respectively. The maximum concentration was more than three-times higher than the minimum concentration. The rate of changes in concentration increased almost linearly with increase in current density. The results have important implications about concentration changes of ions occurring in practical batteries.

  16. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E

    2015-06-11

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures.

  17. A microstructurally based fracture model for nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the physical basis of, and assumptions behind, a fracture model for nuclear graphites. Microstructurally related inputs, such as filler particle size, filler particle fracture toughness (K Ic ), density, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (size and volume), are utilized in the model. The model has been applied to two graphites, Great Lakes Carbon Corporation grade H-451 and Toyo Tanso grade IG-110. For each graphite, the predicted tensile failure probabilities are compared with experimental data generated using ASTM Standard C-749 tensile test specimens. The predicted failure probabilities are in close agreement with the experimental data, particularly in the case of the H-451. The model is also shown to qualitatively predict the influence on the failure probabilities of changes in filler particle size, density, pore size, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (stressed volume). The good performance is attributed to the sound physical basis of the model, which recognizes the dominant role of porosity in controlling crack initiation and propagation during graphite fracture. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  18. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  19. Changes in macular pigment optical density after membrane peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Mario R; Cennamo, Gilda; Grassi, Piergiacomo; Sparnelli, Federica; Allegrini, Davide; Cennamo, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    To highlight the differences in macular pigment optical density (MPOD) between eyes with vitreoretinal interface syndrome and healthy control eyes, to assess the changes in MPOD in eyes treated with macular peeling, to investigate the relationships between MPOD changes and measures of retinal sensitivity such as best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and microperimetry. In this cross-sectional comparative study, 30 eyes affected by idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM, 15eyes) or full-thickness macular hole (FTMH, 15eyes) were compared with 60 eyes from 30 healthy age-matched patients. MPOD values (mean MPOD, maximum MPOD, MPOD area, and MPOD volume) were measured in a range of 4°-7° of eccentricity around the fovea, using the one-wavelength reflectometry method (Visucam 200, Carl-Zeiss Meditec). Patients affected by iERM and FTMH were treated with vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane-inner limiting membrane (ERM-ILM) peeling, with follow-up examinations performed preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. The main outcome measures were the differences in MPOD between eyes with vitreoretinal interface syndrome and healthy eyes, changes in MPOD after ERM-ILM peeling, and relationships between MPOD and functional changes. Mean MPOD differed significantly between control eyes and those with iERM (P = .0001) or FTMH (P = .0006). The max MPOD and MPOD area increased, but not significantly. After peeling, the only significant change in MPOD was in MPOD volume (P = .01). In the ERM group, postoperative mean MPOD correlated significantly with best-corrected visual acuity (r = .739, P = .002). MPOD was reduced in patients with iERM or FTMH compared with healthy eyes. We found a significant correlation between the mean postoperative MPOD and postoperative BCVA, hypothesizing that the postoperative increase in mean MPOD could be due to a change in distribution for unfolding and expansion of the fovea after the peeling. MOPD may be considered as a prognostic factor associated

  20. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  1. Density changes in amorphous Pd80Si20 during low temperature ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, G.; Birtcher, R.C.; Rehn, L.E.

    1994-11-01

    Density changes in amorphous Pd 80 Si 20 during ion irradiation below 100K were detected by in situ HVEM measurements of the changes in specimen length as a function of ion fluence. A decrease in mass density as a function of the ion fluence was observed. The saturation value of the change in mass density was determined to be approximately -1.2%

  2. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  3. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  4. Porous (Swiss-Cheese Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Abrahamson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous graphite was prepared without the use of template by rapidly heating the carbonization products from mixtures of anthracene, fluorene, and pyrene with a CO2 laser. Rapid CO2 laser heating at a rate of 1.8 × 106 °C/s vaporizes out the fluorene-pyrene derived pitch while annealing the anthracene coke. The resulting structure is that of graphite with 100 nm spherical pores. The graphitizablity of the porous material is the same as pure anthracene coke. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces between graphitic layers and the pore walls are unimpeded. Traditional furnace annealing does not result in the porous structure as the heating rates are too slow to vaporize out the pitch, thereby illustrating the advantage of fast thermal processing. The resultant porous graphite was prelithiated and used as an anode in lithium ion capacitors. The porous graphite when lithiated had a specific capacity of 200 mAh/g at 100 mA/g. The assembled lithium ion capacitor demonstrated an energy density as high as 75 Wh/kg when cycled between 2.2 V and 4.2 V.

  5. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  6. Bone mineral density change during adjuvant chemotherapy in pediatric osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyun Ahn

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeOsteoporosis is currently receiving particular attention as a sequela in survivors of childhood osteosarcoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD changes during methotrexate-based chemotherapy in children and adolescents with osteosarcoma.MethodsNine patients with osteosarcoma were included in this retrospective study and compared with eight healthy controls. BMD of the lumbar spine and unaffected femur neck of patients was serially measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA before and just after chemotherapy and compared with controls.ResultsFour patients (44% showed decreased lumbar spine BMD and seven patients (78% showed decreased femur neck BMD, while all controls showed increased lumbar and femur BMD (P=0.024 and P=0.023. The femur neck BMD z-scores decreased from -0.49±1.14 to -1.63±1.50 (P=0.032. At the end of therapy, five patients (56% showed femur neck BMD z-scores below -2.0.ConclusionThe bone metabolism is disturbed during therapy in children with osteosarcoma, resulting in a reduced BMD with respect to healthy controls. Since a reduced BMD predisposes to osteoporosis, specific attention and therapeutic interventions should be considered.

  7. Alcoholic liver disease and changes in bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán López-Larramona

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and osteopenia are alterations in bone mineral density (BMD that frequently occur in the context of chronic liver disease (CLD. These alterations have been studied predominantly in chronic cholestatic disease and cirrhosis of the liver. Alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for the onset of osteoporosis, whose estimated prevalence in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD ranges between 5 % and 40 %. The loss of BMD in ALD is the result of an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes the toxic effects of alcohol on bone and endocrine and nutritional disorders secondary to alcoholism and a deficiency of osteocalcin, vitamin D and insulin growth factor-1. The diagnosis of BMD alterations in ALD is based on its measurement using bone densitometry. Treatment includes smoking and alcohol cessation and general measures such as changes in nutrition and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are recommended in all patients with ALD and osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the specific treatment of this condition. Alternatives include raloxifene, hormone replacement therapy and calcitonin. This review will address the most important aspects involved in the clinical management of abnormal BMD in the context of ALD, including its prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis. We will also review the treatment of osteoporosis in CLD in general, focusing on specific aspects related to bone loss in ALD.

  8. An Experiment on the Carbonization of Fuel Compact Matrix Graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Cho, Moon Sung

    2012-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a properly prepared matrix graphite powder, pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact, and finally heat-treated at about 1800 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, over coating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K, In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is of extreme importance to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the carbonization condition, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the carbonization behavior of green compact samples prepared from the matrix graphite powder mixtures with different binder materials was investigated in order to elucidate the behavior of binders during the carbonization heat treatment by analyzing the change in weight, density and its

  9. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  10. Defect induced electronic states and magnetism in ball-milled graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Adriyan; Dissanayake, D M A S; Kannangara, G S K; Kumarasinghe, A R

    2013-10-14

    The electronic structure and magnetism of nanocrystalline graphite prepared by ball milling of graphite in an inert atmosphere have been investigated using valence band spectroscopy (VB), core level near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetic measurements as a function of the milling time. The NEXAFS spectroscopy of graphite milled for 30 hours shows simultaneous evolution of new states at ~284.0 eV and at ~290.5 eV superimposed upon the characteristic transitions at 285.4 eV and 291.6 eV, respectively. The modulation of the density of states is explained by evolution of discontinuities within the sheets and along the fracture lines in the milled graphite. The magnetic measurements in the temperature interval 2-300-2 K at constant magnetic field strength show a correlation between magnetic properties and evolution of the new electronic states. With the reduction of the crystallite sizes of the graphite fragments, the milled material progressively changes its magnetic properties from diamagnetic to paramagnetic with contributions from both Pauli and Curie paramagnetism due to the evolution of new states at ~284 and ~290.5 eV, respectively. These results indicate that the magnetic behaviour of ball-milled graphite can be manipulated by changing the milling conditions.

  11. Huge cystic craniopharyngioma. Changes of cyst density on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, Seishi; Fukumura, Akinobu; Ito, Yoshihiro; Itoyama, Yoichi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko

    1986-06-01

    The findings of computed tomography (CT) of a huge cystic craniopharyngioma in a 57-year-old woman are described. Cyst density varied from low to high levels in a short duration. Follow-up CT scans were regarded as important to diagnose craniopharyngioma. The mechanism of increment of cyst density was discussed.

  12. Changes in mammographic density and breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokate, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer among women worldwide. One of the most important risk factors for breast cancer is high mammographic density. Mammographic density represents the amount of fibroglandular tissue relative to the fat tissue in the breast. Women with >75% of their

  13. Changes in electrical transport and density of states of phase change materials upon resistance drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, Daniel; Bachmann, Tobias; Jonnalagadda, Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Raoux, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change memory technology has become more mature in recent years. But some fundamental problems linked to the electrical transport properties in the amorphous phase of phase-change materials still need to be solved. The increase of resistance over time, called resistance drift, for example, poses a major challenge for the implementation of multilevel storage, which will eventually be necessary to remain competitive in terms of high storage densities. To link structural properties with electrical transport, a broader knowledge of (i) changes in the density of states (DoS) upon structural relaxation and (ii) the influence of defects on electrical transport is required. In this paper, we present temperature-dependent conductivity and photo-conductivity measurements on the archetype phase change material GeTe. It is shown that trap-limited band transport at high temperatures (above 165 K) and variable range hopping at low temperatures are the predominating transport mechanism. Based on measurements of the temperature dependence of the optical band gap, modulated photo-conductivity and photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy, a DoS model for GeTe was proposed. Using this DoS, the temperature dependence of conductivity and photo-conductivity has been simulated. Our work shows how changes in the DoS (band gap and defect distributions) will affect the electrical transport before and after temperature-accelerated drift. The decrease in conductivity upon annealing can be explained entirely by an increase of the band gap by about 12%. However, low-temperature photo-conductivity measurements revealed that a change in the defect density may also play a role

  14. Experiment and simulation of a LiFePO4 battery pack with a passive thermal management system using composite phase change material and graphite sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunjing; Xu, Sichuan; Chang, Guofeng; Liu, Jinling

    2015-02-01

    A passive thermal management system (TMS) for LiFePO4 battery modules using phase change material (PCM) as the heat dissipation source to control battery temperature rise is developed. Expanded graphite matrix and graphite sheets are applied to compensate low thermal conductivity of PCM and improve temperature uniformity of the batteries. Constant current discharge and mixed charge-discharge duties were applied on battery modules with and without PCM on a battery thermal characteristics test platform. Experimental results show that PCM cooling significantly reduces the battery temperature rise during short-time intense use. It is also found that temperature uniformity across the module deteriorates with the increasing of both discharge time and current rates. The maximum temperature differences at the end of 1C and 2C-rate discharges are both less than 5 °C, indicating a good performance in battery thermal uniformity of the passive TMS. Experiments on warm-keeping performance show that the passive TMS can effectively keep the battery within its optimum operating temperature for a long time during cold weather uses. A three dimensional numerical model of the battery pack with the passive TMS was conducted using ANSYS Fluent. Temperature profiles with respect to discharging time reveal that simulation shows good agreement with experiment at 1C-discharge rate.

  15. Fundamental incorporation of the density change during melting of a confined phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ernesto M.; Otero, José A.

    2018-02-01

    The modeling of thermal diffusion processes taking place in a phase change material presents a challenge when the dynamics of the phase transition is coupled to the mechanical properties of the container. Thermo-mechanical models have been developed by several authors, however, it will be shown that these models only explain the phase transition dynamics at low pressures when the density of each phase experiences negligible changes. In our proposal, a new energy-mass balance equation at the interface is derived and found to be a consequence of mass conservation. The density change experienced in each phase is predicted by the proposed formulation of the problem. Numerical and semi-analytical solutions to the proposed model are presented for an example on a high temperature phase change material. The solutions to the models presented by other authors are observed to be well-behaved close to the isobaric limit. However, compared to the results obtained from our model, the change in the fusion temperature, latent heat, and absolute pressure is found to be greatly overestimated by other proposals when the phase transition is studied close to the isochoric regime.

  16. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  17. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  18. Graphite materials testing in the ATR for lifetime management of Magnox reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on their graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment. (author)

  19. Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on the ir graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment

  20. DOES BONE MINERAL DENSITY CHANGE IN EARLY AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Gubar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of osteoporosis (OP and the mechanism  of its development in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS and other spondyloarthrititides (SpA have not been sufficiently investigated. Steady-state  inflammatory disease activity is anticipated  to be the leading factor of OP in AS.Objective: to investigate lumbar spine (LS and femoral neck (FN  bone mineral density (BMD  in patients with early axial SpA (axSpA and to reveal its association with inflammatory disease activity.Subjects and methods. A total of 150 patients (59 men and 91 women aged 18 to 45 years with inflammatory back pain for ≥3 months and ≤5 years were examined. The diagnosis of axSpA was established in accordance  with the 2009 ASAS criteria. BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP were used to assess activity and functional status was evaluated with BASFI. The examination  included determination of HLA-B27, X-ray of the pelvis and LS, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI  of the sacroiliac joints, LS, and hip joints (in the presence of clinical signs of their involvement,  and densitometry of LS (LI–IV  and FN. By taking into account the patients’ young age, the Z score was used to estimate BMD. The Z-score -2 SD or lower in at the least one of the regions examined is considered to be diminished BMD. Results and discussion. The median Z-score was -0.7 [-1.3; -0.2] SD for FN and -0.9 [-1.6; -0.6] SD for LS. Reduced BMD in at the least one of the regions examined was diagnosed in 27 (18.0% patients. There was lower BMD in LS in 21 (14.0% patients and in FN in 8 (5.3%. Two (1.3% patients were diagnosed as having osteopenia in the two examined regions. There was no association between diminished BMD and age, gender, disease activity assessed with BASDAI, ASDAS-СRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP. An association was found between inflammatory LS changes, as evidenced by MRI (MRI spondylitis, and reduced BMD in at least one of the examined regions. MRI

  1. Volume and density changes of biological fluids with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal expansion of human blood, plasma, ultrafiltrate, and erythrocycte concentration at temperatures in the range of 4-48 C is studied. The mechanical oscillator technique which has an accuracy of 1 x 10 to the -5 th g/ml is utilized to measure fluid density. The relationship between thermal expansion, density, and temperature is analyzed. The study reveals that: (1) thermal expansion increases with increasing temperature; (2) the magnitude of the increase declines with increasing temperature; (3) thermal expansion increases with density at temperatures below 40 C; and (4) the thermal expansion of intracellular fluid is greater than that of extracellular fluid in the temperature range of 4-10 C, but it is equal at temperatures greater than or equal to 40 C.

  2. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  3. Properties of form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide/expanded graphite phase change composites prepared by sol–gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Wu, Zhishen; Tan, Jinmiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite PCM was prepared with sol–gel method. ► The thermal conductivity of SiO 2 /paraffin/EG is 94.7% higher than paraffin. ► The latent heat of paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite is 104.4 J/g. -- Abstract: A form-stable paraffin/silicon dioxide (SiO 2 )/expanded graphite (EG) composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by sol–gel method. Silica gel acts as the supporting material and EG is used to increase the thermal conductivity. The mass fractions of silicon oxide and graphite are 20.8% and 7.2%, respectively. The composite PCM was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method. Thermal properties and thermal stability of the composite PCM were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The result shows that paraffin was well dispersed in the network of silica gel and there is no chemical reaction between them. The phase change temperature of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 27.53 °C and 27.72 °C, respectively. The latent heat of the paraffin/SiO 2 composite and the paraffin/SiO 2 /EG composite are 112.8 J/g and 104.4 J/g, respectively. The thermal conductivity of the SiO 2 /paraffin composite and the SiO 2 /paraffin/EG composite are 28.2% and 94.7% higher than that of paraffin.

  4. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  5. Changes in W monocrystal dislocation density after electroerosion machininig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshina, S.A.; Khvostikova, V.D.; Zolotykh, B.N.; Marchuk, A.I.

    1977-01-01

    The variation of the dislocations and microhardness density in surface layers of single crystal tungsten after electro-erosion machining along the plane (100) at pulse energies of 1200, 2500, 5000 μJ and pulse duration of 1 μs has been investigated with a view to determining the optimum value of the intermediate (between processing stages) allowances in the manufacture of parts from single crystals. It is shown that the density of dislocations is determined by pulse energy and that a maximum value for all the machining conditions is observed at a depth of 20 μm, attaining original magnitude at a depth of approximately 100 μm. The microhardness varies similarly between 500-520 and 390-410 H 20

  6. Preparation and properties of palmitic-stearic acid eutectic mixture/expanded graphite composite as phase change material for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yuan, Yanping; Du, Yanxia; Cao, Xiaoling; Yuan, Yaguang

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite PCM (phase change material) with PA-SA (palmitic-stearic acid) eutectic mixture as PCM and EG (expanded graphite) as supporting material was prepared. The optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was determined as PA-SA:EG = 13:1 (by mass). Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy results show that PA-SA was uniformly distributed in the porous network structure of EG due to the physical action. Thermal property and thermal stability of the PA-SA/EG composite PCM were characterized by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and TGA (thermogravimetric analysis). DSC results indicated that the melting and freezing temperatures and latent heats of PA-SA/EG were measured as 53.89 °C and 54.37 °C, and 166.27 J/g and 166.13 J/g. TGA test results revealed that PA-SA/EG had a good thermal stability in working temperature range. Thermal cycling test results showed PA-SA/EG had a good thermal reliability after 720 thermal cycles. Thermal conductivity of the composite PCM was measured as 2.51 W/m K, much higher than that of PA-SA. The thermal energy storage and release rates of PA-SA/EG were also increased due to the high thermal conductivity of EG. In conclusion, the prepared PA-SA/EG composite PCM can be acted as a potential material for thermal energy storage due to the acceptable thermal properties, good thermal reliability and stability, high thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • PA-SA/EG (Palmitic-stearic acid/expanded graphite) composite PCM was prepared. • Optimum absorption ratio of PA-SA in EG was obtained as 13:1 (by mass). • Thermal conductivity and performance of PA-SA/EG have been significate improved. • PA-SA/EG has a good thermal reliability and thermal stability

  7. Soil bulk density changes caused by mechanized harvesting: A case study in central Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux; Pam Edwards; Mark Jones; Mark Jones

    2005-01-01

    A mechanized harvesting system consisting of a feller-buncher and a grapple skidder was examined to quantify soil bulk density changes in a central Appalachian hardwood forest site. Soil bulk density was measured using a nuclear gauge pre-harvest and post-harvest systematically across the harvest unit and on transects across skid trails. Bulk density also was measured...

  8. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  9. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  10. A core-monitoring based methodology for predictions of graphite weight loss in AGR moderator bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, K., E-mail: kevin.mcnally@hsl.gsi.gov.uk [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Warren, N. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Fahad, M.; Hall, G.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A statistically-based methodology for estimating graphite density is presented. • Graphite shrinkage is accounted for using a finite element model. • Differences in weight loss forecasts were found when compared to the existing model. - Abstract: Physically based models, resolved using the finite element (FE) method are often used to model changes in dimensions and the associated stress fields of graphite moderator bricks within a reactor. These models require inputs that describe the loading conditions (temperature, fluence and weight loss ‘field variables’), and coded relationships describing the behaviour of graphite under these conditions. The weight loss field variables are calculated using a reactor chemistry/physics code FEAT DIFFUSE. In this work the authors consider an alternative data source of weight loss: that from a longitudinal dataset of density measurements made on small samples trepanned from operating reactors during statutory outages. A nonlinear mixed-effect model is presented for modelling the age and depth-related trends in density. A correction that accounts for irradiation-induced dimensional changes (axial and radial shrinkage) is subsequently applied. The authors compare weight loss forecasts made using FEAT DIFFUSE with those based on an alternative statistical model for a layer four moderator brick for the Hinkley Point B, Reactor 3. The authors compare the two approaches for the weight loss distribution through the brick with a particular focus on the interstitial keyway, and for the average (over the volume of the brick) weight loss.

  11. Time evolution of regional CT density changes in normal lung after IMRT for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the clinical radiobiology of radiation induced lung disease in terms of regional computed tomography (CT) density changes following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 387 follow-up CT scans in 131 NSCLC patients receiving IMRT to a prescribed dose of 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. The dose-dependent temporal evolution of the density change was analyzed using a two-component model, a superposition of an early, transient component and a late, persistent component. Results: The CT density of healthy lung tissue was observed to increase significantly (p 12 months. Conclusions: The radiobiology of lung injury may be analyzed in terms of CT density change. The initial transient change in density is consistent with radiation pneumonitis, while the subsequent stabilization of the density is consistent with pulmonary fibrosis

  12. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  13. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  14. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  15. In-vitro studies of change in edge detection with changes in bone density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, N.; Noakes, K.; Griffiths, M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) requires edge detection software to identify the skeletal regions for quantitation of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC). As bone mass decreases, the detection of bone edges becomes more difficult and this potentially could cause errors in DXA estimations of areal BMD or BMC. To address this issue, we have used an in-vitro model to study the effects of 'bone loss' on calculated bone area, BMD and BMC. Multiple vertebral phantoms, of equal cross-sectional area but incrementally decreased areal BMD, were constructed using calcium sulphate hemihydrate. The weight of each phantom vertebra, measured accurately using an electronic balance, was used as an index of its true 'bone mass equivalent' (BME). The phantoms were scanned and analysed in the lumbar spine mode using a Lunar DPX-L (L) and Hologic QDR-1000 (H). The changes in BME were compared to changes in measured area, BMC and areal BMD. The results demonstrate that, in an in-vitro model, as bone mass decreases, measured bone area and consequently BMC will decrease as the edge detection algorithms have greater difficulty in detecting the true edges. In conclusion, in an in-vitro model, the DXA edge detection algorithms will underestimate bone area as bone mass decreases. This has potential implications for monitoring changes in bone mass in vivo

  16. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  17. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  18. Neutron metrology in the L.F.R. Neutron flux density spectrum in the inner graphite reflector of the L.F.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsolnay, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The neutron spectrum in the vertical central plug of the Low Flux Reactor has been determined experimentally. Sets of activation and fission detectors have been irradiated, and the neutron spectrum has been unfolded with aid of 3 special computer programs SAND-II, RFSP-JUEL and CRYSTAL BALL. Using these 3 programs calculations are made on the improvement ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the variance of the input flux density to that of the output flux density. A Monte Carlo error analysis is made to examine the quality of the 3 solution spectra. The results obtained with the different computer codes were compared, and showed a general agreement. The experiment confirmed that the shape of the spectrum in the intermediate energy region is near the 1/E pattern. (author)

  19. Podocyte number and density changes during early human life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Rabah, Raja; Wiggins, Roger C

    2017-05-01

    Podocyte depletion, which drives progressive glomerulosclerosis in glomerular diseases, is caused by a reduction in podocyte number, size or function in the context of increasing glomerular volume. Kidneys obtained at autopsy from premature and mature infants who died in the first year of life (n = 24) were used to measure podometric parameters for comparison with previously reported data from older kidneys. Glomerular volume increased 4.6-fold from 0.13 ± 0.07 μm 3 x10 6 in the pre-capillary loop stage, through 0.35 μm 3 x10 6 at the capillary loop, to 0.60 μm 3 x10 6 at the mature glomerular stage. Podocyte number per glomerulus increased from 326 ± 154 per glomerulus at the pre-capillary loop stage to 584 ± 131 per glomerulus at the capillary loop stage of glomerular development to reach a value of 589 ± 166 per glomerulus in mature glomeruli. Thus, the major podocyte number increase occurs in the early stages of glomerular development, in contradistinction to glomerular volume increase, which continues after birth in association with body growth. As glomeruli continue to enlarge, podocyte density (number per volume) rapidly decreases, requiring a parallel rapid increase in podocyte size that allows podocyte foot processes to maintain complete coverage of the filtration surface area. Hypertrophic stresses on the glomerulus and podocyte during development and early rapid growth periods of life are therefore likely to play significant roles in determining how and when defects in podocyte structure and function due to genetic variants become clinically manifest. Therapeutic strategies aimed at minimizing mismatch between these factors may prove clinically useful.

  20. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Molecular-Bridged Expanded Graphite/Polyethylene Glycol Composite Phase Change Materials for Building Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Chen, Meizhu; Liu, Quantao; Wan, Jiuming; Hu, Jinxuan

    2018-05-16

    Using phase change materials (PCMs) in building envelopes became a reliable method to improve indoor comfort and reduce buildings' energy consumption. This research developed molecular-bridged expanded graphite (EG)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) composite PCMs (m-EPs) to conserve energy in buildings. The m-EPs were prepared through a vacuum absorption technique, and a titanate coupling agent was used to build a molecular bridge between EG and PEG. SEM, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the leakage test, microcalorimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were conducted to characterize the morphology, pore structure, absorbability, and modifying effects of the m-EPs. The phase change temperature, latent heat, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity of the m-EPs were determined by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), TGA, and a thermal constants analyzer. Results showed that the maximum mass ratio of PEG to EG without leakage was 1:7, and a stable connection was established in the m-EPs after modification. Compared with the unmodified EPs, the supercooling degree of the m-EPs reduced by about 3 °C, but the latent heats and initial decomposition temperatures increased by approximately 10% and 20 °C, respectively, which indicated an improvement in the thermal energy storage efficiency. The thermal conductivities of the m-EPs were 10 times higher than those of the pristine PEGs, which ensured a rapid responding to building temperature fluctuations.

  1. Development of synthetic graphite resistive elements for sintering furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.; Rezende, Mirabel C.; Polidoro, H.A.; Otani, S.

    1987-01-01

    The synthetic graphites have been produced using lignin coke, natural graphite and phenolic resin. The bulk density, porosity, flexural strength and eletrical resistivity measurements have been performed on specimens at about 2400 0 C. The performance of these materials, as heating elements, was evaluated in a sintering furnace prototype. This paper reports the fabrication process and the experimental results. (Author) [pt

  2. Linear expansion of products out of thermal splitting graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishina, E.A.; Kurnevich, G.I.

    1994-01-01

    Linear expansion of thermally split graphite in the form of foil and pressed items of different density was studied. It is ascertained that the extreme character of temperature dependence of linear expansion factor of pressed samples of thermally split graphite is determined by the formation of closed pores containing air in the course of their production. 3 refs., 2 figs

  3. Dependence of strength on particle size in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.P.; Kennedy, C.R.

    The strength to particle size relationship for specially fabricated graphites has been demonstrated and rationalized using fracture mechanics. In the past, similar studies have yielded empirical data using only commercially available material. Thus, experimental verification of these relationships has been difficult. However, the graphites of this study were fabricated by controlling the particle size ranges for a series of isotropic graphites. All graphites that were evaluated had a constant 1.85 g/cm 3 density. Thus, particle size was the only variable. This study also considered the particle size effect on other physical properties; coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), electrical resistivity, fracture strain, and Young's modulus

  4. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  5. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  6. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  7. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  8. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  9. Changing electronic density in sites of crystalline lattice under superconducting of phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaev, N.Yu.; Turaev, E.Yu.; Khuzhakulov, E.S.; Seregin, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    Results of electron density change calculations for sites of the one-dimensional Kronig-Penny lattice at the superconducting phase transition have been presented. The transition from normal state to super conducting one is accompanied by the rise of the electron density at the unit cell centre. It is agreement with Moessbauer spectroscopy data. (author)

  10. Changes in soil bulk density resulting from construction and conventional cable skidding using preplanned skid trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux; Pam Edwards

    2007-01-01

    A harvesting system consisting of chainsaw felling and cable skidder extraction was studied to determine soil bulk density changes in a central Appalachian hardwood forest site. Soil bulk density was measured using a nuclear gauge preharvest and postharvest systematically across the harvest site, on transects across skid trails, and for a subset of skid trail transects...

  11. Changes in Gambel oak densities in southwestern ponderosa pine forests since Euro-American settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott R. Abella; Peter Z. Fulé

    2008-01-01

    Densities of small-diameter ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees have increased in southwestern ponderosa pine forests during a period of fire exclusion since Euro-American settlement in the late 1800s. However, less well known are potential changes in Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii) densities during this period in these forests....

  12. Changes in density of aluminium, lead and zinc melts dependent on temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazachkov, S.P.; Kochegura, N.M.; Markovskij, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    Density of aluminium, lead and zinc in various aggregate states has been studied in a wide temperature range. The density of the above metals was found to manifest temperature hysteresis after melting and cyclic change at the temperature of melting and crystallization. These phenomena are in agreement with the Stuart model of liquid state

  13. Spatial structure changes in 4He at fixed density as a function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, F.W.; Ewen, D.A.; Hallock, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray scattering techniques have been used to determine changes in spatial order when cooling 4 He below T/sub lambda/ at several fixed values of the density. The results show surprisingly little density dependence and are relevant to the discussion of condensate fraction determinations in 4 He

  14. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  15. Characterization of fresh and irradiated domestic nuclear graphite; Karakterizacija neozracenog i ozracenog domaceg nuklearnog grafita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, S; Suznjevic, C; Bogdanovic, R; Gasic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report shows results of testing the quality of domestic impregnated graphite IGSP-05, and irradiated domestic graphite IGSP-01 as well as the new methos of characterization based on graphite oxidation by liquid agent. Systematic measurement of domestic impregnated graphite enabled conclusions related to its quality and further improvement. Domestic graphite is relatively well graphitized and its properties are approaching standard nuclear graphite, although it still shows some deficiencies. Important deficiencies are significant inhomogeneity and low density. The applied impregnation procedure did not improve significantly the quality of graphite, probably because the material which was impregnated had fine pores. To avoid this porosity it would be necessary to use material with higher granulation. Soot which was present in some blocks probably worsened the quality of graphite and caused dispersion of the obtained results. First tests of irradiated domestic graphite IGSP-01 showed that its behaviour does not differ from standard nuclear graphite in case of low doses. It is necessary to test its properties in case of higher neutron doses before drawing final conclusions. The new method of graphite oxidation by the N{sub 2}SO{sub 4} - Ag{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} mixture which is highly sensitive on the existence of structural defects is based on detecting the oxidation rate of graphite by measuring the pressure of released CO{sub 2}. Application of the method for testing the domestic and American graphite showed that irradiation caused drastic changes of oxidation rates and similar behaviour of both graphite types. U ovom izvestaju su prikazani rezultati ispitivanja kvaliteta domaceg impregnisanog grafita IGSP-05, rezultati ispitivanja ozracenog domaceg grafita IGSP-01 i opisana je nova uvedena metoda karakterizacije zasnovana na oksidaciji grafita tecnim agensom. Sistematsko merenje osobina domaceg impregnisanog grafita je omogucilo donosenje zakljucaka o

  16. Work function modifications of graphite surface via oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duch, J.; Kubisiak, P.; Adolfsson, K. H.; Hakkarainen, M.; Golda-Cepa, M.; Kotarba, A.

    2017-10-01

    The surface modification of graphite by oxygen plasma was investigated experimentally (X-ray diffraction, nanoparticle tracking analysis, laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, thermogravimetry, water contact angle) and by molecular modelling (Density Functional Theory). Generation of surface functional groups (mainly sbnd OHsurf) leads to substantial changes in electrodonor properties and wettability gauged by work function and water contact angle, respectively. The invoked modifications were analyzed in terms of Helmholtz model taking into account the theoretically determined surface dipole moment of graphite-OHsurf system (μ = 2.71 D) and experimentally measured work function increase (from 0.75 to 1.02 eV) to determine the sbnd OH surface coverage (from 0.70 to 1.03 × 1014 groups cm-2). Since the plasma treatment was confined to the surface, the high thermal stability of the graphite material was preserved as revealed by the thermogravimetric analysis. The obtained results provide a suitable quantitative background for tuning the key operating parameters of carbon electrodes: electronic properties, interaction with water and thermal stability.

  17. Formation of Ag nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces. A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrusi, Rubén E.; García, Silvana G.; Pronsato, María E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining silver nanowires on graphite stepped surfaces theoretically, using density functional theory calculations. Three layer slabs are used to model graphite surfaces with and without defects. Adsorption energies for Ag atoms on graphite surfaces were calculated showing the preference of Ag adatoms to locate on the steps, forming linear structures like nanowires. An analysis of the charge densities and projected densities of states for different structures is also performed.

  18. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  19. Optical motion control of maglev graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Abe, Jiro

    2012-12-26

    Graphite has been known as a typical diamagnetic material and can be levitated in the strong magnetic field. Here we show that the magnetically levitating pyrolytic graphite can be moved in the arbitrary place by simple photoirradiation. It is notable that the optical motion control system described in this paper requires only NdFeB permanent magnets and light source. The optical movement is driven by photothermally induced changes in the magnetic susceptibility of the graphite. Moreover, we demonstrate that light energy can be converted into rotational kinetic energy by means of the photothermal property. We find that the levitating graphite disk rotates at over 200 rpm under the sunlight, making it possible to develop a new class of light energy conversion system.

  20. Density changes in shear bands of a metallic glass determined by correlative analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rösner, Harald, E-mail: rosner@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Peterlechner, Martin [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Kübel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Nanotechnology (INT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Schmidt, Vitalij [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Wilde, Gerhard [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Density changes between sheared zones and their surrounding amorphous matrix as a result of plastic deformation in a cold-rolled metallic glass (melt-spun Al{sub 88}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}) were determined using high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector intensities supplemented by electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and nano-beam diffraction analyses. Sheared zones or shear bands were observed as regions of bright or dark contrast arising from a higher or lower density relative to the matrix. Moreover, abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa were found within individual shear bands. We associate the decrease in density mainly with an enhanced free volume in the shear bands and the increase in density with concomitant changes of the mass. This interpretation is further supported by changes in the zero loss and Plasmon signal originating from such sites. The limits of this new approach are discussed. - Highlights: • We describe a novel approach for measuring densities in shear bands of metallic glasses. • The linear relation of the dark-field intensity I/I{sub 0} and the mass thickness ρt was used. • Individual shear bands showed abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa. • Density changes ranging from about −10% to +6% were found for such shear bands. • Mixtures of amorphous/medium range ordered domains were found within the shear bands.

  1. Low density lesion in solid mass on CT: Pathologic change and housfield number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae Il; Lim, Joo Won; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ko, Young Tae; Song, Mi Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Ju Hie

    1994-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic changes and housfield unit of the low density lesion in solid mass on CT. Pathologically proved solid mass was evaluated in regard to the shape and margin of the low density in the mass on the CT scans of 23 patient. The CT number of the low density lesion was correlated with the pathologic changes. Pathologic changes of the low density lesions were; necrosis (n=17), hemorrhage (n=13), cyst (n=4), myxoid degeneration (n=2), hyaline degeneration (n=1), fibrosis (n=1), and mixed cellularity (n=1). In 14 cases, more than 2 pathologic changes were seen. In 11 cases, necrosis was associated with hemorrhage. The CT number ranged from 11.5 to 44.9 Housfield unit(HU) (mean, 25.2 HU). The average CT number was 26.9 HU in hemorrhage and necrosis, 17.2 HU in cystic change, 20.9 HU in myxoid degeneration, 35.7 HU in hyaline de generation, 22.3 HU in fibrosis, and 21.4 HU in mixed cellularity. The hemorrhage and necrosis in 17 cases showed irregular margin, amorphous shape, and showed centrifugal distribution. The cystic change in 4 cases showed well defined margin, round shape, and peripheral location in solid mass. The low density lesions in solid mass on CT represented variable pathologic changes; necrosis, hemorrhage, cyst, myxoid degeneration, hyaline degeneration, fibrosis, and mixed cellularity. Pathologic changes would not be differentiated on the basis of CT number

  2. Picture change error in quasirelativistic electron/spin density, Laplacian and bond critical points

    KAUST Repository

    Bučinský , Luká š; Kucková , Lenka; Malček, Michal; Koží šek, Jozef; Biskupič, Stanislav; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Bü chel, Gabriel E.; Arion, Vladimir B.

    2014-01-01

    The change of picture of the quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions is considered for electron/spin densities, the negative Laplacian of electron density and the appropriate bond critical point characteristics from the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). [OsCl5(Hpz)]- and [RuCl5(NO)]2- transition metal complexes are considered. Both, scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects have been accounted for using the Infinite Order Two Component (IOTC) Hamiltonian. Picture change error (PCE) correction in the electron and spin densities and the Laplacian of electron density are treated analytically. Generally, PCE is found significant only in the core region of the atoms for the electron/spin density as well as Laplacian.©2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Picture change error in quasirelativistic electron/spin density, Laplacian and bond critical points

    KAUST Repository

    Bučinský, Lukáš

    2014-06-01

    The change of picture of the quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions is considered for electron/spin densities, the negative Laplacian of electron density and the appropriate bond critical point characteristics from the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). [OsCl5(Hpz)]- and [RuCl5(NO)]2- transition metal complexes are considered. Both, scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects have been accounted for using the Infinite Order Two Component (IOTC) Hamiltonian. Picture change error (PCE) correction in the electron and spin densities and the Laplacian of electron density are treated analytically. Generally, PCE is found significant only in the core region of the atoms for the electron/spin density as well as Laplacian.©2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  5. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  6. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  7. Microstructure Changes of ZrO{sub 2}/W/Mo Coating Layers on Graphite after Heat Treatment at 2100 ℃

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Gyu Baek; Choe, Kyeong Hwan; Cho, Gue Serb [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Sub [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    A tungsten coating was deposited onto a graphite substrate using the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) technique. In order to increase the adhesion strength between the metallic tungsten(W) and graphite, a molybdenum (Mo) interlayer was pre-deposited onto the graphite surface by utilizing the APS technique. Also, after deposition of a APS-W coating, a zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) was deposited onto the W coating layer. For the APS process, argon and helium were used as the plasma-forming gases, and argon was used as the shield gas to protect the plasma from oxidation. After the APS coating process, heat exposure treatment was performed at 2100 ℃ for 360 h within a sapphire single crystal-growing furnace in order to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. After heat treatment, the ZrO{sub 2}/W/Mo coating layers were bound with the graphite without any peeling off. The microvickers hardness of the APS-W coating layer was increased after heat treatment due to the formation of carbides. Also, carbide phases such as Mo{sub 2}C, WC, ZrC and Mo{sub 3}C{sub 2} were identified by XRD diffraction and EDS analysis, by analyzing the depths below the coating surface. It was considered that the Mo interlayer served as a good buffer layer between the APS-W coating and the graphite after the heat exposure treatment because the lattice structure of the molybdenum carbide was similar to that of the graphite.

  8. Changes in permittivity and density of molecular liquids under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Vladimir D; Kornilov, Dmitry A; Konovalov, Alexander I

    2014-04-03

    We collected and analyzed the density and permittivity of 57 nonpolar and dipolar molecular liquids at different temperatures (143 sets) and pressures (555 sets). No equation was found that could accurately predict the change to polar liquid permittivity by the change of its density in the range of the pressures and temperatures tested. Consequently, the influence of high hydrostatic pressure and temperature on liquid permittivity may be a more complicated process compared to density changes. The pressure and temperature coefficients of permittivity can be drastically larger than the pressure and temperature coefficients of density, indicating that pressure and particularly temperature significantly affect the structure of molecular liquids. These changes have less influence on the density change but can strongly affect the permittivity change. The clear relationship between the tangent and secant moduli of the permittivity curvatures under pressure for various molecular liquids at different temperatures was obtained, from which one can calculate the Tait equation coefficients from the experimental values of the pressure influence on the permittivity at ambient pressure.

  9. Measurements of anomalous neutron transport in bulk graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.; Smith, G.A.; Vogelaar, B.; Howell, C.R.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Tornow, W.

    2003-01-01

    The neutron absorption of bulk granular graphite has been measured in a classical exponential diffusion experiment. Our first measurements of April 2002 implementing both exponential decay and pulsed die-away experiments and using the TUNL pulsed accelerator at Duke University as a neutron source indicated a capture cross section for graphite a striking factor of three lower than the measured value for carbon of 3.4 millibarns. Therefore a new exponential experiment with an improved geometry enabling greater accuracy has been performed giving an apparent cross section for carbon in the form of bulk granular graphite of less than 0.5 millibarns. This result confirms our first result and is also consistent with less than one part per million of boron in our graphite. The bulk density of the graphite is 1.02 compared with the actual particle density of 1.60 indicating a packing fraction of 0.64 or a void fraction of 0.36. We suspect that the apparent suppression of absorption in bulk graphite may be associated with the strong coherent diffraction of neutrons that dominates neutron transport in graphite. Coherent diffraction has never been taken into account in graphite reactor design and no neutron transport code including general use codes such as MCNP incorporate diffraction effects even though diffraction dominates many practical thermal neutron transport problems. (orig.)

  10. Technical development of graphite waste treatment in NUPEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saishu, S.; Inoue, T.

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, Tokai Power Station, which is a Gas Cooled Reactor and uses graphite as moderator, ceased operation at the end of March in 1998 and it is planned to transfer to decommissioning stage. In this decommissioning stage it is very important to be able to treat and dispose the graphite waste in order to carry out the decommissioning safely and economically. NUPEC has been developing the graphite treatment and disposal technology since 1997 and we introduce the outline of the technical development. For the technology on high density packing into disposal container, the high density packing method and the assessment method on nuclide leaching characteristics were developed, and the cementing test for graphite powder by using Tokai spare graphite was performed and the hydrophobic characteristics between graphite and cement was grasped and the accelerator candidature for affinity was selected. From the view point of economical treatment, the incinerating technology was selected as candidature, and the methods for incinerating graphite and treating off gas are developed. The method of collecting C-14 in off gas was selected for reducing the off gas radiation level. The applicability of actual graphite treatment technology was considered from the view point of safety, economics and preparation of technical standard; the technical theme appeared, the developing planning items were established, and the detailed and actual scale tests will be carried out according to the planning. (author)

  11. Measurements of anomalous neutron transport in bulk graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, C.D.; Smith, G.A. [ADNA Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, B. [Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Howell, C.R.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Tornow, W. [Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The neutron absorption of bulk granular graphite has been measured in a classical exponential diffusion experiment. Our first measurements of April 2002 implementing both exponential decay and pulsed die-away experiments and using the TUNL pulsed accelerator at Duke University as a neutron source indicated a capture cross section for graphite a striking factor of three lower than the measured value for carbon of 3.4 millibarns. Therefore a new exponential experiment with an improved geometry enabling greater accuracy has been performed giving an apparent cross section for carbon in the form of bulk granular graphite of less than 0.5 millibarns. This result confirms our first result and is also consistent with less than one part per million of boron in our graphite. The bulk density of the graphite is 1.02 compared with the actual particle density of 1.60 indicating a packing fraction of 0.64 or a void fraction of 0.36. We suspect that the apparent suppression of absorption in bulk graphite may be associated with the strong coherent diffraction of neutrons that dominates neutron transport in graphite. Coherent diffraction has never been taken into account in graphite reactor design and no neutron transport code including general use codes such as MCNP incorporate diffraction effects even though diffraction dominates many practical thermal neutron transport problems. (orig.)

  12. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  13. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  14. Association Between RT-Induced Changes in Lung Tissue Density and Global Lung Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in computed tomography (CT)-defined lung tissue density and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing incidental partial lung RT were prospectively assessed for global (PFTs) and regional (CT and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) lung function before and, serially, after RT. The percent reductions in the PFT and the average changes in lung density were compared (Pearson correlations) in the overall group and subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Comparisons were also made between the CT- and SPECT-based computations using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 343 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 111 patients had a total of 203 concurrent post-RT evaluations of changes in lung density and PFTs available for the analyses, and 81 patients had a total of 141 concurrent post-RT SPECT images. The average increases in lung density were related to the percent reductions in the PFTs, albeit with modest correlation coefficients (range, 0.20-0.43). The analyses also indicated that the association between lung density and PFT changes is essentially equivalent to the corresponding association with SPECT-defined lung perfusion. Conclusion: We found a weak quantitative association between the degree of increase in lung density as defined by CT and the percent reduction in the PFTs.

  15. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  16. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  17. Changes in CT density-measurement of intraorbital wooden foreign bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Etsuko; Hiyama, Fusako; Machi, Setsuko; Hagihara, Masahiro.

    1991-01-01

    We examined in vitro changes in CT density-measurement of intraorbital wooden foreign bodies. Dry wooden sticks were immersed in distilled water, saline, and serum. Computerized tomography scans were taken several times during 22 weeks. Scans were taken in room air and in fatty tissue. The CT density-measurement of the central part of the wooden bodies was calculated. That of the dry wood was about 500 HU; all of the wooden foreign bodies became denser during the 22 weeks, with those immersed in distilled water and saline at about 130 HU, and those immersed in serum at about 150 HU. It was confirmed that wood becomes denser after soaking in aqueous environments. The CT density of wood soaked in water depends on the density of wood fiber, and the CT density of the wood fiber itself. (author)

  18. Mammographic density changes following discontinuation of tamoxifen in premenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Hwa; Cho, Nariya; Kim, Young-Seon; Yi, Ann

    2018-04-06

    To evaluate the changes in mammographic density after tamoxifen discontinuation in premenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancers and the underlying factors METHODS: A total of 213 consecutive premenopausal women with breast cancer who received tamoxifen treatment after curative surgery and underwent three mammograms (baseline, after tamoxifen treatment, after tamoxifen discontinuation) were included. Changes in mammographic density after tamoxifen discontinuation were assessed qualitatively (decrease, no change, or increase) by two readers and measured quantitatively by semi-automated software. The association between % density change and clinicopathological factors was evaluated using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. After tamoxifen discontinuation, a mammographic density increase was observed in 31.9% (68/213, reader 1) to 22.1% (47/213, reader 2) by qualitative assessment, with a mean density increase of 1.8% by quantitative assessment compared to density before tamoxifen discontinuation. In multivariate analysis, younger age (≤ 39 years) and greater % density decline after tamoxifen treatment (≥ 17.0%) were independent factors associated with density change after tamoxifen discontinuation (p density change with a mean density increase of 1.8%, which was associated with younger age and greater density change after tamoxifen treatment. • Increased mammographic density after tamoxifen discontinuation can occur in premenopausal women. • Mean density increase after tamoxifen discontinuation was 1.8%. • Density increase is associated with age and density decrease after tamoxifen.

  19. Measurement of the diffusion length of thermal neutrons inside graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertaud, A.; Beauge, R.; Fauquez, H.; De Laboulay, H.; Mercier, C.; Vautrey, L.

    1948-11-01

    The diffusion length of thermal neutrons inside a given industrial graphite is determined by measuring the neutron density inside a parallelepipedal piling up of graphite bricks (2.10 x 2.10 x 2.442 m). A 3.8 curies (Ra α → Be) source is placed inside the parallelepipedal block of graphite and thin manganese detectors are used. Corrections are added to the unweighted measurements to take into account the effects of the damping of supra-thermal neutrons in the measurement area. These corrections are experimentally deduced from the differential measurements made with a cadmium screen interposed between the source and the first plane of measurement. An error analysis completes the report. The diffusion length obtained is: L = 45.7 cm ± 0.3. The average density of the graphite used is 1.76 and the average apparent density of the piling up is 1.71. (J.S.)

  20. Regional Lung Density Changes After Radiation Therapy for Tumors in and Around Thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the temporal nature of regional lung density changes and to assess whether the dose-dependent nature of these changes is associated with patient- and treatment-associated factors. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 118 patients with interpretable pre- and post-radiation therapy (RT) chest computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated. Changes in regional lung density were related to regional dose to define a dose-response curve (DRC) for RT-induced lung injury using three-dimensional planning tools and image fusion. Multiple post-RT follow-up CT scans were evaluated by fitting linear-quadratic models of density changes on dose with time as the covariate. Various patient- and treatment-related factors were examined as well. Results: There was a dose-dependent increase in regional lung density at nearly all post-RT follow-up intervals. The population volume-weighted changes evolved over the initial 6-month period after RT and reached a plateau thereafter (p < 0.001). On univariate analysis, patient age greater than 65 years (p = 0.003) and/or the use of pre-RT surgery (p < 0.001) were associated with significantly greater changes in CT density at both 6 and 12 months after RT, but the magnitude of this effect was modest. Conclusions: There appears to be a temporal nature for the dose-dependent increases in lung density. Nondosimetric clinical factors tend to have no, or a modest, impact on these changes.

  1. Analysis of electrochemical disintegration process of graphite matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Lifang; Wen Mingfen; Chen Jing

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical method with ammonium nitrate as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from the simulative fuel elements for high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The influences of process parameters, including salt concentration, system temperature and current density, on the disintegration rate of graphite fragments were investigated in the present work. The experimental results showed that the disintegration rate depended slightly on the temperature and salt concentration. The current density strongly affected the disintegration rate of graphite fragments. Furthermore, the content of introduced oxygen in final graphite fragments was independent of the current density and the concentration of electrolyte. Moreover, the structural evolution of graphite was analyzed based on the microstructural parameters determined by X-ray diffraction profile fitting analysis using MAUD (material analysis using diffraction) before and after the disintegration process. It may safely be concluded that the graphite disintegration can be ascribed to the influences of the intercalation of foreign molecules in between crystal planes and the partial oxidation involved. The disintegration process was described deeply composed of intercalate part and further oxidation part of carbon which effected together to lead to the collapse of graphite crystals.

  2. The effect of change in body mass index on volumetric measures of mammographic density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Vicki; Reeves, Katherine W.; Sturgeon, Susan R.; Reich, Nicholas G.; Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Kerlikowske, Karla; Ma, Lin; Shepherd, John; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir Pasha; Malkov, Serghei; Sprague, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding how changes in body mass index (BMI) relate to changes in mammographic density is necessary to evaluate adjustment for BMI gain/loss in studies of change in density and breast cancer risk. Increase in BMI has been associated with a decrease in percent density, but the effect on change in absolute dense area or volume is unclear. Methods We examined the association between change in BMI and change in volumetric breast density among 24,556 women in the San Francisco Mammography Registry from 2007-2013. Height and weight were self-reported at the time of mammography. Breast density was assessed using single x-ray absorptiometry measurements. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between BMI and dense volume (DV), non-dense volume (NDV) and percent dense volume (PDV) were assessed using multivariable linear regression models, adjusted for demographics, risk factors, and reproductive history. Results In cross-sectional analysis, BMI was positively associated with DV (β=2.95 cm3, 95% CI 2.69, 3.21) and inversely associated with PDV (β=-2.03%, 95% CI -2.09, -1.98). In contrast, increasing BMI was longitudinally associated with a decrease in both DV (β=-1.01 cm3, 95% CI -1.59, -0.42) and PDV (β=-1.17%, 95% CI -1.31, -1.04). These findings were consistent for both pre- and postmenopausal women. Conclusion Our findings support an inverse association between change in BMI and change in PDV. The association between increasing BMI and decreasing DV requires confirmation. Impact Longitudinal studies of PDV and breast cancer risk, or those using PDV as an indicator of breast cancer risk, should evaluate adjustment for change in BMI. PMID:26315554

  3. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  4. The effect of compressive stress on the Young's modulus of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, T.; Usui, T.; Ero, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The Young's moduli of unirradiated and high temperature (800 to 1000 0 C) irradiated graphites for HTGR were measured by the ultrasonic method in the direction of applied compressive stress during and after stressing. The Young's moduli of all the tested graphites decreased with increasing compressive stress both during and after stressing. In order to investigate the reason for the decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress, the mercury pore diameter distributions of a part of the unirradiated and irradiated specimens were measured. The change in pore distribution is believed to be associated with structural changes produced by irradiation and compressive stressing. The residual strain, after removing the compressive stress, showed a good correlation with the decrease in Young's modulus caused by the compressive stress. The decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress was considered to be due to the increase in the mobile dislocation density and the growth or formation of cracks. The results suggest, however, that the mechanism giving the larger contribution depends on the brand of graphite, and in anisotropic graphite it depends on the direction of applied stress and the irradiation conditions. (author)

  5. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  6. Changes in seasonal climate outpace compensatory density-dependence in eastern brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Nislow, Keith H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how multiple extrinsic (density-independent) factors and intrinsic (density-dependent) mechanisms influence population dynamics has become increasingly urgent in the face of rapidly changing climates. It is particularly unclear how multiple extrinsic factors with contrasting effects among seasons are related to declines in population numbers and changes in mean body size and whether there is a strong role for density-dependence. The primary goal of this study was to identify the roles of seasonal variation in climate driven environmental direct effects (mean stream flow and temperature) versus density-dependence on population size and mean body size in eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). We use data from a 10-year capture-mark-recapture study of eastern brook trout in four streams in Western Massachusetts, USA to parameterize a discrete-time population projection model. The model integrates matrix modeling techniques used to characterize discrete population structures (age, habitat type and season) with integral projection models (IPMs) that characterize demographic rates as continuous functions of organismal traits (in this case body size). Using both stochastic and deterministic analyses we show that decreases in population size are due to changes in stream flow and temperature and that these changes are larger than what can be compensated for through density-dependent responses. We also show that the declines are due mostly to increasing mean stream temperatures decreasing the survival of the youngest age class. In contrast, increases in mean body size over the same period are the result of indirect changes in density with a lesser direct role of climate-driven environmental change.

  7. Effect of Graphite on the Properties of Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda jabber Braihi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber-graphite composites (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 pphr graphite were prepared on a laboratory two-roll mill. Swelling measurements were used to evaluate the impacts of graphite on the properties of natural rubber. Swelling results showed that the volume fraction of natural rubber in the swollen gel, the interaction parameter, and the cross-link density decreased by increasing graphite loadings, while the average molecular weight of natural rubber between cross-links increased. Vulcanization results showed that only scorch time parameter increased with increasing graphite loadings, while other parameters (Max. torque, Min. torque, cure rate and cure rate index decreased. Both thermal and AC conductivities increased.

  8. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-09-01

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes.

  9. Relativistic density functional theory with picture-change corrected electron density based on infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Takuro; Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Seino, Junji; Nakai, Hiromi

    2017-07-01

    This Letter proposes a density functional treatment based on the two-component relativistic scheme at the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (IODKH) level. The exchange-correlation energy and potential are calculated using the electron density based on the picture-change corrected density operator transformed by the IODKH method. Numerical assessments indicated that the picture-change uncorrected density functional terms generate significant errors, on the order of hartree for heavy atoms. The present scheme was found to reproduce the energetics in the four-component treatment with high accuracy.

  10. Microstructural modelling of nuclear graphite using multi-phase models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berre, C.; Fok, S.L.; Marsden, B.J.; Mummery, P.M.; Marrow, T.J.; Neighbour, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new modelling technique using three-dimensional multi-phase finite element models in which meshes representing the microstructure of thermally oxidised nuclear graphite were generated from X-ray micro-tomography images. The density of the material was related to the image greyscale using Beer-Lambert's law, and multiple phases could thus be defined. The local elastic and non-linear properties of each phase were defined as a function of density and changes in Young's modulus, tensile and compressive strength with thermal oxidation were calculated. Numerical predictions compared well with experimental data and with other numerical results obtained using two-phase models. These models were found to be more representative of the actual microstructure of the scanned material than two-phase models and, possibly because of pore closure occurring during compression, compressive tests were also predicted to be less sensitive to the microstructure geometry than tensile tests

  11. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  12. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  13. Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S.S.; Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A.; Hendricks, M.R.; Nieto-Perez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium as a plasma-facing component has many attractive features in fusion devices. We investigated chemical properties of the lithiated graphite surfaces during deposition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In this study we try to address some of the known issues during lithium deposition, viz., the chemical state of lithium on graphite substrate, oxide layer formation mechanisms, Li passivation effects over time, and chemical change during exposure of the sample to ambient air. X-ray photoelectron studies indicate changes in the chemical composition with various thickness of lithium on graphite during deposition. An oxide layer formation is noticed during lithium deposition even though all the experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum. The metal oxide is immediately transformed into carbonate when the deposited sample is exposed to air.

  14. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments.

  15. North by north-west: climate change and directions of density shifts in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Virkkala, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that climate change shifts species distributions towards poles and mountain tops. However, most studies are based on presence-absence data, and either abundance or the observation effort has rarely been measured. In addition, hardly any studies have investigated the direction of shifts and factors affecting them. Here, we show using count data on a 1000 km south-north gradient in Finland, that between 1970-1989 and 2000-2012, 128 bird species shifted their densities, on average, 37 km towards the north north-east. The species-specific directions of the shifts in density were significantly explained by migration behaviour and habitat type. Although the temperatures have also moved on average towards the north north-east (186 km), the species-specific directions of the shifts in density and temperature did not correlate due to high variation in density shifts. Findings highlight that climate change is unlikely the only driver of the direction of species density shifts, but species-specific characteristics and human land-use practices are also influencing the direction. Furthermore, the alarming results show that former climatic conditions in the north-west corner of Finland have already moved out of the country. This highlights the need for an international approach in research and conservation actions to mitigate the impacts of climate change. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  17. Lung Density Changes After Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Quantitative Analysis in 50 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soernsen de Koste, John van; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vincent, Andrew [Department of Biometrics, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Radiologic lung density changes are observed in more than 50% of patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. We studied the relationship between SBRT dose and posttreatment computed tomography (CT) density changes, a surrogate for lung injury. Methods and Materials: The SBRT fractionation schemes used to treat Stage I lung cancer with RapidArc were three fractions of 18 Gy, five fractions of 11 Gy, or eight fractions of 7.5 Gy, prescribed at the 80% isodose. Follow-up CT scans performed at less than 6 months (n = 50) and between 6 and 9 months (n = 30) after SBRT were reviewed. Posttreatment scans were coregistered with baseline scans using a B-spline deformable registration algorithm. Voxel-Hounsfield unit histograms were created for doses between 0.5 and 50 Gy. Linear mixed effects models were used to assess the effects of SBRT dose on CT density, and the influence of possible confounders was tested. Results: Increased CT density was associated with higher dose, increasing planning target volume size, and increasing time after SBRT (all p < 0.0001). Density increases were apparent in areas receiving >6 Gy, were most prominent in areas receiving >20 Gy, and seemed to plateau above 40 Gy. In regions receiving >36 Gy, the reduction in air-filled fraction of lung after treatment was up to 18%. No increase in CT density was observed in the contralateral lung receiving {>=}3 Gy. Conclusions: A dose-response relationship exists for quantitative CT density changes after SBRT. A threshold of effect is seen at low doses, and a plateau at highest doses.

  18. A high parasite density environment induces transcriptional changes and cell death in Plasmodium falciparum blood stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Evelyn S; Abidi, Sabia Z; Teye, Marian; Leliwa-Sytek, Aleksandra; Rask, Thomas S; Cobbold, Simon A; Tonkin-Hill, Gerry Q; Subramaniam, Krishanthi S; Sexton, Anna E; Creek, Darren J; Daily, Johanna P; Duffy, Michael F; Day, Karen P

    2018-03-01

    Transient regulation of Plasmodium numbers below the density that induces fever has been observed in chronic malaria infections in humans. This species transcending control cannot be explained by immunity alone. Using an in vitro system we have observed density dependent regulation of malaria population size as a mechanism to possibly explain these in vivo observations. Specifically, Plasmodium falciparum blood stages from a high but not low-density environment exhibited unique phenotypic changes during the late trophozoite (LT) and schizont stages of the intraerythrocytic cycle. These included in order of appearance: failure of schizonts to mature and merozoites to replicate, apoptotic-like morphological changes including shrinking, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and blebbing with eventual release of aberrant parasites from infected erythrocytes. This unique death phenotype was triggered in a stage-specific manner by sensing of a high-density culture environment. Conditions of glucose starvation, nutrient depletion, and high lactate could not induce the phenotype. A high-density culture environment induced rapid global changes in the parasite transcriptome including differential expression of genes involved in cell remodeling, clonal antigenic variation, metabolism, and cell death pathways including an apoptosis-associated metacaspase gene. This transcriptional profile was also characterized by concomitant expression of asexual and sexual stage-specific genes. The data show strong evidence to support our hypothesis that density sensing exists in P. falciparum. They indicate that an apoptotic-like mechanism may play a role in P. falciparum density regulation, which, as in yeast, has features quite distinguishable from mammalian apoptosis. Gene expression data are available in the GEO databases under the accession number GSE91188. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Characteristics of first loaded IG-110 graphite in HTTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    IG-110 graphite is a fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade graphite with excellent resistivity on both irradiation and corrosion and with high strength. The IG-110 graphite is used for the graphite components of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) such as fuel and control rod guide blocks and support posts. In order to design and fabricate the graphite components in the HTTR, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (the Japan Atomic Energy Agency at present) had established the graphite structural design code and design data on the basis of former research results. After the design code establishment, the IG-110 graphite components were fabricated and loaded in the HTTR core. This report summarized the characteristics of the first loaded IG-110 graphite as basic data for surveillance test, measuring material characteristics changed by neutron irradiation and oxidation. By comparing the design data, it was shown that the first loaded IG-110 graphite had excellent strength properties and enough safety margins to the stress limits in the design code. (author)

  20. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs.

  2. Evaluation of changes in vertebral body density following administration of contrast medium during routine CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicek, M.; Bruna, J.; Stenhova, H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of depicting changes in the density of spongiosis of the vertebral body in normal patients after intravenous administration of a bolus of 40 ml 60% Diazetrizoate in the course of a routine CT examination. The average increase in density immediately after the administration of the contrast medium is 12 H (8%), in the course of 10 minutes is reduced to 5 H (4%) against the initial values in native examination. These average changes are statistically significant, in individual patients, however, the increase in density following the administration of a contrast medium fluctuates considerably (from 0.7% to 10%). Only systematic comparison with various pathological conditions will make it possible to assess the possibilities of the evaluation of the structure of the vertebral body in routine CT with the administration of a contrast medium into the blood flow. (author)

  3. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  4. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  5. Role of baseline nodule density and changes in density and nodule features in the discrimination between benign and malignant solid indeterminate pulmonary nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, D.M.; van Klaveren, R.J.; de Bock, G.H.; Leusveld, A.L.M.; Dorrius, M.D.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, Y.; de Koning, H.J.; Scholten, E.T.; Verschakelen, J.; Prokop, M.; Oudkerk, M.

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate whether baseline nodule density or changes in density or nodule features could be used to discriminate between benign and malignant solid indeterminate nodules. Materials and methods: Solid indeterminate nodules between 50 and 500 mm(3) (4.6-9.8 mm) were assessed

  6. Changes in osteocyte density correspond with changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activity in an osteoporotic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinkalam, M R; Mulaibrahimovic, A; Atkins, G J; Moore, R J

    2012-04-01

    Histomorphometric assessment of trabecular bone in osteoporotic sheep showed that bone volume, osteoid surface area, bone formation rate, and osteocyte density were reduced. In contrast, eroded surface area and empty lacunae density were increased. Changes in osteocyte density correlated with changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Osteocytes contribute to the regulation of the activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts that together control bone mass. Osteocytes therefore likely play a role in the loss of bone mass associated with osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between osteocyte lacunar density and other bone histomorphometric parameters in the iliac crest (IC) and lumbar spine (LS) of osteoporotic sheep. Osteoporosis was induced in ten mature ewes by an established protocol involving a combination of ovariectomy, dexamethasone injection, and low calcium diet for 6 months. Five ewes were used as controls. Post-mortem IC and LS biopsies were collected and processed for further histomorphometric assessment. Bone volume, osteoid surface, and bone formation rate in the IC and LS of osteoporotic sheep were reduced compared to those of the controls. In contrast, eroded surface area was increased in osteoporotic sheep. In the osteoporotic group, osteocyte density was reduced in the LS region and to a greater extent in the IC region. The empty osteocyte lacunae were increased 1.7-fold in LS and 2.1-fold in IC in the osteoporotic group. The osteocyte density correlated positively with markers of osteoblast activity and negatively with those of osteoclast activity. Depletion of osteocytes and an increase in the empty lacunae could be important factors contributing to bone loss in this model since they may adversely affect intercellular communication between osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The regional differences in histology suggest that there may be different pathological mechanisms operating at different anatomical sites.

  7. Void fraction prediction in two-phase flows independent of the liquid phase density changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazemi, E.; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Roshani, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray densitometry is a frequently used non-invasive method to determine void fraction in two-phase gas liquid pipe flows. Performance of flow meters using gamma-ray attenuation depends strongly on the fluid properties. Variations of the fluid properties such as density in situations where temperature and pressure fluctuate would cause significant errors in determination of the void fraction in two-phase flows. A conventional solution overcoming such an obstacle is periodical recalibration which is a difficult task. This paper presents a method based on dual modality densitometry using Artificial Neural Network (ANN), which offers the advantage of measuring the void fraction independent of the liquid phase changes. An experimental setup was implemented to generate the required input data for training the network. ANNs were trained on the registered counts of the transmission and scattering detectors in different liquid phase densities and void fractions. Void fractions were predicted by ANNs with mean relative error of less than 0.45% in density variations range of 0.735 up to 0.98 gcm −3 . Applying this method would improve the performance of two-phase flow meters and eliminates the necessity of periodical recalibration. - Highlights: • Void fraction was predicted independent of density changes. • Recorded counts of detectors/void fraction were used as inputs/output of ANN. • ANN eliminated necessity of recalibration in changeable density of two-phase flows

  8. Variation of the properties of siliconized graphite during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Y.S.; Chugunova, T.K.; Pikulik, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluate the radiation-induced property changes in siliconized graphite of the industrial grades SG-P and SG-M. The authors simultaneously tested the reference (control) specimens of graphite that are used as the base for obtaining the SG-M siliconized graphite by impregnating with silicon. The suggested scheme (model) atributes the dimensional changes of the siliconized graphite specimens to the effect of the quantitative ratio of the carbide phase and carbon under different conditions of irradiation. If silicon is insufficient for the formation of a dense skeleton, graphite plays a devisive role, and it may be assumed that at an irradiation temperature greater than 600 K, the material shrinks. The presence of isolated carbide inclusions also affects the physicomechanical properties (including the anitfriction properties)

  9. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  10. A pdf-Free Change Detection Test Based on Density Difference Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Li; Alippi, Cesare; Zhao, Dongbin

    2018-02-01

    The ability to detect online changes in stationarity or time variance in a data stream is a hot research topic with striking implications. In this paper, we propose a novel probability density function-free change detection test, which is based on the least squares density-difference estimation method and operates online on multidimensional inputs. The test does not require any assumption about the underlying data distribution, and is able to operate immediately after having been configured by adopting a reservoir sampling mechanism. Thresholds requested to detect a change are automatically derived once a false positive rate is set by the application designer. Comprehensive experiments validate the effectiveness in detection of the proposed method both in terms of detection promptness and accuracy.

  11. Changes in late-winter snowpack depth, water equivalent, and density in Maine, 1926-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2006-03-01

    Twenty-three snow-course sites in and near Maine, USA, with records spanning at least 50 years through to 2004 were tested for changes over time in snowpack depth, water equivalent, and density in March and April. Of the 23 sites, 18 had a significant decrease (Mann-Kendall test, p 1950s and 1960s, and densities peaked in the most recent decade. Previous studies in western North America also found a water-equivalent peak in the third quarter of the 20th century. Published in 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Received: 14 June 2005; Accepted: 7 October 2005

  12. Changes of the electron density distribution during MHD activity in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2000-09-01

    Density oscillations induced by MHD activities were observed in NBI heated plasmas on CHS by using an HCN laser interferometer. The accompanied changes of the density profiles were also observed. The oscillations are composition of m=0 sawteeth like crash and m=2 sinusoidal oscillations as a post courser of the crash. Possible models of the oscillation structure are examined in order to explain experimental data of the interferometer. Rotating plasma core, which is hollow profile and keeps constant elongation of the flux surface can explain amplitude and phase distribution of the sinusoidal oscillation. (author)

  13. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackstone, R [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Nuclear Research Center

    1977-03-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted.

  14. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behavior compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted

  15. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted. (Auth.)

  16. Prey change behaviour with predation threat, but demographic effects vary with prey density: experiments with grasshoppers and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belovsky, Gary E; Laws, Angela Nardoni; Slade, Jennifer B

    2011-04-01

    Increasingly, ecologists emphasize that prey frequently change behaviour in the presence of predators and these behavioural changes can reduce prey survival and reproduction as much or more than predation itself. However, the effects of behavioural changes on survival and reproduction may vary with prey density due to intraspecific competition. In field experiments, we varied grasshopper density and threat of avian predation and measured grasshopper behaviour, survival and reproduction. Grasshopper behaviour changed with the threat of predation and these behavioural changes were invariant with grasshopper density. Behavioural changes with the threat of predation decreased per capita reproduction over all grasshopper densities; whereas the behavioural changes increased survival at low grasshopper densities and then decreased survival at high densities. At low grasshopper densities, the total reproductive output of the grasshopper population remained unchanged with predation threat, but declined at higher densities. The effects of behavioural changes with predation threat varied with grasshopper density because of a trade-off between survival and reproduction as intraspecific competition increased with density. Therefore, resource availability may need to be considered when assessing how prey behavioural changes with predation threat affect population and food web dynamics. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2012-05-01

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  18. Design of the Graphite Reflectors in Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Haeng; Cho, Yeong Garp; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Jong In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Graphite is often used as one of reflector materials for research reactors because of its low neutron absorption cross-section, good moderating properties, and relatively low and stable price. In addition, graphite has excellent properties at high temperatures, so it is widely used as a core material in high temperature reactors. However, its material characteristics such as strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, dimensional change, and thermal conductivity sensitively depend on neutron fluence, temperature, and its manufacturing process. In addition, the Wigner energy and the treatment of the graphite waste such as C-14 should also be considered. For the design of the graphite reflectors, it is therefore essential to understand the material characteristics of chosen graphite materials at given conditions. Especially, the dimensional changes and the thermal conductivity are very important factors to design the nuclear components using graphite as a nonstructural material. Hence, in this study, the material characteristics of graphite are investigated via some experiments in literature. Improving design methods for graphite reflectors in research reactors are then suggested to minimize the problems, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are also discussed

  19. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  20. Thermal shock test of TiC and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, H.; Okamura, J.; Son, P.; Miyake, M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal shock tests were performed by pulse electron beam heating on chemically vapor deposited coatings of TiC on Poco graphite, bulk TiC, and several kinds of isotropic graphite. The specimens were heated at various power densities (10-45 MW/m 2 ) for various pulse durations (1-2 s) to examine the dependence of thermal failures on heating conditions. The TiC coating on graphite suffered cracking, surface melting and evaporation by the thermal pulse. The surface melting limit, defined as F τ 1/2 , where F is the minimum power density that causes surface melting for a specified pulse duration τ, was approximately 48 MWs 1/2 /m 2 for the TiC coating. The combined-Carbon/Titanium ratio of the coating after electron beam heating decreased with increasing power density and pulse duration. The bulk TiC specimens were so brittle that they fractured at heat load conditions where the coating showed no damage. The graphite specimens showed sublimation as a principal damage mechanism by the thermal pulse, and the sublimation weight loss decreased with increasing the thermal conductivity of the specimen. It was confirmed that the TiC coating on graphite had favorable resistance to thermal shock as compared to the bulk TiC and that graphite with high thermal conductivity is promising material as a high heat flux component. (orig.)

  1. Glial cell morphological and density changes through the lifespan of rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Katelyn N; Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; MacLean, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    How aging impacts the central nervous system (CNS) is an area of intense interest. Glial morphology is known to affect neuronal and immune function as well as metabolic and homeostatic balance. Activation of glia, both astrocytes and microglia, occurs at several stages during development and aging. The present study analyzed changes in glial morphology and density through the entire lifespan of rhesus macaques, which are physiologically and anatomically similar to humans. We observed apparent increases in gray matter astrocytic process length and process complexity as rhesus macaques matured from juveniles through adulthood. These changes were not attributed to cell enlargement because they were not accompanied by proportional changes in soma or process volume. There was a decrease in white matter microglial process length as rhesus macaques aged. Aging was shown to have a significant effect on gray matter microglial density, with a significant increase in aged macaques compared with adults. Overall, we observed significant changes in glial morphology as macaques age indicative of astrocytic activation with subsequent increase in microglial density in aged macaques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cervical vertebral bone mineral density changes in adolescents during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Bethany; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Moon, Eun-Sang; Johnson, Elizabeth; Fields, Henry W; Palomo, J Martin; Johnston, William M

    2014-08-01

    The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages have been used to estimate facial growth status. In this study, we examined whether cone-beam computed tomography images can be used to detect changes of CVM-related parameters and bone mineral density distribution in adolescents during orthodontic treatment. Eighty-two cone-beam computed tomography images were obtained from 41 patients before (14.47 ± 1.42 years) and after (16.15 ± 1.38 years) orthodontic treatment. Two cervical vertebral bodies (C2 and C3) were digitally isolated from each image, and their volumes, means, and standard deviations of gray-level histograms were measured. The CVM stages and mandibular lengths were also estimated after converting the cone-beam computed tomography images. Significant changes for the examined variables were detected during the observation period (P ≤0.018) except for C3 vertebral body volume (P = 0.210). The changes of CVM stage had significant positive correlations with those of vertebral body volume (P ≤0.021). The change of the standard deviation of bone mineral density (variability) showed significant correlations with those of vertebral body volume and mandibular length for C2 (P ≤0.029). The means and variability of the gray levels account for bone mineral density and active remodeling, respectively. Our results indicate that bone mineral density distribution and the volume of the cervical vertebral body changed because of active bone remodeling during maturation. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of gamma irradiation on density and thermal expansion changes of uniaxial oriented LLDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacarevic-Popovic, Z.; Kostoski, D.; Novakovic, Lj.

    1998-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. It is well known that gamma irradiation induces cross-linking in the amorphous phase of isotropic polyethylene, or chain scission in highly oriented fibers and films. Thermomechanical behavior and values of density are the reflection of the changes induced by gamma irradiation. Namely, scission of macromolecules, in general, increases thermal expansion coefficient and decreases density and vice versa. On the other hand, as it is well known, the thermal expansion behavior of oriented polymers shows marked anisotropy. It was found that many highly oriented polymers show a negative coefficient of thermal expansion in the draw direction and a positive coefficient in the transverse direction. It has been suggested that, apart from any intrinsic crystalline contribution, a significant part of the negative thermal expansion coefficients obtained for highly oriented polymers arises from the effect of entropy internal stresses in the amorphous regions. From our previous work, the thermal coefficients in draw direction of irradiated samples rise in the glass transition temperature range and it was related to the effects of cross-linking in the amorphous phase of LDPE. In our present work we observed initial decrease in density with absorbed dose, up to 35 kGy, and subsequent increase up to a dose of 500 kGy. The observed increase in thermal expansion coefficient followed the changes in density and is related to the parallel processes of chain scission and net cross-linking in the amorphous phase of LLDPE, induced by gamma irradiation

  4. Milling Behavior of Matrix Graphite Powders with Different Binder Materials in HTGR Fuel Element Fabrication: I. Variation in Particle Size Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Cho, Moon Sung

    2011-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a matrix graphite powder properly prepared and pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact finally heat-treated at about 1900 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, overcoating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, it is important to develop a technology to prepare the matrix graphite powder (MGP) with proper characteristics, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the milling behavior of matrix graphite powder mixture with different binder materials and their contents was investigated by analyzing the change in particle size distribution with different milling time

  5. Assessment of the radiological inventory of EDF's graphite waste through an assimilation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, B.

    2014-01-01

    The definitive disposal of graphite from the decommissioned UNGG reactors (Chinon A3, Saint-Laurent A1, Saint-Laurent A2 and Bugey 1) has required a radiological inventory of the irradiated graphite. This study focuses on Cl 36 that is produced by neutron absorption on Cl 35 that was present initially in graphite as an impurity (about 80 mg/t of Cl initially in Bugey 1 graphite)). It appears that the changes of Cl 36 concentration along the height of a stack of graphite do neither fit the changes in the neutron flux nor the changes in the graphite temperature. This fact is explained by the high level of purity of the graphite and the nugget effect. Challenged by the absence of spatial correlation of the Cl 36 concentration, an EDF's team has developed an assimilation method based on comparisons between calculations and measurements in order to get a conservative inventory. (A.C.)

  6. Development of graphite foam infiltrated with MgCl 2 for a latent heat based thermal energy storage (LHTES) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep; Kim, Taeil; Zhao, Weihuan; Yu, Wenhua; France, David M.

    2016-08-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) systems that are compatible with high temperature power cycles for concentrating solar power (CSP) require high temperature media for transporting and storing thermal energy. To that end, TES systems have been proposed based on the latent heat of fusion of the phase change materials (PCMs). However, PCMs have relatively low thermal conductivities. In this paper, use of high-thermal-conductivity graphite foam infiltrated with a PCM (MgCl2) has been investigated as a potential TES system. Graphite foams with two porosities were infiltrated with MgCl2. The infiltrated composites were evaluated for density, heat of fusion, melting/freezing temperatures, and thermal diffusivities. Estimated thermal conductivities of MgCl2/graphite foam composites were significantly higher than those of MgCl2 alone over the measured temperature range. Furthermore, heat of fusion, melting/freezing temperatures, and densities showed comparable values to those of pure MgCl2. Results of this study indicate that MgCl2/graphite foam composites show promise as storage media for a latent heat thermal energy storage system for CSP applications.

  7. Precision of bone densitometry measurements: When is change true change and does it vary across bone density values?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.C.H.; Griffiths, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    The precision error of the bone densitometer is used to interpret significant change in bone mineral density (BMD) in serial studies. The precision error can be expressed as standard deviation (SD) or coefficient of variation (CV). The aims of this study are to determine the precision error over a range of BMD values and to demonstrate the application of the precision error in clinical practice. A bone phantom was used consisting of a perspex block with eight compartments containing varying amounts of hydroxyapatite powder to simulate a range of bone densities. The block was scanned 21 times and manual regions placed over each compartment to measure the BMD in each compartment. There were no significant differences in the variances or SD for all eight compartments, that is, over the range of BMD normally encountered in clinical practice. However, the calculated CV show a progressive fall in values as the BMD rises. Therefore, the SD should be used to calculate significant BMD change. In a practise with quality control procedures in place to detect calibration drift and with appropriately trained personnel, a change of approximately 0.05 g/cm 2 is generally regarded as being a significant change at a 95% confidence level. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Late regional density changes of the lung after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagane, Randi; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie Dorothea; Lokkevik, Erik; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate density changes in lung tissue, 3-4 years after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer, based on dose dependence and regional differences. Material and methods: Sixty-one breast cancer patients, who had received computed tomography (CT) based postoperative radiotherapy, were included. CT scans were performed 35-51 months after start of radiotherapy. Dose information and CT scans from before and after radiotherapy were geometrically aligned in order to analyse changes in air-filled fraction (derived from CT density) as a function of dose for different regions of the lung. Results: Dose-dependent reduction of the air-filled fraction was shown to vary between the different regions of the lung. For lung tissue receiving about 50 Gy, the largest reduction in air-filled fraction was found in the cranial part of the lung. An increased air-filled fraction was observed for lung tissue irradiated to doses below 20 Gy, indicating compensatory response. Conclusions: The treatment-induced change in whole-lung density is a weighted response, involving the different regions, the irradiated volumes, and dose levels to these volumes. Simplistic models may therefore not be appropriate for describing the whole-lung dose-volume-response relationship following inhomogeneous irradiation

  9. New insights into canted spiro carbon interstitial in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The self-interstitial carbon is the key to radiation damage in graphite moderator nuclear reactor, so an understanding of its behavior is essential for plant safety and maximized reactor lifetime. The density functional theory is applied on four different graphite unit cells, starting from of 64 carbon atoms up to 256 carbon atoms, using AIMPRO code to obtain the energetic, athermal and mechanical properties of carbon interstitial in graphite. This study presents first principles calculations of the energy of formation that prove its high barrier to athermal diffusion (1.1 eV) and the consequent large critical shear stress (39 eV-50 eV) necessary to shear graphite planes in its presence. Also, for the first time, the gamma surface of graphite in two dimensions is calculated and found to yield the critical shear stress for perfect graphite. Finally, in contrast to the extensive literature describing the interstitial of carbon in graphite as spiro interstitial, in this work the ground state of interstitial carbon is found to be canted spiro interstitial.

  10. Liver lipase and high-density lipoprotein. Lipoprotein changes after incubation of human serum with rat liver lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, P H; Scheek, L M; Jansen, H

    1983-05-16

    Human sera were incubated with rat liver lipase after inactivation of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, and the changes in serum lipoprotein composition were measured. In the presence of liver lipase serum triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine were hydrolyzed. The main changes in the concentrations of these lipids were found in the high-density lipoprotein fraction. Subfractionation of high-density lipoprotein by rate-zonal ultracentrifugation showed a prominent decrease in all constituents of high-density lipoprotein2, a smaller decrease in the 'light' high-density lipoprotein3 and an increase in the 'heavy' high-density lipoprotein3. These data support a concept in which liver lipase is involved in high-density lipoprotein2 phospholipid and triacylglycerol catabolism and suggest that as a result of this action high-density lipoprotein2 is converted into high-density lipoprotein3.

  11. Changes in plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in hypo- and hyperthyroid patients are related to changes in free thyroxine, not to polymorphisms in LDL receptor or cholesterol ester transfer protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, M. J.; Anghelescu, N.; Endert, E.; Bakker, O.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2000-01-01

    Thyroid function disorders lead to changes in lipoprotein metabolism. Both plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increase in hypothyroidism and decrease in hyperthyroidism. Changes in LDL-C relate to altered clearance of LDL particles

  12. Ecological change points: The strength of density dependence and the loss of history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponciano, José M; Taper, Mark L; Dennis, Brian

    2018-05-01

    Change points in the dynamics of animal abundances have extensively been recorded in historical time series records. Little attention has been paid to the theoretical dynamic consequences of such change-points. Here we propose a change-point model of stochastic population dynamics. This investigation embodies a shift of attention from the problem of detecting when a change will occur, to another non-trivial puzzle: using ecological theory to understand and predict the post-breakpoint behavior of the population dynamics. The proposed model and the explicit expressions derived here predict and quantify how density dependence modulates the influence of the pre-breakpoint parameters into the post-breakpoint dynamics. Time series transitioning from one stationary distribution to another contain information about where the process was before the change-point, where is it heading and how long it will take to transition, and here this information is explicitly stated. Importantly, our results provide a direct connection of the strength of density dependence with theoretical properties of dynamic systems, such as the concept of resilience. Finally, we illustrate how to harness such information through maximum likelihood estimation for state-space models, and test the model robustness to widely different forms of compensatory dynamics. The model can be used to estimate important quantities in the theory and practice of population recovery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Because of its high strength and stability at very high temperature, as well as very low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, graphite has been widely used as a structural material in Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR). Recently, many countries are developing the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) because of the potentials of hydrogen production, as well as its safety and viable economics. In VHTR, helium gas serves as the primary coolant. Graphite will be used as a reflector, moderator and core structural materials. The life time of graphite is determined from dimensional changes due to neutron irradiation, which closely relates to the changes of crystal structure. The changes of both lattice parameter and crystallite size can be easily measured by X-ray diffraction method. However, due to high cost and long time of neutron irradiation test, ion irradiation test is being performed instead in KAERI. Therefore, it is essential to develop the technique for measurement of ion irradiation damage of nuclear graphite. Fracture toughness of nuclear grade graphite is one of the key properties in the design and development of VHTR. It is important not only to evaluate the various properties of candidate graphite but also to assess the integrity of nuclear grade graphite during operation. Although fracture toughness tests on graphite have been performed in many laboratories, there have been wide variations in values of the calculated fracture toughness, due to the differences in the geometry of specimens and test conditions. Hence, standard test method for nuclear graphite is required to obtain the reliable fracture toughness values. Crack growth behavior of nuclear grade graphite shows rising R-curve which means the increase in crack growth resistance as the crack length increases. Crack bridging and microcracking have been proposed to be the dominant mechanisms of rising R-curve behavior. In this paper, the technique to measure the changes of crystallite size and

  14. Paraffin/expanded graphite phase change composites with enhanced thermal conductivity prepared by implanted β-SiC nanowires with chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaoyu; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Silin; Zhang, Weiyi; Liu, Yan'gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Fang, Minghao; Min, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Expanded graphite/β-SiC nanowires composites (ESNC) were prepared through chemical vapor deposition, and paraffin/expanded graphite/β-SiC nanowires composites (PESNC) were made through vacuum impregnation to overcome liquid leakage during phase transition and enhance the thermal conductivity of paraffin. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed no chemical interactions between the paraffin and ESNC. Differential scanning calorimetry estimated the temperature and latent heat of PESNC during melting to 45.73 °C and 124.31 J g-1, respectively. The respective values of these quantities during freezing were recorded as 48.93 °C and 124.14 J g-1. The thermal conductivity of PESNC was estimated to 0.75 W mK-1, which was 3.26-folds that of pure paraffin (0.23 W mK-1). PESNC perfectly maintained its phase transition after 200 melting-freezing cycles. The resulting ideal thermal conductivity, good chemical stability, thermal properties and thermal reliability of PESNC are promising for use in energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems.

  15. Change in alcohol outlet density and alcohol-related harm to population health (CHALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fone David

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excess alcohol consumption has serious adverse effects on health and violence-related harm. In the UK around 37% of men and 29% of women drink to excess and 20% and 13% report binge drinking. The potential impact on population health from a reduction in consumption is considerable. One proposed method to reduce consumption is to reduce availability through controls on alcohol outlet density. In this study we investigate the impact of a change in the density of alcohol outlets on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms to health in the community. Methods/Design A natural experiment of the effect of change in outlet density between 2005–09, in Wales, UK; population 2.4 million aged 16 years and over. Data on outlets are held by the 22 local authorities in Wales under The Licensing Act 2003. The study outcomes are change in (1 alcohol consumption using data from annual Welsh Health Surveys, (2 alcohol-related hospital admissions using the Patient Episode Database for Wales, (3 Accident & Emergency department attendances between midnight–6am, and (4 alcohol-related violent crime against the person, using Police data. The data will be anonymously record-linked within the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage Databank at individual and 2001 Census Lower Super Output Area levels. New methods of network analysis will be used to estimate outlet density. Longitudinal statistical analysis will use (1 multilevel ordinal models of consumption and logistic models of admissions and Accident & Emergency attendance as a function of change in individual outlet exposure, adjusting for confounding variables, and (2 spatial models of the change in counts/rates of each outcome measure and outlet density. We will assess the impact on health inequalities and will correct for population migration. Discussion This inter-disciplinary study requires expertise in epidemiology and public health, health informatics, medical statistics

  16. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  17. Dimensional Behavior of Matrix Graphite Compacts during Heat Treatments for HTGR Fuel Element Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung

    2015-01-01

    The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K. This carbonization step is followed by the final high temperature heat treatment where the carbonized compacts are heat treated at 2073-2173 K in vacuum for a relatively short time (about 2 hrs). In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions, which has a strong influence on the further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the dimensional changes of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed, keeping other process parameters constant, such as the binder content, carbonization time, temperature and atmosphere (two hours ant 1073K and N2 atmosphere). In this work, the dimensional variations of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed

  18. Changes in buoyant density relationships of two cell types of Coxiella burneti phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, R.F.; Briggs, G.P.; Gangemi, J.D.; Pedersen, C.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Coxiella burneti phase I, purified from a formalin-inactivated yolk-sac vaccine, was separated into two bands of morphologically distinct cell types when subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation. Recycling of the less dense, rod-shaped cells in unbuffered sucrose gradients (pH 5.5 to 6.0) resulted in the formation of bands having the location and appearance of the original two bands. Recycling of the denser band of larger ovoid-shaped cells yielded a single band, suggesting that the larger cell type arose from the smaller cell. In contrast to vaccine-derived rickettsiae, live, cell culture-propagated phase I organisms formed a single band in unbuffered sucrose gradients, at the same density as the upper band of the vaccine preparation. Centrifugation of cell culture-derived rickettsiae for 26 to 48 h in sucrose gradients of pH 5.5 resulted in the formation of a second band, at the same density as the lower band of the vaccine preparation. This did not occur in gradients of pH 7.0. Treatment of cell culture-propagated rickettsiae with formalin or germicidal ultraviolet radiation induced a total shift of the less dense cell population to a zone of higher density when centrifuged isopycnically in CsCl gradients. This density change did not occur in sucrose gradients, suggesting a difference in the effect of these treatments on the permeability of the cell membrane to sucrose and CsCl

  19. Relationship of changing social atmosphere, lifestyle and bone mineral density in college students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ja; Ko, Yo Han; Kim, Chung Kyung; Kim, Hee Sol; Park, Da Jeong; Yoon, Hyeo Min; Jeong, Yu Jin [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Dongnam Health college, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The decrease of bone mineral density gives rise to the outbreak of osteopenia and makes the possibility of a bone fracture. It makes health problems in society. It's very important to prevent osteopenia in advance. Also it's critical to prevent and take care of it in adolescent because it's the most developing period comparing to middle ages because that bone mineral density decreases. There are genetic, physical and environmental factors that affect bone mineral density. Recently, a lifestyle and eating habits are also changing as the society atmosphere is gradually doing. This study have shown that 134 women and 75 men was chosen and responded to the survey of measuring bone mineral density and investigating a lifestyle. The measure of bone mineral density is to use Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA) and check femoral neck and lumbar spine. Also questionaries was required to pre-made survey about their lifestyles. Analysis of data was done with SPSS program. Multiple regression analysis was used for the relation of bone mineral density, the heigths and BMI. The sample of Groups are checked for drinking, smoking or excercising about differences by t-test. The results of the experiments were; first, there is statistically significant differences in the comparisons between BMD and BMD. But there isn't any special correlation between drinking, smoking and BMD. Secondly, bone mineral density becomes low related to an intake of caffeine. Particularly, this is statically significant on women. Also there is statically significant correlation between femoral neck and quantity of motion for both men and women. Third, there is significant relation between eating habits and bone mineral density on women's lumbar spine. However, there is no significant relation between men's lumbar spine and women's one. Therefore, to prevent osteopenia, it's good to abstain from intaking caffeine within an hour after a meal. In addition, it

  20. Relationship of changing social atmosphere, lifestyle and bone mineral density in college students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ja; Ko, Yo Han; Kim, Chung Kyung; Kim, Hee Sol; Park, Da Jeong; Yoon, Hyeo Min; Jeong, Yu Jin

    2013-01-01

    The decrease of bone mineral density gives rise to the outbreak of osteopenia and makes the possibility of a bone fracture. It makes health problems in society. It's very important to prevent osteopenia in advance. Also it's critical to prevent and take care of it in adolescent because it's the most developing period comparing to middle ages because that bone mineral density decreases. There are genetic, physical and environmental factors that affect bone mineral density. Recently, a lifestyle and eating habits are also changing as the society atmosphere is gradually doing. This study have shown that 134 women and 75 men was chosen and responded to the survey of measuring bone mineral density and investigating a lifestyle. The measure of bone mineral density is to use Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA) and check femoral neck and lumbar spine. Also questionaries was required to pre-made survey about their lifestyles. Analysis of data was done with SPSS program. Multiple regression analysis was used for the relation of bone mineral density, the heigths and BMI. The sample of Groups are checked for drinking, smoking or excercising about differences by t-test. The results of the experiments were; first, there is statistically significant differences in the comparisons between BMD and BMD. But there isn't any special correlation between drinking, smoking and BMD. Secondly, bone mineral density becomes low related to an intake of caffeine. Particularly, this is statically significant on women. Also there is statically significant correlation between femoral neck and quantity of motion for both men and women. Third, there is significant relation between eating habits and bone mineral density on women's lumbar spine. However, there is no significant relation between men's lumbar spine and women's one. Therefore, to prevent osteopenia, it's good to abstain from intaking caffeine within an hour after a meal. In addition, it

  1. Effects of graphite on rheological and conventional properties of bituminous binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Erkuş

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphite used for developing the rheological and conventional properties of bitumen were investigated using various bituminous binder tests. Penetration, softening point, rotational viscosity (RV, dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR tests were applied to bituminous binders modified with four different proportions of graphite by bitumen weight. The penetration values declined while softening point values increased with rising graphite content. While graphite induced 8 °C increases in mixing-compacting temperature by increasing the viscosity values, it also increased the rutting parameter. According to the BBR test, the deformation and stiffness values changed significantly with increasing graphite content, but the m-values did not change significantly. These results showed that graphite generally used for improving the thermal properties can improve to high temperature performance of mixtures. Keywords: Graphite, Bitumen, Conventional properties, Rheological properties

  2. Performance enhancement of spherical natural graphite by phenol resin in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.-S.; Wang, Y.-H.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The capacity of natural graphite in the lithium ion battery anode decays seriously. The phenol resin is used as a reaction material to modify the electrochemical performance of spherical graphite as the anode material in lithium ion batteries. Measuring the reversible capacity indicates change in the surface structure of spherical graphite. A dense layer of methyl groups was thus formed. Some structural imperfections are removed and the stability of the graphite structure is increased. Clearly, reducing the irreversible capacity is beneficial in controlling the uniformity of the spherical graphite surface structure

  3. Density-dependent changes in effective area occupied for sea-bottom-associated marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorson, James T.; Rindorf, Anna; Gao, Jin

    2016-01-01

    among taxa and regions. The average relationship is weak but significant (0.6% increase in area for a 10% increase in abundance), whereas only a small proportion of species–region combinations show a negative relationship (i.e. shrinking area when abundance increases). Approximately one...... for every 10% abundance increase) followed by Pleuronectiformes and Scorpaeniformes, and the Eastern Bering Sea shows a strong relationship between abundance and area occupied relative to other regions. We conclude that the BM explains a small but important portion of spatial dynamics for sea......The spatial distribution of marine fishes can change for many reasons, including density-dependent distributional shifts. Previous studies show mixed support for either the proportional-density model (PDM; no relationship between abundance and area occupied, supported by ideal-free distribution...

  4. High-density near-field optical disc recording using phase change media and polycarbonate substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masataka; Saito, Kimihiro; Ishimoto, Tsutomu; Kondo, Takao; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi; Furuki, Motohiro; Takeda, Minoru; Akiyama, Yuji; Shimouma, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masanobu

    2004-09-01

    We developed a high density near field optical recording disc system with a solid immersion lens and two laser sources. In order to realize the near field optical recording, we used a phase change recording media and a molded polycarbonate substrate. The near field optical pick-up consists of a solid immersion lens with numerical aperture of 1.84. The clear eye pattern of 90.2 GB capacity (160nm track pitch and 62 nm per bit) was observed. The jitter using a limit equalizer was 10.0 % without cross-talk. The bit error rate using an adaptive PRML with 8 taps was 3.7e-6 without cross-talk. We confirmed that the near field optical disc system is a promising technology for a next generation high density optical disc system.

  5. Synchronous changes in coral chromatophore tissue density and skeletal banding as an adaptive response to environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisana, R. N.; Miller, C. A.; Sivaguru, M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    Corals are a key reservoir of biodiversity in coastal, shallow water tropical marine environments, and density banding in their aragonite skeletons is used as a sensitive record of paleoclimate. Therefore, the cellular response of corals to environmental change and its expression in skeletal structure is of significant importance. Chromatophores, pigment-bearing cells within the ectoderm of hermatypic corals, serve to both enhance the photosynthetic activity of zooxanthellae symbionts, as well as protect the coral animal from harmful UV radiation. Yet connections have not previously been drawn between chromatophore tissue density and the development of skeletal density bands. A histological analysis of the coral Montastrea faveolata has therefore been conducted across a bathymetric gradient of 1-20 m on the southern Caribbean island of Curaçao. A combination of field and laboratory photography, serial block face imaging (SBFI), two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), and 3D image analysis has been applied to test whether M. faveolata adapts to increasing water depth and decreasing photosynthetically active radiation by shifting toward a more heterotrophic lifestyle (decreasing zooxanthellae tissue density, increasing mucocyte tissue density, and decreasing chromatophores density). This study is among the first to collect and evaluate histological data in the spatial context of an entire unprocessed coral polyp. TPLSM was used to optically thin section unprocessed tissue biopsies with quantitative image analysis to yield a nanometer-scale three-dimensional map of the quantity and distribution of the symbionts (zooxanthellae) and a host fluorescent pigments (chromatophores), which is thought to have photoprotective properties, within the context of an entire coral polyp. Preliminary results have offered new insight regarding the three-dimensional distribution and abundance of chromatophores and have identified: (1) M. faveolata tissue collected from 8M SWD do

  6. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  7. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  8. High-performance supercapacitors based on hierarchically porous graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zheng; Wen, Jing; Yan, Chunzhu; Rice, Lynn; Sohn, Hiesang; Lu, Yunfeng [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Shen, Meiqing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Cai, Mei [General Motor R and D Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Dunn, Bruce [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Hierarchically porous graphite particles are synthesized using a continuous, scalable aerosol approach. The unique porous graphite architecture provides the particles with high surface area, fast ion transportation, and good electronic conductivity, which endows the resulting supercapacitors with high energy and power densities. This work provides a new material platform for high-performance supercapacitors with high packing density, and is adaptable to battery electrodes, fuel-cell catalyst supports, and other applications. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Magnetic resonance fiber density mapping of age-related white matter changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Ganslandt, Oliver; Salomonowitz, Erich; Buchfelder, Michael; Hammen, Thilo; Bachmair, Johanna; Eberhardt, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To introduce fiber density mapping (FDM) for investigation of age-related white matter (WM) changes and to compare its capabilities with conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) post-processing. Methods: DTI data with 1.9 mm 3 isotropic voxels were acquired from 44 healthy volunteers (18–88 years) at 3 T. FDM is a 3-step approach which includes diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, fiber reconstruction for the whole brain, and calculation of fiber density (FD) values. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were additionally calculated. Voxel-based analyses were performed to determine volume clusters of significant correlation with age. Bivariate linear regression models and Hotelling–Williams tests were used to detect significant differences between correlations. Results: FDM detected a larger WM volume affected by age-related changes concomitant with fewer significant clusters compared to FA and MD. This indicates that WM alterations due to normal aging occur rather globally than locally. FD values showed a significant stronger correlation with age in frontal lobes (prefrontal and precentral gyrus), limbic lobes (cingulate and parahippocampal gyrus), the corpus callosum (genu) and temporal lobes. Conclusions: FDM shows higher sensitivity for detection of age-related WM changes because it includes all surrounding fiber structures into the evaluation of each DTI data voxel.

  10. Threshold-voltage modulated phase change heterojunction for application of high density memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Baihan; Tong, Hao; Qian, Hang; Miao, Xiangshui

    2015-01-01

    Phase change random access memory is one of the most important candidates for the next generation non-volatile memory technology. However, the ability to reduce its memory size is compromised by the fundamental limitations inherent in the CMOS technology. While 0T1R configuration without any additional access transistor shows great advantages in improving the storage density, the leakage current and small operation window limit its application in large-scale arrays. In this work, phase change heterojunction based on GeTe and n-Si is fabricated to address those problems. The relationship between threshold voltage and doping concentration is investigated, and energy band diagrams and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements are provided to explain the results. The threshold voltage is modulated to provide a large operational window based on this relationship. The switching performance of the heterojunction is also tested, showing a good reverse characteristic, which could effectively decrease the leakage current. Furthermore, a reliable read-write-erase function is achieved during the tests. Phase change heterojunction is proposed for high-density memory, showing some notable advantages, such as modulated threshold voltage, large operational window, and low leakage current

  11. Threshold-voltage modulated phase change heterojunction for application of high density memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Baihan; Tong, Hao; Qian, Hang; Miao, Xiangshui

    2015-09-01

    Phase change random access memory is one of the most important candidates for the next generation non-volatile memory technology. However, the ability to reduce its memory size is compromised by the fundamental limitations inherent in the CMOS technology. While 0T1R configuration without any additional access transistor shows great advantages in improving the storage density, the leakage current and small operation window limit its application in large-scale arrays. In this work, phase change heterojunction based on GeTe and n-Si is fabricated to address those problems. The relationship between threshold voltage and doping concentration is investigated, and energy band diagrams and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements are provided to explain the results. The threshold voltage is modulated to provide a large operational window based on this relationship. The switching performance of the heterojunction is also tested, showing a good reverse characteristic, which could effectively decrease the leakage current. Furthermore, a reliable read-write-erase function is achieved during the tests. Phase change heterojunction is proposed for high-density memory, showing some notable advantages, such as modulated threshold voltage, large operational window, and low leakage current.

  12. Magnetic resonance fiber density mapping of age-related white matter changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.at [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, Oliver [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Salomonowitz, Erich [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Buchfelder, Michael [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Hammen, Thilo [Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-90429 Erlangen (Germany); Bachmair, Johanna [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut [Krankenhaus Schloss Werneck, MRT-Kompetenzzentrum, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 1, D-97440 Werneck (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To introduce fiber density mapping (FDM) for investigation of age-related white matter (WM) changes and to compare its capabilities with conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) post-processing. Methods: DTI data with 1.9 mm{sup 3} isotropic voxels were acquired from 44 healthy volunteers (18–88 years) at 3 T. FDM is a 3-step approach which includes diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, fiber reconstruction for the whole brain, and calculation of fiber density (FD) values. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were additionally calculated. Voxel-based analyses were performed to determine volume clusters of significant correlation with age. Bivariate linear regression models and Hotelling–Williams tests were used to detect significant differences between correlations. Results: FDM detected a larger WM volume affected by age-related changes concomitant with fewer significant clusters compared to FA and MD. This indicates that WM alterations due to normal aging occur rather globally than locally. FD values showed a significant stronger correlation with age in frontal lobes (prefrontal and precentral gyrus), limbic lobes (cingulate and parahippocampal gyrus), the corpus callosum (genu) and temporal lobes. Conclusions: FDM shows higher sensitivity for detection of age-related WM changes because it includes all surrounding fiber structures into the evaluation of each DTI data voxel.

  13. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  14. Design Parameter Variation of Highly Stressed, Bi-Conal Graphite Electrode Connections through Numerical Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed, Ali

    2000-01-01

    The dissertation delves into the mediation of change effects between geometrical and materially technical design parameters of graphite electrode connections and the optimization of their combinations...

  15. Isotropic nuclear graphites; the effect of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.; Buscaillon, A.; Mottet, P.; Micaud, G.

    1977-01-01

    Several isotropic graphites have been manufactured using different forming processes and fillers such as needle coke, regular coke, or pitch coke. Their properties are described in this paper. Specimens of these products have been irradiated in the fast reactor Rapsodie between 400 to 1400 0 C, at fluences up to 1,7.10 21 n.cm -2 PHI.FG. The results show an isotropic behavior under neutron irradiation, but the induced dimensional changes are higher than those of isotropic coke graphites although they are lower than those of conventional extruded graphites made with the same coke

  16. An analysis of irradiation creep in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Hacker, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear graphite under load shows remarkably high creep ductility with neutron irradiation, well in excess of any strain experienced in un-irradiated graphite (and additional to any dimensional changes that would occur without stress). As this behaviour compensates, to some extent, some other irradiation effects such as thermal shutdown stresses, it is an important property. This paper briefly reviews the approach to irradiation creep in the UK, described by the UK Creep Law. It then offers an alternative analysis of irradiation creep applicable to most situations, including HTR systems, using AGR moderator graphite as an example, to high values of neutron fluence, applied stress and radiolytic weight loss. (authors)

  17. Density functional simulations of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gabardi, S; Caravati, S; Bernasconi, M; Parrinello, M

    2012-01-01

    We generated models of the amorphous phase of Sb rich GeSbTe phase change alloys by quenching from the melt within density functional molecular dynamics. We considered the two compositions Ge 1Sb 1Te 1 and Ge 2Sb 4Te 5. Comparison with previous results on the most studied Ge 2Sb 2Te 5 allowed us to draw some conclusions on the dependence of the structural properties of the amorphous phase on the alloy composition. Vibrational and electronic properties were also scrutinized. Phonons at high fr...

  18. A first principles study of adhesion and electronic structure at Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yangzhen; Xing, Jiandong; Li, Yefei, E-mail: yefeili@126.com; Sun, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • The surface energy of graphite (0001) and Fe (110) has been calculated and the number of layers of graphite slab and Fe slab has been estimated. • The work of adhesion of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface with different interfacial separation d{sub 0} (1.7–3 Å) has been systematically discussed. • The total electron density and electron density difference of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are used to study the bonding characteristics. • The Interfacial energy and fracture toughness of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) are estimated. - Abstract: Using first–principles calculations, we discuss the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite and that of the surface, the work of adhesion, and the electronic structure of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface. In this study, the experimental results of the bulk properties of bcc Fe and graphite reveal that our adopted parameters are reliable. Moreover, the results of surface energy demonstrate that nine atomic layers of graphite (0001) and five atomic layers of Fe (110) exhibit bulk–like interiors. The lattice mismatch of Fe (110)/graphite (0001) interface is about 6%. The results also exhibit that the Fe atom residing on top of the second layer of graphite slab (HCP structure) is the preferred stacking sequence. The work of adhesion (W{sub ad}) of the optimized Fe/graphite interface of HCP structure is 1.36 J/m{sup 2}. Electronic structures indicate that the bonding characteristics are a mixture of covalent and ionic bonds in the HCP interface. Moreover, the magnetic moment of atoms at the interface was studied using the spin polarized density of states.

  19. Changes of thyroid function, autoantibodies, bone mineral density and bone metabolism indexes in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the changes of thyroid function, autoantibodies, bone mineral density and bone metabolism in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods: A total of 216 cases of hyperthyroidism in our hospital from December 2015 to January 2015 were selected as the case group, 216 cases of healthy people selected the same period in our hospital physical examination center as the control group, detected thyroid function, autoantibodies, bone mineral density and bone metabolism indexes of all the studied subjects and compared with each other. Results: In this study, it was found that diastolic blood pressure, BMI, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL-C, VLDL-C, TSH were all significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05, systolic blood pressure, LDL-C, GLU, T3, T4, FT3, FT4, HTG, TG-Ab, TPO-Ab in case group were significantly higher than the control group (P<0.05. Right calcaneal speed of sound (SOS in case group was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05, BGP, PTH in case group were significantly higher than the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Hyperthyroidism can cause thyroid hormone levels abnormal, abnormal increase autoantibodies, decrease bone density, bone metabolism actively, easy to form osteoporosis, clinical treatment of hyperthyroidism in the same time, should actively prevent the occurrence of osteoporosis

  20. Artificial cognitive memory—changing from density driven to functionality driven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L. P.; Yi, K. J.; Ramanathan, K.; Zhao, R.; Ning, N.; Ding, D.; Chong, T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing density based on bit size reduction is currently a main driving force for the development of data storage technologies. However, it is expected that all of the current available storage technologies might approach their physical limits in around 15 to 20 years due to miniaturization. To further advance the storage technologies, it is required to explore a new development trend that is different from density driven. One possible direction is to derive insights from biological counterparts. Unlike physical memories that have a single function of data storage, human memory is versatile. It contributes to functions of data storage, information processing, and most importantly, cognitive functions such as adaptation, learning, perception, knowledge generation, etc. In this paper, a brief review of current data storage technologies are presented, followed by discussions of future storage technology development trend. We expect that the driving force will evolve from density to functionality, and new memory modules associated with additional functions other than only data storage will appear. As an initial step toward building a future generation memory technology, we propose Artificial Cognitive Memory (ACM), a memory based intelligent system. We also present the characteristics of ACM, new technologies that can be used to develop ACM components such as bioinspired element cells (silicon, memristor, phase change, etc.), and possible methodologies to construct a biologically inspired hierarchical system.

  1. Density functional theory study the effects of oxygen-containing functional groups on oxygen molecules and oxygen atoms adsorbed on carbonaceous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xuejun; Song, Wenwu; Shi, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to study the effects of different types of oxygen-containing functional groups on the adsorption of oxygen molecules and single active oxygen atoms on carbonaceous materials. During gasification or combustion reactions of carbonaceous materials, oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl(-OH), carbonyl(-CO), quinone(-O), and carboxyl(-COOH) are often present on the edge of graphite and can affect graphite's chemical properties. When oxygen-containing functional groups appear on a graphite surface, the oxygen molecules are strongly adsorbed onto the surface to form a four-member ring structure. At the same time, the O-O bond is greatly weakened and easily broken. The adsorption energy value indicates that the adsorption of oxygen molecules changes from physisorption to chemisorption for oxygen-containing functional groups on the edge of a graphite surface. In addition, our results indicate that the adsorption energy depends on the type of oxygen-containing functional group. When a single active oxygen atom is adsorbed on the bridge site of graphite, it gives rise to a stable epoxy structure. Epoxy can cause deformation of the graphite lattice due to the transition of graphite from sp2 to sp3 after the addition of an oxygen atom. For quinone group on the edge of graphite, oxygen atoms react with carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. Similarly, the single active oxygen atoms of carbonyl groups can interact with edge carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. The results show that oxygen-containing functional groups on graphite surfaces enhance the activity of graphite, which promotes adsorption on the graphite surface.

  2. Studies on the development of special graphite for use in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, G.; Aggarwal, R.K.; Saha, M.; Sengupta, P.R.; Mishra, A. [National Physical Lab., New Delhi (India). Carbon Technology Unit

    2002-07-01

    Special graphite is considered as a critical component of the present-day tokamaks wherein it acts as the armour material for plasma-facing components. This graphite is required to possess, besides other characteristics, high values of bulk density, bending strength and electrical and thermal conductivities and a low value of ash content. Since such graphite was not commercially available in the country, efforts to develop it were initiated at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi. The basic approach to develop this graphite was based on green coke method of making the high density graphite, wherein the green coke was modified by incorporating in it small amounts of conducting carbon materials, i.e. needle coke, synthetic graphite and natural graphite. The resulting graphites were characterized with respect to various physical characteristics, namely, green density, weight loss, volume shrinkage, linear shrinkage, bulk density, bending strength, Young's modulus and electrical resistivity, etc. The results are described and discussed in the present paper. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  4. A discrepancy between platelet alpha 2-receptor density and functional circulatory changes in hypertensives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mores, N.; Martire, M.; Pistritto, G.; Cardillo, C.; Folli, G.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether differences exist in peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors between normotensive and hypertensive subjects, we determined platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density in 10 (7 males) untreated essential hypertensives (mean age of 51.1 years, range of 44-59 years) and in 10 age- and sex-matched normotensive controls. Moreover, in hypertensive patients, we examined the relationship between receptor density and cardiovascular reactivity to mental arithmetic, static handgrip, and bicycle exercise, to verify the hypothesis that alpha 2-adrenoceptors might play a role in modulation of hemodynamic response to sympathetic stimuli. alpha 2-Adrenoceptor density, as calculated by binding of [3H]yohimbine to platelets, was significantly higher in essential hypertensives (314.8 +/- 38.7 fmol/mg) than in normotensive subjects (213.6 +/- 34.7 fmol/mg) (p less than 0.05), whereas receptor affinity was similar in both groups (4.0 +/- 0.5 nM hypertensives, 4.3 +/- 0.5 nM normotensives; p greater than 0.05). Mental arithmetic increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 21.5% from basal values and heart rate (HR) by 13.2%. During isometric exercise, MAP increased by 38.1% and HR by 24.7%, while during bicycle ergometry, mean increases in MAP and HR from baseline were of 27.2 and 54.3%, respectively. No correlation was found between platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density and percent changes in MAP induced by all tests, or between adrenoceptors and absolute basal and peak MAP values. Our findings suggest that in hypertensive patients, peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors are increased with respect to matched normotensives, but these receptors seem not to be involved in the modulation of cardiovascular adaptation to enhanced sympathetic activity

  5. Change-in-ratio density estimator for feral pigs is less biased than closed mark-recapture estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, L.B.; Grand, J.B.; Mitchell, M.S.; Jolley, D.B.; Sparklin, B.D.; Ditchkoff, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Closed-population capture-mark-recapture (CMR) methods can produce biased density estimates for species with low or heterogeneous detection probabilities. In an attempt to address such biases, we developed a density-estimation method based on the change in ratio (CIR) of survival between two populations where survival, calculated using an open-population CMR model, is known to differ. We used our method to estimate density for a feral pig (Sus scrofa) population on Fort Benning, Georgia, USA. To assess its validity, we compared it to an estimate of the minimum density of pigs known to be alive and two estimates based on closed-population CMR models. Comparison of the density estimates revealed that the CIR estimator produced a density estimate with low precision that was reasonable with respect to minimum known density. By contrast, density point estimates using the closed-population CMR models were less than the minimum known density, consistent with biases created by low and heterogeneous capture probabilities for species like feral pigs that may occur in low density or are difficult to capture. Our CIR density estimator may be useful for tracking broad-scale, long-term changes in species, such as large cats, for which closed CMR models are unlikely to work. ?? CSIRO 2008.

  6. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  7. Calculation of probability density functions for temperature and precipitation change under global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watterson, Ian G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: he IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (Meehl ef al. 2007) presents multi-model means of the CMIP3 simulations as projections of the global climate change over the 21st century under several SRES emission scenarios. To assess the possible range of change for Australia based on the CMIP3 ensemble, we can follow Whetton etal. (2005) and use the 'pattern scaling' approach, which separates the uncertainty in the global mean warming from that in the local change per degree of warming. This study presents several ways of representing these two factors as probability density functions (PDFs). The beta distribution, a smooth, bounded, function allowing skewness, is found to provide a useful representation of the range of CMIP3 results. A weighting of models based on their skill in simulating seasonal means in the present climate over Australia is included. Dessai ef al. (2005) and others have used Monte-Carlo sampling to recombine such global warming and scaled change factors into values of net change. Here, we use a direct integration of the product across the joint probability space defined by the two PDFs. The result is a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for change, for each variable, location, and season. The median of this distribution provides a best estimate of change, while the 10th and 90th percentiles represent a likely range. The probability of exceeding a specified threshold can also be extracted from the CDF. The presentation focuses on changes in Australian temperature and precipitation at 2070 under the A1B scenario. However, the assumption of linearity behind pattern scaling allows results for different scenarios and times to be simply obtained. In the case of precipitation, which must remain non-negative, a simple modification of the calculations (based on decreases being exponential with warming) is used to avoid unrealistic results. These approaches are currently being used for the new CSIRO/ Bureau of Meteorology climate projections

  8. Graphite behaviour in relation to the fuel element design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Manzel, R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Blackstone, R. [Reactor Centrum, Petten (Netherlands); Delle, W. [Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich (Germany); Lungagnani, V. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands); Krefeld, R. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands)

    1969-09-01

    The first designs of H.T.R. power reactors will probably use a Gilsocarbon based graphite for both the moderator/carrier blocks and for the fuel tubes. The initial physical properties and changes of dimensions, thermal expansion coefficient, Young*s modulus, and thermal conductivity on irradiation of Gilsocarbon graphites to typical reactor dwell-time fast neutron doses of 4 * 1021 cm -2 Ni dose Dido equivalent are given and values for the irradiation creep constant are presented. The influence of these property changes and those of chemical corrosion are considered briefly in relation to the present fuel element designs. The selection of an eventual less costly replacement graphite for Gilsocarbon graphite is discussed in terms of materials properties.

  9. Structural performance of a graphite blanket in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.; Watson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite in a fusion reactor causes dimensional changes, enhanced creep, and changes in elastic properties and fracture strength. Temperature and flux gradients through the graphite blanket structure produce differential distortions and stress gradients. An inelastic stress analysis procedure is described which treats these variations of the graphite properties in a consistent manner as dictated by physical models for the radiation effects. Furthermore, the procedure follows the evolution of the stress and fracture strength distributions during the reactor operation as well as for possible shutdowns at any time. The lifetime of the graphite structure can be determined based on the failure criterion that the stress at any location exceeds one-half of the fracture strength. This procedure is applied to the most critical component of the blanket module in the SOLASE design

  10. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  11. Changes in spinal and femoral bone mineral density due to pelvic irradiation following oophorectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jui-Tung; Hirai, Yasuo; Seimiya, Yumiko; Hasumi, Katsuhiko; Masubuchi, Kazumasa (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital); Shiraki, Masataka

    1991-10-01

    Since radiation therapy has been known to be a cause of bone atrophy (radiation osteopathy), it could be important whether postoperative radiotherapy in patients who have undergone oophorectomy further promotes bone mineral loss or not. Nineteen patients with stage Ib to IIb cervical cancer were studied. Eleven of the 19 patients received only surgical treatment and 8 received postoperative radiotherapy (50 Gy to the pelvis and 40 Gy to the lumber spine), because of the presence of advanced lesions or positive lymphnodes. A significant increase in FSH and decrease in E{sub 2} (p<0.01) compared to before treatment were observed in both groups. A significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activities (p<0.01), urine-calcium/creatinine ratio (p<0.05) and urine-hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio (p<0.01), which indicated high bone turnover, compared to before treatment in both groups also appeared. Although these chemical parameters in both groups changed coincidentally, the decline in spinal bone mineral density in the irradiated group was delayed at 12 months after the treatment. On the other hand, there was no difference in the changes in femoral bone mineral density in the two groups. These results suggest that radiotherapy might inhibit the bone mineral loss at the irradiated bone site even when there was an estrogen lack. (author).

  12. Changes in spinal and femoral bone mineral density due to pelvic irradiation following oophorectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jui-Tung; Hirai, Yasuo; Seimiya, Yumiko; Hasumi, Katsuhiko; Masubuchi, Kazumasa; Shiraki, Masataka.

    1991-01-01

    Since radiation therapy has been known to be a cause of bone atrophy (radiation osteopathy), it could be important whether postoperative radiotherapy in patients who have undergone oophorectomy further promotes bone mineral loss or not. Nineteen patients with stage Ib to IIb cervical cancer were studied. Eleven of the 19 patients received only surgical treatment and 8 received postoperative radiotherapy (50 Gy to the pelvis and 40 Gy to the lumber spine), because of the presence of advanced lesions or positive lymphnodes. A significant increase in FSH and decrease in E 2 (p<0.01) compared to before treatment were observed in both groups. A significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activities (p<0.01), urine-calcium/creatinine ratio (p<0.05) and urine-hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio (p<0.01), which indicated high bone turnover, compared to before treatment in both groups also appeared. Although these chemical parameters in both groups changed coincidentally, the decline in spinal bone mineral density in the irradiated group was delayed at 12 months after the treatment. On the other hand, there was no difference in the changes in femoral bone mineral density in the two groups. These results suggest that radiotherapy might inhibit the bone mineral loss at the irradiated bone site even when there was an estrogen lack. (author)

  13. Implication of volume changes in uranium oxides: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, B.; Szpunar, J.A.; Milman, V.; Goldberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    In severe nuclear accident scenarios (in air environments and high temperatures) UO 2 fuel pellets oxidise to produce uranium oxides with higher oxygen content, e.g., U 4 O 9 or U 3 O 8 . As a first step in investigating the microstructural changes following UO 2 oxidation to hexagonal high temperature phase of U 3 O 8 , density functional quantum mechanical calculations of the structure, elastic properties and electronic structure of U 3 O 8 have been performed. The calculated properties of hexagonal phase of U 3 O 8 are compared to those of the orthorhombic pseudo-hexagonal phase which is stable at room temperature. The total energy technique based on the local density approximation plus Hubbard U as implemented in the CASTEP code is used to investigate changes in the lattice constants. The first-principles calculations predict a 35-42% increase in volume per uranium atom as a result of the transformation from UO 2 to U 3 O 8 , in agreement with experimental data. The implications of this prediction on the linear expansion and fragmentation of fuel are discussed. (authors)

  14. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  15. Effect of Residence Time of Graphitisation on Thermal Conductivity of Molded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedy Artsanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of residence time of graphitisation on thermal conductivity of molded graphite has been examined. The examination has been conducted by varying residence time of graphitisation of molded carbon with petroleum coke as raw material and coal tar pitch. Graphitisation has been conducted by heating molded graphite at 2500 °C in argon atmosphere with residention time of 10, 30 and 90 minutes. Graphitisation degree, density, shrinking mass and porosity of molded graphite were examined and so was its thermal conductivity. The result showed that the decrease of porosity and the increase of graphitisation degree due to the increasing of residention time of graphitisation will increase the thermal conductivity of graphite. Molded graphite graphitisized with residence time for 90 minutes residention time gave thermal conductivity of 2.134 Watt/mK and graphitization degree 0.718.

  16. Porosity effects in the neutron total cross section of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R; Dawidowski, J; Petriw, S. N

    2009-01-01

    Graphite has been used in nuclear reactors since the birth of the nuclear industry due to its good performance as a neutron moderator material. Graphite is still an option as moderator for generation IV reactors due to its good mechanical and thermal properties at high operation temperatures. So, there has been renewed interest in a revision of the computer libraries used to describe the neutron cross section of graphite. For sub-thermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a larger total cross section (between 4 and 8 barns) than predicted by existing theoretical models (0.2 barns). In order to investigate the origin of this discrepancy we measured the total cross section of graphite samples of three different origins, in the energy range from 0.001 eV to 10 eV. Different experimental arrangements and sample treatments were explored, to identify the effect of various experimental parameters on the total cross section measurement. The experiments showed that the increase in total cross section is due to neutrons scattered around the forward direction. We associate these small-angle scattered neutrons (SANS) to the porous structure of graphite, and formulate a very simple model to compute its contribution to the total cross section of the material. This results in an analytic expression that explicitly depends on the density and mean size of the pores, which can be easily incorporated in nuclear library codes. [es

  17. Preparation and properties studies of halogen-free flame retardant form-stable phase change materials based on paraffin/high density polyethylene composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yibing; Wei Qufu; Huang Fenglin; Gao Weidong

    2008-01-01

    The halogen-free flame retardant form-stable phase change materials (PCM) based on paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites were prepared by using twin-screw extruder technique. The structures and properties of the form-stable PCM composites based on intumescent flame retardant system with expandable graphite (EG) and different synergistic additives, such as ammonium polyphosphate (APP) and zinc borate (ZB) were characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), dynamic Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Cone calorimeter test. The TGA results showed that the halogen-free flame retardant form-stable PCM composites produced a larger amount of charred residue at 700 deg. C, although the onset of weight loss of the halogen-free flame retardant form-stable PCM composites occurred at a lower temperature due to the thermal decomposition of flame retardant. The DSC measurements indicated that the additives of flame retardant had little effect on the thermal energy storage property, and the temperatures of phase change peaks and the latent heat of the paraffin showed better occurrence during the freezing process. The dynamic FTIR monitoring results revealed that the breakdowns of main chains (HDPE and paraffin) and formations of various residues increased with increasing thermo-oxidation temperature. It was also found from the Cone calorimeter tests that the peak of heat release rate (PHRR) decreased significantly. Both the decrease of the PHRR and the structure of charred residue after combustion indicated that there was a synergistic effect between the EG and APP, contributing to the improved flammability of the halogen-free flame retardant form-stable PCM composites

  18. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  19. Deuterium pumping and erosion behavior of selected graphite materials under high flux plasma bombardment in PISCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion behavior of selected graphite materials have been investigated using the PISCES-A facility. These materials include: Pyro-graphite; 2D-graphite weave; 4D-graphite weave; and POCO-graphite. Deuterium plasma bombardment conditions are: fluxes around 7 /times/ 10 17 ions s/sup /minus/1/cm/sup /minus/2/; exposure time in the range from 10 to 100 s; bombarding energy of 300 eV; and graphite temperatures between 20 and 120/degree/C. To reduce deuterium plasma recycling, several approaches have been investigated. Erosion due to high-fluence helium plasma conditioning significantly increases the surface porosity of POCO-graphite and 4D-graphite weave whereas little change for 2D-graphite weave and Pyro-graphite. The increased pore openings and refreshed in-pore surface sites are found to reduce the deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion rates at transient stages. The steady state recycling rates for these graphite materials can be also correlated to the surface porosity. Surface topographical modification by machined-grooves noticeably reduces the steady state deuterium recycling rate and the impurity emission from the surface. These surface topography effects are attributed to co-deposition of remitted deuterium, chemically sputtered hydrocarbon and physically sputtered carbon under deuterium plasma bombardment. The co-deposited film is found to have a characteristic surface morphology with dendritic microstructures. 18 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  1. The Effect of Incremental Changes in Phonotactic Probability and Neighborhood Density on Word Learning by Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkel, Holly L.; Bontempo, Daniel E.; Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Maekawa, Junko; Lee, Su-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Phonotactic probability or neighborhood density has predominately been defined through the use of gross distinctions (i.e., low vs. high). In the current studies, the authors examined the influence of finer changes in probability (Experiment 1) and density (Experiment 2) on word learning. Method: The authors examined the full range of…

  2. Land-Use Scenarios: National-Scale Housing-Density Scenarios Consistent with Climate Change Storylines (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Land-Use Scenarios: National-Scale Housing-Density Scenarios Consistent with Climate Change Storylines. This report describes the scenarios and models used to generate national-scale housing density scenarios for the con...

  3. Impacts of airborne lidar pulse density on estimating biomass stocks and changes in a selectively logged tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Alberto Silva; Andrew Thomas Hudak; Lee Alexander Vierling; Carine Klauberg; Mariano Garcia; Antonio Ferraz; Michael Keller; Jan Eitel; Sassan Saatchi

    2017-01-01

    Airborne lidar has become a well-suited technology for predicting and mapping many tropical forest attributes, including aboveground biomass (AGB). However, trade-offs exist between lidar pulse density and acquisition cost. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of lidar pulse density on AGB change predictions using airborne lidar and field plot data in a...

  4. Electrical conductivity and physical changes of functionalized carbon nanotube/graphite/stainless steel (SS316L/polypropylene composites immersed in an acidic solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Suherman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphite (G was performed to improve their adhesion to a metal powder (SS316L and a polypropylene (PP matrix. A conductive pathway was thus formed to utilize the high electrical conductivity of the SS316L for conductive polymer composites (CPCs applications. The rheological properties of the feedstock mixture were measured, and samples were formed by injection molding. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated the existence of functional groups generated by chemical wet oxidation. Only feedstock mixtures containing more than 28 vol% of the PP composite showed a shear rate (102 s -1 to 105 s -1 , shear viscosity (10 Pa·s to 103 Pa·s, and flow behavior index (n<1 suitable for injection molding. The functionalized composites exhibited improved electrical and mechanical properties over the as-produced composites. The functionalized composites containing 28 vol% PP obtained an electrical conductivity of 6 S/m, compared to 0.5 S/m for the as-produced composites.

  5. Dielectric response, functionality and energy storage in epoxy nanocomposites: Barium titanate vs exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patsidis, A.C.; Kalaitzidou, K.; Psarras, G.C.

    2012-01-01

    Barium titanate/epoxy and exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy nanocomposites were prepared and studied varying the filler content. Morphological characteristics were examined via scanning electron microscopy, while structural changes occurring in barium titanate as a function of temperature were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was employed for determining the dielectric response of the prepared systems. Based on the conducted analysis it was found that three relaxation processes are present in the spectra of the examined materials. From the slower to the faster one, these are interfacial polarization, glass to rubber transition of the polymer matrix, and rearrangement of polar side groups of the polymer chain. Systems' functionality and energy storing efficiency were assessed in terms of dielectric reinforcing function. Finally, the energy density of all systems was evaluated. Composite systems with embedded graphite nanoplatelets exhibit higher energy storing efficiency, while thermally induced structural changes in ferroelectric particles provide functional behavior to barium titanate composites. -- Graphical abstract: Systems' functionality, electrical relaxations and energy storing efficiency were assessed in terms of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and dielectric reinforcing function (G). Further, the energy density (U) of all systems was evaluated. Composite systems with embedded graphite nanoplatelets exhibit higher energy storing efficiency, while thermally induced structural changes in ferroelectric particles provide functional behavior to barium titanate composites. Highlights: ► Relaxation phenomena were found to be present in all studied systems. ► Two processes emanate from the polymer matrix (α-mode and β-mode). ► Systems' electrical heterogeneity gives rise to interfacial polarization. ► BaTiO 3 /epoxy composites exhibit functional behavior due to structural changes. ► x

  6. Low dose transdermal estradiol induces breast density and heterogeneity changes comparable to those of raloxifene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Raundahl, Jakob; Pettersen, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether transdermal low dose estradiol treatment induces changes in mammographic density or heterogeneity compared to raloxifene. Secondarily, if these changes relate to changes in bone formation/resorption markers, and if these findings indicate elevation of breast canc...

  7. Measurement of the diffusion length of thermal neutrons inside graphite; Mesure de la longueur de diffusion des neutrons thermiques dans le graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertaud, A; Beauge, R; Fauquez, H; De Laboulay, H; Mercier, C; Vautrey, L

    1948-11-01

    The diffusion length of thermal neutrons inside a given industrial graphite is determined by measuring the neutron density inside a parallelepipedal piling up of graphite bricks (2.10 x 2.10 x 2.442 m). A 3.8 curies (Ra {alpha} {yields} Be) source is placed inside the parallelepipedal block of graphite and thin manganese detectors are used. Corrections are added to the unweighted measurements to take into account the effects of the damping of supra-thermal neutrons in the measurement area. These corrections are experimentally deduced from the differential measurements made with a cadmium screen interposed between the source and the first plane of measurement. An error analysis completes the report. The diffusion length obtained is: L = 45.7 cm {+-} 0.3. The average density of the graphite used is 1.76 and the average apparent density of the piling up is 1.71. (J.S.)

  8. Prediction of crack density and electrical resistance changes in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading

    KAUST Repository

    Mora Cordova, Angel; Khan, Kamran; El Sayed, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    We present unified predictions for the crack onset strain, evolution of crack density, and changes in electrical resistance in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading. We propose a damage mechanics model to quantify and predict

  9. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  10. The impact of degenerative spinal changes on the correlation of peripheral and axial bone density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.; Boerner, W.

    1994-01-01

    Results of bone density measurements by quantitative computed tomography of the peripheral skeleton (pQCT) were compared with those of measurements at the axial skeleton with a view to study the effects of degenerative spinal changes on the validity of bone densitometry of the lumbar spine. 556 consecutive patients were examined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the spine and by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) of the distal radius. There were significant differences between the bone mineral values at the distal radius and those at the spine, depending on the degree of spinal degeneration. As expected, spinal degenerations showed a highly significant age dependence. With increasing degeneration the correlations between the radius total bone mineral concentration and the bone density of the lumbar spine decreased from r=0.45 to 0.23 in women and from r=0.64 to 0.28 in men. We conclude that the value of spinal DXA is reduced in patients with degenerative spinal disease, compared to the pQCT at the peripheral skeleton. (orig.) [de

  11. High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron Density Profile Changes in Response to Large Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2016-01-01

    Large magnetic-storm-induced changes were detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron density profiles Ne(h) in a database of profiles and digital topside ionograms, from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program, that enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained in nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm (Dst -100nT). Storms where Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere had better coverage of solar wind parameters than storms with available Ne(h) profiles in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during all storms, with enhancements and depletions sometimes near a factor of 10 and 0.1, respectively, but with substantial differences in the responses in the two hemispheres. Large spatial andor temporal Ne(h) changes were often observed during Dst minimum and during the storm recovery phase. The storm-induced Ne(h) changes were the most pronounced and consistent in the Northern Hemisphere in that large enhancements were observed during winter nighttime and large depletions during winter and spring daytime. The limited available cases suggested that these Northern Hemisphere enhancements increased with increases of the time-shifted solar wind velocity v, magnetic field B, and with more negative values of the B components except for the highest common altitude (1100km) of the profiles. There was also some evidence suggesting that the Northern Hemisphere depletions were related to changes in the solar wind parameters. Southern Hemisphere storm-induced enhancements and depletions were typically considerably less with depletions observed during summer nighttime conditions and enhancements during summer daytime and fall nighttime conditions.

  12. A High Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitor with Both Electrodes Prepared from Sri Lanka Graphite Ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Changzhen; Yu, Xiaoliang; Liang, Qinghua; Lv, Ruitao; Gai, Guosheng; Shen, Wanci; Kang, Feiyu; Huang, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-14

    The natural Sri Lanka graphite (vein graphite) is widely-used as anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), due to its high crystallinity and low cost. In this work, graphitic porous carbon (GPC) and high-purity vein graphite (PVG) were prepared from Sri Lanka graphite ore by KOH activation, and high temperature purification, respectively. Furthermore, a lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is fabricated with GPC as cathode, and PVG as anode. The assembled GPC//PVG LIC shows a notable electrochemical performance with a maximum energy density of 86 W·h·kg -1 at 150 W·kg -1 , and 48 W·h·kg -1 at a high-power density of 7.4 kW·kg -1 . This high-performance LIC based on PVG and GPC is believed to be promising for practical applications, due to its low-cost raw materials and industrially feasible production.

  13. Change in bone mineral density during adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carina Ørts; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Frøslev, Trine

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adjuvant chemotherapy has been associated with loss of bone mineral density (BMD) either as a direct effect or due to glucocorticoids used as supportive care medication. A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate changes in BMD from baseline to right after completion of chemoth...... % CI -3.3; -0.1, p = 0.04) compared to never/former smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Adjuvant chemotherapy supplemented with prednisolone was not associated with loss of BMD. Postmenopausal women gained bone mass, whereas current smokers lost bone mass....... were excluded: seven because of initiation of bisphosphonate treatment due to osteoporosis at baseline, and one had non-interpretable DXA. The final cohort included 97 patients with a mean age of 53 years (range 34-72). Mean cumulative prednisolone dose was 1308 mg (95 % CI 1255; 1362). BMD increased 1.......36 % (95 % CI 0.7; 2.0, p smokers decreased 1.67 % (95...

  14. Changes in mechanical properties due to gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Cota

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental analysis of the effect of dose and dose rate parameters during gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE samples. Considerations concerning the influence of these parameters on HDPE mechanical strength properties as a result of the predominance of oxidative degradation or of cross-linking are presented. The experimental results show an improvement of HDPE mechanical strength as dose increases, indicating the predominance of cross-linking over oxidative degradation and that lower doses are necessary to obtain a similar change in resistance parameters when radiation is applied at lower dose rates, showing that gamma radiation affects the HDPE in a more efficient way at lower dose rates.

  15. Changes in bone mineral density and body composition during pregnancy and postpartum. A controlled cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liendgaard, Ulla Kristine Møller; við Streym, Susanna; Mosekilde, Leif

    2012-01-01

    In a controlled cohort study, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 153 women pre-pregnancy; during pregnancy; and 0.5, 4, 9, and 19 months postpartum. Seventy-five age-matched controls, without pregnancy plans, were followed in parallel. Pregnancy and breastfeeding cause a reversible bone...... in fat mass differed according to breastfeeding status with a slower decline in women who continued breastfeeding. Calcium and vitamin D intake was not associated with BMD changes. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and breastfeeding cause a reversible bone loss. At 19 months postpartum, BMD has returned to pre-pregnancy...... loss, which, initially, is most pronounced at trabecular sites but also involves cortical sites during prolonged breastfeeding. INTRODUCTION: Conflicting results have been reported on effects of pregnancy and breastfeeding on BMD and body composition (BC). In a controlled cohort study, we elucidate...

  16. Changes in bone density and turnover after alendronate or estrogen withdrawal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wasnich, Richard D; Bagger, Yu Z; Hosking, David J

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover changes after therapy withdrawal in postmenopausal women treated with alendronate or estrogen-progestin. DESIGN: In this randomized, blinded, multinational, placebo-controlled trial, 1,609 healthy postmenopausal women ages 45 to 59...... years were assigned to receive alendronate, placebo, or open-label estrogen-progestin (conjugated equine estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate or a cyclic regimen of 17 beta-estradiol, norethisterone acetate and estradiol). Of the original women, one third after year 2 and one third after year 4...... were switched from alendronate to placebo, while remaining blinded to treatment assignment. The women taking estrogen-progestin in years 1 to 4 were followed off therapy in years 5 and 6. BMD at the lumbar spine and hip and biochemical markers of bone turnover were measured. RESULTS: The treatment...

  17. Density functional simulations of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabardi, S; Bernasconi, M; Caravati, S; Parrinello, M

    2012-01-01

    We generated models of the amorphous phase of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys by quenching from the melt within density functional molecular dynamics. We considered the two compositions Ge 1 Sb 1 Te 1 and Ge 2 Sb 4 Te 5 . Comparison with previous results on the most studied Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 allowed us to draw some conclusions on the dependence of the structural properties of the amorphous phase on the alloy composition. Vibrational and electronic properties were also scrutinized. Phonons at high frequencies above 200 cm -1 are localized in tetrahedra around Ge atoms in Sb-rich compounds as well as in Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . All compounds are semiconducting in the amorphous phase, with a band gap in the range 0.7-1.0 eV.

  18. Density functional simulations of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, S.; Caravati, S.; Bernasconi, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2012-09-01

    We generated models of the amorphous phase of Sb-rich GeSbTe phase change alloys by quenching from the melt within density functional molecular dynamics. We considered the two compositions Ge1Sb1Te1 and Ge2Sb4Te5. Comparison with previous results on the most studied Ge2Sb2Te5 allowed us to draw some conclusions on the dependence of the structural properties of the amorphous phase on the alloy composition. Vibrational and electronic properties were also scrutinized. Phonons at high frequencies above 200 cm-1 are localized in tetrahedra around Ge atoms in Sb-rich compounds as well as in Ge2Sb2Te5. All compounds are semiconducting in the amorphous phase, with a band gap in the range 0.7-1.0 eV.

  19. Changes in mechanical properties due to gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cota, S.S.; Vasconcelos, V.; Senne Junior, M.; Carvalho, L.L.; Rezende, D.B.; Correa, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis of the effect of dose and dose rate parameters during gamma irradiation of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples. Considerations concerning the influence of these parameters on HDPE mechanical strength properties as a result of the predominance of oxidative degradation or of cross-linking are presented. The experimental results show an improvement of HDPE mechanical strength as dose increases, indicating the predominance of cross-linking over oxidative degradation and that lower doses are necessary to obtain a similar change in resistance parameters when radiation is applied at lower dose rates, showing that gamma radiation affects the HDPE in a more efficient way at lower dose rates. (author)

  20. Graphite tail powder and liquid biofertilizer as trace elements source for ground nut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindersah, Reginawanti; Setiawati, M. Rochimi; Fitriatin, B. Natalie; Suryatama, Pujawati; Asmiran, Priyanka; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made

    2018-02-01

    Utilization of graphite tail waste from the mineral beneficiation processing is very important since it contain significant amount of essential minerals which are necessary for plant growth. These mineral are required in biochemical processes and mainly play an important role as cofactor in enzymatic reaction. The objective of this research is to investigate the performance of graphite tail on supporting plant growth and yield of ground nut (Arachishypogeae L.). A field experiment has been performed to test the performance of mixed graphite tail and reduced organic matter dose. The graphite tail size were reduced to various sieved size, -80 mesh, -100 mesh and -200 mesh. The experiment was setup in randomized block design with 4 treatments and 6 replications for each treatment, while the control plot is received without graphite tail. The results demonstrated that reduced organic matter along with -200 mesh tail has potentially decreased plant height at the end of vegetative growth stage, in contrast for to -80 mesh tail amendment increased individual fresh plant biomass. Statistically, there was no change of plant nodule, individual shoot fresh and dry weight, root nodule, number of pod following any mesh of graphite tail amendment. Reducing organic matter while adding graphite tail of 5% did not change bean weight in all plot. In contrast, reduced organic matter along with 80-mesh graphite tail amendment improved the nut yield per plot. This experiment suggests that graphite tail, mainly -80 mesh graphite tail can be possibly used in legume production.

  1. The Density Difference of Cupula and Endolymph Changes the Mechanics of Semicircular Canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, Alexander V.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2011-11-01

    A precise balance of cupula and endolymph densities is key to the proper sensing of angular acceleration by the semicircular canals (SC). Estimates show that a density difference of cupula and endolymph (DD) as small as 10 - 4 g/cm3 is sufficient to make the SC sensitive to gravity and centrifugal forces provided they are comparable with gravity. As a result this might cause vestibular disorders. There are conditions under which the DD may even exceed this value. One of them is a change of intra-labyrinth pressure (IP) that may take place during a spaceflight. Here, the effect of DD on SC dynamics is considered using a simplified one-dimensional toroidal mathematical model of a canal for rotation with constant or harmonically oscillating angular velocities. The DD results in: dependence of cupula dynamics on orientation of both the gravity vector relative to the SC plane and the axis of rotation, as well as on the distance between the axis of rotation and the center of SC; shift of the cupula to a new position of equilibrium that depends on both the gravity vector and the parameters of head rotation; and onset of cupula oscillations with multiple frequencies under harmonic stimulation. The DD effect may be important under conditions of artificial gravity where the directions of centrifugal forces, the values of which are comparable with Earth's gravity, the orientations of the axis of rotation of a space station, and the axes of the SCs change during movements of the individuals and their habitat.

  2. Changes in zooxanthellae density, morphology, and mitotic index in hermatypic corals and anemones exposed to cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervino, J M; Hayes, R L; Honovich, M; Goreau, T J; Jones, S; Rubec, P J

    2003-05-01

    Sodium cyanide (NaCN) is widely used for the capture of reef fish throughout Southeast Asia and causes extensive fish mortality, but the effect of NaCN on reef corals remains debated. To document the impact of cyanide exposure on corals, the species Acropora millepora, Goniopora sp., Favites abdita, Trachyphyllia geoffrio, Plerogyra sp., Heliofungia actinformis, Euphyllia divisa, and Scarophyton sp., and the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida were exposed to varying concentrations of cyanide for varying time periods. Corals were exposed to 50, 100, 300, and 600 mg/l of cyanide ion (CN(-)) for 1-2 min (in seawater, the CN(-) forms hydrocyanic acid). These concentrations are much lower than those reportedly used by fish collectors. Exposed corals and anemones immediately retracted their tentacles and mesenterial filaments, and discharged copious amounts of mucus containing zooxanthellae. Gel electrophoreses techniques found changes in protein expression in both zooxanthellae and host tissue. Corals and anemones exposed to cyanide showed an immediate increase in mitotic cell division of their zooxenthellae, and a decrease in zooxanthellae density. In contrast, zooxanthellae cell division and density remained constant in controls. Histopathological changes included gastrodermal disruption, mesogleal degradation, and increased mucus in coral tissues. Zooxanthellae showed pigment loss, swelling, and deformation. Mortality occurred at all exposure levels. Exposed specimens experienced an increase in the ratio of gram-negative to gram-positive bacteria on the coral surface. The results demonstrate that exposure cyanide causes mortality to corals and anemones, even when applied at lower levels than that used by fish collectors. Even brief exposure to cyanide caused slow-acting and long-term damage to corals and their zooxanthellae.

  3. Density and spatial distribution of Parkia biglobosa pattern in Benin under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fafunkè Titilayo Dotchamou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkia biglobosa is an indigenous species which, traditionally contributes to the resilience of the agricultural production system in terms of food security, source of income, poverty reduction and ecosystem stability. Therefore, it is important to improve knowledge on its density, current and future spatial distribution. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the tree density, the climate change effects on the spatial distribution of the species in the future for better conservation. The modeling of the current and future geographical distribution of the species is based on the principle of Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt on a total of 286 occurrence points from field work and Global Biodiversity Information Facility GBIF-Data Portal-(www.gbif.org. Two climatic models (HadGEM2_ES and Csiro_mk3_6_0 have been used under two scenarios RCP 2.6 and RCP 8.5 for the projection of the species distribution at the horizon 2050. The correlation analyses and Jackknife test have helped to identify seven variables which are less correlated (r < 0.80 with highest modeling participation. The soil, annual precipitation (BIO12 and temperature (diurnal average Deviation are the variables which have mostly contributed to performance of the models. Currently, 53% of national territory, spread from north to south is very suitable to the cultivation of P. biglobosa. The scenarios have predicted at the horizon 2050, a loss of the habitats which are currently very suitable for the cultivation and conservation of P. biglobosa, to the benefit of moderate and weak habitats. 51% and 57% are the highest proportion of this lost which will be registered with HadGEM2_ES model under two scenarios. These results revealed that the suitable habitat of the species is threatened by climate change in Benin. In order to limit damage such as decreased productivity, extinction of species, some appropriate solutions must be found.

  4. Near-real-time radiography detects 0.1% changes in areal density with 1-millimeter spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupin, D.M.

    1987-06-01

    Using digital subtraction radiography, the author detects an 0.1% change in areal density in a phantom. Areal density is the product rho x, where rho is the material density and x is the material thickness. Therefore, it is possible to detect an 0.1% difference in either density or thickness in unknown samples. A special x-ray television camera detects the areal density change on the phantom. In a difference image, formed by subtracting the 128-television-frame averages of the phantom image from the phantom-and-step image, the step is resolved with a 1-mm spatial resolution. Surprisingly, crossed 2-μm-diam tungsten wires that overlie the phantom are also detected. This procedure takes a few seconds. The performance of any digital imaging x-ray system will improve by using the averaging and digital subtraction techniques. 8 refs., 6 figs

  5. A quantum molecular similarity analysis of changes in molecular electron density caused by basis set flotation and electric field application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sílvia; Duran, Miquel

    1997-08-01

    Quantum molecular similarity (QMS) techniques are used to assess the response of the electron density of various small molecules to application of a static, uniform electric field. Likewise, QMS is used to analyze the changes in electron density generated by the process of floating a basis set. The results obtained show an interrelation between the floating process, the optimum geometry, and the presence of an external field. Cases involving the Le Chatelier principle are discussed, and an insight on the changes of bond critical point properties, self-similarity values and density differences is performed.

  6. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  7. Using Open data in analyzing urban growth: urban density and change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    murgante, Beniamino; Nolè, Gabriele; Lasaponara, Rosa; Lanorte, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    In recent years a great attention has been paid to the evolution and the use of spatial data. Internet technologies accelerated such a process, allowing more direct access to spatial information. It is estimated that more than 600 million people have been connected to the Internet at least once to display maps on the web. Consequently, there is an irreversible process which considers geographical dimension as a fundamental attribute for the management of information flows. Furthermore, the great activity produced by open data movement leads to an easier and clearer access to geospatial information. This trend concerns, in a less evident way, also satellite data, which are increasingly accessible through the web. Spatial planning, geography and other regional sciences find it difficult to build knowledge related to spatial transformation. These problems can be significantly reduced due to a large data availability, producing significant opportunities to capture knowledge useful for a better territorial governance. This study has been developed in a heavily anthropized area in southern Italy, Apulia region, using free spatial data and free multispectral and multitemporal satellite data (Apulia region was one of the first regions in Italy to adopt open data policies). The analysis concerns urban growth, which, in recent decades, showed a rapid increase. In a first step the evolution in time and change detection of urban areas has been analyzed paying particular attention to soil consumption. In the second step Kernel Density has been adopted in order to assess development pressures. KDE (Kernel Density Estimation) function is a technique that provides the density of a phenomenon based on point data. A mobile three dimensional surface has been produced from a set of points distributed over a region of space, which weighs the events within its sphere of influence, depending on their distance from the point from which intensity is estimated. It produces, considering as

  8. Low-energy electron observation of graphite and molybdenite crystals. Application to the study of graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.

    1969-01-01

    The LEED study of cleaved (0001) faces of crystals having a layered structure allowed to investigate flakes free of steps on graphite and molybdenite, to show twinning on natural graphite. By intensity measurements and computation in the case of a kinematical approximation it has been possible to determine an inner potential of 19 eV for graphite and to identify the direction of the Mo-S bond of the surface layer of molybdenite. The oxidation of graphite has been studied by observing changes, in symmetry of the diffraction patterns and by mass spectrometry of the gases evolved during the oxidation. No surface compounds have been detected and the carbon layers appeared to be peeled off one after the other. The oxidation took place at temperatures higher than 520 C under an oxygen pressure of 10 -5 torr. (author) [fr

  9. Impacts of Airborne Lidar Pulse Density on Estimating Biomass Stocks and Changes in a Selectively Logged Tropical Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne lidar is a technology well-suited for mapping many forest attributes, including aboveground biomass (AGB stocks and changes in selective logging in tropical forests. However, trade-offs still exist between lidar pulse density and accuracy of AGB estimates. We assessed the impacts of lidar pulse density on the estimation of AGB stocks and changes using airborne lidar and field plot data in a selectively logged tropical forest located near Paragominas, Pará, Brazil. Field-derived AGB was computed at 85 square 50 × 50 m plots in 2014. Lidar data were acquired in 2012 and 2014, and for each dataset the pulse density was subsampled from its original density of 13.8 and 37.5 pulses·m−2 to lower densities of 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, 0.8, 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2 pulses·m−2. For each pulse density dataset, a power-law model was developed to estimate AGB stocks from lidar-derived mean height and corresponding changes between the years 2012 and 2014. We found that AGB change estimates at the plot level were only slightly affected by pulse density. However, at the landscape level we observed differences in estimated AGB change of >20 Mg·ha−1 when pulse density decreased from 12 to 0.2 pulses·m−2. The effects of pulse density were more pronounced in areas of steep slope, especially when the digital terrain models (DTMs used in the lidar derived forest height were created from reduced pulse density data. In particular, when the DTM from high pulse density in 2014 was used to derive the forest height from both years, the effects on forest height and the estimated AGB stock and changes did not exceed 20 Mg·ha−1. The results suggest that AGB change can be monitored in selective logging in tropical forests with reasonable accuracy and low cost with low pulse density lidar surveys if a baseline high-quality DTM is available from at least one lidar survey. We recommend the results of this study to be considered in developing projects and national

  10. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  11. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  12. Long-term persistence, density dependence and effects of climate change on rosyside dace (Cyprinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Grossman; Gary Sundin; Robert E. Ratajczak

    2016-01-01

    SummaryWe used long-term population data for rosyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides), a numerically dominant member of a stochastically organised fish assemblage, to evaluate the relative importance of density-dependent and density-independent processes to population...

  13. Impacts of Ocean Acidification and Temperature Change on Zooxanthellae Density in Coral Stylophora pistillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, G. E.; Martínez Fernández, A.; Paytan, A.

    2016-12-01

    As ocean conditions continue to change, marine ecosystems are significantly impacted. Many calcifying organisms are being affected by the gradual changes in ocean pH and temperature that continue to occur over time. Corals are organisms that engage in a symbiotic relationship with Symbiodinium dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae). Symbiodinium are responsible for photosynthetic activity within oligotrophic waters. Corals depend on high levels of aragonite saturation state of seawater in order to build their skeletal structure. Most corals have a relatively narrow optimal range of temperature and pH in which they thrive. However, it is thought that corals residing in the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea) are resilient to the effects of increasing temperature. Stylophora pistillata's response to environmental impacts was tested via a simulation of ocean conditions at a high temperature and high CO2 emission scenario (pH 7.65) and lower CO2 emission scenario (pH 7.85) that are predicted for the end of this century. We present the difference in zooxanthellae density following a short term experiment where corals were placed in seawater tanks at pH 7.65, 7.85 and 8.1 and temperature was increased by 4 degrees C above seawater temperature in order to measure the response of Stylophora pistillata to potential future ocean conditions.

  14. Feasibility of monitoring the strength of HTGR core support graphite: Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.; Davis, T.J.; Thomas, M.T.

    1983-02-01

    Methods are being developed to monitor, in-situ, the strength changes of graphite core-support components in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The results reported herein pertain to the development of techniques for monitoring the core-support blocks; the PGX graphite used in these studies is the grade used for the core-support blocks of the Fort St. Vrain HTGR, and is coarser-grained than the grades used in our previous investigations. The through-transmission ultrasonic velocity technique, developed for monitoring strength of the core-support posts, is not suitable for use on the core-support blocks. Eddy-current and ultrasonic backscattering techniques have been shown to be capable of measuring the density-depth profile in oxidized PGX and, combined with a correlation of strength versus density, could yield an estimate of the strength-depth profile of in-service HTGR core support blocks. Correlations of strength versus density and other properties, and progress on the development of the eddy-current and ultrasonic backscattering techniques are reported

  15. Studies on low-voltage x-ray radiography for graphite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Susumu; Itami, Hiroharu

    1978-09-01

    Low-voltage radiography has been studied to provide optimum technique for graphite less than 50 mm thick. First we determined the exposure conditions under which the most appropriate photographic density can be obtained. By parametric studies, an exposure chart was prepared. Then we studied how the environment of photographing affected the film density. Thirdly, by use of graphite materials with artificial flaws, Image Quality Indicator (I.Q.I.) sensitivity was determined. Detectability of a crack depended on an incidence angle of X-rays onto a crack. Finally, we photographed graphites having natural flaws and gained a useful information. (author)

  16. Are the reactions of quinones on graphite adiabatic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luque, N.B.; Schmickler, W.

    2013-01-01

    Outer sphere electron transfer reactions on pure metal electrodes are often adiabatic and hence independent of the electrode material. Since it is not clear, whether adiabatic electron transfer can also occur on a semi-metal like graphite, we have re-investigated experimental data presented in a recent communication by Nissim et al. [Chemical Communications 48 (2012) 3294] on the reactions of quinones on graphite. We have supplemented their work by DFT calculations and conclude, that these reactions are indeed adiabatic. This contradicts the assertion of Nissim et al. that the rates are proportional to the density of states at the Fermi level

  17. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept

  18. Development and prototype testing of MgCl 2 /graphite foam latent heat thermal energy storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep; Yu, Wenhua; Zhao, Weihuan; Kim, Taeil; France, David M.; Smith, Roger K.

    2018-01-01

    Composites of graphite foam infiltrated with a magnesium chloride phase-change material have been developed as high-temperature thermal energy storage media for concentrated solar power applications. This storage medium provides a high thermal energy storage density, a narrow operating temperature range, and excellent heat transfer characteristics. In this study, experimental investigations were conducted on laboratory-scale prototypes with magnesium chloride/graphite foam composite as the latent heat thermal energy storage system. Prototypes were designed and built to monitor the melt front movement during the charging/discharging tests. A test loop was built to ensure the charging/discharging of the prototypes at temperatures > 700 degrees C. Repeated thermal cycling experiments were carried out on the fabricated prototypes, and the experimental temperature profiles were compared to the predicted results from numerical simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics software. Experimental results were found to be in good agreement with the simulations to validate the thermal models.

  19. Derivation of a radionuclide inventory for irradiated graphite-chlorine-36 inventory determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.J.; Palmer, J.D.; Wood, P.

    2001-01-01

    The irradiation of materials in nuclear reactors results in neutron activation of component elements. Irradiated graphite wastes arise from their use in UK gas-cooled research and commercial reactor cores, and in fuel element components, where the graphite has acted as the neutron moderator. During irradiation the residual chlorine, which was used to purify the graphite during manufacture, is activated to chlorine-36. This isotope is long-lived and poorly retarded by geological barriers, and may therefore be a key radionuclide with respect to post-closure disposal facilities performance. United Kingdom Nirex Limited, currently responsible for the development of a disposal route for intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK, carried out a major research programme to support an overall assessment of the chlorine-36 activity of all wastes including graphite reactor components. The various UK gas cooled reactors reactors have used a range of graphite components made from diverse graphite types; this has necessitated a systematic programme to cover the wide range of graphite and production processes. The programme consisted of: precursor measurements - on the surface and/or bulk of representative samples of relevant materials, using specially developed methods; transfer studies - to quantify the potential for transfer of Cl-36 into and between waste streams during irradiation of graphite; theoretical assessments - to support the calculational methodology; actual measurements - to confirm the modelling. For graphite, a total of 458 measurements on samples from 57 batches were performed, to provide a detailed understanding of the composition of nuclear graphite. The work has resulted in the generation of probability density functions (PDF) for the mean chlorine concentration of three classes of graphite: fuel element graphite; Magnox moderator and reflector graphite and AGR reflector graphite; AGR moderator graphite. Transfer studies have shown that a significant

  20. Phenology of German Chamomile and its Changes under Different Irrigation Regimes and Plant Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza PIRZAD

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to definite growth stages of Matricaria chamomilla L., 40 plants were planted with 200 200 cm distance from each other. To determine the phenology under different water stress condition and plant densities, an experiment was conducted in factorial based on randomized complete block design with two factors including irrigation at 4 levels (25, 50, 75, and 100 mm evaporation from pan class A, and plant density at 5 levels (cultivation in 30 cm rows with 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 cm intra-row spaces with three replications. Definition of growth stages including the maximum number of nodes, sub stems and tillers were 21, 20 and 14 that were occurred at 970, 1088 and 1088 oC growth degree-days, respectively. The numbers of nodes were 28.6, 30.0, 30.2 and 27.8, of sub stem were 19.2, 18.4, 19.8 and 18.4; and of tillers were 14.8, 14.0, 15.0 and 14.4 that were obtained from irrigation at 25, 50, 75, and 100 mm evaporation from pan, respectively. In the other hand, the number of nodes as follow 28.25, 29.00, 29.75, 29.75 and 29.00; sub stem as 17.50, 20.00, 20.75, 19.00 and 17.50; and tillers were 15.00, 13.50, 14.75, 14.00 and 15.50 that were obtained from 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 cm intra-row spacing, respectively. Differences by irrigation on GDDs values were observed at the second harvest. However the earliest observation of flower and seed receiving at the first harvest occurred on 5 cm intra-row spacing. These changes were identical by GDDs for second harvest of flower, but with mild slope of reduction. There were no differences in number of leaves and tillers among irrigation levels and plant densities.

  1. Phenology of German Chamomile and its Changes under Different Irrigation Regimes and Plant Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza PIRZAD

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to definite growth stages of Matricaria chamomilla L., 40 plants were planted with 200 � 200 cm distance from each other. To determine the phenology under different water stress condition and plant densities, an experiment was conducted in factorial based on randomized complete block design with two factors including irrigation at 4 levels (25, 50, 75, and 100 mm evaporation from pan class A, and plant density at 5 levels (cultivation in 30 cm rows with 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 cm intra-row spaces with three replications. Definition of growth stages including the maximum number of nodes, sub stems and tillers were 21, 20 and 14 that were occurred at 970, 1088 and 1088 oC growth degree-days, respectively. The numbers of nodes were 28.6, 30.0, 30.2 and 27.8, of sub stem were 19.2, 18.4, 19.8 and 18.4; and of tillers were 14.8, 14.0, 15.0 and 14.4 that were obtained from irrigation at 25, 50, 75, and 100 mm evaporation from pan, respectively. In the other hand, the number of nodes as follow 28.25, 29.00, 29.75, 29.75 and 29.00; sub stem as 17.50, 20.00, 20.75, 19.00 and 17.50; and tillers were 15.00, 13.50, 14.75, 14.00 and 15.50 that were obtained from 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 cm intra-row spacing, respectively. Differences by irrigation on GDDs values were observed at the second harvest. However the earliest observation of flower and seed receiving at the first harvest occurred on 5 cm intra-row spacing. These changes were identical by GDDs for second harvest of flower, but with mild slope of reduction. There were no differences in number of leaves and tillers among irrigation levels and plant densities.

  2. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  3. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  4. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  5. Using Prediction Markets to Generate Probability Density Functions for Climate Change Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate-related uncertainty is traditionally presented as an error bar, but it is becoming increasingly common to express it in terms of a probability density function (PDF). PDFs are a necessary component of probabilistic risk assessments, for which simple "best estimate" values are insufficient. Many groups have generated PDFs for climate sensitivity using a variety of methods. These PDFs are broadly consistent, but vary significantly in their details. One axiom of the verification and validation community is, "codes don't make predictions, people make predictions." This is a statement of the fact that subject domain experts generate results using assumptions within a range of epistemic uncertainty and interpret them according to their expert opinion. Different experts with different methods will arrive at different PDFs. For effective decision support, a single consensus PDF would be useful. We suggest that market methods can be used to aggregate an ensemble of opinions into a single distribution that expresses the consensus. Prediction markets have been shown to be highly successful at forecasting the outcome of events ranging from elections to box office returns. In prediction markets, traders can take a position on whether some future event will or will not occur. These positions are expressed as contracts that are traded in a double-action market that aggregates price, which can be interpreted as a consensus probability that the event will take place. Since climate sensitivity cannot directly be measured, it cannot be predicted. However, the changes in global mean surface temperature are a direct consequence of climate sensitivity, changes in forcing, and internal variability. Viable prediction markets require an undisputed event outcome on a specific date. Climate-related markets exist on Intrade.com, an online trading exchange. One such contract is titled "Global Temperature Anomaly for Dec 2011 to be greater than 0.65 Degrees C." Settlement is based

  6. Elaboration of aluminum oxide-based graphite containing castables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ningsheng

    The aim of this work was set to develop effective and practicable new methods to incorporate natural flake graphite (FG) into the Al2O 3 based castables for iron and steel making applications. Three approaches, viz. micro-pelletized graphite (PG), crushed briquette of Al2O3-graphite (BAG) and TiO2 coated graphite (CFG), have been developed to insert flake graphite into Al2O 3 rich Al2O3-SiC based and Al2O 3-MgO based castables. These approaches were put into effect as countermeasures against the problems caused by FG in order: (1) to agglomerate the FG powders so as to decrease the specific surface area; (2) to diminish the density difference by using crushed carbon bonded compact of oxide-FG mixture; (3) to modify the surface of the flake graphite by forming hydrophilic coating; (4) to control the dispersion state of the graphite in the castable to maintain enough bonding strength; and (5) to use appropriate antioxidants to inhibit the oxidation of FG. The whole work was divided into two stages. In stage one, Al2O 3-SiC-C castables were dealt with to compare 4 modes of inserting graphite, i.e., by PG, BAG, CFG and FG. Overall properties were measured, all in correlation with graphite amount and incorporating mode. In stage two, efforts were made to reduce water demand in the Al2O3-MgO castables system. For this purpose, the matrix portion of the castable mixes was extracted and a coaxial double cylinder viscometer was adopted to investigate rheological characteristics of the matrix slurries vs. 4 kinds of deflocculants, through which the best deflocculant and its appropriate amount were found. Efforts were then made to add up to 30% MgO into the castables, using a limited amount of powders (antioxidants, Si, SiC, B4C and ZrB2, were added respectively or in combination. Overall properties of the castables, were investigated in correlation with MgO amount and graphite and antioxidant packages. Optimization work on oxidation and slag resistance was pursued. Finally

  7. Electrical and thermal properties of graphite/polyaniline composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdo, Shawn E., E-mail: sxbourdo@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Warford, Brock A.; Viswanathan, Tito [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    A composite of a carbon allotrope (graphite) and an inherently conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI), has been prepared that exhibits an electrical conductivity greater than either of the two components. An almost 2-fold increase in the bulk conductivity occurs when only a small mass fraction of polyaniline exists in the composite (91% graphite/ 9% polyaniline, by mass). This increase in dc electrical conductivity is curious since in most cases a composite material will exhibit a conductivity somewhere between the two individual components, unless a modification to the electronic nature of the material occurs. In order to elucidate the fundamental electrical properties of the composite we have performed variable temperature conductivity measurements to better understand the nature of conduction in these materials. The results from these studies suggest a change in the mechanism of conduction as the amount of polyaniline is increased in the composite. Along with superior electrical properties, the composites exhibit an increase in thermal stability as compared to the graphite. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Room temperature electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at different mass ratios. (Right) Electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites of graphite and polyaniline have been synthesized with unique electrical and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Certain G-PANI composites are more conductive and more thermally stable than graphite alone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-PANI composites exhibit a larger conductivity ratio with respect to temperature than graphite alone.

  8. Capillary-based micro-battery cell for in situ X-ray powder diffraction studies of working batteries: a study of the initial intercalation and deintercalation of lithium into graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Rune; Norby, Poul

    2013-01-01

    –charging cycle show that the structure of the graphite changes from an intergrown structure of graphite 2H and graphite 3R to a nearly ideal graphite 2H structure. DIFFaX+ was also used to refine a model of the stacking disorder in an apparent stage III compound with AαAB- and AαAC-type slabs....

  9. Direct conversion of graphite into diamond through electronic excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, H

    2003-01-01

    An ab initio total energy calculation has been performed for electronic excited states in diamond and rhombohedral graphite by the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA). First, calculations for the core-excited state in diamond have been performed to show that the ab initio calculations based on the LDA describe the wavefunctions in the electronic excited states as well as in the ground state quite well. Fairly good coincidence with both experimental data and theoretical prediction has been obtained for the lattice relaxation of the core exciton state. The results of the core exciton state are compared with nitrogen-doped diamond. Next, the structural stability of rhombohedral graphite has been investigated to examine the possibility of the transition into the diamond structure through electronic excited states. While maintaining the rhombohedral symmetry, rhombohedral graphite can be spontaneously transformed to cubic diamond. Tota...

  10. Determining the future for irradiated graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Wickham, A.J.; Hacker, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, proposals have been made for the long-term treatment of radioactive graphite waste which have ranged from sea dumping through incineration to land-based disposal, sometimes preceded by a variable period of 'safe storage' within the original reactor containment. Nuclear regulators are challenging the proposed length of 'safe storage' on the basis that essential knowledge may be lost. More recently, political constraints have further complicated the issue by eliminating disposal at sea and imposing a 'near-zero release' philosophy, while public opinion is opposed to land-based disposal and has induced a continual drive towards minimizing radioactivity release to the environment from disposal. This paper proposes that, despite various international agreements, it is time to review technically all options for disposal of irradiated graphite waste as a framework for the eventual decision-making process. It is recognized that the socio-economic and political pressures are high and therefore, given that all currently identified options satisfy the present safety limits, the need to minimize the objective risk is shown to be a minor need in comparison to the public's want of demonstrable control, responsiveness and ability to reverse/change the disposal options in the future. Further, it is shown that the eventual decision-making process for a post-dismantling option for graphite waste must optimize the beneficial attributes of subjective risk experienced by the general public. In addition, in advocating and preferred option to the general public, it is recommended that the industry should communicate at a level commensurate with the public understanding and initiate a process of facilitation which enables the public to arrive at their own solution and constituting a social exchange. Otherwise it is concluded that if the indecision over disposal options is allowed to continue then, by default, graphite will remain in long-term supervised storage. (author)

  11. CT analysis of lung density changes in patients undergoing total body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.Y.; Shank, B.; Bonfiglio, P.; Reid, A.

    1984-01-01

    Sequential changes in lung density measured by CT are potentially sensitive and convenient monitors of lung abnormalities following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods have been developed to compare pre- and post-TBI CT of lung. The average local features of a cross-sectional lung slice are extracted from three peripheral regions of interest in the anterior, posterior, and lateral portions of the CT image. Also, density profiles across a specific region may be obtained. These may be compared first for verification of patient position and breathing status and then for changes between pre- and post-TBI. These may also be compared with radiation dose profiles through the lung. A preliminary study on 21 leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation indicates the following: (a) Density gradients of patients' lungs in the antero-posterior direction show a marked heterogeneity before and after transplantation compared with normal lungs. The patients with departures from normal density gradients pre-TBI correlate with later pulmonary complications. (b) Measurements of average peripheral lung densities have demonstrated that the average lung density in the younger age group is substantially higher: pre-TBI, the average CT number (1,000 scale) is -638 +/- 39 Hounsfield unit (HU) for 0-10 years old and -739 +/- 53 HU for 21-40 years old. (c) Density profiles showed no post-TBI regional changes in lung density corresponding to the dose profile across the lung, so no differentiation of a radiation-specific effect has yet been possible. Computed tomographic density profiles in the antero-posterior direction are successfully used to verify positioning of the CT slice and the breathing level of the lung

  12. Structural features of the adsorption layer of pentacene on the graphite surface and the PMMA/graphite hybrid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeeva, A. I.; Gorbunov, V. A.; Litunenko, T. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using the molecular dynamics and the Monte Carlo methods, we have studied the structural features and growth mechanism of the pentacene film on graphite and polymethylmethacrylate /graphite surfaces. Monolayer capacity and molecular area, optimal angles between the pentacene molecules and graphite and PMMA/graphite surfaces as well as the characteristic angles between the neighboring pentacene molecules in the adsorption layer were estimated. It is shown that the orientation of the pentacene molecules in the film is determined by a number of factors, including the surface concentration of the molecules, relief of the surface, presence or absence of the polymer layer and its thickness. The pentacene molecules adsorbed on the graphite surface keep a horizontal position relative to the long axis at any surface coverage/thickness of the film. In the presence of the PMMA layer on the graphite, the increase of the number of pentacene molecules as well as the thickness of the PMMA layer induce the change of molecular orientation from predominantly horizontal to vertical one. The reason for such behavior is supposed to be the roughness of the PMMA surface.

  13. Changes of bone mineral density, bone metabolism indices and cell factors in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the changes of bone mineral density, bone metabolism indices and cell factor in patients with hyperthyroidism Methods: A total of 116 cases of hyperthyroidism patients from June 2015 to June 2016 in our hospital were selected. as the object of observation group. Then, 120 cases of healthy people were selected as the object of control group. Thyroid function indexes (TT3, TT4, FT3, FT4, TSH, bone mineral density (BMD, bone metabolism indexes (PTH, BGP, PINP and cell factors (IL-2, IL-6 in both groups were detected and compared. Results: TT3, TT4, FT3, FT4, TSH in control group were (1.40±0.81 nmol/ L, (94.36±32.10 nmol/L, (5.04±1.18 pmol/L, (15.37±4.60 pmol/L, (2.55±1.21 mU/L. TT3, TT4, FT3, FT4, TSH in observation group were (5.48±2.36 nmol/L, (405.55±71.48 nmol/L, (16.27±5.14 pmol/L, (46.83±12.66 pmol/L, (0.04±0.01 mU/L. TT3, TT4, FT3, FT4 in the observation group were higher than that in control group obviously. TSH in the observation group was lower than that in observation group obviously. The difference between two groups was considered statistically significant. BMD, PTH in observation group were (0.62±0.08 g/m2, (26.25±9.16 pg/mL, which were obviously lower than BMD (1.23±0.11 g/m2, PTH (37.13±8.05 pg/mL in control group. The difference between two groups was considered statistically significant. BGP, PINP in observation group were (14.51±6.25 ng/ mL, (223.63±10.38 μg/L, which were obviously higher than BGP (5.97±1.98 ng/mL, PINP (33.18±6.15 μg/L in control group. The difference between two groups was considered statistically significant. IL-2 in observation group was (1.60±0.51 ng/L, which was obviously lower than IL-2 (4.72±1.29 ng/L, in control group. IL-6 in observation group was (1.98±0.34 pg/L, which was obviously higher than IL-6, (1.50±0.23 pg/L, in control group. The difference between two groups was considered statistically significant. Conclusion: Bone mineral density in patients

  14. From Graphite to Graphene via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dejun

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to study both graphene on graphite and pristine freestanding grapheme using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) simulation technique. In the experiment part, good quality tungsten metalic tips for experiment were fabricated using our newly developed tip making setup. Then a series of measurements using a technique called electrostatic-manipulation scanning tunneling microscopy (EM-STM) of our own development were performed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. The electrostatic interaction between the STM tip and the sample can be tuned to produce both reversible and irreversible large-scale movement of the graphite surface. Under this influence, atomic-resolution STM images reveal that a continuous electronic transition between two distinct patterns can be systematically controlled. DFT calculations reveal that this transition can be related to vertical displacements of the top layer of graphite relative to the bulk. Evidence for horizontal shifts in the top layer of graphite is also presented. Excellent agreement is found between experimental STM images and those simulated using DFT. In addition, the EM-STM technique was also used to controllably and reversibly pull freestanding graphene membranes up to 35 nm from their equilibrium height. Atomic-scale corrugation amplitudes 20 times larger than the STM electronic corrugation for graphene on a substrate were observed. The freestanding graphene membrane responds to a local attractive force created at the STM tip as a highly conductive yet flexible grounding plane with an elastic restoring force.

  15. Density changes observed in pure molybdenum and Mo-41Re after irradiation in FFTF/MOTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    Pure molybdenum and Mo-41wt% Re, in both the 20% cold-worked and aged and the annealed and aged conditions, were irradiated in FFTF/MOTA to exposures as high as 111 dpa. Pure molybdenum appears to approach a saturation swelling level that is independent of the starting state. Cold-worked and aged molybdenum initially swells at a higher rate than that of solution annealed and aged molybdenum and overshoots the saturation level at lower irradiation temperatures. This requires that part of the accumulated swelling be removed to approach saturation, probably by void shrinkage. The alloy Mo-41Re exhibits a more complex behavior with the annealed and aged condition initially swelling faster, but eventually the density change of both conditions begins to turn downward and tends toward densification. The role of solid transmutation to Tc, Re, and Os is though to be very important in the irradiation behavior of these two metals. Calculations of transmutant generation are provided for FFTF, HFIR and STARFIRE spectra

  16. Bone mineral density changes during pregnancy in actively exercising women as measured by quantitative ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, William W K; Wong, Margaret W N

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate whether bone mineral density (BMD) changes in women engaged in active exercises during pregnancy would be different from non-exercising women. Consecutive patients with singleton pregnancies who were engaged in active exercise training during pregnancy were prospectively recruited over a period of 6 months. Quantitative USG measurements of the os calcis BMD were performed at 14-20 weeks and at 36-38 weeks. These patients were compared to a control cohort of non-exercising low-risk women. A total of 24 physically active women undergoing active physical training of over 10 h per week at 20 weeks gestation and beyond (mean 13.1 h, SD 3.3) were compared to 94 non-exercising low-risk women. A marginal fall in BMD of 0.015 g/cm(2) (SD 0.034) was demonstrable from early to late gestation in the exercising women, which was significantly lower than that of non-exercising women (0.041 g/cm(2); SD 0.042; p = 0.005). Logistic regression models confirmed that active exercises in pregnancy were significantly associated with the absence of or less BMD loss in pregnancy. In women actively engaged in physical training during pregnancy, the physiological fall in BMD during pregnancy was apparently less compared to those who did not regularly exercise.

  17. Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs): High density polyethylene and hydrocarbon waxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Mulan, E-mail: mmu01@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk; Basheer, P. A. M., E-mail: mmu01@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Bai, Yun, E-mail: yun.bai@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McNally, Tony, E-mail: t.mcnally@warwick.ac.uk [WMG, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) with high (HPW, T{sub m}=56-58 °C) and low (L-PW, T{sub m}=18-23 °C) melting point waxes were prepared by melt-mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their potential in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications for housing assessed. The structure and morphology of these blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both H-PW and L-PW were uniformly distributed throughout the HDPE matrix. The melting point and latent heat of the SSPCMs were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results demonstrated that both H-PW and L-PW have a plasticisation effect on the HDPE matrix. The tensile and flexural properties of the samples were measured at room temperature (RT, 20±2 °C) and 70 °C, respectively. All mechanical properties of HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends decreased from RT to 70 °C. In all instances at RT, modulus and stress, irrespective of the mode of deformation was greater for the HDPE/H-PW blends. However, at 70 °C, there was no significant difference in mechanical properties between the HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends.

  18. Weakening density dependence from climate change and agricultural intensification triggers pest outbreaks: a 37-year observation of cotton bollworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Fang; Hui, Cang; Ge, Saiying; Men, Xin-Yuan; Zhao, Zi-Hua; Shi, Pei-Jian; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Li, Bai-Lian

    2014-09-01

    Understanding drivers of population fluctuation, especially for agricultural pests, is central to the provision of agro-ecosystem services. Here, we examine the role of endogenous density dependence and exogenous factors of climate and human activity in regulating the 37-year population dynamics of an important agricultural insect pest, the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), in North China from 1975 to 2011. Quantitative time-series analysis provided strong evidence explaining long-term population dynamics of the cotton bollworm and its driving factors. Rising temperature and declining rainfall exacerbated the effect of agricultural intensification on continuously weakening the negative density dependence in regulating the population dynamics of cotton bollworms. Consequently, ongoing climate change and agricultural intensification unleashed the tightly regulated pest population and triggered the regional outbreak of H. armigera in 1992. Although the negative density dependence can effectively regulate the population change rate to fluctuate around zero at stable equilibrium levels before and after outbreak in the 1992, the population equilibrium jumped to a higher density level with apparently larger amplitudes after the outbreak. The results highlight the possibility for exogenous factors to induce pest outbreaks and alter the population regulating mechanism of negative density dependence and, thus, the stable equilibrium of the pest population, often to a higher level, posing considerable risks to the provision of agro-ecosystem services and regional food security. Efficient and timely measures of pest management in the era of Anthropocene should target the strengthening and revival of weakening density dependence caused by climate change and human activities.

  19. Determinants of change in bone mineral density and fracture risk during bisphosphonate holiday.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L H R; Adams-Huet, B; Poindexter, J R; Maalouf, N M

    2016-05-01

    In a retrospective analysis of 208 osteoporotic patients followed during a bisphosphonate holiday, lower body weight and risedronate use were associated with a more rapid decline in bone mineral density during the bisphosphonate holiday, while bone mineral density (BMD) trends were similar in patients who sustained vs. did not sustain a fracture. A drug holiday has been suggested for some bisphosphonate-treated patients with osteoporosis to minimize potential side effects from prolonged use. However, there is limited information on the evolution of BMD during a bisphosphonate holiday. Our study analyzed the longitudinal course of BMD following bisphosphonate discontinuation and assessed its determinants. Retrospective single-center cohort study of osteoporosis patients treated with alendronate or risedronate for at least 2 years and then discontinued their bisphosphonate for a drug holiday. Patients were stratified by bisphosphonate type and by fracture occurrence during drug holiday. A total of 208 patients were included in this analysis (87.5 % female). At the time of bisphosphonate cessation, mean ± SD age was 66.9 ± 8.9 years and BMI 24.5 ± 4.4 kg/m(2). Duration of bisphosphonate treatment was 5.2 ± 2.3 years, and follow-up during holiday was 3.3 ± 1.7 years. During the first 2 years of the holiday, BMD remained stable at the lumbar spine and femoral neck, but declined significantly at the total hip. BMD declined significantly at all sites thereafter. Significant predictors of BMD decline during bisphosphonate holiday included lower BMI at the start of the holiday and change in body weight during the holiday. BMD decline was more pronounced in former risedronate compared to former alendronate users. BMD trends were similar in patients who sustained vs. did not sustain a fracture during the holiday. BMD at the total hip declines significantly within 1 year of bisphosphonate discontinuation, particularly in lean patients

  20. Early changes of parotid density and volume predict modifications at the end of therapy and intensity of acute xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Broggi, Sara; Scalco, Elisa; Rizzo, Giovanna; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Fiorino, Claudio; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Dinapoli, Nicola; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ricchetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the predictive power of early variations of parotid gland volume and density on final changes at the end of therapy and, possibly, on acute xerostomia during IMRT for head-neck cancer. Data of 92 parotids (46 patients) were available. Kinetics of the changes during treatment were described by the daily rate of density (rΔρ) and volume (rΔvol) variation based on weekly diagnostic kVCT images. Correlation between early and final changes was investigated as well as the correlation with prospective toxicity data (CTCAEv3.0) collected weekly during treatment for 24/46 patients. A higher rΔρ was observed during the first compared to last week of treatment (-0,50 vs -0,05HU, p-value = 0.0001). Based on early variations, a good estimation of the final changes may be obtained (Δρ: AUC = 0.82, p = 0.0001; Δvol: AUC = 0.77, p = 0.0001). Both early rΔρ and rΔvol predict a higher ''mean'' acute xerostomia score (≥ median value, 1.57; p-value = 0.01). Median early density rate changes for patients with mean xerostomia score ≥ / 3 /day for rΔρ and rΔvol respectively. Further studies are necessary to definitively assess the potential of early density/volume changes in identifying more sensitive patients at higher risk of experiencing xerostomia. (orig.) [de

  1. Changes in subchondral bone mineral density and collagen matrix organization in growing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Jaakko T; Brama, Pieter A J; Halmesmäki, Esa; Harjula, Terhi; Tuukkanen, Juha; van Weeren, P René; Helminen, Heikki J; Hyttinen, Mika M

    2008-12-01

    The effects of growth and maturation on the mineral deposition and the collagen framework of equine subchondral bone (SCB) were studied. Osteochondral specimens (diameter 6 mm) from the left metacarpophalangeal joint of 5-(n=8), 11-(n=8) and 18-month-old (n=6) horses were investigated at two differently loaded sites (Site 1 (S1): intermittent peak loading; Site 2 (S2): habitual loading). The SCB mineral density (BMD) was measured with peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT), and the data were adjusted against the volume fraction (Vv) of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Polarised light microscopy (PLM) was used to analyze the Vv, the collagen fibril parallelism index and the orientation angle distribution in two fractions (1 mm/fraction) beneath the osteochondral junction of the SCB. PLM analysis was made along two randomly selected perpendicularly oriented vertical sections to measure the tissue anisotropy in the x-, y-, and z-directions. The BMD of SCB at S1 and S2 increased significantly during maturation. At the same time, the Vv of the ECM increased even more. This meant that the Vv-adjusted BMD decreased. There were no significant differences between sites. The basic collagen fibril framework of SCB seems to be established already at the age of 5 months. During maturation, the extracellular matrix underwent a decrease in collagen fibril parallelism but no changes in collagen orientation. The variation was negligible in the collagen network estimates in the two section planes. Growth and maturation induce significant changes in the equine SCB. The BMD increase in SCB is primarily due to the growth of bone volume and not to any increase in mineral deposition. An increase in weight-bearing appears to greatly affect the BMD and the volume of the extracellular matrix. Growth and maturation induce a striking change in collagen fibril parallelism but not in fibril orientation. The structural anisotropy of the subchondral bone is significant along the

  2. Whole genome DNA copy number changes identified by high density oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jing

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes in DNA copy number are one of the hallmarks of the genetic instability common to most human cancers. Previous micro-array-based methods have been used to identify chromosomal gains and losses; however, they are unable to genotype alleles at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Here we describe a novel algorithm that uses a recently developed high-density oligonucleotide array-based SNP genotyping method, whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA, to identify genome-wide chromosomal gains and losses at high resolution. WGSA simultaneously genotypes over 10,000 SNPs by allele-specific hybridisation to perfect match (PM and mismatch (MM probes synthesised on a single array. The copy number algorithm jointly uses PM intensity and discrimination ratios between paired PM and MM intensity values to identify and estimate genetic copy number changes. Values from an experimental sample are compared with SNP-specific distributions derived from a reference set containing over 100 normal individuals to gain statistical power. Genomic regions with statistically significant copy number changes can be identified using both single point analysis and contiguous point analysis of SNP intensities. We identified multiple regions of amplification and deletion using a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. We verified these results using an independent method based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that our approach is both sensitive and specific and can tolerate samples which contain a mixture of both tumour and normal DNA. In addition, by using known allele frequencies from the reference set, statistically significant genomic intervals can be identified containing contiguous stretches of homozygous markers, potentially allowing the detection of regions undergoing loss of heterozygosity (LOH without the need for a matched normal control sample. The coupling of LOH analysis, via SNP genotyping, with copy number

  3. Changes in peripapillary blood vessel density in Graves' orbitopathy after orbital decompression surgery as measured by optical coherence tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kyle T; Bullock, John R; Drumright, Ryan T; Olsen, Matthew J; Penman, Alan D

    2018-03-08

    The purpose is to evaluate the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in the evaluation of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and response to orbital decompression in patients with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON). This was a single-center, prospective case series in a cohort of 12 patients (24 orbits) with GO and ±DON, (6 orbits) who underwent bilateral orbital decompression. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative OCT angiography of the peripapillary area. Vessel density indices were calculated in a 4.5 mm × 4.5 mm ellipsoid centered on the optic disk using split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography algorithm, producing the vessel density measurements. Mean change in vessel density indices was compared between pre- and postoperative sessions and between patients with and without DON. Patient 1, a 34-year-old male with GO and unilateral DON OD, showed a significant reduction in blood vessel density indices oculus dexter (OD) (DON eye) after decompression while a more modest reduction was found oculus sinister (OS) with the greatest change noted intrapapillary. Patient 2, a 50-year-old male with DON OU, showed worsening neuropathy following decompression OD that was confirmed by angiographic density indices. Patient 3, a 55-year-female with DON, showed a reduction in blood vessel density OD and increased density OS. Patients without DON showed overall less impressive changes in indices as compared to those with DON. Using OCT angiography, response to surgical treatment in GO orbits, more so in orbits with DON, can be demonstrated and quantified using vessel density indices with reproducibility.

  4. Should we change our lipid management strategies to focus on non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rana, Jamal S.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering, patients continue to be at significant risk of cardiovascular events. Assessment of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) provides a measure of cholesterol contained in all atherogenic particles. In the

  5. Oxidation of graphites for core support post in air at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisashi; Fujii, Kimio; Kurosawa, Takeshi

    1982-07-01

    Oxidation reactions of candidate graphites for core support post with atmospheric air were studied in a temperature range between 550 0 C and 1000 0 C. The reaction rates, temperature dependence of the rates and distribution of bulk density in the oxidized graphites were measured and the characters obtained were compared between the brand of graphites. On the basis of the experimental results, dimension and strength of the post after corrosion with air, which might be introduced in rupture accident of primary coolant tube, were discussed. In the case of IG-11 graphite, it was proved that the strength of post is still sufficient even 100 hours after the beginning of the accident and that, however, it is necessary to insert more deeply the post against graphite blocks. (author)

  6. Inverting the diastereoselectivity of the mukaiyama-michael addition with graphite-based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Acocella, Maria Rosaria

    2014-02-07

    Here, we show that graphite-based catalysts, mainly graphite oxide (GO) and exfoliated GO, are effective recyclable catalysts for a relevant stereoselective Mukaiyama-Michael addition, outperforming currently available catalysts. Moreover, the graphite-based catalysts described here invert the diastereoselectivity relative to that observed with known catalysts, with the unprecedented large prevalence of the anti diastereoisomer. This inverted diastereoselectivity is increased when the catalyst concentration is reduced and after catalyst recycling. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the selectivity is determined by two types of supramolecular interactions operating between the catalyst and the substrates at the diastereoselectivity- determining transition state, specifically, the π-stacking of b-nitrostyrene with graphite and the van der Waals interaction between the SiMe3 group of the silyl ether and the graphite. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on graphite specimens irradiated in capsule OG-3 are presented. The graphite grades investigated included near-isotropic H-451 (three different preproduction lots), TS-1240, and SO818; needle coke H-327; and European coal tar pitch coke grades P 3 JHA 2 N, P 3 JHAN, and ASI2-500. Data were obtained in the temperature range 823 0 K to 1673 0 K. The peak fast neutron fluence in the experiment was 3 x 10 25 n/m 3 (E greater than 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/; the total accumulated fluence exceeded 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some H-451 specimens and 6 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some TS-1240 specimens. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes on H-451 graphite differed slightly from earlier predictions. For an irradiation temperature of about 1225 0 K, axial shrinkage rates at high fluences were somewhat higher than predicted, and the fluence at which radial expansion started (about 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 at 1275 0 K) was lower. TS-1240 graphite underwent smaller dimensional changes than H-451 graphite, while limited data on SO818 and ASI2-500 graphites showed similar behavior to H-451. P 3 JHAN and P 3 JHA 2 N graphites displayed anisotropic behavior with rapid axial shrinkage. Comparison of dimensional changes between specimens from three logs of H-451 and of TS-1240 graphites showed no significant log-to-log variations for H-451, and small but significant log-to-log variations for TS-1240. The thermal expansivity of the near-isotropic graphites irradiated at 865-1045 0 K first increased by 5 percent to 10 percent and then decreased. At higher irradiation temperatures the thermal expansivity decreased by up to 50 percent. Changes in thermal conductivity were consistent with previously established curves. Specimens which were successively irradiated at two different temperatures took on the saturation conductivity for the new temperature

  8. Association Between Changes in the Angle of Mandible and Reduced Bone Mineral Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, D.; Sarwath, S.; Nigar, N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish an association between the angle of mandible on an orthopantomogram (OPG) with reduced bone mineral density of femoral neck and spine on Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Institute of Basic Medical Sciences (IBMS), Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, from December 2011 to July 2012. Methodology: Female subjects between 25 and 85 years of age were divided into premenopausal (Group-I) and postmenopausal (Group II) groups. Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scan was done to divide Group-I and Group-II into normal (pre A, post A), osteopenic (pre B, post B) and osteoporotic (pre C, post C) groups. Changes seen in angle of mandible on orthopantomogram (OPG) in subgroups of Group-I were compared with each other and with subgroups of Group-II. SPSS version 16 was used to carry out the statistical analysis. Intragroup significance was evaluated through One Way Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA). For intergroup significance independent samples t-test was applied. Results: The angle of mandible (A) was significantly decreased in Intragroup comparison of Group-II (0.035) between Post normal (Post A) vs. Post osteopenic (Post B) groups. Intergroup comparison between Group-I and Group-II (0.005) showed a significant decrease in angle of mandible between Pre osteopenic (Pre B) vs. Post osteopenic (Post B). Conclusion: As decrease in angle of mandible was observed at stage of osteopenia, it can be conveniently used for early detection of osteoporosis. (author)

  9. Dietary patterns and longitudinal change in hip bone mineral density among older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, T S; Harrison, S; Judd, S; Orwoll, E S; Marshall, L M; Shannon, J; Langsetmo, L; Lane, N E; Shikany, J M

    2018-05-01

    Studying dietary patterns is often more informative than individual nutrients or foods. We found that a Prudent dietary pattern (rich in vegetables and fish) was associated with reduced loss of total hip BMD in older men. A Prudent dietary pattern may be a potential lifestyle strategy for minimizing bone loss. This study aimed to identify baseline dietary patterns using factor analysis in a cohort of older men and to evaluate whether the dietary patterns were associated with bone mineral density change (%ΔBMD) at the total hip and femoral neck over time. Participants (n = 4379; mean age 72.9 ± 5.5 years) were from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) prospective cohort study and had dietary data collected at baseline (March 2000-April 2002) and BMD measured at baseline and Visit 2 (March 2005-May 2006). Dietary intake was assessed with a brief Block food frequency questionnaire (FFQ); factor analysis was used to derive dietary patterns. BMD was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); %ΔBMD was calculated from baseline to Visit 2. We used generalized linear regression to estimate least square (LS) means of %ΔBMD in quartiles of the dietary pattern scores adjusted for potential confounding factors. Two major dietary patterns were derived: Prudent (abundant in vegetables, salad, and non-fried fish) and Western (rich in hamburger, fries, processed meats, cheese, and sweets/desserts). There was an inverse association between adherence to the Prudent pattern and total hip %ΔBMD (p-trend = 0.028 after adjusting for age and clinical site; p-trend = 0.033 after further adjustment for smoking, calcium supplement use, diabetes, hypertension, and total energy intake). No other consistent associations between dietary patterns and %ΔBMD were observed. Greater adherence to a Prudent dietary pattern may attenuate total hip BMD loss (%ΔBMD) in older men.

  10. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  11. The effect of incremental changes in phonotactic probability and neighborhood density on word learning by preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkel, Holly L.; Bontempo, Daniel E.; Aschenbrenner, Andrew J.; Maekawa, Junko; Lee, Su-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Phonotactic probability or neighborhood density have predominately been defined using gross distinctions (i.e., low vs. high). The current studies examined the influence of finer changes in probability (Experiment 1) and density (Experiment 2) on word learning. Method The full range of probability or density was examined by sampling five nonwords from each of four quartiles. Three- and 5-year-old children received training on nonword-nonobject pairs. Learning was measured in a picture-naming task immediately following training and 1-week after training. Results were analyzed using multi-level modeling. Results A linear spline model best captured nonlinearities in phonotactic probability. Specifically word learning improved as probability increased in the lowest quartile, worsened as probability increased in the midlow quartile, and then remained stable and poor in the two highest quartiles. An ordinary linear model sufficiently described neighborhood density. Here, word learning improved as density increased across all quartiles. Conclusion Given these different patterns, phonotactic probability and neighborhood density appear to influence different word learning processes. Specifically, phonotactic probability may affect recognition that a sound sequence is an acceptable word in the language and is a novel word for the child, whereas neighborhood density may influence creation of a new representation in long-term memory. PMID:23882005

  12. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, A., E-mail: aurelian.marcu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Avotina, L. [Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda 4, LV 1010 Riga (Latvia); Porosnicu, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Marin, A. [Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, 202 Splaiul Independentei 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Grigorescu, C.E.A. [National Institute R& D for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Ursescu, D. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Lungu, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics Atomistilor Str., 105 bis, 077125, Magurele (Romania); Demitri, N. [Hard X-ray Beamline and Structural Biology, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 - km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza TS Italy (Italy); Lungu, C.P. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp{sup 3}% increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp{sup 3}% is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp{sup 3} bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp{sup 3} percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  13. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Porosnicu, C.; Marin, A.; Grigorescu, C.E.A.; Ursescu, D.; Lungu, M.; Demitri, N.; Lungu, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp 3 % increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp 3 % is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp 3 bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp 3 percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  14. Comparison of different statin therapy to change low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in Korean patients with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Ah Reum; Song, Young Shin; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Lim, Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul; Choi, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to apply the proper intensity of statin for new treatment guidelines in clinical settings because of few data about the statin efficacy in Asians. We conducted a retrospective, observational study to estimate the percentage changes in lipid parameters and glucose induced by different statins. We analyzed 3854 patients including those with nondiabetes and diabetes treated at the outpatient clinic between 2003 and 2013 who were statin-naïve and maintained fixed-dose of statin for at least 18 months. Moderate- and low-intensity statin therapy was effective in reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to statin group. The effects of statins in elevating high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were similar in each statin groups, except the ezetimibe-simvastatin group (4.5 ± 2.1%) and high-dose atorvastatin groups (9.7 ± 3.3% and 8.7 ± 2.4% for 40 mg and 80 mg of atorvastatin/day, respectively). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased less and LDL-C decreased more in diabetes than in nondiabetes. There were no significant changes of fasting glucose after statin use in nondiabetic patients. Moderate- or low-intensity statin was effective enough in reaching National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III LDL-C target goals in Koreans. Low-intensity statin showed around 30% LDL-C reduction from the baseline level in Koreans, which is comparable to moderate-intensity statin in new guideline. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of the Heat Treatment on the Graphite Matrix of Fuel Element for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chungyong; Lee, Seungjae; Suh, Jungmin; Jo, Youngho; Lee, Youngwoo; Cho, Moonsung

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the cylinder-formed fuel element for the block type reactor is focused on, which consists of the large part of graphite matrix. One of the most important properties of the graphite matrix is the mechanical strength for the high reliability because the graphite matrix should be enabled to protect the TRISO particles from the irradiation environment and the impact from the outside. In this study, the three kinds of candidate graphites and Phenol as a binder were chosen and mixed with each other, formed and heated for the compressive strength test. The objective of this research is to optimize the kinds and composition of the mixed graphite and the forming process by evaluating the compressive strength before/after heat treatment (carbonization of binder). In this study, the effect of heat treatment on graphite matrix was studied in terms of the density and the compressive strength. The size (diameter and length) of pellet is increased by heat treatment. Due to additional weight reduction and swelling (length and diameter) of samples the density of graphite pellet is decreased from about 2.0 to about 1.7g/cm 3 . From the mechanical test results, the compressive strength of graphite pellets was related to the various conditions such as the contents of binder, the kinds of graphite and the heat treatment. Both the green pellet and the heat treated pellet, the compressive strength of G+S+P pellets is relatively higher than that of R+S+P pellets. To optimize fuel element matrix, the effect of Phenol and other binders, graphite composition and the heat treatment on the mechanical properties will be deeply investigated for further study

  16. THE FIRST DISCOVERY OF PRESOLAR GRAPHITE GRAINS FROM THE HIGHLY REDUCING QINGZHEN (EH3) METEORITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuchen; Lin, Yangting; Zhang, Jianchao; Hao, Jialong, E-mail: linyt@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2016-07-10

    Presolar graphite grains have been extensively studied, but are limited in carbonaceous chondrites, particularly in Murchison (CM2) and Orgueil (CI1), which sampled materials from the oxidizing regions in the solar nebula. Here, we report the first discovery of presolar graphite grains from the Qingzhen (EH3) enstatite chondrite which formed under a highly reducing condition. Eighteen presolar graphite grains were identified by C-isotope mapping of the low-density fraction (1.75–1.85 g cm{sup 3}) from Qingzhen acid residue. Another 58 graphite spherules were found in different areas of the same sample mount using a scanning electron microscope and were classified into three morphologies, including cauliflower, onion, and cauliflower–onion. The Raman spectra of these spherules vary from ordered, disordered, and glassy to kerogen-like, suggestive of a wide range of thermal metamorphisms. NanoSIMS analysis of the C- and Si-isotopes of these graphite spherules confirmed 23 presolar grains. The other 35 graphite spherules have no significant isotopic anomalies, but they share similar morphologies and Raman spectra with the presolar ones. Another three grains were identified during NanoSIMS analysis. Of all the 44 presolar graphite grains identified, six grains show {sup 28}Si-excesses, suggestive of supernovae origins, and four grains are {sup 12}C- and {sup 29,30}Si-rich, consistent with low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch star origins. Another two graphite spherules have extremely low {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios with marginal solar Si-isotopes. The morphologies, Raman spectra, and C- and Si-isotopic distributions of the presolar graphite grains from the Qingzhen enstatite chondrite are similar to those of the low-density fractions from Murchison carbonaceous chondrites. This study suggests a homogeneous distribution of presolar graphite grains in the solar nebula.

  17. THE FIRST DISCOVERY OF PRESOLAR GRAPHITE GRAINS FROM THE HIGHLY REDUCING QINGZHEN (EH3) METEORITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuchen; Lin, Yangting; Zhang, Jianchao; Hao, Jialong

    2016-01-01

    Presolar graphite grains have been extensively studied, but are limited in carbonaceous chondrites, particularly in Murchison (CM2) and Orgueil (CI1), which sampled materials from the oxidizing regions in the solar nebula. Here, we report the first discovery of presolar graphite grains from the Qingzhen (EH3) enstatite chondrite which formed under a highly reducing condition. Eighteen presolar graphite grains were identified by C-isotope mapping of the low-density fraction (1.75–1.85 g cm 3 ) from Qingzhen acid residue. Another 58 graphite spherules were found in different areas of the same sample mount using a scanning electron microscope and were classified into three morphologies, including cauliflower, onion, and cauliflower–onion. The Raman spectra of these spherules vary from ordered, disordered, and glassy to kerogen-like, suggestive of a wide range of thermal metamorphisms. NanoSIMS analysis of the C- and Si-isotopes of these graphite spherules confirmed 23 presolar grains. The other 35 graphite spherules have no significant isotopic anomalies, but they share similar morphologies and Raman spectra with the presolar ones. Another three grains were identified during NanoSIMS analysis. Of all the 44 presolar graphite grains identified, six grains show 28 Si-excesses, suggestive of supernovae origins, and four grains are 12 C- and 29,30 Si-rich, consistent with low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch star origins. Another two graphite spherules have extremely low 12 C/ 13 C ratios with marginal solar Si-isotopes. The morphologies, Raman spectra, and C- and Si-isotopic distributions of the presolar graphite grains from the Qingzhen enstatite chondrite are similar to those of the low-density fractions from Murchison carbonaceous chondrites. This study suggests a homogeneous distribution of presolar graphite grains in the solar nebula.

  18. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  19. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  20. Effects of gel composition on the radiation induced density change in PAG polymer gel dosimeters: a model and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilts, M; Jirasek, A; Duzenli, C

    2004-01-01

    Due to a density change that occurs in irradiated polyacrylamide gel (PAG), x-ray computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a feasible method of performing polymer gel dosimetry. However, applicability of the technique is currently limited by low sensitivity of the density change to dose. This work investigates the effect of PAG composition on the radiation induced density change and provides direction for future work in improving the sensitivity of CT polymer gel dosimetry. A model is developed that describes the PAG density change (Δρ gel ) as a function of both polymer yield (%P) and an intrinsic density change, per unit polymer yield, that occurs on conversion of monomer to polymer (Δρ polymer ). %P is a function of the fraction of monomer consumed and the weight fraction of monomer in the unirradiated gel (%T). Applying the model to experimental CT and Raman spectroscopic data, two important fundamental properties of the response of PAG density to dose (Δρ gel dose response) are discovered. The first property is that Δρ polymer depends on PAG %C (cross-linking fraction of total monomer) such that low and high %C PAGs exhibit a higher Δρ polymer than do more intermediate %C PAGs. This relationship is opposite to the relationship of polymer yield to %C and is explained by the effect of %C on the type of polymer formed. The second property is that the Δρ gel dose response is linearly dependent on %T. From the model, the inference is that, at least for %T≤12%, monomer consumption and Δρ polymer depend solely on %C. In terms of optimizing CT polymer gel dosimetry for high sensitivity, these results indicate that Δρ polymer can be expected to vary with each polymer gel system and thus should be considered when choosing a polymer gel for CT gel dosimetry. However, Δρ polymer and %P cannot be maximized simultaneously and maximizing %P, by choosing gels with intermediate %C and high %T, is found to have the greatest impact on increasing the

  1. Preparation and characterization of copper-graphite composites by electrical explosion of wire in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, T N; Gul, W H; Bac, L H; Kim, J C

    2014-11-01

    Copper-graphite nanocomposites containing 5 vol.% graphite were prepared by a powder metallurgy route using an electrical wire explosion (EEW) in liquid method and spark plasma sintering (SPS) process. Graphite rods with a 0.3 mm diameter and copper wire with a 0.2 mm diameter were used as raw materials for EEWin liquid. To compare, a pure copper and copper-graphite mixture was also prepared. The fabricated graphite was in the form of a nanosheet, onto which copper particles were coated. Sintering was performed at 900 degrees C at a heating rate of 30 degrees C/min for 10 min and under a pressure of 70 MPa. The density of the sintered composite samples was measured by the Archimedes method. A wear test was performed by a ball-on-disc tribometer under dry conditions at room temperature in air. The presence of graphite effectively reduced the wear of composites. The copper-graphite nanocomposites prepared by EEW had lower wear rates than pure copper material and simple mixed copper-graphite.

  2. Study on wear resistance of vanadium alloying compacted/vermicular graphite cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yoon Woo

    1987-01-01

    Wear resistance of the Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast irons was studied by changing the vanadium content in the cast irons. The results obtained in this work are summarized as follows. 1. When the same amount of vanadium was added to the flake graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphitecast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron, spheroidal graphite cast iron and Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron wear resistance decreased in following sequence, that is, flake graphite cast iron> spheroidal graphite cast iron>Compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron. 2. Addition of vanadium to the Compacted/Vermicular cast iron leaded to a remarkable increase in hardness because it made the amount of pearlite in matrix increase. 3. Addition of vanadium to the compacted/Vermicular graphite cast iron significantly enhanced wear resistance and the maximum resistance was achieved at about 0.36% vanadium. 4. The maximum amount of wear apppeared at sliding speed of about 1.4m/sec and wear mode was considered to be oxidation abrasion from the observation of wear tracks. (Author)

  3. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  4. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  5. Whole brain analysis of postmortem density changes of grey and white matter on computed tomography by statistical parametric mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Katsube, Takashi; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kanayama, Hidekazu; Tada, Keiji; Yamamoto, Yasushi [Shimane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Takeshita, Haruo [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Legal Medicine, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kawakami, Kazunori [Fujifilm RI Pharma, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    This study examined the usefulness of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for investigating postmortem changes on brain computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study included 128 patients (23 - 100 years old) without cerebral abnormalities who underwent unenhanced brain CT before and after death. The antemortem CT (AMCT) scans and postmortem CT (PMCT) scans were spatially normalized using our original brain CT template, and postmortem changes of CT values (in Hounsfield units; HU) were analysed by the SPM technique. Compared with AMCT scans, 58.6 % and 98.4 % of PMCT scans showed loss of the cerebral sulci and an unclear grey matter (GM)-white matter (WM) interface, respectively. SPM analysis revealed a significant decrease in cortical GM density within 70 min after death on PMCT scans, suggesting cytotoxic brain oedema. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the density of the WM, lenticular nucleus and thalamus more than 120 min after death. The SPM technique demonstrated typical postmortem changes on brain CT scans, and revealed that the unclear GM-WM interface on early PMCT scans is caused by a rapid decrease in cortical GM density combined with a delayed increase in WM density. SPM may be useful for assessment of whole brain postmortem changes. (orig.)

  6. Periacetabular Bone Mineral Density Changes After Resurfacing Hip Arthroplasty Versus Conventional Total Hip Arthroplasty. A Randomized Controlled DEXA Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, J.M.H.; Pakvis, D.F.; Hendrickx, B.W.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; van Susante, J.L.C.

    2013-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt–chromium cup (n

  7. Controlling of merging electric field and IMF magnitude on storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.L.; Ma, S.Y.; Liu, R.S.; Luehr, H.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-01-01

    The controls of merging electrical field, Em, and IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) magnitude, B, on the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass density are statistically investigated using GRACE accelerometer observations and the OMNI data of solar wind and IMF for 35 great storms during

  8. Whole brain analysis of postmortem density changes of grey and white matter on computed tomography by statistical parametric mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Katsube, Takashi; Kitagaki, Hajime; Kanayama, Hidekazu; Tada, Keiji; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Takeshita, Haruo; Kawakami, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the usefulness of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for investigating postmortem changes on brain computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study included 128 patients (23 - 100 years old) without cerebral abnormalities who underwent unenhanced brain CT before and after death. The antemortem CT (AMCT) scans and postmortem CT (PMCT) scans were spatially normalized using our original brain CT template, and postmortem changes of CT values (in Hounsfield units; HU) were analysed by the SPM technique. Compared with AMCT scans, 58.6 % and 98.4 % of PMCT scans showed loss of the cerebral sulci and an unclear grey matter (GM)-white matter (WM) interface, respectively. SPM analysis revealed a significant decrease in cortical GM density within 70 min after death on PMCT scans, suggesting cytotoxic brain oedema. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the density of the WM, lenticular nucleus and thalamus more than 120 min after death. The SPM technique demonstrated typical postmortem changes on brain CT scans, and revealed that the unclear GM-WM interface on early PMCT scans is caused by a rapid decrease in cortical GM density combined with a delayed increase in WM density. SPM may be useful for assessment of whole brain postmortem changes. (orig.)

  9. Dietary Energy Density in Relation to Subsequent Changes of Weight and Waist Circumference in European Men and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, H.; Ginder, V.; Jebb, S.A.; Forouchi, N.G.; Wareham, N.; Halkjaer, J.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Jakobsen, M.U.; Buijsse, B.; Steffen, A.; Palli, D.; Masala, G.; Saris, W.H.; Sorensen, T.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Experimental studies show that a reduction in dietary energy density (ED) is associated with reduced energy intake and body weight. However, few observational studies have investigated the role of ED on long-term weight and waist circumference change. Methods and Principal Findings -

  10. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  11. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  12. Graphitized biogas-derived carbon nanofibers as anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuesta, Nuria; Cameán, Ignacio; Ramos, Alberto; García, Ana B.

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical performance as potential anodes for lithium-ion batteries of graphitized biogas-derived carbon nanofibers (BCNFs) is investigated by galvanostatic cycling versus Li/Li + at different electrical current densities. These graphitic nanomaterials have been prepared by high temperature treatment of carbon nanofibers produced in the catalytic decomposition of biogas. At low current density, they deliver specific capacities comparable to that of oil-derived micrometric graphite, the capacity retention values being mostly in the range 70-80% and cycling efficiency ∼ 100%. A clear tendency of the anode capacity to increase alongside the BCNFs crystal thickness was observed. Besides the degree of graphitic tri-dimensional structural order, the presence of loops between the adjacent edges planes on the graphene layers, the mesopore volume and the active surface area of the graphitized BCNFs were found to influence on battery reversible capacity, capacity retention along cycling and irreversible capacity. Furthermore, provided that the development of the crystalline structure is comparable, the graphitized BCNFs studied show better electrochemical rate performance than micrometric graphite. Therefore, this result can be associated with the nanometric particle size as well as the larger surface area of the BCNFs which, respectively, reduces the diffusion time of the lithium ions for the intercalation/de-intercalation processes, i.e. faster charge-discharge rate, and increases the contact area at the anode active material/electrolyte interface which may improve the Li + ions access, i.e. charge transfer reaction.

  13. Roles of density-dependent growth and life history evolution in accounting for fisheries-induced trait changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeset, Anne Maria; Dunlop, Erin S; Heino, Mikko; Storvik, Geir; Stenseth, Nils C; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2016-12-27

    The relative roles of density dependence and life history evolution in contributing to rapid fisheries-induced trait changes remain debated. In the 1930s, northeast Arctic cod (Gadus morhua), currently the world's largest cod stock, experienced a shift from a traditional spawning-ground fishery to an industrial trawl fishery with elevated exploitation in the stock's feeding grounds. Since then, age and length at maturation have declined dramatically, a trend paralleled in other exploited stocks worldwide. These trends can be explained by demographic truncation of the population's age structure, phenotypic plasticity in maturation arising through density-dependent growth, fisheries-induced evolution favoring faster-growing or earlier-maturing fish, or a combination of these processes. Here, we use a multitrait eco-evolutionary model to assess the capacity of these processes to reproduce 74 y of historical data on age and length at maturation in northeast Arctic cod, while mimicking the stock's historical harvesting regime. Our results show that model predictions critically depend on the assumed density dependence of growth: when this is weak, life history evolution might be necessary to prevent stock collapse, whereas when a stronger density dependence estimated from recent data is used, the role of evolution in explaining fisheries-induced trait changes is diminished. Our integrative analysis of density-dependent growth, multitrait evolution, and stock-specific time series data underscores the importance of jointly considering evolutionary and ecological processes, enabling a more comprehensive perspective on empirically observed stock dynamics than previous studies could provide.

  14. Determining misorientation of graphite grains from the angular dependence of X-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belavin, V. V.; Okotrub, A. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Kotosonov, A. S.; Vyalykh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    Angular-resolved X-ray absorption spectra were measured for pyrolytic graphite samples of various quality. A new approach to determining the misorientation of graphite grains in polycrystalline samples is proposed, which is based on calculations of the angular dependence of the relative intensity of a peak corresponding to the π* state for a normal distribution of grains. The experimental values are used to construct theoretical angular dependences using partial densities of the π* and σ* states determined from the nonempirical calculations for graphite

  15. Change of the dominant luminescent mechanism with increasing current density in molecularly doped organic light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liang; Zhang Hongjie; Meng Qingguo; Liu Fengyi; Yu Jiangbo; Deng Ruiping; Peng Zeping; Li Zhefeng; Guo Zhiyong

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated and measured a series of electroluminescent devices with the structure of ITO/TPD/Eu(TTA) 3 phen (x):CBP/BCP/ALQ/LiF/Al, where x is the weight percentage of Eu(TTA) 3 phen (from 0% to 6%). At very low current density, carrier trapping is the dominant luminescent mechanism and the 4% doped device shows the highest electroluminescence (EL) efficiency among all these devices. With increasing current density, Foerster energy transfer participates in EL process. At the current density of 10.0 and 80.0 mA/cm 2 , 2% and 3% doped devices show the highest EL efficiency, respectively. From analysis of the EL spectra and the EL efficiency-current density characteristics, we found that the EL efficiency is manipulated by Foerster energy transfer efficiency at high current density. So we suggest that the dominant luminescent mechanism changes gradually from carrier trapping to Foerster energy transfer with increasing current density. Moreover, the conversion of dominant EL mechanism was suspected to be partly responsible for the EL efficiency roll-off because of the lower EL quantum efficiency of Foerster energy transfer compared with carrier trapping

  16. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  17. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  18. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  19. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide; Suspension de graphite dans le gaz carbonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Moussez, C; Rouvillois, X; Brevet, R [Societe Nationale d' Etude et de Construction de Moteurs d' Aviation (SNECMA), 75 - Paris (France)

    1965-07-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m{sup 3} and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m{sup 2}/g (graphite particles about 1 {mu}), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m{sup 2}/g (all the particles less than 0.3 {mu}). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [French] Depuis 1963 la Division Atomique de la SNECMA conduit, dans le cadre d'un contrat avec le Commissariat A l'Energie Atomique, l'etude experimentale d'une suspension de fines particules de graphite dans le gaz carbonique. L'objectif principal est d'obtenir des informations d'ordre mecanique et technologique sur la mise en oeuvre de l'ecoulement de ce fluide diphase. Le circuit experimental comprend principalement: un

  20. Inert annealing of irradiated graphite by inductive heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzem, W.; Woerner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Fission neutrons change physical properties of graphite being used in nuclear reactors as moderator and as structural material. The understanding of these effects on an atomic model is expressed by dislocations of carbon atoms within the graphite and the thereby stored energy is known as Wigner Energy. The dismantling of the Pile 1 core may necessitate the thermal treatment of the irradiated but otherwise undamaged graphite. This heat treatment - usually called annealing - initiates the release of stored Wigner Energy in a controlled manner. This energy could otherwise give rise to an increase in temperature under certain conditions during transport or preparation for final storage. In order to prevent such an effect it is intended to anneal the major part of Pile 1 graphite before it is packed into boxes suitable for final disposal. Different heating techniques have been assessed. Inductive heating in an inert atmosphere was selected for installation in the Pile 1 Waste Processing Facility built for the treatment and packaging of the dismantled Pile 1 waste. The graphite blocks will be heated up to 250 deg. C in the annealing ovens, which results in the release of significant amount of the stored energy. External heat sources in a final repository will never heat up the storage boxes to such a temperature. (author)

  1. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  2. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  3. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  4. Prediction of crack density and electrical resistance changes in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading

    KAUST Repository

    Mora Cordova, Angel

    2014-06-11

    We present unified predictions for the crack onset strain, evolution of crack density, and changes in electrical resistance in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading. We propose a damage mechanics model to quantify and predict such changes as an alternative to fracture mechanics formulations. Our predictions are obtained by assuming that there are no flaws at the onset of loading as opposed to the assumptions of fracture mechanics approaches. We calibrate the crack onset strain and the damage model based on experimental data reported in the literature. We predict crack density and changes in electrical resistance as a function of the damage induced in the films. We implement our model in the commercial finite element software ABAQUS using a user subroutine UMAT. We obtain fair to good agreement with experiments. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of graphite edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Y.; Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the electronic local density of states (LDOS) near single-step edges at the surface of exfoliated graphite. In scanning tunneling microscopy measurements, we observed the (3x3)R30 o and honeycomb superstructures extending over 3-4-bar nm both from the zigzag and armchair edges. Calculations based on a density-functional-derived non-orthogonal tight-binding model show that these superstructures can coexist if the two types of edges admix each other in real graphite step edges. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements near the zigzag edge reveal a clear peak in the LDOS at an energy below the Fermi energy by 20-bar meV. No such a peak was observed near the armchair edge. We concluded that this peak corresponds to the 'edge state' theoretically predicted for graphene ribbons, since a similar prominent LDOS peak due to the edge state is obtained by the first principles calculations

  6. Early changes of parotid density and volume predict modifications at the end of therapy and intensity of acute xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Maria Luisa; Scalco, Elisa; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Fiorino, Claudio; Broggi, Sara; Dinapoli, Nicola; Ricchetti, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Giovanna; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro

    2014-10-01

    To quantitatively assess the predictive power of early variations of parotid gland volume and density on final changes at the end of therapy and, possibly, on acute xerostomia during IMRT for head-neck cancer. Data of 92 parotids (46 patients) were available. Kinetics of the changes during treatment were described by the daily rate of density (rΔρ) and volume (rΔvol) variation based on weekly diagnostic kVCT images. Correlation between early and final changes was investigated as well as the correlation with prospective toxicity data (CTCAEv3.0) collected weekly during treatment for 24/46 patients. A higher rΔρ was observed during the first compared to last week of treatment (-0,50 vs -0,05HU, p-value = 0.0001). Based on early variations, a good estimation of the final changes may be obtained (Δρ: AUC = 0.82, p = 0.0001; Δvol: AUC = 0.77, p = 0.0001). Both early rΔρ and rΔvol predict a higher "mean" acute xerostomia score (≥ median value, 1.57; p-value = 0.01). Median early density rate changes for patients with mean xerostomia score ≥ / xerostomia is well predicted by higher rΔρ and rΔvol in the first two weeks of treatment: best cut-off values were -0.50 HU/day and -380 mm(3)/day for rΔρ and rΔvol respectively. Further studies are necessary to definitively assess the potential of early density/volume changes in identifying more sensitive patients at higher risk of experiencing xerostomia.

  7. High density regimes and beta limits in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeulders, P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are first presented on the density limit in JET discharges with graphite (C), Be gettered graphite and Be limiters. There is a clear improvement in the case of Be limiters. The Be gettered phase showed no increase in the gas fueled density limit, except with Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), but, the limit changed character. During MARFE-formation, any further increase in density was prevented, leading to a soft density limit. The soft density limit was a function of input power and impurity content with a week dependence on q. Helium and pellet fuelled discharges exceeded the gas-fuelled global density limits, but essentially had the same edge limit. In the second part, results are presented of high β operation in low-B Double-Null (DN) X-point configurations with Be-gettered carbon target plates. The Troyon limit was reached during H-mode discharges and toroidal β values of 5.5% were obtained. At high beta, the sawteeth were modified and characterised by very rapid heat-waves and fishbone-like pre- and post-cursors with strongly ballooning character. 17 refs., 5 figs

  8. TH-CD-202-06: A Method for Characterizing and Validating Dynamic Lung Density Change During Quiet Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, T [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ruan, D [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Heinrich, M [Institute of Medical Informatics, University of Lubeck, Lubeck, Schleswig-Holstein (Germany); Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain a functional relationship that calibrates the lung tissue density change under free breathing conditions through correlating Jacobian values to the Hounsfield units. Methods: Free-breathing lung computed tomography images were acquired using a fast helical CT protocol, where 25 scans were acquired per patient. Using a state-of-the-art deformable registration algorithm, a set of the deformation vector fields (DVF) was generated to provide spatial mapping from the reference image geometry to the other free-breathing scans. These DVFs were used to generate Jacobian maps, which estimate voxelwise volume change. Subsequently, the set of 25 corresponding Jacobian and voxel intensity in Hounsfield units (HU) were collected and linear regression was performed based on the mass conservation relationship to correlate the volume change to density change. Based on the resulting fitting coefficients, the tissues were classified into parenchymal (Type I), vascular (Type II), and soft tissue (Type III) types. These coefficients modeled the voxelwise density variation during quiet breathing. The accuracy of the proposed method was assessed using mean absolute difference in HU between the CT scan intensities and the model predicted values. In addition, validation experiments employing a leave-five-out method were performed to evaluate the model accuracy. Results: The computed mean model errors were 23.30±9.54 HU, 29.31±10.67 HU, and 35.56±20.56 HU, respectively, for regions I, II, and III, respectively. The cross validation experiments averaged over 100 trials had mean errors of 30.02 ± 1.67 HU over the entire lung. These mean values were comparable with the estimated CT image background noise. Conclusion: The reported validation experiment statistics confirmed the lung density modeling during free breathing. The proposed technique was general and could be applied to a wide range of problem scenarios where accurate dynamic lung density information is needed

  9. Form-stable paraffin/high density polyethylene composites as solid-liquid phase change material for thermal energy storage: preparation and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites as form-stable, solid-liquid phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy storage and with determination of their thermal properties. In such a composite, the paraffin (P) serves as a latent heat storage material and the HDPE acts as a supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin because of providing structural strength. Therefore, it is named form-stable composite PCM. In this study, two kinds of paraffins with melting temperatures of 42-44 deg. C (type P1) and 56-58 deg. C (type P2) and latent heats of 192.8 and 212.4 J g -1 were used. The maximum weight percentage for both paraffin types in the PCM composites without any seepage of the paraffin in the melted state were found as high as 77%. It is observed that the paraffin is dispersed into the network of the solid HDPE by investigation of the structure of the composite PCMs using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The melting temperatures and latent heats of the form-stable P1/HDPE and P2/HDPE composite PCMs were determined as 37.8 and 55.7 deg. C, and 147.6 and 162.2 J g -1 , respectively, by the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore, to improve the thermal conductivity of the form-stable P/HDPE composite PCMs, expanded and exfoliated graphite (EG) by heat treatment was added to the samples in the ratio of 3 wt.%. Thereby, the thermal conductivity was increased about 14% for the form-stable P1/HDPE and about 24% for the P2/HDPE composite PCMs. Based on the results, it is concluded that the prepared form-stable P/HDPE blends as composite type PCM have great potential for thermal energy storage applications in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties and improved thermal conductivity. Furthermore, these composite PCMs added with EG can be considered cost effective latent heat storage materials since they do not require encapsulation and extra cost to enhance

  10. Studies on the behavior of graphite structures irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.; Ridealgh, F.

    1971-11-15

    Design data for the physical and mechanical property changes which occur in graphite structural and fuel body components irradiated in an HTR are largely obtained from small specimens tested in the laboratory and in materials test reactors. A brief data summary is given. This graphite physics data can be used to predict dimensional changes, internal stress generation and strength changes in the graphite materials of HTR fuel elements irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. In this paper, the results which have been obtained from post-irradiation examination of a number of fuel pins, are compared with prediction.

  11. Thermal fatigue of refractory metal / graphite composites for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Nickel, H.

    1989-01-01

    Reactor grade graphite and molybdenum (TZM) were brazed with different high temperature brazes. The resulting composite tiles had a size of 50 mm x 50 mm with a graphite thickness of 10 mm and a TZM thickness of 5mm. The brazed composites have been tested in electron beam simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. The parameters of these tests were chosen to match NET design specifications for normal operation and 'slow' peak energy deposition. The resulting damages and microstructural changes on the graphites and the brazes are discussed. Additional information is supplied on X-ray diffraction data proving the presence of different phases in the brazes. Finally the influence of a hydrogen plasma on the adaptability of the investigated brazes in fusion devices is discussed. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs. (Author)

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Fluorine-Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A.M.; Goren, S.D.; Nakajima, T.; Vieth, H.-M.; Privalov, A.

    1998-01-01

    To study the origin of semimetal-metal and metal-insulator transformations, localization effects and C-E bonding in fluorine-intercalated graphite C x F, 13 C and 19 F NMR investigations have been carried out for a wide range of fluorine content, 3.8 8, are attributed to mobile fluorine acceptor species which are responsible for the increase of electric conductivity in the dilute compound. When increasing the fluorine content to x ∼ 8 corresponding to the maximum electric conductivity, covalent C-P bonds start to oc- cur. The number of these bonds grows with fluorine content resulting in the decrease in conductivity which is caused by a percolation mechanism rather than by a change in bond length. A difference in 19 F chemical shift for fluorine-intercalated graphite C x F and covalent graphite fluoride (CF) n has been observed and is attributed to different C-P bonding in these compounds

  13. In situ electrochemical atomic force microscope study on graphite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasawa, K.A.; Sato, Tomohiro; Asahina, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Mori, Shoichiro [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Inashiki, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Center

    1997-04-01

    Interest in the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film on graphite electrodes has increased recently in the quest to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries. Topographic and frictional changes on the surface of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode in 1 M LiCiO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate/ethylmethyl carbonate (1:1) electrolyte were examined during charge and discharge by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy and friction force microscopy simultaneously in real-time. Solid electrolyte interphase film formation commenced at approximately 2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +} and stable film formation with an island-like morphology was observed below approximately 0.9 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Further experiments on a KS-44 graphite/polyvinylidene difluoride binder composite electrode showed similar phenomena.

  14. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  15. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  16. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  17. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  18. Enhanced oxidation resistance of SiC coating on Graphite by crack healing at the elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un; Kim, Yoo-Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Windes, William E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2015-10-15

    An oxidation protective SiC coating on the graphite components could assist in slowing the oxidation down. However, the irradiation induced dimensional changes in the graphite (shrinkage followed by swelling) can occur, while the SiC CVD coating has been reported to swell even at a low dose neutron irradiation. In this work, functionally gradient electron beam evaporative coating with an ion beam processing was firstly conducted and then SiC coating on the FG coating to the desired thickness is followed. For the crack healing, both the repeated EB-PVD and CVD were performed. Oxidation and thermal cycling tests of the coated specimens were performed and reflected in the process development. In this work, efforts have been paid to heal the cracks in the SiC coated layer on graphite with both EB-PVD and CVD. CVD seems to be more appropriate coating method for crack healing probably due to its excellent crack-line filling capability for high density and high aspect ratio.

  19. X-ray absorption studies of graphite intercalates and metal-ammonia solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, A.S.

    1979-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to study the arsenic fluorocomplexes, including the AsF 5 and AsF 6 - intercalates of graphite, and rubidium metal-ammonia solutions. The As-F distances obtained for AsF 3 and AsF 5 gas are both in excellent agreement with electron diffraction data (within 0.004 A). A superior measurement which is significantly shorter than the accepted value of the bond distance in an undistorted AsF 6 - octahedra is reported. Both the XAES and EXAFS data presented support the hypothesis that the AsF 5 oxidizes graphite upon intercalation to produce AsF 6 - and AsF 3 intercalant species. Changes in the Rb K-edge features which are consistent with the known properties of Rb-NH 3 are correlated with conductivity and delocalization of the solvated electrons. In the XAES region, intensity and position changes of absorption transitions are explained. In the EXAFS region, the Rb-N bond distance and the relative number of nitrogen atoms in the first shell are measured. XAS has been shown to provide unique information about the nature of the metal-ammonia phase separation, phase transition, and density fluctuations

  20. Effect of plasma treatments to graphite nanofibers supports on electrochemical behaviors of metal catalyst electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hochun; Jung, Yongju; Kim, Seok

    2012-02-01

    In the present work, we had studied the graphite nanofibers as catalyst supports after a plasma treatment for studying the effect of surface modification. By controlling the plasma intensity, a surface functional group concentration was changed. The nanoparticle size, loading efficiency, and catalytic activity were studied, after Pt-Ru deposition by a chemical reduction. Pt-Ru catalysts deposited on the plasma-treated GNFs showed the smaller size, 3.58 nm than the pristine GNFs. The catalyst loading contents were enhanced with plasma power and duration time increase, meaning an enhanced catalyst deposition efficiency. Accordingly, cyclic voltammetry result showed that the specific current density was increased proportionally till 200 W and then the value was decreased. Enhanced activity of 40 (mA mg(-1)-catalyst) was accomplished at 200 W and 180 sec duration time. Consequently, it was found that the improved electroactivity was originated from the change of size or morphology of catalysts by controlling the plasma intensity.

  1. Elves and associated electron density changes due to cloud-to-ground and in-cloud lightning discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Inan, U. S.; Glukhov, V. S.

    2010-04-01

    A 3-D finite difference time domain model is used to simulate the lightning electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and its interaction with the lower ionosphere. Results agree with the frequently observed, doughnut-shaped optical signature of elves but show that the structure exhibits asymmetry due to the presence of Earth's ambient magnetic field. Furthermore, in-cloud (horizontal) lightning channels produce observable optical emissions without the doughnut shape and, in fact, produce a much stronger optical output for the same channel current. Electron density perturbations associated with elves are also calculated, with contributions from attachment and ionization. Results presented as a function of parameters such as magnetic field direction, dipole current orientation, altitude and amplitude, and ambient ionospheric density profile demonstrate the highly nonlinear nature of the EMP-ionosphere interaction. Ionospheric effects of a sequence of in-cloud discharges are calculated, simulating a burst of in-cloud lightning activity and resulting in large density changes in the overlying ionosphere.

  2. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  3. The Effect of Process Condition and SiO2 as Catalyst for the Density and the Resistivity of the Calcine Coke and Tar Pitch Mixed Pellet as 900 oC Baking Product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tundjung lndrati Y; Imam Dahroni; Kasilani Noor Sayekti

    2002-01-01

    The experiment of the baking condition effect and SiO 2 as catalyst have been done. Graphite turbo static be produced by baking of the mixed pellet ( Calcine Coke, Tar Pitch (32%) and SiO 2 as catalyst). The baking have been done on the inert atmospherics (argon : 2 l/hour) and the heating rate 10 o C/minute. The baking condition and catalyst was affected for density and resistivity. There was little bit density change with densification phenomena. The graphite resistivity was more decrease with the increasing of heating and the longer baking time. The baking condition for produce turbo static graphite with resistivity 2100 Ωμm and density 1.4 gram/cm 3 was 900 o C, 3 hours for baking time and optimal adding catalyst SiO 2 0.5 %. (author)

  4. Development and validation of spectroscopic methods for monitoring density changes in pressurized gaseous and supercritical fluid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Marc A; Wallen, Scott L

    2002-04-15

    The further development of new processes utilizing liquid or supercritical CO2 as a solvent will benefit from the rational design of new CO2-philes. Understanding solvation structures and mechanisms of these molecules is an important part of this process. In such studies, determining the change in density as a function of the measured thermodynamic conditions (pressure and temperature) provides an excellent means of directly monitoring the solution conditions in the detection volume for a given technique. By integrating spectroscopic peaks, changes in area can be used to determine changes in analyte concentration in the detection volume, and thus, it should be possible to monitor the system density in situ. In the present study, we examine the utility of Raman and NMR spectroscopy as a means of following changes in solution density conditions and validate this approach in pure fluids and gases (N2 and CO2) and supercritical fluid mixtures (acetaldehyde vapor in N2). In addition, we present the design of a simple, inexpensive cell for conducting Raman and NMR measurements under moderate pressure conditions.

  5. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  6. Computational Design of Non-natural Sugar Alcohols to Increase Thermal Storage Density: Beyond Existing Organic Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Taichi; Ishida, Toyokazu

    2016-09-14

    Thermal storage, a technology that enables us to control thermal energy, makes it possible to reuse a huge amount of waste heat, and materials with the ability to treat larger thermal energy are in high demand for energy-saving societies. Sugar alcohols are now one promising candidate for phase change materials (PCMs) because of their large thermal storage density. In this study, we computationally design experimentally unknown non-natural sugar alcohols and predict their thermal storage density as a basic step toward the development of new high performance PCMs. The non-natural sugar alcohol molecules are constructed in silico in accordance with the previously suggested molecular design guidelines: linear elongation of a carbon backbone, separated distribution of OH groups, and even numbers of carbon atoms. Their crystal structures are then predicted using the random search method and first-principles calculations. Our molecular simulation results clearly demonstrate that the non-natural sugar alcohols have potential ability to have thermal storage density up to ∼450-500 kJ/kg, which is significantly larger than the maximum thermal storage density of the present known organic PCMs (∼350 kJ/kg). This computational study suggests that, even in the case of H-bonded molecular crystals where the electrostatic energy contributes mainly to thermal storage density, the molecular distortion and van der Waals energies are also important factors to increase thermal storage density. In addition, the comparison between the three eight-carbon non-natural sugar alcohol isomers indicates that the selection of preferable isomers is also essential for large thermal storage density.

  7. Designing and assessment of accuracy of an algorithm for determining the accuracy of radiographic film density by changing exposure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorieh Bashizadeh Fakhar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims Bone density is frequently used in medical diagnosis and research. The current methods for determining bone density are expensive and not easily available in dental clinics. The aim of this study was to design and evaluate the accuracy of a digital method for hard tissue densitometry which could be applied on personal computers.   Materials and Methods: An aluminum step wedge was constructed. 50 E-speed Kodak films were exposed. Exposure time varied from 0.05s to 0.5 s with 0.05 s interval. Films were developed with automatic developer and fixer and digitized with 1240U photo Epson scanner. Images were cropped at 10 × 10mm size with Microsoft Office Picture Manager. By running the algorithm designed in MATLAB software, the mean pixel value of pictures was calculated.   Results: Finding of this study showed that by increasing the exposure time, the mean pixel value was decreased and at step 12, a significant discrimination was seen between the two subsequent times(P<0.001. By increasing the thickness of object, algorithm could define the density changes from step 4 in 0.3 s and 5 in 0.5 s, and it could determine the differences in the mean pixel value between the same steps of 0.3 s and 0.5 s from step 4.   Conclusion: By increasing the object thickness and exposure time, the accuracy of the algorithm for recognizing changes in density was increased. This software was able to determine the radiographic density changes of aluminum step wedge with at least 4mm thickness at exposure time of 0.3 s and 5 mm at 0.5 s.

  8. An evaluation of the subtraction photoshop software accuracy to detect minor changes in optical density by radiovisiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaeipour AR.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Subtraction is a newly presented radiography technique to detect minor density"nchanges that are not visible by conventional radiography."nPurpose: The aim of this In-vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of photoshop subtraction software for"ndetecting minor density changes between two dental images."nMaterials and Methods: In this research, five dried human mandibles were held in fixed position while thin"naluminium sheets were superimposed on each mandible on the 1th and 2nd molar teeth regions."nA reference image, without aluminium sheet placement, was obtained from each mandible subsequently series"nconsist of 20 images with aluminium sheets, ranging from 50p. to "5Q0"x were recorded by radiovisiography"n(RVG system. Initial images were subtracted from subsequent ones by Photoshop subtraction software. The"ndifference in density between the two images at the 1st and 2nd molar sites was related to the aluminium"nsheets. The optical density of aluminium sheets was determined by densitometer."nResults: In the present study, 6.6% of the optical density changes of the minimum aluminium thickness as"n300u. could be detected by photoshop software software."nConclusion: The findings of this study showed that the accuracy of photoshop subtraction software was equal"nto that of the conventional subtraction softwares. Additionally, the accuracy of this software was proved to be"nsuitable for clinical investigations of small localized changes in alveolar bone.

  9. Repeat Mapping in the Lower Monterey Submarine Canyon Sheds Light on Morphological Change During Discrete Sediment Density Flow Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Paull, C. K.; Maier, K. L.; Gales, J. A.; Gwiazda, R.; Talling, P.; Xu, J.; Parsons, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE), a multi-institutional collaboration effort, was designed to monitor the passage of sediment density flows along the axis of Monterey Canyon, offshore California, between 200 and 1850 m water depth. An array of moorings and sensors were deployed for three 6-month periods from October 2015 to April 2017. Aligned with the CCE deployments, repeat high-resolution multibeam bathymetric surveys of the Monterey Canyon floor were conducted with a mapping AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle). The AUV carried a Reson 7125 multibeam echosounder (vertical precision of 0.15 m and horizontal resolution of 1.0 m). An inertial navigation system combined with a Doppler velocity logger allowed the AUV to fly pre-programmed grids at 3 knots, while maintaining an altitude of 50 m above the seafloor, to obtain a nominal line spacing of 130 m. The floor and lower flanks of the canyon between 200 to 540 m and 1350 to 1880 m water depths were mapped six times during the CCE. These repeat maps are subtracted to create bathymetry difference grids to show morphological change. Coupling the sensor observations with the bathymetric surveys, the CCE successfully documented sediment density flow events as well as the associated changes in seafloor morphology. Between repeat surveys, three sediment density flow events reached the lower canyon, extending to at least 1850 m water depth. On January 15, 2016, a particularly large density flow traveled more than 50 km down Monterey Canyon. Unlike in the upper canyon where this event caused wholesale reorganization of geomorphological features, changes to the lower canyon morphology involved a more moderate re-sculpting of the features. The effect of a sediment density flow of known magnitude and duration on the seafloor morphology has never been documented in a deep-sea setting before.

  10. Graphite curtain vacuum outgassing and heat transfer. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivel, H.J.; Lang, G.P.; Kipp, H.W.

    1976-12-01

    Thermal conductivity of a bundle of high conductivity graphite fibers (T-50) was measured as a function of temperature, density and fiber orientation at pressures of 10 -4 to 10 -5 torr. All 3 variables had a significant influence on thermal conductivity. The highest conductivity fiber bundle tested had a conductivity significantly less than dense, bulk nuclear grade graphite. The incorporation of heat pipes into a graphite spectral shaper will permit a 2-fold thicker shaper. Heat pipes not only increase the transport of heat within the spectral shaper but can increase heat transfer at the shaper-first wall interface and potentially serve as a means of attaching shaper modules to the first wall. A heat pipe using a liquid metal working fluid was fabricated and tested in magnetic fields of 1 and 2 Tesla. Liquid metal heat pipes can be used in a magnetic field of at least up to 2 Tesla. Much more work needs to be done to establish the capabilities for high performance heat pipes when used in magnetic fields. Four different types of graphite fibers were exposed in EBR-II to a neutron fluence of 3.5 x 10 21 cm -2 EFF at 470 0 C. Large axial shrinkages of 6.6 to 8.6% resulted

  11. Controlling of merging electric field and IMF magnitude on storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The controls of merging electrical field, Em, and IMF (interplanetary magnetic field magnitude, B, on the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass density are statistically investigated using GRACE accelerometer observations and the OMNI data of solar wind and IMF for 35 great storms during 2002–2006. It reveals the following: (1 The correlation coefficients between the air mass density changes and the parameters of Em and B are generally larger at lower latitudes than at higher latitudes, and larger in noon and midnight sectors than in dawn and dusk. (2 The most likely delay time (MLDT of mass density changes in respect to Em is about 1.5 h (4.5 h at high (low latitudes, having no distinct local time dependence, while it is 6 h at middle latitudes in all the local time sectors except for noon, which is longer than at low latitudes. A similar fact of longer delay time at mid-latitude is also seen for B. The MLDTs for B at various latitudes are all local time dependent distinctly with shorter delay time in noon/midnight sector and larger in dawn/dusk. Despite of widely spread of the delay time, IMF B exhibits still larger correlation coefficients with mass density changes among the interplanetary parameters. (3 The linear control factor of B on the density changes increases for large B, in contrast to somewhat saturation trend for larger Em. (4 The influence of B and Em on the mass densities shows different behavior for different types of storms. The influence intensity of Em is much stronger for CIR-driven than for CME-driven storm, while it is not so distinct for B. On the local time asymmetry of the influence, both Em and B have largest influence at noon sector for CME-driven storms, while an obviously larger intensification of the influence is found in dawn/dusk sector during CIR storms, especially for parameter Em.

  12. Changes in tree density do not influence epicormic branching of yellow-poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith

    1977-01-01

    Epicormic branching was studied in a West Virginia yellow-poplar stand thinned to various tree density levels. Study trees in the 55- to 60-year-old second-growth stand were primarily codominant in crown class with 32 to 48 feet of log height. Eight-year study results indicated that yellow-poplar trees in this age class and locale could be thinned without serious loss...

  13. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  14. Dynamic method for the measurement of Young'S modulus. Application to nuclear graphites; Methode de mesure dynamique du module d'Young. Application aux graphites nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattou, F; Trutt, J C

    1963-07-01

    A dynamic method has been developed for measuring Young's modulus and the rigidity modulus using the 'Forster Elastomat'. The principle consists in the determination of the resonance frequencies of graphite samples submitted to transverse, longitudinal, and torsional vibrations. The first two modes of vibration make it possible to calculate the elasticity modulus or the Young's modulus E, the third mode makes possible the calculation of the rigidity modulus G. The relationships from which the moduli E and G are measured are given. A systematic study has been made of graphite samples produced by extrusion or compression and submitted afterwards to one or several impregnations with pitch. For graphites made from the same coke by the same method, a linear relationship has been found for Young's modulus as a function of the apparent density. For the same apparent density, graphites made from different starting materials have generally different Young's moduli that bear a relationship to the crystalline characteristics of the material. The measurements of the rigidity modulus C made on different graphites also show the influence of crystallite orientation. (authors) [French] Une methode de mesure dynamique du module d'Young et du module de rigidite du graphite utilisant 'l'Elastomat Forster' a ete mise au point. Le principe consiste a determiner les frequences de resonance d'echantillons de graphite soumis a des vibrations transversales, longitudinales et de torsion. Les deux premiers modes de vibration permettent de calculer le module d'elasticite ou module d'Young E, le troisieme mode de vibration permet de calculer le module de rigidite G. Apres avoir decrit la methode de mesure, on rappelle les relations qui permettent de calculer les modules E et G. L'etude systematique d'echantillons de graphite, fabriques par filage ou pressage et ayant subi eventuellement une ou plusieurs impregnations au brai a ete effectuee. Pour les graphites issus du meme coke et fabriques

  15. Dietary energy density in relation to subsequent changes of weight and waist circumference in European men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Huaidong; van der A, Daphne L; Ginder, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies show that a reduction in dietary energy density (ED) is associated with reduced energy intake and body weight. However, few observational studies have investigated the role of ED on long-term weight and waist circumference change. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T...... not prevent weight gain but have a weak yet potentially beneficial effect on the prevention of abdominal obesity as measured by waist circumference....

  16. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-05-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and 11 of them also underwent a colonoscopy, with biopsy samples obtained from the ileum. Fourteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received 3 sessions of dietary guidance. Gastroscopies and colonoscopies were performed on both the controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and at 3-9 months after receiving guidance). Biopsy samples obtained from the duodenum and ileum were immunostained for CgA using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method and were quantified using computerized image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum (mean ± SEM values) in the control subjects was 235.9 ± 31.9 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 36.9 ± 9.8 and 103.7 ± 16.9 cells/mm2 before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007). The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the ileum in the control subjects was 47.4 ± 8.3 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 48.4 ± 8.1 and 17.9 ± 4.4 cells/mm2, before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.0006). These data indicate that changes in CgA-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with IBS after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the small intestinal enteroendocrine cells, which may contribute to an improvement in the IBS symptoms.

  17. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  18. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a late-time ''fireworks-like'' particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma during its evolution. Plasmas were produced using graphite targets excited with 1064 nm Nd: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser in vacuum. The time evolution of graphite plasma was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma is rapidly changing with time and the delayed firework-like emission from the graphite target followed a black-body curve. Our studies indicated that such firework-like emission is strongly depended on target material properties and explained due to material spallation caused by overheating the trapped gases through thermal diffusion along the layer structures of graphite.

  19. Some aspects of nuclear graphite production in France; Etude generale sur les graphites nucleaires produits en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueron, J; Hering, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Legendre, A [Pechiney, 75 - Paris (France)

    1958-07-01

    1) Manufacturing: A summary and results on the CEA-Pechiney purification process are given. Variations in the preparation of green pastes and their effects on graphitized material are described. 2) Physical and mechanical properties: Results are given on: - Statistics of dimensional variatior products having square cross-section. - Statistical variation of thermal expansion coefficients and of electrical conductivity. - Density of normals to carbon layer planes and their connexion with thermal expansion. - Stress-strain cycles and conclusions drawn therefrom. - Mechanical resistance and gas permeability of items for supporting fuel elements. 3) Behaviour under radiation: Alteration under radiation of French graphites irradiated either in G1 pile or in experimental piles, and thermal annealing of those alterations, are given. (author)Fren. [French] 1) Fabrication: On resume le procede d'epuration CEA-PECHINEY, ainsi que diverses modalites de preparation des pates et on expose les resultats obtenus. 2) Proprietes physiques et mecaniques: On indique le resultat d'etudes sur: - la statistique des dimensions de produits a section carree. - celle des variations des coefficients de dilatation thermique et de la conductibilite electrique. - la densite des normales aux plans graphitiques et leur connexion avec la dilatation thermique. - la compression mecanique du graphite. - la solidite mecanique et la permeabilite aux gaz de pieces destinees a supporter des cartouches de combustible. 3) Tenue sous rayonnement: Modification sous rayonnement des graphites fran is irradies soit dans la pile G1, soit dans des piles experimentales, et guerison thermique de ces modifications. (auteur)

  20. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  1. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kage, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 442, Nov (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * cast iron * graphite structure * pearlite content Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2016

  3. Modelling of Magma Density and Viscocity Changes and Their Influences towards the Characteristic of Kelud Volcano Eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanik Humaida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v6i4.129The effusive eruption of Kelud Volcano in 2007 was different from the previous ones, which in general were more explosive. Among others, density and viscosity are factors that determine the type of eruption. Therefore, the study on the difference of the recent eruption style based on the density and viscosity of magma was carried out. The method used in this study was based on geochemical analysis of the rock and then a modeling was established by using the above parameter. The study on the explosive eruption was emphasized on the data of 1990 eruption, whereas the effusive eruption was based on the data of 2007 eruption. The result shows that the magma viscosity of Kelud Volcano depend on the H O concentration as one of the volatile compound in magma, and temperature which gives the exponential equation. The higher the increase of H O content the smaller the value of its viscosity as well as the higher the temperature. The H O content in silica fluid can break the polymer bond of the silica fluid, because a shorter polymer will produce a lower viscosity. The density of the silica content of Kelud Volcano ranges between andesitic and basaltic types, but andesite is more likely. The fluid density of the material of 1990 eruption is different from 2007 eruption. Compared to the 2007, the 1990 eruption material gave a lower density value in its silica fluid than that of the 2007 one. The low density value of the silica fluid of the 1990 eruption material was reflecting a more acid magma. The level of density value of silica fluid depends on its temperature. At the temperature of 1073 K the density of the 1990 Kelud magma is 2810 kg/m3 and the 2007 magma is 2818 kg/m3, whereas at a temperature of 1673 K, the density is 2672 kg/m3 and 2682 kg/m3 of the 1990 and 2007 eruptions respectively. A modeling by using an ideal gas law of Henry’s Law illustrated that the ascent of Kelud’s magma to the surface may cause changes

  4. Improved numerical calculation of the generation of a neutral beam by charge transfer between chlorine ions/neutrals and a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Samukawa, Seiji; Watanabe, Naoki; Ohtsuka, Shingo; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ono, Kohei; Iriye, Yasuroh

    2014-01-01

    The charge transfer process between chlorine particles (ions or neutrals) and a graphite surface on collision was investigated by using a highly stable numerical simulator based on time-dependent density functional theory to understand the generation mechanism of a high-efficiency neutral beam developed by Samukawa et al (2001 Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 40 L779). A straightforward calculation was achieved by adopting a large enough unit cell. The dependence of the neutralization efficiency on the incident energy of the particle was investigated, and the trend of the experimental result was reproduced. It was also found that doping the electrons and holes into graphite could change the charge transfer process and neutralization probability. This result suggests that it is possible to develop a neutral beam source that has high neutralization efficiency for both positive and negative ions. (paper)

  5. Preparation and characterization of flake graphite/silicon/carbon spherical composite as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Jun; Guo Huajun; Wang Zhixing; Li Xinhai; Zhang Xiaoping; Wu Feixiang; Yue Peng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Flake graphite/silicon/carbon composite is synthesized via spray drying. ► Flake graphite of ∼0.5 μm and glucose are used to prepare the composite. ► The as-prepared composite shows spherical and porous appearance. ► The composite shows nearly the same cycleability as commercial graphite in 20 cycles. ► The composite shows a reversible capacity of 552 mAh/g at the 20th cycle. - Abstract: Using nano-Si, glucose and flake graphite of ∼0.5 μm as raw materials, flake graphite/silicon/carbon composite is successfully synthesized via spray drying and subsequent pyrolysis. The samples are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical measurements. The composite is composed of flake graphite, nano-Si and amorphous glucose-pyrolyzed carbon and presents good spherical appearance. Some micron pores arising from the decomposition of glucose exist on the surface of the composite particles. The composite has a high reversible capacity of 602.7 mAh/g with an initial coulombic efficiency of 69.71%, and shows nearly the same cycleability as the commercial graphite in 20 cycles. Both the glucose-pyrolyzed carbon and the micron pores play important roles in improving the cycleability of the composite. The flake graphite/silicon/carbon composite electrode is a potential alternative to graphite for high energy-density lithium ion batteries.

  6. Consequence of changes in herd size and densities for the contingency planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to evaluate whether the effects and control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) spread would differ following the structural changes to the Danish agricultural sector from now until 2030. Following the predicted structural changes, a new farm file was created, re...

  7. Purification process of natural graphite as anode for Li-ion batteries: chemical versus thermal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghib, K.; Song, X.; Guerfi, A.; Rioux, R.; Kinoshita, K.

    The intercalation of Li ions in natural graphite that was purified by chemical and thermal processes was investigated. A new chemical process was developed that involved a mixed aqueous solution containing 30% H 2SO 4 and 30% NH xF y heated to 90 °C. The results of this process are compared to those obtained by heating the natural graphite from 1500 to 2400 °C in an inert environment (thermal process). The first-cycle coulombic efficiency of the purified natural graphite obtained by the chemical process is 91 and 84% after the thermal process at 2400 °C. Grinding the natural graphite before or after purification had no significant effect on electrochemical performance at low currents. However, grinding to a very small particle size before purification permitted optimization of the size distribution of the particles, which gives rise to a more homogenous electrode. The impurities in the graphite play a role as microabrasion agents during grinding which enhances its hardness and improves its mechanical properties. Grinding also modifies the particle morphology from a 2- to a 3-D structure (similar in shape to a potato). This potato-shaped natural graphite shows high reversible capacity at high current densities (about 90% at 1 C rate). Our analysis suggests that thermal processing is considerably more expensive than the chemical process to obtain purified natural graphite.

  8. Graphitic structure formation in ion implanted polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavenner, E., E-mail: tazman1492@gmail.com [Creative Polymers Pty. Ltd., 41 Wilkinson Street, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Wood, B. [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Chemical Committee, Surface Chemical Analysis, Standards (Australia); Curry, M.; Jankovic, A.; Patel, R. [Center for Applied Science and Engineering, Missouri State University, 524 North Boonville Avenue, Springfield, MO 65806 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Ion implantation is a technique that is used to change the electrical, optical, hardness and biocompatibility of a wide range of inorganic materials. This technique also imparts similar changes to organic or polymer based materials. With polymers, ion implantation can produce a carbon enriched volume. Knowledge as to the nature of this enrichment and its relative concentration is necessary to produce accurate models of the physical properties of the modified material. One technique that can achieve this is X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this study the formation of graphite like structures in the near surface of polyetheretherketone by ion implantation has been elucidated from detailed analysis of the C 1s and valence band peak structures generated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further evidence is given by both Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy and elastic recoil detection.

  9. Novel changes in discoidal high density lipoprotein morphology: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catte, Andrea; Patterson, James C; Jones, Martin K; Jerome, W Gray; Bashtovyy, Denys; Su, Zhengchang; Gu, Feifei; Chen, Jianguo; Aliste, Marcela P; Harvey, Stephen C; Li, Ling; Weinstein, Gilbert; Segrest, Jere P

    2006-06-15

    ApoA-I is a uniquely flexible lipid-scavenging protein capable of incorporating phospholipids into stable particles. Here we report molecular dynamics simulations on a series of progressively smaller discoidal high density lipoprotein particles produced by incremental removal of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine via four different pathways. The starting model contained 160 palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholines and a belt of two antiparallel amphipathic helical lipid-associating domains of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. The results are particularly compelling. After a few nanoseconds of molecular dynamics simulation, independent of the starting particle and method of size reduction, all simulated double belts of the four lipidated apoA-I particles have helical domains that impressively approximate the x-ray crystal structure of lipid-free apoA-I, particularly between residues 88 and 186. These results provide atomic resolution models for two of the particles produced by in vitro reconstitution of nascent high density lipoprotein particles. These particles, measuring 95 angstroms and 78 angstroms by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, correspond in composition and in size/shape (by negative stain electron microscopy) to the simulated particles with molar ratios of 100:2 and 50:2, respectively. The lipids of the 100:2 particle family form minimal surfaces at their monolayer-monolayer interface, whereas the 50:2 particle family displays a lipid pocket capable of binding a dynamic range of phospholipid molecules.

  10. Challenges of Estimating Fracture Risk with DXA: Changing Concepts About Bone Strength and Bone Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Angelo A

    2015-07-01

    Bone loss due to weightlessness is a significant concern for astronauts' mission safety and health upon return to Earth. This problem is monitored with bone densitometry (DXA), the clinical tool used to assess skeletal strength. DXA has served clinicians well in assessing fracture risk and has been particularly useful in diagnosing osteoporosis in the elderly postmenopausal population for which it was originally developed. Over the past 1-2 decades, however, paradoxical and contradictory findings have emerged when this technology was widely employed in caring for diverse populations unlike those for which it was developed. Although DXA was originally considered the surrogate marker for bone strength, it is now considered one part of a constellation of factors-described collectively as bone quality-that makes bone strong and resists fracturing, independent of bone density. These characteristics are beyond the capability of routine DXA to identify, and as a result, DXA can be a poor prognosticator of bone health in many clinical scenarios. New clinical tools are emerging to make measurement of bone strength more accurate. This article reviews the historical timeline of bone density measurement (dual X-ray absorptiometry), expands upon the clinical observations that modified the relationship of DXA and bone strength, discusses some of the new clinical tools to predict fracture risk, and highlights the challenges DXA poses in the assessment of fracture risk in astronauts.

  11. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terufumi Kokabu

    Full Text Available Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49 were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ. Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P < 0.0001 and significantly correlated with Risser sign (P = 0.032, the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031, the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012, and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007. Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003, the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021, and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008. Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively.

  12. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  13. Spatial changes in soil organic carbon density and storage of cultivated soils in China from 1980 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanyan; Guo, Zhengtang; Wu, Haibin; Kahmann, Julia A.; Oldfield, Frank

    2009-06-01

    We address the spatial changes in organic carbon density and storage in cultivated soils in China from 1980 to 2000 on the basis of measured data from individual studies and those acquired during the second national soil survey in China. The results show a carbon gain in ˜66% of the cultivated area of China as a whole with the increase in soil organic carbon (SOC) density mostly ranging from 10% to 30%. Soil organic carbon density increased in fluvi-aquic soils (fluvisols, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations) in north China, irrigated silting soils (calcaric fluvisols) in northwest China, latosolic red earths (haplic acrisols/alisols), and paddy soils (fluvisols/cambisols) in south China. In contrast, significant decreases are observed in black soils (phaeozems) in northeast China and latosols (haplic acrisols) in southwest China. No significant changes are detected in loessial soils (calcaric regosols) and dark loessial soils (calcisols) in the loess plateau region. The total SOC storage and average density in the upper 20 cm in the late 1990s are estimated to be ˜5.37 Pg C and 2.77 kg/m2, respectively, compared with the values of ˜5.11 Pg C and 2.63 kg/m2 in the early 1980s. This reveals an increase of SOC storage of 0.26 Pg C and suggests an overall carbon sink for cultivated soils in China, which has contributed 2-3% to the global terrestrial ecosystem carbon absorption from 1980 to 2000. Statistical analyses suggest an insignificant contribution to the observed SOC increase from climate change, and we infer that it is mostly attributable to improved agricultural practices. Despite the SOC density increases over 20 years, the SOC density of the cultivated soils in China in the late 1990s is still ˜30% lower compared to their uncultivated counterparts in comparable soil types, suggesting a considerable potential for SOC restoration through improving management practices. Assuming a restoration of ˜50% of the lost SOC in the next 30

  14. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  15. Potassium vapor assisted preparation of highly graphitized hierarchical porous carbon for high rate performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Zeng, Ying; Tang, Qunli; Hu, Aiping; Xiao, Kuikui; Zhang, Shiying; Deng, Weina; Fan, Binbin; Zhu, Yanfei; Chen, Xiaohua

    2017-09-01

    Ultrahigh graphitized carbon microspheres with rich hierarchical pores (AGHPCM-1) have been successfully synthesized through the one-step activation-carbonization strategy (OACS) with porous sulfonated poly-divinylbenzene as the carbon precursor, iron as the hard template and catalyst, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) as activation agent. Through the XRD, TEM, Raman and BET analysis, AGHPCM-1 shows very high graphitization degree and rich micro-, meso- and macro-pores. More importantly, the mechanism for KOH to improve the graphitization degree of carbon materials in OACS has been illustrated by the thermodynamical theory. The tremendous heat releasing from the reaction between the catalyst precursor of Fe2O3 and potassium vapor plays a key role in the formation of graphitized carbon. It may provide a general direction to prepare highly graphitized porous carbon at a moderate temperature. Integrating the advantages of high graphitization degree and rich hierarchical porous structure, the AGHPCM-1 exhibits an excellent rate performance with a response to up to the high current density of 150 A g-1 and high scan rate of 2000 mV s-1. No obvious capacitance decay can be observed after 10000 charge/discharge cycles even at the high current density of 20 A g-1.

  16. Metal-decored graphites as anode materials for use in lithium-ion accumulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licht, Bjoern Karl

    2015-01-01

    Graphitic materials are currently the most frequently used anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIB). This type of battery is considered to be the ideal application for energy storage in electromobility or in mobile devices that require a high power density. Although intercalated graphite has only about 8 % of the gravimetric energy density of lithium metal, these materials are preferred due to safety reasons. However, by chemical modification of the surface, the electrochemical performance of graphite can be enhanced. In the thesis presented at hand, a novel synthesis route for the preparation of homogenous metal depositions on graphite is shown. The reaction proceeds via a gas phase reaction by the thermal decomposition of metal carboxylates. The decomposition process was analyzed by thermogravimetry and gas phase analysis. In comparison to the unmodified graphite, copper-coated graphite shows in increased capacity and cycle stability when used as anode materials in LIBs. Special emphasis should be placed on an improved adhesion of the active material on the copper current collector. The proven catalytic activity of the metal depositions not only enables a use in battery devices but could also be innovating for catalytic processes such as chlorine-alkali electrolysis.

  17. Controlling In–Ga–Zn–O thin films transport properties through density changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarski, Jakub, E-mail: kaczmarski@ite.waw.pl [Institute of Electron Technology, al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Boll, Torben [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Fysikgränd 3, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Borysiewicz, Michał A. [Institute of Electron Technology, al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Taube, Andrzej [Institute of Electron Technology, al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Microelectronics & Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Thuvander, Mattias; Law, Jia Yan [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Fysikgränd 3, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Kamińska, Eliana [Institute of Electron Technology, al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Stiller, Krystyna [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Fysikgränd 3, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-06-01

    In the following study we investigate the effect of the magnetron cathode current (I{sub c}) during reactive sputtering of In–Ga–Zn–O (a-IGZO) on thin-films nanostructure and transport properties. All fabricated films are amorphous, according to X-ray diffraction measurements. However, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy revealed the a-IGZO fabricated at I{sub C} = 70 mA to contain randomly-oriented nanocrystals dispersed in amorphous matrix, which disappear in films deposited at higher cathode current. These nanocrystals have the same composition as the amorphous matrix. One can observe that, while I{sub C} is increased from 70 to 150 mA, the carrier mobility improves from μ{sub Hall} = 6.9 cm{sup 2}/Vs to μ{sub Hall} = 9.1 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Additionally, the increase of I{sub C} caused a reduction of the depletion region trap states density of the Ru–Si–O/In–Ga–Zn–O Schottky barrier. This enhancement in transport properties is attributed to the greater overlapping of s-orbitals of the film-forming cations caused by increased density, evidenced by X-ray reflectivity, at a fixed chemical composition, regardless nanostructure of thin films. - Highlights: • Magnetron cathode current (I{sub C}) controls the transport properties of In–Ga–Zn–O (IGZO). • Low I{sub C} results in IGZO films with nanocrystalline inclusions in amorphous matrix. • High I{sub C} reduces the number of trap states in depletion region of Schottky contacts.

  18. Exponential experiment on a uranium-graphite lattice; Experience exponentielle sur un reseau uranium-graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, J; Martelly, J

    1958-12-01

    An exponential experiment on a natural uranium and graphite lattice is described. The critical buckling for a cubic pile made with this lattice is B{sup 2} = 0.726 {+-} 0.011 m{sup -2} and the anisotropy {alpha} = (B{sub L}{sup 2}/B{sub T}{sup 2}) is 0.987 {+-} 0.006. The behavior of the neutron density in the lattice near the reflector and sources is discussed in detail. (authors) [French] Une experience exponentielle sur reseau a uranium naturel et graphite est decrite. Le Laplacien de la pile cubique nue, critique, constituee avec un tel reseau serait: B{sup 2} = 0.726 {+-} 0.011 m{sup -2} et l'anisotropie {alpha} (B{sub L}{sup 2}/B{sub T}{sup 2}) est egale a 0.987 {+-} 0.006. La perturbation apportee a la densite de neutrons dans le reseau par le voisinage du reflecteur est discutee en detail. (auteurs)

  19. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  20. A radiographic evaluation of progressive loading on crestal and bone density changes around single osseointegrated implants in the posterior maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ommati Shabestari Gh.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to determine the effectiveness of progressive loading procedures on preserving crestal bone height and improving peri-implant bone density around maxillary implants restored with single crowns by an accurate longitudinal radiographic assessment technique. "n "n "nMaterials and Methods: Eleven Micro-Thread Osseo Speed dental implants were placed in 11 subjects and permitted to heal for 6 weeks before surgical uncovering. Following an 8-week healing period, implants underwent a progressive loading protocol by increasing the height of the occlusal table in increments from adding acrylic resin to an acrylic crown. The progressively loaded crowns were placed in 2 mm infraocclusion for the first 2 months, light occlusion for the second 2 months, and full occlusion for the third 2 months. At forth 2 months, a metal ceramic crown replaced the acrylic crown. Digital radiographs of each implant were made at the time of restoration, then after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 months of function. Digital image analysis was done to measure changes in crestal bone height and peri-implant bone density. "n "n "nResults: The mean values of crestal bone loss at 12 months were 0.11 ± 0.19 mm, and when tested with Friedman across the time periods, the differences were not statistically significant (p> 0.05. The mean values of bone density in the crestal, middle, and apical area were tested with Repeated Measure ANOVA across the time periods, the differences were statistically significant (p<0.05. "n "n "nConclusion: Progressive loading doesn’t cause crestal bone loss. The peri-implant density measurements of the progressively loaded implants show continuous increase in crestal, middle and apical peri-implant bone density by time. "n 

  1. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Elmenhorst, David; Weisshaupt, Angela; Wedekind, Franziska; Kroll, Tina; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E; Bauer, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day(-1) for 5 consecutive days (SR1-SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1-R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26-31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in β-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  2. Do energy density and dietary fiber influence subsequent 5-year weight changes in adult men and women?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Sofia I; Helge, Jørn W; Heitmann, Berit L

    2006-01-01

    the associations between ED and subsequent changes in BW, and despite a general belief that ED is a major determinant of obesity, the present study did not generally lend support for an association. However, among certain subgroups, an energy-dense diet may be a risk factor for weight development.......OBJECTIVE: We examined whether associations between dietary components and, in particular, energy density (ED) predicted subsequent 5-year weight changes. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: The present longitudinal population study was part of the Danish World Health Organization Multinational...... Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) and the 1936 cohort dietary studies. Effects of components were studied in relation to subsequent 5-year weight changes in 862 men and 900 women, 30 to 60 years old. Linear multiple regression analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Mean 5...

  3. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  4. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-10-26

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  5. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Upadhyay Kahaly, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  6. Recording of radiation-induced optical density changes in doped agarose gels with a CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarte, B.J.; Jardine, P.A.; Van Doorn, T.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Spatially resolved dose measurement with iron-doped agarose gels is continuing to be investigated for applications in radiotherapy dosimetry. It has previously been proposed to use optical methods, rather than MRI, for dose measurement with such gels and this has been investigated using a spectrophotometer (Appleby A and Leghrouz A, Med Phys, 18:309-312, 1991). We have previously studied the use of a pencil beam laser for such optical density measurement of gels and are currently investigating charge-coupled devices (CCD) camera imaging for the same purpose but with the advantages of higher data acquisition rates and potentially greater spatial resolution. The gels used in these studies were poured, irradiated and optically analysed in Perspex casts providing gel sections 1 cm thick and up to 20 cm x 30 cm in dimension. The gels were also infused with a metal indicator dye (xylenol orange) to render the radiation induced oxidation of the iron in the gel sensitive to optical radiation, specifically in the green spectral region. Data acquisition with the CCD camera involved illumination of the irradiated gel section with a diffuse white light source, with the light from the plane of the gel section focussed to the CCD array with a manual zoom lens. The light was also filtered with a green colour glass filter to maximise the contrast between unirradiated and irradiated gels. The CCD camera (EG and G Reticon MC4013) featured a 1024 x 1024 pixel array and was interfaced to a PC via a frame grabber acquisition board with 8 bit resolution. The performance of the gel dosimeter was appraised in mapping of physical and dynamic wedged 6 MV X-ray fields. The results from the CCD camera detection system were compared with both ionisation chamber data and laser based optical density measurements of the gels. Cross beam profiles were extracted from each measurement system at a particular depth (eg. 2.3 cm for the physical wedge field) for direct comparison. A

  7. Paralytic shellfish toxin concentration and cell density changes in Pyrodinium bahamense -Noctiluca scintillans feeding experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, Rhodora V; Cruz, Lourdes J; Cariño, Flerida A; Blanco, Alelea G; Butardo, Vito M

    2010-05-01

    For the first time the potential of Noctiluca scintillans, a non-toxic mixotrophic dinoflagellate, in bioconverting and/or excreting saxitoxin has been illustrated, thus contributing to the limited knowledge on the aspects of toxin pathways in the food chain/web and predator-prey preferences. Noctiluca growth rate increased with higher Pyrodinium concentration but the ratio of Noctiluca to Pyrodinium should at least be 1:250 cells per mL. Noctiluca fed with Pyrodinium alone was found to decrease in number suggesting that the nutrients from this prey were insufficient. This was confirmed by the improved cell density of Noctiluca upon addition of 0.01% casitone to the Pyrodinium-fed Noctiluca. The alternative prey (Gymnodinium sanguineum) slowed down the grazing impact of Noctiluca on Pyrodinium. Noctiluca depleted Gymnodinium earlier than Pyrodinium showing preference over a prey with less saxitoxin. After the feeding experiments, total saxitoxin levels decreased to 72% in the Noctiluca-Pyrodinium setup whereas no saxitoxin was detected in the Noctiluca culture fed with Pyrodinium and G. sanguineum. It is possible that Gymnodinium can provide some nutrients needed to make Noctiluca more efficient in bioconverting saxitoxin. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamics of graphite flake on a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K.; Tsuda, D.; Kaneta, Y.; Harada, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Sasaki, N.

    2006-11-01

    One-directional motion, where graphite flakes are driven by a nanotip on an octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) liquid surface, is presented. A transition from quasiperiodic to chaotic motions occurs in the dynamics of a graphite flake when its velocity is increased. The dynamics of graphite flakes pulled by the nanotip on an OMCTS liquid surface can be treated as that of a nanobody on a liquid.

  9. Sealing nuclear graphite with pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shanglei; Xu, Li; Li, Li; Bai, Shuo; Yang, Xinmei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings were deposited on IG-110 nuclear graphite by thermal decomposition of methane at ∼1830 °C. The PyC coatings are anisotropic and airtight enough to protect IG-110 nuclear graphite against the permeation of molten fluoride salts and the diffusion of gases. The investigations indicate that the sealing nuclear graphite with PyC coating is a promising method for its application in Molten Salt Reactor (MSR)

  10. Responses of Sap Flux Density to Changing Atmospheric Humidity in Three Common Street Tree Species in Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantana Tor-ngern

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficient water management in urban landscape is imperative under the projected increases in drought stress under future climate. Because different tree species have different stomatal regulations to prevent water loss under water limitation, comparative study of species-specific responses of water use to changing weather conditions will benefit selective planting of urban trees for sustainable urban greening management. Here, we performed a simple and short-term investigation of water use characteristics of three common street tree species in Bangkok, a major city in Southeast Asia. Species included Pterocarpus indicus (Pi, Swietenia macrophylla (Sm and Lagerstroemia speciosa (Ls. We used self-constructed heat dissipation probes to track water uptake rates, expressed as sap flux density (JS, in stems of potted trees and examined their diurnal variations with changing atmospheric humidity, represented by vapor pressure deficit (D. The results implied that two of the three species: Pi and Sm, may be selected for planting because their Js was less sensitive to changing D compared to Ls. The sap flux density of Ls increased more rapidly with rising D, implying higher sensitivity to drought in Ls, compared to the other two species. Nevertheless, further study on large trees and under longer period of investigation, covering both dry and wet seasons, is required to confirm this finding.

  11. Graphite Microstructural Characterization Using Time-Domain and Correlation-Based Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, James [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-12-06

    Among techniques that have been used to determine elastic modulus in nuclear graphites, ultrasonic methods have enjoyed wide use and standards using contacting piezoelectric tranducers have been developed to ensure repeatability of these types of measurements. However, the use of couplants and the pressures used to effectively couple transducers to samples can bias measurements and produce results that are not wholly related to the properties of the graphite itself. In this work, we have investigated the use of laser ultrasonic methods for making elastic modulus measurements in nuclear graphites. These methods use laser-based transmitters and receivers to gather data and do not require use of ultrasonic couplants or mechanical contact with the sample. As a result, information directly related to the elastic responses of graphite can be gathered even if the graphite is porous, brittle and compliant. In particular, we have demonstrated the use of laser ultrasonics for the determination of both Young’s modulus and shear modulus in a range of nuclear graphites including those that are being considered for use in future nuclear reactors. These results have been analyzed to assess the contributions of porosity and microcracking to the elastic responses of these graphites. Laser-based methods have also been used to assess the moduli of NBG-18 and IG-110 where samples of each grade were oxidized to produce specific changes in porosity. These data were used to develop new models for the elastic responses of nuclear graphites and these models have been used to infer specific changes in graphite microstructure that occur during oxidation that affect elastic modulus. Specifically, we show how ultrasonic measurements in oxidized graphites are consistent with nano/microscale oxidation processes where basal plane edges react more readily than basal plane surfaces. We have also shown the use of laser-based methods to perform shear-wave birefringence measurements and have shown

  12. Fabrication of uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite experimental-fuel-element specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzer, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    A method has been developed for fabricating uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite fuel-element specimens for reactor-core-meltdown studies. The method involves milling and blending the raw materials and densifying the resulting blend by conventional graphite-die hot-pressing techniques. It can be used to fabricate specimens with good physical integrity and material dispersion, with densities of greater than 90% of the theoretical density, and with a uranium carbide particle size of less than 10 μm

  13. Graphitization kinetics of fluidized-bed pyrolytic carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beatty, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    Graphitization of 12 fluidized-bed pyrocarbons was studied as a function of heat-treatment time and temperature (1350 to 3000 0 C) to investigate the effect of initial microstructure on the graphitization process. The term ''graphitization'' is defined to include any thermally induced structural change, whether or not any layer stacking order is attained. A broad range of CVD microstructures was prepared at temperatures from 1150 to 1900 0 C and various propylene and methane concentrations. The twelve carbons spanned a wide range of graphitizabilities, primarily as a function of deposition temperature. Hydrocarbon concentration was of much less importance except for deposition at 1900 0 C. Hydrogen content of the as-deposited carbons decreased with increasing temperature of deposition, and initial graphitization behavior of the low-temperature carbons appeared to be related to hydrogen content and evolution. Rates of change in the parameters varied widely throughout the range of heat-treatment times (HTt) and temperatures (HTT) for the different carbons showing differences between the more graphitizable or ''soft'' carbons from the nongraphitizing or ''hard'' carbons. ΔH for nongraphitizing carbons was 175 +- 15 kcal below 1950 0 C, 240 +- 35 kcal at 1950 to 2700 0 C, and 330 +- 20 kcal above 2700 0 C. For graphitizing carbons deposited at 1150 0 C, values near 245 kcal were obtained from anti chi data for the HTT range 1350 to 1650 0 C, while densification data yielded values of about 160 kcal in the same range. The behaviors observed for graphitizable carbons above 2000 0 C are consistent with literature. Different kinetic behaviors below 2000 0 C were shown to be due to different initial microstructures as well as to different parameters measured. (U.S.)

  14. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  15. Production of nuclear graphite in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L.; Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H.

    1955-01-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [fr

  16. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  17. Structural analysis of polycrystalline (graphitized) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, M.M.; Kravchik, A.E.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Specific features of the structure of polycrystal carbon materials (CM), characterized by high enough degree of structural perfection and different genesis are analyzed. From the viewpoint of fine and supercrystallite structure analysis of the most characteristic groups of graphitized CM: artificial graphites, and natural graphites, as well, has been carried out. It is ascertained that in paracrystal CM a monolayer of hexagonally-bound carbon atoms is the basic element of the structure, and in graphitized CM - a microlayer. The importance of the evaluation of the degree of three-dimensional ordering of the microlayer is shown

  18. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  19. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  20. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  1. Contribution to the study of internal friction in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, J.

    1969-03-01

    A study has been made of the internal friction in different graphites between -180 C and +500 C using a torsion pendulum; the graphites had been previously treated thermo-mechanically, by neutron irradiation and subjected to partial annealings. It has been shown that there occurs: a hysteretic type dissipation of energy, connected with interactions between dislocations and other defects in the matrix; a dissipation having a partially hysteretic character which can be interpreted by a Granato-Luke type formalism and which is connected with the presence of an 'ultra-micro porosity'; a dissipation by a relaxation mechanism after a small dose of irradiation; this is attributed to the reorientation of bi-interstitials; a dissipation having the characteristics of a solid state transformation, this during an annealing after irradiation. It is attributed to the reorganization of interstitial defects. Some information has thus been obtained concerning graphites, in particular: their behaviour at low mechanical stresses, the nature of irradiation defects and their behaviour during annealing, the structural changes occurring during graphitization, the relationship between internal friction and macroscopic mechanical properties. (author) [fr

  2. Project accent: graphite irradiated creep in a materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooking, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atkins manages a pioneering programme of irradiation experiments for EDF Energy. One of these projects is Project ACCENT, designed to obtain evidence of a beneficial physical property of the graphite, which may extend the life of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The project team combines the in-house experience of EDF Energy with two supplier organisations (providing the material test reactors and testing facilities) and supporting consultancies (Atkins and an independent technical expert). This paper describes: - Brief summary of the Project; - Discussion of the challenges faced by the Project; and - Conclusion elaborating on the aims of the Project. These challenging experiments use bespoke technology and both un-irradiated (virgin) and irradiated AGR graphite. The results will help to better understand graphite irradiation-induced creep (or stress modified dimensional change) properties and therefore more accurately determine lifetime and safe operating envelopes of the AGRs. The first round of irradiation has been completed, with a second round about to commence. This is a key step to realising the full lifetime ambition for AGRs, demonstrating the relaxation of stresses within the graphite bricks. (authors)

  3. Aterial connective tissue changes and distribution of 125I-labelled low density lipoprotein in hypertensive pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, D.N.; Scott, P.J.; Flint, M.H.; Donald, J.

    1980-01-01

    Young pigs with hypertension of 10 weeks duration, resulting from cellophane perinephritis, were injected with 125 I-labelled low-density lipoprotein ( 125 I LDL) before being killed 24 h or 48 h later. Intimal thickening and increased acid mucopolysaccharide were demonstrated in the aortas and major arteries of the hypertensive animals. Increased accumulation of ( 125 I)LDL was observed in the inner media beneath areas of intimal thickening. It is suggested that the primary effect of hypertension in atherosclerosis is to produce structural changes in arterial connective tissue which allow increased accumulation of LDL by altering the permeability and binding properties of the arterial wall. (author)

  4. An experimental study of dynamic behaviour of graphite-polycarbonatediol polyurethane composites for protective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, C. M.; Culebras, M.; Cantarero, A.; Redondo-Foj, B.; Ortiz-Serna, P.; Carsí, M.; Sanchis, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    Segmented polycarbonatediol polyurethane (PUPH) has been synthesized and modified with different amounts of graphite conductive filler (from 0 to 50 wt%). Thermal and dynamical thermal analysis of the composites clearly indicates changes in the polyurethane relaxations upon addition of graphite. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy has been used to study the dielectric properties of the (PUPH) and one composite in the frequency range from 10-2 to 107 Hz and in the temperature window of -140 to 170 °C. Relaxation processes associated with different molecular motions and conductivity phenomena (Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars and electrode polarization) are discussed and related to the graphite content.

  5. Direct reform of graphite oxide electrodes by using ambient plasma for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-10-01

    Ambient plasma is applied to graphite oxide electrodes directly to improve electrochemical properties for supercapacitor applications. Surface morphology of the electrodes after the plasma treatment changes dramatically and amount of oxygen reduced significantly, demonstrating a reduction effect on the graphite oxide electrode by the ambient plasma. Equivalent series resistance of the electrode also reduced from 108 Ω to 84 Ω after the plasma treatment. Corresponding specific capacitance, therefore, increases from 0.45 F cm-2 to 0.85 F cm-2, proving that the ambient plasma treatment is very efficient, clean, economic, and environment-friendly method to reform the graphite oxide electrodes directly for the supercapacitor applications.

  6. Changes in bone mineral density 10 years after marked reduction of cadmium exposure in a Chinese population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiao [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Zhu, Guoying, E-mail: zhugy@shmu.edu.cn [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Jin, Taiyi [Department of Occupation Medicine, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Akesson, Agneta [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergdahl, Ingvar A. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Lei, Lijian [Department of Occupation Medicine, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Weng, Shifang [Department of Bone Metabolism, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, 200032 Shanghai (China); Liang, Yihuai [Department of Occupation Medicine, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umea University, Umea (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    The main focus of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of Cd on forearm bone mineral density after the cessation of the ingestion of Cd-polluted rice. A total of 458 persons (294 women, 164 men) from three Cd exposure areas (low, moderately, and heavy) participated in this study. Those living in the moderate and heavy exposure areas ceased ingesting Cd-polluted rice (0.51 and 3.7 mg/kg, respectively) in 1996 (10 years prior to present analysis). The participants completed a questionnaire and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the proximal radius and ulna. The changes and change percentage in forearm bone density and the prevalence of osteoporosis between 1998 and 2006 were used as markers of bone recovery. The Cd concentrations in urine (UCd) and blood (BCd) in 1998 were used as Cd exposure markers. The values of the BMD change and change percentage of groups in which UCd was above 5 {mu}g/g creatinine ({mu}g/g crea) and BCd was above 10 {mu}g/L were significantly higher than those of the low-exposure groups (in women, p<0.001; in men, p>0.05). The BMD change and change percentage correlated positively with the UCd and BCd (in women, p<0.01; in men, p>0.05). Analysis of the Z-score revealed that the prevalence of osteoporosis in 2006 was higher than that in 1998 and increased along with the level of UCd and BCd in both women and men, especially for those subjects with the higher BCd [BCd>5 {mu}g/L, OR=3.45 (0.95-13.6); BCd>10 {mu}g/L, OR=4.51(1.57-13.54)] and UCd [UCd>10 {mu}g/g crea, OR=4.74 (1.82-12.81)] in women. It is concluded that decreasing dietary cadmium exposure at the population level is not associated with bone recovery at the individual level, and the adverse bone effects of Cd exposure persisted after the main source of Cd exposure had been blocked, especially in women.

  7. Changes in bone mineral density 10 years after marked reduction of cadmium exposure in a Chinese population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Guoying; Jin, Taiyi; Akesson, Agneta; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Lei, Lijian; Weng, Shifang; Liang, Yihuai

    2009-01-01

    The main focus of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of Cd on forearm bone mineral density after the cessation of the ingestion of Cd-polluted rice. A total of 458 persons (294 women, 164 men) from three Cd exposure areas (low, moderately, and heavy) participated in this study. Those living in the moderate and heavy exposure areas ceased ingesting Cd-polluted rice (0.51 and 3.7 mg/kg, respectively) in 1996 (10 years prior to present analysis). The participants completed a questionnaire and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the proximal radius and ulna. The changes and change percentage in forearm bone density and the prevalence of osteoporosis between 1998 and 2006 were used as markers of bone recovery. The Cd concentrations in urine (UCd) and blood (BCd) in 1998 were used as Cd exposure markers. The values of the BMD change and change percentage of groups in which UCd was above 5 μg/g creatinine (μg/g crea) and BCd was above 10 μg/L were significantly higher than those of the low-exposure groups (in women, p 0.05). The BMD change and change percentage correlated positively with the UCd and BCd (in women, p 0.05). Analysis of the Z-score revealed that the prevalence of osteoporosis in 2006 was higher than that in 1998 and increased along with the level of UCd and BCd in both women and men, especially for those subjects with the higher BCd [BCd>5 μg/L, OR=3.45 (0.95-13.6); BCd>10 μg/L, OR=4.51(1.57-13.54)] and UCd [UCd>10 μg/g crea, OR=4.74 (1.82-12.81)] in women. It is concluded that decreasing dietary cadmium exposure at the population level is not associated with bone recovery at the individual level, and the adverse bone effects of Cd exposure persisted after the main source of Cd exposure had been blocked, especially in women.

  8. Correlation analysis between change in thoracic kyphosis and multilevel facetectomy and screw density in main thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Kokabu, Terufumi; Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Yoichi M; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-09-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on deformity correction, especially thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on sagittal plane correction in patients with main thoracic (MT) AIS curve. A retrospective correlation and comparative analysis of pro