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Sample records for graphic displays provide

  1. Software for graphic display systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlov, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper some aspects of graphic display systems are discussed. The design of a display subroutine library is described, with an example, and graphic dialogue software is considered primarily from the point of view of the programmer who uses a high-level language. (Auth.)

  2. Computer graphic display of cardiac CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.; Carlsson, E.

    1982-01-01

    In order to improve spatial conception and quantitative assessment of the cardiac structures based on cardiac computed tomography, methods for computer graphic display were developed. Excised hearts and living dogs with myocardial infarctions were subjected to CT scanning. The data on the scanner tapes were processed to provide isodensity plots, linear section plots, time-weighted integrated isodensity plots as well as topographical density displays and three-dimensional spatial reconstructions of single and multi-layer scans. (orig.)

  3. Interactive and Animated Scalable Vector Graphics and R Data Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Nolan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an approach to creating interactive and animated graphical displays using R's graphics engine and Scalable Vector Graphics, an XML vocabulary for describing two-dimensional graphical displays. We use the svg( graphics device in R and then post-process the resulting XML documents. The post-processing identities the elements in the SVG that correspond to the different components of the graphical display, e.g., points, axes, labels, lines. One can then annotate these elements to add interactivity and animation effects. One can also use JavaScript to provide dynamic interactive effects to the plot, enabling rich user interactions and compelling visualizations. The resulting SVG documents can be embedded withinHTML documents and can involve JavaScript code that integrates the SVG and HTML objects. The functionality is provided via the SVGAnnotation package and makes static plots generated via R graphics functions available as stand-alone, interactive and animated plots for the Web and other venues.

  4. Producing EGS4 shower displays with the Unified Graphics System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The EGS4 Code System has been coupled with the SLAC Unified Graphics System in such a manner as to provide a means for displaying showers on UGS77-supported devices. This is most easily accomplished by attaching an auxiliary subprogram package (SHOWGRAF) to existing EGS4 User Codes and making use of a graphics display or a post-processor code called EGS4PL. SHOWGRAF may be used to create shower displays directly on interactive IBM 5080 color display devices, supporting three-dimensional rotations, translations, and zoom features, and providing illustration of particle types and energies by color and/or intensity. Alternatively, SHOWGRAF may be used to record a two-dimensional projection of the shower in a device-independent graphics file. The EGS4PL post-processor may then be used to convert this file into device-dependent graphics code for any UGS77-supported device. Options exist within EGS4PL that allow for two-dimensional translations and zoom, for creating line structure to indicate particle types and energies, and for optional display of particles by type. All of this is facilitated by means of the command processor EGS4PL EXEC together with new options (5080 and PDEV) with the standard EGS4IN EXEC routine for running EGS4 interactively under VM/SP. 6 refs

  5. Scientific Graphical Displays on the Macintosh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotch, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    In many organizations scientists have ready access to more than one computer, often both a workstation (e.g., SUN, HP, SGI) as well as a Macintosh or other PC. The scientist commonly uses the work station for `number-crunching` and data analysis whereas the Macintosh is relegated to either word processing or serves as a `dumb terminal` to a larger main-frame computer. In an informal poll of my colleagues, very few of them used their Macintoshes for either statistical analysis or for graphical data display. I believe that this state of affairs is particularly unfortunate because over the last few years both the computational capability, and even more so, the software availability for the Macintosh have become quite formidable. In some instances, very powerful tools are now available on the Macintosh that may not exist (or be far too costly) on the so-called `high end` workstations. Many scientists are simply unaware of the wealth of extremely useful, `off-the-shelf` software that already exists on the Macintosh for scientific graphical and statistical analysis.

  6. Graphic Display Development Program. Volume II, Revision 0. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of developing a set of graphic displays to support symptom-based emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Development of generic graphic displays is based on Revision 3 of the symptomatic Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) prepared by the BWR Owners' Group (BWROG), and development of plant-specific graphic displays is based on a set of emergency operating procedures developed from these EPGs

  7. The use of interpractive graphic displays for interpretation of surface design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer graphics technique known as the Graphic Display Data method has been developed to provide a convenient means for rapidly interpreting large amounts of surface design data. The display technique should prove valuable in such disciplines as aerodynamic analysis, structural analysis, and experimental data analysis. To demonstrate the system's features, an example is presented of the Graphic Data Display method used as an interpretive tool for radiation equilibrium temperature distributions over the surface of an aerodynamic vehicle. Color graphic displays were also examined as a logical extension of the technique to improve its clarity and to allow the presentation of greater detail in a single display.

  8. Graphic Data Display from Manufacturing on Web Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin VALAS

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial data can by displayed in graphical form which is usually used by three types of users. The first, nonstop users, most frequent operational engineer, who checking actual displayed values and then intervene in operation. The second are occasional users who are interested in historical data e.g. for servicing reason. The last users’ types are tradesmen and managers. State comparison few days or months ago helps as decision-making support. Graph component with web application, which provides data as XML document, was designed for second users group. Graph component displays historical data. Students can fully understand all the problems go along with web application creation in ASP.NET, which provides data in XML document, as well as graph component creation in integrated development environment Flash, thanks in detail described solution using ActionScript.

  9. 'Grafic'. A subroutine for the graphic displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunta Carretero, J.

    1977-01-01

    The subroutire Grafic allows the drawing of different standard graphics in a pploter Calcomp and avoid the users the preparation of calls to several Plot subroutines, which are necessary for the plotting. The possibilities of this subroutine, user's guide, suggestions about better use and examples, and also the carry out in Fortran language, are described. (author) [es

  10. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  11. Interactive computer graphics displays for hierarchical data structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, D.F.; Murano, C.V.

    1980-05-01

    An interactive computer graphical display program was developed as an aid to user visualization and manipulation of hierarchically structured data systems such as thesauri. In the present configuration, a thesaurus term and its primary and secondary conceptual neighbors are presented to the user in tree graph form on a CRT; the user then designates, via light pen or keyboard, any of the neighbors as the next term of interest and receives a new display centered on this term. By successive specification of broader, narrower, and related terms, the user can course rapidly through the thesaurus space and refine his search file. At any stage, he deals with a term-centered, conceptually meaningful picture of a localized portion of the thesaurus, and is freed from the artificial difficulties of handling the traditional alphabetized thesaurus. Intentional limitation of the associative range of each display frame, and the use of color, case, and interconnecting vectors to encode relationships among terms, enhance interpretability of the display. Facile movement through the term space, provided by interactive computation, allows the display to remain simple, and is an essential element of the system. 3 figures

  12. Knowledge based development of graphic display systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    Most human factors guidelines on computer display design attempt to ensure that human sensory limits are not strained or that users can potentially access data. While this is a necessary and too often an overlooked step in interface design, it does not address issues about how to use computer displays to aid human performance at domain tasks. This challenge to human factors guidance is particularly acute in complex environments such as nuclear power plants where the goal is more than a useable interface system; the interface must support effective human performance at tasks like situation assessment, fault management, problem solving and planning. Studies of human performance in complex domains reveal that human-machine performance failures can often be linked to problems in information handling - data overload, getting lost, keyhole effects, tunnel vision to name but a few. All of these information handling problems represent manifestations of an inability to find, integrate or interpret the ''right'' data at the ''right'' time, i.e., failures where critical information is not detected among the ambient data load, where critical information is not assembled from data distributed over time or over space; and where critical information is not looked for because of misunderstandings or erroneous assumptions (cf., Woods, 1985). Problems of this kind illustrate that the potential to see, read, or access data does not guarantee successful user information extraction. The result is a need for research and guidance on design for enhanced information extraction in addition to design for data availability

  13. Real-time graphic display utility for nuclear safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.; Huang, X.; Taylor, J.; Stevens, J.; Gerardis, T.; Hsu, A.; McCreary, T.

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing interests in the nuclear energy, new nuclear power plants will be constructed and licensed, and older generation ones will be upgraded for assuring continuing operation. The tendency of adopting the latest proven technology and the fact of older parts becoming obsolete have made the upgrades imperative. One of the areas for upgrades is the older CRT display being replaced by the latest graphics displays running under modern real time operating system (RTOS) with safety graded modern computer. HFC has developed a graphic display utility (GDU) under the QNX RTOS. A standard off-the-shelf software with a long history of performance in industrial applications, QNX RTOS used for safety applications has been examined via a commercial dedication process that is consistent with the regulatory guidelines. Through a commercial survey, a design life cycle and an operating history evaluation, and necessary tests dictated by the dedication plan, it is reasonably confirmed that the QNX RTOS was essentially equivalent to what would be expected in the nuclear industry. The developed GDU operates and communicates with the existing equipment through a dedicated serial channel of a flat panel controller (FPC) module. The FPC module drives a flat panel display (FPD) monitor. A touch screen mounted on the FPD serves as the normal operator interface with the FPC/FPD monitor system. The GDU can be used not only for replacing older CRTs but also in new applications. The replacement of the older CRT does not disturb the function of the existing equipment. It not only provides modern proven technology upgrade but also improves human ergonomics. The FPC, which can be used as a standalone controller running with the GDU, is an integrated hardware and software module. It operates as a single board computer within a control system, and applies primarily to the graphics display, targeting, keyboard and mouse. During normal system operation, the GDU has two sources of data

  14. DISPLAY3D. A Graphics Preprocessor for CHIEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-27

    graphics devices, the user may write a graphics program th.,.t can read DISPLAY3D output files, or use one of the commercial plotting packages...COMMON/NBPRTC/IRHSPT, NARSPT, NPTBLK FRQPT COMMON/NBPRTS/SYMTPT CHARACTER*3 SYMTPT DIMENSION CC(10), TRNS(3), IELTS (8,300) real xl(1000) ,yl(leee...C Prompt the user for filename. C--- ------------------------------------------------------- WRITE (6,1) ’Enter filename used in CID or

  15. Methods and apparatus for graphical display and editing of flight plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Michael J. (Inventor); Adams, Jr., Mike B. (Inventor); Chase, Karl L. (Inventor); Lewis, Daniel E. (Inventor); McCrobie, Daniel E. (Inventor); Omen, Debi Van (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are provided for an integrated graphical user interface which facilitates the display and editing of aircraft flight-plan data. A user (e.g., a pilot) located within the aircraft provides input to a processor through a cursor control device and receives visual feedback via a display produced by a monitor. The display includes various graphical elements associated with the lateral position, vertical position, flight-plan and/or other indicia of the aircraft's operational state as determined from avionics data and/or various data sources. Through use of the cursor control device, the user may modify the flight-plan and/or other such indicia graphically in accordance with feedback provided by the display. In one embodiment, the display includes a lateral view, a vertical profile view, and a hot-map view configured to simplify the display and editing of the aircraft's flight-plan data.

  16. Graphic display of spatially distributed binary-state experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data collected from a large number of transducers spatially distributed throughout a three-dimensional volume has typically posed a difficult interpretation task for the analyst. This paper describes one approach to alleviating this problem by presenting color graphic displays of experimental data; specifically, data representing the dynamic three-dimensional distribution of cooling fluid collected during the reflood and refill of simulated nuclear reactor vessels. Color-coded binary data (wet/dry) are integrated with a graphic representation of the reactor vessel and displayed on a high-resolution color CRT. The display is updated with successive data sets and made into 16-mm movies for distribution and analysis. Specific display formats are presented and extension to other applications discussed

  17. Design, testing, and delivery of an interactive graphics display subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, B.

    1973-01-01

    An interactive graphics display system was designed to be used in locating components on a printed circuit card and outputting data concerning their thermal values. The manner in which this was accomplished in terms of both hardware and software is described. An analysis of the accuracy of this approach is also included.

  18. Graphic terminal based on storage tube display with microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leich, H.; Levchanovsky, F.; Nikulnikov, A.; Polyntsev, A.; Prikhodko, V.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a graphic terminal where a microcomputer realizes functions like the generation of picture elements (points, symbols, vectors), display control, processing of data received from keyboard and trackball, communication with a host computer and others. The terminal has been designed for operating in a local network as well as in autonomous control systems for data acquisition and processing in physical experiments [ru

  19. A CAMAC display module for fast bit-mapped graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    In many data acquisition and analysis facilities for nuclear physics research, utilities for the display of two-dimensional (2D) images and spectra on graphics terminals suffer from low speed, poor resolution, and limit accuracy. Developed of CAMAC bit-mapped graphics modules for this purpose has been discouraged in the past by the large device count needed and the long times required to load the image data from the host computer into the CAMAC hardware; particularly since many such facilities have been designed to support fast DMA block transfers only for data acquisition into the host. This paper describes the design and implementation of a prototype CAMAC graphics display module with a resolution of 256x256 pixels at eight colours for which all components can be easily accommodated in a single-width package. Employed is a hardware technique which reduces the number of programmed CAMAC data transfer operations needed for writing 2D images into the display memory by approximately an order of magnitude, with attendant improvements in the display speed and CPU time consumption. Hardware and software details are given together with sample results. Information on the performance of the module in a typical VAX/MBD data acquisition environment is presented, including data on the mutual effects of simultaneous data acquisition traffic. Suggestions are made for further improvements in performance. (orig.)

  20. Development of a graphical user interface and graphics display for the WIND system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Steen, B.L.; Fast, J.D.; Suire, B.S.

    1992-01-01

    An advanced graphical user interface (GUI) and improved graphics for transport calculations have been developed for the Weather Information and Display System (WINDS). Two WINDS transport codes, Area Evac and 2DPUF, have been ported from their original VAX/VMS environment to a UNIX operating system and reconfigured to take advantage of the new graphics capability. A developmental prototype of this software is now available on a UNIX based IBM 340 workstation in the Dose Assessment Center (DAC). Automatic transfer of meteorological data from the WINDS VAX computers to the IBM workstation in the DAC has been implemented. This includes both regional National Weather Service (NWS) data and SRS tower data. The above developments fulfill a FY 1993 DOE milestone

  1. Working at a Ferranti-Argus graphics display linked to a CDC 6600

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The photo shows a Ferranti-Argus graphics display linked to a CDC 6600 computer running one of the first interactive graphics packages for physics analysis. The people around are Jean-Claude Marin, Harry Renshall and Emilio Pagiola (right).

  2. A low-cost system for graphical process monitoring with colour video symbol display units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, H.; Jarsch, V.; Mueller, W.

    1977-01-01

    A system for computer controlled graphic process supervision, using color symbol video displays is described. It has the following characteristics: - compact unit: no external memory for image storage - problem oriented simple descriptive cut to the process program - no restriction of the graphical representation of process variables - computer and display independent, by implementation of colours and parameterized code creation for the display. (WB) [de

  3. Wide-angle display developments by computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Computer graphics can now expand its new subset, wide-angle projection, to be as significant a generic capability as computer graphics itself. Some prior work in computer graphics is presented which leads to an attractive further subset of wide-angle projection, called hemispheric projection, to be a major communication media. Hemispheric film systems have long been present and such computer graphics systems are in use in simulators. This is the leading edge of capabilities which should ultimately be as ubiquitous as CRTs (cathode-ray tubes). These assertions are not from degrees in science or only from a degree in graphic design, but in a history of computer graphics innovations, laying groundwork by demonstration. The author believes that it is timely to look at several development strategies, since hemispheric projection is now at a point comparable to the early stages of computer graphics, requiring similar patterns of development again.

  4. Generating high gray-level resolution monochrome displays with conventional computer graphics cards and color monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangrui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Xu, Pengjing; Jin, Jianzhong; Zhou, Yifeng

    2003-11-30

    Display systems based on conventional computer graphics cards are capable of generating images with about 8-bit luminance resolution. However, most vision experiments require more than 12 bits of luminance resolution. Pelli and Zhang [Spatial Vis. 10 (1997) 443] described a video attenuator for generating high luminance resolution displays on a monochrome monitor, or for driving just the green gun of a color monitor. Here we show how to achieve a white display by adding video amplifiers to duplicate the monochrome signal to drive all three guns of any color monitor. Because of the lack of the availability of high quality monochrome monitors, our method provides an inexpensive way to achieve high-resolution monochromatic displays using conventional, easy-to-get equipment. We describe the design principles, test results, and a few additional functionalities.

  5. Role of computer graphics in space telerobotics - Preview and predictive displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Venema, Steven; Kim, Won S.

    1991-01-01

    The application of computer graphics in space telerobotics research and development work is briefly reviewed and illustrated by specific examples implemented in real time operation. The applications are discussed under the following four major categories: preview displays, predictive displays, sensor data displays, and control system status displays.

  6. A Module for Graphical Display of Model Results with the CBP Toolbox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-21

    This report describes work performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in fiscal year 2014 to add enhanced graphical capabilities to display model results in the Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) Toolbox. Because Version 2.0 of the CBP Toolbox has just been released, the graphing enhancements described in this report have not yet been integrated into a new version of the Toolbox. Instead they have been tested using a standalone GoldSim model and, while they are substantially complete, may undergo further refinement before full implementation. Nevertheless, this report is issued to document the FY14 development efforts which will provide a basis for further development of the CBP Toolbox.

  7. A computer graphics display technique for the examination of aircraft design data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer graphics technique has been developed for quickly sorting and interpreting large amounts of aerodynamic data. It utilizes a graphic representation rather than numbers. The geometry package represents the vehicle as a set of panels. These panels are ordered in groups of ascending values (e.g., equilibrium temperatures). The groups are then displayed successively on a CRT building up to the complete vehicle. A zoom feature allows for displaying only the panels with values between certain limits. The addition of color allows a one-time display thus eliminating the need for a display build up.

  8. Flexible Smart Display with Integrated Graphics Rasterizor using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SG-TFTs and other similar technologies can potentially enable fabricating electronics directly on arbitrary substrates. This would further enable integration of embedded intelligence in devices that would enhance the current functionalists of displays. This paper is an effort in this direction as it undertakes a study to design a ...

  9. ATM Technology Demonstration-1 Phase II Boeing Configurable Graphical Display (CGD) Software Design Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, George F.

    2017-01-01

    This Software Description Document (SDD) captures the design for developing the Flight Interval Management (FIM) system Configurable Graphics Display (CGD) software. Specifically this SDD describes aspects of the Boeing CGD software and the surrounding context and interfaces. It does not describe the Honeywell components of the CGD system. The SDD provides the system overview, architectural design, and detailed design with all the necessary information to implement the Boeing components of the CGD software and integrate them into the CGD subsystem within the larger FIM system. Overall system and CGD system-level requirements are derived from the CGD SRS (in turn derived from the Boeing System Requirements Design Document (SRDD)). Display and look-and-feel requirements are derived from Human Machine Interface (HMI) design documents and working group recommendations. This Boeing CGD SDD is required to support the upcoming Critical Design Review (CDR).

  10. Tests of Cumulative Prospect Theory with graphical displays of probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Birnbaum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent research reported evidence that contradicts cumulative prospect theory and the priority heuristic. The same body of research also violates two editing principles of original prospect theory: cancellation (the principle that people delete any attribute that is the same in both alternatives before deciding between them and combination (the principle that people combine branches leading to the same consequence by adding their probabilities. This study was designed to replicate previous results and to test whether the violations of cumulative prospect theory might be eliminated or reduced by using formats for presentation of risky gambles in which cancellation and combination could be facilitated visually. Contrary to the idea that decision behavior contradicting cumulative prospect theory and the priority heuristic would be altered by use of these formats, however, data with two new graphical formats as well as fresh replication data continued to show the patterns of evidence that violate cumulative prospect theory, the priority heuristic, and the editing principles of combination and cancellation. Systematic violations of restricted branch independence also contradicted predictions of ``stripped'' prospect theory (subjectively weighted additive utility without the editing rules.

  11. Network, system, and status software enhancements for the autonomously managed electrical power system breadboard. Volume 4: Graphical status display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, James W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume (4 of 4) contains the description, structured flow charts, prints of the graphical displays, and source code to generate the displays for the AMPS graphical status system. The function of these displays is to present to the manager of the AMPS system a graphical status display with the hot boxes that allow the manager to get more detailed status on selected portions of the AMPS system. The development of the graphical displays is divided into two processes; the creation of the screen images and storage of them in files on the computer, and the running of the status program which uses the screen images.

  12. Human factors engineering in the design of colour-graphic displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    The operator interface for Ontario Hydro's Darlington Nuclear Generating Station will rely extensively on the use of coloured graphic display formats. These are used for the presentation of both control and monitoring information. The displays are organized in a hierarchical relationship and a simple interactive selection method using light pens has been implemented. The application of human factors engineering principles has been a major factor in all aspects of the design. This paper describes the system and the human factors engineering function

  13. Designing a Visual Factors-Based Screen Display Interface: The New Role of the Graphic Technologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Tony; DeBloois, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the graphic technologist in preparing computer screen displays for interactive videodisc systems, and suggests screen design guidelines. Topics discussed include the grid system; typography; visual factors research; color; course mobility through branching and software menus; and a model of course integration. (22 references)…

  14. Topographic Information Requirements and Computer-Graphic Display Techniques for Nap-of-the-Earth Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    of- at Battle Positions sight to target when unmask Concealment of Approach Map j Routes ! I i. 16 ... ’ FUNCTION: IASb SELECT AERIAL OBSERVATION...to select special overlays for temporary display and to remove them for clutter avoidance. In addition to these graphic presentation roles , the

  15. A projection graphic display for the computer aided analysis of bubble chamber images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomos, E.

    1979-01-01

    A projection graphic display for aiding the analysis of bubble chamber photographs has been developed by the Instrumentation Group of EF Division at CERN. The display image is generated on a very high brightness cathode ray tube and projected on to the table of the scanning-measuring machines as a superposition to the image of the bubble chamber. The display can send messages to the operator and aid the measurement by indicating directly on the chamber image the tracks which are measured correctly or not. (orig.)

  16. Understanding Graphics on a Scalable Latching Assistive Haptic Display Using a Shape Memory Polymer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Nadine; Rosset, Samuel; Zarate, Juan Jose; Ferrari, Elisabetta; Brayda, Luca; Shea, Herbert

    2018-01-01

    We present a fully latching and scalable 4 × 4 haptic display with 4 mm pitch, 5 s refresh time, 400 mN holding force, and 650 μm displacement per taxel. The display serves to convey dynamic graphical information to blind and visually impaired users. Combining significant holding force with high taxel density and large amplitude motion in a very compact overall form factor was made possible by exploiting the reversible, fast, hundred-fold change in the stiffness of a thin shape memory polymer (SMP) membrane when heated above its glass transition temperature. Local heating is produced using an addressable array of 3 mm in diameter stretchable microheaters patterned on the SMP. Each taxel is selectively and independently actuated by synchronizing the local Joule heating with a single pressure supply. Switching off the heating locks each taxel into its position (up or down), enabling holding any array configuration with zero power consumption. A 3D-printed pin array is mounted over the SMP membrane, providing the user with a smooth and room temperature array of movable pins to explore by touch. Perception tests were carried out with 24 blind users resulting in 70 percent correct pattern recognition over a 12-word tactile dictionary.

  17. Evaluation of an integrated graphical display to promote acute change detection in ICU patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Shilo; Albert, Robert; Miller, Anne; Weinger, Matthew B.; Doig, Alexa K.; Behrens, Michael; Agutter, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate ICU nurses’ ability to detect patient change using an integrated graphical information display (IGID) versus a conventional tabular ICU patient information display (i.e. electronic chart). Design Using participants from two different sites, we conducted a repeated measures simulator-based experiment to assess ICU nurses’ ability to detect abnormal patient variables using a novel IGID versus a conventional tabular information display. Patient scenarios and display presentations were fully counterbalanced. Measurements We measured percent correct detection of abnormal patient variables, nurses’ perceived workload (NASA-TLX), and display usability ratings. Results 32 ICU nurses (87% female, median age of 29 years, and median ICU experience of 2.5 years) using the IGID detected more abnormal variables compared to the tabular display [F (1,119)=13.0, p < 0.05]. There was a significant main effect of site [F (1, 119)=14.2], with development site participants doing better. There were no significant differences in nurses’ perceived workload. The IGID display was rated as more usable than the conventional display, [F (1, 60)=31.7]. Conclusion Overall, nurses reported more important physiological information with the novel IGID than tabular display. Moreover, the finding of site differences may reflect local influences in work practice and involvement in iterative display design methodology. Information displays developed using user-centered design should accommodate the full diversity of the intended user population across use sites. PMID:22534099

  18. Real-time graphic display system for ROSA-V Large Scale Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masaya; Anoda, Yoshinari; Osaki, Hideki; Kukita, Yutaka; Takigawa, Yoshio.

    1993-11-01

    A real-time graphic display system was developed for the ROSA-V Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) experiments simulating accident management measures for prevention of severe core damage in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The system works on an IBM workstation (Power Station RS/6000 model 560) and accommodates 512 channels out of about 2500 total measurements in the LSTF. It has three major functions: (a) displaying the coolant inventory distribution in the facility primary and secondary systems; (b) displaying the measured quantities at desired locations in the facility; and (c) displaying the time histories of measured quantities. The coolant inventory distribution is derived from differential pressure measurements along vertical sections and gamma-ray densitometer measurements for horizontal legs. The color display indicates liquid subcooling calculated from pressure and temperature at individual locations. (author)

  19. Achieving graphical excellence: suggestions and methods for creating high-quality visual displays of experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriger, D L; Cooper, R J

    2001-01-01

    Graphics are an important means of communicating experimental data and results. There is evidence, however, that many of the graphics printed in scientific journals contain errors, redundancies, and lack clarity. Perhaps more important, many graphics fail to portray data at an appropriate level of detail, presenting summary statistics rather than underlying distributions. We seek to aid investigators in the production of high-quality graphics that do their investigations justice by providing the reader with optimum access to the relevant aspects of the data. The depiction of by-subject data, the signification of pairing when present, and the use of symbolic dimensionality (graphing different symbols to identify relevant subgroups) and small multiples (the presentation of an array of similar graphics each depicting one group of subjects) to portray stratification are stressed. Step-by-step instructions for the construction of high-quality graphics are offered. We hope that authors will incorporate these suggestions when developing graphics to accompany their manuscripts and that this process will lead to improvements in the graphical literacy of scientific journals. We also hope that journal editors will keep these principles in mind when refereeing manuscripts submitted for peer review.

  20. Graphic displays on PCs of gaseous diffusion models of radionuclide releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo Ortega, E. del

    1993-01-01

    The well-known MESOI program has been modified and improved to adapt it to a PC/AT with VGA colour monitor. Far from losing any of its powerful characteristics to calculate the transport, diffusion, deposition and decay of gaseous radioactive effluents discharged to the atmosphere, it has been enhanced to allow graphic viewing of concentrations, wind speed and direction and puff locations in colour, all on a background map of the site. The background covers a 75 x 75 km square and has a graphic grid density of 421 x 421 pixels. This means that effluent concentration is represented approximately every 170 metres in the 'clouded-area'. Among the modifications and enhancements made, the following are of particular interest: 1. A new subroutine called NUBE has been added, which calculates the distribution of effluent concentration of activity in a grid of 421 x 421 pixels. 2. Several subroutines have been added to obtain graphic displays and printouts of the cloud, wind field and puff locations. 3. Graphic display of the geographic plane of the area surrounding the effluent release point. 4. Off-line preparation of meteorological and topographical data files necessary for program execution. (author)

  1. Visual, tangible, and touch-screen: Comparison of platforms for displaying simple graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Pnina; Klatzky, Roberta L; Palani, Hari; Giudice, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Four different platforms were compared in a task of exploring an angular stimulus and reporting its value. The angle was explored visually, tangibly as raised fine-grit sandpaper, or on a touch-screen with a frictional or vibratory signal. All platforms produced highly accurate angle judgments. Differences were found, however, in exploration time, with vision fastest as expected, followed by tangible, vibration, and friction. Relative to the tangible display, touch-screens evidenced greater noise in the perceived angular value, with a particular disadvantage for friction. The latter must be interpreted in the context of a first-generation display and a rapidly advancing technology. On the whole, the results point both to promise and barriers in the use of refreshable graphical displays for blind users.

  2. Diagrams and Relational Maps: The Use of Graphic Elicitation Techniques with Interviewing for Data Collection, Analysis, and Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J. Copeland PhD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphic elicitation techniques, which ask research participants to provide visual data representing personal understandings of concepts, experiences, beliefs, or behaviors, can be especially useful in helping participants to express complex or abstract ideas or opinions. The benefits and drawbacks of using graphic elicitation techniques for data collection, data analysis, and data display in qualitative research studies are analyzed using examples from a research study that employed data matrices and relational maps in conjunction with semi-structured interviews. Results from this analysis demonstrate that the use of these combined techniques for data collection facilitates triangulation and helps to establish internal consistency of data, thereby increasing the trustworthiness of the interpretation of that data and lending support to validity and reliability claims. Findings support the notion that graphic elicitation techniques can be highly useful in qualitative research studies at the data collection, the data analysis, and the data reporting stages. For example, this study found that graphic elicitation techniques are especially useful for eliciting data related to emotions and emotional experiences.

  3. Implementation of the ALEPH detector simulation code using UNIX with on-line graphics display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corden, M.J.; Georgiopoulos, C.H.; Mermikides, M.E.; Streets, J.

    1989-01-01

    GALEPH, the detector simulation program of the ALEPH detector was ported to an ETA10 running under ATandT UNIX System 5. The program on the ETA10 can be driven using standard UNIX socket connections between the ETA and a Silicon Graphics Iris-3020 workstation. The simulated data on the ETA are transferred, using the machine independent binary format EPIO, and displayed on the workstation using a locally developed software package for the visualization of the ALEPH detector. The client (Iris-3020) can also pass parameters to the server (ETA10) and thus interactively change the type of events produced using the same socket connection. (orig.)

  4. The Communicability of Graphical Alternatives to Tabular Displays of Statistical Simulation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alex R.; Teo, Shanice W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Simulation studies are often used to assess the frequency properties and optimality of statistical methods. They are typically reported in tables, which may contain hundreds of figures to be contrasted over multiple dimensions. To assess the degree to which these tables are fit for purpose, we performed a randomised cross-over experiment in which statisticians were asked to extract information from (i) such a table sourced from the literature and (ii) a graphical adaptation designed by the authors, and were timed and assessed for accuracy. We developed hierarchical models accounting for differences between individuals of different experience levels (under- and post-graduate), within experience levels, and between different table-graph pairs. In our experiment, information could be extracted quicker and, for less experienced participants, more accurately from graphical presentations than tabular displays. We also performed a literature review to assess the prevalence of hard-to-interpret design features in tables of simulation studies in three popular statistics journals, finding that many are presented innumerately. We recommend simulation studies be presented in graphical form. PMID:22132184

  5. Interactive computer graphics displays for hierarchical data structures. [Description of THESGRAF, in FORTRAN IV for CDC and IBM computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahn, D.F.; Murano, C.V.

    1980-05-01

    An interactive computer graphical display program was developed as an aid to user visualization and manipulation of hierarchically structured data systems such as thesauri. In the present configuration, a thesaurus term and its primary and secondary conceptual neighbors are presented to the user in tree graph form on a CRT; the user then designates, via light pen or keyboard, any of the neighbors as the next term of interest and receives a new display centered on this term. By successive specification of broader, narrower, and related terms, the user can course rapidly through the thesaurus space and refine his search file. At any stage, he deals with a term-centered, conceptually meaningful picture of a localized portion of the thesaurus, and is freed from the artificial difficulties of handling the traditional alphabetized thesaurus. Intentional limitation of the associative range of each display frame, and the use of color, case, and interconnecting vectors to encode relationships among terms, enhance interpretability of the display. Facile movement through the term space, provided by interactive computation, allows the display to remain simple, and is an essential element of the system. 3 figures.

  6. LOOM-P: a finite element mesh generation program with on-line graphic display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Takeharu; Yamazaki, Toshio.

    1977-06-01

    A description of the two-dimensional mesh generation program, LOOM-P, is given in detail. The program is developed newly to produce a mesh network for a reactor core geometry with the help of an automatic mesh generation routine built in it, under the control of the refresh-type graphic display. It is therefore similar to the edit program of the self-organizing mesh generator, QMESH-RENUM. Additional techniques are incorporated to improve the pattern of mesh elements by means of on-line conversational mode. The obtained mesh network is edited out as input data to the three-dimensional neutron diffusion theory code, FEM-BABEL. (auth.)

  7. Reactor FaceMap Tool: A modern graphics tool for displaying reactor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    A prominent graphical user interface in reactor physics applications at the Savannah River Site is the reactor facemap display. This is a two dimensional view of a cross section of a reactor. In the past each application which needed a facemap implemented its own version. Thus, none of the code was reused, the facemap implementation was hardware dependent and the user interface was different for each facemap. The Reactor FaceMap Tool was built to solve these problems. Through the use of modern computing technologies such as X Windows, object-oriented programming and client/server technology the Reactor FaceMap Tool has the flexibility to work in many diverse applications and the portability to run on numerous types of hardware

  8. Virtual reality hardware and graphic display options for brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, Amar R; Carey, Holle L; Taylor, Dawn M

    2008-01-15

    Virtual reality hardware and graphic displays are reviewed here as a development environment for brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). Two desktop stereoscopic monitors and one 2D monitor were compared in a visual depth discrimination task and in a 3D target-matching task where able-bodied individuals used actual hand movements to match a virtual hand to different target hands. Three graphic representations of the hand were compared: a plain sphere, a sphere attached to the fingertip of a realistic hand and arm, and a stylized pacman-like hand. Several subjects had great difficulty using either stereo monitor for depth perception when perspective size cues were removed. A mismatch in stereo and size cues generated inappropriate depth illusions. This phenomenon has implications for choosing target and virtual hand sizes in BMI experiments. Target-matching accuracy was about as good with the 2D monitor as with either 3D monitor. However, users achieved this accuracy by exploring the boundaries of the hand in the target with carefully controlled movements. This method of determining relative depth may not be possible in BMI experiments if movement control is more limited. Intuitive depth cues, such as including a virtual arm, can significantly improve depth perception accuracy with or without stereo viewing.

  9. COREMAP: Graphical user interface for displaying reactor core data in an interactive hexagon map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscat, F.L.; Derstine, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    COREMAP is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed to assist users read and check reactor core data from multidimensional neutronic simulation models in color and/or as text in an interactive 2D planar grid of hexagonal subassemblies. COREMAP is a complete GEODST/RUNDESC viewing tool which enables the user to access multi data set files (e.g. planes, moments, energy groups ,... ) and display up to two data sets simultaneously, one as color and the other as text. The user (1) controls color scale characteristics such as type (linear or logarithmic) and range limits, (2) controls the text display based upon conditional statements on data spelling, and value. (3) chooses zoom features such as core map size, number of rings and surrounding subassemblies, and (4) specifies the data selection for supplied popup subwindows which display a selection of data currently off-screen for a selected cell, as a list of data and/or as a graph. COREMAP includes a RUNDESC file editing tool which creates ''proposed'' Run-description files by point and click revisions to subassembly assignments in an existing EBRII Run-description file. COREMAP includes a fully automated printing option which creates high quality PostScript color or greyscale images of the core map independent of the monitor used, e.g. color prints can be generated with a session from a color or monochrome monitor. The automated PostScript output is an alternative to the xgrabsc based printing option. COREMAP includes a plotting option which creates graphs related to a selected cell. The user specifies the X and Y coordinates types (planes, moment, group, flux ,... ) and a parameter, P, when displaying several curves for the specified (X, Y) pair COREMAP supports hexagonal geometry reactor core configurations specified by: the GEODST file and binary Standard Interface Files and the RUNDESC ordering

  10. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Gotou, Kazuko

    2001-01-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  11. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Gotou, Kazuko [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  12. Network Distributed Data Acquisition, Storage, and Graphical Live Display Software for a Laser Ion Source at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rossel, Ralf Erik; Rothe, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    This project documentation outlines the requirements and implementation details for the measurement data recording software currently in development for the Resonance Ionisation Laser Ion Source (RILIS) at CERN. The software is capable of acquiring data from multiple laser parameter monitoring devices and associating the gathered values to represent qualitative and quantitative measurements. The measurement data is displayed graphically within the program and recorded to files for later analysis. The main application of the software is the acquisition coordination and recording of measurement data during spectroscopy experiments performed by RILIS and collaborating experiments. This document describes the design concept and detailed program implementation status at the end of July 2014 and provides an outlook to future developments in RILIS spectroscopy data acquisition.

  13. An interactive graphics program to retrieve, display, compare, manipulate, curve fit, difference and cross plot wind tunnel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, R. D.; Werner, N. M.; Baker, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Aerodynamic Data Analysis and Integration System (ADAIS), developed as a highly interactive computer graphics program capable of manipulating large quantities of data such that addressable elements of a data base can be called up for graphic display, compared, curve fit, stored, retrieved, differenced, etc., was described. The general nature of the system is evidenced by the fact that limited usage has already occurred with data bases consisting of thermodynamic, basic loads, and flight dynamics data. Productivity using ADAIS of five times that for conventional manual methods of wind tunnel data analysis is routinely achieved. In wind tunnel data analysis, data from one or more runs of a particular test may be called up and displayed along with data from one or more runs of a different test. Curves may be faired through the data points by any of four methods, including cubic spline and least squares polynomial fit up to seventh order.

  14. Sequence walkers: a graphical method to display how binding proteins interact with DNA or RNA sequences | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A graphical method is presented for displaying how binding proteins and other macromolecules interact with individual bases of nucleotide sequences. Characters representing the sequence are either oriented normally and placed above a line indicating favorable contact, or upside-down and placed below the line indicating unfavorable contact. The positive or negative height of each letter shows the contribution of that base to the average sequence conservation of the binding site, as represented by a sequence logo.

  15. Concurrent use of data base and graphics computer workstations to provide graphic access to large, complex data bases for robotics control of nuclear surveillance and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, G.R.; Tulenko, J.S.; Zhou, X.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Florida is part of a multiuniversity research effort, sponsored by the US Department of Energy which is under way to develop and deploy an advanced semi-autonomous robotic system for use in nuclear power stations. This paper reports on the development of the computer tools necessary to gain convenient graphic access to the intelligence implicit in a large complex data base such as that in a nuclear reactor plant. This program is integrated as a man/machine interface within the larger context of the total computerized robotic planning and control system. The portion of the project described here addresses the connection between the three-dimensional displays on an interactive graphic workstation and a data-base computer running a large data-base server program. Programming the two computers to work together to accept graphic queries and return answers on the graphic workstation is a key part of the interactive capability developed

  16. Learning by Doing versus Learning by Viewing: Three Experimental Comparisons of Learner-Generated versus Author-Provided Graphic Organizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    Do students learn more deeply from a passage when they attempt to construct their own graphic organizers (i.e., learning by doing) than when graphic organizers are provided (i.e., learning by viewing)? In 3 experiments, learners were tested on retention and transfer after reading a passage with author-provided graphic organizers or when asked to…

  17. Three-dimensional display by computer graphics method of hepatocellular carcinoma using seen with the hepatic arteriogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itsubo, Mariko; Kameda, Haruo; Suzuki, Naoki; Okamura, Tetsuo

    1989-01-01

    The method of three-dimensional display of hepatocellular carcinoma using conventional hepatic arteriogram by computer graphics method was newly exploited and applied in clinical use. Three-dimensional models were reconstructed from contour lines of tumors demonstrated as hypervascular lesions by hepatic arteriography. Although objects were limited by angiographic images in which tumors need to be demonstrated as nodules with hypervascularity, this method of three-dimensional display was not worse on accuracy than that using computed tomographic images. According to this method property of the tumor expressed by vascularity was demonstrated clear and in addition volume of the tumor was calculated easily. When the tumor arose in necrotic changes in which demonstrated as a vascular lesion by hepatic arteriography with reduction of size in usual by conservative treatment such as transcathter arterial embolization therapy, this three-dimensional display was able to demonstrate such changes clear. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility and clinical usefulness of three-dimensional display of hepatocellular carcinoma using hepatic arteriogram by computer graphics method. (author)

  18. Thinking about the Weather: How Display Salience and Knowledge Affect Performance in a Graphic Inference Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Mary; Canham, Matt S.; Fabrikant, Sara I.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments examined how bottom-up and top-down processes interact when people view and make inferences from complex visual displays (weather maps). Bottom-up effects of display design were investigated by manipulating the relative visual salience of task-relevant and task-irrelevant information across different maps. Top-down effects of…

  19. Performance-based evaluation of graphic displays for nuclear-power-plant control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, R.J.; Banks, W.W.; Gertman, D.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports several methodologies for evaluating the perceptual and perceptual/decision making aspects of displays used in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. This NRC funded study focuses upon the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) and relates the utility of the display to objective performance and preference measures obtained in experimental conditions. The first condition is a traditional laboratory setting where classical experimental methodologies can be employed. The second condition is an interactive control room simulation where the operator's performance is assessed while he/she operates the simulator. The third condition is a rating scale designed to assess operator preferences and opinions regarding a variety of display formats. The goal of this study is the development of a cost-efficient display evaluation methodology which correlates highly with the operator's ability to control a plant

  20. COREMAP - Graphical User Interface for displaying reactor core data in an interactive hexagonal map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscat, F.L.; Derstine, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    COREMAP displays reactor core data from multidimensional neutronic simulation models in color and/or as text in an interactive 2D planar grid of hexagonal subassemblies. The interactive (point and click) interface enables the user to access multi data set files (e.g.. planes, moments, energy groups, ...) and to display up to two data sets simultaneously, one as text and the other as color. The user (1) controls color scale characteristics (linear or logarithmic) with a variety of range limits, (2) chooses zoom features (map size, ring number and surrounding subassemblies), (3) is supplied with popup sub-windows to display data from planes and energy groups currently offscreen for the selected cell. Three color scale shading techniques may be used to display data on any bitmapped screen monitor. Most effective displays are obtained with shades of blue and red on color monitors, shades of grey on greyscale monitors or stipple patterns on monochrome monitors. A fully automated printing option creates high quality PostScript color or greyscale images of the core map independent of the monitor used, e.g. color prints can be generated with a session from a monochrome monitor

  1. Display graphical information optimization methods in a client-server information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрий Викторович Мазуревич

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to reduce load time and volume of data necessary to display web page due to server side preprocessing. Measurement of this approach’s effectivity has been conducted. There were discovered conditions in which this approach will be the most effective, its disadvantages and presented ways to reduce them

  2. Programming the diagnosis logic by means of the conversational graphic input to the CRT display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, A.; Tsuji, H.; Okamoto, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A plant diagnostic method using Cause Consequence Tree (CCT) has been recognized as a powerful means to identify and analyze plant fault events. The off-line support program called the 'CCT diagram editor' was developed and it could generate the computer object program by inputting the CCT diagram itself using the CRT display, tablet and key-board just as the computer aided design (CAD). The CCT diagram editor has improved the problems of the programming error, difficulty of correction or modification and productivity of the program. The system can be used also for safety analysis of nuclear power plants. (author)

  3. Real-time acquisition and display of flow contrast using speckle variance optical coherence tomography in a graphics processing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Wong, Kevin; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2014-02-01

    In this report, we describe a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated processing platform for real-time acquisition and display of flow contrast images with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) in mouse and human eyes in vivo. Motion contrast from blood flow is processed using the speckle variance OCT (svOCT) technique, which relies on the acquisition of multiple B-scan frames at the same location and tracking the change of the speckle pattern. Real-time mouse and human retinal imaging using two different custom-built OCT systems with processing and display performed on GPU are presented with an in-depth analysis of performance metrics. The display output included structural OCT data, en face projections of the intensity data, and the svOCT en face projections of retinal microvasculature; these results compare projections with and without speckle variance in the different retinal layers to reveal significant contrast improvements. As a demonstration, videos of real-time svOCT for in vivo human and mouse retinal imaging are included in our results. The capability of performing real-time svOCT imaging of the retinal vasculature may be a useful tool in a clinical environment for monitoring disease-related pathological changes in the microcirculation such as diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Graphics gems V (Macintosh version)

    CERN Document Server

    Paeth, Alan W

    1995-01-01

    Graphics Gems V is the newest volume in The Graphics Gems Series. It is intended to provide the graphics community with a set of practical tools for implementing new ideas and techniques, and to offer working solutions to real programming problems. These tools are written by a wide variety of graphics programmers from industry, academia, and research. The books in the series have become essential, time-saving tools for many programmers.Latest collection of graphics tips in The Graphics Gems Series written by the leading programmers in the field.Contains over 50 new gems displaying some of t

  5. Computer graphic displays for microscopists assisting in evaluating radiation-damaged cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, P.H.; Olson, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    Computer analysis of digitized images of cells and tissues has developed into a highly refined methodology. In particular, the nuclear chromatin has numerous features that allow reliable recognition and classification of cells. This was hardly a surprise to cytopathologists, since chromatin texture and staining properties have always provided valuable clues for visual diagnosis. However, two aspects of computer assessment came as a surprise. First, there was the consistency with which chromatin distribution patterns express the state of the cell, its differentiation, and the sensitivity with which a change in the cell's environment is reflected in the chromatin. Second, chromatin texture provides highly discriminating, objectively measurable features that are not perceived by human visual assessment. Numerous studies have shown that computer assessment is capable of making clear-cut discriminations in cases where human cytodiagnostic evaluation is not effective

  6. HiRel: Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated reliability tool system, (version 7.0). Volume 4: HARP Output (HARPO) graphics display user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproles, Darrell W.; Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1994-01-01

    The Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated Reliability (HiRel) tool system for reliability/availability prediction offers a toolbox of integrated reliability/availability programs that can be used to customize the user's application in a workstation or nonworkstation environment. HiRel consists of interactive graphical input/output programs and four reliability/availability modeling engines that provide analytical and simulative solutions to a wide host of highly reliable fault-tolerant system architectures and is also applicable to electronic systems in general. The tool system was designed at the outset to be compatible with most computing platforms and operating systems and some programs have been beta tested within the aerospace community for over 8 years. This document is a user's guide for the HiRel graphical postprocessor program HARPO (HARP Output). HARPO reads ASCII files generated by HARP. It provides an interactive plotting capability that can be used to display alternate model data for trade-off analyses. File data can also be imported to other commercial software programs.

  7. Advanced Visualization and Interactive Display Rapid Innovation and Discovery Evaluation Research Program task 8: Survey of WEBGL Graphics Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    1 3.0 Methods, Assumptions, and Procedures ...18 4.6.3. LineUp Web... Procedures A search of the internet looking at web sites specializing in graphics, graphics engines, web browser applications, and games was conducted to

  8. Sequence Similarity Presenter: a tool for the graphic display of similarities of long sequences for use in presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, K U

    1994-04-01

    A new method for the presentation of alignments of long sequences is described. The degree of identity for the aligned sequences is averaged for sections of a fixed number of residues. The resulting values are converted to shades of gray, with white corresponding to lack of identity and black corresponding to perfect identity. A sequence alignment is represented as a bar filled with varying shades of gray. The display is compact and allows for a fast and intuitive recognition of the distribution of regions with a high similarity. It is well suited for the presentation of alignments of long sequences, e.g. of protein superfamilies, in plenary lectures. The method is implemented as a HyperCard stack for Apple Macintosh computers. Several options for the modification of the output are available (e.g. background reduction, size of the summation window, consideration of amino acid similarity, inclusion of graphic markers to indicate specific domains). The output is a PostScript file which can be printed, imported as EPS or processed further with Adobe Illustrator.

  9. GUIdock-VNC: using a graphical desktop sharing system to provide a browser-based interface for containerized software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Varun; Hung, Ling-Hong; Keswani, Jayant; Kristiyanto, Daniel; Lee, Sung Bong; Yeung, Ka Yee

    2017-04-01

    Software container technology such as Docker can be used to package and distribute bioinformatics workflows consisting of multiple software implementations and dependencies. However, Docker is a command line-based tool, and many bioinformatics pipelines consist of components that require a graphical user interface. We present a container tool called GUIdock-VNC that uses a graphical desktop sharing system to provide a browser-based interface for containerized software. GUIdock-VNC uses the Virtual Network Computing protocol to render the graphics within most commonly used browsers. We also present a minimal image builder that can add our proposed graphical desktop sharing system to any Docker packages, with the end result that any Docker packages can be run using a graphical desktop within a browser. In addition, GUIdock-VNC uses the Oauth2 authentication protocols when deployed on the cloud. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrated the utility of GUIdock-noVNC in gene network inference. We benchmarked our container implementation on various operating systems and showed that our solution creates minimal overhead. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Influence of Point-of-Sale Tobacco Displays and Graphic Health Warning Signs on Adults: Evidence From a Virtual Store Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Annice E.; Nonnemaker, James M.; Loomis, Brett R.; Shafer, Paul R.; Shaikh, Asma; Hill, Edward; Holloway, John W.; Farrelly, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the impact of banning tobacco displays and posting graphic health warning signs at the point of sale (POS). Methods. We designed 3 variations of the tobacco product display (open, enclosed [not visible], enclosed with pro-tobacco ads) and 2 variations of the warning sign (present vs absent) with virtual store software. In December 2011 and January 2012, we randomized a national convenience sample of 1216 adult smokers and recent quitters to 1 of 6 store conditions and gave them a shopping task. We tested for the main effects of the enclosed display, the sign, and their interaction on urge to smoke and tobacco purchase attempts. Results. The enclosed display significantly lowered current smokers’ (B = −7.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −13.20, −0.91; P influence purchase behavior. Banning them may reduce cues to smoke and unplanned tobacco purchases. PMID:24625149

  11. Advanced diagnostic graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, M.A.; Petersen, R.J.; Clark, M.T.; Gertman, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports US NRC-sponsored research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) involving evaluation of computer-based diagnostic graphics. The specific targets of current evaluations are multivariate data display formats which may be used in Safety Parameter Display Systems (SPDS) being developed for nuclear power plant control rooms. The purpose of the work is to provide a basis for NRC action in regulating licensee SPDSs or later computer/cathode ray tube (CRT) applications in nuclear control rooms

  12. Influence of point-of-sale tobacco displays and graphic health warning signs on adults: evidence from a virtual store experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Annice E; Nonnemaker, James M; Loomis, Brett R; Shafer, Paul R; Shaikh, Asma; Hill, Edward; Holloway, John W; Farrelly, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    We tested the impact of banning tobacco displays and posting graphic health warning signs at the point of sale (POS). We designed 3 variations of the tobacco product display (open, enclosed [not visible], enclosed with pro-tobacco ads) and 2 variations of the warning sign (present vs absent) with virtual store software. In December 2011 and January 2012, we randomized a national convenience sample of 1216 adult smokers and recent quitters to 1 of 6 store conditions and gave them a shopping task. We tested for the main effects of the enclosed display, the sign, and their interaction on urge to smoke and tobacco purchase attempts. The enclosed display significantly lowered current smokers' (B = -7.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -13.20, -0.91; P < .05) and recent quitters' (Β = -6.00, 95% CI = -11.00, -1.00; P < .01) urge to smoke and current smokers' purchase attempts (adjusted odds ratio = 0.06; 95% CI = 0.03, 0.11; P < .01). The warning sign had no significant main effect on study outcomes or interaction with enclosed display. These data show that POS tobacco displays influence purchase behavior. Banning them may reduce cues to smoke and unplanned tobacco purchases.

  13. Application of computer generated color graphic techniques to the processing and display of three dimensional fluid dynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. H.; Putt, C. W.; Giamati, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Color coding techniques used in the processing of remote sensing imagery were adapted and applied to the fluid dynamics problems associated with turbofan mixer nozzles. The computer generated color graphics were found to be useful in reconstructing the measured flow field from low resolution experimental data to give more physical meaning to this information and in scanning and interpreting the large volume of computer generated data from the three dimensional viscous computer code used in the analysis.

  14. Full-Screen Magnification on a Budget: Using a Hardware-Based Multi-Display Graphics Card as a Screen-Magnifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Anthony; Evans, Shirley; Musgrove, Nick; Homfray, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Potentially, computers can balance some of the effects of visual impairment and provide equality of opportunity (Gerber, 2003). Students' individual needs entail that they and their teachers have access to a range of assistive technologies that may vary according to the task as well as to the learner. A dual output graphics card with a twin…

  15. The effect of alternative graphical displays used to present the benefits of antibiotics for sore throat on decisions about whether to seek treatment: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Cheryl L L; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Flottorp, Signe; Fretheim, Atle; Oxman, Andrew D; Schünemann, Holger J; Akl, Elie A; Herrin, Jeph; MacKenzie, Thomas D; Montori, Victor M

    2009-08-01

    We conducted an Internet-based randomized trial comparing four graphical displays of the benefits of antibiotics for people with sore throat who must decide whether to go to the doctor to seek treatment. Our objective was to determine which display resulted in choices most consistent with participants' values. This was the first of a series of televised trials undertaken in cooperation with the Norwegian Broadcasting Company. We recruited adult volunteers in Norway through a nationally televised weekly health program. Participants went to our Web site and rated the relative importance of the consequences of treatment using visual analogue scales (VAS). They viewed the graphical display (or no information) to which they were randomized and were asked to decide whether to go to the doctor for an antibiotic prescription. We compared four presentations: face icons (happy/sad) or a bar graph showing the proportion of people with symptoms on day three with and without treatment, a bar graph of the average duration of symptoms, and a bar graph of proportion with symptoms on both days three and seven. Before completing the study, all participants were shown all the displays and detailed patient information about the treatment of sore throat and were asked to decide again. We calculated a relative importance score (RIS) by subtracting the VAS scores for the undesirable consequences of antibiotics from the VAS score for the benefit of symptom relief. We used logistic regression to determine the association between participants' RIS and their choice. 1,760 participants completed the study. There were statistically significant differences in the likelihood of choosing to go to the doctor in relation to different values (RIS). Of the four presentations, the bar graph of duration of symptoms resulted in decisions that were most consistent with the more fully informed second decision. Most participants also preferred this presentation (38%) and found it easiest to understand (37

  16. BOT3P5.2, 3D Mesh Generator and Graphical Display of Geometry for Radiation Transport Codes, Display of Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsi, Roberto; Bidaud, Adrien

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: BOT3P was originally conceived as a set of standard FORTRAN 77 language programs in order to give the users of the DORT and TORT deterministic transport codes some useful diagnostic tools to prepare and check their input data files. Later versions extended the possibility to produce the geometrical, material distribution and fixed neutron source data to other deterministic transport codes such as TWODANT/THREEDANT of the DANTSYS system, PARTISN and, potentially, to any transport code through BOT3P binary output files that can be easily interfaced (see, for example, the Russian two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) discrete ordinates neutron, photon and charged particle transport codes KASKAD-S-2.5 and KATRIN-2.0). As from Version 5.1 BOT3P contained important additions specifically addressed to radiation transport analysis for medical applications. BOT3P-5.2 contains new graphics capabilities. Some of them enable users to select space sub-domains of the total mesh grid in order to improve the zoom simulation of the geometry, both in 2D cuts and in 3D. Moreover the new BOT3P module (PDTM) may improve the interface of BOT3P geometrical models to transport analysis codes. The following programs are included in the BOT3P software package: GGDM, DDM, GGTM, DTM2, DTM3, RVARSCL, COMPARE, MKSRC, CATSM, DTET, and PDTM. The main features of these different programs are described. 2 - Methods: GGDM and GGTM work similarly from the logical point of view. Since the 3D case is more general, the following description refers to GGTM. All the co-ordinate values that characterise the geometrical scheme at the basis of the 3D transport code geometrical and material model are read, sorted and all stored if different from the neighbouring ones more than an input tolerance established by the user. These co-ordinates are always present in the fine-mesh boundary arrays independently of the mesh grid refinement options, because they

  17. Basic Graphical Data Management System (BAGDAMS version 1.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weindorf, J.W.

    1979-06-01

    BAGDAMS (BAsic Graphical DAta Management System) is a set of FORTRAN callable subroutines which provides mass storage data structuring and manipulation capabilities. Although primarily designed to facilitate the handling of graphical data files (files containing information to be displayed upon graphical hardware devices), BAGDAMS can also be used in many other applications requiring complex mass storage resident data structures. (author)

  18. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  19. Graphics gems

    CERN Document Server

    Glassner, Andrew S

    1993-01-01

    ""The GRAPHICS GEMS Series"" was started in 1990 by Andrew Glassner. The vision and purpose of the Series was - and still is - to provide tips, techniques, and algorithms for graphics programmers. All of the gems are written by programmers who work in the field and are motivated by a common desire to share interesting ideas and tools with their colleagues. Each volume provides a new set of innovative solutions to a variety of programming problems.

  20. TMACS test procedure TP003: Graphics. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project's acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the graphics requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are the data display graphics and the graphic elements that provide for operator control and selection of displays

  1. TMACS test procedure TP003: Graphics. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanlan, P.K.; Washburn, S.

    1994-01-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project's acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the graphics requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are the data display graphics and the graphic elements that provide for operator control and selection of displays

  2. Alarm annunciation in a graphical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    Well-designed graphical user interfaces, such as Microsoft reg-sign Windows trademark or UNIX trademark--based X-Windows reg-sign, provide a capability for enhanced display of security alarm information. Conversely, a poorly designed interface can quickly overwhelm an operator. This paper describes types of graphical information that can be displayed and offers guidance on how to best display that information. Limits are proposed for the complexity of the user interface, and guidelines are suggested for the display of maps and sensors

  3. Development of Improved Graphical Displays for an Advanced Outage Control Center, Employing Human Factors Principles for Outage Schedule Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St Germain, Shawn Walter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Farris, Ronald Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Kenneth David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are somewhat challenging to coordinate; therefore, finding ways to improve refueling outage performance, while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC) project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the LWRS Program. LWRS is an R&D program that works closely with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current fleet of NPPs. As such, the LWRS Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, INL is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. The overall focus is on developing an AOCC with the following capabilities that enables plant and OCC staff to; Collaborate in real-time to address emergent issues; Effectively communicate outage status to all workers involved in the outage; Effectively communicate discovered conditions in the field to the OCC; Provide real-time work status; Provide automatic pending support notifications

  4. Development of Improved Graphical Displays for an Advanced Outage Control Center, Employing Human Factors Principles for Outage Schedule Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Germain, Shawn Walter; Farris, Ronald Keith; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-01-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are somewhat challenging to coordinate; therefore, finding ways to improve refueling outage performance, while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC) project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the LWRS Program. LWRS is an R&D program that works closely with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current fleet of NPPs. As such, the LWRS Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, INL is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. The overall focus is on developing an AOCC with the following capabilities that enables plant and OCC staff to; Collaborate in real-time to address emergent issues; Effectively communicate outage status to all workers involved in the outage; Effectively communicate discovered conditions in the field to the OCC; Provide real-time work status; Provide automatic pending support notifications

  5. The Hydrograph Analyst, an Arcview GIS Extension That Integrates Point, Spatial, and Temporal Data Provides A Graphical User Interface for Hydrograph Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.L.; O'Brien, G.M.; Jones, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Hydrograph Analyst (HA) is an ArcView GIS 3.2 extension developed by the authors to analyze hydrographs from a network of ground-water wells and springs in a regional ground-water flow model. ArcView GIS integrates geographic, hydrologic, and descriptive information and provides the base functionality needed for hydrograph analysis. The HA extends ArcView's base functionality by automating data integration procedures and by adding capabilities to visualize and analyze hydrologic data. Data integration procedures were automated by adding functionality to the View document's Document Graphical User Interface (DocGUI). A menu allows the user to query a relational database and select sites which are displayed as a point theme in a View document. An ''Identify One to Many'' tool is provided within the View DocGUI to retrieve all hydrologic information for a selected site and display it in a simple and concise tabular format. For example, the display could contain various records from many tables storing data for one site. Another HA menu allows the user to generate a hydrograph for sites selected from the point theme. Hydrographs generated by the HA are added as hydrograph documents and accessed by the user with the Hydrograph DocGUI, which contains tools and buttons for hydrograph analysis. The Hydrograph DocGUI has a ''Select By Polygon'' tool used for isolating particular points on the hydrograph inside a user-drawn polygon or the user could isolate the same points by constructing a logical expression with the ArcView GIS ''Query Builder'' dialog that is also accessible in the Hydrograph DocGUI. Other buttons can be selected to alter the query applied to the active hydrograph. The selected points on the active hydrograph can be attributed (or flagged) individually or as a group using the ''Flag'' tool found on the Hydrograph DocGUI. The ''Flag'' tool activates a dialog box that prompts the user to select an attribute and ''methods'' or ''conditions'' that qualify

  6. Computer Graphics Instruction in VizClass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Douglas; Warschauer, Mark; Hutchinson, Tara; Kuester, Falko

    2005-01-01

    "VizClass" is a university classroom environment designed to offer students in computer graphics and engineering courses up-to-date visualization technologies. Three digital whiteboards and a three-dimensional stereoscopic display provide complementary display surfaces. Input devices include touchscreens on the digital whiteboards, remote…

  7. ArraySolver: an algorithm for colour-coded graphical display and Wilcoxon signed-rank statistics for comparing microarray gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2004-01-01

    The massive surge in the production of microarray data poses a great challenge for proper analysis and interpretation. In recent years numerous computational tools have been developed to extract meaningful interpretation of microarray gene expression data. However, a convenient tool for two-groups comparison of microarray data is still lacking and users have to rely on commercial statistical packages that might be costly and require special skills, in addition to extra time and effort for transferring data from one platform to other. Various statistical methods, including the t-test, analysis of variance, Pearson test and Mann-Whitney U test, have been reported for comparing microarray data, whereas the utilization of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, which is an appropriate test for two-groups comparison of gene expression data, has largely been neglected in microarray studies. The aim of this investigation was to build an integrated tool, ArraySolver, for colour-coded graphical display and comparison of gene expression data using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The results of software validation showed similar outputs with ArraySolver and SPSS for large datasets. Whereas the former program appeared to be more accurate for 25 or fewer pairs (n < or = 25), suggesting its potential application in analysing molecular signatures that usually contain small numbers of genes. The main advantages of ArraySolver are easy data selection, convenient report format, accurate statistics and the familiar Excel platform.

  8. VAX Professional Workstation goes graphic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downward, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The VAX Professional Workstation (VPW) is a collection of programs and procedures designed to provide an integrated work-station environment for the staff at KMS Fusion's research laboratories. During the past year numerous capabilities have been added to VPW, including support for VT125/VT240/4014 graphic workstations, editing windows, and additional desk utilities. Graphics workstation support allows users to create, edit, and modify graph data files, enter the data via a graphic tablet, create simple plots with DATATRIEVE or DECgraph on ReGIS terminals, or elaborate plots with TEKGRAPH on ReGIS or Tektronix terminals. Users may assign display error bars to the data and interactively plot it in a variety of ways. Users also can create and display viewgraphs. Hard copy output for a large network of office terminals is obtained by multiplexing each terminal's video output into a recently developed video multiplexer front ending a single channel video hard copy unit

  9. The Digital Space Shuttle, 3D Graphics, and Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Julian E.; Keller, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Shuttle is a knowledge management project that seeks to define symbiotic relationships between 3D graphics and formal knowledge representations (ontologies). 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content, in 2D and 3D CAD forms, and the capability to display systems knowledge. Because the data is so heterogeneous, and the interrelated data structures are complex, 3D graphics combined with ontologies provides mechanisms for navigating the data and visualizing relationships.

  10. A handbook of statistical graphics using SAS ODS

    CERN Document Server

    Der, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    An Introduction to Graphics: Good Graphics, Bad Graphics, Catastrophic Graphics and Statistical GraphicsThe Challenger DisasterGraphical DisplaysA Little History and Some Early Graphical DisplaysGraphical DeceptionAn Introduction to ODS GraphicsGenerating ODS GraphsODS DestinationsStatistical Graphics ProceduresODS Graphs from Statistical ProceduresControlling ODS GraphicsControlling Labelling in GraphsODS Graphics EditorGraphs for Displaying the Characteristics of Univariate Data: Horse Racing, Mortality Rates, Forearm Lengths, Survival Times and Geyser EruptionsIntroductionPie Chart, Bar Cha

  11. A mobile communication device adapted to provide a dynamic display arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to a mobile communication device comprising a light projector adapted to project a multi-coloured image onto a surface; a hinged mirror comprising a first mirror part adapted to be tilted around the hinge into the light path of the light projector; wherein the first mirror...... part comprises means for correcting a skew angle in the multi-coloured image projected onto a surface. Thereby is achieved that the mobile communication device is able to provide RGB full colour dynamic image projection which is preferred over monochromatic laser projection because it is a speckle free...... and eye-friendly projection....

  12. Remote just-in-time telementored trauma ultrasound: a double-factorial randomized controlled trial examining fluid detection and remote knobology control through an ultrasound graphic user interface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; McKee, Ian; McKee, Jessica L; Ma, Irene; McBeth, Paul B; Roberts, Derek J; Wurster, Charles L; Parfitt, Robbie; Ball, Chad G; Oberg, Scott; Sevcik, William; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2016-05-01

    Remote-telementored ultrasound involves novice examiners being remotely guided by experts using informatic-technologies. However, requiring a novice to perform ultrasound is a cognitively demanding task exacerbated by unfamiliarity with ultrasound-machine controls. We incorporated a randomized evaluation of using remote control of the ultrasound functionality (knobology) within a study in which the images generated by distant naive examiners were viewed on an ultrasound graphic user interface (GUI) display viewed on laptop computers by mentors in different cities. Fire-fighters in Edmonton (101) were remotely mentored from Calgary (n = 65), Nanaimo (n = 19), and Memphis (n = 17) to examine an ultrasound phantom randomized to contain free fluid or not. Remote mentors (2 surgeons, 1 internist, and 1 ED physician) were randomly assigned to use GUI knobology control during mentoring (GUIK+/GUIK-). Remote-telementored ultrasound was feasible in all cases. Overall accuracy for fluid detection was 97% (confidence interval = 91 to 99%) with 3 false negatives (FNs). Positive/negative likelihood ratios were infinity/0.0625. One FN occurred with the GUIK+ and 2 without (GUIK-). There were no statistical test performance differences in either group (GUIK+ and GUIK-). Ultrasound-naive 1st responders can be remotely mentored with high accuracy, although providing basic remote control of the knobology did not affect outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Graphical interpretation of numerical model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewes, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer software has been developed to produce high quality graphical displays of data from a numerical grid model. The code uses an existing graphical display package (DISSPLA) and overcomes some of the problems of both line-printer output and traditional graphics. The software has been designed to be flexible enough to handle arbitrarily placed computation grids and a variety of display requirements

  14. Object-oriented graphics programming in C++

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Roger T

    2014-01-01

    Object-Oriented Graphics Programming in C++ provides programmers with the information needed to produce realistic pictures on a PC monitor screen.The book is comprised of 20 chapters that discuss the aspects of graphics programming in C++. The book starts with a short introduction discussing the purpose of the book. It also includes the basic concepts of programming in C++ and the basic hardware requirement. Subsequent chapters cover related topics in C++ programming such as the various display modes; displaying TGA files, and the vector class. The text also tackles subjects on the processing

  15. Engineering computer graphics in gas turbine engine design, analysis and manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatka, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A time-sharing and computer graphics facility designed to provide effective interactive tools to a large number of engineering users with varied requirements was described. The application of computer graphics displays at several levels of hardware complexity and capability is discussed, with examples of graphics systems tracing gas turbine product development, beginning with preliminary design through manufacture. Highlights of an operating system stylized for interactive engineering graphics is described.

  16. Graphics in DAQSIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.; Booth, A.W.; Chen, Y.M.; Botlo, M.

    1993-06-01

    At the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) a tool called DAQSIM has been developed to study the behavior of Data Acquisition (DAQ) systems. This paper reports and discusses the graphics used in DAQSIM. DAQSIM graphics includes graphical user interface (GUI), animation, debugging, and control facilities. DAQSIM graphics not only provides a convenient DAQ simulation environment, it also serves as an efficient manager in simulation development and verification

  17. Display-management system for MFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is controlled by 65 local control microcomputers which are supervised by a local network of nine 32-bit minicomputers. Associated with seven of the nine computers are state-of-the-art graphics devices, each with extensive local processing capability. These devices provide the means for an operator to interact with the control software running on the minicomputers. It is critical that the information the operator views accurately reflects the current state of the experiment. This information is integrated into dynamically changing pictures called displays. The primary organizational component of the display system is the software-addressable segment. The segments created by the display creation software are managed by display managers associated with each graphics device. Each display manager uses sophisticated storage management mechanisms to keep the proper segments resident in the local graphics device storage

  18. Engineering graphics data entry for space station data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacovara, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The entry of graphical engineering data into the Space Station Data Base was examined. Discussed were: representation of graphics objects; representation of connectivity data; graphics capture hardware; graphics display hardware; site-wide distribution of graphics, and consolidation of tools and hardware. A fundamental assumption was that existing equipment such as IBM based graphics capture software and VAX networked facilities would be exploited. Defensible conclusions reached after study and simulations of use of these systems at the engineering level are: (1) existing IBM based graphics capture software is an adequate and economical means of entry of schematic and block diagram data for present and anticipated electronic systems for Space Station; (2) connectivity data from the aforementioned system may be incorporated into the envisioned Space Station Data Base with modest effort; (3) graphics and connectivity data captured on the IBM based system may be exported to the VAX network in a simple and direct fashion; (4) graphics data may be displayed site-wide on VT-125 terminals and lookalikes; (5) graphics hard-copy may be produced site-wide on various dot-matrix printers; and (6) the system may provide integrated engineering services at both the engineering and engineering management level.

  19. Graphical Models with R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsgaard, Søren; Edwards, David; Lauritzen, Steffen

    Graphical models in their modern form have been around since the late 1970s and appear today in many areas of the sciences. Along with the ongoing developments of graphical models, a number of different graphical modeling software programs have been written over the years. In recent years many...... of these software developments have taken place within the R community, either in the form of new packages or by providing an R ingerface to existing software. This book attempts to give the reader a gentle introduction to graphical modeling using R and the main features of some of these packages. In addition......, the book provides examples of how more advanced aspects of graphical modeling can be represented and handled within R. Topics covered in the seven chapters include graphical models for contingency tables, Gaussian and mixed graphical models, Bayesian networks and modeling high dimensional data...

  20. OAP- OFFICE AUTOMATION PILOT GRAPHICS DATABASE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Office Automation Pilot (OAP) Graphics Database system offers the IBM PC user assistance in producing a wide variety of graphs and charts. OAP uses a convenient database system, called a chartbase, for creating and maintaining data associated with the charts, and twelve different graphics packages are available to the OAP user. Each of the graphics capabilities is accessed in a similar manner. The user chooses creation, revision, or chartbase/slide show maintenance options from an initial menu. The user may then enter or modify data displayed on a graphic chart. The cursor moves through the chart in a "circular" fashion to facilitate data entries and changes. Various "help" functions and on-screen instructions are available to aid the user. The user data is used to generate the graphics portion of the chart. Completed charts may be displayed in monotone or color, printed, plotted, or stored in the chartbase on the IBM PC. Once completed, the charts may be put in a vector format and plotted for color viewgraphs. The twelve graphics capabilities are divided into three groups: Forms, Structured Charts, and Block Diagrams. There are eight Forms available: 1) Bar/Line Charts, 2) Pie Charts, 3) Milestone Charts, 4) Resources Charts, 5) Earned Value Analysis Charts, 6) Progress/Effort Charts, 7) Travel/Training Charts, and 8) Trend Analysis Charts. There are three Structured Charts available: 1) Bullet Charts, 2) Organization Charts, and 3) Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Charts. The Block Diagram available is an N x N Chart. Each graphics capability supports a chartbase. The OAP graphics database system provides the IBM PC user with an effective means of managing data which is best interpreted as a graphic display. The OAP graphics database system is written in IBM PASCAL 2.0 and assembler for interactive execution on an IBM PC or XT with at least 384K of memory, and a color graphics adapter and monitor. Printed charts require an Epson, IBM, OKIDATA, or HP Laser

  1. R graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Murrell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    R is revolutionizing the world of statistical computing. Powerful, flexible, and best of all free, R is now the program of choice for tens of thousands of statisticians. Destined to become an instant classic, R Graphics presents the first complete, authoritative exposition on the R graphical system. Paul Murrell, widely known as the leading expert on R graphics, has developed an in-depth resource that takes nothing for granted and helps both neophyte and seasoned users master the intricacies of R graphics. After an introductory overview of R graphics facilities, the presentation first focuses

  2. Design Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    A mathematician, David R. Hedgley, Jr. developed a computer program that considers whether a line in a graphic model of a three-dimensional object should or should not be visible. Known as the Hidden Line Computer Code, the program automatically removes superfluous lines and displays an object from a specific viewpoint, just as the human eye would see it. An example of how one company uses the program is the experience of Birdair which specializes in production of fabric skylights and stadium covers. The fabric called SHEERFILL is a Teflon coated fiberglass material developed in cooperation with DuPont Company. SHEERFILL glazed structures are either tension structures or air-supported tension structures. Both are formed by patterned fabric sheets supported by a steel or aluminum frame or cable network. Birdair uses the Hidden Line Computer Code, to illustrate a prospective structure to an architect or owner. The program generates a three- dimensional perspective with the hidden lines removed. This program is still used by Birdair and continues to be commercially available to the public.

  3. Critical frameworks for graphic design: graphic design and visual culture

    OpenAIRE

    Dauppe, Michele-Anne

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers an approach to the study of graphic design which addresses the expanding nature of graphic design in the 21st century and the purposeful application of theory to the subject of graphic design. In recent years graphic design has expanded its domain from the world of print culture (e.g. books, posters) into what is sometimes called screen culture. Everything from a mobile phone to a display in an airport lounge to the A.T.M. carries graphic design. It has become ever more ub...

  4. Display hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    To appreciate the limitations and possibilities of computer graphics it is necessary to have some acquaintance with the available technology. The aim of this chapter is to mention briefly the different display types and their 'ball-park' price ranges. It must be stressed that prices change rapidly, and so those quoted here are only intended to give an idea of the cost at the time of writing.

  5. The computer graphics interface

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  6. EASI graphics - Version II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allensworth, J.A.

    1984-04-01

    EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) is an analytical technique for measuring the effectiveness of physical protection systems. EASI Graphics is a computer graphics extension of EASI which provides a capability for performing sensitivity and trade-off analyses of the parameters of a physical protection system. This document reports on the implementation of the Version II of EASI Graphics and illustrates its application with some examples. 5 references, 15 figures, 6 tables

  7. Computer communications and graphics for clinical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, M.L.; Azzawi, Y.; Tivattanasuk, E.S.; Pang, A.T.; Ly, K.; Panicker, H.

    1985-01-01

    Computer graphics has many forms. When applied in medicine, it can range from simple two dimensional charts and graphs to rendering of three-dimensional scenes. Computer graphic displays of molecular or large anatomic structures have been used to great advantage by numerous medical researchers. In addition, graphic presentations can be dynamic where displays are controlled by physician-user commands, or the presentations can be static, where views are recorded in discrete frames for later distribution or permanent archival. In medicine both interactive and static forms of computer graphics have their proper place in the effective delivery of health care. Computer graphics, however, changes constantly in the area of software techniques, hardware improvements and its clinical application. What may be medically appropriate today in the use of computer graphics can soon become inadequate and well behind the new advances that so quickly follow. In this paper the key feature of computer communication is discussed that aids in the clinical utility of computer graphics in medicine. It is distribution. Distribution in terms of instantaneous computer graphic software updates and more importantly, distribution of meaningful three-dimensional presentations to referring physicians. Physicians who, working in their private offices, have no routine access to medical work stations. In this environment three dimensional presentations of anatomy are static in nature, but must deliver realistic views of critical structures. This paper outlines how computer communication provides the essential ingredient to the provision of this service. As an illustration, the electronic distribution of software to generate three dimensional views of complex anatomoic structures is discussed. Sample views are included

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Improving Human Problem-Solving Performance by Guiding Attention and Adaptively Providing Details on Information Displays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Narayanan, N. H

    2007-01-01

    .... Results showed that various display strategies for augmenting information presented based on knowledge about both the viewer's gaze patterns and the problem solving procedure he or she is employing could indeed improve problem-solving performance.

  9. An Experimental Investigation of Improving Human Problem-Solving Performance by Guiding Attention and Adaptively Providing Details on Information Displays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Narayanan, N. H

    2007-01-01

    ... in real-time in response to the viewer's gaze patterns. Designs of these displays were based on a cognitive model of multimodal information comprehension developed in a previous ONR project (N00014-96-1-1187...

  10. On-line data display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sherman Y. T.; Brooks, Martin; Gauthier, Marc; Wein, Marceli

    1993-05-01

    A data display system for embedded realtime systems has been developed for use as an operator's user interface and debugging tool. The motivation for development of the On-Line Data Display (ODD) have come from several sources. In particular the design reflects the needs of researchers developing an experimental mobile robot within our laboratory. A proliferation of specialized user interfaces revealed a need for a flexible communications and graphical data display system. At the same time the system had to be readily extensible for arbitrary graphical display formats which would be required for data visualization needs of the researchers. The system defines a communication protocol transmitting 'datagrams' between tasks executing on the realtime system and virtual devices displaying the data in a meaningful way on a graphical workstation. The communication protocol multiplexes logical channels on a single data stream. The current implementation consists of a server for the Harmony realtime operating system and an application written for the Macintosh computer. Flexibility requirements resulted in a highly modular server design, and a layered modular object- oriented design for the Macintosh part of the system. Users assign data types to specific channels at run time. Then devices are instantiated by the user and connected to channels to receive datagrams. The current suite of device types do not provide enough functionality for most users' specialized needs. Instead the system design allows the creation of new device types with modest programming effort. The protocol, design and use of the system are discussed.

  11. Printer Graphics Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    Printer Graphics Package (PGP) is tool for making two-dimensional symbolic plots on line printer. PGP created to support development of Heads-Up Display (HUD) simulation. Standard symbols defined with HUD in mind. Available symbols include circle, triangle, quadrangle, window, line, numbers, and text. Additional symbols easily added or built up from available symbols.

  12. Graphical Models with R

    CERN Document Server

    Højsgaard, Søren; Lauritzen, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Graphical models in their modern form have been around since the late 1970s and appear today in many areas of the sciences. Along with the ongoing developments of graphical models, a number of different graphical modeling software programs have been written over the years. In recent years many of these software developments have taken place within the R community, either in the form of new packages or by providing an R interface to existing software. This book attempts to give the reader a gentle introduction to graphical modeling using R and the main features of some of these packages. In add

  13. A graphics based remote handling control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinemann, K.

    1984-08-01

    A control and simulation system with an interactive graphic man-machine interface is proposed for the articulated boom in JET. The system shall support 1. the study of boom movements in the planning phase, 2. the training of operators by appropriate simulations, 3. the programming of boom movements, and 4. the on-line control of the boom. A combination of computer graphic display and TV-images is proposed for providing optimum recognition of the actual situation and for echoing to the operator actions. (orig.) [de

  14. Stereotypic and complex phrase types provide structural evidence for a multi-message display in humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Anita; Dunlop, Rebecca A; Noad, Michael J; Goldizen, Anne W

    2018-02-01

    Male humpback whales produce a mating display called "song." Behavioral studies indicate song has inter- and/or intra-sexual functionality, suggesting song may be a multi-message display. Multi-message displays often include stereotypic components that convey group membership for mate attraction and/or male-male interactions, and complex components that convey individual quality for courtship. Humpback whale song contains sounds ("units") arranged into sequences ("phrases"). Repetitions of a specific phrase create a "theme." Within a theme, imperfect phrase repetitions ("phrase variants") create variability among phrases of the same type ("phrase type"). The hypothesis that song contains stereotypic and complex phrase types, structural characteristics consistent with a multi-message display, is investigated using recordings of 17 east Australian males (8:2004, 9:2011). Phrase types are categorized as stereotypic or complex using number of unit types, number of phrase variants, and the proportion of phrases that is unique to an individual versus shared amongst males. Unit types are determined using self-organizing maps. Phrase variants are determined by Levenshtein distances between phrases. Stereotypic phrase types have smaller numbers of unit types and shared phrase variants. Complex phrase types have larger numbers of unit types and unique phrase variants. This study supports the hypothesis that song could be a multi-message display.

  15. Graphic Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John

    2009-01-01

    Graphic storytelling is a medium that allows students to make and share stories, while developing their art communication skills. American comics today are more varied in genre, approach, and audience than ever before. When considering the impact of Japanese manga on the youth, graphic storytelling emerges as a powerful player in pop culture. In…

  16. Graphic Communications. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This guide provides the basic foundation to develop a one-semester course based on the cluster concept, graphic communications. One of a set of six guides for an industrial arts curriculum at the junior high school level, it suggests exploratory experiences designed to (1) develop an awareness and understanding of the drafting and graphic arts…

  17. [Present Status of Displaying Pharmaceutical Products for Sale on Flea Market Applications for Smartphones and the Responses to Illicit Selling by Service Providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Keiko; Takeuchi, Tomoe; Fukushima, Noriko

    2017-12-01

     In Japan, a pharmacy or drug store license is required for selling pharmaceutical products. However, civilians without a pharmacy or drug store license are displaying pharmaceutical products for sale on a flea market application, which is illegal dealing. This study discussed the modality for implementing countermeasures for the illicit selling of pharmaceutical products. We extracted pharmaceutical products displayed for sale on three flea market applications (Mercari, Rakuma, Fril) on one day. One hundred and eighty-one pharmaceutical products were displayed (49 on Mercari, 86 on Rakuma, and 46 on Fril). There were 6.1% (11/181) domestically prescribed drugs, 69.1% (125/181) domestic OTC drugs, 23.8% (43/181) foreign-made prescribed drugs, and 1.1% (2/181) foreign-made OTC drugs. The seller could display the product for sale without confirming whether it is prohibited. We alerted the service providers of this illicit selling at flea markets at three different instances. The pharmaceutical product displays were deleted by the service providers at a rate of 55.1% (27/49) for Mercari and 51.2% (44/86) for Rakuma. The average number of drugs that were displayed for sale by each seller was 1.4 and the average number of total products that were displayed for sale by each seller was 100. The seller could have unintentionally displayed the pharmaceutical products for sale, without the knowledge that it is illegal. The service providers of flea market applications should create mechanisms to alert the sellers that displaying pharmaceutical products for sale is an illicit act and regulate these violations.

  18. TEKLIB, Tektronix Graphics Subroutine Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: TEKLIB is a library of subroutines that produces graphical output on all Tektronix terminals with model numbers from 4010 through 4115. The application program identifies the model number in the initialization subroutine, GRSTRT, and then uses this number as a flag throughout the run to tailor the graphical output to that specific device. Output includes lines, markers, text, polygons, and panels. Graphic input is supported on all terminals. 2 - Method of solution: TEKLIB uses two coordinate systems, viewport and world, to generate graphic images on the screen. Viewport coordinates refer to an imaginary rectangular grid on the display screen surface. The world coordinate system is a rectangular grid on any x-y plane, defined by the application program. The rectangular portion of the x-y plane specified, termed a w indow , is projected onto a rectangular region of the screen, called a v iewport . In addition to 2-D graphics, TEKLIB also provides subroutines for drawing projections of 3-D objects. The application program first defines a point in space to look at the v iew point , and the direction and distance from that point to the observer's position. A viewing transformation is performed on each x,y,z point to project it onto a v iew plane , a plane perpendicular to the line of sight and passing through the view point. This view plane then becomes the x-y plane of the world window which is mapped into the viewport. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: TEKLIB does not attempt to emulate attributes such as line style and marker type in software if the terminal does not support those attributes in hardware

  19. Mikado: A graphic program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secretan, Y.

    A discussion of the modular program Mikado is presented. Mikado was developed with the goal of creating a flexible graphic tool to display and help analyze the results of finite element fluid flow computations. Mikado works on unstructured meshes, with elements of mixed geometric type, but also offers the possibility of using structured meshes. The program can be operated by both menu and mouse (interactive), or by command file (batch). Mikado is written in FORTRAN, except for a few system dependent subroutines which are in C. It runs presently on Silicon Graphics' workstations and could be easily ported to the IBM-RISC System/6000 family of workstations.

  20. Graphic notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    1992-01-01

    Texbook to be used along with training the practise of graphic notation. Describes method; exercises; bibliography; collection of examples. If you can read Danish, please refer to that edition which is by far much more updated.......Texbook to be used along with training the practise of graphic notation. Describes method; exercises; bibliography; collection of examples. If you can read Danish, please refer to that edition which is by far much more updated....

  1. Stereoscopic 3D graphics generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Jianping; Zan, Y.

    1997-05-01

    Stereoscopic display technology is one of the key techniques of areas such as simulation, multimedia, entertainment, virtual reality, and so on. Moreover, stereoscopic 3D graphics generation is an important part of stereoscopic 3D display system. In this paper, at first, we describe the principle of stereoscopic display and summarize some methods to generate stereoscopic 3D graphics. Secondly, to overcome the problems which came from the methods of user defined models (such as inconvenience, long modifying period and so on), we put forward the vector graphics files defined method. Thus we can design more directly; modify the model simply and easily; generate more conveniently; furthermore, we can make full use of graphics accelerator card and so on. Finally, we discuss the problem of how to speed up the generation.

  2. Graphic Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook Weld Muller

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay describes strategic approaches to graphic representation associated with critical environmental engagement and that build from the idea of works of architecture as stitches in the ecological fabric of the city. It focuses on the building up of partial or fragmented graphics in order to describe inclusive, open-ended possibilities for making architecture that marry rich experience and responsive performance. An aphoristic approach to crafting drawings involves complex layering, conscious absence and the embracing of tension. A self-critical attitude toward the generation of imagery characterized by the notion of ‘loose precision’ may lead to more transformative and environmentally responsive architectures.

  3. Graphics gems

    CERN Document Server

    Heckbert, Paul S

    1994-01-01

    Graphics Gems IV contains practical techniques for 2D and 3D modeling, animation, rendering, and image processing. The book presents articles on polygons and polyhedral; a mix of formulas, optimized algorithms, and tutorial information on the geometry of 2D, 3D, and n-D space; transformations; and parametric curves and surfaces. The text also includes articles on ray tracing; shading 3D models; and frame buffer techniques. Articles on image processing; algorithms for graphical layout; basic interpolation methods; and subroutine libraries for vector and matrix algebra are also demonstrated. Com

  4. Software Graphical User Interface For Analysis Of Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Desiree M.; Nolf, Scott R.; Avis, Elizabeth L.; Stacy, Kathryn

    1992-01-01

    CAMTOOL software provides graphical interface between Sun Microsystems workstation and Eikonix Model 1412 digitizing camera system. Camera scans and digitizes images, halftones, reflectives, transmissives, rigid or flexible flat material, or three-dimensional objects. Users digitize images and select from three destinations: work-station display screen, magnetic-tape drive, or hard disk. Written in C.

  5. Graphic notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Graphic notation is taught to music therapy students at Aalborg University in both simple and elaborate forms. This is a method of depicting music visually, and notations may serve as memory aids, as aids for analysis and reflection, and for communication purposes such as supervision or within...

  6. Computer graphics in heat-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlin, G.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Computer graphics can be very useful in the setup of heat transfer simulations and in the display of the results of such simulations. The potential use of recently available low-cost graphics devices in the setup of such simulations has not been fully exploited. Several types of graphics devices and their potential usefulness are discussed, and some configurations of graphics equipment are presented in the low-, medium-, and high-price ranges

  7. INTLIB-6, Graphic Device Interface Library for ENDF/B Processing Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, L.

    1999-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The graphic subroutine libraries DISSPLA and GRALIB (USCD1211) generally produce output which is independent of the output graphic device. A set of device dependent interface routines is required to translate the device independent output to the form required for each graphic device available. The interface library INTLIB provides interface routines for the following output formats: TETRONIX - LN03 PLUS, - video display terminal; POSTSCRIPT - LN03 PLUS with PostScript, - LaserJet III in PostScript mode, - video display terminal; REGIS - VT240 and VT1200; HPGL - LaserJet III in HPGL mode; FR80 - COMP80 film, fiche and hard copy

  8. The human factors of CRT displays for nuclear power plant control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchak, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter attempts to show how the Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) can be used to effectively present information to the operator rather than just data. The capabilities of the human as a sensing and information processing subsystem are discussed with CRT displays in mind. The display system is described in terms of its hardware and functioning. The interface between the two is examined by providing substantive guidelines for the effective design of CRT displays for nuclear power plant control. Alphanumeric displays, graphic displays, and representational displays are treated. The design of CRT displays for nuclear power plant control requires an extensive knowledge of cognitive psychology, computer display systems and the process being controlled

  9. Provider Use of a Novel EHR display in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Large Customizable Interactive Monitor (LCIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur; Holden, Richard J; Flynn, Kathryn E; Yang, Yushi; Azam, Laila; Scanlon, Matthew C

    2016-07-20

    The purpose of this study was to explore providers' perspectives on the use of a novel technology, "Large Customizable Interactive Monitor" (LCIM), a novel application of the electronic health record system implemented in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. We employed a qualitative approach to collect and analyze data from pediatric intensive care physicians, pediatric nurse practitioners, and acute care specialists. Using semi-structured interviews, we collected data from January to April, 2015. The research team analyzed the transcripts using an iterative coding method to identify common themes. Study results highlight contextual data on providers' use routines of the LCIM. Findings from thirty six interviews were classified into three groups: 1) providers' familiarity with the LCIM; 2) providers' use routines (i.e. when and how they use it); and 3) reasons why they use or do not use it. It is important to conduct baseline studies of the use of novel technologies. The importance of training and orientation affects the adoption and use patterns of this new technology. This study is notable for being the first to investigate a LCIM system, a next generation system implemented in the pediatric critical care setting. Our study revealed this next generation HIT might have great potential for family-centered rounds, team education during rounds, and family education/engagement in their child's health in the patient room. This study also highlights the effect of training and orientation on the adoption patterns of new technology.

  10. The Case for Graphic Novels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Hoover

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Many libraries and librarians have embraced graphic novels. A number of books, articles, and presentations have focused on the history of the medium and offered advice on building and maintaining collections, but very little attention has been given the question of how integrate graphic novels into a library’s instructional efforts. This paper will explore the characteristics of graphic novels that make them a valuable resource for librarians who focus on research and information literacy instruction, identify skills and competencies that can be taught by the study of graphic novels, and will provide specific examples of how to incorporate graphic novels into instruction.

  11. Resurfacing Graphics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Patty K. Wongpakdee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Resurfacing Graphics” deals with the subject of unconventional design, with the purpose of engaging the viewer to experience the graphics beyond paper’s passive surface. Unconventional designs serve to reinvigorate people, whose senses are dulled by the typical, printed graphics, which bombard them each day. Today’s cutting-edge designers, illustrators and artists utilize graphics in a unique manner that allows for tactile interaction. Such works serve as valuable teaching models and encourage students to do the following: 1 investigate the trans-disciplines of art and technology; 2 appreciate that this approach can have a positive effect on the environment; 3 examine and research other approaches of design communications and 4 utilize new mediums to stretch the boundaries of artistic endeavor. This paper examines how visuals communicators are “Resurfacing Graphics” by using atypical surfaces and materials such as textile, wood, ceramics and even water. Such non-traditional transmissions of visual language serve to demonstrate student’s overreliance on paper as an outdated medium. With this exposure, students can become forward-thinking, eco-friendly, creative leaders by expanding their creative breadth and continuing the perpetual exploration for new ways to make their mark. 

  12. Resurfacing Graphics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Patty K. Wongpakdee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Resurfacing Graphics” deals with the subject of unconventional design, with the purpose of engaging the viewer to experience the graphics beyond paper’s passive surface. Unconventional designs serve to reinvigorate people, whose senses are dulled by the typical, printed graphics, which bombard them each day. Today’s cutting-edge designers, illustrators and artists utilize graphics in a unique manner that allows for tactile interaction. Such works serve as valuable teaching models and encourage students to do the following: 1 investigate the trans-disciplines of art and technology; 2 appreciate that this approach can have a positive effect on the environment; 3 examine and research other approaches of design communications and 4 utilize new mediums to stretch the boundaries of artistic endeavor. This paper examines how visuals communicators are “Resurfacing Graphics” by using atypical surfaces and materials such as textile, wood, ceramics and even water. Such non-traditional transmissions of visual language serve to demonstrate student’s overreliance on paper as an outdated medium. With this exposure, students can become forward-thinking, eco-friendly, creative leaders by expanding their creative breadth and continuing the perpetual exploration for new ways to make their mark.

  13. Graphics and visualization principles & algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Theoharis, T; Platis, Nikolaos; Patrikalakis, Nicholas M

    2008-01-01

    Computer and engineering collections strong in applied graphics and analysis of visual data via computer will find Graphics & Visualization: Principles and Algorithms makes an excellent classroom text as well as supplemental reading. It integrates coverage of computer graphics and other visualization topics, from shadow geneeration and particle tracing to spatial subdivision and vector data visualization, and it provides a thorough review of literature from multiple experts, making for a comprehensive review essential to any advanced computer study.-California Bookw

  14. Computer graphics and research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingtrakul, P.

    1994-01-01

    This report was prepared as an account of scientific visualization tools and application tools for scientists and engineers. It is provided a set of tools to create pictures and to interact with them in natural ways. It applied many techniques of computer graphics and computer animation through a number of full-color presentations as computer animated commercials, 3D computer graphics, dynamic and environmental simulations, scientific modeling and visualization, physically based modelling, and beavioral, skelatal, dynamics, and particle animation. It took in depth at original hardware and limitations of existing PC graphics adapters contain syste m performance, especially with graphics intensive application programs and user interfaces

  15. Heterogeneous Multicore Parallel Programming for Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Bodin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid parallel multicore architectures based on graphics processing units (GPUs can provide tremendous computing power. Current NVIDIA and AMD Graphics Product Group hardware display a peak performance of hundreds of gigaflops. However, exploiting GPUs from existing applications is a difficult task that requires non-portable rewriting of the code. In this paper, we present HMPP, a Heterogeneous Multicore Parallel Programming workbench with compilers, developed by CAPS entreprise, that allows the integration of heterogeneous hardware accelerators in a unintrusive manner while preserving the legacy code.

  16. LookOnX: A new technological approach for the H1 off-line event display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perus, A.; Arnault, C.

    1994-01-01

    The authors present the re-engineering work achieved on a traditional-fashioned GKS graphical package with new open-quotes event drivenclose quotes concepts required by using workstation interactivity. The Off-line Event Display for the H1 experiment H1look was originally written using a basic kernel package - Look - that provides a uniform control engine for graphical modules based on conventional GKS graphics. The use of powerful UNIX workstations is growing daily and their new graphical functionalities and CPU power are well suited to interactive graphical data analysis. Therefore re-engineering work was needed to put in some new features such as: interactive manipulations of graphical objects; object oriented definitions of the graphical representations and connectivity between graphical objects and physical objects; multi-windowing facility

  17. An SML Driven Graphical User Interface and Application Management Toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Greg R

    2002-01-01

    In the past, the features of a user interface were limited by those available in the existing graphical widgets it used. Now, improvements in processor speed have fostered the emergence of interpreted languages, in which the appropriate method to render a given data object can be loaded at runtime. XML can be used to precisely describe the association of data types with their graphical handling (beans), and Java provides an especially rich environment for programming the graphics. We present a graphical user interface builder based on Java Beans and XML, in which the graphical screens are described textually (in files or a database) in terms of their screen components. Each component may be a simple text read back, or a complex plot. The programming model provides for dynamic data pertaining to a component to be forwarded synchronously or asynchronously, to the appropriate handler, which may be a built-in method, or a complex applet. This work was initially motivated by the need to move the legacy VMS display interface of the SLAC Control Program to another platform while preserving all of its existing functionality. However the model allows us a powerful and generic system for adding new kinds of graphics, such as Matlab, data sources, such as EPICS, middleware, such as AIDA[1], and transport, such as XML and SOAP. The system will also include a management console, which will be able to report on the present usage of the system, for instance who is running it where and connected to which channels

  18. Software Development for Remote Control and Firing Room Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano Pena, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The Launch Control System (LCS) developed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) will be used to launch future spacecraft. Two of the many components of this system are the Application Control Language (ACL) and remote displays. ACL is a high level domain specific language that is used to write remote control applications for LCS. Remote displays are graphical user interfaces (GUIs) developed to display vehicle and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) data, they also provide the ability to send commands to control GSE and the vehicle. The remote displays and the control applications have many facets and this internship experience dealt with several of them.

  19. Computer and computer graphics support for the ALARA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, D.; Hall, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Computer programs have been developed which support three aspects of the ALARA program at Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO): 1) Setting annual dose and skin contamination goals, 2) Analyzing trends in operational organizations' dose, numbers of skin contaminations, or radiation occurrences, and 3) Presenting graphic displays to enhance worker safety awareness. Programs have been written which search dosemetry files and produce histograms of annual occupational exposure and skin contamination histories utilizing the DISSPLA software or a desk top color graphics terminal. These programs and associated graphics are used to assemble dose and skin contamination information in a summary format so that ALARA teams can assess the past year's performance and establish reduction goals for the coming year. In addition, the graphics provide a management tool for recognizing desirable or undesirable trends in an organization's occupational dose or number of skin contaminations. Desk top graphics capabilities have been used to display safety-related data to enhance management review and worker awareness of radiological and industrial safety conditions in the work area. The following graphs are prepared on a monthly basis: 1) Numbers of skin contaminations company wide and for specific operating organizations within the company, 2) Numbers of radiation occurrences, 3) Dose histories for specific operational organizations, 4) Numbers of OSHA recordable incidents, 5) OSHA recordable incident rates and severity levels and 6) Lost workday cases

  20. Statistical analysis and data display an intermediate course with examples in R

    CERN Document Server

    Heiberger, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    This contemporary presentation of statistical methods features extensive use of graphical displays for exploring data and for displaying the analysis. The authors demonstrate how to analyze data—showing code, graphics, and accompanying tabular listings—for all the methods they cover. They emphasize how to construct and interpret graphs. They discuss principles of graphical design. They identify situations where visual impressions from graphs may need confirmation from traditional tabular results. All chapters have exercises. The authors provide and discuss R functions for all the new graphical display formats. All graphs and tabular output in the book were constructed using these functions. Complete R scripts for all examples and figures are provided for readers to use as models for their own analyses. This book can serve as a standalone text for statistics majors at the master’s level and for other quantitatively oriented disciplines at the doctoral level, and as a reference book for researchers. In-de...

  1. Real-time flight test data distribution and display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesel, Michael C.; Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    Enhancements to the real-time processing and display systems of the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range are described. Display processing has been moved out of the telemetry and radar acquisition processing systems super-minicomputers into user/client interactive graphic workstations. Real-time data is provided to the workstations by way of Ethernet. Future enhancement plans include use of fiber optic cable to replace the Ethernet.

  2. The Xamine online/offline display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.; Vander Molen, A.

    1996-01-01

    The authors report on the design, development and stage-wise deployment of a new histogram display subsystem at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). This subsystem is based on the X/Motif graphical user interface library. The development cycle and feature set of this subsystem are described. The authors describe why they felt it was necessary to write a new package rather than to work with existing packages. The paper will also discuss the communication between the client and Xamine. This communications allows Xamine to cooperate with client programs providing the illusion of a unified GUI shared between the display subsystem and the client program

  3. WinGraphics: An optimized windowing environment for interactive real-time simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Vahedi, V.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a customized windowing environment, Win Graphics, which provides particle simulation codes with an interactive user interface. The environment supports real-time animation of the simulation, displaying multiple diagnostics as they evolve in time. In addition, keyboard and printer (PostScript and dot matrix) support is provided. This paper describes this environment

  4. Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU) for Deep Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Mary; Salazar, George; Steele, Glen

    2015-01-01

    A graphics processing capability will be required for deep space missions and must include a range of applications, from safety-critical vehicle health status to telemedicine for crew health. However, preliminary radiation testing of commercial graphics processing cards suggest they cannot operate in the deep space radiation environment. Investigation into an Software Graphics Processing Unit (sGPU)comprised of commercial-equivalent radiation hardened/tolerant single board computers, field programmable gate arrays, and safety-critical display software shows promising results. Preliminary performance of approximately 30 frames per second (FPS) has been achieved. Use of multi-core processors may provide a significant increase in performance.

  5. Printing--Graphic Arts--Graphic Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauenstein, A. Dean

    1975-01-01

    Recently, "graphic arts" has shifted from printing skills to a conceptual approach of production processes. "Graphic communications" must embrace the total system of communication through graphic media, to serve broad career education purposes; students taught concepts and principles can be flexible and adaptive. The author…

  6. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  7. Crystal ball single event display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosnick, D.; Gibson, A.; Allgower, C.; Alyea, J.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1997-01-01

    The Single Event Display (SED) is a routine that is designed to provide information graphically about a triggered event within the Crystal Ball. The SED is written entirely in FORTRAN and uses the CERN-based HICZ graphing package. The primary display shows the amount of energy deposited in each of the NaI crystals on a Mercator-like projection of the crystals. Ten different shades and colors correspond to varying amounts of energy deposited within a crystal. Information about energy clusters is displayed on the crystal map by outlining in red the thirteen (or twelve) crystals contained within a cluster and assigning each cluster a number. Additional information about energy clusters is provided in a series of boxes containing useful data about the energy distribution among the crystals within the cluster. Other information shown on the event display include the event trigger type and data about π o 's and η's formed from pairs of clusters as found by the analyzer. A description of the major features is given, along with some information on how to install the SED into the analyzer

  8. Graphics workflow optimization when editing standard tasks using modern graphics editing programs

    OpenAIRE

    Khabirova, Maja

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the description and characteristics of common problems which graphic designers face daily when working for advertising agencies. This work describes tasks and organises them according to the type of graphic being processed and the types of output. In addition, this work describes the ways these common tasks can be completed using modern graphics editing software. It also provides a practical definition of a graphic designer and graphic agency. The aim of this work is to m...

  9. Nucleic acid secondary structure prediction and display.

    OpenAIRE

    Stüber, K

    1986-01-01

    A set of programs has been developed for the prediction and display of nucleic acid secondary structures. Information from experimental data can be used to restrict or enforce secondary structural elements. The predictions can be displayed either on normal line printers or on graphic devices like plotters or graphic terminals.

  10. Industrial Personal Computer based Display for Nuclear Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Aram; Jo, Jung Hee; Kim, Ki Beom; Cheon, Sung Hyun; Cho, Joo Hyun; Sohn, Se Do; Baek, Seung Min

    2014-01-01

    The safety display of nuclear system has been classified as important to safety (SIL:Safety Integrity Level 3). These days the regulatory agencies are imposing more strict safety requirements for digital safety display system. To satisfy these requirements, it is necessary to develop a safety-critical (SIL 4) grade safety display system. This paper proposes industrial personal computer based safety display system with safety grade operating system and safety grade display methods. The description consists of three parts, the background, the safety requirements and the proposed safety display system design. The hardware platform is designed using commercially available off-the-shelf processor board with back plane bus. The operating system is customized for nuclear safety display application. The display unit is designed adopting two improvement features, i.e., one is to provide two separate processors for main computer and display device using serial communication, and the other is to use Digital Visual Interface between main computer and display device. In this case the main computer uses minimized graphic functions for safety display. The display design is at the conceptual phase, and there are several open areas to be concreted for a solid system. The main purpose of this paper is to describe and suggest a methodology to develop a safety-critical display system and the descriptions are focused on the safety requirement point of view

  11. Industrial Personal Computer based Display for Nuclear Safety System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Aram; Jo, Jung Hee; Kim, Ki Beom; Cheon, Sung Hyun; Cho, Joo Hyun; Sohn, Se Do; Baek, Seung Min [KEPCO, Youngin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The safety display of nuclear system has been classified as important to safety (SIL:Safety Integrity Level 3). These days the regulatory agencies are imposing more strict safety requirements for digital safety display system. To satisfy these requirements, it is necessary to develop a safety-critical (SIL 4) grade safety display system. This paper proposes industrial personal computer based safety display system with safety grade operating system and safety grade display methods. The description consists of three parts, the background, the safety requirements and the proposed safety display system design. The hardware platform is designed using commercially available off-the-shelf processor board with back plane bus. The operating system is customized for nuclear safety display application. The display unit is designed adopting two improvement features, i.e., one is to provide two separate processors for main computer and display device using serial communication, and the other is to use Digital Visual Interface between main computer and display device. In this case the main computer uses minimized graphic functions for safety display. The display design is at the conceptual phase, and there are several open areas to be concreted for a solid system. The main purpose of this paper is to describe and suggest a methodology to develop a safety-critical display system and the descriptions are focused on the safety requirement point of view.

  12. iMOSFLM: a new graphical interface for diffraction-image processing with MOSFLM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battye, T. Geoff G.; Kontogiannis, Luke; Johnson, Owen; Powell, Harold R.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2011-01-01

    A new graphical user interface to the MOSFLM program has been developed to simplify the processing of macromolecular diffraction data. The interface, iMOSFLM, allows data processing via a series of clearly defined tasks and provides visual feedback on the progress of each stage. iMOSFLM is a graphical user interface to the diffraction data-integration program MOSFLM. It is designed to simplify data processing by dividing the process into a series of steps, which are normally carried out sequentially. Each step has its own display pane, allowing control over parameters that influence that step and providing graphical feedback to the user. Suitable values for integration parameters are set automatically, but additional menus provide a detailed level of control for experienced users. The image display and the interfaces to the different tasks (indexing, strategy calculation, cell refinement, integration and history) are described. The most important parameters for each step and the best way of assessing success or failure are discussed

  13. Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Graphics Processing Board (GPB) Radiation Test Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, George A.; Steele, Glen F.

    2013-01-01

    Large round trip communications latency for deep space missions will require more onboard computational capabilities to enable the space vehicle to undertake many tasks that have traditionally been ground-based, mission control responsibilities. As a result, visual display graphics will be required to provide simpler vehicle situational awareness through graphical representations, as well as provide capabilities never before done in a space mission, such as augmented reality for in-flight maintenance or Telepresence activities. These capabilities will require graphics processors and associated support electronic components for high computational graphics processing. In an effort to understand the performance of commercial graphics card electronics operating in the expected radiation environment, a preliminary test was performed on five commercial offthe- shelf (COTS) graphics cards. This paper discusses the preliminary evaluation test results of five COTS graphics processing cards tested to the International Space Station (ISS) low earth orbit radiation environment. Three of the five graphics cards were tested to a total dose of 6000 rads (Si). The test articles, test configuration, preliminary results, and recommendations are discussed.

  14. Storyboard dalam Pembuatan Motion Graphic

    OpenAIRE

    Satrya Mahardhika; A.F. Choiril Anam Fathoni

    2013-01-01

    Motion graphics is one category in the animation that makes animation with lots of design elements in each component. Motion graphics needs long process including preproduction, production, and postproduction. Preproduction has an important role so that the next stage may provide guidance or instructions for the production process or the animation process. Preproduction includes research, making the story, script, screenplay, character, environment design and storyboards. The storyboard will ...

  15. Development of a prototype graphic simulation program for severe accident training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ko Ryu; Jeong, Kwang Sub; Ha, Jae Joo

    2000-05-01

    This is a report of the development process and related technologies of severe accident graphic simulators, required in industrial severe accident management and training. Here, we say 'a severe accident graphic simulator' as a graphics add-in system to existing calculation codes, which can show the severe accident phenomena dynamically on computer screens and therefore which can supplement one of main defects of existing calculation codes. With graphic simulators it is fairly easy to see the total behavior of nuclear power plants, where it was very difficult to see only from partial variable numerical information. Moreover, the fast processing and control feature of a graphic simulator can give some opportunities of predicting the severe accident advancement among several possibilities, to one who is not an expert. Utilizing graphic simulators' we expect operators' and TSC members' physical phenomena understanding enhancement from the realistic dynamic behavior of plants. We also expect that severe accident training course can gain better training effects using graphic simulator's control functions and predicting capabilities, and therefore we expect that graphic simulators will be effective decision-aids tools both in sever accident training course and in real severe accident situations. With these in mind, we have developed a prototype graphic simulator having surveyed related technologies, and from this development experiences we have inspected the possibility to build a severe accident graphic simulator. The prototype graphic simulator is developed under IBM PC WinNT environments and is suited to Uljin 3and4 nuclear power plant. When supplied with adequate severe accident scenario as an input, the prototype can provide graphical simulations of plant safety systems' dynamic behaviors. The prototype is composed of several different modules, which are phenomena display module, MELCOR data interface module and graphic database interface module. Main functions of

  16. Development of a prototype graphic simulation program for severe accident training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ko Ryu; Jeong, Kwang Sub; Ha, Jae Joo

    2000-05-01

    This is a report of the development process and related technologies of severe accident graphic simulators, required in industrial severe accident management and training. Here, we say 'a severe accident graphic simulator' as a graphics add-in system to existing calculation codes, which can show the severe accident phenomena dynamically on computer screens and therefore which can supplement one of main defects of existing calculation codes. With graphic simulators it is fairly easy to see the total behavior of nuclear power plants, where it was very difficult to see only from partial variable numerical information. Moreover, the fast processing and control feature of a graphic simulator can give some opportunities of predicting the severe accident advancement among several possibilities, to one who is not an expert. Utilizing graphic simulators' we expect operators' and TSC members' physical phenomena understanding enhancement from the realistic dynamic behavior of plants. We also expect that severe accident training course can gain better training effects using graphic simulator's control functions and predicting capabilities, and therefore we expect that graphic simulators will be effective decision-aids tools both in sever accident training course and in real severe accident situations. With these in mind, we have developed a prototype graphic simulator having surveyed related technologies, and from this development experiences we have inspected the possibility to build a severe accident graphic simulator. The prototype graphic simulator is developed under IBM PC WinNT environments and is suited to Uljin 3and4 nuclear power plant. When supplied with adequate severe accident scenario as an input, the prototype can provide graphical simulations of plant safety systems' dynamic behaviors. The prototype is composed of several different modules, which are phenomena display module, MELCOR data interface module and graphic database

  17. Scientific and Graphic Design Foundations for C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    the elements in the composition. This section presents a summary of the concepts in graphic design layout, typography , color, and data graphics ...document for ease of use 4 Graphic Design • Layout – Literally the aesthetic of the display design • Typography – Serif versus san serif – Font sizes...12th ICCRTS “Adapting C2 to the 21st Century” Title: Scientific and graphic design foundations for C2 Topics: C2 Concepts, Theory and

  18. PC Graphic file programing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin Seok

    1993-04-01

    This book gives description of basic of graphic knowledge and understanding and realization of graphic file form. The first part deals with graphic with graphic data, store of graphic data and compress of data, programing language such as assembling, stack, compile and link of program and practice and debugging. The next part mentions graphic file form such as Mac paint file, GEM/IMG file, PCX file, GIF file, and TIFF file, consideration of hardware like mono screen driver and color screen driver in high speed, basic conception of dithering and conversion of formality.

  19. MPGT - THE MISSION PLANNING GRAPHICAL TOOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeletic, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    The Mission Planning Graphical Tool (MPGT) provides mission analysts with a mouse driven graphical representation of the spacecraft and environment data used in spaceflight planning. Developed by the Flight Dynamics Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, MPGT is designed to be a generic tool that can be configured to analyze any specified earth orbiting spacecraft mission. The data is presented as a series of overlays on top of a 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional projection of the earth. Up to six spacecraft orbit tracks can be drawn at one time. Position data can be obtained by either an analytical process or by use of ephemeris files. If the user chooses to propagate the spacecraft orbit using an ephemeris file, then Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) formatted ephemeris files must be supplied. The MPGT User's Guide provides a complete description of the GTDS ephemeris file format so that users can create their own. Other overlays included are ground station antenna masks, solar and lunar ephemeris, Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) coverage, a field-of-view swath, and orbit number. From these graphical representations an analyst can determine such spacecraft-related constraints as communication coverage, interference zone infringement, sunlight availability, and instrument target visibility. The presentation of time and geometric data as graphical overlays on a world map makes possible quick analyses of trends and time-oriented parameters. For instance, MPGT can display the propagation of the position of the Sun and Moon over time, shadowing of sunrise/sunset terminators to indicate spacecraft and Earth day/night, and color coding of the spacecraft orbit tracks to indicate spacecraft day/night. With the 3-dimensional display, the user specifies a vector that represents the position in the universe from which the user wishes to view the earth. From these "viewpoint" parameters the user can zoom in on or rotate around the earth

  20. Computer graphics aid mission operations. [NASA missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeletic, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The application of computer graphics techniques in NASA space missions is reviewed. Telemetric monitoring of the Space Shuttle and its components is discussed, noting the use of computer graphics for real-time visualization problems in the retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission. The use of the world map display for determining a spacecraft's location above the earth and the problem of verifying the relative position and orientation of spacecraft to celestial bodies are examined. The Flight Dynamics/STS Three-dimensional Monitoring System and the Trajectroy Computations and Orbital Products System world map display are described, emphasizing Space Shuttle applications. Also, consideration is given to the development of monitoring systems such as the Shuttle Payloads Mission Monitoring System and the Attitude Heads-Up Display and the use of the NASA-Goddard Two-dimensional Graphics Monitoring System during Shuttle missions and to support the Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  2. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  3. Graphical Rasch models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Svend; Christensen, Karl Bang

    Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models......Rasch models; Partial Credit models; Rating Scale models; Item bias; Differential item functioning; Local independence; Graphical models...

  4. Handbook of display technology

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, Joseph A

    1992-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive review of technical and commercial aspects of display technology. It provides design engineers with the information needed to select proper technology for new products. The book focuses on flat, thin displays such as light-emitting diodes, plasma display panels, and liquid crystal displays, but it also includes material on cathode ray tubes. Displays include a large number of products from televisions, auto dashboards, radios, and household appliances, to gasoline pumps, heart monitors, microwave ovens, and more.For more information on display tech

  5. Refreshing Refreshable Braille Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russomanno, Alexander; O'Modhrain, Sile; Gillespie, R Brent; Rodger, Matthew W M

    2015-01-01

    The increased access to books afforded to blind people via e-publishing has given them long-sought independence for both recreational and educational reading. In most cases, blind readers access materials using speech output. For some content such as highly technical texts, music, and graphics, speech is not an appropriate access modality as it does not promote deep understanding. Therefore blind braille readers often prefer electronic braille displays. But, these are prohibitively expensive. The search is on, therefore, for a low-cost refreshable display that would go beyond current technologies and deliver graphical content as well as text. And many solutions have been proposed, some of which reduce costs by restricting the number of characters that can be displayed, even down to a single braille cell. In this paper, we demonstrate that restricting tactile cues during braille reading leads to poorer performance in a letter recognition task. In particular, we show that lack of sliding contact between the fingertip and the braille reading surface results in more errors and that the number of errors increases as a function of presentation speed. These findings suggest that single cell displays which do not incorporate sliding contact are likely to be less effective for braille reading.

  6. Computer generated movies to display biotelemetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, G.C.

    1979-01-01

    The three dimensional nature of biotelemetry data (x, y, time) makes them difficult to comprehend. Graphic displays provide a means of extracting information and analyzing biotelemetry data. The extensive computer graphics facilities at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory have been utilized to analyze elk biotelemetry data. Fixes have been taken weekly for 14 months on 14 animals'. The inadequacy of still graphic displays to portray the time dimension of this data has lead to the use of computer generated movies to help grasp time relationships. A computer movie of the data from one animal demonstrates habitat use as a function of time, while a movie of 2 or more animals illustrates the correlations between the animals movements. About 2 hours of computer time were required to generate the movies for each animal for 1 year of data. The cost of the movies is quite small relative to the cost of collecting the data, so that computer generated movies are a reasonable method to depict biotelemetry data

  7. Bayesian Graphical Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Finn Verner; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2016-01-01

    Mathematically, a Bayesian graphical model is a compact representation of the joint probability distribution for a set of variables. The most frequently used type of Bayesian graphical models are Bayesian networks. The structural part of a Bayesian graphical model is a graph consisting of nodes...

  8. A Theoretical Analysis of Learning with Graphics--Implications for Computer Graphics Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChanLin, Lih-Juan

    This paper reviews the literature pertinent to learning with graphics. The dual coding theory provides explanation about how graphics are stored and precessed in semantic memory. The level of processing theory suggests how graphics can be employed in learning to encourage deeper processing. In addition to dual coding theory and level of processing…

  9. Graphic overview system for DOE's effluent and environmental monitoring programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burson, Z.G.; Elle, D.R.

    1980-03-01

    The Graphic Overview System is a compilation of photos, maps, overlays, and summary information of environmental programs and related data for each DOE site. The information consists of liquid and airborne effluent release points, on-site storage locations, monitoring locations, aerial survey results, population distributions, wind roses, and other related information. The relationships of different environmental programs are visualized through the use of colored overlays. Trends in monitoring data, effluent releases, and on-site storage data are also provided as a corollary to the graphic display of monitoring and release points. The results provide a working tool with which DOE management (headquarters and field offices) can place in proper perspective key aspects of all environmental programs and related data, and the resulting public impact of each DOE site

  10. The PC graphics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Julio

    2003-01-01

    Part I - Graphics Fundamentals PC GRAPHICS OVERVIEW History and Evolution Short History of PC Video PS/2 Video Systems SuperVGA Graphics Coprocessors and Accelerators Graphics Applications State-of-the-Art in PC Graphics 3D Application Programming Interfaces POLYGONAL MODELING Vector and Raster Data Coordinate Systems Modeling with Polygons IMAGE TRANSFORMATIONS Matrix-based Representations Matrix Arithmetic 3D Transformations PROGRAMMING MATRIX TRANSFORMATIONS Numeric Data in Matrix Form Array Processing PROJECTIONS AND RENDERING Perspective The Rendering Pipeline LIGHTING AND SHADING Lightin

  11. Graphics gems II

    CERN Document Server

    Arvo, James

    1991-01-01

    Graphics Gems II is a collection of articles shared by a diverse group of people that reflect ideas and approaches in graphics programming which can benefit other computer graphics programmers.This volume presents techniques for doing well-known graphics operations faster or easier. The book contains chapters devoted to topics on two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry and algorithms, image processing, frame buffer techniques, and ray tracing techniques. The radiosity approach, matrix techniques, and numerical and programming techniques are likewise discussed.Graphics artists and comput

  12. Graphical programming at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, M.J.; Palmquist, R.D.; Desjarlais, L.

    1993-09-01

    Sandia has developed an advanced operational control system approach, called Graphical Programming, to design, program, and operate robotic systems. The Graphical Programming approach produces robot systems that are faster to develop and use, safer in operation, and cheaper overall than altemative teleoperation or autonomous robot control systems. Graphical Programming also provides an efficient and easy-to-use interface to traditional robot systems for use in setup and programming tasks. This paper provides an overview of the Graphical Programming approach and lists key features of Graphical Programming systems. Graphical Programming uses 3-D visualization and simulation software with intuitive operator interfaces for the programming and control of complex robotic systems. Graphical Programming Supervisor software modules allow an operator to command and simulate complex tasks in a graphic preview mode and, when acceptable, command the actual robots and monitor their motions with the graphic system. Graphical Programming Supervisors maintain registration with the real world and allow the robot to perform tasks that cannot be accurately represented with models alone by using a combination of model and sensor-based control

  13. Transforming Graphical System Models to Graphical Attack Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2016-01-01

    Manually identifying possible attacks on an organisation is a complex undertaking; many different factors must be considered, and the resulting attack scenarios can be complex and hard to maintain as the organisation changes. System models provide a systematic representation of organisations...... approach to transforming graphical system models to graphical attack models in the form of attack trees. Based on an asset in the model, our transformations result in an attack tree that represents attacks by all possible actors in the model, after which the actor in question has obtained the asset....

  14. Graphical debugging of combinational geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.; Smith, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A graphical debugger for combinatorial geometry being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described. The prototype debugger consists of two parts: a FORTRAN-based ''view'' generator and a Microsoft Windows application for displaying the geometry. Options and features of both modules are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options available are presented. The potential for utilizing the images produced using the debugger as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is discussed as is the future direction of the development

  15. IDEA: Interactive Display for Evolutionary Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Amy; Mahurkar, Anup; Crabtree, Jonathan; Badger, Jonathan H; Carlton, Jane M; Silva, Joana C

    2008-12-08

    The availability of complete genomic sequences for hundreds of organisms promises to make obtaining genome-wide estimates of substitution rates, selective constraints and other molecular evolution variables of interest an increasingly important approach to addressing broad evolutionary questions. Two of the programs most widely used for this purpose are codeml and baseml, parts of the PAML (Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood) suite. A significant drawback of these programs is their lack of a graphical user interface, which can limit their user base and considerably reduce their efficiency. We have developed IDEA (Interactive Display for Evolutionary Analyses), an intuitive graphical input and output interface which interacts with PHYLIP for phylogeny reconstruction and with codeml and baseml for molecular evolution analyses. IDEA's graphical input and visualization interfaces eliminate the need to edit and parse text input and output files, reducing the likelihood of errors and improving processing time. Further, its interactive output display gives the user immediate access to results. Finally, IDEA can process data in parallel on a local machine or computing grid, allowing genome-wide analyses to be completed quickly. IDEA provides a graphical user interface that allows the user to follow a codeml or baseml analysis from parameter input through to the exploration of results. Novel options streamline the analysis process, and post-analysis visualization of phylogenies, evolutionary rates and selective constraint along protein sequences simplifies the interpretation of results. The integration of these functions into a single tool eliminates the need for lengthy data handling and parsing, significantly expediting access to global patterns in the data.

  16. IDEA: Interactive Display for Evolutionary Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlton Jane M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of complete genomic sequences for hundreds of organisms promises to make obtaining genome-wide estimates of substitution rates, selective constraints and other molecular evolution variables of interest an increasingly important approach to addressing broad evolutionary questions. Two of the programs most widely used for this purpose are codeml and baseml, parts of the PAML (Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood suite. A significant drawback of these programs is their lack of a graphical user interface, which can limit their user base and considerably reduce their efficiency. Results We have developed IDEA (Interactive Display for Evolutionary Analyses, an intuitive graphical input and output interface which interacts with PHYLIP for phylogeny reconstruction and with codeml and baseml for molecular evolution analyses. IDEA's graphical input and visualization interfaces eliminate the need to edit and parse text input and output files, reducing the likelihood of errors and improving processing time. Further, its interactive output display gives the user immediate access to results. Finally, IDEA can process data in parallel on a local machine or computing grid, allowing genome-wide analyses to be completed quickly. Conclusion IDEA provides a graphical user interface that allows the user to follow a codeml or baseml analysis from parameter input through to the exploration of results. Novel options streamline the analysis process, and post-analysis visualization of phylogenies, evolutionary rates and selective constraint along protein sequences simplifies the interpretation of results. The integration of these functions into a single tool eliminates the need for lengthy data handling and parsing, significantly expediting access to global patterns in the data.

  17. Configurable software for satellite graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartzman, P D

    1977-12-01

    An important goal in interactive computer graphics is to provide users with both quick system responses for basic graphics functions and enough computing power for complex calculations. One solution is to have a distributed graphics system in which a minicomputer and a powerful large computer share the work. The most versatile type of distributed system is an intelligent satellite system in which the minicomputer is programmable by the application user and can do most of the work while the large remote machine is used for difficult computations. At New York University, the hardware was configured from available equipment. The level of system intelligence resulted almost completely from software development. Unlike previous work with intelligent satellites, the resulting system had system control centered in the satellite. It also had the ability to reconfigure software during realtime operation. The design of the system was done at a very high level using set theoretic language. The specification clearly illustrated processor boundaries and interfaces. The high-level specification also produced a compact, machine-independent virtual graphics data structure for picture representation. The software was written in a systems implementation language; thus, only one set of programs was needed for both machines. A user can program both machines in a single language. Tests of the system with an application program indicate that is has very high potential. A major result of this work is the demonstration that a gigantic investment in new hardware is not necessary for computing facilities interested in graphics.

  18. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...... games and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm for computing an equilibrium of such a game. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem....

  19. Emergent features and perceptual objects: re-examining fundamental principles in analogical display design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jerred; Bennett, Kevin B; Flach, John M

    2015-01-01

    Two sets of design principles for analogical visual displays, based on the concepts of emergent features and perceptual objects, are described. An interpretation of previous empirical findings for three displays (bar graph, polar graphic, alphanumeric) is provided from both perspectives. A fourth display (configural coordinate) was designed using principles of ecological interface design (i.e. direct perception). An experiment was conducted to evaluate performance (accuracy and latency of state identification) with these four displays. Numerous significant effects were obtained and a clear rank ordering of performance emerged (from best to worst): configural coordinate, bar graph, alphanumeric and polar graphic. These findings are consistent with principles of design based on emergent features; they are inconsistent with principles based on perceptual objects. Some limitations of the configural coordinate display are discussed and a redesign is provided. Practitioner Summary: Principles of ecological interface design, which emphasise the quality of very specific mappings between domain, display and observer constraints, are described; these principles are applicable to the design of all analogical graphical displays.

  20. General-Purpose Software For Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Device Independent Graphics Library (NASADIG) is general-purpose computer-graphics package for computer-based engineering and management applications which gives opportunity to translate data into effective graphical displays for presentation. Features include two- and three-dimensional plotting, spline and polynomial interpolation, control of blanking of areas, multiple log and/or linear axes, control of legends and text, control of thicknesses of curves, and multiple text fonts. Included are subroutines for definition of areas and axes of plots; setup and display of text; blanking of areas; setup of style, interpolation, and plotting of lines; control of patterns and of shading of colors; control of legends, blocks of text, and characters; initialization of devices; and setting of mixed alphabets. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. The computer graphics metafile

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, LR; Shepherd, B; Arnold, D B

    1990-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Metafile deals with the Computer Graphics Metafile (CGM) standard and covers topics ranging from the structure and contents of a metafile to CGM functionality, metafile elements, and real-world applications of CGM. Binary Encoding, Character Encoding, application profiles, and implementations are also discussed. This book is comprised of 18 chapters divided into five sections and begins with an overview of the CGM standard and how it can meet some of the requirements for storage of graphical data within a graphics system or application environment. The reader is then intr

  2. Fluid simulation for computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Bridson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Animating fluids like water, smoke, and fire using physics-based simulation is increasingly important in visual effects, in particular in movies, like The Day After Tomorrow, and in computer games. This book provides a practical introduction to fluid simulation for graphics. The focus is on animating fully three-dimensional incompressible flow, from understanding the math and the algorithms to the actual implementation.

  3. TEK11 graphics user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R. Jr.; Joubert, W.D.; Overbey, D.R.; Stewart, K.A.

    1978-10-01

    The TEK11 graphics library was written for use on PDP-11 minicomputers running the RT-11 operating system to drive Tektronix 4010 graphics display terminals. Library subroutines are coded in FORTRAN and assembly language. The library includes routines to draw axes, either linear or semilog, to plot data in terms of logical values without first scaling to screen coordinates, to label graphs, and to plot in a maximum of four regions on the screen. Modes of plotting may be point plot with any character at the point, vector plot, or bar plot. Two features, automatic scaling and windowing, permit the researcher to use computer graphics without spending time first to learn about scaling or ''Tek points'' and preparing long parameter lists for subroutines. Regions on the screen are defined by specifying minima and maxima logical coordinates, i.e., 0 K or milliseconds, and a region number. After definition, a region may be activated for plotting by calling REGN with the region number as an argument

  4. Programming Language Software For Graphics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Brian C.

    1993-01-01

    New approach reduces repetitive development of features common to different applications. High-level programming language and interactive environment with access to graphical hardware and software created by adding graphical commands and other constructs to standardized, general-purpose programming language, "Scheme". Designed for use in developing other software incorporating interactive computer-graphics capabilities into application programs. Provides alternative to programming entire applications in C or FORTRAN, specifically ameliorating design and implementation of complex control and data structures typifying applications with interactive graphics. Enables experimental programming and rapid development of prototype software, and yields high-level programs serving as executable versions of software-design documentation.

  5. Plots, Calculations and Graphics Tools (PCG2). Software Transfer Request Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Marilou R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of the Plots, Calculations and Graphics Tools (PCG2) system. PCG2 is an easy to use tool that provides a single user interface to view data in a pictorial, tabular or graphical format. It allows the user to view the same display and data in the Control Room, engineering office area, or remote sites. PCG2 supports extensive and regular engineering needs that are both planned and unplanned and it supports the ability to compare, contrast and perform ad hoc data mining over the entire domain of a program's test data.

  6. Interactive Graphic Journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlichting, Laura

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines graphic journalism (GJ) in a transmedial context, and argues that transmedial graphic journalism (TMGJ) is an important and fruitful new form of visual storytelling, that will re-invigorate the field of journalism, as it steadily tests out and plays with new media,

  7. Mathematics for computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Vince, John

    2006-01-01

    Helps you understand the mathematical ideas used in computer animation, virtual reality, CAD, and other areas of computer graphics. This work also helps you to rediscover the mathematical techniques required to solve problems and design computer programs for computer graphic applications

  8. Displays in scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.E.; Pizer, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Displays have several functions: to transmit images, to permit interaction, to quantitate features and to provide records. The main characteristics of displays used for image transmission are their resolution, dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity. Considerations of visual acuity suggest that the display element size should be much less than the data element size, and in current practice at least 256X256 for a gamma camera image. The dynamic range for image transmission should be such that at least 64 levels of grey (or equivalent) are displayed. Scanner displays are also considered, and in particular, the requirements of a whole-body camera are examined. A number of display systems and devices are presented including a 'new' heated object colour display system. Interaction with displays is considered, including background subtraction, contrast enhancement, position indication and region-of-interest generation. Such systems lead to methods of quantitation, which imply knowledge of the expected distributions. Methods for intercomparing displays are considered. Polaroid displays, which have for so long dominated the field, are in the process of being replaced by stored image displays, now that large cheap memories exist which give an equivalent image quality. The impact of this in nuclear medicine is yet to be seen, but a major effect will be to enable true quantitation. (author)

  9. Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) UTM NAD 83 Clipped

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) is a raster image of a scanned USGS topographic map including the collar information, georeferenced to the UTM grid. For display...

  10. Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) UTM NAD 27 Clipped

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) is a raster image of a scanned USGS topographic map including the collar information, georeferenced to the UTM grid. For display...

  11. Spatial Ability through Engineering Graphics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marunic, Gordana; Glazar, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability has been confirmed to be of particular importance for successful engineering graphics education and to be a component of human intelligence that can be improved through instruction and training. Consequently, the creation and communication by means of graphics demand careful development of spatial skills provided by the balanced…

  12. Graphic Design in Libraries: A Conceptual Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Providing successful library services requires efficient and effective communication with users; therefore, it is important that content creators who develop visual materials understand key components of design and, specifically, develop a holistic graphic design process. Graphic design, as a form of visual communication, is the process of…

  13. Three Dimensional Computer Graphics Federates for the 2012 Smackdown Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, Crystal; Govindaiah, Swetha; Muratet, Sean; O'Neil, Daniel A.; Schricker, Bradley C.

    2012-01-01

    The Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO) Smackdown is a two-year old annual event held at the 2012 Spring Simulation Interoperability Workshop (SIW). A primary objective of the Smackdown event is to provide college students with hands-on experience in developing distributed simulations using High Level Architecture (HLA). Participating for the second time, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) deployed four federates, two federates simulated a communications server and a lunar communications satellite with a radio. The other two federates generated 3D computer graphics displays for the communication satellite constellation and for the surface based lunar resupply mission. Using the Light-Weight Java Graphics Library, the satellite display federate presented a lunar-texture mapped sphere of the moon and four Telemetry Data Relay Satellites (TDRS), which received object attributes from the lunar communications satellite federate to drive their motion. The surface mission display federate was an enhanced version of the federate developed by ForwardSim, Inc. for the 2011 Smackdown simulation. Enhancements included a dead-reckoning algorithm and a visual indication of which communication satellite was in line of sight of Hadley Rille. This paper concentrates on these two federates by describing the functions, algorithms, HLA object attributes received from other federates, development experiences and recommendations for future, participating Smackdown teams.

  14. Influence of Colour on Acquisition and Generalisation of Graphic Symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, O. E.; Ne'eman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children with autism may benefit from using graphic symbols for their communication, language and literacy development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of colour versus grey-scale displays on the identification of graphic symbols using a computer-based intervention. Method: An alternating treatment design was…

  15. LCFM - LIVING COLOR FRAME MAKER: PC GRAPHICS GENERATION AND MANAGEMENT TOOL FOR REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, L. V.

    1994-01-01

    Computer graphics are often applied for better understanding and interpretation of data under observation. These graphics become more complicated when animation is required during "run-time", as found in many typical modern artificial intelligence and expert systems. Living Color Frame Maker is a solution to many of these real-time graphics problems. Living Color Frame Maker (LCFM) is a graphics generation and management tool for IBM or IBM compatible personal computers. To eliminate graphics programming, the graphic designer can use LCFM to generate computer graphics frames. The graphical frames are then saved as text files, in a readable and disclosed format, which can be easily accessed and manipulated by user programs for a wide range of "real-time" visual information applications. For example, LCFM can be implemented in a frame-based expert system for visual aids in management of systems. For monitoring, diagnosis, and/or controlling purposes, circuit or systems diagrams can be brought to "life" by using designated video colors and intensities to symbolize the status of hardware components (via real-time feedback from sensors). Thus status of the system itself can be displayed. The Living Color Frame Maker is user friendly with graphical interfaces, and provides on-line help instructions. All options are executed using mouse commands and are displayed on a single menu for fast and easy operation. LCFM is written in C++ using the Borland C++ 2.0 compiler for IBM PC series computers and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The program requires a mouse and an EGA/VGA display. A minimum of 77K of RAM is also required for execution. The documentation is provided in electronic form on the distribution medium in WordPerfect format. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools

  16. DPAK and HPAK: a versatile display and histogramming package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logg, C.A.; Boyarski, A.M.; Cook, A.J.; Cottrell, R.L.A.; Sund, S.

    1979-07-01

    The features of a display and histogram package which requires a minimal number of subroutine calls in order to generate graphic output in many flavors on a variety of devices are described. Default options are preset to values that are generally most wanted, but the default values may be readily changed to the user's needs. The description falls naturally into two parts, namely, the set of routines (DPAK) for displaying data on some device, and the set of routines (HPAK) for generating histograms. HPAK provides a means of allocating memory for histograms, accumulating data into histograms, and subsequently displaying the hisotgrams via calls to the DPAK routines. Histograms and displays of either one or two independent variables can be made

  17. General multiplex centralized fire-alarm display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Liqun; Chen Jinming

    2002-01-01

    The fire-alarm display system is developed, which can connect with each type of fire controllers produced in the factory and SIGMASYS controllers. It can display whole alarm information. The display system software gathers communication, database and multimedia, has functions of inspecting fire, showing alarm, storing data, searching information and so on. The drawing software lets the user expediently add, delete, move and modify fire detection or fire fighting facilities on the building floor maps. The graphic transform software lets the display use the vectorgraph produced by popular plotting software such as Auto CAD. The system software provides the administration function, such as log book of changing shift and managing workers etc.. The software executed on Windows 98 platform. The user interface is friendly and reliable in operation

  18. OLED displays and lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Koden, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have emerged as the leading technology for the new display and lighting market. OLEDs are solid-state devices composed of thin films of organic molecules that create light with the application of electricity. OLEDs can provide brighter, crisper displays on electronic devices and use less power than conventional light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or liquid crystal displays (LCDs) used today. This book covers both the fundamentals and practical applications of flat and flexible OLEDs.

  19. Ultrascale collaborative visualization using a display-rich global cyberinfrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byungil; Leigh, Jason; Johnson, Andrew; Renambot, Luc; Brown, Maxine; Jagodic, Ratko; Nam, Sungwon; Hur, Hyejung

    2010-01-01

    The scalable adaptive graphics environment (SAGE) is high-performance graphics middleware for ultrascale collaborative visualization using a display-rich global cyberinfrastructure. Dozens of sites worldwide use this cyberinfrastructure middleware, which connects high-performance-computing resources over high-speed networks to distributed ultraresolution displays.

  20. Perception in statistical graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderPlas, Susan Ruth

    There has been quite a bit of research on statistical graphics and visualization, generally focused on new types of graphics, new software to create graphics, interactivity, and usability studies. Our ability to interpret and use statistical graphics hinges on the interface between the graph itself and the brain that perceives and interprets it, and there is substantially less research on the interplay between graph, eye, brain, and mind than is sufficient to understand the nature of these relationships. The goal of the work presented here is to further explore the interplay between a static graph, the translation of that graph from paper to mental representation (the journey from eye to brain), and the mental processes that operate on that graph once it is transferred into memory (mind). Understanding the perception of statistical graphics should allow researchers to create more effective graphs which produce fewer distortions and viewer errors while reducing the cognitive load necessary to understand the information presented in the graph. Taken together, these experiments should lay a foundation for exploring the perception of statistical graphics. There has been considerable research into the accuracy of numerical judgments viewers make from graphs, and these studies are useful, but it is more effective to understand how errors in these judgments occur so that the root cause of the error can be addressed directly. Understanding how visual reasoning relates to the ability to make judgments from graphs allows us to tailor graphics to particular target audiences. In addition, understanding the hierarchy of salient features in statistical graphics allows us to clearly communicate the important message from data or statistical models by constructing graphics which are designed specifically for the perceptual system.

  1. New portable FELIX 3D display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Knut; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis; Bahr, Detlef; Vogt, Carsten; Blohm, Christian; Scharschmidt, Karl-Heinz

    1998-04-01

    An improved generation of our 'FELIX 3D Display' is presented. This system is compact, light, modular and easy to transport. The created volumetric images consist of many voxels, which are generated in a half-sphere display volume. In that way a spatial object can be displayed occupying a physical space with height, width and depth. The new FELIX generation uses a screen rotating with 20 revolutions per second. This target screen is mounted by an easy to change mechanism making it possible to use appropriate screens for the specific purpose of the display. An acousto-optic deflection unit with an integrated small diode pumped laser draws the images on the spinning screen. Images can consist of up to 10,000 voxels at a refresh rate of 20 Hz. Currently two different hardware systems are investigated. The first one is based on a standard PCMCIA digital/analog converter card as an interface and is controlled by a notebook. The developed software is provided with a graphical user interface enabling several animation features. The second, new prototype is designed to display images created by standard CAD applications. It includes the development of a new high speed hardware interface suitable for state-of-the- art fast and high resolution scanning devices, which require high data rates. A true 3D volume display as described will complement the broad range of 3D visualization tools, such as volume rendering packages, stereoscopic and virtual reality techniques, which have become widely available in recent years. Potential applications for the FELIX 3D display include imaging in the field so fair traffic control, medical imaging, computer aided design, science as well as entertainment.

  2. VFR Class B Graphics - Aeronautical Information Services Digital Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — These graphics are designed to increase safety and aid pilots in gaining situational awareness within existing and redesigned Class B areas. The graphic provides an...

  3. Storyboard dalam Pembuatan Motion Graphic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satrya Mahardhika

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Motion graphics is one category in the animation that makes animation with lots of design elements in each component. Motion graphics needs long process including preproduction, production, and postproduction. Preproduction has an important role so that the next stage may provide guidance or instructions for the production process or the animation process. Preproduction includes research, making the story, script, screenplay, character, environment design and storyboards. The storyboard will be determined through camera angles, blocking, sets, and many supporting roles involved in a scene. Storyboard is also useful as a production reference in recording or taping each scene in sequence or as an efficient priority. The example used is an ad creation using motion graphic animation storyboard which has an important role as a blueprint for every scene and giving instructions to make the transition movement, layout, blocking, and defining camera movement that everything should be done periodically in animation production. Planning before making the animation or motion graphic will make the job more organized, presentable, and more efficient in the process.  

  4. Turtle Graphics implementation using a graphical dataflow programming approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lovejoy, Robert Steven

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis expands the concepts of object-oriented programming to implement a visual dataflow programming language. The main thrust of this research is to develop a functional prototype language, based upon the Turtle Graphics tool provided by LOGO programming language, for children to develop both their problem solving skills as well as their general programming skills. The language developed for this thesis was implemented in the...

  5. User's manual for the two-dimensional transputer graphics toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Graham K.

    1988-01-01

    The user manual for the 2-D graphics toolkit for a transputer based parallel processor is presented. The toolkit consists of a package of 2-D display routines that can be used for the simulation visualizations. It supports multiple windows, double buffered screens for animations, and simple graphics transformations such as translation, rotation, and scaling. The display routines are written in occam to take advantage of the multiprocessing features available on transputers. The package is designed to run on a transputer separate from the graphics board.

  6. A manned maneuvering unit proximity operations planning and flight guidance display and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershzohn, Gary R.; Sirko, Robert J.; Zimmerman, K.; Jones, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    This task concerns the design, development, testing, and evaluation of a new proximity operations planning and flight guidance display and control system for manned space operations. A forecast, derivative manned maneuvering unit (MMU) was identified as a candidate for the application of a color, highway-in-the-sky display format for the presentation of flight guidance information. A silicon graphics 4D/20-based simulation is being developed to design and test display formats and operations concepts. The simulation includes the following: (1) real-time color graphics generation to provide realistic, dynamic flight guidance displays and control characteristics; (2) real-time graphics generation of spacecraft trajectories; (3) MMU flight dynamics and control characteristics; (4) control algorithms for rotational and translational hand controllers; (5) orbital mechanics effects for rendezvous and chase spacecraft; (6) inclusion of appropriate navigation aids; and (7) measurement of subject performance. The flight planning system under development provides for: (1) selection of appropriate operational modes, including minimum cost, optimum cost, minimum time, and specified ETA; (2) automatic calculation of rendezvous trajectories, en route times, and fuel requirements; (3) and provisions for manual override. Man/machine function allocations in planning and en route flight segments are being evaluated. Planning and en route data are presented on one screen composed of two windows: (1) a map display presenting a view perpendicular to the orbital plane, depicting flight planning trajectory and time data attitude display presenting attitude and course data for use en route; and (2) an attitude display presenting local vertical-local horizontal attitude data superimposed on a highway-in-the-sky or flight channel representation of the flight planned course. Both display formats are presented while the MMU is en route. In addition to these displays, several original display

  7. Computer graphics at VAX JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashov, V.K.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the software for computer graphics at VAX JINR is described. It consists of graphical packages GKS, WAND and a set graphicals packages for High Energy Physics application designed at CERN. 17 refs.; 1 tab

  8. Free, cross-platform gRaphical software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Claus

    2006-01-01

    -recursive graphical models, and models defined using the BUGS language. Today, there exists a wide range of packages to support the analysis of data using graphical models. Here, we focus on Open Source software, making it possible to extend the functionality by integrating these packages into more general tools. We...... will attempt to give an overview of the available Open Source software, with focus on the gR project. This project was launched in 2002 to make facilities in R for graphical modelling. Several R packages have been developed within the gR project both for display and analysis of graphical models...

  9. Graphical symbol recognition

    OpenAIRE

    K.C. , Santosh; Wendling , Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The chapter focuses on one of the key issues in document image processing i.e., graphical symbol recognition. Graphical symbol recognition is a sub-field of a larger research domain: pattern recognition. The chapter covers several approaches (i.e., statistical, structural and syntactic) and specially designed symbol recognition techniques inspired by real-world industrial problems. It, in general, contains research problems, state-of-the-art methods that convey basic s...

  10. Flowfield computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desautel, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research include supporting the Aerothermodynamics Branch's research by developing graphical visualization tools for both the branch's adaptive grid code and flow field ray tracing code. The completed research for the reporting period includes development of a graphical user interface (GUI) and its implementation into the NAS Flowfield Analysis Software Tool kit (FAST), for both the adaptive grid code (SAGE) and the flow field ray tracing code (CISS).

  11. Graphical user interface concepts for tactical augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenta, Chris; Murphy, Anne; Hinton, Jeremy; Cook, James; Sherrill, Todd; Snarski, Steve

    2010-04-01

    Applied Research Associates and BAE Systems are working together to develop a wearable augmented reality system under the DARPA ULTRA-Vis program†. Our approach to achieve the objectives of ULTRAVis, called iLeader, incorporates a full color 40° field of view (FOV) see-thru holographic waveguide integrated with sensors for full position and head tracking to provide an unobtrusive information system for operational maneuvers. iLeader will enable warfighters to mark-up the 3D battle-space with symbologic identification of graphical control measures, friendly force positions and enemy/target locations. Our augmented reality display provides dynamic real-time painting of symbols on real objects, a pose-sensitive 360° representation of relevant object positions, and visual feedback for a variety of system activities. The iLeader user interface and situational awareness graphical representations are highly intuitive, nondisruptive, and always tactically relevant. We used best human-factors practices, system engineering expertise, and cognitive task analysis to design effective strategies for presenting real-time situational awareness to the military user without distorting their natural senses and perception. We present requirements identified for presenting information within a see-through display in combat environments, challenges in designing suitable visualization capabilities, and solutions that enable us to bring real-time iconic command and control to the tactical user community.

  12. The influence of graphic format on breast cancer risk communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Nattinger, Ann B; McAuliffe, Timothy L

    2006-09-01

    Graphic displays can enhance quantitative risk communication. However, empiric data regarding the effect of graphic format on risk perception is lacking. We evaluate the effect of graphic format elements on perceptions of risk magnitude and perceived truth of data. Preferences for format also were assessed. Participants (254 female primary care patients) viewed a series of hypothetical risk communications regarding the lifetime risk of breast cancer. Identical numeric risk information was presented using different graphic formats. Risk was perceived to be of lower magnitude when communicated with a bar graph as compared with a pictorial display (p graphic format used to convey quantitative risk information effects key domains of risk perception. One must be cognizant of these effects when designing risk communication strategies.

  13. Color image display and visual perception in computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouatouch, Kadi; Tellier, Pierre

    1996-03-01

    This paper put an emphasis on the importance of two points which are crucial when the aim is physically based lighting simulation. The first one is the spectral approach which considers emitted, reflected, diffused and transmitted light as wavelength dependent. The second corresponds to the different steps aiming at converting into RGB components the radiance arriving at the viewpoint through the pixels of a screen.

  14. Graphic Designer/Production Coordinator | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Provides design and graphic services for print- and Web-based publishing;; Initiates designs and carries out ... process, ensuring that such suppliers meet appropriate standards of quality and service at reasonable cost; ... Internal Services.

  15. Functional displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis De, F.; Haentjens, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Functional Displays are directly derived from the Man-Machine Design key document: Function-Based Task Analysis. The presentation defines and describes the goals-means structure of the plant function along with applicable control volumes and parameters of interest. The purpose of the subject is to show, through an example of a preliminary design, what the main parts of a function are. (3 figs.)

  16. A rule-based expert system for generating control displays at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    The integration of a rule-based expert system for generating screen displays for controlling and monitoring instrumentation under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is presented. The expert system is implemented using CLIPS, an expert system shell from the Software Technology Branch at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The user selects the hardware input and output to be displayed and the expert system constructs a graphical control screen appropriate for the data. Such a system provides a method for implementing a common look and feel for displays created by several different users and reduces the amount of time required to create displays for new hardware configurations. Users are able to modify the displays as needed using the EPICS display editor tool

  17. A rule-based expert system for generating control displays at the advanced photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The integration of a rule-based expert system for generating screen displays for controlling and monitoring instrumentation under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is presented. The expert system is implemented using CLIPS, an expert system shell from the Software Technology Branch at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The user selects the hardware input and output to be displayed and the expert system constructs a graphical control screen appropriate for the data. Such a system provides a method for implementing a common look and feel for displays created by several different users and reduces the amount of time required to create displays for new hardware configurations. Users are able to modify the displays as needed using the EPICS display editor tool. ((orig.))

  18. Simulated monitor display for CCTV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    Two computer programs have been developed which generate a two-dimensional graphic perspective of the video output produced by a Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) camera. Both programs were primarily written to produce a graphic display simulating the field-of-view (FOV) of a perimeter assessment system as seen on a CCTV monitor. The original program was developed for use on a Tektronix 4054 desktop computer; however, the usefulness of this graphic display program led to the development of a similar program for a Hewlett-Packard 9845B desktop computer. After entry of various input parameters, such as, camera lens and orientation, the programs automatically calculate and graphically plot the locations of various items, e.g., fences, an assessment zone, running men, and intrusion detection sensors. Numerous special effects can be generated to simulate such things as roads, interior walls, or sides of buildings. Other objects can be digitized and entered into permanent memory similar to the running men. With this type of simulated monitor perspective, proposed camera locations with respect to fences and a particular assessment zone can be rapidly evaluated without the costly time delays and expenditures associated with field evaluation

  19. Computer graphics application in the engineering design integration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt, C. R.; Abel, R. W.; Hirsch, G. N.; Alford, G. E.; Colquitt, W. N.; Stewart, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The computer graphics aspect of the Engineering Design Integration (EDIN) system and its application to design problems were discussed. Three basic types of computer graphics may be used with the EDIN system for the evaluation of aerospace vehicles preliminary designs: offline graphics systems using vellum-inking or photographic processes, online graphics systems characterized by direct coupled low cost storage tube terminals with limited interactive capabilities, and a minicomputer based refresh terminal offering highly interactive capabilities. The offline line systems are characterized by high quality (resolution better than 0.254 mm) and slow turnaround (one to four days). The online systems are characterized by low cost, instant visualization of the computer results, slow line speed (300 BAUD), poor hard copy, and the early limitations on vector graphic input capabilities. The recent acquisition of the Adage 330 Graphic Display system has greatly enhanced the potential for interactive computer aided design.

  20. Advanced computer graphics techniques as applied to the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.J.; Koontz, A.S.

    1985-08-01

    Computer graphics is a rapidly advancing technological area in computer science. This is being motivated by increased hardware capability coupled with reduced hardware costs. This paper will cover six topics in computer graphics, with examples forecasting how each of these capabilities could be used in the nuclear industry. These topics are: (1) Image Realism with Surfaces and Transparency; (2) Computer Graphics Motion; (3) Graphics Resolution Issues and Examples; (4) Iconic Interaction; (5) Graphic Workstations; and (6) Data Fusion - illustrating data coming from numerous sources, for display through high dimensional, greater than 3-D, graphics. All topics will be discussed using extensive examples with slides, video tapes, and movies. Illustrations have been omitted from the paper due to the complexity of color reproduction. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Computer Series, 3: Computer Graphics for Chemical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1979-01-01

    Surveys the current scene in computer graphics from the point of view of a chemistry educator. Discusses the scope of current applications of computer graphics in chemical education, and provides information about hardware and software systems to promote communication with vendors of computer graphics equipment. (HM)

  2. When Do Computer Graphics Contribute to Early Literacy Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepner, Shelley B.; Cotter, Michelle

    2002-01-01

    Notes that new literacies use computer graphics to tell a story, demonstrate a theory, or support a definition. Offers a functionality framework for assessing the value of computer graphics for early literacy learning. Provides ideas for determining the value of CD-ROM software and websites. Concludes that graphics that give text meaning or…

  3. Drag and drop display & builder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  4. Selecting personnel to work on the interactive graphics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper established criteria for the selection of personnel to work on the interactive graphics system and mentions some of human behavioral patterns that are created by the implementation of graphic systems. Some of the social and educational problems associated with the interactive graphics system will be discussed. The project also provided for collecting objective data which would be useful in assessing the benefits of interactive graphics systems

  5. Selecting personnel to work on the interactive graphics system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, F.J.

    1979-11-30

    The paper established criteria for the selection of personnel to work on the interactive graphics system and mentions some of human behavioral patterns that are created by the implementation of graphic systems. Some of the social and educational problems associated with the interactive graphics system will be discussed. The project also provided for collecting objective data which would be useful in assessing the benefits of interactive graphics systems.

  6. Embedded 3D Graphics Core for FPGA-based System-on-Chip Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Lund, Hans Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D graphics accelerator core for an FPGA based system, and illustrates how to build a System-on-Chip containing a Xilinx MicroBlaze soft-core CPU and our 3D graphics accelerator core. The system is capable of running uClinux and hardware accelerated 3D graphics applications......, and the video display which periodically reads from memory to display the final rendered graphics. The graphics core uses internal scratch-pad memory to reduce its external bandwidth requirement, this is achieved by implementing a tile-based rendering algorithm. Reduced external bandwidth means that the power...

  7. Displays enabling mobile multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Jyrki

    2007-02-01

    With the rapid advances in telecommunications networks, mobile multimedia delivery to handsets is now a reality. While a truly immersive multimedia experience is still far ahead in the mobile world, significant advances have been made in the constituent audio-visual technologies to make this become possible. One of the critical components in multimedia delivery is the mobile handset display. While such alternatives as headset-style near-to-eye displays, autostereoscopic displays, mini-projectors, and roll-out flexible displays can deliver either a larger virtual screen size than the pocketable dimensions of the mobile device can offer, or an added degree of immersion by adding the illusion of the third dimension in the viewing experience, there are still challenges in the full deployment of such displays in real-life mobile communication terminals. Meanwhile, direct-view display technologies have developed steadily, and can provide a development platform for an even better viewing experience for multimedia in the near future. The paper presents an overview of the mobile display technology space with an emphasis on the advances and potential in developing direct-view displays further to meet the goal of enabling multimedia in the mobile domain.

  8. Graphical Acoustic Liner Design and Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An interactive liner design and impedance modeling tool comprises software utilized to design acoustic liners for use in constrained spaces, both regularly and irregularly shaped. A graphical user interface allows the acoustic channel geometry to be drawn in a liner volume while the surface impedance calculations are updated and displayed in real-time. A one-dimensional transmission line model may be used as the basis for the impedance calculations.

  9. Introduction to regression graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Covers the use of dynamic and interactive computer graphics in linear regression analysis, focusing on analytical graphics. Features new techniques like plot rotation. The authors have composed their own regression code, using Xlisp-Stat language called R-code, which is a nearly complete system for linear regression analysis and can be utilized as the main computer program in a linear regression course. The accompanying disks, for both Macintosh and Windows computers, contain the R-code and Xlisp-Stat. An Instructor's Manual presenting detailed solutions to all the problems in the book is ava

  10. Microlaser-based displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  11. Volumetric three-dimensional display system with rasterization hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalora, Gregg E.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Giovinco, Michael; Napoli, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    An 8-color multiplanar volumetric display is being developed by Actuality Systems, Inc. It will be capable of utilizing an image volume greater than 90 million voxels, which we believe is the greatest utilizable voxel set of any volumetric display constructed to date. The display is designed to be used for molecular visualization, mechanical CAD, e-commerce, entertainment, and medical imaging. As such, it contains a new graphics processing architecture, novel high-performance line- drawing algorithms, and an API similar to a current standard. Three-dimensional imagery is created by projecting a series of 2-D bitmaps ('image slices') onto a diffuse screen that rotates at 600 rpm. Persistence of vision fuses the slices into a volume-filling 3-D image. A modified three-panel Texas Instruments projector provides slices at approximately 4 kHz, resulting in 8-color 3-D imagery comprised of roughly 200 radially-disposed slices which are updated at 20 Hz. Each slice has a resolution of 768 by 768 pixels, subtending 10 inches. An unusual off-axis projection scheme incorporating tilted rotating optics is used to maintain good focus across the projection screen. The display electronics includes a custom rasterization architecture which converts the user's 3- D geometry data into image slices, as well as 6 Gbits of DDR SDRAM graphics memory.

  12. Digital Image Processing Overview For Helmet Mounted Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Michael J.

    1989-09-01

    Digital image processing provides a means to manipulate an image and presents a user with a variety of display formats that are not available in the analog image processing environment. When performed in real time and presented on a Helmet Mounted Display, system capability and flexibility are greatly enhanced. The information content of a display can be increased by the addition of real time insets and static windows from secondary sensor sources, near real time 3-D imaging from a single sensor can be achieved, graphical information can be added, and enhancement techniques can be employed. Such increased functionality is generating a considerable amount of interest in the military and commercial markets. This paper discusses some of these image processing techniques and their applications.

  13. Mathematical structures for computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Janke, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the mathematics behind the modeling and rendering of computer graphics scenes Mathematical Structures for Computer Graphics presents an accessible and intuitive approach to the mathematical ideas and techniques necessary for two- and three-dimensional computer graphics. Focusing on the significant mathematical results, the book establishes key algorithms used to build complex graphics scenes. Written for readers with various levels of mathematical background, the book develops a solid foundation for graphics techniques and fills in relevant grap

  14. A Linux Workstation for High Performance Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Robert; Westall, James

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of this effort was to provide a low-cost method of obtaining high-performance 3-D graphics using an industry standard library (OpenGL) on PC class computers. Previously, users interested in doing substantial visualization or graphical manipulation were constrained to using specialized, custom hardware most often found in computers from Silicon Graphics (SGI). We provided an alternative to expensive SGI hardware by taking advantage of third-party, 3-D graphics accelerators that have now become available at very affordable prices. To make use of this hardware our goal was to provide a free, redistributable, and fully-compatible OpenGL work-alike library so that existing bodies of code could simply be recompiled. for PC class machines running a free version of Unix. This should allow substantial cost savings while greatly expanding the population of people with access to a serious graphics development and viewing environment. This should offer a means for NASA to provide a spectrum of graphics performance to its scientists, supplying high-end specialized SGI hardware for high-performance visualization while fulfilling the requirements of medium and lower performance applications with generic, off-the-shelf components and still maintaining compatibility between the two.

  15. HISPLT: A history graphics postprocessor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.L.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1991-09-01

    HISPLT is a graphics postprocessor designed to plot time histories for wave propagation codes. HISPLT is available for CRAY UNICOS, CRAY CTSS, VAX VMS computer systems, and a variety of UNIX workstations. The original HISPLT code employs a database structure that allows the program to be used without modification to process data generated by many wave propagation codes. HISPLT has recently been modified to process time histories for the reactor safety analysis code, MELCOR. This report provides a complete set of input instructions for HISPLT and provides examples of the types of plotted output that can be generated using HISPLT. 6 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Graphical Language for Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonso, Keith

    2011-01-01

    A graphical language for processing data allows processing elements to be connected with virtual wires that represent data flows between processing modules. The processing of complex data, such as lidar data, requires many different algorithms to be applied. The purpose of this innovation is to automate the processing of complex data, such as LIDAR, without the need for complex scripting and programming languages. The system consists of a set of user-interface components that allow the user to drag and drop various algorithmic and processing components onto a process graph. By working graphically, the user can completely visualize the process flow and create complex diagrams. This innovation supports the nesting of graphs, such that a graph can be included in another graph as a single step for processing. In addition to the user interface components, the system includes a set of .NET classes that represent the graph internally. These classes provide the internal system representation of the graphical user interface. The system includes a graph execution component that reads the internal representation of the graph (as described above) and executes that graph. The execution of the graph follows the interpreted model of execution in that each node is traversed and executed from the original internal representation. In addition, there are components that allow external code elements, such as algorithms, to be easily integrated into the system, thus making the system infinitely expandable.

  17. Remote Software Application and Display Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Brandon T.

    2014-01-01

    The era of the shuttle program has come to an end, but only to give rise to newer and more exciting projects. Now is the time of the Orion spacecraft, a work of art designed to exceed all previous endeavors of man. NASA is exiting the time of exploration and is entering a new period, a period of pioneering. With this new mission, many of NASAs organizations must undergo a great deal of change and development to support the Orion missions. The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the new system that will provide NASA the ability to launch rockets into orbit and thus control Orion and other spacecraft as the goal of populating Mars becomes ever increasingly tangible. Since the previous control system, Launch Processing System (LPS), was primarily designed to launch the shuttles, SCCS was needed as Kennedy Space Center (KSC) reorganized to a multiuser spaceport for commercial flights, providing a more versatile control over rockets. Within SCCS, is the Launch Control System (LCS), which is the remote software behind the command and monitoring of flight and ground system hardware. This internship at KSC has involved two main components in LCS, including Remote Software Application and Display development. The display environment provides a graphical user interface for an operator to view and see if any cautions are raised, while the remote applications are the backbone that communicate with hardware, and then relay the data back to the displays. These elements go hand in hand as they provide monitoring and control over hardware and software alike from the safety of the Launch Control Center. The remote software applications are written in Application Control Language (ACL), which must undergo unit testing to ensure data integrity. This paper describes both the implementation and writing of unit tests in ACL code for remote software applications, as well as the building of remote displays to be used in the Launch Control Center (LCC).

  18. X-Windows Widget for Image Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    XvicImage is a high-performance XWindows (Motif-compliant) user interface widget for displaying images. It handles all aspects of low-level image display. The fully Motif-compliant image display widget handles the following tasks: (1) Image display, including dithering as needed (2) Zoom (3) Pan (4) Stretch (contrast enhancement, via lookup table) (5) Display of single-band or color data (6) Display of non-byte data (ints, floats) (7) Pseudocolor display (8) Full overlay support (drawing graphics on image) (9) Mouse-based panning (10) Cursor handling, shaping, and planting (disconnecting cursor from mouse) (11) Support for all user interaction events (passed to application) (12) Background loading and display of images (doesn't freeze the GUI) (13) Tiling of images.

  19. History And Importance Of Graphic Design

    OpenAIRE

    Lyallya, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is about history and importance of graphic design in different periods, from ancient times until today. The features inherent in different countries are considered. The techniques, basic methods for creating projects and computer software that designers have used are mentioned. In order to understand the importance of graphic design in our lives, it is considered from the side of ordinary people, how it manifests itself in daily lives and how it affects business. The thesis provid...

  20. Fault tree graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, L.; Wynholds, H.W.; Porterfield, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    Described is an operational system that enables the user, through an intelligent graphics terminal, to construct, modify, analyze, and store fault trees. With this system, complex engineering designs can be analyzed. This paper discusses the system and its capabilities. Included is a brief discussion of fault tree analysis, which represents an aspect of reliability and safety modeling

  1. Mathematical Graphic Organizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    As part of a math-science partnership, a university mathematics educator and ten elementary school teachers developed a novel approach to mathematical problem solving derived from research on reading and writing pedagogy. Specifically, research indicates that students who use graphic organizers to arrange their ideas improve their comprehension…

  2. Graphical Interfaces for Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollan, J. D.; And Others

    This document presents a discussion of the development of a set of software tools to assist in the construction of interfaces to simulations and real-time systems. Presuppositions to the approach to interface design that was used are surveyed, the tools are described, and the conclusions drawn from these experiences in graphical interface design…

  3. Comics & Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Not so many years ago, comic books in school were considered the enemy. Students caught sneaking comics between the pages of bulky--and less engaging--textbooks were likely sent to the principal. Today, however, comics, including classics such as "Superman" but also their generally more complex, nuanced cousins, graphic novels, are not only…

  4. Interactive simulation of nuclear power systems using a dedicated minicomputer - computer graphics facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tye, C.; Sezgen, A.O.

    1980-01-01

    The design of control systems and operational procedures for large scale nuclear power plant poses a difficult optimization problem requiring a lot of computational effort. Plant dynamic simulation using digital minicomputers offers the prospect of relatively low cost computing and when combined with graphical input/output provides a powerful tool for studying such problems. The paper discusses the results obtained from a simulation study carried out at the Computer Graphics Unit of the University of Manchester using a typical station control model for an Advanced Gas Cooled reactor. Particular reference is placed on the use of computer graphics for information display, parameter and control system optimization and techniques for using graphical input for defining and/or modifying the control system topology. Experience gained from this study has shown that a relatively modest minicomputer system can be used for simulating large scale dynamic systems and that highly interactive computer graphics can be used to advantage to relieve the designer of many of the tedious aspects of simulation leaving him free to concentrate on the more creative aspects of his work. (author)

  5. Spatial issues in user interface design from a graphic design perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Aaron

    1989-01-01

    The user interface of a computer system is a visual display that provides information about the status of operations on data within the computer and control options to the user that enable adjustments to these operations. From the very beginning of computer technology the user interface was a spatial display, although its spatial features were not necessarily complex or explicitly recognized by the users. All text and nonverbal signs appeared in a virtual space generally thought of as a single flat plane of symbols. Current technology of high performance workstations permits any element of the display to appear as dynamic, multicolor, 3-D signs in a virtual 3-D space. The complexity of appearance and the user's interaction with the display provide significant challenges to the graphic designer of current and future user interfaces. In particular, spatial depiction provides many opportunities for effective communication of objects, structures, processes, navigation, selection, and manipulation. Issues are presented that are relevant to the graphic designer seeking to optimize the user interface's spatial attributes for effective visual communication.

  6. Telemetry Monitoring and Display Using LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, George; Baroth, Edmund C.

    1993-01-01

    The Measurement Technology Center of the Instrumentation Section configures automated data acquisition systems to meet the diverse needs of JPL's experimental research community. These systems are based on personal computers or workstations (Apple, IBM/Compatible, Hewlett-Packard, and Sun Microsystems) and often include integrated data analysis, visualization and experiment control functions in addition to data acquisition capabilities. These integrated systems may include sensors, signal conditioning, data acquisition interface cards, software, and a user interface. Graphical programming is used to simplify configuration of such systems. Employment of a graphical programming language is the most important factor in enabling the implementation of data acquisition, analysis, display and visualization systems at low cost. Other important factors are the use of commercial software packages and off-the-shelf data acquisition hardware where possible. Understanding the experimenter's needs is also critical. An interactive approach to user interface construction and training of operators is also important. One application was created as a result of a competative effort between a graphical programming language team and a text-based C language programming team to verify the advantages of using a graphical programming language approach. With approximately eight weeks of funding over a period of three months, the text-based programming team accomplished about 10% of the basic requirements, while the Macintosh/LabVIEW team accomplished about 150%, having gone beyond the original requirements to simulate a telemetry stream and provide utility programs. This application verified that using graphical programming can significantly reduce software development time. As a result of this initial effort, additional follow-on work was awarded to the graphical programming team.

  7. Latest development of display technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong-Yue; Yao Qiu-Xiang; Liu Pan; Zheng Zhi-Qiang; Liu Ji-Cheng; Zheng Hua-Dong; Zeng Chao; Yu Ying-Jie; Sun Tao; Zeng Zhen-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    In this review we will focus on recent progress in the field of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) display technologies. We present the current display materials and their applications, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), flexible OLEDs quantum dot light emitting diodes (QLEDs), active-matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs), electronic paper (E-paper), curved displays, stereoscopic 3D displays, volumetric 3D displays, light field 3D displays, and holographic 3D displays. Conventional 2D display devices, such as liquid crystal devices (LCDs) often result in ambiguity in high-dimensional data images because of lacking true depth information. This review thus provides a detailed description of 3D display technologies. (topical review)

  8. Fireworks: A physics event display for CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalskyi, D.; Tadel, M.; Mrak-Tadel, A.; Bellenot, B.; Kuznetsov, V.; Jones, C.D.; Bauerdick, L.; Case, M.; Mulmenstadt, J.; Yagil, A.

    2010-01-01

    Fireworks is a CMS event display which is specialized for the physics studies case. This specialization allows us to use a stylized rather than 3D-accurate representation when appropriate. Data handling is greatly simplified by using only reconstructed information and ideal geometry. Fireworks provides an easy-to-use interface which allows a physicist to concentrate only on the data in which he is interested. Data is presented via graphical and textual views. Fireworks is built using the Eve subsystem of the CERN ROOT project and CMS's FWLite project. The FWLite project was part of CMS's recent code redesign which separates data classes into libraries separate from algorithms producing the data and uses ROOT directly for C++ object storage, thereby allowing the data classes to be used directly in ROOT.

  9. Fireworks A Physics Event Display for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalskyi, D; Mrak-Tadel, A; Bellenot, B; Kuznetsov, V; Jones, C D; Bauerdick, L; Case, M; Mülmenstädt, J; Yagil, A

    2010-01-01

    Fireworks is a CMS event display which is specialized for the physics studies case. This specialization allows us to use a stylized rather than 3D-accurate representation when appropriate. Data handling is greatly simplified by using only reconstructed information and ideal geometry. Fireworks provides an easy-to-use interface which allows a physicist to concentrate only on the data in which he is interested. Data is presented via graphical and textual views. Fireworks is built using the Eve subsystem of the CERN ROOT project and CMS's FWLite project. The FWLite project was part of CMS's recent code redesign which separates data classes into libraries separate from algorithms producing the data and uses ROOT directly for C++ object storage, thereby allowing the data classes to be used directly in ROOT.

  10. Topographic Digital Raster Graphics - USGS DIGITAL RASTER GRAPHICS

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — USGS Topographic Digital Raster Graphics downloaded from LABINS (http://data.labins.org/2003/MappingData/drg/drg_stpl83.cfm). A digital raster graphic (DRG) is a...

  11. Adaptation of Control Center Software to Commerical Real-Time Display Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing an enhanced Huntsville Operation Support Center (HOSC) system designed to support multiple spacecraft missions. The Enhanced HOSC is based upon a distributed computing architecture using graphic workstation hardware and industry standard software including POSIX, X Windows, Motif, TCP/IP, and ANSI C. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is currently developing a prototype of the Display Services application for this system. Display Services provides the capability to generate and operate real-time data-driven graphic displays. This prototype is a highly functional application designed to allow system end users to easily generate complex data-driven displays. The prototype is easy to use, flexible, highly functional, and portable. Although this prototype is being developed for NASA-MSFC, the general-purpose real-time display capability can be reused in similar mission and process control environments. This includes any environment depending heavily upon real-time data acquisition and display. Reuse of the prototype will be a straight-forward transition because the prototype is portable, is designed to add new display types easily, has a user interface which is separated from the application code, and is very independent of the specifics of NASA-MSFC's system. Reuse of this prototype in other environments is a excellent alternative to creation of a new custom application, or for environments with a large number of users, to purchasing a COTS package.

  12. Interactive Graphic Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schlichting

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines graphic journalism (GJ in a transmedial context, and argues that transmedial graphic journalism (TMGJ is an important and fruitful new form of visual storytelling, that will re-invigorate the field of journalism, as it steadily tests out and plays with new media, ultimately leading to new challenges in both the production and reception process. With TMGJ, linear narratives may be broken up and ethical issues concerning the emotional and entertainment value are raised when it comes to ‘playing the news’. The aesthetic characteristics of TMGJ will be described and interactivity’s influence on non-fiction storytelling will be explored in an analysis of The Nisoor Square Shooting (2011 and Ferguson Firsthand (2015.

  13. Graphic Grown Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ann

    2009-01-01

    It's no secret that children and YAs are clued in to graphic novels (GNs) and that comics-loving adults are positively giddy that this format is getting the recognition it deserves. Still, there is a whole swath of library card-carrying grown-up readers out there with no idea where to start. Splashy movies such as "300" and "Spider-Man" and their…

  14. Career Opportunities in Computer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Victor

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the impact of computer graphics on industrial productivity. Details the computer graphics technician curriculum at Milwaukee Area Technical College and the cooperative efforts of business and industry to fund and equip the program. (SK)

  15. Operational computer graphics in the flight dynamics environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeletic, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Over the past five years, the Flight Dynamics Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Goddard Space Flight Center has incorporated computer graphics technology into its operational environment. In an attempt to increase the effectiveness and productivity of the Division, computer graphics software systems have been developed that display spacecraft tracking and telemetry data in 2-d and 3-d graphic formats that are more comprehensible than the alphanumeric tables of the past. These systems vary in functionality from real-time mission monitoring system, to mission planning utilities, to system development tools. Here, the capabilities and architecture of these systems are discussed.

  16. Contributions to the integrated graphical user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badescu, E.; Caprini, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Online Software is part of the distributed Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for the ATLAS experiment that will start taking data in 2007 at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The Online Software system is responsible for overall experiment control, including run control, configuration and monitoring of Trigger and Data Acquisition System (TDAQ) and management of data-taking partitions. The system encompasses all the software dealing with configuring, controlling and monitoring the data acquisition system but excludes anything dealing with the management, processing or transportation of physics data. In other words, the Online Software is supposed to act as the 'glue' to a quantity of heterogeneous sub-system, providing not only a uniform control interface, but also the possibility of easily abstracting the specificities of those subsystems in order to provide them with control services. The component model architecture has been adopted for the system, each component being developed as an individual package. All the hardware and software configurations of the data taking partitions are stored in configuration databases. The Process Manager component performs the basic job control of the software components. The Integrated Graphical User Interface (IGUI) is one of the integration components of the Online Software, allowing the operator to control and monitor the status of the current data taking run in terms of its main parameters, detector configuration, trigger rate, buffer occupancy and state of the subsystems. The component has been designed as a Java application, having defined some specialized panels for allowing the user to send the main DAQ commands and displaying messages, state or run specific parameters of the whole system or related to all the other components (Run Control, Run Parameters, DAQ Supervisor, Process Manager, Message Reporting, Monitoring or Data Flow). The design of this component allows the users to develop their own panel to be displayed

  17. Enhancement to the Tektronix PLOT-10 Terminal Control System for creation of graphics metafiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Many data handling and analysis codes at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) use the Tektronix PLOT-10 Terminal Control System to graphically display data upon Tektronix or Tektronix-emulating graphics devices. Prior to the development of the software libraries and postprocessors discussed within this report, ORNL users were limited to the type of hardcopy output obtainable from the Tektronix PLOT-10 software library. Only Tektronix graphics devices are supported by the PLOT-10 library. The graphics library presented here eliminates this restriction by implementing a suite of software that optionally creates a graphics metafile within the user's disk area while simultaneously drawing a display image on the screen of a user's Tektronix terminal. This graphics metafile can then be postprocessed onto any of the graphics devices at ORNL via the ORNL PLOT command

  18. A three-dimensional computer graphic imaging for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Masafumi; Onagi, Atsuo; Seiki, Yoshikatsu

    1987-01-01

    Information offered by conventional diagnostic tools for medical use, including X-ray films, CT, MRI, RI images and PET, are usually two-dimensional. However, the human body and pathological lesions are really extended in 3 dimensions. Interpreters have to reconstruct an imaginative, 3-dimensional configuration of lesions from 2-dimensional information on many films, according to their knowledge and experience. All this sometimes wastes a lot of time and gives rise to inconclusive discussion among interpreters. The advent and rapid progress of new computer graphic techniques, however, makes it possible to draw an apparent 3-dimensional image of a lesion on the basis of a 2-dimensional display; this is named a pseudo-3-dimensional image. After the region of interest of the CT-sliced image has been extracted by means of a semi-automatic contour extraction algorithm, multi-slice CT images are constructed by the voxel method. A 3-dimensional image is then generated by the use of the Z-buffer. Subsequently, transparent, semi-transparent, and color display are provided. This new method of display was used for CT-scan films of various intracerebral pathological lesions, including tumors, hematomas, and congenital anomalies: The benefits, prospects, and technical limits of this imaging technique for clinical use were discussed. (author)

  19. Animated computer graphics models of space and earth sciences data generated via the massively parallel processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.; Gough, Michael L.; Wildenhain, W. David

    1987-01-01

    The capability was developed of rapidly producing visual representations of large, complex, multi-dimensional space and earth sciences data sets via the implementation of computer graphics modeling techniques on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) by employing techniques recently developed for typically non-scientific applications. Such capabilities can provide a new and valuable tool for the understanding of complex scientific data, and a new application of parallel computing via the MPP. A prototype system with such capabilities was developed and integrated into the National Space Science Data Center's (NSSDC) Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS) data-independent environment for computer graphics data display to provide easy access to users. While developing these capabilities, several problems had to be solved independently of the actual use of the MPP, all of which are outlined.

  20. Graphical calculus for Gaussian pure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Flammia, Steven T.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-01-01

    We provide a unified graphical calculus for all Gaussian pure states, including graph transformation rules for all local and semilocal Gaussian unitary operations, as well as local quadrature measurements. We then use this graphical calculus to analyze continuous-variable (CV) cluster states, the essential resource for one-way quantum computing with CV systems. Current graphical approaches to CV cluster states are only valid in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing, and the associated graph transformation rules only apply when the initial and final states are of this form. Our formalism applies to all Gaussian pure states and subsumes these rules in a natural way. In addition, the term 'CV graph state' currently has several inequivalent definitions in use. Using this formalism we provide a single unifying definition that encompasses all of them. We provide many examples of how the formalism may be used in the context of CV cluster states: defining the 'closest' CV cluster state to a given Gaussian pure state and quantifying the error in the approximation due to finite squeezing; analyzing the optimality of certain methods of generating CV cluster states; drawing connections between this graphical formalism and bosonic Hamiltonians with Gaussian ground states, including those useful for CV one-way quantum computing; and deriving a graphical measure of bipartite entanglement for certain classes of CV cluster states. We mention other possible applications of this formalism and conclude with a brief note on fault tolerance in CV one-way quantum computing.

  1. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  2. Circuit II--A Conversational Graphical Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Ronald A.

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of Circuit II, an interactive system that provides users with a graphical representation of an electronic circuit within which questions may be posed and manipulated, and discusses how mouse selections have analogous roles to certain natural language features, such as anaphora, deixis, and ellipsis. (13 references) (EA)

  3. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2012-01-01

    Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them......, such as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm...

  4. Display systems for NPP control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozov, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    Main trends in development of display systems used as the means for image displaying in NPP control systems are considered. It is shown that colour display devices appear to be the most universal means for concentrated data presentation. Along with digital means the display systems provide for high-speed response, sufficient for operative control of executive mechanisms. A conclusion is drawn that further development of display systems will move towards creation of large colour fields (on reflection base or with multicolour gas-discharge elements)

  5. Design considerations for parallel graphics libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Applications which run on parallel supercomputers are often characterized by massive datasets. Converting these vast collections of numbers to visual form has proven to be a powerful aid to comprehension. For a variety of reasons, it may be desirable to provide this visual feedback at runtime. One way to accomplish this is to exploit the available parallelism to perform graphics operations in place. In order to do this, we need appropriate parallel rendering algorithms and library interfaces. This paper provides a tutorial introduction to some of the issues which arise in designing parallel graphics libraries and their underlying rendering algorithms. The focus is on polygon rendering for distributed memory message-passing systems. We illustrate our discussion with examples from PGL, a parallel graphics library which has been developed on the Intel family of parallel systems.

  6. The role of proximal body information on anticipatory judgment in tennis using graphical information richness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunobu Fukuhara

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that skilled tennis players are likely to use proximal body information for anticipating the direction of their opponent's forehand shot. However, in these studies, the visual stimuli did not include visual information about the ball. Skilled players may have used proximal information owing to the lack of distal information. To address this issue, we developed a novel methodological approach using computer graphics (CG images in which the entire body was presented by a combination of point-light display (i.e., poor graphical information, PLD and polygons (i.e., rich graphical information. Using our novel methodological approach, we examined whether skilled tennis players use proximal body information when anticipating shot directions.Fifteen skilled tennis players and fifteen novice players tried to anticipate shot directions by observing four CG forehand strokes (ALPOL: all body parts were represented with polygon; RAPLD: racket and arm were represented with PLD; BOPLD: body parts without racket and arm were represented with PLD; and ALPLD: all body parts were represented with PLD. Our intention in creating CG models with such combinations (i.e., RAPLD and BOPLD was that because of the richer graphical information provided by polygons compared to PLD, the participant's anticipatory judgment would be influenced more by body parts expressed with polygons. The results showed that for skilled players, anticipatory judgment was more accurate when they observed RAPLD than when they observed BOPLD and ALPLD. In contrast, for novice players, there were no differences in the accuracy of anticipatory judgments with the four CG models.Only skilled players made more accurate anticipatory judgments when body regions were expressed with rich graphical information, and the racket and arm were expressed with poor graphical information. These suggest that skilled players used proximal information to effectively anticipate shot

  7. Daylighting Design in Classroom Based on Yearly-Graphic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Guan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In China, existing buildings comprise more than 40 billion square meters, most being of high energy consumption. A substantial reduction in electrical energy costs could be obtained through greater use of daylight. Daylight varies widely due to the movement of sun, changing seasons and diverse weather conditions. Custom static daylight assessments, simulations represent only one time of the year or one time of the day, are inadequate to evaluate the dynamics of daylight variability. Using the intuitive graphic tool Temporal Map to display the annual daylight data, this study compared different passive architectural design strategies under the climate conditions of five representative Chinese cities and selected the most suitable design scheme for each city. In this study, the dynamic yearly-graphic tool was utilized for architectural design in China, and we integrated the optimal design with the Chinese academic calendar to achieve improvements within the occupancy time. This modified map connects design work with human activity that makes daylight evaluation more accurate and efficient. The results of this study will provide preliminary recommendations for energy-saving design in China, and reference to other similar studies.

  8. Strategy-oriented display concept to assist severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwangsub; Ha, Jaejoo

    2000-01-01

    The Critical Function Monitoring System (CFMS) is a typical Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) to assist the operation of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants during normal and emergency operation, and SPDS for severe accident is being developed in Korea. When the existing CFMS is used under a severe accident situation, some problems are expected from: (1) different design basis, i.e. prevention of core melt vs. protection of radiation release to environment, (2) different parameters for decision-making, and (3) different domain and depth of information to restore the plant. To resolve the above problems, a concept, 'Strategy-Oriented Information Display' concept, for displaying information for severe accident management is developed in this paper. Whereas the existing SPDS structure is based on the critical safety function, the developed concept is based on the severe accident management strategy. The display for each strategy includes the plant parameters to check the status of plant and component with the logical or graphical views necessary for executing the strategy. As the application of the proposed concept, KAERI is developing a display system, the prototype severe accident SPDS, Severe Accident Management Display System (SAMDIS), to assist plant personnel for executing Korean Severe Accident Management Guidelines. CFMS is developed for a general display suitable to all situations with various displays. On the contrary, SAMDIS provides all the relevant information on one screen based on the proposed concept. The SAMDIS screen shows more extensive area than CFMS and thus plant personnel can recognize the overall plant status at a glance. This concept is quite effective when used with severe accident management guidelines because of the relatively macroscopic characteristics of a severe accident management strategy. (author)

  9. The Graphical User Interface Crisis: Danger and Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Lawrence H.; And Others

    This paper examines graphic computing environments, identifies potential problems in providing access to blind people, and describes programs and strategies being developed to provide this access. The paper begins with an explanation of how graphic user interfaces differ from character-based systems in their use of pixels, visual metaphors such as…

  10. Graphic Communications Objectives. Career Education. DS Manual 2860.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This instructional guide provides materials for a program in the Department of Defense Dependents Schools designed to provide the high school student with the opportunity to explore graphic communications. Introductory materials include the philosophy of graphic communications, organization and numbering code, and use of symbols. The general and…

  11. Web Extensible Display Manager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slominski, Ryan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Larrieu, Theodore L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Jefferson Lab's Web Extensible Display Manager (WEDM) allows staff to access EDM control system screens from a web browser in remote offices and from mobile devices. Native browser technologies are leveraged to avoid installing and managing software on remote clients such as browser plugins, tunnel applications, or an EDM environment. Since standard network ports are used firewall exceptions are minimized. To avoid security concerns from remote users modifying a control system, WEDM exposes read-only access and basic web authentication can be used to further restrict access. Updates of monitored EPICS channels are delivered via a Web Socket using a web gateway. The software translates EDM description files (denoted with the edl suffix) to HTML with Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) following the EDM's edl file vector drawing rules to create faithful screen renderings. The WEDM server parses edl files and creates the HTML equivalent in real-time allowing existing screens to work without modification. Alternatively, the familiar drag and drop EDM screen creation tool can be used to create optimized screens sized specifically for smart phones and then rendered by WEDM.

  12. The design of a graphics processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, M.; Thorne, A.R.

    1975-12-01

    The design of a graphics processor is described which takes into account known and anticipated user requirements, the availability of cheap minicomputers, the state of integrated circuit technology, and the overall need to minimise cost for a given performance. The main user needs are the ability to display large high resolution pictures, and to dynamically change the user's view in real time by means of fast coordinate processing hardware. The transformations that can be applied to 2D or 3D coordinates either singly or in combination are: translation, scaling, mirror imaging, rotation, and the ability to map the transformation origin on to any point on the screen. (author)

  13. Can we be more Graphic about Graphic Design?

    OpenAIRE

    Vienne, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    Can you objectify a subjective notion? This is the question graphic designers must face when they talk about their work. Even though graphic design artifacts are omnipresent in our culture, graphic design is still an exceptionally ill-defined profession. This is one of the reasons design criticism is still a rudimentary discipline. No one knows for sure what is this thing we sometimes call “graphic communication” for lack of a better word–a technique my Webster’s dictionary describes as “the ...

  14. Theory and practice of Auto CAD, computer graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Si Won; Choe, Hong Yeong; Shin, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ryong Cheol

    1990-08-01

    This book describes theory and practice of Auto CAD, computer graphics, which deals with peripheral of computer, occurrence of digital line by DDA, BRM, theory of conversion, data base and display and shape modeling. This book gives descriptions of outline of CAD system, Auto CAD, basic function practice, simple figure practice, the third angle projection drawing a little complex single object, machine drawing I, function practice of improved Auto CAD, edit, set up layer, and 3D, and 3D display function.

  15. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  16. [Hardware for graphics systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C

    1991-02-01

    In all personal computer applications, be it for private or professional use, the decision of which "brand" of computer to buy is of central importance. In the USA Apple computers are mainly used in universities, while in Europe computers of the so-called "industry standard" by IBM (or clones thereof) have been increasingly used for many years. Independently of any brand name considerations, the computer components purchased must meet the current (and projected) needs of the user. Graphic capabilities and standards, processor speed, the use of co-processors, as well as input and output devices such as "mouse", printers and scanners are discussed. This overview is meant to serve as a decision aid. Potential users are given a short but detailed summary of current technical features.

  17. Safety Parameters Graphical Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canamero, B.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear power plant data are received at the Operations Center of the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear in emergency situations. In order to achieve the required interface and to prepare those data to perform simulation and forecasting with already existing computer codes a Safety Parameters Graphical Interface (IGPS) has been developed. The system runs in a UNIX environment and use the Xwindows capabilities. The received data are stored in such a way that it can be easily used for further analysis and training activities. The system consists of task-oriented modules (processes) which communicate each other using well known UNIX mechanisms (signals, sockets and shared memory segments). IGPS conceptually have two different parts: Data collection and preparation, and Data monitorization. (Author)

  18. Position display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yukio.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To provide a device capable of easily and quickly reading mutual mounting relations of control bodies such as control rods mounted on a nuclear reactor and positions to which the control bodies are driven. Structure: A scanning circuit is provided to scan positions of controllably mounted control bodies such as control rods. Values detected by scanning the positions are converted into character signals according to the values and converted into preranked color signals. The character signals and color signals are stored in a memory circuit by synchronous signals in synchronism with the scanning in the scanning circuit. Outputs of the memory circuit are displayed by a display unit such as a color Braun tube in accordance with the synchronous signals to provide color representations according to positions to which control bodies are driven in the same positional relation as the mounting of the control bodies. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Plant state display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, Kazuo; Ito, Toshiichiro.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention conducts information processing suitable for a man to solve a problem in a plant such as a nuclear power plant incorporating a great amount of information, where safety is required and provides information to an operator. Namely, theories and rules with respect to the flow and balanced state of materials and energy upon plant start-up, and a vapor cycle of operation fluids are symbolized and displayed on the display screen of the device. Then, the display of the plant information suitable to the information processing for a man to dissolve problems is provided. Accordingly, a mechanism for analyzing a purpose of the plant is made more definite, thereby enabling to prevent an erroneous judgement of an operator and occurrence of plant troubles. In addition, a simular effect can also be expected when the theories and rules with respect to the flow and the balanced state of materials and energy and thermohydrodynamic behavior of the operation fluids in a state of after-heat removing operation during shutdown of the plant are symbolized and displayed. (I.S.)

  20. IDAS, software support for mathematical models and map-based graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, M.D.; Wecker, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    IDAS (Intermediate Dose Assessment System) was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a hardware/software host for radiological models and display of map-based plume graphics at the Operations Center (HQ), regional incident response centers, and site emergency facilities. IDAS design goals acknowledged the likelihood of future changes in the suite of models and the composition of map features for analysis and graphical display. IDAS provides a generalized software support environment to programmers and users of modeling programs. A database manager process provides multi-user access control to all input and output data for modeling programs. A programmer-created data description file (schema) specifies data field names, data types, legal and recommended ranges, default values, preferred units of measurement, and ''help'' text. Subroutine calls to IDAS from a model program invoke a consistent user interface which can show any of the schema contents, convert units of measurement, and route data to multiple logical devices, including the database. A stand-alone data editor allows the user to read and write model data records without execution of a model. IDAS stores digitized map features in a 4-level naming hierarchy. A user can select the map icon, color, and whether to show a stored name tag, for each map feature. The user also selects image scale (zoom) within limits set by map digitization. The resulting image combines static map information, computed analytic modeling results, and the user's feature selections for display to decision-makers

  1. Towards a responsive and interactive graphical user interface for neutron data reduction and visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Alok; Worlton, T.; Hammonds, J.; Loong, C.K.; Mikkelson, D.; Mikkelson, R.; Chen, D.

    2001-01-01

    An Integrated Spectral Analysis Workbench, ISAW has been developed at IPNS with the goal of providing a flexible and powerful tool to visualize and analyze neutron scattering time-of-flight data. The software, written in Java, is platform independent, object oriented and modular, making it easier to maintain and add features. The graphical user interface (GUI) for ISAW allows intuitive and interactive loading and manipulation of multiple spectra from different 'runs'. ISAW provides multiple displays of the spectra in a Runfile' and most of the functions can be performed through the GUI menu bar as well as through command scripts. All displays are simultaneously updated when the data is changed using the Observable-observer object-model pattern. All displays are observers of the Dataset (observable) and respond to changes or selections in it simultaneously. A 'tree' display of the spectra in run files is provided for a detailed view of detector elements and easy selection of spectra. The operations menu is instrument sensitive so that it displays the appropriate set of operators accordingly. Automatic menu generation is made possible by the ability of the DataSet objects to furnish a list of operations contained in the particular DataSet selected at the time the menu bar is accessed. The transformed and corrected data can be saved to a disk in different file formats for further analyses (e.g., GSAS for structure refinement). (author)

  2. The Case for Graphic Novels

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Hoover

    2012-01-01

    Many libraries and librarians have embraced graphic novels. A number of books, articles, and presentations have focused on the history of the medium and offered advice on building and maintaining collections, but very little attention has been given the question of how integrate graphic novels into a library’s instructional efforts. This paper will explore the characteristics of graphic novels that make them a valuable resource for librarians who focus on research and information literacy i...

  3. Graphical models for genetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Sheehan, Nuala A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces graphical models as a natural environment in which to formulate and solve problems in genetics and related areas. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among various local computation algorithms which have been developed within the hitherto mostly separate areas...... of graphical models and genetics. The potential of graphical models is explored and illustrated through a number of example applications where the genetic element is substantial or dominating....

  4. Graphical Model Debugger Framework for Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Kebin

    2010-01-01

    Model Driven Software Development has offered a faster way to design and implement embedded real-time software by moving the design to a model level, and by transforming models to code. However, the testing of embedded systems has remained at the code level. This paper presents a Graphical Model...... Debugger Framework, providing an auxiliary avenue of analysis of system models at runtime by executing generated code and updating models synchronously, which allows embedded developers to focus on the model level. With the model debugger, embedded developers can graphically test their design model...

  5. Fast Gridding on Commodity Graphics Hardware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Schaeffter, Tobias; Noe, Karsten Østergaard

    2007-01-01

    is the far most time consuming of the three steps (Table 1). Modern graphics cards (GPUs) can be utilised as a fast parallel processor provided that algorithms are reformulated in a parallel solution. The purpose of this work is to test the hypothesis, that a non-cartesian reconstruction can be efficiently...... implemented on graphics hardware giving a significant speedup compared to CPU based alternatives. We present a novel GPU implementation of the convolution step that overcomes the problems of memory bandwidth that has limited the speed of previous GPU gridding algorithms [2]....

  6. Graphical Model Theory for Wireless Sensor Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, William B.

    2002-01-01

    Information processing in sensor networks, with many small processors, demands a theory of computation that allows the minimization of processing effort, and the distribution of this effort throughout the network. Graphical model theory provides a probabilistic theory of computation that explicitly addresses complexity and decentralization for optimizing network computation. The junction tree algorithm, for decentralized inference on graphical probability models, can be instantiated in a variety of applications useful for wireless sensor networks, including: sensor validation and fusion; data compression and channel coding; expert systems, with decentralized data structures, and efficient local queries; pattern classification, and machine learning. Graphical models for these applications are sketched, and a model of dynamic sensor validation and fusion is presented in more depth, to illustrate the junction tree algorithm

  7. CT applications of medical computer graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Few applications of computer graphics show as much promise and early success as that for CT. Unlike electron microscopy, ultrasound, business, military, and animation applications, CT image data are inherently digital. CT pictures can be processed directly by programs well established in the fields of computer graphics and digital image processing. Methods for reformatting digital pictures, enhancing structure shape, reducing image noise, and rendering three-dimensional (3D) scenes of anatomic structures have all become routine at many CT centers. In this chapter, the authors provide a brief introduction to computer graphics terms and techniques commonly applied to CT pictures and, when appropriate, to those showing promise for magnetic resonance images. Topics discussed here are image-processing options that are applied to digital images already constructed. In the final portion of this chapter techniques for ''slicing'' CT image data are presented, and geometric principles that describe the specification of oblique and curved images are outlined. Clinical examples are included

  8. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  9. Network performance for graphical control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clout, P.; Geib, M.; Westervelt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Vsystem is a toolbox for building graphically-based control systems. The real-tiem database component, Vaccess, includes all the networking support necessary to build multi-computer control systems. Vaccess has two modes of database access, synchronous and asynchronous. Vdraw is another component of Vsystem that allows developers and users to develop control screens and windows by drawing rather than programming. Based on X-windows, Vsystem provides the possibility of running Vdraw either on the workstation with the graphics or on the computer with the database. We have made some measurements on the cpu loading, elapsed time and the network loading to give some guidance in system configuration performance. It will be seen that asynchronous network access gives large performance increases and that the network database change notification protocol can be either more or less efficient than the X-window network protocol, depending on the graphical representation of the data. (author)

  10. 3D for Graphic Designers

    CERN Document Server

    Connell, Ellery

    2011-01-01

    Helping graphic designers expand their 2D skills into the 3D space The trend in graphic design is towards 3D, with the demand for motion graphics, animation, photorealism, and interactivity rapidly increasing. And with the meteoric rise of iPads, smartphones, and other interactive devices, the design landscape is changing faster than ever.2D digital artists who need a quick and efficient way to join this brave new world will want 3D for Graphic Designers. Readers get hands-on basic training in working in the 3D space, including product design, industrial design and visualization, modeling, ani

  11. Computer graphics in engineering education

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, David F

    2013-01-01

    Computer Graphics in Engineering Education discusses the use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) as an instructional material in engineering education. Each of the nine chapters of this book covers topics and cites examples that are relevant to the relationship of CAD-CAM with engineering education. The first chapter discusses the use of computer graphics in the U.S. Naval Academy, while Chapter 2 covers key issues in instructional computer graphics. This book then discusses low-cost computer graphics in engineering education. Chapter 4 discusses the uniform b

  12. Probabilistic reasoning with graphical security models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordy, Barbara; Pouly, Marc; Schweitzer, Patrick

    This work provides a computational framework for meaningful probabilistic evaluation of attack–defense scenarios involving dependent actions. We combine the graphical security modeling technique of attack–defense trees with probabilistic information expressed in terms of Bayesian networks. In order

  13. STUDY OF A PROBLEM OF GRAPHIC ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana LUCA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an approximate graphical method for determining the development of the revolution surface obtained by means of the deltoid. The approximate development of the revolution surfaces are based on general methods of development, provided by Descriptive Geometry.

  14. Graphical route information on variable message signs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkim, T.P.; Mede, P.H.J. van der; Janssen, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on experiments in the Netherlands on the use of graphical route information panels (GRIP) as part of variable message systems (VMS) providing information to drivers. GRIP appear to be as safe as regular VMS. Digestion of the information presented is initially quicker for regular VMS, but

  15. Graphical interface for PPDS system based on PAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.; Stolyarskij, Yu.V.

    1992-01-01

    The program interface allowing to display graphically experimental measurements results and evaluations of various physical reactions parameters stored in the REACTIONS database of PPDS system is described. PAW package is used for experimental data visualization. 7 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. Meaningful Real-Time Graphics Workstation Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    alike can effectively operate the program with little or no help from user’s manuals or other users. A thorough and efficient design of command line...Specifica- tions, San Jose, California, 1988. 4. Apgar , Brian, Bersack, Bret and Mammen, Abraham, "A Display System for the Stellarr m Graphics

  17. GRAPHIC, time-sharing magnet design computer programs at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes three magnet design computer programs in use at the Zero Gradient Synchrotron of Argonne National Laboratory. These programs are used in the time sharing mode in conjunction with a Tektronix model 4012 graphic display terminal. The first program in called TRIM, the second MAGNET, and the third GFUN. (U.S.)

  18. A Functional Programming Technique for Forms in Graphical User Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, S.; Kuper, Jan; Achten, P.M.; Grelck, G.; Huch, F.; Michaelson, G.; Trinder, Ph.W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents FunctionalForms, a new combinator library for constructing fully functioning forms in a concise and flexible way. A form is a part of a graphical user interface (GUI) restricted to displaying a value and allowing the user to modify it. The library is built on top of the

  19. Reservation system with graphical user interface

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Mahmoud A. Abdelhamid; Jamjoom, Hani T.; Podlaseck, Mark E.; Qu, Huiming; Shae, Zon-Yin; Sheopuri, Anshul

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for providing a reservation system are provided. The techniques include displaying a scalable visualization object, wherein the scalable visualization object comprises an expanded view element of the reservation system depicting

  20. Evaluating Texts for Graphical Literacy Instruction: The Graphic Rating Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kathryn L.; Brugar, Kristy A.; Norman, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present the Graphical Rating Tool (GRT), which is designed to evaluate the graphical devices that are commonly found in content-area, non-fiction texts, in order to identify books that are well suited for teaching about those devices. We also present a "best of" list of science and social studies books, which includes…

  1. Graphics with Mathematica fractals, Julia sets, patterns and natural forms

    CERN Document Server

    Getz, Chonat

    2004-01-01

    In this book we generate graphic images using the software Mathematica thus providing a gentle and enjoyable introduction to this rather technical software and its graphic capabilities. The programs we use for generating these graphics are easily adaptable to many variations.These graphic images are enhanced by introducing a variety of different coloring techniques.Detailed instructions are given for the construction of some interesting 2D and 3D fractals using iterated functions systems as well as the construction of many different types of Julia sets and parameter sets such as the Mandelbrot

  2. Displaying DIII-D plasma data using DEC's X window system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, K.L.

    1991-11-01

    The D3-D tokamak program, funded by the Department of Energy, carries out plasma physics and fusion energy research experiments. The machine began operation in February 1986; at that time, approximately 7 Mbytes of data was collected for shot. Since that time, the shot size has steadily increased to over 50 Mbytes with the average shot size between 35 and 45 Mbytes. Shots are fired every 12 to 15 minutes and last approximately 5 to 10 seconds. Between 30 and 40 shots are fired each day when plasma experiments are scheduled. In 1987 MFITD and MFITPLAY were written/modified. These two programs provide graphical output that allows the users to see, before the next shot, the plasma shape and the locations of the plasma and magnetic flux lines within the tokamak. MFITD performs the computations which calculate the shape and location of the plasma; it also graphically displays a small subset of timeslice data. MFITPLAY graphically displays the full set of timeslice data. Through interactive commands, MFITPLAY also allows the user to control the various aspects of how the data is displayed. In 1990, both programs were converted from User Interface Services (UIS) routines, which are part of the MicroVMS workstation graphics software, to DEC's X Window System using the DECWindows window manager. These modifications were required because of a move by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) to support X windows and phase out UIS. Due to the nature and purpose of each program, MFITD needed only simple graphics conversion while MFITPLAY was completely rewritten. The DECWindows version of MFITPLAY offers a number of improvements, such as a more intuitive user interface

  3. Multichannel waveform display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolvankar, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    For any multichannel data acquisition system, a multichannel paper chart recorder undoubtedly forms an essential part of the system. When deployed on-line, it instantaneously provides, for visual inspection, hard copies of the signal waveforms on common time base at any desired sensitivity and time resolution. Within the country, only a small range of these strip chart recorder s is available, and under stringent specifications imported recorders are often procured. The cost of such recorders may range from 1 to 5 lakhs of rupees in foreign exchange. A system to provide on the oscilloscope a steady display of multichannel waveforms, refreshed from the digital data stored in the memory is developed. The merits and demerits of the display system are compared with that built around a conventional paper chart recorder. Various illustrations of multichannel seismic event data acquired at Gauribidanur seismic array station are also presented. (author). 2 figs

  4. Computing and Displaying Isosurfaces in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Feng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents R utilities for computing and displaying isosurfaces, or three-dimensional contour surfaces, from a three-dimensional array of function values. A version of the marching cubes algorithm that takes into account face and internal ambiguities is used to compute the isosurfaces. Vectorization is used to ensure adequate performance using only R code. Examples are presented showing contours of theoretical densities, density estimates, and medical imaging data. Rendering can use the rgl package or standard or grid graphics, and a set of tools for representing and rendering surfaces using standard or grid graphics is presented.

  5. A computer graphics pilot project - Spacecraft mission support with an interactive graphics workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, John; Ehrner, Marie-Jacqueline; Reese, Jodi; Chang, Kan; Tseng, Irene

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Computer Graphics Pilot Project was undertaken to enhance the quality control, productivity and efficiency of mission support operations at the Goddard Operations Support Computing Facility. The Project evolved into a set of demonstration programs for graphics intensive simulated control room operations, particularly in connection with the complex space missions that began in the 1980s. Complex mission mean more data. Graphic displays are a means to reduce the probabilities of operator errors. Workstations were selected with 1024 x 768 pixel color displays controlled by a custom VLSI chip coupled to an MC68010 chip running UNIX within a shell that permits operations through the medium of mouse-accessed pulldown window menus. The distributed workstations run off a host NAS 8040 computer. Applications of the system for tracking spacecraft orbits and monitoring Shuttle payload handling illustrate the system capabilities, noting the built-in capabilities of shifting the point of view and rotating and zooming in on three-dimensional views of spacecraft.

  6. Developing an integrated digitizing and display surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipple, James D.; Wedding, Daniel K.; Wedding, Donald K., Sr.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an integrated digitizing and display surface, which utilizes touch entry and flat panel display (FPD) technology, is a significant hardware advance in the field of geographic information systems (GIS). Inherent qualities of the FPD, notably the ac gas plasma display, makes such a marriage inevitable. Large diagonal sizes, high resolution color, screen flatness, and monitor thickness are desirable features of an integrated digitizing and display surface. Recently, the GIS literature has addressed a need for such an innovation. The development of graphics displays based on sophisticated technologies include `photorealistic' (or high definition) imaging at resolutions of 2048 X 2048 or greater, palates of 16.7 million colors, formats greater than 30 inches diagonal, and integrated touch entry. In this paper, there is an evaluation of FPDs and data input technologies in the development of such a product.

  7. Generating Animated Displays of Spacecraft Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, Robert M.; Chimiak, Reine A.; Harris, Bernard T.

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Interactive Plotting, Sonification, and 3D Orbit Display (TIPSOD) is a computer program for generating interactive, animated, four-dimensional (space and time) displays of spacecraft orbits. TIPSOD utilizes the programming interface of the Satellite Situation Center Web (SSCWeb) services to communicate with the SSC logic and database by use of the open protocols of the Internet. TIPSOD is implemented in Java 3D and effects an extension of the preexisting SSCWeb two-dimensional static graphical displays of orbits. Orbits can be displayed in any or all of the following seven reference systems: true-of-date (an inertial system), J2000 (another inertial system), geographic, geomagnetic, geocentric solar ecliptic, geocentric solar magnetospheric, and solar magnetic. In addition to orbits, TIPSOD computes and displays Sibeck's magnetopause and Fairfield's bow-shock surfaces. TIPSOD can be used by the scientific community as a means of projection or interpretation. It also has potential as an educational tool.

  8. You Be the Judge: Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeninger, Jimmy G.

    The instructional package was developed to provide the distributive education teacher-coordinator with visual materials that can be used to supplement existing textbook offerings in the area of display (visual merchandising). Designed for use with 35mm slides of retail store displays, the package allows the student to view the slides of displays…

  9. Instrumentation for on-line mountain range displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Asselt, W.K.; Ahrens, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    A method to obtain and process 'mountain range' displays of beam signals is described. A custom-made trigger generator and a digital oscilloscope are used for the data acquisition and the graphical interface package LabVIEW is used to process the data. High resolution displays of wall monitor signals updating every AGS cycle have proven very powerful as a beam diagnostic

  10. Oklahoma's Mobile Computer Graphics Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Gerald R.

    This Computer Graphics Laboratory houses an IBM 1130 computer, U.C.C. plotter, printer, card reader, two key punch machines, and seminar-type classroom furniture. A "General Drafting Graphics System" (GDGS) is used, based on repetitive use of basic coordinate and plot generating commands. The system is used by 12 institutions of higher education…

  11. Graphics Education Survey. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Sandra B.

    After a 1977 survey reflected the importance of graphics education for news students, a study was developed to investigate the state of graphics education in the whole field of journalism. A questionnaire was sent to professors and administrators in four print-oriented professional fields of education: magazine, advertising, public relations, and…

  12. Display technologies for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Lee, Seungjae; Jang, Changwon; Hong, Jong-Young; Li, Gang

    2018-02-01

    With the virtue of rapid progress in optics, sensors, and computer science, we are witnessing that commercial products or prototypes for augmented reality (AR) are penetrating into the consumer markets. AR is spotlighted as expected to provide much more immersive and realistic experience than ordinary displays. However, there are several barriers to be overcome for successful commercialization of AR. Here, we explore challenging and important topics for AR such as image combiners, enhancement of display performance, and focus cue reproduction. Image combiners are essential to integrate virtual images with real-world. Display performance (e.g. field of view and resolution) is important for more immersive experience and focus cue reproduction may mitigate visual fatigue caused by vergence-accommodation conflict. We also demonstrate emerging technologies to overcome these issues: index-matched anisotropic crystal lens (IMACL), retinal projection displays, and 3D display with focus cues. For image combiners, a novel optical element called IMACL provides relatively wide field of view. Retinal projection displays may enhance field of view and resolution of AR displays. Focus cues could be reconstructed via multi-layer displays and holographic displays. Experimental results of our prototypes are explained.

  13. Simulaser, a graphical laser simulator based on Matlab Simulink

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, Cobus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a single-element plane-wave laser rate equation model and its implementation as a graphical laser simulation library using Matlab Simulink. Simulink’s graphical interface and vector capabilities provide a unique layer of abstraction...

  14. Use of Graphic Organizers in a Language Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Starting from 2009 academic year, the instructional coaches in a school district in a northwest American city began to provide Workshop II (pseudonym) to elementary school English teachers. This study aims to discuss the use of graphic organizers in English teachers' professional development. Different types of graphic organizers such as…

  15. Representing Graphical User Interfaces with Sound: A Review of Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasit, Dan; Moore, Melody M.

    2005-01-01

    The inability of computer users who are visually impaired to access graphical user interfaces (GUIs) has led researchers to propose approaches for adapting GUIs to auditory interfaces, with the goal of providing access for visually impaired people. This article outlines the issues involved in nonvisual access to graphical user interfaces, reviews…

  16. The Graphical User Interface: Crisis, Danger, and Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, L. H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article describes differences between the graphical user interface and traditional character-based interface systems, identifies potential problems posed by graphic computing environments for blind computer users, and describes some programs and strategies that are being developed to provide access to those environments. (Author/JDD)

  17. Graphic Arts. A Bilingual Text = Artes Graficas. Un Texto Bilingue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Career and Continuing Education.

    This bilingual instructional text, one in a series of six texts covering various vocational and technical topics, provides secondary level English and Spanish instruction in graphic arts. Addressed in the individual sections are basic graphic arts (composition, stone and press work, offset printing, silk screen, and photography) and allied graphic…

  18. An improved map based graphical android authentication system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, graphical password methods are available for android and other devices, but the major problem is vulnerability issue. A map graphical-based authentication system (Dheeraj et al, 2013) was designed on mobile android devices, but it did not provide a large choice or multiple sequence to user for selecting ...

  19. IMAGE information monitoring and applied graphics software environment. Volume 2. Software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallam, J.W.; Ng, K.B.; Upham, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The EPRI Information Monitoring and Applied Graphics Environment (IMAGE) system is designed for 'fast proto-typing' of advanced concepts for computer-aided plant operations tools. It is a flexible software system which can be used for rapidly creating, dynamically driving and evaluating advanced operator aid displays. The software is written to be both host computer and graphic device independent

  20. User's manual for the CORTES GRAPHICS PACKAGE GRFPAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report provides necessary user information to implement and use a graphics package for the CORTES finite-element computer programs. Complete input instructions are provided. Sample input and output are given

  1. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  2. A graphics approach in the design of the dual air density Explorer satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program was developed to generate a graphics display of the Dual Air Density (DAD) Explorer satellites which aids in the engineering and scientific design. The program displays a two-dimensional view of both spacecraft and their surface features from any direction. The graphics have been an indispensable tool in the design, analysis, and understanding of the critical locations of the various surface features for both satellites.

  3. Interactive display of molecular models using a microcomputer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, J. T.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, microcomputer-based, interactive graphics display system has been developed for the presentation of perspective views of wire frame molecular models. The display system is based on a TERAK 8510a graphics computer system with a display unit consisting of microprocessor, television display and keyboard subsystems. The operating system includes a screen editor, file manager, PASCAL and BASIC compilers and command options for linking and executing programs. The graphics program, written in USCD PASCAL, involves the centering of the coordinate system, the transformation of centered model coordinates into homogeneous coordinates, the construction of a viewing transformation matrix to operate on the coordinates, clipping invisible points, perspective transformation and scaling to screen coordinates; commands available include ZOOM, ROTATE, RESET, and CHANGEVIEW. Data file structure was chosen to minimize the amount of disk storage space. Despite the inherent slowness of the system, its low cost and flexibility suggests general applicability.

  4. ElectroEncephaloGraphics: Making waves in computer graphics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Maryam; Magnor, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a novel modality for investigating perceptual graphics problems. Until recently, EEG has predominantly been used for clinical diagnosis, in psychology, and by the brain-computer-interface community. Researchers are extending it to help understand the perception of visual output from graphics applications and to create approaches based on direct neural feedback. Researchers have applied EEG to graphics to determine perceived image and video quality by detecting typical rendering artifacts, to evaluate visualization effectiveness by calculating the cognitive load, and to automatically optimize rendering parameters for images and videos on the basis of implicit neural feedback.

  5. WIRED — World Wide Web interactive remote event display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaminut, A.; Colonello, C.; Dönszelmann, M.; van Herwijnen, E.; Köper, D.; Korhonen, J.; Litmaath, M.; Perl, J.; Theodorou, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wolff, E.

    2001-10-01

    WIRED ( http://wired.cern.ch/) is a framework, written in Java, to build High Energy Physics event displays that can be used across the network. To guarantee portability across all platforms, WIRED is implemented in the Java language and uses the Swing user interface component set. It can be used as a stand-alone application or as an applet inside a WWW browser. The graphical user interface allows for multiple views and for multiple controls acting on those views. A detector tree control is available to toggle the visibility of parts of the events and detector geometry. XML (Extensible Markup Language), RMI (Remote Method Invocation) and CORBA loaders can be used to load event data as well as geometry data, and to connect to FORTRAN, C, C++ and Java reconstruction programs. Non-linear and non-Cartesian projections (e.g., fisheye, ρ- φ, ρ- Z, φ- Z) provide special views to get a better understanding of events. A special Java interpreter allows physicists to write small scripts to interact with their data and its display. WIRED has grown to be a framework in use and under development in several HEP experiments (ATLAS, CHORUS, DELPHI, LHCb, BaBar, D0 and ZEUS). WIRED event displays have also proven to be useful to explain High Energy Physics to the general public. Both CERN, in its traveling exhibition and MicroCosm, and RAL, during its open days, have displays set up.

  6. SutraPlot, a graphical post-processor for SUTRA, a model for ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a graphical display post-processor (SutraPlot) for the U.S. Geological Survey Saturated-Unsaturated flow and solute or energy TRAnsport simulation model SUTRA, Version 2D3D.1. This version of SutraPlot is an upgrade to SutraPlot for the 2D-only SUTRA model (Souza, 1987). It has been modified to add 3D functionality, a graphical user interface (GUI), and enhanced graphic output options. Graphical options for 2D SUTRA (2-dimension) simulations include: drawing the 2D finite-element mesh, mesh boundary, and velocity vectors; plots of contours for pressure, saturation, concentration, and temperature within the model region; 2D finite-element based gridding and interpolation; and 2D gridded data export files. Graphical options for 3D SUTRA (3-dimension) simulations include: drawing the 3D finite-element mesh; plots of contours for pressure, saturation, concentration, and temperature in 2D sections of the 3D model region; 3D finite-element based gridding and interpolation; drawing selected regions of velocity vectors (projected on principal coordinate planes); and 3D gridded data export files. Installation instructions and a description of all graphic options are presented. A sample SUTRA problem is described and three step-by-step SutraPlot applications are provided. In addition, the methodology and numerical algorithms for the 2D and 3D finite-element based gridding and interpolation, developed for SutraPlot, are described. 1

  7. Integrated Display & Environmental Awareness System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is the development of a head mounted display for use in operations here on Earth and in Space. The technology would provide various means of...

  8. PC graphics generation and management tool for real-time applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Long V.

    1992-01-01

    A graphics tool was designed and developed for easy generation and management of personal computer graphics. It also provides methods and 'run-time' software for many common artificial intelligence (AI) or expert system (ES) applications.

  9. Development of an Adaptable Display and Diagnostic System for the Evaluation of Tropical Cyclone Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, P. A.; Burek, T.; Halley-Gotway, J.

    2015-12-01

    NCAR's Joint Numerical Testbed Program (JNTP) focuses on the evaluation of experimental forecasts of tropical cyclones (TCs) with the goal of developing new research tools and diagnostic evaluation methods that can be transitioned to operations. Recent activities include the development of new TC forecast verification methods and the development of an adaptable TC display and diagnostic system. The next generation display and diagnostic system is being developed to support evaluation needs of the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) and broader TC research community. The new hurricane display and diagnostic capabilities allow forecasters and research scientists to more deeply examine the performance of operational and experimental models. The system is built upon modern and flexible technology that includes OpenLayers Mapping tools that are platform independent. The forecast track and intensity along with associated observed track information are stored in an efficient MySQL database. The system provides easy-to-use interactive display system, and provides diagnostic tools to examine forecast track stratified by intensity. Consensus forecasts can be computed and displayed interactively. The system is designed to display information for both real-time and for historical TC cyclones. The display configurations are easily adaptable to meet the needs of the end-user preferences. Ongoing enhancements include improving capabilities for stratification and evaluation of historical best tracks, development and implementation of additional methods to stratify and compute consensus hurricane track and intensity forecasts, and improved graphical display tools. The display is also being enhanced to incorporate gridded forecast, satellite, and sea surface temperature fields. The presentation will provide an overview of the display and diagnostic system development and demonstration of the current capabilities.

  10. Computerized three-dimensional treatment planning system utilizing interactive colour graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McShan, D L; Silverman, A; Lanza, D M; Reinstein, L E; Glicksman, A S [Rhode Island Hospital (US). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1979-06-01

    A new computerized radiation treatment planning system has been developed to aid in three-dimensional treatment planning. Using interactive colour graphics in conjunction with a PDP 11/45 computer, the system can take multiple transverse contours and construct a perspective display of the treatment region showing organ surfaces as well as cross-sectional contours. With interactively selected orientations, the display allows easy perception of the relative positioning of the treatment volume and the neighbouring anatomy. For external beam treatment planning, interactive computer simulation is used to select diaphragm sizes which best conform to the target area while avoiding sensitive structures. Dose calculations for the selected beams are carried out on multiple transverse planes. The calculational planes and surfaces are displayed in perspective with radiation dosage displayed in an interactively manipulated colour display. Altogether the system provides an easy assessment of the volume to be irradiated, interactive selection of optimal arrangements of treatment fields and a means of visualizing and evaluating the resulting dose distributions.

  11. Interactive graphics for data analysis principles and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Theus, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction PRINCIPLESInteractivity Queries Selection and Linked Highlighting Linking AnalysesInteracting with Graphics Examining a Single Variable Categorical DataContinuous DataTransforming Data Weighted Plots Interactions between Two VariablesTwo Categorical VariablesOne Categorical Variable and One Continuous VariableTwo Continuous VariablesMultidimensional Plots Mosaic PlotsParallel Coordinate Plots Trellis Displays Plot Ensembles and Statistical ModelsResponse ModelsANOVALoglinear ModelsGeographical DataMore Interactivity Sorting and Ordering Zooming Multiple ViewsInteractive Graphics ?

  12. The practical use of computer graphics techniques for site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tencer, B.; Newell, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the approach utilized by Roy F. Weston, Inc. (WESTON) to analyze and characterize data relative to a specific site and the computerized graphical techniques developed to display site characterization data. These techniques reduce massive amounts of tabular data to a limited number of graphics easily understood by both the public and policy level decision makers. First, they describe the general design of the system; then the application of this system to a low level rad site followed by a description of an application to an uncontrolled hazardous waste site

  13. Data analysis using a data base driven graphics animation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwieder, D.H.; Stewart, H.D.; Curtis, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    A graphics animation system has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assist engineers in the analysis of large amounts of time series data. Most prior attempts at computer animation of data involve the development of large and expensive problem-specific systems. This paper discusses a generalized interactive computer animation system designed to be used in a wide variety of data analysis applications. By using relational data base storage of graphics and control information, considerable flexibility in design and development of animated displays is achieved

  14. ESO Reflex: a graphical workflow engine for data reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Richard; Ullgrén, Marko; Romaniello, Martino; Maisala, Sami; Oittinen, Tero; Solin, Otto; Savolainen, Ville; Järveläinen, Pekka; Tyynelä, Jani; Péron, Michèle; Ballester, Pascal; Gabasch, Armin; Izzo, Carlo

    ESO Reflex is a prototype software tool that provides a novel approach to astronomical data reduction by integrating a modern graphical workflow system (Taverna) with existing legacy data reduction algorithms. Most of the raw data produced by instruments at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile are reduced using recipes. These are compiled C applications following an ESO standard and utilising routines provided by the Common Pipeline Library (CPL). Currently these are run in batch mode as part of the data flow system to generate the input to the ESO/VLT quality control process and are also exported for use offline. ESO Reflex can invoke CPL-based recipes in a flexible way through a general purpose graphical interface. ESO Reflex is based on the Taverna system that was originally developed within the UK life-sciences community. Workflows have been created so far for three VLT/VLTI instruments, and the GUI allows the user to make changes to these or create workflows of their own. Python scripts or IDL procedures can be easily brought into workflows and a variety of visualisation and display options, including custom product inspection and validation steps, are available. Taverna is intended for use with web services and experiments using ESO Reflex to access Virtual Observatory web services have been successfully performed. ESO Reflex is the main product developed by Sampo, a project led by ESO and conducted by a software development team from Finland as an in-kind contribution to joining ESO. The goal was to look into the needs of the ESO community in the area of data reduction environments and to create pilot software products that illustrate critical steps along the road to a new system. Sampo concluded early in 2008. This contribution will describe ESO Reflex and show several examples of its use both locally and using Virtual Observatory remote web services. ESO Reflex is expected to be released to the community in early 2009.

  15. Animated analysis of geoscientific datasets: An interactive graphical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Peter; Reading, Anya; Lueg, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Geoscientists are required to analyze and draw conclusions from increasingly large volumes of data. There is a need to recognise and characterise features and changing patterns of Earth observables within such large datasets. It is also necessary to identify significant subsets of the data for more detailed analysis. We present an innovative, interactive software tool and workflow to visualise, characterise, sample and tag large geoscientific datasets from both local and cloud-based repositories. It uses an animated interface and human-computer interaction to utilise the capacity of human expert observers to identify features via enhanced visual analytics. 'Tagger' enables users to analyze datasets that are too large in volume to be drawn legibly on a reasonable number of single static plots. Users interact with the moving graphical display, tagging data ranges of interest for subsequent attention. The tool provides a rapid pre-pass process using fast GPU-based OpenGL graphics and data-handling and is coded in the Quartz Composer visual programing language (VPL) on Mac OSX. It makes use of interoperable data formats, and cloud-based (or local) data storage and compute. In a case study, Tagger was used to characterise a decade (2000-2009) of data recorded by the Cape Sorell Waverider Buoy, located approximately 10 km off the west coast of Tasmania, Australia. These data serve as a proxy for the understanding of Southern Ocean storminess, which has both local and global implications. This example shows use of the tool to identify and characterise 4 different types of storm and non-storm events during this time. Events characterised in this way are compared with conventional analysis, noting advantages and limitations of data analysis using animation and human interaction. Tagger provides a new ability to make use of humans as feature detectors in computer-based analysis of large-volume geosciences and other data.

  16. System Would Generate Virtual Heads-Up Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed helmet-mounted electronic display system superimposes full-color alphanumerical and/or graphical information onto observer's visual field. Displayed information projected directly onto observer's retinas, giving observer illusion of full-size computer display in foreground or background. Display stereoscopic, holographic, or in form of virtual image. Used by pilots to view navigational information while looking outside or at instruments, by security officers to view information about critical facilities while looking at visitors, or possibly even stock-exchange facilities to view desktop monitors and overhead displays simultaneously. System includes acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF), which acts as both spectral filter and spatial light modulator.

  17. EPA Communications Stylebook: Graphics Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Includes standards and guidance for graphics typography, layout, composition, color scheme, appropriate use of charts and graphs, logos and related symbols, and consistency with the message of accompanied content.

  18. IAU Graphics Extension - Gnu C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz; Jørgensen, John Leif; Riis, Troels

    1999-01-01

    This document contains a description of the library GrxIau (former UtilVesa and UTILLE). The library acts as shell to the graphics commands used at the exercises at the course 50240 Image Analysis with Microcomputers....

  19. Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) Lambert

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Digital Raster Graphic-Lambert (DRG-Lam) is a raster image of a scanned USGS topographic map with the collar information clipped out, georeferenced to the...

  20. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs

  1. BNL325 - Nuclear reaction data display program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunford, C L

    1994-11-27

    A computer code for the graphical display of nuclear reaction data is described. The code, which works on a computer with VMS operating system, can overlay experimental data from an EXFOR/CSISRS table-computation format with evaluated data from ENDF formatted data libraries. Originally, this code has been used at the U.S. National Nuclear Data Center to produce the well-known neutron cross-section atlas published as report BNL-325. (author). 3 tabs.

  2. The graphics editor in ROOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antcheva, Ilka; Brun, Rene; Hof, Carsten; Rademakers, Fons

    2006-01-01

    A well-designed Graphical User Interface (GUI) has critical importance in any computer application. The user interface is where the end users and the complex system intersect. An effective interface design can make a powerful and complex system, such as ROOT, easy and intuitive to learn and operate. This paper describes the main goals we defined and the design solution we found developing the graphics editor in ROOT

  3. Randomness in Contemporary Graphic Art

    OpenAIRE

    Zavřelová, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Veronika Zavřelová Bachelor thesis Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Education, Department of Art Education Randomness in contemporary graphic art imaginative picture card game ANNOTATION This (bachelor) thesis concerns itself with a connection between verbal and visual character system within the topic of Randomness in contemporary graphic art - imaginative picture card game. The thesis is mainly based on the practical part - exclusively created card game Piktim. The card game uses as...

  4. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  5. Invisible Display in Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prichystal, Jan Phuklin; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bladt, Henrik Henriksen

    2005-01-01

    Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish for an integ......Bang & Olufsen a/s has been working with ideas for invisible integration of displays in metal surfaces. Invisible integration of information displays traditionally has been possible by placing displays behind transparent or semitransparent materials such as plastic or glass. The wish...... for an integrated display in a metal surface is often ruled by design and functionality of a product. The integration of displays in metal surfaces requires metal removal in order to clear the area of the display to some extent. The idea behind an invisible display in Aluminum concerns the processing of a metal...

  6. Influence of colour on acquisition and generalisation of graphic symbols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, O E; Ne'eman, A

    2013-07-01

    Children with autism may benefit from using graphic symbols for their communication, language and literacy development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of colour versus grey-scale displays on the identification of graphic symbols using a computer-based intervention. An alternating treatment design was employed to examine the learning and generalisation of 58 colour and grey-scale symbols by four preschool children with autism. The graphic symbols were taught via a meaning-based intervention using stories and educational games. Results demonstrate that all of the children were able to learn and maintain symbol identification over time for both symbol displays with no apparent differences. Differences were apparent for two of the children who exhibited better generalisation when learning grey-scale symbols first. The other two showed no noticeable difference, between displays when generalising from one display to the other. Implications and further research are discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  7. NCAP projection displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, John R.; Ishioka, J.; Jones, Philip J.; Lau, Aldrich; Tomita, Akira; Asano, A.; Konuma, Nobuhiro; Sato, Kazuhiko; Takemoto, Iwao

    1997-05-01

    Projectors based on polymer-eNCAPsulated liquid crystals can provide bright displays suitable for use in conference rooms with normal lighting. Contrast is generated by light scattering among the droplets, rather than by light absorption with crossed polarizers. We have demonstrated a full-color, compact projector showing 1200 ANSI lumens with 200 watts of lamp power - a light efficiency of 6 lumens/watt. This projector is based on low-voltage NCAP material, highly reflective CMOS die, and matched illumination and projection optics. We will review each of these areas and discuss the integrated system performance.

  8. Risk Management Collaboration through Sharing Interactive Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingsby, Aidan; Dykes, Jason; Wood, Jo; Foote, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    Risk management involves the cooperation of scientists, underwriters and actuaries all of whom analyse data to support decision-making. Results are often disseminated through static documents with graphics that convey the message the analyst wishes to communicate. Interactive graphics are increasingly popular means of communicating the results of data analyses because they enable other parties to explore and visually analyse some of the data themselves prior to and during discussion. Discussion around interactive graphics can occur synchronously in face-to-face meetings or with video-conferencing and screen sharing or they can occur asynchronously through web-sites such as ManyEyes, web-based fora, blogs, wikis and email. A limitation of approaches that do not involve screen sharing is the difficulty in sharing the results of insights from interacting with the graphic. Static images accompanied can be shared but these themselves cannot be interacted, producing a discussion bottleneck (Baker, 2008). We address this limitation by allowing the state and configuration of graphics to be shared (rather than static images) so that a user can reproduce someone else's graphic, interact with it and then share the results of this accompanied with some commentary. HiVE (Slingsby et al, 2009) is a compact and intuitive text-based language that has been designed for this purpose. We will describe the vizTweets project (a 9-month project funded by JISC) in which we are applying these principles to insurance risk management in the context of the Willis Research Network, the world's largest collaboration between the insurance industry and the academia). The project aims to extend HiVE to meet the needs of the sector, design, implement free-available web services and tools and to provide case studies. We will present a case study that demonstrate the potential of this approach for collaboration within the Willis Research Network. Baker, D. Towards Transparency in Visualisation Based

  9. Canvas Pocket Reference Scripted Graphics for HTML5

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The Canvas element is a revolutionary feature of HTML5 that enables powerful graphics for rich Internet applications, and this pocket reference provides the essentials you need to put this element to work. If you have working knowledge of JavaScript, this book will help you create detailed, interactive, and animated graphics -- from charts to animations to video games -- whether you're a web designer or a programmer interested in graphics. Canvas Pocket Reference provides both a tutorial that covers all of the element's features with plenty of examples and a definitive reference to each of t

  10. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  11. Application of Al techniques to a voice actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherley, P.L.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Meadow, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that to provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures, languages, and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users, research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study, an artificial intelligence (AI) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user, the AI control strategy determines the user's intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid, the control strategy queries the user for additional informaiton. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AI techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure

  12. Fast DRR splat rendering using common consumer graphics hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoerk, Jakob; Bergmann, Helmar; Wanschitz, Felix; Dong, Shuo; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) are a vital part of various medical image processing applications such as 2D/3D registration for patient pose determination in image-guided radiotherapy procedures. This paper presents a technique to accelerate DRR creation by using conventional graphics hardware for the rendering process. DRR computation itself is done by an efficient volume rendering method named wobbled splatting. For programming the graphics hardware, NVIDIAs C for Graphics (Cg) is used. The description of an algorithm used for rendering DRRs on the graphics hardware is presented, together with a benchmark comparing this technique to a CPU-based wobbled splatting program. Results show a reduction of rendering time by about 70%-90% depending on the amount of data. For instance, rendering a volume of 2x10 6 voxels is feasible at an update rate of 38 Hz compared to 6 Hz on a common Intel-based PC using the graphics processing unit (GPU) of a conventional graphics adapter. In addition, wobbled splatting using graphics hardware for DRR computation provides higher resolution DRRs with comparable image quality due to special processing characteristics of the GPU. We conclude that DRR generation on common graphics hardware using the freely available Cg environment is a major step toward 2D/3D registration in clinical routine

  13. Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment (SAGE) Software for the Visualization of Large Data Sets on a Video Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Edwards, Rita; Cross, David; Welch, Jon; Smith, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The use of collaborative scientific visualization systems for the analysis, visualization, and sharing of "big data" available from new high resolution remote sensing satellite sensors or four-dimensional numerical model simulations is propelling the wider adoption of ultra-resolution tiled display walls interconnected by high speed networks. These systems require a globally connected and well-integrated operating environment that provides persistent visualization and collaboration services. This abstract and subsequent presentation describes a new collaborative visualization system installed for NASA's Shortterm Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program at Marshall Space Flight Center and its use for Earth science applications. The system consists of a 3 x 4 array of 1920 x 1080 pixel thin bezel video monitors mounted on a wall in a scientific collaboration lab. The monitors are physically and virtually integrated into a 14' x 7' for video display. The display of scientific data on the video wall is controlled by a single Alienware Aurora PC with a 2nd Generation Intel Core 4.1 GHz processor, 32 GB memory, and an AMD Fire Pro W600 video card with 6 mini display port connections. Six mini display-to-dual DVI cables are used to connect the 12 individual video monitors. The open source Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment (SAGE) windowing and media control framework, running on top of the Ubuntu 12 Linux operating system, allows several users to simultaneously control the display and storage of high resolution still and moving graphics in a variety of formats, on tiled display walls of any size. The Ubuntu operating system supports the open source Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment (SAGE) software which provides a common environment, or framework, enabling its users to access, display and share a variety of data-intensive information. This information can be digital-cinema animations, high-resolution images, high-definition video

  14. Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment (SAGE) Software for the Visualization of Large Data Sets on a Video Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, G.; Srikishen, J.; Edwards, R.; Cross, D.; Welch, J. D.; Smith, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The use of collaborative scientific visualization systems for the analysis, visualization, and sharing of 'big data' available from new high resolution remote sensing satellite sensors or four-dimensional numerical model simulations is propelling the wider adoption of ultra-resolution tiled display walls interconnected by high speed networks. These systems require a globally connected and well-integrated operating environment that provides persistent visualization and collaboration services. This abstract and subsequent presentation describes a new collaborative visualization system installed for NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program at Marshall Space Flight Center and its use for Earth science applications. The system consists of a 3 x 4 array of 1920 x 1080 pixel thin bezel video monitors mounted on a wall in a scientific collaboration lab. The monitors are physically and virtually integrated into a 14' x 7' for video display. The display of scientific data on the video wall is controlled by a single Alienware Aurora PC with a 2nd Generation Intel Core 4.1 GHz processor, 32 GB memory, and an AMD Fire Pro W600 video card with 6 mini display port connections. Six mini display-to-dual DVI cables are used to connect the 12 individual video monitors. The open source Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment (SAGE) windowing and media control framework, running on top of the Ubuntu 12 Linux operating system, allows several users to simultaneously control the display and storage of high resolution still and moving graphics in a variety of formats, on tiled display walls of any size. The Ubuntu operating system supports the open source Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment (SAGE) software which provides a common environment, or framework, enabling its users to access, display and share a variety of data-intensive information. This information can be digital-cinema animations, high-resolution images, high-definition video

  15. Cockpit weather graphics using mobile satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Shashi

    1993-01-01

    Many new companies are pushing state-of-the-art technology to bring a revolution in the cockpits of General Aviation (GA) aircraft. The vision, according to Dr. Bruce Holmes - the Assistant Director for Aeronautics at National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center, is to provide such an advanced flight control system that the motor and cognitive skills you use to drive a car would be very similar to the ones you would use to fly an airplane. We at ViGYAN, Inc., are currently developing a system called the Pilot Weather Advisor (PWxA), which would be a part of such an advanced technology flight management system. The PWxA provides graphical depictions of weather information in the cockpit of aircraft in near real-time, through the use of broadcast satellite communications. The purpose of this system is to improve the safety and utility of GA aircraft operations. Considerable effort is being extended for research in the design of graphical weather systems, notably the works of Scanlon and Dash. The concept of providing pilots with graphical depictions of weather conditions, overlaid on geographical and navigational maps, is extremely powerful.

  16. ESO Reflex: A Graphical Workflow Engine for Data Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, R.; Romaniello, M.; Péron, M.; Ballester, P.; Gabasch, A.; Izzo, C.; Ullgrén, M.; Maisala, S.; Oittinen, T.; Solin, O.; Savolainen, V.; Järveläinen, P.; Tyynelä, J.

    2008-08-01

    Sampo {http://www.eso.org/sampo} (Hook et al. 2005) is a project led by ESO and conducted by a software development team from Finland as an in-kind contribution to joining ESO. The goal is to assess the needs of the ESO community in the area of data reduction environments and to create pilot software products that illustrate critical steps along the road to a new system. Those prototypes will not only be used to validate concepts and understand requirements but will also be tools of immediate value for the community. Most of the raw data produced by ESO instruments can be reduced using CPL {http://www.eso.org/cpl} recipes: compiled C programs following an ESO standard and utilizing routines provided by the Common Pipeline Library. Currently reduction recipes are run in batch mode as part of the data flow system to generate the input to the ESO VLT/VLTI quality control process and are also made public for external users. Sampo has developed a prototype application called ESO Reflex {http://www.eso.org/sampo/reflex/} that integrates a graphical user interface and existing data reduction algorithms. ESO Reflex can invoke CPL-based recipes in a flexible way through a dedicated interface. ESO Reflex is based on the graphical workflow engine Taverna {http://taverna.sourceforge.net} that was originally developed by the UK eScience community, mostly for work in the life sciences. Workflows have been created so far for three VLT/VLTI instrument modes ( VIMOS/IFU {http://www.eso.org/instruments/vimos/}, FORS spectroscopy {http://www.eso.org/instruments/fors/} and AMBER {http://www.eso.org/instruments/amber/}), and the easy-to-use GUI allows the user to make changes to these or create workflows of their own. Python scripts and IDL procedures can be easily brought into workflows and a variety of visualisation and display options, including custom product inspection and validation steps, are available.

  17. SPACEBAR: Kinematic design by computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interactive graphics computer program SPACEBAR, conceived to reduce the time and complexity associated with the development of kinematic mechanisms on the design board, was described. This program allows the direct design and analysis of mechanisms right at the terminal screen. All input variables, including linkage geometry, stiffness, and applied loading conditions, can be fed into or changed at the terminal and may be displayed in three dimensions. All mechanism configurations can be cycled through their range of travel and viewed in their various geometric positions. Output data includes geometric positioning in orthogonal coordinates of each node point in the mechanism, velocity and acceleration of the node points, and internal loads and displacements of the node points and linkages. All analysis calculations take at most a few seconds to complete. Output data can be viewed at the scope and also printed at the discretion of the user.

  18. A graphical user interface for RAId, a knowledge integrated proteomics analysis suite with accurate statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Brendan; Lee, Danny; Rubio, Alex; Ogurtsov, Aleksey; Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2018-03-15

    RAId is a software package that has been actively developed for the past 10 years for computationally and visually analyzing MS/MS data. Founded on rigorous statistical methods, RAId's core program computes accurate E-values for peptides and proteins identified during database searches. Making this robust tool readily accessible for the proteomics community by developing a graphical user interface (GUI) is our main goal here. We have constructed a graphical user interface to facilitate the use of RAId on users' local machines. Written in Java, RAId_GUI not only makes easy executions of RAId but also provides tools for data/spectra visualization, MS-product analysis, molecular isotopic distribution analysis, and graphing the retrieval versus the proportion of false discoveries. The results viewer displays and allows the users to download the analyses results. Both the knowledge-integrated organismal databases and the code package (containing source code, the graphical user interface, and a user manual) are available for download at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads/raid.html .

  19. LOFT advanced control room operator diagnostic and display system (ODDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.G.; Robb, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Reactor Facility in Idaho includes a highly instrumented nuclear reactor operated by the Department of Energy for the purpose of establishing nuclear safety requirements. The results of the development and installation into LOFT of an Operator Diagnostic and Display System (ODDS) are presented. The ODDS is a computer-based graphics display system centered around a PRIME 550 computer with several RAMTEK color graphic display units located within the control room and available to the reactor operators. Use of computer-based color graphics to aid the reactor operator is discussed. A detailed hardware description of the LOFT data system and the ODDS is presented. Methods and problems of backfitting the ODDS equipment into the LOFT plant are discussed

  20. Surface Display of the Receptor-Binding Region of the Lactobacillus brevis S-Layer Protein in Lactococcus lactis Provides Nonadhesive Lactococci with the Ability To Adhere to Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Lindholm, Agneta; Palva, Airi

    2003-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis is a promising lactic acid bacterium for use as a probiotic dietary adjunct and a vaccine vector. The N-terminal region of the S-layer protein (SlpA) of L. brevis ATCC 8287 was recently shown to mediate adhesion to various human cell lines in vitro. In this study, a surface display cassette was constructed on the basis of this SlpA receptor-binding domain, a proteinase spacer, and an autolysin anchor. The cassette was expressed under control of the nisA promoter in Lactoc...

  1. European display scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Christopher T.

    2000-08-01

    The manufacture of Flat Panel Displays (FPDs) is dominated by Far Eastern sources, particularly in Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays (AMLCD) and Plasma. The United States has a very powerful capability in micro-displays. It is not well known that Europe has a very active research capability which has lead to many innovations in display technology. In addition there is a capability in display manufacturing of organic technologies as well as the licensed build of Japanese or Korean designs. Finally, Europe has a display systems capability in military products which is world class.

  2. Interactive editing program using display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, I.; Ehsenski, J.; Namsraj, Yu.; Fefilov, B.V.

    1976-01-01

    A general description is given as well as principal functions are considered of 'DOSE' interactive editor program with a display involved. The program has been elaborated for TRA/1-1001 computer. This program enables one to edit and correct texts in algorithmical languages on a raster display screen as well as to provide perforated tapes for their further usage. 'DOSE' program is regarded as a basic program system for a set of TRA/1 and MINSK-32 computers

  3. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE WITH APPLICATIONS IN SUSCEPTIBLE-INFECTIOUS-SUSCEPTIBLE MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Arotăriţei, D; Rotariu, Mariana; Popescu, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Practical significance of understanding the dynamics and evolution of infectious diseases increases continuously in contemporary world. The mathematical study of the dynamics of infectious diseases has a long history. By incorporating statistical methods and computer-based simulations in dynamic epidemiological models, it could be possible for modeling methods and theoretical analyses to be more realistic and reliable, allowing a more detailed understanding of the rules governing epidemic spreading. To provide the basis for a disease transmission, the population of a region is often divided into various compartments, and the model governing their relation is called the compartmental model. To present all of the information available, a graphical user interface provides icons and visual indicators. The graphical interface shown in this paper is performed using the MATLAB software ver. 7.6.0. MATLAB software offers a wide range of techniques by which data can be displayed graphically. The process of data viewing involves a series of operations. To achieve it, I had to make three separate files, one for defining the mathematical model and two for the interface itself. Considering a fixed population, it is observed that the number of susceptible individuals diminishes along with an increase in the number of infectious individuals so that in about ten days the number of individuals infected and susceptible, respectively, has the same value. If the epidemic is not controlled, it will continue for an indefinite period of time. By changing the global parameters specific of the SIS model, a more rapid increase of infectious individuals is noted. Using the graphical user interface shown in this paper helps achieving a much easier interaction with the computer, simplifying the structure of complex instructions by using icons and menus, and, in particular, programs and files are much easier to organize. Some numerical simulations have been presented to illustrate theoretical

  4. Outline of the Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for OPR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. Y.; Ahn, K. I. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This paper introduce the desktop severe accident graphic simulator module (VMAAP) which is a window-based severe accident simulator using MAAP as its engine. The VMAAP is one of the submodules in SAMEX system (Severe Accident Management Support Expert System) which is a decision support system for use in a severe accident management following an incident at a nuclear power plant. The SAMEX system consists of four major modules as sub-systems: (a) Severe accident risk data base module (SARDB): stores the data of integrated severe accident analysis code results like MAAP and MELCOR for hundreds of high frequency scenarios for the reference plant; (b) Risk-informed severe accident risk data base management module (RI-SARD): provides a platform to identify the initiating event, determine plant status and equipment availability, diagnoses the status of the reactor core, reactor vessel and containment building, and predicts the plant behaviors; (c) Severe accident management simulator module (VMAAP): runs the MAAP4 code with user friendly graphic interface for input deck and output display; (d) On-line severe accident management guidance module (On-line SAMG); provides available accident management strategies with an electronic format. The role of VMAAP in SAMEX can be described as followings. SARDB contains the most of high frequency scenarios based on a level 2 probabilistic safety analysis. Therefore, there is good chance that a real accident sequence is similar to one of the data base cases. In such a case, RI-SARD can predict an accident progression by a scenario-base or symptom-base search depends on the available plant parameter information. Nevertheless, there still may be deviations or variations between the actual scenario and the data base scenario. The deviations can be decreased by using a real-time graphic accident simulator, VMAAP.. VMAAP is a MAAP4-based severe accident simulation model for OPR-1000 plant. It can simulate spectrum of physical processes

  5. Outline of the Desktop Severe Accident Graphic Simulator Module for OPR-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Ahn, K. I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduce the desktop severe accident graphic simulator module (VMAAP) which is a window-based severe accident simulator using MAAP as its engine. The VMAAP is one of the submodules in SAMEX system (Severe Accident Management Support Expert System) which is a decision support system for use in a severe accident management following an incident at a nuclear power plant. The SAMEX system consists of four major modules as sub-systems: (a) Severe accident risk data base module (SARDB): stores the data of integrated severe accident analysis code results like MAAP and MELCOR for hundreds of high frequency scenarios for the reference plant; (b) Risk-informed severe accident risk data base management module (RI-SARD): provides a platform to identify the initiating event, determine plant status and equipment availability, diagnoses the status of the reactor core, reactor vessel and containment building, and predicts the plant behaviors; (c) Severe accident management simulator module (VMAAP): runs the MAAP4 code with user friendly graphic interface for input deck and output display; (d) On-line severe accident management guidance module (On-line SAMG); provides available accident management strategies with an electronic format. The role of VMAAP in SAMEX can be described as followings. SARDB contains the most of high frequency scenarios based on a level 2 probabilistic safety analysis. Therefore, there is good chance that a real accident sequence is similar to one of the data base cases. In such a case, RI-SARD can predict an accident progression by a scenario-base or symptom-base search depends on the available plant parameter information. Nevertheless, there still may be deviations or variations between the actual scenario and the data base scenario. The deviations can be decreased by using a real-time graphic accident simulator, VMAAP.. VMAAP is a MAAP4-based severe accident simulation model for OPR-1000 plant. It can simulate spectrum of physical processes

  6. Utilizing General Purpose Graphics Processing Units to Improve Performance of Computer Modelling and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, J.; Zhu, Y.; Koons, P. O.; Segee, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    With the introduction of the G8X series of cards by nVidia an architecture called CUDA was released, virtually all subsequent video cards have had CUDA support. With this new architecture nVidia provided extensions for C/C++ that create an Application Programming Interface (API) allowing code to be executed on the GPU. Since then the concept of GPGPU (general purpose graphics processing unit) has been growing, this is the concept that the GPU is very good a algebra and running things in parallel so we should take use of that power for other applications. This is highly appealing in the area of geodynamic modeling, as multiple parallel solutions of the same differential equations at different points in space leads to a large speedup in simulation speed. Another benefit of CUDA is a programmatic method of transferring large amounts of data between the computer's main memory and the dedicated GPU memory located on the video card. In addition to being able to compute and render on the video card, the CUDA framework allows for a large speedup in the situation, such as with a tiled display wall, where the rendered pixels are to be displayed in a different location than where they are rendered. A CUDA extension for VirtualGL was developed allowing for faster read back at high resolutions. This paper examines several aspects of rendering OpenGL graphics on large displays using VirtualGL and VNC. It demonstrates how performance can be significantly improved in rendering on a tiled monitor wall. We present a CUDA enhanced version of VirtualGL as well as the advantages to having multiple VNC servers. It will discuss restrictions caused by read back and blitting rates and how they are affected by different sizes of virtual displays being rendered.

  7. Nuclear Medicine Image Display. Chapter 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, H. [Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    The final step in a medical imaging procedure is to display the image(s) on a suitable display system where it is presented to the medical specialist for diagnostic interpretation. The display of hard copy images on X ray film or photographic film has largely been replaced today by soft copy image display systems with cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors as the image rendering device. Soft copy display requires a high quality display monitor and a certain amount of image processing to optimize the image both with respect to the properties of the display device and to some psychophysiological properties of the human visual system. A soft copy display system, therefore, consists of a display workstation providing some basic image processing functions and the display monitor as the intrinsic display device. Display devices of lower quality may be used during intermediate steps of the acquisition and analysis of a patient study. Display monitors with a quality suitable for diagnostic reading by the specialist medical doctor are called primary devices, also known as diagnostic devices. Monitors with lower quality but good enough to be used for positioning, processing of studies, presentation of images in the wards, etc. are referred to as secondary devices or clinical devices. Nuclear medicine images can be adequately displayed even for diagnostic purposes on secondary devices. However, the increasing use of X ray images on which to report jointly with images from nuclear medicine studies, such as those generated by dual modality imaging, notably by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, requires display devices capable of visualizing high resolution grey scale images at diagnostic quality, i.e. primary display devices. Both grey scale and colour display devices are used, the latter playing an important role in the display of processed nuclear medicine images and

  8. Nuclear Medicine Image Display. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.

    2014-01-01

    The final step in a medical imaging procedure is to display the image(s) on a suitable display system where it is presented to the medical specialist for diagnostic interpretation. The display of hard copy images on X ray film or photographic film has largely been replaced today by soft copy image display systems with cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors as the image rendering device. Soft copy display requires a high quality display monitor and a certain amount of image processing to optimize the image both with respect to the properties of the display device and to some psychophysiological properties of the human visual system. A soft copy display system, therefore, consists of a display workstation providing some basic image processing functions and the display monitor as the intrinsic display device. Display devices of lower quality may be used during intermediate steps of the acquisition and analysis of a patient study. Display monitors with a quality suitable for diagnostic reading by the specialist medical doctor are called primary devices, also known as diagnostic devices. Monitors with lower quality but good enough to be used for positioning, processing of studies, presentation of images in the wards, etc. are referred to as secondary devices or clinical devices. Nuclear medicine images can be adequately displayed even for diagnostic purposes on secondary devices. However, the increasing use of X ray images on which to report jointly with images from nuclear medicine studies, such as those generated by dual modality imaging, notably by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, requires display devices capable of visualizing high resolution grey scale images at diagnostic quality, i.e. primary display devices. Both grey scale and colour display devices are used, the latter playing an important role in the display of processed nuclear medicine images and

  9. Real-time graphics for the Space Station Freedom cupola, developed in the Systems Engineering Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Red, Michael T.; Hess, Philip W.

    1989-01-01

    Among the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center's responsibilities for Space Station Freedom is the cupola. Attached to the resource node, the cupola is a windowed structure that will serve as the space station's secondary control center. From the cupola, operations involving the mobile service center and orbital maneuvering vehicle will be conducted. The Systems Engineering Simulator (SES), located in building 16, activated a real-time man-in-the-loop cupola simulator in November 1987. The SES cupola is an engineering tool with the flexibility to evolve in both hardware and software as the final cupola design matures. Two workstations are simulated with closed-circuit television monitors, rotational and translational hand controllers, programmable display pushbuttons, and graphics display with trackball and keyboard. The displays and controls of the SES cupola are driven by a Silicon Graphics Integrated Raster Imaging System (IRIS) 4D/70 GT computer. Through the use of an interactive display builder program, SES, cupola display pages consisting of two dimensional and three dimensional graphics are constructed. These display pages interact with the SES via the IRIS real-time graphics interface. The focus is on the real-time graphics interface applications software developed on the IRIS.

  10. MathModelica - An Extensible Modeling and Simulation Environment with Integrated Graphics and Literate Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzson, Peter; Gunnarsson, Johan; Jirstrand, Mats

    2002-01-01

    MathModelica is an integrated interactive development environment for advanced system modeling and simulation. The environment integrates Modelica-based modeling and simulation with graphic design, advanced scripting facilities, integration of program code, test cases, graphics, documentation, mathematical type setting, and symbolic formula manipulation provided via Mathematica. The user interface consists of a graphical Model Editor and Notebooks. The Model Editor is a graphical user interfa...

  11. A Graphical Solution for Espaces Verts

    CERN Document Server

    Skelton, K

    1999-01-01

    'Espaces Verts' is responsible for the landscaping of the green areas, the cleaning of the roads, pavements, and car parks on the CERN site. This work is carried out by a contracting company. To control the work previously, there was a database of all the areas included in the contract and paper plans of the site. Given the size of the site the ideal solution was considered to be a visual system which integrates the maps and the database. To achieve this, the Surveying Department's graphical information system was used, linking it to the database for Espaces Verts, thus enabling the presentation of graphical thematic queries. This provides a useful management tool, which facilitates the task of ensuring that the contracting company carries out the work according to the agreed planning, and gives precise measurement of the site and thus of the contract. This paper will present how this has been achieved.

  12. Decision making in water resource planning: Models and computer graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedra, K; Carlsen, A J [ed.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes some basic concepts of simulation-based decision support systems for water resources management and the role of symbolic, graphics-based user interfaces. Designed to allow direct and easy access to advanced methods of analysis and decision support for a broad and heterogeneous group of users, these systems combine data base management, system simulation, operations research techniques such as optimization, interactive data analysis, elements of advanced decision technology, and artificial intelligence, with a friendly and conversational, symbolic display oriented user interface. Important features of the interface are the use of several parallel or alternative styles of interaction and display, indlucing colour graphics and natural language. Combining quantitative numerical methods with qualitative and heuristic approaches, and giving the user direct and interactive control over the systems function, human knowledge, experience and judgement are integrated with formal approaches into a tightly coupled man-machine system through an intelligent and easily accessible user interface. 4 drawings, 42 references.

  13. ShelXle: a Qt graphical user interface for SHELXL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübschle, Christian B; Sheldrick, George M; Dittrich, Birger

    2011-12-01

    ShelXle is a graphical user interface for SHELXL [Sheldrick, G. M. (2008). Acta Cryst. A64, 112-122], currently the most widely used program for small-molecule structure refinement. It combines an editor with syntax highlighting for the SHELXL-associated .ins (input) and .res (output) files with an interactive graphical display for visualization of a three-dimensional structure including the electron density (F(o)) and difference density (F(o)-F(c)) maps. Special features of ShelXle include intuitive atom (re-)naming, a strongly coupled editor, structure visualization in various mono and stereo modes, and a novel way of displaying disorder extending over special positions. ShelXle is completely compatible with all features of SHELXL and is written entirely in C++ using the Qt4 and FFTW libraries. It is available at no cost for Windows, Linux and Mac-OS X and as source code.

  14. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Gregson, James; Wetzstein, Gordon; Raskar, Ramesh; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  15. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  16. Conventions for reporting and displaying overflight observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, B.; Murphy, J.; Simecek-Beatty, D.

    1993-01-01

    During the critical initial phases of an oil spill response, as observations and reports come in from different agencies and companies, descriptions and representations can vary widely. These apparently conflicting reports can cause unnecessary confusion, wasting valuable time and resources. As the number of open-quotes expertsclose quotes and the amount of open-quotes necessaryclose quotes information multiply, the potential for information overload also increases. Important information that needs to be presented can be lost in the flood of information that is available. For many years the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in support of the US Coast Guard, has coordinated scientific input concerning the tracking and prediction of the transport of oil spilled in the marine environment. This role frequently involves recording visual or remote sensing observations from multiple platforms and observers, and displaying the information in a clear format, which needs to be rapidly available and unambiguous. Simple graphic products help identify conflicting views of information and allow responders to quickly build a open-quotes graphic consensusclose quotes of the situation. To this end the authors have developed in-house guidelines for presentation of crucial response information. Because correctly designed graphics can clearly and rapidly transmit large amounts of information, these guidelines focus on the graphic presentation of information. Some of these same conventions and criteria are being applied in evaluating and developing information acquisition and display tools. This poster presentation includes examples of the hardware and software used by Genwest and NOAA for the rapid display of response information

  17. Fractal geometry and computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Sakas, Georgios; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Englert, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Fractal geometry has become popular in the last 15 years, its applications can be found in technology, science, or even arts. Fractal methods and formalism are seen today as a general, abstract, but nevertheless practical instrument for the description of nature in a wide sense. But it was Computer Graphics which made possible the increasing popularity of fractals several years ago, and long after their mathematical formulation. The two disciplines are tightly linked. The book contains the scientificcontributions presented in an international workshop in the "Computer Graphics Center" in Darmstadt, Germany. The target of the workshop was to present the wide spectrum of interrelationships and interactions between Fractal Geometry and Computer Graphics. The topics vary from fundamentals and new theoretical results to various applications and systems development. All contributions are original, unpublished papers.The presentations have been discussed in two working groups; the discussion results, together with a...

  18. Graphical programming of telerobotic tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, D.E.; McDonald, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    With a goal of producing faster, safer, and cheaper technologies for nuclear waste cleanup, Sandia is actively developing and extending intelligent systems technologies. Graphical Programming is a key technology for robotic waste cleanup that Sandia is developing for this goal. This paper describes Sancho, Sandia most advanced Graphical Programming supervisory software. Sancho, now operational on several robot systems, incorporates all of Sandia's recent advances in supervisory control. Sancho, developed to rapidly apply Graphical Programming on a diverse set of robot systems, uses a general set of tools to implement task and operational behavior. Sancho can be rapidly reconfigured for new tasks and operations without modifying the supervisory code. Other innovations include task-based interfaces, event-based sequencing, and sophisticated GUI design. These innovations have resulted in robot control programs and approaches that are easier and safer to use than teleoperation, off-line programming, or full automation

  19. Cartooning History: Canada's Stories in Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alyson E.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, historical events, issues, and characters have been portrayed in an increasing number of non-fiction graphic texts. Similar to comics and graphic novels, graphic texts are defined as fully developed, non-fiction narratives told through panels of sequential art. Such non-fiction graphic texts are being used to teach history in…

  20. An Opening: Graphic Design's Discursive Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauvelt, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Introduces a special issue on critical histories of graphic design with a review of the particular problems identified with the history of graphic design as a field of study and the emerging discipline of graphic design history. Makes a case for the examination of graphic design through its relationships with larger discourses. (SR)

  1. Antinomies of Semiotics in Graphic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkerson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The following paper assesses the roles played by semiotics in graphic design and in graphic design education, which both reflects and shapes practice. It identifies a series of factors; graphic design education methods and culture; semiotic theories themselves and their application to graphic design; the two wings of Peircian semiotics and…

  2. Graphic Design Career Guide 2. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, James

    The graphic design field is diverse and includes many areas of specialization. This guide introduces students to career opportunities in graphic design. The guide is organized in four parts. "Part One: Careers in Graphic Design" identifies and discusses the various segments of the graphic design industry, including: Advertising, Audio-Visual, Book…

  3. Consed: a graphical editor for next-generation sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, David; Green, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The rapid growth of DNA sequencing throughput in recent years implies that graphical interfaces for viewing and correcting errors must now handle large numbers of reads, efficiently pinpoint regions of interest and automate as many tasks as possible. We have adapted consed to reflect this. To allow full-feature editing of large datasets while keeping memory requirements low, we developed a viewer, bamScape, that reads billion-read BAM files, identifies and displays problem areas for ...

  4. DEBUGGER: Developing a graphical user interface to debug FPGAs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)773309

    2015-01-01

    As part of the summer student projects, an FPGA debugger was designed using Qt- framework. The aim of this project is to help Data Acquisition System (DAQ) experts of COMPASS experiment to easily monitor the state of each FPGA being used. It is needful to continually monitor their state. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has then been designed to aid experts to do so. Via IP-Bus, the content of the FPGA under investigation is displayed to the user.

  5. IGUANA Architecture, Framework and Toolkit for Interactive Graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Alverson, G; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Tuura, L A; Taylor, L; Alverson, George; Eulisse, Giulio; Muzaffar, Shahzad; Osborne, Ianna; Tuura, Lassi A.; Taylor, Lucas

    2003-01-01

    IGUANA is a generic interactive visualisation framework based on a C++ component model. It provides powerful user interface and visualisation primitives in a way that is not tied to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The article describes interactive visualisation tools built using IGUANA for the CMS and D0 experiments, as well as generic GEANT4 and GEANT3 applications. It covers features of the graphical user interfaces, 3D and 2D graphics, high-quality vector graphics output for print media, various textual, tabular and hierarchical data views, and integration with the application through control panels, a command line and different multi-threading models.

  6. GUANA Architecture, Framework and Toolkit for Interactive Graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Alverson, G; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Tuura, L A; Taylor, L

    2003-01-01

    IGUANA is a generic interactive visualisation framework based on a C++ component model. It provides powerful user interface and visualisation primitives in a way that is not tied to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The article describes interactive visualisation tools built using IGUANA for the CMS and D0 experiments, as well as generic GEANT4 and GEANT3 applications. It covers features of the graphical user interfaces, 3D and 2D graphics, high-quality vector graphics output for print media, various textual, tabular and hierarchical data views, and integration with the application through control panels, a command line and different multi-threading models.

  7. Graphic Somatography: Life Writing, Comics, and the Ethics of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFalco, Amelia

    2016-09-01

    This essay considers the ways in which graphic caregiving memoirs complicate the idealizing tendencies of ethics of care philosophy. The medium's "capacious" layering of words, images, temporalities, and perspectives produces "productive tensions. . . The words and images entwine, but never synthesize" (Chute 2010, 5). In graphic memoirs about care, this "capaciousness" allows for quick oscillation between the rewards and struggles of care work, representing ambiguous, even ambivalent attitudes toward care. Graphic memoirs effectively represent multiple perspectives without synthesis, part of a structural and thematic ambivalence that provides a provocative counterpart to the abstract idealism of ethics of care philosophy.

  8. Liquid crystal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takami, K.

    1981-01-01

    An improved liquid crystal display device is described which can display letters, numerals and other necessary patterns in the night time using a minimized amount of radioactive material. To achieve this a self-luminous light source is placed in a limited region corresponding to a specific display area. (U.K.)

  9. Graphic Journeys: Graphic Novels' Representations of Immigrant Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how immigrant experiences are represented in the narratives of three graphic novels published in the last decade: Tan's (2007) "The Arrival," Kiyama's (1931/1999) "The Four Immigrants Manga: A Japanese Experience in San Francisco, 1904-1924," and Yang's (2006) "American Born Chinese." Through a theoretical lens informed by…

  10. Graphics Technology Study. Volume 1. State of Graphics Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    reaction of special heat sensitive paper when exposed to the heated elements of a thermal print head. Copy quality was poor due to characteristics...Vendors are now attempting to offer smaller units aimed at applications such as typography , graphic arts, CAD, and office automation. The key element in

  11. Surface display of the receptor-binding region of the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein in Lactococcus lactis provides nonadhesive lactococci with the ability to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Lindholm, Agneta; Palva, Airi

    2003-04-01

    Lactobacillus brevis is a promising lactic acid bacterium for use as a probiotic dietary adjunct and a vaccine vector. The N-terminal region of the S-layer protein (SlpA) of L. brevis ATCC 8287 was recently shown to mediate adhesion to various human cell lines in vitro. In this study, a surface display cassette was constructed on the basis of this SlpA receptor-binding domain, a proteinase spacer, and an autolysin anchor. The cassette was expressed under control of the nisA promoter in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. Western blot assay of lactococcal cell wall extracts with anti-SlpA antibodies confirmed that the SlpA adhesion domain of the fusion protein was expressed and located within the cell wall layer. Whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence microscopy verified that the SlpA adhesion-mediating region was accessible on the lactococcal cell surface. In vitro adhesion assays with the human intestinal epithelial cell line Intestine 407 indicated that the recombinant lactococcal cells had gained an ability to adhere to Intestine 407 cells significantly greater than that of wild-type L. lactis NZ9000. Serum inhibition assay further confirmed that adhesion of recombinant lactococci to Intestine 407 cells was indeed mediated by the N terminus-encoding part of the slpA gene. The ability of the receptor-binding region of SlpA to adhere to fibronectin was also confirmed with this lactococcal surface display system. These results show that, with the aid of the receptor-binding region of the L. brevis SlpA protein, the ability to adhere to gut epithelial cells can indeed be transferred to another, nonadhesive, lactic acid bacterium.

  12. Reconfigurable Full-Page Braille Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, H. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    Electrically actuated braille display cells of proposed type arrayed together to form full-page braille displays. Like other braille display cells, these provide changeable patterns of bumps driven by digitally recorded text stored on magnetic tapes or in solid-state electronic memories. Proposed cells contain electrorheological fluid. Viscosity of such fluid increases in strong electrostatic field.

  13. LOFT data acquisition and visual display system (DAVDS) presentation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, M.G.; Miyasaki, F.S.

    1976-03-01

    The Data Acquisition and Visual Display System (DAVDS) at the Loss-of-Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) has 742 data channel recording capability of which 576 are recorded digitally. The purpose of this computer program is to graphically present the data acquired and/or processed by the LOFT DAVDS. This program takes specially created plot data buffers of up to 1024 words and generates time history plots on the system electrostatic printer-plotter. The data can be extracted from two system input devices: Magnetic disk or digital magnetic tape. Versatility has been designed in the program by providing the user three methods of scaling plots: Automatic, control record, and manual. Time required to produce a plot on the system electrostatic printer-plotter varies from 30 to 90 seconds depending on the options selected. The basic computer and program details are described

  14. Dimensions of Situatedness for Digital Public Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui José

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Public displays are often strongly situated signs deeply embedded in their physical, social, and cultural setting. Understanding how the display is coupled with on-going situations, its level of situatedness, provides a key element for the interpretation of the displays themselves but is also an element for the interpretation of place, its situated practices, and its social context. Most digital displays, however, do not achieve the same sense of situatedness that seems so natural in their nondigital counterparts. This paper investigates people’s perception of situatedness when considering the connection between public displays and their context. We have collected over 300 photos of displays and conducted a set of analysis tasks involving focus groups and structured interviews with 15 participants. The contribution is a consolidated list of situatedness dimensions that should provide a valuable resource for reasoning about situatedness in digital displays and informing the design and development of display systems.

  15. Trend Monitoring System (TMS) graphics software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype bus communications systems, which is being used to support the Trend Monitoring System (TMS) and to evaluate the bus concept is considered. A set of FORTRAN-callable graphics subroutines for the host MODCOMP comuter, and an approach to splitting graphics work between the host and the system's intelligent graphics terminals are described. The graphics software in the MODCOMP and the operating software package written for the graphics terminals are included.

  16. Collection Of Software For Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbard, Eric A.; Makatura, George

    1990-01-01

    Ames Research Graphics System (ARCGRAPH) collection of software libraries and software utilities assisting researchers in generating, manipulating, and visualizing graphical data. Defines metafile format containing device-independent graphical data. File format used with various computer-graphics-manipulation and -animation software packages at Ames, including SURF (COSMIC Program ARC-12381) and GAS (COSMIC Program ARC-12379). Consists of two-stage "pipeline" used to put out graphical primitives. ARCGRAPH libraries developed on VAX computer running VMS.

  17. Immersive virtual walk-through development for tokamak using active head mounted display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Pramit

    2015-01-01

    A fully immersive virtual walk-through of the SST-1 tokamak has been developed. The virtual walkthrough renders the virtual model of SST-1 tokamak through a active stereoscopic head mounted display to visualize the virtual environment. All locations inside and outside of the reactor can be accessed and reviewed. Such a virtual walkthrough provides a 1:1 scale visualization of all components of the tokamak. To achieve such a virtual model, the graphical details of the tokamak CAD model are enhanced. Such enhancements are provided to improve lighting conditions at various locations, texturing of components to have a realistic visual effect and 360° rendering for ease of access. The graphical enhancements also include the redefinition of the facets to optimize the surface triangles to remove lags in display during visual rendering. Two separate algorithms are developed to interact with the virtual model. A fly-by algorithm, developed using C#, uses inputs from a commercial joystick to navigate within the virtual environment. The second algorithm uses the IR and gyroscopic tracking system of the head mounted display to render view as per the current pose of the user within the virtual environment and the direction of view. Such a virtual walk-thorough can be used extensively for design review and integration, review of new components, operator training for remote handling, operations, upgrades of tokamak, etc. (author)

  18. Three-dimensional display techniques: description and critique of methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.

    1982-01-01

    The recent advances in non invasive medical imaging of 3 dimensional spatial distribution of radionuclides, X-ray attenuation coefficients, and nuclear magnetic resonance parameters necessitate development of a general method for displaying these data. The objective of this paper is to give a systematic description and comparison of known methods for displaying three dimensional data. The discussion of display methods is divided into two major categories: 1) computer-graphics methods which use a two dimensional display screen; and 2) optical methods (such as holography, stereopsis and vari-focal systems)

  19. Geometric database maintenance using CCTV cameras and overlay graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenberg, Sheldon C.; Landell, B. Patrick; Kan, Edwin

    1988-01-01

    An interactive graphics system using closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras for remote verification and maintenance of a geometric world model database has been demonstrated in GE's telerobotics testbed. The database provides geometric models and locations of objects viewed by CCTV cameras and manipulated by telerobots. To update the database, an operator uses the interactive graphics system to superimpose a wireframe line drawing of an object with known dimensions on a live video scene containing that object. The methodology used is multipoint positioning to easily superimpose a wireframe graphic on the CCTV image of an object in the work scene. An enhanced version of GE's interactive graphics system will provide the object designation function for the operator control station of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's telerobot demonstration system.

  20. Common Graphics Library (CGL). Volume 1: LEZ user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nancy L.; Hammond, Dana P.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Miner, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Users are introduced to and instructed in the use of the Langley Easy (LEZ) routines of the Common Graphics Library (CGL). The LEZ routines form an application independent graphics package which enables the user community to view data quickly and easily, while providing a means of generating scientific charts conforming to the publication and/or viewgraph process. A distinct advantage for using the LEZ routines is that the underlying graphics package may be replaced or modified without requiring the users to change their application programs. The library is written in ANSI FORTRAN 77, and currently uses a CORE-based underlying graphics package, and is therefore machine independent, providing support for centralized and/or distributed computer systems.

  1. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    Cum.nings, J. P., et al., Properties and Limitations oe Liquid Crystals for Aircraft Displays, Honeywell Corporate Researc ."I Center, Final Report HR-72...basic module could be used to build displays for both the commercial and military! 157- marhecs, and so would establi sh a broad and sizable market ... market for the display becomes a reality; therein lies, f TABLE 16 THE COURSE OF FUTURE DISPLAY DEVELOPMENT Today 1976-77 1980 1985 Display Size 2" 1 3.2

  2. Use of a Data-Linked Weather Information Display and Effects on Pilot Navigation Decision Making in a Piloted Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchnovicz, Daniel E.; Novacek, Paul F.; Burgess, Malcolm A.; Heck, Michael L.; Stokes, Alan F.

    2001-01-01

    This study provides recommendations to the FAA and to prospective manufacturers based on an exploration of the effects of data link weather displays upon pilot decision performance. An experiment was conducted with twenty-four current instrument rated pilots who were divided into two equal groups and presented with a challenging but realistic flight scenario involving weather containing significant embedded convective activity. All flights were flown in a full-mission simulation facility within instrument meteorological conditions. The inflight weather display depicted NexRad images, graphical METARs and textual METARs. The objective was to investigate the potential for misuse of a weather display, and incorporate recommendations for the design and use of these displays. The primary conclusion of the study found that the inflight weather display did not improve weather avoidance decision making. Some of the reasons to support this finding include: the pilot's inability to easily perceive their proximity to the storms, increased workload and difficulty in deciphering METAR textual data. The compelling nature of a graphical weather display caused many pilots to reduce their reliance on corroborating weather information from other sources. Minor changes to the weather display could improve the ability of a pilot to make better decisions on hazard avoidance.

  3. High performance visual display for HENP detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McGuigan, M; Spiletic, J; Fine, V; Nevski, P

    2001-01-01

    A high end visual display for High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) detectors is necessary because of the sheer size and complexity of the detector. For BNL this display will be of special interest because of STAR and ATLAS. To load, rotate, query, and debug simulation code with a modern detector simply takes too long even on a powerful work station. To visualize the HENP detectors with maximal performance we have developed software with the following characteristics. We develop a visual display of HENP detectors on BNL multiprocessor visualization server at multiple level of detail. We work with general and generic detector framework consistent with ROOT, GAUDI etc, to avoid conflicting with the many graphic development groups associated with specific detectors like STAR and ATLAS. We develop advanced OpenGL features such as transparency and polarized stereoscopy. We enable collaborative viewing of detector and events by directly running the analysis in BNL stereoscopic theatre. We construct enhanced interactiv...

  4. PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED COURSE OF ENGINEERING-GRAPHICAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Zhuykova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present the results of managing the competence oriented self-directed student learning while studying graphical subjects at Kalashnikov Izhevsk State Technical University.Methods. The technology of self-directed engineering-graphical training of future bachelors based on the analysis of educational literature and teaching experience, providing individualization and professional education is suggested. The method of team expert appraisal was used at all stages of self-directed learning management. This method is one of main in qualimetry (the science concerned with assessing and evaluating the quality of any objects and processes; it permits to reveal the components of engineering-graphical competence, to establish the criteria and markers of determining the level of its development, to perform expert evaluation of student tasks and estimation procedures.Results. It has been established that the revitalization of student selfdirected learning owing to professional education and individualization permits to increase the level of student engineering-graphical competence development. Scientific novelty. The criteria evaluation procedures for determining the level of student engineering-graphical competence development in the process of their professional oriented self-directed learning while studying graphical subjects at a technical university are developed.Practical significance. The professional-focused educational trajectories of independent engineering-graphic preparation of students are designed and substantially filled in content. Such training is being realised at the present time at Kalashnikov Izhevsk State Technical University, major «Instrument Engineering». 

  5. Standards for electronic imaging for graphic arts systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, S. T.; Dunn, Patrice M.

    1991-03-01

    This paper examines the development of electronic imaging standards by and for the graphic arts industry. Taken collectively this body of work is referred to as Digital Data Exchange Standards (DDES). Because these standards are being driven by market and user requirements there are several fundamental guiding principles to their development. This paper examines these and provides an overview to the technical developments undertaken by the accredited graphic arts industry standards committees to date.

  6. Application of computer graphics to regional trunk road network planning

    OpenAIRE

    M Odani

    1992-01-01

    The author attempts to demonstrate the use of computer graphics to provide an efficient and effective visual presentation method for tranbsprtation planning. First, the basic concept of the visual presentation method of planning is explained and the required hardware is introduced. The information presented graphically by the proposed method is then shown for each step in the process of regional trunk road network planning in the Keihanshin Metropolitan Area of Japan: analysis of the traffic-...

  7. Math on a sphere: Making use of public displays in mathematics and programming education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eisenberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Science on a Sphere (SoS is a compelling educational display installed at numerous museums and planetariums around the world; essentially the SoS display is a large spherical surface on which multicolor high-resolution depictions of (e.g. planetary weather maps may be depicted. Fascinating as the SoS display is, however, it is in practice restricted to the use of museum professionals; students (and for that matter, older museum visitors are unable to create their own displays for the surface. This paper describes a working software system, Math on a Sphere (MoS, that democratizes the SoS display by providing a simple programming interface to the public, over the World Wide Web. Briefly, our system allows anyone to write programs for spherical graphics patterns, and then to upload those programs at a planetarium or museum site and see the result on the giant sphere. This paper describes the implementation of the MoS system; sketches a sample project; and concludes with a more wide-ranging discussion of our user testing to date, as well as strategies for empowering children and students with greater control of public displays.

  8. A Poetics of Graphic Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Proposes that the work of the French feminist writers Helene Cixous and Luce Irigaray could serve as the basis for devising a more imaginative form of critical writing that might help to draw the history and practice of graphic design into a closer and more purposeful relation. (SR)

  9. Recorded Music and Graphic Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterer, Irv

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of art as an element of music-recording packaging. Describes a project in which students design a jacket for either cassette or CD using a combination of computerized and traditional rendering techniques. Reports that students have been inspired to look into careers in graphic design. (DSK)

  10. GRAPHIC INTERFACES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion PANA,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using effective the method of calculating Fitness for Service requires the achievement of graphical interfaces. This paper presents an example of such interfaces, made with Visual Basic program and used in the evaluation of pipelines in a research contract [4

  11. Overview of Graphical User Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulser, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of graphical user interfaces for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers the history of OPACs; OPAC front-end design, including examples from Indiana University and the University of Illinois; and planning and implementation of a user interface. (10 references) (EA)

  12. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.G.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N.

    1997-01-01

    Traditional Single-Sensor-Single Indicator (SSSI) displays are poorly matched to the cognitive abilities of operators, especially for large and complex systems. It is difficult for operators to monitor very large arrays of displays and controls, and to integrate the information displayed therein. In addition, standard operating procedures (SOPs) are bulky (running to many hundreds of pages) and difficult to use, and operators may become lost. For these reasons, and also because it is becoming increasingly difficult to find replacements for aging hardware components, there is a trend towards computerized graphical interfaces for nuclear power plants (NPPs). There is, however, little rational theory for display design in this domain. This report describes some recent theoretical developments and shows how to develop displays which will greatly reduce the cognitive load on the operator and allow the use of perceptual rather than cognitive mechanisms while using SON and to support state diagnosis and fault management. The report outlines the conceptual framework within which such a new approach could be developed, and provides an example of how the operating procedures for the start-up sequence of a NPP could be realized. A detailed description of a set of displays for a graphical interface for the SON of the feedwater system is provided as an example of how the proposed approach could be realized, and a general account of how it would fit into the overall start-up sequence is given. Examples of open-quotes direct perceptionclose quotes or open-quotes ecologicalclose quotes configural state space displays to support the use of the proposed direct manipulation SOP interface are provided, and also a critical discussion which identifies some difficulties which may be anticipated should the general approach herein advocated be adopted

  13. Vega-Lite: A Grammar of Interactive Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayan, Arvind; Moritz, Dominik; Wongsuphasawat, Kanit; Heer, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    We present Vega-Lite, a high-level grammar that enables rapid specification of interactive data visualizations. Vega-Lite combines a traditional grammar of graphics, providing visual encoding rules and a composition algebra for layered and multi-view displays, with a novel grammar of interaction. Users specify interactive semantics by composing selections. In Vega-Lite, a selection is an abstraction that defines input event processing, points of interest, and a predicate function for inclusion testing. Selections parameterize visual encodings by serving as input data, defining scale extents, or by driving conditional logic. The Vega-Lite compiler automatically synthesizes requisite data flow and event handling logic, which users can override for further customization. In contrast to existing reactive specifications, Vega-Lite selections decompose an interaction design into concise, enumerable semantic units. We evaluate Vega-Lite through a range of examples, demonstrating succinct specification of both customized interaction methods and common techniques such as panning, zooming, and linked selection.

  14. Distributed rendering for multiview parallax displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annen, T.; Matusik, W.; Pfister, H.; Seidel, H.-P.; Zwicker, M.

    2006-02-01

    3D display technology holds great promise for the future of television, virtual reality, entertainment, and visualization. Multiview parallax displays deliver stereoscopic views without glasses to arbitrary positions within the viewing zone. These systems must include a high-performance and scalable 3D rendering subsystem in order to generate multiple views at real-time frame rates. This paper describes a distributed rendering system for large-scale multiview parallax displays built with a network of PCs, commodity graphics accelerators, multiple projectors, and multiview screens. The main challenge is to render various perspective views of the scene and assign rendering tasks effectively. In this paper we investigate two different approaches: Optical multiplexing for lenticular screens and software multiplexing for parallax-barrier displays. We describe the construction of large-scale multi-projector 3D display systems using lenticular and parallax-barrier technology. We have developed different distributed rendering algorithms using the Chromium stream-processing framework and evaluate the trade-offs and performance bottlenecks. Our results show that Chromium is well suited for interactive rendering on multiview parallax displays.

  15. An Investigation of Interval Management Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swieringa, Kurt A.; Wilson, Sara R.; Shay, Rick

    2015-01-01

    NASA's first Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration (ATD-1) was created to transition the most mature ATM technologies from the laboratory to the National Airspace System. One selected technology is Interval Management (IM), which uses onboard aircraft automation to compute speeds that help the flight crew achieve and maintain precise spacing behind a preceding aircraft. Since ATD-1 focuses on a near-term environment, the ATD-1 flight demonstration prototype requires radio voice communication to issue an IM clearance. Retrofit IM displays will enable pilots to both enter information into the IM avionics and monitor IM operation. These displays could consist of an interface to enter data from an IM clearance and also an auxiliary display that presents critical information in the primary field-of-view. A human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted to examine usability and acceptability of retrofit IM displays, which flight crews found acceptable. Results also indicate the need for salient alerting when new speeds are generated and the desire to have a primary field of view display available that can display text and graphic trend indicators.

  16. Reverse-engineering graphical innovation: an introduction to graphical regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Arsenault

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Technological innovation in the video games industry is a rich area of research that has barely been explored as of yet. Gamers are always clamoring for novelty and a remedy to the oft-decried “sequelitis” that “plagues” the industry, while game publishers and platform holders secretly plan a next-gen platform to capture the ever-shifting market. In this light, the importance of graphics cannot be understated, as it is usually taken for granted in game historiography that “[g]ame graphics were, and to a large extent still are, the main criteria by which advancing video game technology is benchmarked” (Wolf, 2003, p.53.

  17. Energy, mass, model-based displays, and memory recall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltracchi, L.

    1989-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor in the context of the conservation laws for energy and mass is discussed. These conservation laws are the basis of the Rankine heat engine cycle. Computer graphic implementation of the heat engine cycle, in terms of temperature-entropy coordinates for water, serves as a model-based display of the plant process. A human user of this display, trained in first principles of the process, may exercise a monitoring strategy based on the conservation laws

  18. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason; Johnson, Andrew; Renambot, Luc; Peterka, Tom; Jeong, Byungil; Sandin, Daniel J.; Talandis, Jonas; Jagodic, Ratko; Nam, Sungwon; Hur, Hyejung; Sun, Yiwen

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  19. High performance interactive graphics for shower reconstruction in HPC, the DELPHI barrel electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, C.

    1990-01-01

    Complex software for shower reconstruction in DELPHI barrel electromagnetic calorimeter which deals, for each event, with great amounts of information, due to the high spatial resolution of this detector, needs powerful verification tools. An interactive graphics program, running on high performance graphics display system Whizzard 7555 from Megatek, was developed to display the logical steps in showers and their axes reconstruction. The program allows both operations on the image in real-time (rotation, translation and zoom) and the use of non-geometrical criteria to modify it (as the use of energy) thresholds for the representation of the elements that compound the showers (or of the associated lego plots). For this purpose graphics objects associated to user parameters were defined. Instancing and modelling features of the native graphics library were extensively used

  20. Application of standard softWare of the CDC-6500 interactive graphic therminal for representation of spiral scanning data and event saving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehrguj, B.; Ososkov, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A system of programs, based on a standard graphic display software, is developed which enables the user to display the results of spiral scanning using a terminal keyboard and a FILTR program. Quality assessment of filtering is also available. The use of a cursor which provides a certain feedback between the display and the CDC-6500 computer provides good capabilities for the investigation of the filtering program failures and saves the most interesting events. To speed up scanning of events, a special program is written which performs pre-filtration and reduces 4 to 5 fold the amount of source numerical data of track projections. Its flowchart is based on the well-known method of cords, which allows to save 10-12 events/hour

  1. Displays and simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohon, N.

    A 'simulator' is defined as a machine which imitates the behavior of a real system in a very precise manner. The major components of a simulator and their interaction are outlined in brief form, taking into account the major components of an aircraft flight simulator. Particular attention is given to the visual display portion of the simulator, the basic components of the display, their interactions, and their characteristics. Real image displays are considered along with virtual image displays, and image generators. Attention is given to an advanced simulator for pilot training, a holographic pancake window, a scan laser image generator, the construction of an infrared target simulator, and the Apollo Command Module Simulator.

  2. Upper Limb-Hand 3D Display System for Biomimetic Myoelectric Hand Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jimenez, Gonzalo

    2001-01-01

    A graphics system displaying both upper limb posture and opening-closing of a prosthetic hand was developed for realtime operation of our biomimetic myoelectric hand simulator, Posture of the upper...

  3. Two graphical user interfaces for managing and analyzing MODFLOW groundwater-model scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Scenario Manager and Scenario Analyzer are graphical user interfaces that facilitate the use of calibrated, MODFLOW-based groundwater models for investigating possible responses to proposed stresses on a groundwater system. Scenario Manager allows a user, starting with a calibrated model, to design and run model scenarios by adding or modifying stresses simulated by the model. Scenario Analyzer facilitates the process of extracting data from model output and preparing such display elements as maps, charts, and tables. Both programs are designed for users who are familiar with the science on which groundwater modeling is based but who may not have a groundwater modeler’s expertise in building and calibrating a groundwater model from start to finish. With Scenario Manager, the user can manipulate model input to simulate withdrawal or injection wells, time-variant specified hydraulic heads, recharge, and such surface-water features as rivers and canals. Input for stresses to be simulated comes from user-provided geographic information system files and time-series data files. A Scenario Manager project can contain multiple scenarios and is self-documenting. Scenario Analyzer can be used to analyze output from any MODFLOW-based model; it is not limited to use with scenarios generated by Scenario Manager. Model-simulated values of hydraulic head, drawdown, solute concentration, and cell-by-cell flow rates can be presented in display elements. Map data can be represented as lines of equal value (contours) or as a gradated color fill. Charts and tables display time-series data obtained from output generated by a transient-state model run or from user-provided text files of time-series data. A display element can be based entirely on output of a single model run, or, to facilitate comparison of results of multiple scenarios, an element can be based on output from multiple model runs. Scenario Analyzer can export display elements and supporting metadata as a Portable

  4. Practical algorithms for 3D computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, R Stuart

    2013-01-01

    ""A valuable book to accompany any course that mixes the theory and practice of 3D graphics. The book's web site has many useful programs and code samples.""-Karen Rafferty, Queen's University, Belfast""The topics covered by this book are backed by the OpenFX modeling and animation software. This is a big plus in that it provides a practical perspective and encourages experimentation. … [This] will offer students a more interesting and hands-on learning experience, especially for those wishing to pursue a career in computer game development.""-Naganand Madhavapeddy, GameDeveloper>

  5. Programming Graphical User Interfaces in R

    CERN Document Server

    Verzani, John

    2012-01-01

    Programming Graphical User Interfaces with R introduces each of the major R packages for GUI programming: RGtk2, qtbase, Tcl/Tk, and gWidgets. With examples woven through the text as well as stand-alone demonstrations of simple yet reasonably complete applications, the book features topics especially relevant to statisticians who aim to provide a practical interface to functionality implemented in R. The book offers: A how-to guide for developing GUIs within R The fundamentals for users with limited knowledge of programming within R and other languages GUI design for specific functions or as l

  6. Interactive computer graphics for stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Davis, J.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer (IBM PC/AT) system has been developed to incorporate multiple image sources for stereotactic neurosurgery. Hard copy data is calibrated and captured with a video camera and frame grabber. Line contours are generated automatically on the basis of gray scale density or digitized manually. Interactive computer graphics provide a format with acceptable speed and accuracy for stereotactic neurosurgery. The ability to dimensionally integrate existing image data from multiple sources for target selection makes preoperative scans and scanner compatible head holders unnecessary. The system description and examples of use for brain tumor biopsy and brachytherapy ware presented

  7. A graphical user interface for diagnostic radiology dosimetry using Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.J.; Gorbatkov, D.; Schultz, F.W.

    2000-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods (for example, MCNP, EGGS4) are the 'gold standard' for both external and internal dosimetry in humans. These powerful simulation tools are, however, general-purpose codes and consequently do not provide a simple user interface for specific dosimetry tasks. We have developed a graphical user interface, for external radiation dosimetry (diagnostic radiology) using MCNP and an anthropomorphic mathematical phantom (Adam/Eva), which enables convenient modification and processing of the MCNP input and output files. The input form displays a colour coded, 3D representation of the phantom with a superimposed 'beam' for the required x-ray projection. The phantom can be rotated through 360 degrees and a transverse section at the level of the mid-point of the beam is also displayed. Text fields enable entry of input data (beam dimensions, source position, kVp, total filtration, focus-to-skin distance). A pull-down menu enables the user to select from 22 standard radiographic views. A standard projection can be modified, or new projection data entered if required. The input program modifies the MCNP input file and initiates processing. An output form displays the organ doses, normalised to unit skin entrance dose (with backscatter) (SED). The user can also enter the SED (calculated or measured) for a particular machine, to obtain the effective dose. To validate the program, the results for a PA Chest study (80 kVp, 2.5 mm Al total filtration) were compared with NRPB data (Jones and Wall, 1985). In conclusion, a convenient and reliable graphical user interface has been developed for MCNP, which enables dosimetry calculation for a full range of diagnostic radiological studies. (author)

  8. Intuitive Music and Graphic Notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    Describes subjects existing at Aalborg University since the middle eighties. "Intuitive Music" trains free improvisation through exercises including group-dynamic exercises, awareness exercises and parameter exercises. Students also create open compositions. "Graphic notation"concerns aural scores....... Students' works are quoted. The writer discusses the theoretical context and advocates for giving more attention to music as the medium in which music therapy takes place, referring to language theory and Jakobson. NB: the description of the two subjects are, at the present moment (2011) no longer up...... to date. Intuitive music stresses less making compositions and more using the main instrument intuitively. Graphic notation has been integrated into a larger subject (also taught by the present author) which also comprises other methods of description and interpretation of music....

  9. The missing graphical user interface for genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    dynamic graphical menus, and the results are displayed in intuitive plots and summaries that encourage interactive workflows and the exploration of hypotheses. The underlying data analysis tools can be almost any piece of software, written in any language, but all their complexity is neatly hidden inside of Galaxy, allowing users to focus on scientific rather than technical questions.

  10. Development of the graphic design and control system based on a graphic simulator for the spent fuel dismantling equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Song, T. G.; Yoon, J. S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, the graphic design system is developed for designing the spent fuel rod consolidation and the dismantling processes. This system is used throughout the design stages from the conceptual design to the motion analysis. Also, the real-time control system of the rod extracting equipment is developed. This system utilizes the graphic simulator which simulates the motion of the equipment in real time by synchronously connecting the control PC with the graphic server through the TCP/IP network. The developed system is expected to be used as an effective tool in designing the process equipment for the spent fuel management. And the real-time graphic control system can be effectively used to enhance the reliability and safety of the spent fuel handling process by providing the remote monitoring function of the process.

  11. Development of the graphic design and control system based on a graphic simulator for the spent fuel dismantling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Song, T. G.; Yoon, J. S.

    2000-06-01

    In this study, the graphic design system is developed for designing the spent fuel rod consolidation and the dismantling processes. This system is used throughout the design stages from the conceptual design to the motion analysis. Also, the real-time control system of the rod extracting equipment is developed. This system utilizes the graphic simulator which simulates the motion of the equipment in real time by synchronously connecting the control PC with the graphic server through the TCP/IP network. The developed system is expected to be used as an effective tool in designing the process equipment for the spent fuel management. And the real-time graphic control system can be effectively used to enhance the reliability and safety of the spent fuel handling process by providing the remote monitoring function of the process

  12. Random Number Simulations Reveal How Random Noise Affects the Measurements and Graphical Portrayals of Self-Assessed Competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Nuhfer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assessment measures of competency are blends of an authentic self-assessment signal that researchers seek to measure and random disorder or "noise" that accompanies that signal. In this study, we use random number simulations to explore how random noise affects critical aspects of self-assessment investigations: reliability, correlation, critical sample size, and the graphical representations of self-assessment data. We show that graphical conventions common in the self-assessment literature introduce artifacts that invite misinterpretation. Troublesome conventions include: (y minus x vs. (x scatterplots; (y minus x vs. (x column graphs aggregated as quantiles; line charts that display data aggregated as quantiles; and some histograms. Graphical conventions that generate minimal artifacts include scatterplots with a best-fit line that depict (y vs. (x measures (self-assessed competence vs. measured competence plotted by individual participant scores, and (y vs. (x scatterplots of collective average measures of all participants plotted item-by-item. This last graphic convention attenuates noise and improves the definition of the signal. To provide relevant comparisons across varied graphical conventions, we use a single dataset derived from paired measures of 1154 participants' self-assessed competence and demonstrated competence in science literacy. Our results show that different numerical approaches employed in investigating and describing self-assessment accuracy are not equally valid. By modeling this dataset with random numbers, we show how recognizing the varied expressions of randomness in self-assessment data can improve the validity of numeracy-based descriptions of self-assessment.

  13. Learning Graphical Models With Hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kean Ming; London, Palma; Mohan, Karthik; Lee, Su-In; Fazel, Maryam; Witten, Daniela

    2014-10-01

    We consider the problem of learning a high-dimensional graphical model in which there are a few hub nodes that are densely-connected to many other nodes. Many authors have studied the use of an ℓ 1 penalty in order to learn a sparse graph in the high-dimensional setting. However, the ℓ 1 penalty implicitly assumes that each edge is equally likely and independent of all other edges. We propose a general framework to accommodate more realistic networks with hub nodes, using a convex formulation that involves a row-column overlap norm penalty. We apply this general framework to three widely-used probabilistic graphical models: the Gaussian graphical model, the covariance graph model, and the binary Ising model. An alternating direction method of multipliers algorithm is used to solve the corresponding convex optimization problems. On synthetic data, we demonstrate that our proposed framework outperforms competitors that do not explicitly model hub nodes. We illustrate our proposal on a webpage data set and a gene expression data set.

  14. Graphical Classification of Entangled Qutrits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Honda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A multipartite quantum state is entangled if it is not separable. Quantum entanglement plays a fundamental role in many applications of quantum information theory, such as quantum teleportation. Stochastic local quantum operations and classical communication (SLOCC cannot essentially change quantum entanglement without destroying it. Therefore, entanglement can be classified by dividing quantum states into equivalence classes, where two states are equivalent if each can be converted into the other by SLOCC. Properties of this classification, especially in the case of non two-dimensional quantum systems, have not been well studied. Graphical representation is sometimes used to clarify the nature and structural features of entangled states. SLOCC equivalence of quantum bits (qubits has been described graphically via a connection between tripartite entangled qubit states and commutative Frobenius algebras (CFAs in monoidal categories. In this paper, we extend this method to qutrits, i.e., systems that have three basis states. We examine the correspondence between CFAs and tripartite entangled qutrits. Using the symmetry property, which is required by the definition of a CFA, we find that there are only three equivalence classes that correspond to CFAs. We represent qutrits graphically, using the connection to CFAs. We derive equations that characterize the three equivalence classes. Moreover, we show that any qutrit can be represented as a composite of three graphs that correspond to the three classes.

  15. 3D Graphics with Spreadsheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Benacka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the formulas for orthographic parallel projection of 3D bodies on computer screen are derived using secondary school vector algebra. The spreadsheet implementation is demonstrated in six applications that project bodies with increasing intricacy – a convex body (cube with non-solved visibility, convex bodies (cube, chapel with solved visibility, a coloured convex body (chapel with solved visibility, and a coloured non-convex body (church with solved visibility. The projections are revolvable in horizontal and vertical plane, and they are changeable in size. The examples show an unusual way of using spreadsheets as a 3D computer graphics tool. The applications can serve as a simple introduction to the general principles of computer graphics, to the graphics with spreadsheets, and as a tool for exercising stereoscopic vision. The presented approach is usable at visualising 3D scenes within some topics of secondary school curricula as solid geometry (angles and distances of lines and planes within simple bodies or analytic geometry in space (angles and distances of lines and planes in E3, and even at university level within calculus at visualising graphs of z = f(x,y functions. Examples are pictured.

  16. Graphical models for inferring single molecule dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Ruben L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent explosion of experimental techniques in single molecule biophysics has generated a variety of novel time series data requiring equally novel computational tools for analysis and inference. This article describes in general terms how graphical modeling may be used to learn from biophysical time series data using the variational Bayesian expectation maximization algorithm (VBEM. The discussion is illustrated by the example of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET versus time data, where the smFRET time series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM with Gaussian observables. A detailed description of smFRET is provided as well. Results The VBEM algorithm returns the model’s evidence and an approximating posterior parameter distribution given the data. The former provides a metric for model selection via maximum evidence (ME, and the latter a description of the model’s parameters learned from the data. ME/VBEM provide several advantages over the more commonly used approach of maximum likelihood (ML optimized by the expectation maximization (EM algorithm, the most important being a natural form of model selection and a well-posed (non-divergent optimization problem. Conclusions The results demonstrate the utility of graphical modeling for inference of dynamic processes in single molecule biophysics.

  17. User interface graphically improves generator AL diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.F.; King, I.J.

    1991-01-01

    In April of 1990, the recently developed Diagnostic Graphical User Interface (DGUI) was installed at a large nuclear power plant in the midwestern United States. Since 1988, the power plant has been using the Generator Artificial Intelligence Diagnostics (GenAID) System, which provides online diagnostic capability for the generator and generator auxiliaries through a plant data center (PDC) and communication link to the diagnostic operations center (DOC) in Orlando, Florida. The enhanced system provides the power plant control room operator with a comprehensive tool to understand and better utilize the information provided by the existing knowledge bases. This paper represents a significant improvement over existing technology by providing the power plant control room operator with the capability of interacting directly with the diagnostic system

  18. Graphics-oriented application language for LASNEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    GOAL, a graphics-oriented application language, was developed to help physicists understand the large amounts of data produced by LASNEX. GOAL combines many aspects of the old LASNEX language, computer graphics, and standard computer languages

  19. The influence of annotation in graphical organizers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezdan, Eniko; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Bezdan, E., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 29-31 August). The influence of annotation in graphical organizers. Poster presented at the biannual meeting of the EARLI Special Interest Group Comprehension of Text and Graphics, Grenoble, France.

  20. Microcomputer Simulated CAD for Engineering Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, David L.; Myers, Roy E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a simulated computer-aided-graphics (CAD) program at The Pennsylvania State University. Rationale for the program, facilities, microcomputer equipment (Apple) used, and development of a software package for simulating applied engineering graphics are considered. (JN)

  1. Computer Graphics and Administrative Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Reduction in prices now makes it possible for almost any institution to use computer graphics for administrative decision making and research. Current and potential uses of computer graphics in these two areas are discussed. (JN)

  2. Computer Graphics for Multimedia and Hypermedia Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses several theoretical and technical aspects of computer-graphics development that are useful for creating hypermedia and multimedia materials. Topics addressed include primary bitmap attributes in computer graphics, the jigsaw principle, and raster layering. (MSE)

  3. NIST display colorimeter calibration facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven W.; Ohno, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    A facility has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to provide calibration services for color-measuring instruments to address the need for improving and certifying the measurement uncertainties of this type of instrument. While NIST has active programs in photometry, flat panel display metrology, and color and appearance measurements, these are the first services offered by NIST tailored to color-measuring instruments for displays. An overview of the facility, the calibration approach, and associated uncertainties are presented. Details of a new tunable colorimetric source and the development of new transfer standard instruments are discussed.

  4. Visual merchandising window display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opris (Cas. Stanila M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Window display plays a major part in the selling strategies; it does not only include the simple display of goods, nowadays it is a form of art, also having the purpose of sustaining the brand image. This article wants to reveal the tools that are essential in creating a fabulous window display. Being a window designer is not an easy job, you have to always think ahead trends, to have a sense of colour, to know how to use light to attract customers in the store after only one glance at the window. The big store window displays are theatre scenes: with expensive backgrounds, special effects and high fashion mannequins. The final role of the displays is to convince customers to enter the store and trigger the purchasing act which is the final goal of the retail activity.

  5. Perceived effectiveness of graphic health warnings as a deterrent for smoking initiation among adolescents in selected schools in southwest Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Adebiyi

    2016-03-01

    Introduction of graphic health warnings, especially with an imagery depicting cancer and impotence may influence non-smokers to remain abstinent. Therefore, this study provides a template for a future policy-relevant study on graphic health warning in Nigeria.

  6. Computer graphics from basic to application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Hyeong; Mun, Sung Min

    1998-04-01

    This book mentions conception of computer graphics, background history, necessity and applied field like construction design, image processing, auto mobile design, fashion design and TV broadcast, basic principle of computer, computer graphics hardware, computer graphics software such as adobe illustrator tool box and adobe photo shop, quarkXpress like introduction, application and operating circumstance, 3D graphics with summary, difference of versions of 3D studio and system, and Auto CAD application.

  7. Graphic filter library implemented in CUDA language

    OpenAIRE

    Peroutková, Hedvika

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the problem of reducing computation time of raster image processing by parallel computing on graphics processing unit. Raster image processing thereby refers to the application of graphic filters, which can be applied in sequence with different settings. This thesis evaluates the suitability of using parallelization on graphic card for raster image adjustments based on multicriterial choice. Filters are implemented for graphics processing unit in CUDA language. Opacity ...

  8. Hierarchical data structures for graphics program languages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonauser, M.; Schinner, P.; Weiss, J.

    1978-01-01

    Graphic data processing with a computer makes exacting demands on the interactive capability of the program language and the management of the graphic data. A description of the structure of a graphics program language which has been shown by initial practical experiments to possess a particularly favorable interactive capability is followed by the evaluation of various data structures (list, tree, ring) with respect to their interactive capability in processing graphics. A practical structure is proposed. (orig.) [de

  9. Computer graphics from basic to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Hyeong; Mun, Sung Min

    1998-04-15

    This book mentions conception of computer graphics, background history, necessity and applied field like construction design, image processing, auto mobile design, fashion design and TV broadcast, basic principle of computer, computer graphics hardware, computer graphics software such as adobe illustrator tool box and adobe photo shop, quarkXpress like introduction, application and operating circumstance, 3D graphics with summary, difference of versions of 3D studio and system, and Auto CAD application.

  10. Data structures, computer graphics, and pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, A; Kunii, T L

    1977-01-01

    Data Structures, Computer Graphics, and Pattern Recognition focuses on the computer graphics and pattern recognition applications of data structures methodology.This book presents design related principles and research aspects of the computer graphics, system design, data management, and pattern recognition tasks. The topics include the data structure design, concise structuring of geometric data for computer aided design, and data structures for pattern recognition algorithms. The survey of data structures for computer graphics systems, application of relational data structures in computer gr

  11. Childhood trauma in the graphic memoir

    OpenAIRE

    Beskow, Sara H.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I examine why the graphic memoir has become such a popular platform for authors to explore their childhood, and how these authors use graphic memoirs in an attempt to understand any trauma that they experienced during their formative years. Graphic memoirs in this context allow for a dual outlet to express these complex traumatic events, both through vivid illustrations and descriptive text. To illustrate how graphic memoirs are used as an outlet for traumatic experiences I hav...

  12. Characterizing chemical systems with on-line computers and graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazer, J.W.; Rigdon, L.P.; Brand, H.R.; Pomernacki, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Incorporating computers and graphics on-line to chemical experiments and processes opens up new opportunities for the study and control of complex systems. Systems having many variables can be characterized even when the variable interactions are nonlinear, and the system cannot a priori be represented by numerical methods and models. That is, large sets of accurate data can be rapidly acquired, then modeling and graphic techniques can be used to obtain partial interpretation plus design of further experimentation. The experimenter can thus comparatively quickly iterate between experimentation and modeling to obtain a final solution. We have designed and characterized a versatile computer-controlled apparatus for chemical research, which incorporates on-line instrumentation and graphics. It can be used to determine the mechanism of enzyme-induced reactions or to optimize analytical methods. The apparatus can also be operated as a pilot plant to design control strategies. On-line graphics were used to display conventional plots used by biochemists and three-dimensional response-surface plots

  13. A High Performance VLSI Computer Architecture For Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Wen-Tai

    1988-10-01

    A VLSI computer architecture, consisting of multiple processors, is presented in this paper to satisfy the modern computer graphics demands, e.g. high resolution, realistic animation, real-time display etc.. All processors share a global memory which are partitioned into multiple banks. Through a crossbar network, data from one memory bank can be broadcasted to many processors. Processors are physically interconnected through a hyper-crossbar network (a crossbar-like network). By programming the network, the topology of communication links among processors can be reconfigurated to satisfy specific dataflows of different applications. Each processor consists of a controller, arithmetic operators, local memory, a local crossbar network, and I/O ports to communicate with other processors, memory banks, and a system controller. Operations in each processor are characterized into two modes, i.e. object domain and space domain, to fully utilize the data-independency characteristics of graphics processing. Special graphics features such as 3D-to-2D conversion, shadow generation, texturing, and reflection, can be easily handled. With the current high density interconnection (MI) technology, it is feasible to implement a 64-processor system to achieve 2.5 billion operations per second, a performance needed in most advanced graphics applications.

  14. Advancing satellite operations with intelligent graphical monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Peter M.; Shirah, Gregory W.; Luczak, Edward C.

    1993-01-01

    For nearly twenty-five years, spacecraft missions have been operated in essentially the same manner: human operators monitor displays filled with alphanumeric text watching for limit violations or other indicators that signal a problem. The task is performed predominately by humans. Only in recent years have graphical user interfaces and expert systems been accepted within the control center environment to help reduce operator workloads. Unfortunately, the development of these systems is often time consuming and costly. At the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a new domain specific expert system development tool called the Generic Spacecraft Analyst Assistant (GenSAA) has been developed. Through the use of a highly graphical user interface and point-and-click operation, GenSAA facilitates the rapid, 'programming-free' construction of intelligent graphical monitoring systems to serve as real-time, fault-isolation assistants for spacecraft analysts. Although specifically developed to support real-time satellite monitoring, GenSAA can support the development of intelligent graphical monitoring systems in a variety of space and commercial applications.

  15. GROPE-1: a computer display to the sense of feel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batter, J J; Brooks, Jr, F P

    1972-01-01

    A computer display system was built and programmed that exerts programmable forces on the fingers as one moves a knob in a plane. The system includes a movable carriage, position sensors, mechanisms for converting computer outputs to forces, a visual graphic display, and, most important, the programs. A controlled experiment measured the utility of force output. Two groups were taught topics in elementary field theory and exercised with the computer displays. One group had force displayed to the hand as well as to the eye. The other had visual display only. The experiment was repeated with three different sets of students. The force-display groups performed significantly better in two of the three cases; in the third case, interest in the subject was low and this seems to account for low performance.

  16. Investigating pointing tasks across angularly coupled display areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennecke, Fabian; De Luca, Alexander; Nguyen, Ngo Dieu Huong

    2013-01-01

    Pointing tasks are a crucial part of today’s graphical user interfaces. They are well understood for flat displays and most prominently are modeled through Fitts’ Law. For novel displays (e.g., curved displays with multi-purpose areas), however, it remains unclear whether such models for predicting...... that the target position affects overall pointing speed and offset in both conditions. However, we also found that Fitts’ Law can in fact still be used to predict performance as on flat displays. Our results help designers to optimize user interfaces on angularly coupled displays when pointing tasks are involved....... user performance still hold – in particular when pointing is performed across differently oriented areas. To answer this question, we conducted an experiment on an angularly coupled display – the Curve – with two input conditions: direct touch and indirect mouse pointer. Our findings show...

  17. Narrative Problems of Graphic Design History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Victor

    1994-01-01

    Discusses three major accounts (by Philip Meggs, Enric Satue and Richard Hollis) of graphic design history. Notes that these texts address the history of graphic design, but each raises questions about what material to include, as well as how graphic design is both related to and distinct from other visual practices such as typography, art…

  18. Positioning graphical objects on computer screens: a three-phase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Robert

    2011-02-01

    This experiment identifies and models phases during the positioning of graphical objects (called cursors in this article) on computer displays. The human computer-interaction community has traditionally used Fitts' law to model selection in graphical user interfaces, whereas human factors experiments have found the single-component Fitts' law inadequate to model positioning of real objects. Participants (N=145) repeatedly positioned variably sized square cursors within variably sized rectangular targets using computer mice. The times for the cursor to just touch the target, for the cursor to enter the target, and for participants to indicate positioning completion were observed. The positioning tolerances were varied from very precise and difficult to imprecise and easy. The time for the cursor to touch the target was proportional to the initial cursor-target distance. The time for the cursor to completely enter the target after touching was proportional to the logarithms of cursor size divided by target tolerances. The time for participants to indicate positioning after entering was inversely proportional to the tolerance. A three-phase model defined by regions--distant, proximate, and inside the target--was proposed and could model the positioning tasks. The three-phase model provides a framework for ergonomists to evaluate new positioning techniques and can explain their deficiencies. The model provides a means to analyze tasks and enhance interaction during positioning.

  19. The Effect of Programmable Tactile Displays on Spatial Learning Skills in Children and Adolescents of Different Visual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Fabrizio; Cocchi, Elena; Brayda, Luca

    2017-07-01

    Vision loss has severe impacts on physical, social and emotional well-being. The education of blind children poses issues as many scholar disciplines (e.g., geometry, mathematics) are normally taught by heavily relying on vision. Touch-based assistive technologies are potential tools to provide graphical contents to blind users, improving learning possibilities and social inclusion. Raised-lines drawings are still the golden standard, but stimuli cannot be reconfigured or adapted and the blind person constantly requires assistance. Although much research concerns technological development, little work concerned the assessment of programmable tactile graphics, in educative and rehabilitative contexts. Here we designed, on programmable tactile displays, tests aimed at assessing spatial memory skills and shapes recognition abilities. Tests involved a group of blind and a group of low vision children and adolescents in a four-week longitudinal schedule. After establishing subject-specific difficulty levels, we observed a significant enhancement of performance across sessions and for both groups. Learning effects were comparable to raised paper control tests: however, our setup required minimal external assistance. Overall, our results demonstrate that programmable maps are an effective way to display graphical contents in educative/rehabilitative contexts. They can be at least as effective as traditional paper tests yet providing superior flexibility and versatility.

  20. Development of a visual control and display system for the SMART plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Han Ok; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Seo, Jae Kwang; Lee, Doo Jeong

    2000-01-01

    A Visual Control and Display System (VCDS) for the SMART plant analyzer has been developed using the MMS simulation tools. The SAMRT plant analyzer consists of the VCDS and the MMS SMART model. The MMS SMART model is a numerical simulation model for the SMART plant and is composed of the MMS real-time modules and control blocks. It covers the whole plant including primary, secondary and auxiliary systems. The developed VCDS is Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) that is running in a synchronized way with the SMART model. The VCDS consists of the MMS Simulation tools and seven control and display screens. The VCDS provides easy means for the control and display of the SMART model status. The VCDS allows users to display and change a specified list of model variables and transient scenarios interactively through the MMS simulation tools. The control and display screens are developed with Visual Basic 6.0 and MMI32 ActiveX controls and it can be executed in several TCP/IP networked computers simultaneously. The developed VCDS can be utilized for the engineering simulation of the SMART plant operation, and for control logic and operational procedure developments

  1. Virtual network computing: cross-platform remote display and collaboration software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konerding, D E

    1999-04-01

    VNC (Virtual Network Computing) is a computer program written to address the problem of cross-platform remote desktop/application display. VNC uses a client/server model in which an image of the desktop of the server is transmitted to the client and displayed. The client collects mouse and keyboard input from the user and transmits them back to the server. The VNC client and server can run on Windows 95/98/NT, MacOS, and Unix (including Linux) operating systems. VNC is multi-user on Unix machines (any number of servers can be run are unrelated to the primary display of the computer), while it is effectively single-user on Macintosh and Windows machines (only one server can be run, displaying the contents of the primary display of the server). The VNC servers can be configured to allow more than one client to connect at one time, effectively allowing collaboration through the shared desktop. I describe the function of VNC, provide details of installation, describe how it achieves its goal, and evaluate the use of VNC for molecular modelling. VNC is an extremely useful tool for collaboration, instruction, software development, and debugging of graphical programs with remote users.

  2. Colorimetry for CRT displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golz, Jürgen; MacLeod, Donald I A

    2003-05-01

    We analyze the sources of error in specifying color in CRT displays. These include errors inherent in the use of the color matching functions of the CIE 1931 standard observer when only colorimetric, not radiometric, calibrations are available. We provide transformation coefficients that prove to correct the deficiencies of this observer very well. We consider four different candidate sets of cone sensitivities. Some of these differ substantially; variation among candidate cone sensitivities exceeds the variation among phosphors. Finally, the effects of the recognized forms of observer variation on the visual responses (cone excitations or cone contrasts) generated by CRT stimuli are investigated and quantitatively specified. Cone pigment polymorphism gives rise to variation of a few per cent in relative excitation by the different phosphors--a variation larger than the errors ensuing from the adoption of the CIE standard observer, though smaller than the differences between some candidate cone sensitivities. Macular pigmentation has a larger influence, affecting mainly responses to the blue phosphor. The estimated combined effect of all sources of observer variation is comparable in magnitude with the largest differences between competing cone sensitivity estimates but is not enough to disrupt very seriously the relation between the L and M cone weights and the isoluminance settings of individual observers. It is also comparable with typical instrumental colorimetric errors, but we discuss these only briefly.

  3. New ROOT Graphical User Interfaces for fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maline, D Gonzalez; Moneta, L; Antcheva, I

    2010-01-01

    ROOT, as a scientific data analysis framework, provides extensive capabilities via Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) for performing interactive analysis and visualizing data objects like histograms and graphs. A new interface for fitting has been developed for performing, exploring and comparing fits on data point sets such as histograms, multi-dimensional graphs or trees. With this new interface, users can build interactively the fit model function, set parameter values and constraints and select fit and minimization methods with their options. Functionality for visualizing the fit results is as well provided, with the possibility of drawing residuals or confidence intervals. Furthermore, the new fit panel reacts as a standalone application and it does not prevent users from interacting with other windows. We will describe in great detail the functionality of this user interface, covering as well new capabilities provided by the new fitting and minimization tools introduced recently in the ROOT framework.

  4. Development and use of interactive displays in real-time ground support research facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Hammons, Kvin R.; Malone, Jacqueline C.; Nesel, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is one of the world's most advanced aeronautical research flight test support facilities. A variety of advanced and often unique real-time interactive displays has been developed for use in the mission control centers (MCC) to support research flight and ground testing. These dispalys consist of applications operating on systems described as real-time interactive graphics super workstations and real-time interactive PC/AT compatible workstations. This paper reviews these two types of workstations and the specific applications operating on each display system. The applications provide examples that demonstrate overall system capability applicable for use in other ground-based real-time research/test facilities.

  5. Graphic Presentation: An Empirical Examination of the Graphic Novel Approach to Communicate Business Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Jeremy C.; Randolph-Seng, Brandon; McKenny, Aaron F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphic novels have been increasingly incorporated into business communication forums. Despite potential benefits, little research has examined the merits of the graphic novel approach. In response, we engage in a two-study approach. Study 1 explores the potential of graphic novels to affect learning outcomes and finds that the graphic novel was…

  6. Measuring Cognitive Load in Test Items: Static Graphics versus Animated Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindar, M.; Kabakçi Yurdakul, I.; Inan Dönmez, F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of multimedia learning studies focus on the use of graphics in learning process but very few of them examine the role of graphics in testing students' knowledge. This study investigates the use of static graphics versus animated graphics in a computer-based English achievement test from a cognitive load theory perspective. Three…

  7. Graphics and control for in-reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    A wide range of manipulator systems has been developed to carry out remotely operated inspection, repair and maintenance tasks at the Magnox reactors in the United Kingdom. A key factor in the improvement of these systems in recent years has been the extensive use of computer graphics as a real-time aid to the manipulator operator. This is exemplified by the reactor pressure vessel inspection work at the Bradwell reactor which is described in detail. The graphics sub-system of the control system for the manipulator plays a unique and wide-ranging role. The 3D modelling and simulation capability of the IGRIP software has contributed to the conceptual design, detailed path planning, rehearsal support, public relations, real-time manipulator display, post inspection documentation and quality assurance. (UK)

  8. Interactive graphics analysis system for nuclear engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchak, M.; Moyer, W.R.; Becker, M.

    1973-01-01

    From working with continuous slowing down theory, the need was recognized for a system which allowed rapid calculation of the theoretical flux, instant comparison with experiment and a simple means of iterating on the slowing down parameters to force flux agreement and reflect cross section modification. Similar requirements exist in other areas of nuclear work for streamlining and simplifying the data analysis process. As a solution, a unique interactive graphics analysis system (RIGAS) was devised to allow a user to calculate, display, compare, manipulate and modify his data without requiring any programming on his part. This was accomplished by establishing human primacy, through extensive human factor considerations, and designing a man-machine dialogue which responds to the mere push of a button. This system results in an instrument which maximizes man's decision making capability and the computer's speed to improve graphic communication and data analysis. (14 figs) (U.S.)

  9. Distributed interactive graphics applications in computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.E.; Buning, P.G.; Merritt, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Implementation of two distributed graphics programs used in computational fluid dynamics is discussed. Both programs are interactive in nature. They run on a CRAY-2 supercomputer and use a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation as the front-end machine. The hardware and supporting software are from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation project. The supercomputer does all numerically intensive work and the workstation, as the front-end machine, allows the user to perform real-time interactive transformations on the displayed data. The first program was written as a distributed program that computes particle traces for fluid flow solutions existing on the supercomputer. The second is an older post-processing and plotting program modified to run in a distributed mode. Both programs have realized a large increase in speed over that obtained using a single machine. By using these programs, one can learn quickly about complex features of a three-dimensional flow field. Some color results are presented

  10. Packaging printed circuit boards: A production application of interactive graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrill, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure and use of an Interactive Graphics Packaging Program (IGPP), conceived to apply computer graphics to the design of packaging electronic circuits onto printed circuit boards (PCB), were described. The intent was to combine the data storage and manipulative power of the computer with the imaginative, intuitive power of a human designer. The hardware includes a CDC 6400 computer and two CDC 777 terminals with CRT screens, light pens, and keyboards. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 extended with the exception of a few functions coded in COMPASS (assembly language). The IGPP performs four major functions for the designer: (1) data input and display, (2) component placement (automatic or manual), (3) conductor path routing (automatic or manual), and (4) data output. The most complex PCB packaged to date measured 16.5 cm by 19 cm and contained 380 components, two layers of ground planes and four layers of conductors mixed with ground planes.

  11. Particle swarm optimization for automatic creation of complex graphic characters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fister, Iztok; Perc, Matjaž; Ljubič, Karin; Kamal, Salahuddin M.; Iglesias, Andres; Fister, Iztok

    2015-01-01

    Nature-inspired algorithms are a very promising tool for solving the hardest problems in computer sciences and mathematics. These algorithms are typically inspired by the fascinating behavior at display in biological systems, such as bee swarms or fish schools. So far, these algorithms have been applied in many practical applications. In this paper, we present a simple particle swarm optimization, which allows automatic creation of complex two-dimensional graphic characters. The method involves constructing the base characters, optimizing the modifications of the base characters with the particle swarm optimization algorithm, and finally generating the graphic characters from the solution. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach with the creation of simple snowman, but we also outline in detail how more complex characters can be created

  12. ModelMate - A graphical user interface for model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    ModelMate is a graphical user interface designed to facilitate use of model-analysis programs with models. This initial version of ModelMate supports one model-analysis program, UCODE_2005, and one model software program, MODFLOW-2005. ModelMate can be used to prepare input files for UCODE_2005, run UCODE_2005, and display analysis results. A link to the GW_Chart graphing program facilitates visual interpretation of results. ModelMate includes capabilities for organizing directories used with the parallel-processing capabilities of UCODE_2005 and for maintaining files in those directories to be identical to a set of files in a master directory. ModelMate can be used on its own or in conjunction with ModelMuse, a graphical user interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST.

  13. Some Thoughts on Contemporary Graphic Print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Skiba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production requirements of original graphic works of art have changed since 1980. The development of digital printing using lightfast colors now rivals traditional techniques such as wood cut, screen print, lithography, etching etc. Today, with respect to artistic legitimacy, original graphics using traditional printing techniques compete with original graphics produced by digital printing techniques on the art market. What criteria distinguish traditional printing techniques from those of digital printing in the production and acquisition of original graphics? What consequences is the serious artist faced with when deciding to implement digital print production? How does digital print change original graphic acquisition decisions?

  14. Time management displays for shuttle countdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Arthur E.; Hadaller, H. Greg; Ricci, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The Intelligent Launch Decision Support System project is developing a Time Management System (TMS) for the NASA Test Director (NTD) to use for time management during Shuttle terminal countdown. TMS is being developed in three phases: an information phase; a tool phase; and an advisor phase. The information phase is an integrated display (TMID) of firing room clocks, of graphic timelines with Ground Launch Sequencer events, and of constraints. The tool phase is a what-if spreadsheet (TMWI) for devising plans for resuming from unplanned hold situations. It is tied to information in TMID, propagates constraints forward and backward to complete unspecified values, and checks the plan against constraints. The advisor phase is a situation advisor (TMSA), which proactively suggests tactics. A concept prototype for TMSA is under development. The TMID is currently undergoing field testing. Displays for TMID and TMWI are described. Descriptions include organization, rationale for organization, implementation choices and constraints, and use by NTD.

  15. Wang Tiles in Computer Graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Lagae, Ares

    2009-01-01

    Many complex signals in computer graphics, such as point distributions and textures, cannot be efficiently synthesized and stored. This book presents tile-based methods based on Wang tiles and corner tiles to solve both these problems. Instead of synthesizing a complex signal when needed, the signal is synthesized beforehand over a small set of Wang tiles or corner tiles. Arbitrary large amounts of that signal can then efficiently be generated when needed by generating a stochastic tiling, and storing only a small set of tiles reduces storage requirements. A tile-based method for generating a

  16. Graphical presentation of participants' results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained by 19 participating dosimetry systems are presented in this section. Section 3 of the preceding report, ''Evaluation of the Results of the First IAEA Coordinated Research Program on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring'', explains the format and conventions used for the graphical presentation. The system number appearing in the upper left hand corner of each page can be used to correlate the dosimeter design information found in Table 2 of the preceding report with the results. However, care should be used in drawing inferences from this correlation, since system performance depends on a number of factors other than detector selection and design characteristics. (orig.)

  17. Causal inference, probability theory, and graphical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stuart G

    2013-11-10

    Causal inference from observational studies is a fundamental topic in biostatistics. The causal graph literature typically views probability theory as insufficient to express causal concepts in observational studies. In contrast, the view here is that probability theory is a desirable and sufficient basis for many topics in causal inference for the following two reasons. First, probability theory is generally more flexible than causal graphs: Besides explaining such causal graph topics as M-bias (adjusting for a collider) and bias amplification and attenuation (when adjusting for instrumental variable), probability theory is also the foundation of the paired availability design for historical controls, which does not fit into a causal graph framework. Second, probability theory is the basis for insightful graphical displays including the BK-Plot for understanding Simpson's paradox with a binary confounder, the BK2-Plot for understanding bias amplification and attenuation in the presence of an unobserved binary confounder, and the PAD-Plot for understanding the principal stratification component of the paired availability design. Published 2013. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. ENERGY STAR Certified Displays

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 7.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Displays that are effective as of July 1, 2016....

  19. Improvements in data display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    An analog signal processor is described in this patent for connecting a source of analog signals to a cathode ray tube display in order to extend the dynamic range of the display. This has important applications in the field of computerised X-ray tomography since significant medical information, such as tumours in soft tissue, is often represented by minimal level changes in image density. Cathode ray tube displays are limited to approximately 15 intensity levels. Thus if both strong and weak absorption of the X-rays occurs, the dynamic range of the transmitted signals will be too large to permit small variations to be examined directly on a cathode ray display. Present tomographic image reconstruction methods are capable of quantising X-ray absorption density measurements into 256 or more distinct levels and a description is given of the electronics which enables the upper and lower range of intensity levels to be independently set and continuously varied. (UK)

  20. Vacuum status-display and sector-conditioning programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skelly, J.; Yen, S.

    1989-01-01

    Two programs have been developed for observation and control of the AGS vacuum system, which include these notable features: they incorporate a graphical user interface, and they are driven by a relational database which describes the vacuum system. The vacuum system comprises some 440 devices organized into 28 vacuum sectors. The Status Display Program invites menu selection of a sector, interrogates the relational database for relevant vacuum devices, acquires live readbacks, and posts a graphical display of their status. The Sector Conditioning Program likewise invites sector selection, produces the same status display, and also implements process control logic on the sector devices to pump the sector down from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum over a period extending for several hours. As additional devices are installed in the vacuum system, the devices are likewise added to the relational database; these programs then automatically include the new devices. 2 refs., 1 fig

  1. The application of visual communication design in display design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仪晓华

    2015-01-01

    Visual communication design is a kind of visual language and the art of communication behavior, it condenses complex and chaos and obscure information can in the shortest possible time to be understanding of the functional information, at the same time, make the design work itself sound art, philosophy and culture, cause the audience’s perception experience and emotional resonance, and eventually approved. Display of visual communication don’t like people use language to convey, but in all kinds of display environment by graphics, text, color elements such as passing information to people, visual communication design as a medium between designer and audience, communicate through planar graphic elements, format design, the combination of the text elements, color elements make exhibition has rhythm beauty so as to build a display space, the space information accurate, vivid and clear function division, comfortable, and the outline of rich imagination space to the person and strong visual impression.

  2. Array display tool ADT reference manual. Version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Array Display Tool (ADT) is a Motif program to display arrays of process variables from the Advanced Photon Source control system. A typical use is to display the horizontal and vertical monitor readings. A picture of the ADT interface is here. The screen layout, apart from the menu bar, consists of two types of graphic areas in which the values for the arrays of process variables are shown: Display areas, which display one or more arrays as a function of index, and a zoom area. In the zoom area specified arrays only are displayed as a function of lattice position along with symbols for the major elements of the lattice. There can be several display areas, but at most one zoom area. When the screen is resized these areas change size proportionally. There are a number of options in the View Menu to change the way the values are displayed. It is also possible via the Options Menu to: (1) Store the current values internally. (2) Store the values from a snapshot file internally. (3) Display one of the stored sets of values along with the current values. (4) Display the difference of the current values with one of the stored sets of values. (5) Write the current values to a snapshot file. There are several (currently 5) slots in which you can store values internally. In addition you can display the values with specified reference values subtracted

  3. Computer generated multi-color graphics in whole body gamma spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.G.; Curtis, S.P.; Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV)

    1984-01-01

    A medium resolution color graphics terminal (512 x 512 pixels) was appended to a computerized gamma spectrometer for the display of whole body counting data. The color display enhances the ability of a spectroscopist to identify at a glance multicolored spectral regions of interest immediate qualitative interpretation. Spectral data from subjects containing low concentrations of gamma emitters obtained by both NaI(T1) and phoswich detectors are viewed by the method. In addition, software generates a multispectral display by which the gross, background, and net spectra are displayed in color simultaneously on a single screen

  4. Gamma camera display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera having an array of photomultipliers coupled via pulse shaping circuitry and a resistor weighting circuit to a display for forming an image of a radioactive subject is described. A linearizing circuit is coupled to the weighting circuit, the linearizing circuit including a nonlinear feedback circuit with diode coupling to the weighting circuit for linearizing the correspondence between points of the display and points of the subject. 4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures

  5. Flexible displays, rigid designs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbæk, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Rapid technological progress has enabled a wide range of flexible displays for computing devices, but the user experience--which we're only beginning to understand--will be the key driver for successful designs.......Rapid technological progress has enabled a wide range of flexible displays for computing devices, but the user experience--which we're only beginning to understand--will be the key driver for successful designs....

  6. A Graphical User Interface to Generalized Linear Models in MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dunn

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Generalized linear models unite a wide variety of statistical models in a common theoretical framework. This paper discusses GLMLAB-software that enables such models to be fitted in the popular mathematical package MATLAB. It provides a graphical user interface to the powerful MATLAB computational engine to produce a program that is easy to use but with many features, including offsets, prior weights and user-defined distributions and link functions. MATLAB's graphical capacities are also utilized in providing a number of simple residual diagnostic plots.

  7. Struggling readers learning with graphic-rich digital science text: Effects of a Highlight & Animate Feature and Manipulable Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrance, Nancy L.

    Technology offers promise of 'leveling the playing field' for struggling readers. That is, instructional support features within digital texts may enable all readers to learn. This quasi-experimental study examined the effects on learning of two support features, which offered unique opportunities to interact with text. The Highlight & Animate Feature highlighted an important idea in prose, while simultaneously animating its representation in an adjacent graphic. It invited readers to integrate ideas depicted in graphics and prose, using each one to interpret the other. The Manipulable Graphics had parts that the reader could operate to discover relationships among phenomena. It invited readers to test or refine the ideas that they brought to, or gleaned from, the text. Use of these support features was compulsory. Twenty fifth grade struggling readers read a graphic-rich digital science text in a clinical interview setting, under one of two conditions: using either the Highlight & Animate Feature or the Manipulable Graphics. Participants in both conditions made statistically significant gains on a multiple choice measure of knowledge of the topic of the text. While there were no significant differences by condition in the amount of knowledge gained; there were significant differences in the quality of knowledge expressed. Transcripts revealed that understandings about light and vision, expressed by those who used the Highlight & Animate Feature, were more often conceptually and linguistically 'complete.' That is, their understandings included both a description of phenomena as well as an explanation of underlying scientific principles, which participants articulated using the vocabulary of the text. This finding may be attributed to the multiple opportunities to integrate graphics (depicting the behavior of phenomena) and prose (providing the scientific explanation of that phenomena), which characterized the Highlight & Animate Condition. Those who used the

  8. Identification of computer graphics objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossinskyi Yu.M.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the use of computer graphics methods in problems of creating drawings, charts, drafting, etc. The widespread use of these methods requires the development of efficient algorithms for the identification of objects of drawings. The article analyzes the model-making algorithms for this problem and considered the possibility of reducing the time using graphics editing operations. Editing results in such operations as copying, moving and deleting objects specified images. These operations allow the use of a reliable identification of images of objects methods. For information on the composition of the image of the object along with information about the identity and the color should include information about the spatial location and other characteristics of the object (the thickness and style of contour lines, fill style, and so on. In order to enable the pixel image analysis to structure the information it is necessary to enable the initial code image objects color. The article shows the results of the implementation of the algorithm of encoding object identifiers. To simplify the process of building drawings of any kind, and reduce time-consuming, method of drawing objects identification is proposed based on the use as the ID information of the object color.

  9. Animated graphics for comparing two risks: a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Witteman, Holly O; Fuhrel-Forbis, Andrea; Exe, Nicole L; Kahn, Valerie C; Dickson, Mark

    2012-07-25

    The increasing use of computer-administered risk communications affords the potential to replace static risk graphics with animations that use motion cues to reinforce key risk messages. Research on the use of animated graphics, however, has yielded mixed findings, and little research exists to identify the specific animations that might improve risk knowledge and patients' decision making. To test whether viewing animated forms of standard pictograph (icon array) risk graphics displaying risks of side effects would improve people's ability to select the treatment with the lowest risk profile, as compared with viewing static images of the same risks. A total of 4198 members of a demographically diverse Internet panel read a scenario about two hypothetical treatments for thyroid cancer. Each treatment was described as equally effective but varied in side effects (with one option slightly better than the other). Participants were randomly assigned to receive all risk information in 1 of 10 pictograph formats in a quasi-factorial design. We compared a control condition of static grouped icons with a static scattered icon display and with 8 Flash-based animated versions that incorporated different combinations of (1) building the risk 1 icon at a time, (2) having scattered risk icons settle into a group, or (3) having scattered risk icons shuffle themselves (either automatically or by user control). We assessed participants' ability to choose the better treatment (choice accuracy), their gist knowledge of side effects (knowledge accuracy), and their graph evaluation ratings, controlling for subjective numeracy and need for cognition. When compared against static grouped-icon arrays, no animations significantly improved any outcomes, and most showed significant performance degradations. However, participants who received animations of grouped icons in which at-risk icons appeared 1 at a time performed as well on all outcomes as the static grouped-icon control group

  10. Stochastic Spectral Descent for Discrete Graphical Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, David; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Collins, Edo; Carin, Lawrence; Cevher, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Interest in deep probabilistic graphical models has in-creased in recent years, due to their state-of-the-art performance on many machine learning applications. Such models are typically trained with the stochastic gradient method, which can take a significant number of iterations to converge. Since the computational cost of gradient estimation is prohibitive even for modestly sized models, training becomes slow and practically usable models are kept small. In this paper we propose a new, largely tuning-free algorithm to address this problem. Our approach derives novel majorization bounds based on the Schatten- norm. Intriguingly, the minimizers of these bounds can be interpreted as gradient methods in a non-Euclidean space. We thus propose using a stochastic gradient method in non-Euclidean space. We both provide simple conditions under which our algorithm is guaranteed to converge, and demonstrate empirically that our algorithm leads to dramatically faster training and improved predictive ability compared to stochastic gradient descent for both directed and undirected graphical models.

  11. Partial wave analysis using graphics processing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Niklaus; Liu Beijiang; Wang Jike, E-mail: nberger@ihep.ac.c [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Lu, Shijingshan, 100049 Beijing (China)

    2010-04-01

    Partial wave analysis is an important tool for determining resonance properties in hadron spectroscopy. For large data samples however, the un-binned likelihood fits employed are computationally very expensive. At the Beijing Spectrometer (BES) III experiment, an increase in statistics compared to earlier experiments of up to two orders of magnitude is expected. In order to allow for a timely analysis of these datasets, additional computing power with short turnover times has to be made available. It turns out that graphics processing units (GPUs) originally developed for 3D computer games have an architecture of massively parallel single instruction multiple data floating point units that is almost ideally suited for the algorithms employed in partial wave analysis. We have implemented a framework for tensor manipulation and partial wave fits called GPUPWA. The user writes a program in pure C++ whilst the GPUPWA classes handle computations on the GPU, memory transfers, caching and other technical details. In conjunction with a recent graphics processor, the framework provides a speed-up of the partial wave fit by more than two orders of magnitude compared to legacy FORTRAN code.

  12. Graphical Calculation of Estimated Energy Expenditure in Burn Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egro, Francesco M; Manders, Ernest C; Manders, Ernest K

    2018-03-01

    Historically, estimated energy expenditure (EEE) has been related to the percent of body surface area burned. Subsequent evaluations of these estimates have indicated that the earlier formulas may overestimate the amount of caloric support necessary for burn-injured patients. Ireton-Jones et al derived 2 equations for determining the EEE required to support burn patients, 1 for ventilator-dependent patients and 1 for spontaneously breathing patients. Evidence has proved their reliability, but they remain challenging to apply in a clinical setting given the difficult and cumbersome mathematics involved. This study aims to introduce a graphical calculation of EEE in burn patients that can be easily used in the clinical setting. The multivariant linear regression analysis from Ireton-Jones et al yielded equations that were rearranged into the form of a simple linear equation of the type y = mx + b. By choosing an energy expenditure and the age of the subject, the weight was calculated. The endpoints were then calculated, and a graph was mapped by means of Adobe FrameMaker. A graphical representation of Ireton-Jones et al's equations was obtained by plotting the weight (kg) on the y axis, the age (years) on the x axis, and a series of parallel lines representing the EEE in burn patients. The EEE has been displayed graphically on a grid to allow rapid determination of the EEE needed for a given patient of a designated weight and age. Two graphs were plotted: 1 for ventilator-dependent patients and 1 for spontaneously breathing patients. Correction factors for sex, the presence of additional trauma, and obesity are indicated on the graphical calculators. We propose a graphical tool to calculate caloric requirements in a fast, easy, and portable manner.

  13. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  14. Information rich display design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Robin; Braseth, Alf Ove; Veland, Oeystein

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the concept Information Rich Displays. The purpose of Information Rich Displays (IRDs) is to condensate prevailing information in process displays in such a way that each display format (picture) contains more relevant information for the user. Compared to traditional process control displays, this new concept allows the operator to attain key information at a glance and at the same time allows for improved monitoring of larger portions of the process. This again allows for reduced navigation between both process and trend displays and ease the cognitive demand on the operator. This concept has been created while working on designing display prototypes for the offshore petroleum production facilities of tomorrow. Offshore installations basically consist of wells, separation trains (where oil, gas and water are separated from each other), an oil tax measurement system (where oil quality is measured and the pressure increased to allow for export), gas compression (compression of gas for export) and utility systems (water treatment, chemical systems etc.). This means that an offshore control room operator has to deal with a complex process that comprises several functionally different systems. The need for a new approach to offshore display format design is in particular based on shortcomings in today's designs related to the keyhole effect, where the display format only reveals a fraction of the whole process. Furthermore, the upcoming introduction of larger off- and on-shore operation centres will increase the size and complexity of the operators' work domain. In the light of the increased demands on the operator, the proposed IRDs aim to counter the negative effects this may have on the workload. In this work we have attempted to classify the wide range of different roles an operator can have in different situations. The information content and amount being presented to the operator in a display should be viewed in context of the roles the

  15. IMDISP - INTERACTIVE IMAGE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Image Display Program (IMDISP) is an interactive image display utility for the IBM Personal Computer (PC, XT and AT) and compatibles. Until recently, efforts to utilize small computer systems for display and analysis of scientific data have been hampered by the lack of sufficient data storage capacity to accomodate large image arrays. Most planetary images, for example, require nearly a megabyte of storage. The recent development of the "CDROM" (Compact Disk Read-Only Memory) storage technology makes possible the storage of up to 680 megabytes of data on a single 4.72-inch disk. IMDISP was developed for use with the CDROM storage system which is currently being evaluated by the Planetary Data System. The latest disks to be produced by the Planetary Data System are a set of three disks containing all of the images of Uranus acquired by the Voyager spacecraft. The images are in both compressed and uncompressed format. IMDISP can read the uncompressed images directly, but special software is provided to decompress the compressed images, which can not be processed directly. IMDISP can also display images stored on floppy or hard disks. A digital image is a picture converted to numerical form so that it can be stored and used in a computer. The image is divided into a matrix of small regions called picture elements, or pixels. The rows and columns of pixels are called "lines" and "samples", respectively. Each pixel has a numerical value, or DN (data number) value, quantifying the darkness or brightness of the image at that spot. In total, each pixel has an address (line number, sample number) and a DN value, which is all that the computer needs for processing. DISPLAY commands allow the IMDISP user to display all or part of an image at various positions on the display screen. The user may also zoom in and out from a point on the image defined by the cursor, and may pan around the image. To enable more or all of the original image to be displayed on the

  16. The IGUANA interactive graphics toolkit with examples from CMS and D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alverson, G.; Osborne, I.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L.

    2001-01-01

    IGUANA (Interactive Graphics for User ANAlysis) is a C++ toolkit for developing graphical user interfaces and high performance 2-D and 3-D graphics applications, such as data browsers and detector and event visualisation programs. The IGUANA strategy is to use freely available software (e.g. Qt, SoQt, OpenInventor, OpenGL, HEPVis) and package and extend it to provide a general-purpose and experiment-independent toolkit. The authors describe the evaluation and choices of publicly available GUI/graphics software and the additional functionality currently provided by IGUANA. The authors demonstrate the use of IGUANA with several applications built for CMS and D0

  17. Automated graphic image generation system for effective representation of infectious disease surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masashi; Hasegawa, Shinsaku; Suyama, Akihiko; Meshitsuka, Shunsuke

    2003-11-01

    Infectious disease surveillance schemes have been established to detect infectious disease outbreak in the early stages, to identify the causative viral strains, and to rapidly assess related morbidity and mortality. To make a scheme function well, two things are required. Firstly, it must have sufficient sensitivity and be timely to guarantee as short a delay as possible from collection to redistribution of information. Secondly, it must provide a good representation of the results of the surveillance. To do this, we have developed a database system that can redistribute the information via the Internet. The feature of this system is to automatically generate the graphic images based on the numerical data stored in the database by using Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) script and Graphics Drawing (GD) library. It dynamically displays the information as a map or bar chart as well as a numerical impression according to the real time demand of the users. This system will be a useful tool for medical personnel and researchers working on infectious disease problems and will save significant time in the redistribution of information.

  18. MuSim, a Graphical User Interface for Multiple Simulation Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Thomas [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, Mary Anne [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, Rolland [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neuffer, David [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    MuSim is a new user-friendly program designed to interface to many different particle simulation codes, regardless of their data formats or geometry descriptions. It presents the user with a compelling graphical user interface that includes a flexible 3-D view of the simulated world plus powerful editing and drag-and-drop capabilities. All aspects of the design can be parametrized so that parameter scans and optimizations are easy. It is simple to create plots and display events in the 3-D viewer (with a slider to vary the transparency of solids), allowing for an effortless comparison of different simulation codes. Simulation codes: G4beamline, MAD-X, and MCNP; more coming. Many accelerator design tools and beam optics codes were written long ago, with primitive user interfaces by today's standards. MuSim is specifically designed to make it easy to interface to such codes, providing a common user experience for all, and permitting the construction and exploration of models with very little overhead. For today's technology-driven students, graphical interfaces meet their expectations far better than text-based tools, and education in accelerator physics is one of our primary goals.

  19. Designing low cost LED display for the billboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yi-Jian; Uang, Chii-Maw; Wang, Ping-Chieh; Ho, Zu-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    With quickly advance of the computer, microelectronics and photonics technologies, LED display panel becomes a new electronic advertising media. It can be used to show any information whatever characters or graphics. Most LED display panels are built of many Light-Emitting Diodes arranged in a matrix form. The display has many advantages such as low power, low cost, long life and high definition. Because the display panel is asked to show rich color, the LED display panel's driving system becomes very complex. The design methodology of LED display panel's driver becomes more and more important to meet the market requirements. Cost is always the most important issue in public market domain. In this paper, we report a design methodology of LED display panel's driver based on the microprocessor control unit (MCU) system and LED display controller IC, HT1632C, to control three colors, RGB, color LED display panel and the modular panel size is 24*16 in matrix form. The HT1632C is a memory mapping LED display controller, it can be used on many applications, such as digital clock, thermometer, counter, voltmeter or other instrumentation readouts. Three pieces of HT1632C are used to drive a 24*16 RGB LED display panel, in our design case. Each HT163C chip is used to control one of the R, G and B color. As the drive mode is driven in DC mode, the RGB display panel can create and totally of seven colors under the control of MCU. The MCU generates the control signal to drive HT1632C. In this study, the software design methodology is adopted with dynamic display principle. When the scan frequency is 60Hz, LED display panel will get the clear picture and be able to display seven colors.

  20. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * DICHROIC DYES * Chemical Structure * Chemical and Photochemical Stability * THEORETICAL MODELLING * DEFECTS CAUSED BY PROLONGED LIGHT IRRADIATION * CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PHOTOSTABILITY * OTHER PARAMETERS AFFECTING PHOTOSTABILITY * CELL PREPARATION * DICHROIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR MEASUREMENTS * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Of Dyes * Absorbance, Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio Measurements * IMPACT OF DYE STRUCTURE AND LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A DICHROIC MIXTURE * Order Parameter and Dichroic Ratio * EFFECT OF LENGTH OF DICHROIC DYES ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE BREADTH OF DYE ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * EFFECT OF THE HOST ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * TEMPERATURE VARIATION OF THE ORDER PARAMETER OF DYES IN A LIQUID CRYSTAL HOST * IMPACT OF DYE CONCENTRATION ON THE ORDER PARAMETER * Temperature Range * Viscosity * Dielectric Constant and Anisotropy * Refractive Indices and Birefringence * solubility43,153-156 * Absorption Wavelength and Auxochromic Groups * Molecular Engineering of Dichroic Dyes * OPTICAL, ELECTRO-OPTICAL AND LIFE PARAMETERS * Colour And CIE Colour space120,160-166 * CIE 1931 COLOUR SPACE * CIE 1976 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * CIE UNIFORM COLOUR SPACES & COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE120,160-166 * Electro-Optical Parameters120 * LUMINANCE * CONTRAST AND CONTRAST RATIO * SWITCHING SPEED * Life Parameters and Failure Modes * DICHROIC MIXTURE FORMULATION * Monochrome Mixture * Black Mixture * ACHROMATIC BLACK MIXTURE FOR HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Effect of Illuminant on Display Colour * Colour of the Field-On State * Effect of Dye Linewidth * Optimum Centroid Wavelengths * Effect of Dye Concentration * Mixture Formulation Using More Than Three Dyes * ACHROMATIC MIXTURE FOR WHITE-TAYLOR TYPE DISPLAYS * HEILMEIER DISPLAYS * Theoretical Modelling * Threshold Characteristic * Effects of Dye Concentration on Electro-optical Parameters * Effect of Cholesteric Doping * Effect of Alignment