WorldWideScience

Sample records for graph representation approach

  1. Moment graphs and representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jens Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Moment graphs and sheaves on moment graphs are basically combinatorial objects that have be used to describe equivariant intersectiion cohomology. In these lectures we are going to show that they can be used to provide a direct link from this cohomology to the representation theory of simple Lie...

  2. Linear representation of a graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Montenegro

    2019-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the linear representation of a graph is defined. A linear representation of a graph is a subgroup of $GL(p,\\mathbb{R}$, the group of invertible matrices of order $ p $ and real coefficients. It will be demonstrated that every graph admits a linear representation. In this paper, simple and finite graphs will be used, framed in the graphs theory's area

  3. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  4. Graph representation of protein free energy landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Huo, Shuanghong; Han, Li

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system

  5. Dynamic Representations of Sparse Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf

    1999-01-01

    We present a linear space data structure for maintaining graphs with bounded arboricity—a large class of sparse graphs containing e.g. planar graphs and graphs of bounded treewidth—under edge insertions, edge deletions, and adjacency queries. The data structure supports adjacency queries in worst...... case O(c) time, and edge insertions and edge deletions in amortized O(1) and O(c+log n) time, respectively, where n is the number of nodes in the graph, and c is the bound on the arboricity....

  6. A Novel Relevance Feedback Approach Based on Similarity Measure Modification in an X-Ray Image Retrieval System Based on Fuzzy Representation Using Fuzzy Attributed Relational Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossien Pourghassem

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Relevance feedback approaches is used to improve the performance of content-based image retrieval systems. In this paper, a novel relevance feedback approach based on similarity measure modification in an X-ray image retrieval system based on fuzzy representation using fuzzy attributed relational graph (FARG is presented. In this approach, optimum weight of each feature in feature vector is calculated using similarity rate between query image and relevant and irrelevant images in user feedback. The calculated weight is used to tune fuzzy graph matching algorithm as a modifier parameter in similarity measure. The standard deviation of the retrieved image features is applied to calculate the optimum weight. The proposed image retrieval system uses a FARG for representation of images, a fuzzy matching graph algorithm as similarity measure and a semantic classifier based on merging scheme for determination of the search space in image database. To evaluate relevance feedback approach in the proposed system, a standard X-ray image database consisting of 10000 images in 57 classes is used. The improvement of the evaluation parameters shows proficiency and efficiency of the proposed system.

  7. Graph-based representation for multiview image geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugey, Thomas; Ortega, Antonio; Frossard, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new geometry representation method for multiview image sets. Our approach relies on graphs to describe the multiview geometry information in a compact and controllable way. The links of the graph connect pixels in different images and describe the proximity between pixels in 3D space. These connections are dependent on the geometry of the scene and provide the right amount of information that is necessary for coding and reconstructing multiple views. Our multiview image representation is very compact and adapts the transmitted geometry information as a function of the complexity of the prediction performed at the decoder side. To achieve this, our graph-based representation (GBR) carefully selects the amount of geometry information needed before coding. This is in contrast with depth coding, which directly compresses with losses the original geometry signal, thus making it difficult to quantify the impact of coding errors on geometry-based interpolation. We present the principles of this GBR and we build an efficient coding algorithm to represent it. We compare our GBR approach to classical depth compression methods and compare their respective view synthesis qualities as a function of the compactness of the geometry description. We show that GBR can achieve significant gains in geometry coding rate over depth-based schemes operating at similar quality. Experimental results demonstrate the potential of this new representation.

  8. Neuro-symbolic representation learning on biological knowledge graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Alshahrani, Mona

    2017-04-21

    Biological data and knowledge bases increasingly rely on Semantic Web technologies and the use of knowledge graphs for data integration, retrieval and federated queries. In the past years, feature learning methods that are applicable to graph-structured data are becoming available, but have not yet widely been applied and evaluated on structured biological knowledge.We develop a novel method for feature learning on biological knowledge graphs. Our method combines symbolic methods, in particular knowledge representation using symbolic logic and automated reasoning, with neural networks to generate embeddings of nodes that encode for related information within knowledge graphs. Through the use of symbolic logic, these embeddings contain both explicit and implicit information. We apply these embeddings to the prediction of edges in the knowledge graph representing problems of function prediction, finding candidate genes of diseases, protein-protein interactions, or drug target relations, and demonstrate performance that matches and sometimes outperforms traditional approaches based on manually crafted features. Our method can be applied to any biological knowledge graph, and will thereby open up the increasing amount of SemanticWeb based knowledge bases in biology to use in machine learning and data analytics.https://github.com/bio-ontology-research-group/walking-rdf-and-owl.robert.hoehndorf@kaust.edu.sa.Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Neuro-symbolic representation learning on biological knowledge graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Mona; Khan, Mohammad Asif; Maddouri, Omar; Kinjo, Akira R; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Biological data and knowledge bases increasingly rely on Semantic Web technologies and the use of knowledge graphs for data integration, retrieval and federated queries. In the past years, feature learning methods that are applicable to graph-structured data are becoming available, but have not yet widely been applied and evaluated on structured biological knowledge. Results: We develop a novel method for feature learning on biological knowledge graphs. Our method combines symbolic methods, in particular knowledge representation using symbolic logic and automated reasoning, with neural networks to generate embeddings of nodes that encode for related information within knowledge graphs. Through the use of symbolic logic, these embeddings contain both explicit and implicit information. We apply these embeddings to the prediction of edges in the knowledge graph representing problems of function prediction, finding candidate genes of diseases, protein-protein interactions, or drug target relations, and demonstrate performance that matches and sometimes outperforms traditional approaches based on manually crafted features. Our method can be applied to any biological knowledge graph, and will thereby open up the increasing amount of Semantic Web based knowledge bases in biology to use in machine learning and data analytics. https://github.com/bio-ontology-research-group/walking-rdf-and-owl. robert.hoehndorf@kaust.edu.sa. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Representation and integration of sociological knowledge using knowledge graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popping, R; Strijker, [No Value

    1997-01-01

    The representation and integration of sociological knowledge using knowledge graphs, a specific kind of semantic network, is discussed. Knowledge it systematically searched this reveals. inconsistencies, reducing superfluous research and knowledge, and showing gaps in a theory. This representation

  11. $1$-string $B_2$-VPG representation of planar graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Biedl

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we prove that every planar graph has a 1-string $B_2$-VPG representation—a string representation using paths in a rectangular grid that contain at most two bends. Furthermore, two paths representing vertices $u,v$ intersect precisely once whenever there is an edge between $u$ and $v$. We also show that only a subset of the possible curve shapes is necessary to represent $4$-connected planar graphs.

  12. Symbol Spotting using Full Visibility Graph Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Locteau , Hervé; Adam , Sébastien; Trupin , Eric; Labiche , Jacques; Héroux , Pierre

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, a method for matching symbols in line-drawings is presented. Facing both segmentation and recognition of symbols is a difficult challenge. Starting from the results of a vectorization proce- dure, a visibility graph is built to enhance the main geometric constraints which were specified during the construction of the initial document. The cliques detection, which correspond to a perceptual grouping of primi- tives, is used in the system to detect regions...

  13. Using graph approach for managing connectivity in integrative landscape modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabotin, Michael; Fabre, Jean-Christophe; Libres, Aline; Lagacherie, Philippe; Crevoisier, David; Moussa, Roger

    2013-04-01

    In cultivated landscapes, a lot of landscape elements such as field boundaries, ditches or banks strongly impact water flows, mass and energy fluxes. At the watershed scale, these impacts are strongly conditionned by the connectivity of these landscape elements. An accurate representation of these elements and of their complex spatial arrangements is therefore of great importance for modelling and predicting these impacts.We developped in the framework of the OpenFLUID platform (Software Environment for Modelling Fluxes in Landscapes) a digital landscape representation that takes into account the spatial variabilities and connectivities of diverse landscape elements through the application of the graph theory concepts. The proposed landscape representation consider spatial units connected together to represent the flux exchanges or any other information exchanges. Each spatial unit of the landscape is represented as a node of a graph and relations between units as graph connections. The connections are of two types - parent-child connection and up/downstream connection - which allows OpenFLUID to handle hierarchical graphs. Connections can also carry informations and graph evolution during simulation is possible (connections or elements modifications). This graph approach allows a better genericity on landscape representation, a management of complex connections and facilitate development of new landscape representation algorithms. Graph management is fully operational in OpenFLUID for developers or modelers ; and several graph tools are available such as graph traversal algorithms or graph displays. Graph representation can be managed i) manually by the user (for example in simple catchments) through XML-based files in easily editable and readable format or ii) by using methods of the OpenFLUID-landr library which is an OpenFLUID library relying on common open-source spatial libraries (ogr vector, geos topologic vector and gdal raster libraries). Open

  14. Graph Regularized Auto-Encoders for Image Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiyi Liao; Yue Wang; Yong Liu

    2017-06-01

    Image representation has been intensively explored in the domain of computer vision for its significant influence on the relative tasks such as image clustering and classification. It is valuable to learn a low-dimensional representation of an image which preserves its inherent information from the original image space. At the perspective of manifold learning, this is implemented with the local invariant idea to capture the intrinsic low-dimensional manifold embedded in the high-dimensional input space. Inspired by the recent successes of deep architectures, we propose a local invariant deep nonlinear mapping algorithm, called graph regularized auto-encoder (GAE). With the graph regularization, the proposed method preserves the local connectivity from the original image space to the representation space, while the stacked auto-encoders provide explicit encoding model for fast inference and powerful expressive capacity for complex modeling. Theoretical analysis shows that the graph regularizer penalizes the weighted Frobenius norm of the Jacobian matrix of the encoder mapping, where the weight matrix captures the local property in the input space. Furthermore, the underlying effects on the hidden representation space are revealed, providing insightful explanation to the advantage of the proposed method. Finally, the experimental results on both clustering and classification tasks demonstrate the effectiveness of our GAE as well as the correctness of the proposed theoretical analysis, and it also suggests that GAE is a superior solution to the current deep representation learning techniques comparing with variant auto-encoders and existing local invariant methods.

  15. MultiAspect Graphs: Algebraic Representation and Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Wehmuth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the algebraic representation and basic algorithms for MultiAspect Graphs (MAGs. A MAG is a structure capable of representing multilayer and time-varying networks, as well as higher-order networks, while also having the property of being isomorphic to a directed graph. In particular, we show that, as a consequence of the properties associated with the MAG structure, a MAG can be represented in matrix form. Moreover, we also show that any possible MAG function (algorithm can be obtained from this matrix-based representation. This is an important theoretical result since it paves the way for adapting well-known graph algorithms for application in MAGs. We present a set of basic MAG algorithms, constructed from well-known graph algorithms, such as degree computing, Breadth First Search (BFS, and Depth First Search (DFS. These algorithms adapted to the MAG context can be used as primitives for building other more sophisticated MAG algorithms. Therefore, such examples can be seen as guidelines on how to properly derive MAG algorithms from basic algorithms on directed graphs. We also make available Python implementations of all the algorithms presented in this paper.

  16. Representation Methods in AI. Searching by Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel GARRIDO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical origin of the Artificial Intelligence (A I is usually established in the Darmouth Conference, of 1956. But we can find many more arcane origins [1]. Also, we can consider, in more recent times, very great thinkers, as Janos Neumann (then, John von Neumann, arrived in USA, Norbert Wiener, Alan Mathison Turing, or Lofti Zadehfor instance [6, 7]. Frequently A I requires Logic. But its classical version shows too many insufficiencies. So, it was necessary to introduce more sophisticated tools, as fuzzy logic, modal logic, non-monotonic logic and so on [2]. Among the things that A I needs to represent are: categories, objects, properties, relations between objects, situations, states, time, events, causes and effects, knowledge about knowledge, and so on. The problems in A I can be classified in two general types [3, 4]: search problems and representation problems. In this last “mountain”, there exist different ways to reach their summit. So, we have [3]: logics, rules, frames, associative nets, scripts and so on, many times connectedamong them. We attempt, in this paper, a panoramic vision of the scope of application of such Representation Methods in A I. The two more disputable questions of both modern philosophy of mind and A I will be Turing Test and The Chinese Room Argument. To elucidate these very difficult questions, see both final Appendices.

  17. Graph-representation of oxidative folding pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaján László

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of oxidative folding combines the formation of native disulfide bond with conformational folding resulting in the native three-dimensional fold. Oxidative folding pathways can be described in terms of disulfide intermediate species (DIS which can also be isolated and characterized. Each DIS corresponds to a family of folding states (conformations that the given DIS can adopt in three dimensions. Results The oxidative folding space can be represented as a network of DIS states interconnected by disulfide interchange reactions that can either create/abolish or rearrange disulfide bridges. We propose a simple 3D representation wherein the states having the same number of disulfide bridges are placed on separate planes. In this representation, the shuffling transitions are within the planes, and the redox edges connect adjacent planes. In a number of experimentally studied cases (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, insulin-like growth factor and epidermal growth factor, the observed intermediates appear as part of contiguous oxidative folding pathways. Conclusions Such networks can be used to visualize folding pathways in terms of the experimentally observed intermediates. A simple visualization template written for the Tulip package http://www.tulip-software.org/ can be obtained from V.A.

  18. GOGrapher: A Python library for GO graph representation and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Brian; Richards, Adam J; Jin, Bo; Lu, Xinghua

    2009-07-07

    The Gene Ontology is the most commonly used controlled vocabulary for annotating proteins. The concepts in the ontology are organized as a directed acyclic graph, in which a node corresponds to a biological concept and a directed edge denotes the parent-child semantic relationship between a pair of terms. A large number of protein annotations further create links between proteins and their functional annotations, reflecting the contemporary knowledge about proteins and their functional relationships. This leads to a complex graph consisting of interleaved biological concepts and their associated proteins. What is needed is a simple, open source library that provides tools to not only create and view the Gene Ontology graph, but to analyze and manipulate it as well. Here we describe the development and use of GOGrapher, a Python library that can be used for the creation, analysis, manipulation, and visualization of Gene Ontology related graphs. An object-oriented approach was adopted to organize the hierarchy of the graphs types and associated classes. An Application Programming Interface is provided through which different types of graphs can be pragmatically created, manipulated, and visualized. GOGrapher has been successfully utilized in multiple research projects, e.g., a graph-based multi-label text classifier for protein annotation. The GOGrapher project provides a reusable programming library designed for the manipulation and analysis of Gene Ontology graphs. The library is freely available for the scientific community to use and improve.

  19. GOGrapher: A Python library for GO graph representation and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xinghua

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gene Ontology is the most commonly used controlled vocabulary for annotating proteins. The concepts in the ontology are organized as a directed acyclic graph, in which a node corresponds to a biological concept and a directed edge denotes the parent-child semantic relationship between a pair of terms. A large number of protein annotations further create links between proteins and their functional annotations, reflecting the contemporary knowledge about proteins and their functional relationships. This leads to a complex graph consisting of interleaved biological concepts and their associated proteins. What is needed is a simple, open source library that provides tools to not only create and view the Gene Ontology graph, but to analyze and manipulate it as well. Here we describe the development and use of GOGrapher, a Python library that can be used for the creation, analysis, manipulation, and visualization of Gene Ontology related graphs. Findings An object-oriented approach was adopted to organize the hierarchy of the graphs types and associated classes. An Application Programming Interface is provided through which different types of graphs can be pragmatically created, manipulated, and visualized. GOGrapher has been successfully utilized in multiple research projects, e.g., a graph-based multi-label text classifier for protein annotation. Conclusion The GOGrapher project provides a reusable programming library designed for the manipulation and analysis of Gene Ontology graphs. The library is freely available for the scientific community to use and improve.

  20. [Experimental investigation of the effects of representations and perspectives for the comprehension of line graphs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Nana; Miwa, Kazuhisa

    2012-08-01

    The comprehension of graphs is achieved through interaction between bottom-up and top-down processing. This study experimentally investigated the interaction between the graph representations determining bottom-up processing and the reader's perspective relating to top-down processing. Different representations on graphs generated from an identical data set elicited different interpretations of the graphs. We call this the "representation effect" on graph comprehension. In Experiment 1, we confirmed the characteristic of the bottom-up process of graph comprehension by using a set of line graphs which were identical in perceptual characteristics. In Experiments 2A and 2B, the participants were given a perspective for reading the graphs, and then they interpreted the graphs. The results showed that this perspective affected their comprehension of the graphs. Previous studies have shown that top-down processing may not be compatible with bottom-up processing in graph comprehension. However, our result indicated that top-down processing controlled by a perspective for reading the graph was not inconsistent with bottom-up processing, and therefore does not violate bottom-up processing.

  1. Towards Translating Graph Transformation Approaches by Model Transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermann, F.; Kastenberg, H.; Modica, T.; Karsai, G.; Taentzer, G.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, many researchers are working on semantics preserving model transformation. In the field of graph transformation one can think of translating graph grammars written in one approach to a behaviourally equivalent graph grammar in another approach. In this paper we translate graph grammars

  2. Graph Representations of Flow and Transport in Fracture Networks using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, G.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Karra, S.; O'Malley, D.; Godinez, H. C.; Hagberg, A.; Osthus, D.; Mohd-Yusof, J.

    2017-12-01

    Flow and transport of fluids through fractured systems is governed by the properties and interactions at the micro-scale. Retaining information about the micro-structure such as fracture length, orientation, aperture and connectivity in mesh-based computational models results in solving for millions to billions of degrees of freedom and quickly renders the problem computationally intractable. Our approach depicts fracture networks graphically, by mapping fractures to nodes and intersections to edges, thereby greatly reducing computational burden. Additionally, we use machine learning techniques to build simulators on the graph representation, trained on data from the mesh-based high fidelity simulations to speed up computation by orders of magnitude. We demonstrate our methodology on ensembles of discrete fracture networks, dividing up the data into training and validation sets. Our machine learned graph-based solvers result in over 3 orders of magnitude speedup without any significant sacrifice in accuracy.

  3. Multilinear Graph Embedding: Representation and Regularization for Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lei; Hsu, Chiou-Ting

    2014-02-01

    Given a set of images, finding a compact and discriminative representation is still a big challenge especially when multiple latent factors are hidden in the way of data generation. To represent multifactor images, although multilinear models are widely used to parameterize the data, most methods are based on high-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), which preserves global statistics but interprets local variations inadequately. To this end, we propose a novel method, called multilinear graph embedding (MGE), as well as its kernelization MKGE to leverage the manifold learning techniques into multilinear models. Our method theoretically links the linear, nonlinear, and multilinear dimensionality reduction. We also show that the supervised MGE encodes informative image priors for image regularization, provided that an image is represented as a high-order tensor. From our experiments on face and gait recognition, the superior performance demonstrates that MGE better represents multifactor images than classic methods, including HOSVD and its variants. In addition, the significant improvement in image (or tensor) completion validates the potential of MGE for image regularization.

  4. Back to basics: homogeneous representations of multi-rate synchronous dataflow graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, Robert; Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Kuper, Jan; Broersma, Haitze J.

    2013-01-01

    Exact temporal analyses of multi-rate synchronous dataflow (MRSDF) graphs, such as computing the maximum achievable throughput, or sufficient buffer sizes required to reach a minimum throughput, require a homogeneous representation called a homogeneous synchronous dataflow (HSDF) graph. The size of

  5. A fast algorithm for vertex-frequency representations of signals on graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestrović, Iva; Coyle, James L; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-02-01

    The windowed Fourier transform (short time Fourier transform) and the S-transform are widely used signal processing tools for extracting frequency information from non-stationary signals. Previously, the windowed Fourier transform had been adopted for signals on graphs and has been shown to be very useful for extracting vertex-frequency information from graphs. However, high computational complexity makes these algorithms impractical. We sought to develop a fast windowed graph Fourier transform and a fast graph S-transform requiring significantly shorter computation time. The proposed schemes have been tested with synthetic test graph signals and real graph signals derived from electroencephalography recordings made during swallowing. The results showed that the proposed schemes provide significantly lower computation time in comparison with the standard windowed graph Fourier transform and the fast graph S-transform. Also, the results showed that noise has no effect on the results of the algorithm for the fast windowed graph Fourier transform or on the graph S-transform. Finally, we showed that graphs can be reconstructed from the vertex-frequency representations obtained with the proposed algorithms.

  6. An Association-Oriented Partitioning Approach for Streaming Graph Query

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Hao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The volumes of real-world graphs like knowledge graph are increasing rapidly, which makes streaming graph processing a hot research area. Processing graphs in streaming setting poses significant challenges from different perspectives, among which graph partitioning method plays a key role. Regarding graph query, a well-designed partitioning method is essential for achieving better performance. Existing offline graph partitioning methods often require full knowledge of the graph, which is not possible during streaming graph processing. In order to handle this problem, we propose an association-oriented streaming graph partitioning method named Assc. This approach first computes the rank values of vertices with a hybrid approximate PageRank algorithm. After splitting these vertices with an adapted variant affinity propagation algorithm, the process order on vertices in the sliding window can be determined. Finally, according to the level of these vertices and their association, the partition where the vertices should be distributed is decided. We compare its performance with a set of streaming graph partition methods and METIS, a widely adopted offline approach. The results show that our solution can partition graphs with hundreds of millions of vertices in streaming setting on a large collection of graph datasets and our approach outperforms other graph partitioning methods.

  7. A graphical representation of equivalence classes of AMP chain graphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roverato, A.; Studený, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2006), s. 1045-1078 ISSN 1532-4435 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/04/0393 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : chain graph * AMP Markov equivalence * strong equivalence * largest deflagged graph Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.255, year: 2006 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/historie/studeny-0040067.pdf

  8. Survey of Approaches to Generate Realistic Synthetic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seung-Hwan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Sangkeun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Sarah S [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Imam, Neena [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A graph is a flexible data structure that can represent relationships between entities. As with other data analysis tasks, the use of realistic graphs is critical to obtaining valid research results. Unfortunately, using the actual ("real-world") graphs for research and new algorithm development is difficult due to the presence of sensitive information in the data or due to the scale of data. This results in practitioners developing algorithms and systems that employ synthetic graphs instead of real-world graphs. Generating realistic synthetic graphs that provide reliable statistical confidence to algorithmic analysis and system evaluation involves addressing technical hurdles in a broad set of areas. This report surveys the state of the art in approaches to generate realistic graphs that are derived from fitted graph models on real-world graphs.

  9. An algebraic approach to graph codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinero, Fernando

    theory as evaluation codes. Chapter three consists of the introduction to graph based codes, such as Tanner codes and graph codes. In Chapter four, we compute the dimension of some graph based codes with a result combining graph based codes and subfield subcodes. Moreover, some codes in chapter four...... are optimal or best known for their parameters. In chapter five we study some graph codes with Reed–Solomon component codes. The underlying graph is well known and widely used for its good characteristics. This helps us to compute the dimension of the graph codes. We also introduce a combinatorial concept...... related to the iterative encoding of graph codes with MDS component code. The last chapter deals with affine Grassmann codes and Grassmann codes. We begin with some previously known codes and prove that they are also Tanner codes of the incidence graph of the point–line partial geometry...

  10. Modeling the effect of task and graphical representation on response latency in a graph reading task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, David; Cheng, Peter C H

    2003-01-01

    We report an investigation into the processes involved in a common graph-reading task using two types of Cartesian graph. We describe an experiment and eye movement study, the results of which show that optimal scan paths assumed in the task analysis approximate the detailed sequences of saccades made by individuals. The research demonstrates the computational inequivalence of two sets of informationally equivalent graphs and illustrates how the computational advantages of a representation outweigh factors such as user unfamiliarity. We describe two models, using the ACT rational perceptual motor (ACT-R/PM) cognitive architecture, that replicate the pattern of observed response latencies and the complex scan paths revealed by the eye movement study. Finally, we outline three guidelines for designers of visual displays: Designers should (a) consider how different quantities are encoded within any chosen representational format, (b) consider the full range of alternative varieties of a given task, and (c) balance the cost of familiarization with the computational advantages of less familiar representations. Actual or potential applications of this research include informing the design and selection of appropriate visual displays and illustrating the practice and utility of task analysis, eye tracking, and cognitive modeling for understanding interactive tasks with external representations.

  11. Classification of non-coding RNA using graph representations ofsecondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karklin, Yan; Meraz, Richard F.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2004-06-07

    Some genes produce transcripts that function directly in regulatory, catalytic, or structural roles in the cell. These non-coding RNAs are prevalent in all living organisms, and methods that aid the understanding of their functional roles are essential. RNA secondary structure, the pattern of base-pairing, contains the critical information for determining the three dimensional structure and function of the molecule. In this work we examine whether the basic geometric and topological properties of secondary structure are sufficient to distinguish between RNA families in a learning framework. First, we develop a labeled dual graph representation of RNA secondary structure by adding biologically meaningful labels to the dual graphs proposed by Gan et al [1]. Next, we define a similarity measure directly on the labeled dual graphs using the recently developed marginalized kernels [2]. Using this similarity measure, we were able to train Support Vector Machine classifiers to distinguish RNAs of known families from random RNAs with similar statistics. For 22 of the 25 families tested, the classifier achieved better than 70% accuracy, with much higher accuracy rates for some families. Training a set of classifiers to automatically assign family labels to RNAs using a one vs. all multi-class scheme also yielded encouraging results. From these initial learning experiments, we suggest that the labeled dual graph representation, together with kernel machine methods, has potential for use in automated analysis and classification of uncharacterized RNA molecules or efficient genome-wide screens for RNA molecules from existing families.

  12. From graphs to tensegrity structures : geometric and symbolic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán, Miguel de

    2006-01-01

    A form-finding problem for tensegrity structures is studied; given an abstract graph, we show an algorithm to provide a necessary condition for it to be the underlying graph of a tensegrity in Rd (typically d = 2, 3) with vertices in general position. Furthermore, for a certain class of graphs our algorithm allows to obtain necessary and sufficient conditions on the relative position of the vertices in order to underlie a tensegrity, for what we propose both a geometric and a symbolic approach.

  13. Alternative approach to nuclear data representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruet, J.; Brown, D.; Beck, B.; McNabb, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers an approach for representing nuclear data that is qualitatively different from the approach currently adopted by the nuclear science community. Specifically, we examine a representation in which complicated data is described through collections of distinct and self-contained simple data structures. This structure-based representation is compared with the ENDF and ENDL formats, which can be roughly characterized as dictionary-based representations. A pilot data representation for replacing the format currently used at LLNL is presented. Examples are given as is a discussion of promises and shortcomings associated with moving from traditional dictionary-based formats to a structure-rich or class-like representation

  14. Graph Theory Approach for Studying Food Webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longjas, A.; Tejedor, A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2017-12-01

    Food webs are complex networks of feeding interactions among species in ecological communities. Metrics describing food web structure have been proposed to compare and classify food webs ranging from food chain length, connectance, degree distribution, centrality measures, to the presence of motifs (distinct compartments), among others. However, formal methodologies for studying both food web topology and the dynamic processes operating on them are still lacking. Here, we utilize a quantitative framework using graph theory within which a food web is represented by a directed graph, i.e., a collection of vertices (species or trophic species defined as sets of species sharing the same predators and prey) and directed edges (predation links). This framework allows us to identify apex (environmental "source" node) to outlet (top predators) subnetworks and compute the steady-state flux (e.g., carbon, nutrients, energy etc.) in the food web. We use this framework to (1) construct vulnerability maps that quantify the relative change of flux delivery to the top predators in response to perturbations in prey species (2) identify keystone species, whose loss would precipitate further species extinction, and (3) introduce a suite of graph-theoretic metrics to quantify the topologic (imposed by food web connectivity) and dynamic (dictated by the flux partitioning and distribution) components of a food web's complexity. By projecting food webs into a 2D Topodynamic Complexity Space whose coordinates are given by Number of alternative paths (topologic) and Leakage Index (dynamic), we show that this space provides a basis for food web comparison and provide physical insights into their dynamic behavior.

  15. Introducing the LASSO graph for compound data set representation and structure-activity relationship analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-06-14

    A graphical method is introduced for compound data mining and structure-activity relationship (SAR) data analysis that is based upon a canonical structural organization scheme and captures a compound-scaffold-skeleton hierarchy. The graph representation has a constant layout, integrates compound activity data, and provides direct access to SAR information. Characteristic SAR patterns that emerge from the graph are easily identified. The molecular hierarchy enables "forward-backward" analysis of compound data and reveals both global and local SAR patterns. For example, in heterogeneous data sets, compound series are immediately identified that convey interpretable SAR information in isolation or in the structural context of related series, which often define SAR pathways through data sets.

  16. A hierarchical approach to reducing communication in parallel graph algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Harshvardhan,

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale graph computing has become critical due to the ever-increasing size of data. However, distributed graph computations are limited in their scalability and performance due to the heavy communication inherent in such computations. This is exacerbated in scale-free networks, such as social and web graphs, which contain hub vertices that have large degrees and therefore send a large number of messages over the network. Furthermore, many graph algorithms and computations send the same data to each of the neighbors of a vertex. Our proposed approach recognizes this, and reduces communication performed by the algorithm without change to user-code, through a hierarchical machine model imposed upon the input graph. The hierarchical model takes advantage of locale information of the neighboring vertices to reduce communication, both in message volume and total number of bytes sent. It is also able to better exploit the machine hierarchy to further reduce the communication costs, by aggregating traffic between different levels of the machine hierarchy. Results of an implementation in the STAPL GL shows improved scalability and performance over the traditional level-synchronous approach, with 2.5 × - 8× improvement for a variety of graph algorithms at 12, 000+ cores.

  17. Cell nuclei attributed relational graphs for efficient representation and classification of gastric cancer in digital histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Harshita; Zerbe, Norman; Heim, Daniel; Wienert, Stephan; Lohmann, Sebastian; Hellwich, Olaf; Hufnagl, Peter

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a novel graph-based method for efficient representation and subsequent classification in histological whole slide images of gastric cancer. Her2/neu immunohistochemically stained and haematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections of gastric carcinoma are digitized. Immunohistochemical staining is used in practice by pathologists to determine extent of malignancy, however, it is laborious to visually discriminate the corresponding malignancy levels in the more commonly used haematoxylin and eosin stain, and this study attempts to solve this problem using a computer-based method. Cell nuclei are first isolated at high magnification using an automatic cell nuclei segmentation strategy, followed by construction of cell nuclei attributed relational graphs of the tissue regions. These graphs represent tissue architecture comprehensively, as they contain information about cell nuclei morphology as vertex attributes, along with knowledge of neighborhood in the form of edge linking and edge attributes. Global graph characteristics are derived and ensemble learning is used to discriminate between three types of malignancy levels, namely, non-tumor, Her2/neu positive tumor and Her2/neu negative tumor. Performance is compared with state of the art methods including four texture feature groups (Haralick, Gabor, Local Binary Patterns and Varma Zisserman features), color and intensity features, and Voronoi diagram and Delaunay triangulation. Texture, color and intensity information is also combined with graph-based knowledge, followed by correlation analysis. Quantitative assessment is performed using two cross validation strategies. On investigating the experimental results, it can be concluded that the proposed method provides a promising way for computer-based analysis of histopathological images of gastric cancer.

  18. What Would a Graph Look Like in this Layout? A Machine Learning Approach to Large Graph Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Hyun; Crnovrsanin, Tarik; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2018-01-01

    Using different methods for laying out a graph can lead to very different visual appearances, with which the viewer perceives different information. Selecting a "good" layout method is thus important for visualizing a graph. The selection can be highly subjective and dependent on the given task. A common approach to selecting a good layout is to use aesthetic criteria and visual inspection. However, fully calculating various layouts and their associated aesthetic metrics is computationally expensive. In this paper, we present a machine learning approach to large graph visualization based on computing the topological similarity of graphs using graph kernels. For a given graph, our approach can show what the graph would look like in different layouts and estimate their corresponding aesthetic metrics. An important contribution of our work is the development of a new framework to design graph kernels. Our experimental study shows that our estimation calculation is considerably faster than computing the actual layouts and their aesthetic metrics. Also, our graph kernels outperform the state-of-the-art ones in both time and accuracy. In addition, we conducted a user study to demonstrate that the topological similarity computed with our graph kernel matches perceptual similarity assessed by human users.

  19. A graph-graph approach to the analysis of the set of associative rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belim, S. V.; Smirnova, T. B.; Mironenko, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The article proposes a method for processing a set of associative rules, which makes it possible to identify additional relationships between the set of objects under study. The proposed approach consists of three stages. At the first stage, associative rules are revealed from the statistical data. At the second stage, constructed weighted oriented graph of relationships between the objects of the system. The third stage analyses the graph and identifies the community (community), which allows you to determine the groups of the most related objects. As an example, is given an analysis of the activities of public organizations. The result of the work is a method that allows to identify patterns from the analysis of a set of associative rules, and not just from a separate associative rule.

  20. Tracking of Moving Objects in Video Through Invariant Features in Their Graph Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Miller

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests a contour-based algorithm for tracking moving objects in video. The inputs are segmented moving objects. Each segmented frame is transformed into region adjacency graphs (RAGs. The object's contour is divided into subcurves. Contour's junctions are derived. These junctions are the unique “signature” of the tracked object. Junctions from two consecutive frames are matched. The junctions' motion is estimated using RAG edges in consecutive frames. Each pair of matched junctions may be connected by several paths (edges that become candidates that represent a tracked contour. These paths are obtained by the k-shortest paths algorithm between two nodes. The RAG is transformed into a weighted directed graph. The final tracked contour construction is derived by a match between edges (subcurves and candidate paths sets. The RAG constructs the tracked contour that enables an accurate and unique moving object representation. The algorithm tracks multiple objects, partially covered (occluded objects, compounded object of merge/split such as players in a soccer game and tracking in a crowded area for surveillance applications. We assume that features of topologic signature of the tracked object stay invariant in two consecutive frames. The algorithm's complexity depends on RAG's edges and not on the image's size.

  1. Engineering system dynamics a unified graph-centered approach

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Forbes T

    2006-01-01

    For today's students, learning to model the dynamics of complex systems is increasingly important across nearly all engineering disciplines. First published in 2001, Forbes T. Brown's Engineering System Dynamics: A Unified Graph-Centered Approach introduced students to a unique and highly successful approach to modeling system dynamics using bond graphs. Updated with nearly one-third new material, this second edition expands this approach to an even broader range of topics. What's New in the Second Edition? In addition to new material, this edition was restructured to build students' competence in traditional linear mathematical methods before they have gone too far into the modeling that still plays a pivotal role. New topics include magnetic circuits and motors including simulation with magnetic hysteresis; extensive new material on the modeling, analysis, and simulation of distributed-parameter systems; kinetic energy in thermodynamic systems; and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods. MATLAB(R) figures promi...

  2. A graph-based approach for designing extensible pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maíra R; Magalhães, Wagner C S; Machado, Moara; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2012-07-12

    In bioinformatics, it is important to build extensible and low-maintenance systems that are able to deal with the new tools and data formats that are constantly being developed. The traditional and simplest implementation of pipelines involves hardcoding the execution steps into programs or scripts. This approach can lead to problems when a pipeline is expanding because the incorporation of new tools is often error prone and time consuming. Current approaches to pipeline development such as workflow management systems focus on analysis tasks that are systematically repeated without significant changes in their course of execution, such as genome annotation. However, more dynamism on the pipeline composition is necessary when each execution requires a different combination of steps. We propose a graph-based approach to implement extensible and low-maintenance pipelines that is suitable for pipeline applications with multiple functionalities that require different combinations of steps in each execution. Here pipelines are composed automatically by compiling a specialised set of tools on demand, depending on the functionality required, instead of specifying every sequence of tools in advance. We represent the connectivity of pipeline components with a directed graph in which components are the graph edges, their inputs and outputs are the graph nodes, and the paths through the graph are pipelines. To that end, we developed special data structures and a pipeline system algorithm. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach by implementing a format conversion pipeline for the fields of population genetics and genetic epidemiology, but our approach is also helpful in other fields where the use of multiple software is necessary to perform comprehensive analyses, such as gene expression and proteomics analyses. The project code, documentation and the Java executables are available under an open source license at http://code.google.com/p/dynamic-pipeline. The system

  3. A graph-based approach for designing extensible pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Maíra R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bioinformatics, it is important to build extensible and low-maintenance systems that are able to deal with the new tools and data formats that are constantly being developed. The traditional and simplest implementation of pipelines involves hardcoding the execution steps into programs or scripts. This approach can lead to problems when a pipeline is expanding because the incorporation of new tools is often error prone and time consuming. Current approaches to pipeline development such as workflow management systems focus on analysis tasks that are systematically repeated without significant changes in their course of execution, such as genome annotation. However, more dynamism on the pipeline composition is necessary when each execution requires a different combination of steps. Results We propose a graph-based approach to implement extensible and low-maintenance pipelines that is suitable for pipeline applications with multiple functionalities that require different combinations of steps in each execution. Here pipelines are composed automatically by compiling a specialised set of tools on demand, depending on the functionality required, instead of specifying every sequence of tools in advance. We represent the connectivity of pipeline components with a directed graph in which components are the graph edges, their inputs and outputs are the graph nodes, and the paths through the graph are pipelines. To that end, we developed special data structures and a pipeline system algorithm. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach by implementing a format conversion pipeline for the fields of population genetics and genetic epidemiology, but our approach is also helpful in other fields where the use of multiple software is necessary to perform comprehensive analyses, such as gene expression and proteomics analyses. The project code, documentation and the Java executables are available under an open source license at http

  4. Information Retrieval and Graph Analysis Approaches for Book Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkoussas, Chahinez; Bellot, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    A combination of multiple information retrieval approaches is proposed for the purpose of book recommendation. In this paper, book recommendation is based on complex user's query. We used different theoretical retrieval models: probabilistic as InL2 (Divergence from Randomness model) and language model and tested their interpolated combination. Graph analysis algorithms such as PageRank have been successful in Web environments. We consider the application of this algorithm in a new retrieval approach to related document network comprised of social links. We called Directed Graph of Documents (DGD) a network constructed with documents and social information provided from each one of them. Specifically, this work tackles the problem of book recommendation in the context of INEX (Initiative for the Evaluation of XML retrieval) Social Book Search track. A series of reranking experiments demonstrate that combining retrieval models yields significant improvements in terms of standard ranked retrieval metrics. These results extend the applicability of link analysis algorithms to different environments.

  5. Graph-based representation of behavior in detection and prediction of daily living activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Piotr; Ślusarczyk, Grażyna

    2018-04-01

    Various surveillance systems capture signs of human activities of daily living (ADLs) and store multimodal information as time line behavioral records. In this paper, we present a novel approach to the analysis of a behavioral record used in a surveillance system designed for use in elderly smart homes. The description of a subject's activity is first decomposed into elementary poses - easily detectable by dedicated intelligent sensors - and represented by the share coefficients. Then, the activity is represented in the form of an attributed graph, where nodes correspond to elementary poses. As share coefficients of poses are expressed as attributes assigned to graph nodes, their change corresponding to a subject's action is represented by flow in graph edges. The behavioral record is thus a time series of graphs, which tiny size facilitates storage and management of long-term monitoring results. At the system learning stage, the contribution of elementary poses is accumulated, discretized and probability-ordered leading to a finite list representing the possible transitions between states. Such a list is independently built for each room in the supervised residence, and employed for assessment of the current action in the context of subject's habits and a room purpose. The proposed format of a behavioral record, applied to an adaptive surveillance system, is particularly advantageous for representing new activities not known at the setup stage, for providing a quantitative measure of transitions between poses and for expressing the difference between a predicted and actual action in a numerical way. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Information Retrieval and Graph Analysis Approaches for Book Recommendation

    OpenAIRE

    Chahinez Benkoussas; Patrice Bellot

    2015-01-01

    A combination of multiple information retrieval approaches is proposed for the purpose of book recommendation. In this paper, book recommendation is based on complex user's query. We used different theoretical retrieval models: probabilistic as InL2 (Divergence from Randomness model) and language model and tested their interpolated combination. Graph analysis algorithms such as PageRank have been successful in Web environments. We consider the application of this algorithm in a new retrieval ...

  7. A Factor Graph Approach to Automated GO Annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio E Spetale

    Full Text Available As volume of genomic data grows, computational methods become essential for providing a first glimpse onto gene annotations. Automated Gene Ontology (GO annotation methods based on hierarchical ensemble classification techniques are particularly interesting when interpretability of annotation results is a main concern. In these methods, raw GO-term predictions computed by base binary classifiers are leveraged by checking the consistency of predefined GO relationships. Both formal leveraging strategies, with main focus on annotation precision, and heuristic alternatives, with main focus on scalability issues, have been described in literature. In this contribution, a factor graph approach to the hierarchical ensemble formulation of the automated GO annotation problem is presented. In this formal framework, a core factor graph is first built based on the GO structure and then enriched to take into account the noisy nature of GO-term predictions. Hence, starting from raw GO-term predictions, an iterative message passing algorithm between nodes of the factor graph is used to compute marginal probabilities of target GO-terms. Evaluations on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster protein sequences from the GO Molecular Function domain showed significant improvements over competing approaches, even when protein sequences were naively characterized by their physicochemical and secondary structure properties or when loose noisy annotation datasets were considered. Based on these promising results and using Arabidopsis thaliana annotation data, we extend our approach to the identification of most promising molecular function annotations for a set of proteins of unknown function in Solanum lycopersicum.

  8. Social representations: a theoretical approach in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaiane Santos Bittencourt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the theory of social representations, placing its epistemology and knowing the basic concepts of its approach as a structural unit of knowledge for health studies. Justification: The use of this theory comes from the need to understand social eventsunder the lens of the meanings constructed by the community. Data Synthesis: This was a descriptive study of literature review, which used as a source of data collection the classical authors of social representations supported by articles from electronic search at Virtual Health Library (VHL. The definition and discussion of collected data enabled to introduce two themes, versed on the history and epistemology of representations and on the structuralapproach of representations in health studies. Conclusion: This review allowed highlight the importance of locating the objects of study with regard to contextual issues of individual and collective histories, valuing the plurality of relations, to come closer to reality that is represented by the subjects.

  9. Measuring geographic segregation: a graph-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Yun; Sadahiro, Yukio

    2014-04-01

    Residential segregation is a multidimensional phenomenon that encompasses several conceptually distinct aspects of geographical separation between populations. While various indices have been developed as a response to different definitions of segregation, the reliance on such single-figure indices could oversimplify the complex, multidimensional phenomena. In this regard, this paper suggests an alternative graph-based approach that provides more detailed information than simple indices: The concentration profile graphically conveys information about how evenly a population group is distributed over the study region, and the spatial proximity profile depicts the degree of clustering across different threshold levels. These graphs can also be summarized into single numbers for comparative purposes, but the interpretation can be more accurate by inspecting the additional information. To demonstrate the use of these methods, the residential patterns of three major ethnic groups in Auckland, namely Māori, Pacific peoples, and Asians, are examined using the 2006 census data.

  10. Interaction Graphs: Graphings

    OpenAIRE

    Seiller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In two previous papers, we exposed a combinatorial approach to the program of Geometry of Interaction, a program initiated by Jean-Yves Girard. The strength of our approach lies in the fact that we interpret proofs by simpler structures - graphs - than Girard's constructions, while generalizing the latter since they can be recovered as special cases of our setting. This third paper extends this approach by considering a generalization of graphs named graphings, which is in some way a geometri...

  11. A Community-Aware Approach to Minimizing Dissemination in Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chuxu

    2017-08-02

    Given a graph, can we minimize the spread of an entity (such as a meme or a virus) while maintaining the graph’s community structure (defined as groups of nodes with denser intra-connectivity than inter-connectivity)? At first glance, these two objectives seem at odds with each other. To minimize dissemination, nodes or links are often deleted to reduce the graph’s connectivity. These deletions can (and often do) destroy the graph’s community structure, which is an important construct in real-world settings (e.g., communities promote trust among their members). We utilize rewiring of links to achieve both objectives. Examples of rewiring in real life are prevalent, such as purchasing products from a new farm since the local farm has signs of mad cow disease; getting information from a new source after a disaster since your usual source is no longer available, etc. Our community-aware approach, called constrCRlink (short for Constraint Community Relink), preserves (on average) 98.6% of the efficacy of the best community-agnostic link-deletion approach (namely, NetMelt+), but changes the original community structure of the graph by only 4.5%. In contrast, NetMelt+ changes 13.6% of the original community structure.

  12. Information Retrieval and Graph Analysis Approaches for Book Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chahinez Benkoussas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of multiple information retrieval approaches is proposed for the purpose of book recommendation. In this paper, book recommendation is based on complex user's query. We used different theoretical retrieval models: probabilistic as InL2 (Divergence from Randomness model and language model and tested their interpolated combination. Graph analysis algorithms such as PageRank have been successful in Web environments. We consider the application of this algorithm in a new retrieval approach to related document network comprised of social links. We called Directed Graph of Documents (DGD a network constructed with documents and social information provided from each one of them. Specifically, this work tackles the problem of book recommendation in the context of INEX (Initiative for the Evaluation of XML retrieval Social Book Search track. A series of reranking experiments demonstrate that combining retrieval models yields significant improvements in terms of standard ranked retrieval metrics. These results extend the applicability of link analysis algorithms to different environments.

  13. Flexible Manifold Learning With Optimal Graph for Image and Video Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yan, Yan; Nie, Feiping; Yan, Shuicheng; Sebe, Nicu

    2018-06-01

    Graph-based dimensionality reduction techniques have been widely and successfully applied to clustering and classification tasks. The basis of these algorithms is the constructed graph which dictates their performance. In general, the graph is defined by the input affinity matrix. However, the affinity matrix derived from the data is sometimes suboptimal for dimension reduction as the data used are very noisy. To address this issue, we propose the projective unsupervised flexible embedding models with optimal graph (PUFE-OG). We build an optimal graph by adjusting the affinity matrix. To tackle the out-of-sample problem, we employ a linear regression term to learn a projection matrix. The optimal graph and the projection matrix are jointly learned by integrating the manifold regularizer and regression residual into a unified model. The experimental results on the public benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed PUFE-OG outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

  14. Graphing trillions of triangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Paul

    2017-07-01

    The increasing size of Big Data is often heralded but how data are transformed and represented is also profoundly important to knowledge discovery, and this is exemplified in Big Graph analytics. Much attention has been placed on the scale of the input graph but the product of a graph algorithm can be many times larger than the input. This is true for many graph problems, such as listing all triangles in a graph. Enabling scalable graph exploration for Big Graphs requires new approaches to algorithms, architectures, and visual analytics. A brief tutorial is given to aid the argument for thoughtful representation of data in the context of graph analysis. Then a new algebraic method to reduce the arithmetic operations in counting and listing triangles in graphs is introduced. Additionally, a scalable triangle listing algorithm in the MapReduce model will be presented followed by a description of the experiments with that algorithm that led to the current largest and fastest triangle listing benchmarks to date. Finally, a method for identifying triangles in new visual graph exploration technologies is proposed.

  15. Maximal independent set graph partitions for representations of body-centered cubic lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Kenny

    2009-01-01

    corresponding to the leaves of a quad-tree thus has a smaller memory foot-print. The adjacency information in the graph relieves one from going up and down the quad-tree when searching for neighbors. This results in constant time complexities for refinement and coarsening operations.......A maximal independent set graph data structure for a body-centered cubic lattice is presented. Refinement and coarsening operations are defined in terms of set-operations resulting in robust and easy implementation compared to a quad-tree-based implementation. The graph only stores information...

  16. Geospatial-temporal semantic graph representations of trajectories from remote sensing and geolocation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, David Nikolaus; Brost, Randolph; Ray, Lawrence P.

    2017-08-08

    Various technologies for facilitating analysis of large remote sensing and geolocation datasets to identify features of interest are described herein. A search query can be submitted to a computing system that executes searches over a geospatial temporal semantic (GTS) graph to identify features of interest. The GTS graph comprises nodes corresponding to objects described in the remote sensing and geolocation datasets, and edges that indicate geospatial or temporal relationships between pairs of nodes in the nodes. Trajectory information is encoded in the GTS graph by the inclusion of movable nodes to facilitate searches for features of interest in the datasets relative to moving objects such as vehicles.

  17. Description of continuous data using bar graphs: a misleading approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi

    2015-01-01

    With the ease provided by current computational programs, medical and scientific journals use bar graphs to describe continuous data. This manuscript discusses the inadequacy of bars graphs to present continuous data. Simulated data show that box plots and dot plots are more-feasible tools to describe continuous data. These plots are preferred to represent continuous variables since they effectively describe the range, shape, and variability of observations and clearly identify outliers. By contrast, bar graphs address only measures of central tendency. Bar graphs should be used only to describe qualitative data.

  18. A Hybrid Approach to Processing Big Data Graphs on Memory-Restricted Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Harshvardhan,

    2015-05-01

    With the advent of big-data, processing large graphs quickly has become increasingly important. Most existing approaches either utilize in-memory processing techniques that can only process graphs that fit completely in RAM, or disk-based techniques that sacrifice performance. In this work, we propose a novel RAM-Disk hybrid approach to graph processing that can scale well from a single shared-memory node to large distributed-memory systems. It works by partitioning the graph into sub graphs that fit in RAM and uses a paging-like technique to load sub graphs. We show that without modifying the algorithms, this approach can scale from small memory-constrained systems (such as tablets) to large-scale distributed machines with 16, 000+ cores.

  19. Data structure techniques for the graphical special unitary group approach to arbitrary spin representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, R.D.; Schlesinger, M.

    1987-01-01

    For the purpose of computing matrix elements of quantum mechanical operators in complex N-particle systems it is necessary that as much of each irreducible representation be stored in high-speed memory as possible in order to achieve the highest possible rate of computations. A graph theoretic approach to the representation of N-particle systems involving arbitrary single-particle spin is presented. The method involves a generalization of a technique employed by Shavitt in developing the graphical group approach (GUGA) to electronic spin-orbitals. The methods implemented in GENDRT and DRTDIM overcome many deficiencies inherent in other approaches, particularly with respect to utilization of memory resources, computational efficiency in the recognition and evaluation of non-zero matrix elements of certain group theoretic operators and complete labelling of all the basis states of the permutation symmetry (S N ) adapted irreducible representations of SU(n) groups. (orig.)

  20. From graphs to tensegrity structures: Geometric and symbolic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    de Guzmán, Miguel; Orden, David

    2004-01-01

    A form-finding problem for tensegrity structures is studied; given an abstract graph, we show an algorithm to provide a necessary condition for it to be the underlying graph of a tensegrity in $\\mathbb{R}^d$ (typically $d=2,3$) with vertices in general position. Furthermore, for a certain class of graphs our algorithm allows to obtain necessary and sufficient conditions on the relative position of the vertices in order to underlie a tensegrity, for what we propose both a geometric and a symbo...

  1. MetricForensics: A Multi-Level Approach for Mining Volatile Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Keith [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eliassi-Rad, Tina [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Faloutsos, Christos [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Akoglu, Leman [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Li, Lei [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Maruhashi, Koji [Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Prakash, B. Aditya [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tong, H [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-02-08

    Advances in data collection and storage capacity have made it increasingly possible to collect highly volatile graph data for analysis. Existing graph analysis techniques are not appropriate for such data, especially in cases where streaming or near-real-time results are required. An example that has drawn significant research interest is the cyber-security domain, where internet communication traces are collected and real-time discovery of events, behaviors, patterns and anomalies is desired. We propose MetricForensics, a scalable framework for analysis of volatile graphs. MetricForensics combines a multi-level “drill down" approach, a collection of user-selected graph metrics and a collection of analysis techniques. At each successive level, more sophisticated metrics are computed and the graph is viewed at a finer temporal resolution. In this way, MetricForensics scales to highly volatile graphs by only allocating resources for computationally expensive analysis when an interesting event is discovered at a coarser resolution first. We test MetricForensics on three real-world graphs: an enterprise IP trace, a trace of legitimate and malicious network traffic from a research institution, and the MIT Reality Mining proximity sensor data. Our largest graph has »3M vertices and »32M edges, spanning 4:5 days. The results demonstrate the scalability and capability of MetricForensics in analyzing volatile graphs; and highlight four novel phenomena in such graphs: elbows, broken correlations, prolonged spikes, and strange stars.

  2. Modified risk graph method using fuzzy rule-based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nait-Said, R., E-mail: r_nait_said@hotmail.com [LARPI Laboratory, Safety Department, Institute of Health and Occupational Safety, University of Batna, Road Med El-Hadi Boukhlouf, Batna (Algeria); Zidani, F., E-mail: fati_zidani@lycos.com [LSPIE Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Batna, Road Med El-Hadi Boukhlouf, Batna 05000 (Algeria); Ouzraoui, N., E-mail: ouzraoui@yahoo.fr [LARPI Laboratory, Safety Department, Institute of Health and Occupational Safety, University of Batna, Road Med El-Hadi Boukhlouf, Batna (Algeria)

    2009-05-30

    The risk graph is one of the most popular methods used to determine the safety integrity level for safety instrumented functions. However, conventional risk graph as described in the IEC 61508 standard is subjective and suffers from an interpretation problem of risk parameters. Thus, it can lead to inconsistent outcomes that may result in conservative SILs. To overcome this difficulty, a modified risk graph using fuzzy rule-based system is proposed. This novel version of risk graph uses fuzzy scales to assess risk parameters and calibration may be made by varying risk parameter values. Furthermore, the outcomes which are numerical values of risk reduction factor (the inverse of the probability of failure on demand) can be compared directly with those given by quantitative and semi-quantitative methods such as fault tree analysis (FTA), quantitative risk assessment (QRA) and layers of protection analysis (LOPA).

  3. Modified risk graph method using fuzzy rule-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait-Said, R; Zidani, F; Ouzraoui, N

    2009-05-30

    The risk graph is one of the most popular methods used to determine the safety integrity level for safety instrumented functions. However, conventional risk graph as described in the IEC 61508 standard is subjective and suffers from an interpretation problem of risk parameters. Thus, it can lead to inconsistent outcomes that may result in conservative SILs. To overcome this difficulty, a modified risk graph using fuzzy rule-based system is proposed. This novel version of risk graph uses fuzzy scales to assess risk parameters and calibration may be made by varying risk parameter values. Furthermore, the outcomes which are numerical values of risk reduction factor (the inverse of the probability of failure on demand) can be compared directly with those given by quantitative and semi-quantitative methods such as fault tree analysis (FTA), quantitative risk assessment (QRA) and layers of protection analysis (LOPA).

  4. A Framework to Measure the Service Quality of Distributor with Fuzzy Graph Theoretic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Kumar Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of fuzzy logic and graph theoretic approach has been used to find the service quality of distributor in a manufacturing supply chain management. This combination is termed as the fuzzy graph theoretic (FGT approach. Initially the identified factors were grouped by SPSS (statistical package for social science software and then the digraph approach was applied. The interaction and inheritance values were calculated by fuzzy graph theory approach in terms of permanent function. Then a single numerical index was calculated by using permanent function which indicates the distributor service quality. This method can be used to compare the service quality of different distributors.

  5. Geosites and geoheritage representations - a cartographic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Joao; Brilha, José

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the increasing awareness of the importance of nature conservation, particularly towards the protection, conservation and promotion of geological sites, has resulted in a wide range of scientific studies. In a certain way, the majority of geodiversity studies, geoconservation strategies and geosites inventories and geoheritage assessment projects will use, on a particular stage, a cartographic representation - a map - of the most relevant geological and geomorphological features within the area of analyses. A wide range of geosite maps and geological heritage maps have been produced but, so far, a widely accepted conceptual cartographic framework with a specific symbology for cartographic representation has not been created. In this work we debate the lack of a systematic and conceptual framework to support geoheritage and geosite mapping. It is important to create a widely accepted conceptual cartographic framework with a specific symbology to be used within maps dedicated to geoheritage and geosites. We propose a cartographic approach aiming the conceptualization and the definition of a nomenclature and symbology system to be used on both geosite and geoheritage maps. We define a symbology framework for geosite and geoheritage mapping addressed to general public and to secondary school students, in order to be used as geotouristic and didactic tools, respectively. Three different approaches to support the definition of the symbology framework were developed: i) symbols to correlate geosites with the geological time scale; ii) symbols related to each one of the 27 geological frameworks defined in the Portuguese geoheritage inventory; iii) symbols to represent groups of geosites that share common geological and geomorphological features. The use of these different symbols in a map allows a quick understanding of a set of relevant information, in addition to the usual geographical distribution of geosites in a certain area.

  6. A graph signal filtering-based approach for detection of different edge types on airborne lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Eda; Vural, Elif; Alatan, Aydin

    2017-10-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning is a well-known remote sensing technology, which provides a dense and highly accurate, yet unorganized point cloud of earth surface. During the last decade, extracting information from the data generated by airborne LiDAR systems has been addressed by many studies in geo-spatial analysis and urban monitoring applications. However, the processing of LiDAR point clouds is challenging due to their irregular structure and 3D geometry. In this study, we propose a novel framework for the detection of the boundaries of an object or scene captured by LiDAR. Our approach is motivated by edge detection techniques in vision research and it is established on graph signal filtering which is an exciting and promising field of signal processing for irregular data types. Due to the convenient applicability of graph signal processing tools on unstructured point clouds, we achieve the detection of the edge points directly on 3D data by using a graph representation that is constructed exclusively to answer the requirements of the application. Moreover, considering the elevation data as the (graph) signal, we leverage aerial characteristic of the airborne LiDAR data. The proposed method can be employed both for discovering the jump edges on a segmentation problem and for exploring the crease edges on a LiDAR object on a reconstruction/modeling problem, by only adjusting the filter characteristics.

  7. A Graph Theory Approach for Geovisualization of Anthropogenic Land Use Change: An application to Lisbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vaz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban sprawl and growth has experienced increased concern in geographic and environmental literature. Preceding the existence of robust frameworks found in regional and urban planning, as well as urban geography and economics, the spatial properties of allocation of urban land use are still far from being completely understood. This is largely due to the underlying complexity of the change found at the spatial level of urban land use, merging social, economic and natural drivers. The spatial patterns formed, and the connectivity established among the different subsets of land-use types, becomes a complex network of interactions over time, helping to shape the structure of the city. The possibility to merge the configuration of land-use with complex networks may be assessed elegantly through graph theory. Nodes and edges can become abstract representations of typologies of space and are represented into a topological space of different land use types which traditionally share common spatial boundaries. Within a regional framework, the links between adjacent and neighboring urban land use types become better understood, by means of a KamadaKawai algorithm. This study uses land use in Lisbon over three years, 1990, 2000 and 2006, to develop a Kamada-Kawai graph interpretation of land-use as a result of neighboring power. The rapid change witnessed in Lisbon since the nineties, as well as the availability of CORINE Land Cover data in these three time stamps, permits a reflection on anthropogenic land-use change in urban and semi-urban areas in Portugal’s capital. This paper responds to (1 the structure and connectivity of urban land use over time, demonstrating that most of the agricultural land is stressed to transform to urban, gaining a central role in future. (2 Offer a systemic approach to land-use transitions generating what we call spatial memory, where land use change is often unpredictable over space, but becomes evident in a graph theory

  8. Fractional graph theory a rational approach to the theory of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Scheinerman, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    A unified treatment of the most important results in the study of fractional graph concepts, this volume explores the various ways in which integer-valued concepts can be modified to derive nonintegral values. It begins with the general fractional theory of hypergraphs and presents in-depth coverage of fundamental and advanced topics. Subjects include fractional matching, fractional coloring, fractional edge coloring, fractional arboricity via matroid methods, and fractional isomorphism. The final chapter examines additional topics such as fractional domination, fractional intersection numbers

  9. Understanding Tourism Development: A Representational Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Meliou, Elina; Maroudas, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    The article investigates hotel employees and postgraduate students’ representations of “tourism development”, using social representations theory. Data from a sample of eighty participants were collected on Chios Island, Greece. To reveal social representations a word association procedure was applied followed by a correspondence analysis. The analysis attempts to map the meanings associated with “tourism development” and to pinpoint the links between those meanings. Results highlight differe...

  10. A semantic graph-based approach to biomedical summarisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Laura; Díaz, Alberto; Gervás, Pablo

    2011-09-01

    Access to the vast body of research literature that is available in biomedicine and related fields may be improved by automatic summarisation. This paper presents a method for summarising biomedical scientific literature that takes into consideration the characteristics of the domain and the type of documents. To address the problem of identifying salient sentences in biomedical texts, concepts and relations derived from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) are arranged to construct a semantic graph that represents the document. A degree-based clustering algorithm is then used to identify different themes or topics within the text. Different heuristics for sentence selection, intended to generate different types of summaries, are tested. A real document case is drawn up to illustrate how the method works. A large-scale evaluation is performed using the recall-oriented understudy for gisting-evaluation (ROUGE) metrics. The results are compared with those achieved by three well-known summarisers (two research prototypes and a commercial application) and two baselines. Our method significantly outperforms all summarisers and baselines. The best of our heuristics achieves an improvement in performance of almost 7.7 percentage units in the ROUGE-1 score over the LexRank summariser (0.7862 versus 0.7302). A qualitative analysis of the summaries also shows that our method succeeds in identifying sentences that cover the main topic of the document and also considers other secondary or "satellite" information that might be relevant to the user. The method proposed is proved to be an efficient approach to biomedical literature summarisation, which confirms that the use of concepts rather than terms can be very useful in automatic summarisation, especially when dealing with highly specialised domains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Practical Approach to Constructing a Knowledge Graph for Cybersecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyberattack forms are complex and varied, and the detection and prediction of dynamic types of attack are always challenging tasks. Research on knowledge graphs is becoming increasingly mature in many fields. At present, it is very significant that certain scholars have combined the concept of the knowledge graph with cybersecurity in order to construct a cybersecurity knowledge base. This paper presents a cybersecurity knowledge base and deduction rules based on a quintuple model. Using machine learning, we extract entities and build ontology to obtain a cybersecurity knowledge base. New rules are then deduced by calculating formulas and using the path-ranking algorithm. The Stanford named entity recognizer (NER is also used to train an extractor to extract useful information. Experimental results show that the Stanford NER provides many features and the useGazettes parameter may be used to train a recognizer in the cybersecurity domain in preparation for future work. Keywords: Cybersecurity, Knowledge graph, Knowledge deduction

  12. A coherent graph-based semantic clustering and summarization approach for biomedical literature and a new summarization evaluation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Illhoi; Hu, Xiaohua; Song, Il-Yeol

    2007-11-27

    A huge amount of biomedical textual information has been produced and collected in MEDLINE for decades. In order to easily utilize biomedical information in the free text, document clustering and text summarization together are used as a solution for text information overload problem. In this paper, we introduce a coherent graph-based semantic clustering and summarization approach for biomedical literature. Our extensive experimental results show the approach shows 45% cluster quality improvement and 72% clustering reliability improvement, in terms of misclassification index, over Bisecting K-means as a leading document clustering approach. In addition, our approach provides concise but rich text summary in key concepts and sentences. Our coherent biomedical literature clustering and summarization approach that takes advantage of ontology-enriched graphical representations significantly improves the quality of document clusters and understandability of documents through summaries.

  13. Visual Adjacency Lists for Dynamic Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlawatsch, Marcel; Burch, Michael; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We present a visual representation for dynamic, weighted graphs based on the concept of adjacency lists. Two orthogonal axes are used: one for all nodes of the displayed graph, the other for the corresponding links. Colors and labels are employed to identify the nodes. The usage of color allows us to scale the visualization to single pixel level for large graphs. In contrast to other techniques, we employ an asymmetric mapping that results in an aligned and compact representation of links. Our approach is independent of the specific properties of the graph to be visualized, but certain graphs and tasks benefit from the asymmetry. As we show in our results, the strength of our technique is the visualization of dynamic graphs. In particular, sparse graphs benefit from the compact representation. Furthermore, our approach uses visual encoding by size to represent weights and therefore allows easy quantification and comparison. We evaluate our approach in a quantitative user study that confirms the suitability for dynamic and weighted graphs. Finally, we demonstrate our approach for two examples of dynamic graphs.

  14. A Numerical Approach to Long Cycles in Graphs and Digraphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 235, - (2001), s. 233-236 ISSN 0012-365X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/98/0222 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : graph * diagraph * cycle * Hamilton cycle Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.301, year: 2001

  15. Designing a graph-based approach to landscape ecological assessment of linear infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardet, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.girardet@univ-fcomte.fr; Foltête, Jean-Christophe, E-mail: jean-christophe.foltete@univ-fcomte.fr; Clauzel, Céline, E-mail: celine.clauzel@univ-fcomte.fr

    2013-09-15

    The development of major linear infrastructures contributes to landscape fragmentation and impacts natural habitats and biodiversity in various ways. To anticipate and minimize such impacts, landscape planning needs to be capable of effective strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and of supporting environmental impact assessment (EIA) decisions. To this end, species distribution models (SDMs) are an effective way of making predictive maps of the presence of a given species. In this paper, we propose to combine SDMs and graph-based representation of landscape networks to integrate the potential long-distance effect of infrastructures on species distribution. A diachronic approach, comparing distribution before and after the linear infrastructure is constructed, leads to the design of a species distribution assessment (SDA), taking into account population isolation. The SDA makes it possible (1) to estimate the local variation in probability of presence and (2) to characterize the impact of the infrastructure in terms of global variation in presence and of distance of disturbance. The method is illustrated by assessing the impact of the construction of a high-speed railway line on the distribution of several virtual species in Franche-Comté (France). The study shows the capacity of the SDA to characterize the impact of a linear infrastructure either as a research concern or as a spatial planning challenge. SDAs could be helpful in deciding among several scenarios for linear infrastructure routes or for the location of mitigation measures. -- Highlights: • Graph connectivity metrics were integrated into a species distribution model. • SDM was performed before and after the implementation of linear infrastructure. • The local variation of presence provides spatial indicators of the impact.

  16. Knowledge representation an approach to artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Bench-Capon, TJM

    1990-01-01

    Although many texts exist offering an introduction to artificial intelligence (AI), this book is unique in that it places an emphasis on knowledge representation (KR) concepts. It includes small-scale implementations in PROLOG to illustrate the major KR paradigms and their developments.****back cover copy:**Knowledge representation is at the heart of the artificial intelligence enterprise: anyone writing a program which seeks to work by encoding and manipulating knowledge needs to pay attention to the scheme whereby he will represent the knowledge, and to be aware of the consequences of the ch

  17. Assessment of tautomer distribution using the condensed reaction graph approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimadiev, T. R.; Madzhidov, T. I.; Nugmanov, R. I.; Baskin, I. I.; Antipin, I. S.; Varnek, A.

    2018-03-01

    We report the first direct QSPR modeling of equilibrium constants of tautomeric transformations (logK T ) in different solvents and at different temperatures, which do not require intermediate assessment of acidity (basicity) constants for all tautomeric forms. The key step of the modeling consisted in the merging of two tautomers in one sole molecular graph ("condensed reaction graph") which enables to compute molecular descriptors characterizing entire equilibrium. The support vector regression method was used to build the models. The training set consisted of 785 transformations belonging to 11 types of tautomeric reactions with equilibrium constants measured in different solvents and at different temperatures. The models obtained perform well both in cross-validation (Q2 = 0.81 RMSE = 0.7 logK T units) and on two external test sets. Benchmarking studies demonstrate that our models outperform results obtained with DFT B3LYP/6-311 ++ G(d,p) and ChemAxon Tautomerizer applicable only in water at room temperature.

  18. A Parallel Approach for Frequent Subgraph Mining in a Single Large Graph Using Spark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengcai Qiao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Frequent subgraph mining (FSM plays an important role in graph mining, attracting a great deal of attention in many areas, such as bioinformatics, web data mining and social networks. In this paper, we propose SSiGraM (Spark based Single Graph Mining, a Spark based parallel frequent subgraph mining algorithm in a single large graph. Aiming to approach the two computational challenges of FSM, we conduct the subgraph extension and support evaluation parallel across all the distributed cluster worker nodes. In addition, we also employ a heuristic search strategy and three novel optimizations: load balancing, pre-search pruning and top-down pruning in the support evaluation process, which significantly improve the performance. Extensive experiments with four different real-world datasets demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the existing GraMi (Graph Mining algorithm by an order of magnitude for all datasets and can work with a lower support threshold.

  19. A graph lattice approach to maintaining and learning dense collections of subgraphs as image features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saund, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Effective object and scene classification and indexing depend on extraction of informative image features. This paper shows how large families of complex image features in the form of subgraphs can be built out of simpler ones through construction of a graph lattice—a hierarchy of related subgraphs linked in a lattice. Robustness is achieved by matching many overlapping and redundant subgraphs, which allows the use of inexpensive exact graph matching, instead of relying on expensive error-tolerant graph matching to a minimal set of ideal model graphs. Efficiency in exact matching is gained by exploitation of the graph lattice data structure. Additionally, the graph lattice enables methods for adaptively growing a feature space of subgraphs tailored to observed data. We develop the approach in the domain of rectilinear line art, specifically for the practical problem of document forms recognition. We are especially interested in methods that require only one or very few labeled training examples per category. We demonstrate two approaches to using the subgraph features for this purpose. Using a bag-of-words feature vector we achieve essentially single-instance learning on a benchmark forms database, following an unsupervised clustering stage. Further performance gains are achieved on a more difficult dataset using a feature voting method and feature selection procedure.

  20. A direct mining approach to efficient constrained graph pattern discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Feida; Zhang, Zequn; Qu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Despite the wealth of research on frequent graph pattern mining, how to efficiently mine the complete set of those with constraints still poses a huge challenge to the existing algorithms mainly due to the inherent bottleneck in the mining paradigm. In essence, mining requests with explicitly...... which short twigs branch out. These patterns, which we formally define as l-long δ-skinny patterns, are able to reveal insightful spatial and temporal trajectory patterns in mobile data mining, information diffusion, adoption propagation, and many others. Based on the key concept of a canonical diameter......, we develop SkinnyMine, an efficient algorithm to mine all the l-long δ-skinny patterns guaranteeing both the completeness of our mining result as well as the unique generation of each target pattern. We also present a general direct mining framework together with two properties of reducibility...

  1. Code-Aided Estimation and Detection on Time-Varying Correlated Mimo Channels: A Factor Graph Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoens Frederik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns channel tracking in a multiantenna context for correlated flat-fading channels obeying a Gauss-Markov model. It is known that data-aided tracking of fast-fading channels requires a lot of pilot symbols in order to achieve sufficient accuracy, and hence decreases the spectral efficiency. To overcome this problem, we design a code-aided estimation scheme which exploits information from both the pilot symbols and the unknown coded data symbols. The algorithm is derived based on a factor graph representation of the system and application of the sum-product algorithm. The sum-product algorithm reveals how soft information from the decoder should be exploited for the purpose of estimation and how the information bits can be detected. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  2. Compact Graphical Representation of Phylogenetic Data and Metadata with GraPh1An

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    F-type ATPase capability. Interestingly, some species such as those in the Streptococcus genus and some Clostridia still show both ATPase systems in...Temporal dynamics of the human vaginal microbiota. Science Translational Medicine 4:132ra152 DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.3003605. Giardine B, Riemer C...comprehensive approach for supporting accessible, reproducible, and transparent computational research in the life sciences . Genome Biology 11:R86 DOI

  3. A graph-based approach to detect spatiotemporal dynamics in satellite image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttler, Fabio; Ienco, Dino; Nin, Jordi; Teisseire, Maguelonne; Poncelet, Pascal

    2017-08-01

    Enhancing the frequency of satellite acquisitions represents a key issue for Earth Observation community nowadays. Repeated observations are crucial for monitoring purposes, particularly when intra-annual process should be taken into account. Time series of images constitute a valuable source of information in these cases. The goal of this paper is to propose a new methodological framework to automatically detect and extract spatiotemporal information from satellite image time series (SITS). Existing methods dealing with such kind of data are usually classification-oriented and cannot provide information about evolutions and temporal behaviors. In this paper we propose a graph-based strategy that combines object-based image analysis (OBIA) with data mining techniques. Image objects computed at each individual timestamp are connected across the time series and generates a set of evolution graphs. Each evolution graph is associated to a particular area within the study site and stores information about its temporal evolution. Such information can be deeply explored at the evolution graph scale or used to compare the graphs and supply a general picture at the study site scale. We validated our framework on two study sites located in the South of France and involving different types of natural, semi-natural and agricultural areas. The results obtained from a Landsat SITS support the quality of the methodological approach and illustrate how the framework can be employed to extract and characterize spatiotemporal dynamics.

  4. iBGP: A Bipartite Graph Propagation Approach for Mobile Advertising Fraud Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online mobile advertising plays a vital financial role in supporting free mobile apps, but detecting malicious apps publishers who generate fraudulent actions on the advertisements hosted on their apps is difficult, since fraudulent traffic often mimics behaviors of legitimate users and evolves rapidly. In this paper, we propose a novel bipartite graph-based propagation approach, iBGP, for mobile apps advertising fraud detection in large advertising system. We exploit the characteristics of mobile advertising user’s behavior and identify two persistent patterns: power law distribution and pertinence and propose an automatic initial score learning algorithm to formulate both concepts to learn the initial scores of non-seed nodes. We propose a weighted graph propagation algorithm to propagate the scores of all nodes in the user-app bipartite graphs until convergence. To extend our approach for large-scale settings, we decompose the objective function of the initial score learning model into separate one-dimensional problems and parallelize the whole approach on an Apache Spark cluster. iBGP was applied on a large synthetic dataset and a large real-world mobile advertising dataset; experiment results demonstrate that iBGP significantly outperforms other popular graph-based propagation methods.

  5. A Graph-Algorithmic Approach for the Study of Metastability in Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Tingyue; Cameron, Maria

    2017-06-01

    Large continuous-time Markov chains with exponentially small transition rates arise in modeling complex systems in physics, chemistry, and biology. We propose a constructive graph-algorithmic approach to determine the sequence of critical timescales at which the qualitative behavior of a given Markov chain changes, and give an effective description of the dynamics on each of them. This approach is valid for both time-reversible and time-irreversible Markov processes, with or without symmetry. Central to this approach are two graph algorithms, Algorithm 1 and Algorithm 2, for obtaining the sequences of the critical timescales and the hierarchies of Typical Transition Graphs or T-graphs indicating the most likely transitions in the system without and with symmetry, respectively. The sequence of critical timescales includes the subsequence of the reciprocals of the real parts of eigenvalues. Under a certain assumption, we prove sharp asymptotic estimates for eigenvalues (including pre-factors) and show how one can extract them from the output of Algorithm 1. We discuss the relationship between Algorithms 1 and 2 and explain how one needs to interpret the output of Algorithm 1 if it is applied in the case with symmetry instead of Algorithm 2. Finally, we analyze an example motivated by R. D. Astumian's model of the dynamics of kinesin, a molecular motor, by means of Algorithm 2.

  6. RRES: A Novel Approach to the Partitioning Problem for a Typical Subset of System Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Knerr

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The research field of system partitioning in modern electronic system design started to find strong advertence of scientists about fifteen years ago. Since a multitude of formulations for the partitioning problem exist, the same multitude could be found in the number of strategies that address this problem. Their feasibility is highly dependent on the platform abstraction and the degree of realism that it features. This work originated from the intention to identify the most mature and powerful approaches for system partitioning in order to integrate them into a consistent design framework for wireless embedded systems. Within this publication, a thorough characterisation of graph properties typical for task graphs in the field of wireless embedded system design has been undertaken and has led to the development of an entirely new approach for the system partitioning problem. The restricted range exhaustive search algorithm is introduced and compared to popular and well-reputed heuristic techniques based on tabu search, genetic algorithm, and the global criticality/local phase algorithm. It proves superior performance for a set of system graphs featuring specific properties found in human-made task graphs, since it exploits their typical characteristics such as locality, sparsity, and their degree of parallelism.

  7. RRES: A Novel Approach to the Partitioning Problem for a Typical Subset of System Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knerr B

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The research field of system partitioning in modern electronic system design started to find strong advertence of scientists about fifteen years ago. Since a multitude of formulations for the partitioning problem exist, the same multitude could be found in the number of strategies that address this problem. Their feasibility is highly dependent on the platform abstraction and the degree of realism that it features. This work originated from the intention to identify the most mature and powerful approaches for system partitioning in order to integrate them into a consistent design framework for wireless embedded systems. Within this publication, a thorough characterisation of graph properties typical for task graphs in the field of wireless embedded system design has been undertaken and has led to the development of an entirely new approach for the system partitioning problem. The restricted range exhaustive search algorithm is introduced and compared to popular and well-reputed heuristic techniques based on tabu search, genetic algorithm, and the global criticality/local phase algorithm. It proves superior performance for a set of system graphs featuring specific properties found in human-made task graphs, since it exploits their typical characteristics such as locality, sparsity, and their degree of parallelism.

  8. A Unified Bond Graph Modeling Approach for the Ejection Phase of the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUBNA MOIN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the unified Bond Graph model of the left ventricle ejection phase is presented, simulated and validated. The integro-differential and ordinary differential equations obtained from the bond graph models are simulated using ODE45 (Ordinary Differential Equation Solver on MATLAB and Simulink. The results, thus, obtained are compared with CVS (Cardiovascular System physiological data present in Simbiosys (a software for simulating biological systems and also with the CVS Wiggers diagram of heart cycle. As the cardiac activity is a multi domain process that includes mechanical, hydraulic, chemical and electrical events; therefore, for modeling such systems a unified modeling approach is needed. In this paper the unified Bond Graph model of the left ventricle ejection phase is proposed. The Bond Graph conventionalism approach is a graphical method principally powerful to portray multi-energy systems, as it is formulated on the portrayal of power exchanges. The model takes into account a simplified description of the left ventricle which is close to the medical investigation promoting the apperception and the dialogue between engineers and physiologists.

  9. On self-approaching and increasing-chord drawings of 3-connected planar graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nöllenburg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An $st$-path in a drawing of a graph is self-approaching if during the traversal of the corresponding curve from $s$ to any point $t'$ on the curve the distance to $t'$ is non-increasing. A path has increasing chords if it is self-approaching in both directions. A drawing is self-approaching (increasing-chord if any pair of vertices is connected by a self-approaching (increasing-chord path.We study self-approaching and increasing-chord drawings of triangulations and 3-connected planar graphs. We show that in the Euclidean plane, triangulations admit increasing-chord drawings, and for planar 3-trees we can ensure planarity. We prove that strongly monotone (and thus increasing-chord drawings of trees and binary cactuses require exponential resolution in the worst case, answering an open question by Kindermann et al. (GD 2014. Moreover, we provide a binary cactus that does not admit a self-approaching drawing. Finally, we show that 3-connected planar graphs admit increasing-chord drawings in the hyperbolic plane and characterize the trees that admit such drawings.

  10. ESIP's Earth Science Knowledge Graph (ESKG) Testbed Project: An Automatic Approach to Building Interdisciplinary Earth Science Knowledge Graphs to Improve Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGibbney, L. J.; Jiang, Y.; Burgess, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    Big Earth observation data have been produced, archived and made available online, but discovering the right data in a manner that precisely and efficiently satisfies user needs presents a significant challenge to the Earth Science (ES) community. An emerging trend in information retrieval community is to utilize knowledge graphs to assist users in quickly finding desired information from across knowledge sources. This is particularly prevalent within the fields of social media and complex multimodal information processing to name but a few, however building a domain-specific knowledge graph is labour-intensive and hard to keep up-to-date. In this work, we update our progress on the Earth Science Knowledge Graph (ESKG) project; an ESIP-funded testbed project which provides an automatic approach to building a dynamic knowledge graph for ES to improve interdisciplinary data discovery by leveraging implicit, latent existing knowledge present within across several U.S Federal Agencies e.g. NASA, NOAA and USGS. ESKG strengthens ties between observations and user communities by: 1) developing a knowledge graph derived from various sources e.g. Web pages, Web Services, etc. via natural language processing and knowledge extraction techniques; 2) allowing users to traverse, explore, query, reason and navigate ES data via knowledge graph interaction. ESKG has the potential to revolutionize the way in which ES communities interact with ES data in the open world through the entity, spatial and temporal linkages and characteristics that make it up. This project enables the advancement of ESIP collaboration areas including both Discovery and Semantic Technologies by putting graph information right at our fingertips in an interactive, modern manner and reducing the efforts to constructing ontology. To demonstrate the ESKG concept, we will demonstrate use of our framework across NASA JPL's PO.DAAC, NOAA's Earth Observation Requirements Evaluation System (EORES) and various USGS

  11. Graph-based sequence annotation using a data integration approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesch Robert

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The automated annotation of data from high throughput sequencing and genomics experiments is a significant challenge for bioinformatics. Most current approaches rely on sequential pipelines of gene finding and gene function prediction methods that annotate a gene with information from different reference data sources. Each function prediction method contributes evidence supporting a functional assignment. Such approaches generally ignore the links between the information in the reference datasets. These links, however, are valuable for assessing the plausibility of a function assignment and can be used to evaluate the confidence in a prediction. We are working towards a novel annotation system that uses the network of information supporting the function assignment to enrich the annotation process for use by expert curators and predicting the function of previously unannotated genes. In this paper we describe our success in the first stages of this development. We present the data integration steps that are needed to create the core database of integrated reference databases (UniProt, PFAM, PDB, GO and the pathway database Ara- Cyc which has been established in the ONDEX data integration system. We also present a comparison between different methods for integration of GO terms as part of the function assignment pipeline and discuss the consequences of this analysis for improving the accuracy of gene function annotation.

  12. Graph-based sequence annotation using a data integration approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Robert; Lysenko, Artem; Hindle, Matthew; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Thiele, Ralf; Rawlings, Christopher; Köhler, Jacob; Taubert, Jan

    2008-08-25

    The automated annotation of data from high throughput sequencing and genomics experiments is a significant challenge for bioinformatics. Most current approaches rely on sequential pipelines of gene finding and gene function prediction methods that annotate a gene with information from different reference data sources. Each function prediction method contributes evidence supporting a functional assignment. Such approaches generally ignore the links between the information in the reference datasets. These links, however, are valuable for assessing the plausibility of a function assignment and can be used to evaluate the confidence in a prediction. We are working towards a novel annotation system that uses the network of information supporting the function assignment to enrich the annotation process for use by expert curators and predicting the function of previously unannotated genes. In this paper we describe our success in the first stages of this development. We present the data integration steps that are needed to create the core database of integrated reference databases (UniProt, PFAM, PDB, GO and the pathway database Ara-Cyc) which has been established in the ONDEX data integration system. We also present a comparison between different methods for integration of GO terms as part of the function assignment pipeline and discuss the consequences of this analysis for improving the accuracy of gene function annotation. The methods and algorithms presented in this publication are an integral part of the ONDEX system which is freely available from http://ondex.sf.net/.

  13. Querying 3D Data by Adjacency Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Bore, Nils; Jensfelt, Patric; Folkesson, John

    2015-01-01

    The need for robots to search the 3D data they have saved is becoming more apparent. We present an approach for finding structures in 3D models such as those built by robots of their environment. The method extracts geometric primitives from point cloud data. An attributed graph over these primitives forms our representation of the surface structures. Recurring substructures are found with frequent graph mining techniques. We investigate if a model invariant to changes in size and reflection ...

  14. A Multi-Level Middle-Out Cross-Zooming Approach for Large Graph Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Cook, Kristin A.; Rohrer, Randall M.; Foote, Harlan P.; Whiting, Mark A.

    2009-10-11

    This paper presents a working graph analytics model that embraces the strengths of the traditional top-down and bottom-up approaches with a resilient crossover concept to exploit the vast middle-ground information overlooked by the two extreme analytical approaches. Our graph analytics model is developed in collaboration with researchers and users, who carefully studied the functional requirements that reflect the critical thinking and interaction pattern of a real-life intelligence analyst. To evaluate the model, we implement a system prototype, known as GreenHornet, which allows our analysts to test the theory in practice, identify the technological and usage-related gaps in the model, and then adapt the new technology in their work space. The paper describes the implementation of GreenHornet and compares its strengths and weaknesses against the other prevailing models and tools.

  15. FSG: Fast String Graph Construction for De Novo Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Vedova, Gianluca Della; Pirola, Yuri; Previtali, Marco; Rizzi, Raffaella

    2017-10-01

    The string graph for a collection of next-generation reads is a lossless data representation that is fundamental for de novo assemblers based on the overlap-layout-consensus paradigm. In this article, we explore a novel approach to compute the string graph, based on the FM-index and Burrows and Wheeler Transform. We describe a simple algorithm that uses only the FM-index representation of the collection of reads to construct the string graph, without accessing the input reads. Our algorithm has been integrated into the string graph assembler (SGA) as a standalone module to construct the string graph. The new integrated assembler has been assessed on a standard benchmark, showing that fast string graph (FSG) is significantly faster than SGA while maintaining a moderate use of main memory, and showing practical advantages in running FSG on multiple threads. Moreover, we have studied the effect of coverage rates on the running times.

  16. iBGP: A Bipartite Graph Propagation Approach for Mobile Advertising Fraud Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jinlong; Liang, Junjie; Dong, Shoubin

    2017-01-01

    Online mobile advertising plays a vital financial role in supporting free mobile apps, but detecting malicious apps publishers who generate fraudulent actions on the advertisements hosted on their apps is difficult, since fraudulent traffic often mimics behaviors of legitimate users and evolves rapidly. In this paper, we propose a novel bipartite graph-based propagation approach, iBGP, for mobile apps advertising fraud detection in large advertising system. We exploit the characteristics of m...

  17. Application of linear graph embedding as a dimensionality reduction technique and sparse representation classifier as a post classifier for the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Sunil Kumar; Rajaguru, Harikumar

    2015-12-01

    The most common and frequently occurring neurological disorder is epilepsy and the main method useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy is electroencephalogram (EEG) signal analysis. Due to the length of EEG recordings, EEG signal analysis method is quite time-consuming when it is processed manually by an expert. This paper proposes the application of Linear Graph Embedding (LGE) concept as a dimensionality reduction technique for processing the epileptic encephalographic signals and then it is classified using Sparse Representation Classifiers (SRC). SRC is used to analyze the classification of epilepsy risk levels from EEG signals and the parameters such as Sensitivity, Specificity, Time Delay, Quality Value, Performance Index and Accuracy are analyzed.

  18. Multiscale Analysis of Time Irreversibility Based on Phase-Space Reconstruction and Horizontal Visibility Graph Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongping; Shang, Pengjian; Xiong, Hui; Xia, Jianan

    Time irreversibility is an important property of nonequilibrium dynamic systems. A visibility graph approach was recently proposed, and this approach is generally effective to measure time irreversibility of time series. However, its result may be unreliable when dealing with high-dimensional systems. In this work, we consider the joint concept of time irreversibility and adopt the phase-space reconstruction technique to improve this visibility graph approach. Compared with the previous approach, the improved approach gives a more accurate estimate for the irreversibility of time series, and is more effective to distinguish irreversible and reversible stochastic processes. We also use this approach to extract the multiscale irreversibility to account for the multiple inherent dynamics of time series. Finally, we apply the approach to detect the multiscale irreversibility of financial time series, and succeed to distinguish the time of financial crisis and the plateau. In addition, Asian stock indexes away from other indexes are clearly visible in higher time scales. Simulations and real data support the effectiveness of the improved approach when detecting time irreversibility.

  19. Distributed Cooperative Optimal Control for Multiagent Systems on Directed Graphs: An Inverse Optimal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaguang; Feng, Tao; Yang, Guang-Hong; Liang, Hongjing

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the inverse optimal approach is employed to design distributed consensus protocols that guarantee consensus and global optimality with respect to some quadratic performance indexes for identical linear systems on a directed graph. The inverse optimal theory is developed by introducing the notion of partial stability. As a result, the necessary and sufficient conditions for inverse optimality are proposed. By means of the developed inverse optimal theory, the necessary and sufficient conditions are established for globally optimal cooperative control problems on directed graphs. Basic optimal cooperative design procedures are given based on asymptotic properties of the resulting optimal distributed consensus protocols, and the multiagent systems can reach desired consensus performance (convergence rate and damping rate) asymptotically. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  20. An unprecedented multi attribute decision making using graph theory matrix approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Geetha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A frame work for investigating the best combination of functioning parameters on a variable compression ratio diesel engine is proposed in the present study using a multi attribute optimization methodology, Graph Theory Matrix Approach. The functioning parameters, attributes, sub attributes and functioning variables of sub attributes are chosen based on expert’s opinion and literature review. The directed graphs are developed for attributes and sub attributes. The ‘Parameter Index’ was calculated for all trials to choose the best trial. The experimental results are verified with the theoretical data. Functioning parameters with combination of compression ratio of 17, fuel injection pressure of 20 N/mm2 and fuel injection pressure of 21°bTDC was found to be best. The proposed method allows the decision maker to systematically and logically find the best combination of functioning parameters.

  1. Knowledge Representation in Patient Safety Reporting: An Ontological Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Chen; Yang Gong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The current development of patient safety reporting systems is criticized for loss of information and low data quality due to the lack of a uniformed domain knowledge base and text processing functionality. To improve patient safety reporting, the present paper suggests an ontological representation of patient safety knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: We propose a framework for constructing an ontological knowledge base of patient safety. The present paper describes our desig...

  2. Mining chemical reactions using neighborhood behavior and condensed graphs of reactions approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Aurélie; Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Solov'ev, Vitaly; Varnek, Alexandre

    2012-09-24

    This work addresses the problem of similarity search and classification of chemical reactions using Neighborhood Behavior (NB) and Condensed Graphs of Reaction (CGR) approaches. The CGR formalism represents chemical reactions as a classical molecular graph with dynamic bonds, enabling descriptor calculations on this graph. Different types of the ISIDA fragment descriptors generated for CGRs in combination with two metrics--Tanimoto and Euclidean--were considered as chemical spaces, to serve for reaction dissimilarity scoring. The NB method has been used to select an optimal combination of descriptors which distinguish different types of chemical reactions in a database containing 8544 reactions of 9 classes. Relevance of NB analysis has been validated in generic (multiclass) similarity search and in clustering with Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). NB-compliant sets of descriptors were shown to display enhanced mapping propensities, allowing the construction of better Self-Organizing Maps and similarity searches (NB and classical similarity search criteria--AUC ROC--correlate at a level of 0.7). The analysis of the SOM clusters proved chemically meaningful CGR substructures representing specific reaction signatures.

  3. A Bond Graph Approach for the Modeling and Simulation of a Buck Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rached Zrafi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the modeling of bond graph buck converter systems. The bond graph formalism, which represents a heterogeneous formalism for physical modeling, is used to design a sub-model of a power MOSFET and PiN diode switchers. These bond graph models are based on the device’s electrical elements. The application of these models to a bond graph buck converter permit us to obtain an invariant causal structure when the switch devices change state. This paper shows the usefulness of the bond graph device’s modeling to simulate an implicit bond graph buck converter.

  4. Learning Probabilistic Decision Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred; Dalgaard, Jens; Silander, Tomi

    2004-01-01

    Probabilistic decision graphs (PDGs) are a representation language for probability distributions based on binary decision diagrams. PDGs can encode (context-specific) independence relations that cannot be captured in a Bayesian network structure, and can sometimes provide computationally more...

  5. Karhunen-Loève-Based Reduced-Complexity Representation of the Mixed-Density Messages in SPA on Factor Graph and Its Impact on BER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prochazka Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sum product algorithm on factor graphs (FG/SPA is a widely used tool to solve various problems in a wide area of fields. A representation of generally-shaped continuously valued messages in the FG/SPA is commonly solved by a proper parameterization of the messages. Obtaining such a proper parameterization is, however, a crucial problem in general. The paper introduces a systematic procedure for obtaining a scalar message representation with well-defined fidelity criterion in a general FG/SPA. The procedure utilizes a stochastic nature of the messages as they evolve during the FG/SPA processing. A Karhunen-Loève Transform (KLT is used to find a generic canonical message representation which exploits the message stochastic behavior with mean square error (MSE fidelity criterion. We demonstrate the procedure on a range of scenarios including mixture-messages (a digital modulation in phase parametric channel. The proposed systematic procedure achieves equal results as the Fourier parameterization developed especially for this particular class of scenarios.

  6. Determining X-chains in graph states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jun-Yi; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The representation of graph states in the X-basis as well as the calculation of graph state overlaps can efficiently be performed by using the concept of X-chains (Wu et al 2015 Phys. Rev. A 92 012322). We present a necessary and sufficient criterion for X-chains and show that they can efficiently be determined by the Bareiss algorithm. An analytical approach for searching X-chain groups of a graph state is proposed. Furthermore we generalize the concept of X-chains to so-called Euler chains, whose induced subgraphs are Eulerian. This approach helps to determine if a given vertex set is an X-chain and we show how Euler chains can be used in the construction of multipartite Bell inequalities for graph states. (paper)

  7. Fracture and Fragmentation of Simplicial Finite Elements Meshes using Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, A; Knap, J; Ortiz, M

    2006-10-18

    An approach for the topological representation of simplicial finite element meshes as graphs is presented. It is shown that by using a graph, the topological changes induced by fracture reduce to a few, local kernel operations. The performance of the graph representation is demonstrated and analyzed, using as reference the 3D fracture algorithm by Pandolfi and Ortiz [22]. It is shown that the graph representation initializes in O(N{sub E}{sup 1.1}) time and fractures in O(N{sub I}{sup 1.0}) time, while the reference implementation requires O(N{sub E}{sup 2.1}) time to initialize and O(N{sub I}{sup 1.9}) time to fracture, where NE is the number of elements in the mesh and N{sub I} is the number of interfaces to fracture.

  8. Graph-rewriting approach to discrete relaxation: application to music recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Hoda M.; Blostein, Dorothea

    1994-03-01

    In image analysis, low-level recognition of the primitives plays a very important role. Once the primitives of the image are recognized, depending on the application, many types of analyses can take place. It is likely that associated with each object or primitive is a set of possible interpretations, herein referred to as the label set. The low-level recognizer may associate a probability with each label in the label set. We can use the constraints of the application domain to reduce the ambiguity in the object's identity. This process is variously termed constraint satisfaction, labeling, or relaxation. In this paper, we focus on the discrete form of relaxation. Our contribution lies in the development of a graph-rewriting approach which does not assume the degree of localness is high. We apply our approach to the recognition of music notation, where non-local interactions between primitives must be used in order to reduce ambiguity in the identity of the primitives. We use graph-rewriting rules to express not only binary constraints, but also higher-order notational constraints.

  9. A study of brain networks associated with swallowing using graph-theoretical approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Luan

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity between brain regions during swallowing tasks is still not well understood. Understanding these complex interactions is of great interest from both a scientific and a clinical perspective. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was utilized to study brain functional networks during voluntary saliva swallowing in twenty-two adult healthy subjects (all females, [Formula: see text] years of age. To construct these functional connections, we computed mean partial correlation matrices over ninety brain regions for each participant. Two regions were determined to be functionally connected if their correlation was above a certain threshold. These correlation matrices were then analyzed using graph-theoretical approaches. In particular, we considered several network measures for the whole brain and for swallowing-related brain regions. The results have shown that significant pairwise functional connections were, mostly, either local and intra-hemispheric or symmetrically inter-hemispheric. Furthermore, we showed that all human brain functional network, although varying in some degree, had typical small-world properties as compared to regular networks and random networks. These properties allow information transfer within the network at a relatively high efficiency. Swallowing-related brain regions also had higher values for some of the network measures in comparison to when these measures were calculated for the whole brain. The current results warrant further investigation of graph-theoretical approaches as a potential tool for understanding the neural basis of dysphagia.

  10. Quantitative graph theory mathematical foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The first book devoted exclusively to quantitative graph theory, Quantitative Graph Theory: Mathematical Foundations and Applications presents and demonstrates existing and novel methods for analyzing graphs quantitatively. Incorporating interdisciplinary knowledge from graph theory, information theory, measurement theory, and statistical techniques, this book covers a wide range of quantitative-graph theoretical concepts and methods, including those pertaining to real and random graphs such as:Comparative approaches (graph similarity or distance)Graph measures to characterize graphs quantitat

  11. Orthogonal polynomials derived from the tridiagonal representation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaidari, A. D.

    2018-01-01

    The tridiagonal representation approach is an algebraic method for solving second order differential wave equations. Using this approach in the solution of quantum mechanical problems, we encounter two new classes of orthogonal polynomials whose properties give the structure and dynamics of the corresponding physical system. For a certain range of parameters, one of these polynomials has a mix of continuous and discrete spectra making it suitable for describing physical systems with both scattering and bound states. In this work, we define these polynomials by their recursion relations and highlight some of their properties using numerical means. Due to the prime significance of these polynomials in physics, we hope that our short expose will encourage experts in the field of orthogonal polynomials to study them and derive their properties (weight functions, generating functions, asymptotics, orthogonality relations, zeros, etc.) analytically.

  12. Geometry of Graph Edit Distance Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Brijnesh J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the geometry of graph spaces endowed with a special class of graph edit distances. The focus is on geometrical results useful for statistical pattern recognition. The main result is the Graph Representation Theorem. It states that a graph is a point in some geometrical space, called orbit space. Orbit spaces are well investigated and easier to explore than the original graph space. We derive a number of geometrical results from the orbit space representation, translate ...

  13. Patch definition in metapopulation analysis: a graph theory approach to solve the mega-patch problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Kyle C; Siegel, David A; Raimondi, Peter T; Alberto, Filipe

    2014-02-01

    The manner in which patches are delineated in spatially realistic metapopulation models will influence the size, connectivity, and extinction and recolonization dynamics of those patches. Most commonly used patch-definition methods focus on identifying discrete, contiguous patches of habitat from a single temporal observation of species occurrence or from a model of habitat suitability. However, these approaches are not suitable for many metapopulation systems where entire patches may not be fully colonized at a given time. For these metapopulation systems, a single large patch of habitat may actually support multiple, interacting subpopulations. The interactions among these subpopulations will be ignored if the patch is treated as a single unit, a situation we term the "mega-patch problem." Mega-patches are characterized by variable intra-patch synchrony, artificially low inter-patch connectivity, and low extinction rates. One way to detect this problem is by using time series data to calculate demographic synchrony within mega-patches. We present a framework for identifying subpopulations in mega-patches using a combination of spatial autocorrelation and graph theory analyses. We apply our approach to southern California giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forests using a new, long-term (27 years), satellite-based data set of giant kelp canopy biomass. We define metapopulation patches using our method as well as several other commonly used patch delineation methodologies and examine the colonization and extinction dynamics of the metapopulation under each approach. We find that the relationships between patch characteristics such as area and connectivity and the demographic processes of colonizations and extinctions vary among the different patch-definition methods. Our spatial-analysis/graph-theoretic framework produces results that match theoretical expectations better than the other methods. This approach can be used to identify subpopulations in metapopulations

  14. Intraplate seismicity in Canada: a graph theoretic approach to data analysis and interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vasudevan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Intraplate seismicity occurs in central and northern Canada, but the underlying origin and dynamics remain poorly understood. Here, we apply a graph theoretic approach to characterize the statistical structure of spatiotemporal clustering exhibited by intraplate seismicity, a direct consequence of the underlying nonlinear dynamics. Using a recently proposed definition of "recurrences" based on record breaking processes (Davidsen et al., 2006, 2008, we have constructed directed graphs using catalogue data for three selected regions (Region 1: 45°−48° N/74°−80° W; Region 2: 51°−55° N/77°−83° W; and Region 3: 56°−70° N/65°−95° W, with attributes drawn from the location, origin time and the magnitude of the events. Based on comparisons with a null model derived from Poisson distribution or Monte Carlo shuffling of the catalogue data, our results provide strong evidence in support of spatiotemporal correlations of seismicity in all three regions considered. Similar evidence for spatiotemporal clustering has been documented using seismicity catalogues for southern California, suggesting possible similarities in underlying earthquake dynamics of both regions despite huge differences in the variability of seismic activity.

  15. A probabilistic approach for representation of interval uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman, Kais; Rangavajhala, Sirisha; McDonald, Mark P.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a probabilistic approach to represent interval data for input variables in reliability and uncertainty analysis problems, using flexible families of continuous Johnson distributions. Such a probabilistic representation of interval data facilitates a unified framework for handling aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. For fitting probability distributions, methods such as moment matching are commonly used in the literature. However, unlike point data where single estimates for the moments of data can be calculated, moments of interval data can only be computed in terms of upper and lower bounds. Finding bounds on the moments of interval data has been generally considered an NP-hard problem because it includes a search among the combinations of multiple values of the variables, including interval endpoints. In this paper, we present efficient algorithms based on continuous optimization to find the bounds on second and higher moments of interval data. With numerical examples, we show that the proposed bounding algorithms are scalable in polynomial time with respect to increasing number of intervals. Using the bounds on moments computed using the proposed approach, we fit a family of Johnson distributions to interval data. Furthermore, using an optimization approach based on percentiles, we find the bounding envelopes of the family of distributions, termed as a Johnson p-box. The idea of bounding envelopes for the family of Johnson distributions is analogous to the notion of empirical p-box in the literature. Several sets of interval data with different numbers of intervals and type of overlap are presented to demonstrate the proposed methods. As against the computationally expensive nested analysis that is typically required in the presence of interval variables, the proposed probabilistic representation enables inexpensive optimization-based strategies to estimate bounds on an output quantity of interest.

  16. Knowledge Representation in Patient Safety Reporting: An Ontological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The current development of patient safety reporting systems is criticized for loss of information and low data quality due to the lack of a uniformed domain knowledge base and text processing functionality. To improve patient safety reporting, the present paper suggests an ontological representation of patient safety knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: We propose a framework for constructing an ontological knowledge base of patient safety. The present paper describes our design, implementation, and evaluation of the ontology at its initial stage. Findings: We describe the design and initial outcomes of the ontology implementation. The evaluation results demonstrate the clinical validity of the ontology by a self-developed survey measurement. Research limitations: The proposed ontology was developed and evaluated using a small number of information sources. Presently, US data are used, but they are not essential for the ultimate structure of the ontology. Practical implications: The goal of improving patient safety can be aided through investigating patient safety reports and providing actionable knowledge to clinical practitioners. As such, constructing a domain specific ontology for patient safety reports serves as a cornerstone in information collection and text mining methods. Originality/value: The use of ontologies provides abstracted representation of semantic information and enables a wealth of applications in a reporting system. Therefore, constructing such a knowledge base is recognized as a high priority in health care.

  17. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  18. Forecasting Construction Cost Index based on visibility graph: A network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Ashuri, Baabak; Shyr, Yu; Deng, Yong

    2018-03-01

    Engineering News-Record (ENR), a professional magazine in the field of global construction engineering, publishes Construction Cost Index (CCI) every month. Cost estimators and contractors assess projects, arrange budgets and prepare bids by forecasting CCI. However, fluctuations and uncertainties of CCI cause irrational estimations now and then. This paper aims at achieving more accurate predictions of CCI based on a network approach in which time series is firstly converted into a visibility graph and future values are forecasted relied on link prediction. According to the experimental results, the proposed method shows satisfactory performance since the error measures are acceptable. Compared with other methods, the proposed method is easier to implement and is able to forecast CCI with less errors. It is convinced that the proposed method is efficient to provide considerably accurate CCI predictions, which will make contributions to the construction engineering by assisting individuals and organizations in reducing costs and making project schedules.

  19. Time series analysis of S&P 500 index: A horizontal visibility graph approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakaris, Michail D.; Pantelous, Athanasios A.; Zuev, Konstantin M.

    2018-05-01

    The behavior of stock prices has been thoroughly studied throughout the last century, and contradictory results have been reported in the corresponding literature. In this paper, a network theoretical approach is provided to investigate how crises affected the behavior of US stock prices. We analyze high frequency data from S&P500 via the Horizontal Visibility Graph method, and find that all major crises that took place worldwide in the last twenty years, affected significantly the behavior of the price-index. Nevertheless, we observe that each of those crises impacted the index in a different way and magnitude. Interestingly, our results suggest that the predictability of the price-index series increases during the periods of crises.

  20. Pedestrian detection from thermal images: A sparse representation based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bin; John, Vijay; Liu, Zheng; Mita, Seiichi

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection, a key technology in computer vision, plays a paramount role in the applications of advanced driver assistant systems (ADASs) and autonomous vehicles. The objective of pedestrian detection is to identify and locate people in a dynamic environment so that accidents can be avoided. With significant variations introduced by illumination, occlusion, articulated pose, and complex background, pedestrian detection is a challenging task for visual perception. Different from visible images, thermal images are captured and presented with intensity maps based objects' emissivity, and thus have an enhanced spectral range to make human beings perceptible from the cool background. In this study, a sparse representation based approach is proposed for pedestrian detection from thermal images. We first adopted the histogram of sparse code to represent image features and then detect pedestrian with the extracted features in an unimodal and a multimodal framework respectively. In the unimodal framework, two types of dictionaries, i.e. joint dictionary and individual dictionary, are built by learning from prepared training samples. In the multimodal framework, a weighted fusion scheme is proposed to further highlight the contributions from features with higher separability. To validate the proposed approach, experiments were conducted to compare with three widely used features: Haar wavelets (HWs), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and histogram of phase congruency (HPC) as well as two classification methods, i.e. AdaBoost and support vector machine (SVM). Experimental results on a publicly available data set demonstrate the superiority of the proposed approach.

  1. CONSPIROLOGICAL APPROACHES TO THE REPRESENTATION OF POLITICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталья Владимировна Кадурина

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The author of the paper makes an attempt to synthesize the effect of conspirological approaches on ideas of particular social groups of community about the existing political events around the world. Conspirological concepts are proving very popular in postmodern society as most modern political technologists try to treat unexplainable events of political reality through different conspiracy theories. Media actively uses conspirological concepts to attract readers and audiences, and political technologists use them as one of the means to influence the electoral processes.A growing interest to conspiracy theory determines its connection with political science. The general disadvantage of conspirological approach is poor evidences which show, according to some researches, its parascientific basis. A wide spread of conspirological concepts among political technologists and mass-media distorts the representation of political processes. To form a scientific vision of political processes the transparency of political situation is required which enables to decrease the role of conspirological approaches to political process.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-26

  2. An original approach to the mathematical concept of graph from braid crafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albanese Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous researches we found that a community of Argentinean artisans models its own practices of braiding using graphs. Inspired by these findings, we designed an educational activity to introduce the concept of graphs. The study of graphs helps students to develop combinatorial and systematic thinking as well as skills to model reality and abstract and generalize patterns from particular situations. The tasks proposed aim to construct the concept of graphs, then identify characteristics that allow some graphs to be models of braids and finally use them to invent more graphs for new braids. The activity performed in a secondary school teachers’ educational course, had quite satisfactory results due to the number of braids invented and the small amount of mistakes made by the participants.

  3. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    In this report we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java

  4. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo; Lee, D.; Lopes, A.; Poetzsch-Heffter, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java syntax

  5. A Graph Theoretic Approach for Hydraulic Fracturing and Wellbore Leakage Risk Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosser, D.; Rose, K.; Bauer, J. R.; Warner, T.

    2016-12-01

    Recent large scale development of unconventional formations for fossil energy has raised concerns over the potential for fluid leakage between subsurface systems and wellbores. This is particularly true in regions with extensive drilling history, where spatial densities of wellbores are higher, and where significant uncertainties in the location and mechanical integrity of such wellbores exist. The generation of induced fracture networks during hydraulic fracturing may increase subsurface connectivity, and create the potential for unwanted fluid migration between operational and legacy wellbores and subsurface fracture networks. We present a graph theoretic approach for identifying geospatial regions and wellbores at increased risk for subsurface connectivity based on wellbore proximity and local geologic characteristics. The algorithm transforms user inputted geospatial data (geologic and wellbore x,y,z) to graph structure, where wellbores are represented as nodes, and where potential overlapping fracture network zones are represented as edges. The algorithm can be used to complement existing fracture models to better account for the reach of induced fractures, and to identify spatial extents at increased risk for unwanted subsurface connectivity. Additionally, the model can be used to identify regions in need of geophysical detection methods for locating undocumented wells. As a result, the method can be part of a cumulative strategy to reduce uncertainty inherent to combined geologic and engineered systems. The algorithm has been successfully tested against a known leakage scenario in Pennsylvania. In addition to identifying wells associated with the leakage event, the algorithm identified two other higher risk networks in the region. The algorithm output provides valuable information for industry to develop environmentally safe drilling and injection plans; and for regulators to identify specific wellbores at greater risk for leakage, and to develop targeted

  6. Expert and Novice Approaches to Using Graphs: Evidence from Eye-Track Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, K. R.; Lindgren, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Professionals and students in geology use an array of graphs to study the earth, but relatively little detail is known about how users interact with these graphs. Comprehension of graphical information in the earth sciences is further complicated by the common use of non-traditional formats (e.g., inverted axes, logarithmic scales, normalized plots, ternary diagrams). Many educators consider graph-reading skills an important outcome of general education science curricula, so it is critical that we understand both the development of graph-reading skills and the instructional practices that are most efficacious. Eye-tracking instruments provide quantitative information about eye movements and offer important insights into the development of expertise in graph use. We measured the graph reading skills and eye movements of novices (students with a variety of majors and educational attainment) and experts (faculty and staff from a variety of disciplines) while observing traditional and non-traditional graph formats. Individuals in the expert group consistently demonstrated significantly greater accuracy in responding to questions (e.g., retrieval, interpretation, prediction) about graphs. Among novices, only the number of college math and science courses correlated with response accuracy. Interestingly, novices and experts exhibited similar eye-tracks when they first encountered a new graph; they typically scanned through the title, x and y-axes, and data regions in the first 5-15 seconds. However, experts are readily distinguished from novices by a greater number of eye movements (20-35%) between the data and other graph elements (e.g., title, x-axis, y-axis) both during and after the initial orientation phase. We attribute the greater eye movements between the different graph elements an outcome of the generally better-developed self-regulation skills (goal-setting, monitoring, self-evaluation) that likely characterize individuals in our expert group.

  7. Similarity Measure of Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Labriji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of identifying the similarity of graphs was considered as highly recommended research field in the Web semantic, artificial intelligence, the shape recognition and information research. One of the fundamental problems of graph databases is finding similar graphs to a graph query. Existing approaches dealing with this problem are usually based on the nodes and arcs of the two graphs, regardless of parental semantic links. For instance, a common connection is not identified as being part of the similarity of two graphs in cases like two graphs without common concepts, the measure of similarity based on the union of two graphs, or the one based on the notion of maximum common sub-graph (SCM, or the distance of edition of graphs. This leads to an inadequate situation in the context of information research. To overcome this problem, we suggest a new measure of similarity between graphs, based on the similarity measure of Wu and Palmer. We have shown that this new measure satisfies the properties of a measure of similarities and we applied this new measure on examples. The results show that our measure provides a run time with a gain of time compared to existing approaches. In addition, we compared the relevance of the similarity values obtained, it appears that this new graphs measure is advantageous and  offers a contribution to solving the problem mentioned above.

  8. Graph Abstraction and Abstract Graph Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boneva, I.B.; Rensink, Arend; Kurban, M.E.; Bauer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Many important systems like concurrent heap-manipulating programs, communication networks, or distributed algorithms are hard to verify due to their inherent dynamics and unboundedness. Graphs are an intuitive representation of states of these systems, where transitions can be conveniently described

  9. A mass graph-based approach for the identification of modified proteoforms using top-down tandem mass spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Tolić, Nikola; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Liu, Yunlong; Liu, Xiaowen

    2016-12-21

    Motivation: Although proteomics has rapidly developed in the past decade, researchers are still in the early stage of exploring the world of complex proteoforms, which are protein products with various primary structure alterations resulting from gene mutations, alternative splicing, post-translational modifications, and other biological processes. Proteoform identification is essential to mapping proteoforms to their biological functions as well as discovering novel proteoforms and new protein functions. Top-down mass spectrometry is the method of choice for identifying complex proteoforms because it provides a “bird’s eye view” of intact proteoforms. The combinatorial explosion of various alterations on a protein may result in billions of possible proteoforms, making proteoform identification a challenging computational problem. Results: We propose a new data structure, called the mass graph, for efficient representation of proteoforms and design mass graph alignment algorithms. We developed TopMG, a mass graph-based software tool for proteoform identification by top-down mass spectrometry. Experiments on top-down mass spectrometry data sets showed that TopMG outperformed existing methods in identifying complex proteoforms.

  10. Uniform Single Valued Neutrosophic Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Broumi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new concept named the uniform single valued neutrosophic graph. An illustrative example and some properties are examined. Next, we develop an algorithmic approach for computing the complement of the single valued neutrosophic graph. A numerical example is demonstrated for computing the complement of single valued neutrosophic graphs and uniform single valued neutrosophic graph.

  11. Completeness and regularity of generalized fuzzy graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sovan; Sarkar, Biswajit; Shin, Dongmin; Pal, Madhumangal

    2016-01-01

    Fuzzy graphs are the backbone of many real systems like networks, image, scheduling, etc. But, due to some restriction on edges, fuzzy graphs are limited to represent for some systems. Generalized fuzzy graphs are appropriate to avoid such restrictions. In this study generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. In this study, matrix representation of generalized fuzzy graphs is described. Completeness and regularity are two important parameters of graph theory. Here, regular and complete generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. Some properties of them are discussed. After that, effective regular graphs are exemplified.

  12. Handbook of graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Jonathan L

    2003-01-01

    The Handbook of Graph Theory is the most comprehensive single-source guide to graph theory ever published. Best-selling authors Jonathan Gross and Jay Yellen assembled an outstanding team of experts to contribute overviews of more than 50 of the most significant topics in graph theory-including those related to algorithmic and optimization approaches as well as ""pure"" graph theory. They then carefully edited the compilation to produce a unified, authoritative work ideal for ready reference.Designed and edited with non-experts in mind, the Handbook of Graph Theory makes information easy to fi

  13. Exploratory graph analysis: A new approach for estimating the number of dimensions in psychological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golino, Hudson F; Epskamp, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of the correct number of dimensions is a long-standing problem in psychometrics. Several methods have been proposed, such as parallel analysis (PA), Kaiser-Guttman's eigenvalue-greater-than-one rule, multiple average partial procedure (MAP), the maximum-likelihood approaches that use fit indexes as BIC and EBIC and the less used and studied approach called very simple structure (VSS). In the present paper a new approach to estimate the number of dimensions will be introduced and compared via simulation to the traditional techniques pointed above. The approach proposed in the current paper is called exploratory graph analysis (EGA), since it is based on the graphical lasso with the regularization parameter specified using EBIC. The number of dimensions is verified using the walktrap, a random walk algorithm used to identify communities in networks. In total, 32,000 data sets were simulated to fit known factor structures, with the data sets varying across different criteria: number of factors (2 and 4), number of items (5 and 10), sample size (100, 500, 1000 and 5000) and correlation between factors (orthogonal, .20, .50 and .70), resulting in 64 different conditions. For each condition, 500 data sets were simulated using lavaan. The result shows that the EGA performs comparable to parallel analysis, EBIC, eBIC and to Kaiser-Guttman rule in a number of situations, especially when the number of factors was two. However, EGA was the only technique able to correctly estimate the number of dimensions in the four-factor structure when the correlation between factors were .7, showing an accuracy of 100% for a sample size of 5,000 observations. Finally, the EGA was used to estimate the number of factors in a real dataset, in order to compare its performance with the other six techniques tested in the simulation study.

  14. Pattern graph rewrite systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleks Kissinger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available String diagrams are a powerful tool for reasoning about physical processes, logic circuits, tensor networks, and many other compositional structures. Dixon, Duncan and Kissinger introduced string graphs, which are a combinatoric representations of string diagrams, amenable to automated reasoning about diagrammatic theories via graph rewrite systems. In this extended abstract, we show how the power of such rewrite systems can be greatly extended by introducing pattern graphs, which provide a means of expressing infinite families of rewrite rules where certain marked subgraphs, called !-boxes ("bang boxes", on both sides of a rule can be copied any number of times or removed. After reviewing the string graph formalism, we show how string graphs can be extended to pattern graphs and how pattern graphs and pattern rewrite rules can be instantiated to concrete string graphs and rewrite rules. We then provide examples demonstrating the expressive power of pattern graphs and how they can be applied to study interacting algebraic structures that are central to categorical quantum mechanics.

  15. Knot Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, S D; Welsh, D J A

    2000-01-01

    We consider the equivalence classes of graphs induced by the unsigned versions of the Reidemeister moves on knot diagrams. Any graph which is reducible by some finite sequence of these moves, to a graph with no edges is called a knot graph. We show that the class of knot graphs strictly contains the set of delta-wye graphs. We prove that the dimension of the intersection of the cycle and cocycle spaces is an effective numerical invariant of these classes.

  16. Graph-theoretic techniques for web content mining

    CERN Document Server

    Schenker, Adam; Bunke, Horst; Last, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This book describes exciting new opportunities for utilizing robust graph representations of data with common machine learning algorithms. Graphs can model additional information which is often not present in commonly used data representations, such as vectors.

  17. A quantum annealing approach for fault detection and diagnosis of graph-based systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo-Ortiz, A.; Fluegemann, J.; Narasimhan, S.; Biswas, R.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosing the minimal set of faults capable of explaining a set of given observations, e.g., from sensor readouts, is a hard combinatorial optimization problem usually tackled with artificial intelligence techniques. We present the mapping of this combinatorial problem to quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO), and the experimental results of instances embedded onto a quantum annealing device with 509 quantum bits. Besides being the first time a quantum approach has been proposed for problems in the advanced diagnostics community, to the best of our knowledge this work is also the first research utilizing the route Problem → QUBO → Direct embedding into quantum hardware, where we are able to implement and tackle problem instances with sizes that go beyond previously reported toy-model proof-of-principle quantum annealing implementations; this is a significant leap in the solution of problems via direct-embedding adiabatic quantum optimization. We discuss some of the programmability challenges in the current generation of the quantum device as well as a few possible ways to extend this work to more complex arbitrary network graphs.

  18. 3D Materials image segmentation by 2D propagation: a graph-cut approach considering homomorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jarrell; Zhou, Youjie; Simmons, Jeff; De Graef, Marc; Wang, Song

    2013-12-01

    Segmentation propagation, similar to tracking, is the problem of transferring a segmentation of an image to a neighboring image in a sequence. This problem is of particular importance to materials science, where the accurate segmentation of a series of 2D serial-sectioned images of multiple, contiguous 3D structures has important applications. Such structures may have distinct shape, appearance, and topology, which can be considered to improve segmentation accuracy. For example, some materials images may have structures with a specific shape or appearance in each serial section slice, which only changes minimally from slice to slice, and some materials may exhibit specific inter-structure topology that constrains their neighboring relations. Some of these properties have been individually incorporated to segment specific materials images in prior work. In this paper, we develop a propagation framework for materials image segmentation where each propagation is formulated as an optimal labeling problem that can be efficiently solved using the graph-cut algorithm. Our framework makes three key contributions: 1) a homomorphic propagation approach, which considers the consistency of region adjacency in the propagation; 2) incorporation of shape and appearance consistency in the propagation; and 3) a local non-homomorphism strategy to handle newly appearing and disappearing substructures during this propagation. To show the effectiveness of our framework, we conduct experiments on various 3D materials images, and compare the performance against several existing image segmentation methods.

  19. Dynamic Analysis and Design Optimization of Series Hydraulic Hybrid System through Power Bond Graph Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of natural gas and crude oil resources has been declining over the years. In automobile sector, the consumption of crude oil is 63% of total crude oil production in the world. Hence, automobile industries are placing more emphasis on energy efficient hydraulic hybrid systems, which can replace their conventional transmission systems. Series hydraulic hybrid system (SHHS is a multidomain mechatronics system with two distinct power sources that includes prime mover and hydropneumatic accumulator. It replaces the conventional transmission system to drive the vehicle. The sizing of the subsystems in SHHS plays a major role in improving the energy efficiency of the vehicle. In this paper, a power bond graph approach is used to model the dynamics of the SHHS. The obtained simulation results indicate the energy flow during various modes of operations. It also includes the dynamic response of hydropneumatic accumulator, prime mover, and system output speed. Further, design optimization of the system is carried out to optimize the process parameters for maximizing the system energy efficiency. This leads to increase in fuel economy and environmentally friendly vehicle.

  20. Visualizing automorphisms of graph algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, James Emil; Johansen, Rune; Szymanski, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    Graph C*-algebras have been celebrated as C*-algebras that can be seen, because many important properties may be determined by looking at the underlying graph. This paper introduces the permutation graph for a permutative endomorphism of a graph C*-algebra as a labeled directed multigraph...... that gives a visual representation of the endomorphism and facilitates computations. Combinatorial criteria have previously been developed for deciding when such an endomorphism is an automorphism, but here the question is reformulated in terms of the permutation graph and new proofs are given. Furthermore......, it is shown how to use permutation graphs to efficiently generate exhaustive collections of permutative automorphisms. Permutation graphs provide a natural link to the textile systems representing induced endomorphisms on the edge shift of the given graph, and this allows the powerful tools of the theory...

  1. Linear game non-contextuality and Bell inequalities—a graph-theoretic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosicka, M; Ramanathan, R; Gnaciński, P; Horodecki, M; Horodecki, K; Horodecki, P; Severini, S

    2016-01-01

    We study the classical and quantum values of a class of one- and two-party unique games, that generalizes the well-known XOR games to the case of non-binary outcomes. In the bipartite case the generalized XOR (XOR-d) games we study are a subclass of the well-known linear games. We introduce a ‘constraint graph’ associated to such a game, with the constraints defining the game represented by an edge-coloring of the graph. We use the graph-theoretic characterization to relate the task of finding equivalent games to the notion of signed graphs and switching equivalence from graph theory. We relate the problem of computing the classical value of single-party anti-correlation XOR games to finding the edge bipartization number of a graph, which is known to be MaxSNP hard, and connect the computation of the classical value of XOR-d games to the identification of specific cycles in the graph. We construct an orthogonality graph of the game from the constraint graph and study its Lovász theta number as a general upper bound on the quantum value even in the case of single-party contextual XOR-d games. XOR-d games possess appealing properties for use in device-independent applications such as randomness of the local correlated outcomes in the optimal quantum strategy. We study the possibility of obtaining quantum algebraic violation of these games, and show that no finite XOR-d game possesses the property of pseudo-telepathy leaving the frequently used chained Bell inequalities as the natural candidates for such applications. We also show this lack of pseudo-telepathy for multi-party XOR-type inequalities involving two-body correlation functions. (paper)

  2. Simplicial complexes of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    A graph complex is a finite family of graphs closed under deletion of edges. Graph complexes show up naturally in many different areas of mathematics, including commutative algebra, geometry, and knot theory. Identifying each graph with its edge set, one may view a graph complex as a simplicial complex and hence interpret it as a geometric object. This volume examines topological properties of graph complexes, focusing on homotopy type and homology. Many of the proofs are based on Robin Forman's discrete version of Morse theory. As a byproduct, this volume also provides a loosely defined toolbox for attacking problems in topological combinatorics via discrete Morse theory. In terms of simplicity and power, arguably the most efficient tool is Forman's divide and conquer approach via decision trees; it is successfully applied to a large number of graph and digraph complexes.

  3. International Space Station Centrifuge Rotor Models A Comparison of the Euler-Lagrange and the Bond Graph Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Louis H.; Ramakrishnan, Jayant; Granda, Jose J.

    2006-01-01

    The assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) require extensive testing and engineering analysis to verify that the Space Station system of systems would work together without any adverse interactions. Since the dynamic behavior of an entire Space Station cannot be tested on earth, math models of the Space Station structures and mechanical systems have to be built and integrated in computer simulations and analysis tools to analyze and predict what will happen in space. The ISS Centrifuge Rotor (CR) is one of many mechanical systems that need to be modeled and analyzed to verify the ISS integrated system performance on-orbit. This study investigates using Bond Graph modeling techniques as quick and simplified ways to generate models of the ISS Centrifuge Rotor. This paper outlines the steps used to generate simple and more complex models of the CR using Bond Graph Computer Aided Modeling Program with Graphical Input (CAMP-G). Comparisons of the Bond Graph CR models with those derived from Euler-Lagrange equations in MATLAB and those developed using multibody dynamic simulation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the Bond Graph modeling approach for aeronautics and space applications.

  4. Graph Transforming Java Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, M.J.; Rensink, Arend; Hunt, James J.

    This paper introduces an approach for adding graph transformation-based functionality to existing JAVA programs. The approach relies on a set of annotations to identify the intended graph structure, as well as on user methods to manipulate that structure, within the user’s own JAVA class

  5. CD30 cell graphs of Hodgkin lymphoma are not scale-free--an image analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Hendrik; Schäfer, Tim; Ackermann, Jörg; Dichter, Norbert; Döring, Claudia; Hartmann, Sylvia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Koch, Ina

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a type of B-cell lymphoma. To diagnose the subtypes, biopsies are taken and immunostained. The slides are scanned to produce high-resolution digital whole slide images (WSI). Pathologists manually inspect the spatial distribution of cells, but little is known on the statistical properties of cell distributions in WSIs. Such properties would give valuable information for the construction of theoretical models that describe the invasion of malignant cells in the lymph node and the intercellular interactions. In this work, we define and discuss HL cell graphs. We identify CD30(+) cells in HL WSIs, bringing together the fields of digital imaging and network analysis. We define special graphs based on the positions of the immunostained cells. We present an automatic analysis of complete WSIs to determine significant morphological and immunohistochemical features of HL cells and their spatial distribution in the lymph node tissue under three different medical conditions: lymphadenitis (LA) and two types of HL. We analyze the vertex degree distributions of CD30 cell graphs and compare them to a null model. CD30 cell graphs show higher vertex degrees than expected by a random unit disk graph, suggesting clustering of the cells. We found that a gamma distribution is suitable to model the vertex degree distributions of CD30 cell graphs, meaning that they are not scale-free. Moreover, we compare the graphs for LA and two subtypes of HL. LA and classical HL showed different vertex degree distributions. The vertex degree distributions of the two HL subtypes NScHL and mixed cellularity HL (MXcHL) were similar. The CellProfiler pipeline used for cell detection is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/cellgraphs/. ina.koch@bioinformatik.uni-frankfurt.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A Graph-Based Approach for 3D Building Model Reconstruction from Airborne LiDAR Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D building model reconstruction is of great importance for environmental and urban applications. Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR is a very useful data source for acquiring detailed geometric and topological information of building objects. In this study, we employed a graph-based method based on hierarchical structure analysis of building contours derived from LiDAR data to reconstruct urban building models. The proposed approach first uses a graph theory-based localized contour tree method to represent the topological structure of buildings, then separates the buildings into different parts by analyzing their topological relationships, and finally reconstructs the building model by integrating all the individual models established through the bipartite graph matching process. Our approach provides a more complete topological and geometrical description of building contours than existing approaches. We evaluated the proposed method by applying it to the Lujiazui region in Shanghai, China, a complex and large urban scene with various types of buildings. The results revealed that complex buildings could be reconstructed successfully with a mean modeling error of 0.32 m. Our proposed method offers a promising solution for 3D building model reconstruction from airborne LiDAR point clouds.

  7. A graph-theoretic approach to River Deltas: Studying complexity, universality, and vulnerability to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Zaliapin, Ilya; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2015-04-01

    River deltas are landforms with complex channel networks that deliver water, sediment and nutrient fluxes from rivers to oceans or inland water bodies via multiple pathways. Most of the deltas are subject to anthropogenic and natural perturbations causing topological and dynamical changes in the delta structure and function. We present a quantitative framework based on spectral graph theory within which a systematic study of the topology, transport dynamics and response to change of river deltas can be performed, as well as computation of sub-networks (from apex to shoreline outlets), and contributing/nourishing areas. We introduce metrics of topologic and dynamic complexity and define a multidimensional complexity space where each delta projects. By analysis of seven deltas of different morphodynamic and environmental settings, we report a surprising power law relationship between sub-network size and its dynamic exchange with surrounding sub-networks within the deltaic system. The exponent of the relationship is universal (predicting that a sub-network twice as large leaks out to other sub-networks only 1.3 times its total flux) and the pre-exponent depends on the topologic complexity of the delta network as a whole, i.e., the ensemble of the interacting sub-sub-networks. We also use the developed framework to construct vulnerability maps that quantify the relative change of sediment and water delivery to the shoreline outlets in response to possible perturbations in hundreds of upstream links. This enables us to evaluate which links (hotspots) and what management scenarios would most influence flux delivery to the outlets, paving the way for systematically examining how local or spatially distributed delta interventions can be studied within a systems approach for delta sustainability.

  8. Using Graph Transformations and Graph Abstractions for Software Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambon, Eduardo; Rensink, Arend

    In this paper we describe our intended approach for the verification of software written in imperative programming languages. We base our approach on model checking of graph transition systems, where each state is a graph and the transitions are specified by graph transformation rules. We believe

  9. Strongly and weakly directed approaches to teaching multiple representation use in physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rosengrant

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Good use of multiple representations is considered key to learning physics, and so there is considerable motivation both to learn how students use multiple representations when solving problems and to learn how best to teach problem solving using multiple representations. In this study of two large-lecture algebra-based physics courses at the University of Colorado (CU and Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, we address both issues. Students in each of the two courses solved five common electrostatics problems of varying difficulty, and we examine their solutions to clarify the relationship between multiple representation use and performance on problems involving free-body diagrams. We also compare our data across the courses, since the two physics-education-research-based courses take substantially different approaches to teaching the use of multiple representations. The course at Rutgers takes a strongly directed approach, emphasizing specific heuristics and problem-solving strategies. The course at CU takes a weakly directed approach, modeling good problem solving without teaching a specific strategy. We find that, in both courses, students make extensive use of multiple representations, and that this use (when both complete and correct is associated with significantly increased performance. Some minor differences in representation use exist, and are consistent with the types of instruction given. Most significant are the strong and broad similarities in the results, suggesting that either instructional approach or a combination thereof can be useful for helping students learn to use multiple representations for problem solving and concept development.

  10. SOUR graphs for efficient completion

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Christopher; Strogova, Polina

    1998-01-01

    International audience; We introduce a data structure called \\emphSOUR graphs and present an efficient Knuth-Bendix completion procedure based on it. \\emphSOUR graphs allow for a maximal structure sharing of terms in rewriting systems. The term representation is a dag representation, except that edges are labelled with equational constraints and variable renamings. The rewrite rules correspond to rewrite edges, the unification problems to unification edges. The Critical Pair and Simplificatio...

  11. An evolutionary approach to realism-based adverse event representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceusters, W; Capolupo, M; de Moor, G; Devlies, J; Smith, B

    2011-01-01

    Part of the ReMINE project involved the creation of an ontology enabling computer-assisted decision support for optimal adverse event management. The ontology was required to satisfy the following requirements: 1) to be able to account for the distinct and context-dependent ways in which authoritative sources define the term 'adverse event', 2) to allow the identification of relevant risks against patient safety (RAPS) on the basis of the disease history of a patient as documented in electronic health records, and 3) to be compatible with present and future ontologies developed under the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) Foundry framework. We used as feeder ontologies the Basic Formal Ontology, the Foundational Model of Anatomy, the Ontology for General Medical Science, the Information Artifact Ontology and the Ontology of Mental Health. We further used relations defined according to the pattern set forth in the OBO Relation Ontology. In light of the intended use of the ontology for the representation of adverse events that have actually occurred and therefore are registered in a database, we also applied the principles of referent tracking. We merged the upper portions of the mentioned feeder ontologies and introduced 22 additional representational units of which 13 are generally applicable in biomedicine and nine in the adverse event context. We provided for each representational unit a textual definition that can be translated into equivalent formal definitions. The resulting ontology satisfies all of the requirements set forth. Merging the feeder ontologies, although all designed under the OBO Foundry principles, brought new insight into what the representational units of such ontologies actually denote.

  12. Graph structure and monadic second-order logic. A language-theoretic approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Courcelle, Bruno; Engelfriet, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Collection Encyclopedia of Mathematics and Applications, Vol. 138; International audience; Livre sur les décompositions de graphes et la logique du second-ordre monadique. Applications algorithmiques et en théorie des langages. Cambridge University Press, Juin 2012

  13. A Comparison of Two Approaches to Training Visual Analysis of AB Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Katie; Slocum, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Visual analysis is the primary method of evaluating data in single-subject research. Few studies have evaluated interventions to teach visual analysis skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate systematic instruction, delivered using computer-based intervention or a recorded lecture, on identifying changes in slope and level in AB graphs.…

  14. A Graph-Based Approach to Action Scheduling in a Parallel Database System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Apers, Peter M.G.

    Parallel database machines are meant to obtain high performance in transaction processing, both in terms of response time adn throughput. To obtain high performance, a good scheduling of the execution of the various actions in transactions is crucial. This paper describes a graph-based technique for

  15. Row—column visibility graph approach to two-dimensional landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Qin; Pan Xue; Li Xin-Li; Stephen Mutua; Yang Hui-Jie; Jiang Yan; Wang Jian-Yong; Zhang Qing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A new concept, called the row—column visibility graph, is proposed to map two-dimensional landscapes to complex networks. A cluster coverage is introduced to describe the extensive property of node clusters on a Euclidean lattice. Graphs mapped from fractals generated with the probability redistribution model behave scale-free. They have pattern-induced hierarchical organizations and comparatively much more extensive structures. The scale-free exponent has a negative correlation with the Hurst exponent, however, there is no deterministic relation between them. Graphs for fractals generated with the midpoint displacement model are exponential networks. When the Hurst exponent is large enough (e.g., H > 0.5), the degree distribution decays much more slowly, the average coverage becomes significant large, and the initially hierarchical structure at H < 0.5 is destroyed completely. Hence, the row—column visibility graph can be used to detect the pattern-related new characteristics of two-dimensional landscapes. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  16. Mal-Netminer: Malware Classification Approach Based on Social Network Analysis of System Call Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-wook Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the security landscape evolves over time, where thousands of species of malicious codes are seen every day, antivirus vendors strive to detect and classify malware families for efficient and effective responses against malware campaigns. To enrich this effort and by capitalizing on ideas from the social network analysis domain, we build a tool that can help classify malware families using features driven from the graph structure of their system calls. To achieve that, we first construct a system call graph that consists of system calls found in the execution of the individual malware families. To explore distinguishing features of various malware species, we study social network properties as applied to the call graph, including the degree distribution, degree centrality, average distance, clustering coefficient, network density, and component ratio. We utilize features driven from those properties to build a classifier for malware families. Our experimental results show that “influence-based” graph metrics such as the degree centrality are effective for classifying malware, whereas the general structural metrics of malware are less effective for classifying malware. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed system performs well in detecting and classifying malware families within each malware class with accuracy greater than 96%.

  17. Proxy Graph: Visual Quality Metrics of Big Graph Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quan Hoang; Hong, Seok-Hee; Eades, Peter; Meidiana, Amyra

    2017-06-01

    Data sampling has been extensively studied for large scale graph mining. Many analyses and tasks become more efficient when performed on graph samples of much smaller size. The use of proxy objects is common in software engineering for analysis and interaction with heavy objects or systems. In this paper, we coin the term 'proxy graph' and empirically investigate how well a proxy graph visualization can represent a big graph. Our investigation focuses on proxy graphs obtained by sampling; this is one of the most common proxy approaches. Despite the plethora of data sampling studies, this is the first evaluation of sampling in the context of graph visualization. For an objective evaluation, we propose a new family of quality metrics for visual quality of proxy graphs. Our experiments cover popular sampling techniques. Our experimental results lead to guidelines for using sampling-based proxy graphs in visualization.

  18. Neural Representations of Belief Concepts: A Representational Similarity Approach to Social Semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshinskaya, Anna; Contreras, Juan Manuel; Caramazza, Alfonso; Mitchell, Jason P

    2017-01-01

    The present experiment identified neural regions that represent a class of concepts that are independent of perceptual or sensory attributes. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, participants viewed names of social groups (e.g. Atheists, Evangelicals, and Economists) and performed a one-back similarity judgment according to 1 of 2 dimensions of belief attributes: political orientation (Liberal to Conservative) or spiritualism (Spiritualist to Materialist). By generalizing across a wide variety of social groups that possess these beliefs, these attribute concepts did not coincide with any specific sensory quality, allowing us to target conceptual, rather than perceptual, representations. Multi-voxel pattern searchlight analysis was used to identify regions in which activation patterns distinguished the 2 ends of both dimensions: Conservative from Liberal social groups when participants focused on the political orientation dimension, and spiritual from Materialist groups when participants focused on the spiritualism dimension. A cluster in right precuneus exhibited such a pattern, indicating that it carries information about belief-attribute concepts and forms part of semantic memory-perhaps a component particularly concerned with psychological traits. This region did not overlap with the theory of mind network, which engaged nearby, but distinct, parts of precuneus. These findings have implications for the neural organization of conceptual knowledge, especially the understanding of social groups. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Modeling Software Evolution using Algebraic Graph Rewriting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; van den Broek, P.M.; Avgeriou, P.; Zdun, U.; Borne, I.

    We show how evolution requests can be formalized using algebraic graph rewriting. In particular, we present a way to convert the UML class diagrams to colored graphs. Since changes in software may effect the relation between the methods of classes, our colored graph representation also employs the

  20. Fundamentals of algebraic graph transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrig, Hartmut; Prange, Ulrike; Taentzer, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to represent structural information in the form of objects and connections between them. Graph transformation is the rule-based manipulation of graphs, an increasingly important concept in computer science and related fields. This is the first textbook treatment of the algebraic approach to graph transformation, based on algebraic structures and category theory. Part I is an introduction to the classical case of graph and typed graph transformation. In Part II basic and advanced results are first shown for an abstract form of replacement systems, so-called adhesive high-level replacement systems based on category theory, and are then instantiated to several forms of graph and Petri net transformation systems. Part III develops typed attributed graph transformation, a technique of key relevance in the modeling of visual languages and in model transformation. Part IV contains a practical case study on model transformation and a presentation of the AGG (attributed graph grammar) tool envir...

  1. Equipackable graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartnell, B.L.; Vestergaard, Preben Dahl

    There are many results dealing with the problem of decomposing a fixed graph into isomorphic subgraphs. There has also been work on characterizing graphs with the property that one can delete the edges of a number of edge disjoint copies of the subgraph and, regardless of how that is done......, the graph that remains can still be decomposed (such graphs are called or ). In this paper we consider the follwing variation. Given a fixed graph H, determine which graphs (call them ) have the property that every edge disjoint packing with H is maximum. In the case that the graph H is isomorphic...... to the path on 3 nodes, we characterize the equipackable graphs of girth 5 or more. randomly packable randomly decomposable equipackable maximal...

  2. Equipackable graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Preben Dahl; Hartnell, Bert L.

    2006-01-01

    There are many results dealing with the problem of decomposing a fixed graph into isomorphic subgraphs. There has also been work on characterizing graphs with the property that one can delete the edges of a number of edge disjoint copies of the subgraph and, regardless of how that is done......, the graph that remains can still be decomposed (such graphs are called randomly packable or randomly decomposable). In this paper we consider the following variation. Given a fixed graph H, determine which graphs (call them equipackable) have the property that every maximal edge disjoint packing with H...... is maximum. In the case that the graph H is isomorphic to the path on 3 nodes, we characterize the equipackable graphs of girth 5 or more....

  3. Modeling flow and transport in fracture networks using graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, S.; O'Malley, D.; Hyman, J. D.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Srinivasan, G.

    2018-03-01

    Fractures form the main pathways for flow in the subsurface within low-permeability rock. For this reason, accurately predicting flow and transport in fractured systems is vital for improving the performance of subsurface applications. Fracture sizes in these systems can range from millimeters to kilometers. Although modeling flow and transport using the discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is known to be more accurate due to incorporation of the detailed fracture network structure over continuum-based methods, capturing the flow and transport in such a wide range of scales is still computationally intractable. Furthermore, if one has to quantify uncertainty, hundreds of realizations of these DFN models have to be run. To reduce the computational burden, we solve flow and transport on a graph representation of a DFN. We study the accuracy of the graph approach by comparing breakthrough times and tracer particle statistical data between the graph-based and the high-fidelity DFN approaches, for fracture networks with varying number of fractures and degree of heterogeneity. Due to our recent developments in capabilities to perform DFN high-fidelity simulations on fracture networks with large number of fractures, we are in a unique position to perform such a comparison. We show that the graph approach shows a consistent bias with up to an order of magnitude slower breakthrough when compared to the DFN approach. We show that this is due to graph algorithm's underprediction of the pressure gradients across intersections on a given fracture, leading to slower tracer particle speeds between intersections and longer travel times. We present a bias correction methodology to the graph algorithm that reduces the discrepancy between the DFN and graph predictions. We show that with this bias correction, the graph algorithm predictions significantly improve and the results are very accurate. The good accuracy and the low computational cost, with O (104) times lower times than

  4. Observing representational practices in art and anthropology - a transdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Preiser

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that anthropology operates in “liminal spaces” which can be defined as “spaces between disciplines”. This study will explore the space where the fields of art and anthropology meet in order to discover the epistemological and representational challenges that arise from this encounter. The common ground on which art and anthropology engage can be defined in terms of their observational and knowledge producing practices. Both art and anthropology rely on observational skills and varying forms of visual literacy to collect and represent data. Anthropologists represent their data mostly in written form by means of ethnographic accounts, and artists represent their findings by means of imaginative artistic mediums such as painting, sculpture, filmmaking and music. Departing from a paradigm that acknowledges the importance of transdisciplinary enquiry, the paper proposes a position suggesting that by combining observational and knowledge producing practices, both anthropology and art can overcome the limits that are inherent in their representational practices. The paper will explore how insights from complexity theory offer the necessary conceptual tools with which anthropology and art can work together in offering solutions to problems of presentation that emerge when dealing with complex issues.

  5. Extensions and improvements to the chordal graph approach to the multistate perfect phylogeny problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysel, Rob; Gusfield, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The multistate perfect phylogeny problem is a classic problem in computational biology. When no perfect phylogeny exists, it is of interest to find a set of characters to remove in order to obtain a perfect phylogeny in the remaining data. This is known as the character removal problem. We show how to use chordal graphs and triangulations to solve the character removal problem for an arbitrary number of states, which was previously unsolved. We outline a preprocessing technique that speeds up the computation of the minimal separators of a graph. Minimal separators are used in our solution to the missing data character removal problem and to Gusfield's solution of the perfect phylogeny problem with missing data.

  6. A covering-graph approach to epidemics on SIS and SIS-like networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, William; Kay, Leslie; Shapiro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new class of epidemics on networks which we call SI(S/I). SI(S/I) networks differ from SIS networks in allowing an infected individual to become reinfected without first passing to the susceptible state. We use a covering-graph construction to compare SIR, SIS, and SI(S/I) networks. Like the SIR networks that cover them, SI(S/I) networks exhibit infection probabilities that are monotone with respect to both transmission probabilities and the initial set of infectives. The same covering-graph construction allows us to characterize the recurrent states in an SIS or SI(S/I) network with reinfection.

  7. Graph-based stochastic control with constraints: A unified approach with perfect and imperfect measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Agha-mohammadi, Ali-akbar

    2013-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of stochastic optimal control (possibly with imperfect measurements) in the presence of constraints. We propose a computationally tractable framework to address this problem. The method lends itself to sampling-based methods where we construct a graph in the state space of the problem, on which a Dynamic Programming (DP) is solved and a closed-loop feedback policy is computed. The constraints are seamlessly incorporated to the control policy selection by including their effect on the transition probabilities of the graph edges. We present a unified framework that is applicable both in the state space (with perfect measurements) and in the information space (with imperfect measurements).

  8. Learning Based Approach for Optimal Clustering of Distributed Program's Call Flow Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abofathi, Yousef; Zarei, Bager; Parsa, Saeed

    Optimal clustering of call flow graph for reaching maximum concurrency in execution of distributable components is one of the NP-Complete problems. Learning automatas (LAs) are search tools which are used for solving many NP-Complete problems. In this paper a learning based algorithm is proposed to optimal clustering of call flow graph and appropriate distributing of programs in network level. The algorithm uses learning feature of LAs to search in state space. It has been shown that the speed of reaching to solution increases remarkably using LA in search process, and it also prevents algorithm from being trapped in local minimums. Experimental results show the superiority of proposed algorithm over others.

  9. A Semantic Graph-Based Approach for Radicalisation Detection on Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Saif, Hassan; Dickinson, Thomas; Kastler, Leon; Fernandez, Miriam; Alani, Harith

    2017-01-01

    From its start, the so-called Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/ISIS) has been successfully exploiting social media networks, most notoriously Twitter, to promote its propaganda and recruit new members, resulting in thousands of social media users adopting a pro-ISIS stance every year. Automatic identification of pro-ISIS users on social media has, thus, become the centre of interest for various governmental and research organisations. In this paper we propose a semantic graph-based ...

  10. Task-linked Diurnal Brain Network Reorganization in Older Adults: A Graph Theoretical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John A E; Sarraf, Saman; Amer, Tarek; Bellana, Buddhika; Man, Vincent; Campbell, Karen L; Hasher, Lynn; Grady, Cheryl L

    2017-03-01

    Testing older adults in the morning generally improves behavioral performance relative to afternoon testing. Morning testing is also associated with brain activity similar to that of young adults. Here, we used graph theory to explore how time of day (TOD) affects the organization of brain networks in older adults across rest and task states. We used nodes from the automated anatomical labeling atlas to construct participant-specific correlation matrices of fMRI data obtained during 1-back tasks with interference and rest. We computed pairwise group differences for key graph metrics, including small-worldness and modularity. We found that older adults tested in the morning and young adults did not differ on any graph metric. Both of these groups differed from older adults tested in the afternoon during the tasks-but not rest. Specifically, the latter group had lower modularity and small-worldness (indices of more efficient network organization). Across all groups, higher modularity and small-worldness strongly correlated with reduced distractibility on an implicit priming task. Increasingly, TOD is seen as important for interpreting and reproducing neuroimaging results. Our study emphasizes how TOD affects brain network organization and executive control in older adults.

  11. Functional Organization of the Action Observation Network in Autism: A Graph Theory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaerts, Kaat; Geerlings, Franca; Herremans, Lynn; Swinnen, Stephan P; Verhoeven, Judith; Sunaert, Stefan; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recognize, understand and interpret other's actions and emotions has been linked to the mirror system or action-observation-network (AON). Although variations in these abilities are prevalent in the neuro-typical population, persons diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have deficits in the social domain and exhibit alterations in this neural network. Here, we examined functional network properties of the AON using graph theory measures and region-to-region functional connectivity analyses of resting-state fMRI-data from adolescents and young adults with ASD and typical controls (TC). Overall, our graph theory analyses provided convergent evidence that the network integrity of the AON is altered in ASD, and that reductions in network efficiency relate to reductions in overall network density (i.e., decreased overall connection strength). Compared to TC, individuals with ASD showed significant reductions in network efficiency and increased shortest path lengths and centrality. Importantly, when adjusting for overall differences in network density between ASD and TC groups, participants with ASD continued to display reductions in network integrity, suggesting that also network-level organizational properties of the AON are altered in ASD. While differences in empirical connectivity contributed to reductions in network integrity, graph theoretical analyses provided indications that also changes in the high-level network organization reduced integrity of the AON.

  12. Functional Organization of the Action Observation Network in Autism: A Graph Theory Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaat Alaerts

    Full Text Available The ability to recognize, understand and interpret other's actions and emotions has been linked to the mirror system or action-observation-network (AON. Although variations in these abilities are prevalent in the neuro-typical population, persons diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD have deficits in the social domain and exhibit alterations in this neural network.Here, we examined functional network properties of the AON using graph theory measures and region-to-region functional connectivity analyses of resting-state fMRI-data from adolescents and young adults with ASD and typical controls (TC.Overall, our graph theory analyses provided convergent evidence that the network integrity of the AON is altered in ASD, and that reductions in network efficiency relate to reductions in overall network density (i.e., decreased overall connection strength. Compared to TC, individuals with ASD showed significant reductions in network efficiency and increased shortest path lengths and centrality. Importantly, when adjusting for overall differences in network density between ASD and TC groups, participants with ASD continued to display reductions in network integrity, suggesting that also network-level organizational properties of the AON are altered in ASD.While differences in empirical connectivity contributed to reductions in network integrity, graph theoretical analyses provided indications that also changes in the high-level network organization reduced integrity of the AON.

  13. Bond graph model-based fault diagnosis of hybrid systems

    CERN Document Server

    Borutzky, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a bond graph model-based approach to fault diagnosis in mechatronic systems appropriately represented by a hybrid model. The book begins by giving a survey of the fundamentals of fault diagnosis and failure prognosis, then recalls state-of-art developments referring to latest publications, and goes on to discuss various bond graph representations of hybrid system models, equations formulation for switched systems, and simulation of their dynamic behavior. The structured text: • focuses on bond graph model-based fault detection and isolation in hybrid systems; • addresses isolation of multiple parametric faults in hybrid systems; • considers system mode identification; • provides a number of elaborated case studies that consider fault scenarios for switched power electronic systems commonly used in a variety of applications; and • indicates that bond graph modelling can also be used for failure prognosis. In order to facilitate the understanding of fault diagnosis and the presented...

  14. Summary 2: Graph Grammar Verification through Abstraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldan, P.; Koenig, B.; Rensink, A.; Rensink, Arend; König, B.; Montanari, U.; Gardner, P.

    2005-01-01

    Until now there have been few contributions concerning the verification of graph grammars, specifically of infinite-state graph grammars. This paper compares two existing approaches, based on abstractions of graph transformation systems. While in the unfolding approach graph grammars are

  15. Graph passing in graph transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghamarian, A.H.; Rensink, Arend; Fish, Andrew; Lambers, Leen

    Graph transformation works under the whole world assumption. Therefore, in realistic systems, both the individual graphs and the set of all such graphs can grow very large. In reactive formalisms such as process algebra, on the other hand, each system is split into smaller components which

  16. Graph Passing in Graph Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghamarian, A.H.; Rensink, Arend

    2012-01-01

    Graph transformation works under the whole world assumption. Therefore, in realistic systems, both the individual graphs and the set of all such graphs can grow very large. In reactive formalisms such as process algebra, on the other hand, each system is split into smaller components which

  17. Graph Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merker, Martin

    The topic of this PhD thesis is graph decompositions. While there exist various kinds of decompositions, this thesis focuses on three problems concerning edgedecompositions. Given a family of graphs H we ask the following question: When can the edge-set of a graph be partitioned so that each part...... k(T)-edge-connected graph whose size is divisible by the size of T admits a T-decomposition. This proves a conjecture by Barát and Thomassen from 2006. Moreover, we introduce a new arboricity notion where we restrict the diameter of the trees in a decomposition into forests. We conjecture......-connected planar graph contains two edge-disjoint 18/19 -thin spanning trees. Finally, we make progress on a conjecture by Baudon, Bensmail, Przybyło, and Wozniak stating that if a graph can be decomposed into locally irregular graphs, then there exists such a decomposition with at most 3 parts. We show...

  18. Social representations: a theoretical approach in health - doi:10.5020/18061230.2011.p80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaiane Santos Bittencourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the theory of social representations, placing its epistemology and knowing the basic concepts of its approach as a structural unit of knowledge for health studies. Justification: The use of this theory comes from the need to understand social events under the lens of the meanings constructed by the community. Data Synthesis: This was a descriptive study of literature review, which used as a source of data collection the classical authors of social representations supported by articles from electronic search at Virtual Health Library (VHL. The definition and discussion of collected data enabled to introduce two themes, versed on the history and epistemology of representations and on the structural approach of representations in health studies. Conclusion: This review allowed highlight the importance of locating the objects of study with regard to contextual issues of individual and collective histories, valuing the plurality of relations, to come closer to reality that is represented by the subjects.

  19. Graph Theory and ANT Colony Optimization Approach for Forest Patch Connectivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantala Devi, B. S.; Murthy, M. S. R.; Pujar, G. S.; Debnath, B.

    2011-08-01

    Forest connectivity is necessary for prioritizing biodiversity conservation. Connectivity indices facilitate to predict the movement pattern of species across complex landscapes. Change in area and inter-patch distance in forest affects the biodiversity, wildlife movement, seed dispersal and other ecological factors. In graph theory components play an important role to analyze the group of patches and its impact with reference to the threshold distance between the patches. The study on link, threshold distance and components showed that with the increase in threshold distance, number of components decreased and number of links increased. Also Integral index of connectivity importance value (dIIC > 0.05) is high for big forest patches and considered to be intact forest. For those less than 0.05 importance value requires protection and conservation. Hence dIIC is categorised into Very low, low, Medium, high and Very high to analyze the degree of connectivity. Choosing correct threshold distance based on the requirement of species movement is preferred. Based on the selection of potential habitat patches shortest path between them is determined using Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) Technique. Vegetation type Map, Slope, Elevation, Disturbance Index, Biological Richness Map and DIIC layers facilitated to analyze the optimal path of the species through ACO for connectivity. Graph Theory and ACO works as a robust tool for Biodiversity Conservation.

  20. Foodsheds in Virtual Water Flow Networks: A Spectral Graph Theory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kshetry

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A foodshed is a geographic area from which a population derives its food supply, but a method to determine boundaries of foodsheds has not been formalized. Drawing on the food–water–energy nexus, we propose a formal network science definition of foodsheds by using data from virtual water flows, i.e., water that is virtually embedded in food. In particular, we use spectral graph partitioning for directed graphs. If foodsheds turn out to be geographically compact, it suggests the food system is local and therefore reduces energy and externality costs of food transport. Using our proposed method we compute foodshed boundaries at the global-scale, and at the national-scale in the case of two of the largest agricultural countries: India and the United States. Based on our determination of foodshed boundaries, we are able to better understand commodity flows and whether foodsheds are contiguous and compact, and other factors that impact environmental sustainability. The formal method we propose may be used more broadly to study commodity flows and their impact on environmental sustainability.

  1. Monitoring Effective Connectivity in the Preterm Brain: A Graph Approach to Study Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lavanga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, functional connectivity in the developmental science received increasing attention. Although it has been reported that the anatomical connectivity in the preterm brain develops dramatically during the last months of pregnancy, little is known about how functional and effective connectivity change with maturation. The present study investigated how effective connectivity in premature infants evolves. To assess it, we use EEG measurements and graph-theory methodologies. We recorded data from 25 preterm babies, who underwent long-EEG monitoring at least twice during their stay in the NICU. The recordings took place from 27 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA until 42 weeks PMA. Results showed that the EEG-connectivity, assessed using graph-theory indices, moved from a small-world network to a random one, since the clustering coefficient increases and the path length decreases. This shift can be due to the development of the thalamocortical connections and long-range cortical connections. Based on the network indices, we developed different age-prediction models. The best result showed that it is possible to predict the age of the infant with a root mean-squared error (MSE equal to 2.11 weeks. These results are similar to the ones reported in the literature for age prediction in preterm babies.

  2. Bounding the HL-index of a graph: a majorization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Gian Paolo; Cornaro, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    In mathematical chemistry, the median eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of a molecular graph are strictly related to orbital energies and molecular orbitals. In this regard, the difference between the occupied orbital of highest energy (HOMO) and the unoccupied orbital of lowest energy (LUMO) has been investigated (see Fowler and Pisansky in Acta Chim. Slov. 57:513-517, 2010). Motivated by the HOMO-LUMO separation problem, Jaklič et al. in (Ars Math. Contemp. 5:99-115, 2012) proposed the notion of HL -index that measures how large in absolute value are the median eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix. Several bounds for this index have been provided in the literature. The aim of the paper is to derive alternative inequalities to bound the HL -index. By applying majorization techniques and making use of some known relations, we derive new and sharper upper bounds for this index. Analytical and numerical results show the performance of these bounds on different classes of graphs.

  3. Quantum Probability and Spectral Analysis of Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Akihito

    2007-01-01

    This is the first book to comprehensively cover the quantum probabilistic approach to spectral analysis of graphs. This approach has been developed by the authors and has become an interesting research area in applied mathematics and physics. The book can be used as a concise introduction to quantum probability from an algebraic aspect. Here readers will learn several powerful methods and techniques of wide applicability, which have been recently developed under the name of quantum probability. The exercises at the end of each chapter help to deepen understanding. Among the topics discussed along the way are: quantum probability and orthogonal polynomials; asymptotic spectral theory (quantum central limit theorems) for adjacency matrices; the method of quantum decomposition; notions of independence and structure of graphs; and asymptotic representation theory of the symmetric groups.

  4. On the Recognition of Fuzzy Circular Interval Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Oriolo, Gianpaolo; Pietropaoli, Ugo; Stauffer, Gautier

    2011-01-01

    Fuzzy circular interval graphs are a generalization of proper circular arc graphs and have been recently introduced by Chudnovsky and Seymour as a fundamental subclass of claw-free graphs. In this paper, we provide a polynomial-time algorithm for recognizing such graphs, and more importantly for building a suitable representation.

  5. Constructing the L2-Graph for Robust Subspace Learning and Subspace Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Yu, Zhiding; Yi, Zhang; Tang, Huajin

    2017-04-01

    Under the framework of graph-based learning, the key to robust subspace clustering and subspace learning is to obtain a good similarity graph that eliminates the effects of errors and retains only connections between the data points from the same subspace (i.e., intrasubspace data points). Recent works achieve good performance by modeling errors into their objective functions to remove the errors from the inputs. However, these approaches face the limitations that the structure of errors should be known prior and a complex convex problem must be solved. In this paper, we present a novel method to eliminate the effects of the errors from the projection space (representation) rather than from the input space. We first prove that l 1 -, l 2 -, l ∞ -, and nuclear-norm-based linear projection spaces share the property of intrasubspace projection dominance, i.e., the coefficients over intrasubspace data points are larger than those over intersubspace data points. Based on this property, we introduce a method to construct a sparse similarity graph, called L2-graph. The subspace clustering and subspace learning algorithms are developed upon L2-graph. We conduct comprehensive experiment on subspace learning, image clustering, and motion segmentation and consider several quantitative benchmarks classification/clustering accuracy, normalized mutual information, and running time. Results show that L2-graph outperforms many state-of-the-art methods in our experiments, including L1-graph, low rank representation (LRR), and latent LRR, least square regression, sparse subspace clustering, and locally linear representation.

  6. A new holistic approach to vulnerability assessment to natural hazards of socio-economic systems by means of Graph Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Marcello; Martina, Mario L. V.

    2017-04-01

    In the last years, the relations and interactions between multi-hazards, vulnerability, exposure and resilience spheres are assuming more and more attention and the scientific community recognized that they are very dynamic, complex and interconnected. The traditional approaches define risk as the potential economic, social and environmental consequences due to a hazardous phenomenon in a specific period. Although there have been major improvements in recent years, there are still some limitation in term of a holistic approach that is able to include the emergent value hidden in the relation and interaction between the different spheres. Furthermore, the emergent behaviour of a society makes the collective risk greater than the sum of the parts and this requires a holistic, systematic and integrated approach. For this reason, it is important to consider the connections between elements to assess properly the vulnerability of systems. In a system (e.g. road, hospital and ecological network, etc.), or in a System of System (e.g. socio-technical urban service), there are critical elements that, beyond the intrinsic vulnerability, can be characterize by greater or lower vulnerability because of their physical, geographical, cyber or logical connections. To understand the system response to a perturbation, and therefore its resilience, is necessary not only to represent but also to quantify the relative importance of the elements and their interconnections. To this aim, we propose an innovative approach in the field of natural risk assessment based on the properties of graph G=(N,L). A graph consists of two sets N (nodes) and L (links): the nodes represent the single exposed elements (physical, social, environmental, etc.) to a hazard, while the links (or connections) represent the interaction between the elements. This approach encourages the risk assessment to a new prospective: from reductionist to holistic. The final goal is to provide insight in understanding how

  7. Identification of current-carrying part of a random resistor network: electrical approaches vs. graph theory algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevich, Yu Yu; Burmistrov, A. S.; Goltseva, V. A.; Gordeev, I. I.; Serbin, V. I.; Sizova, A. A.; Vodolazskaya, I. V.; Zholobov, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    A set of current-carrying bonds of a random resistor network (RRN) is called the (effective) backbone. The (geometrical) backbone can be defined as a union of all self-avoiding walks between two given points on a network or between its opposite borders. These two definitions provide two different approaches for identification of backbones. On the one hand, one can treat an arbitrary network as RRN and calculate potentials and currents in this RRN. On the other hand, one can apply to the network some search algorithms on graphs. Each of these approaches are known to have both advantages and drawbacks. We have implemented several different algorithms for backbone identification. The algorithms were applied to backbone identification for different system sizes and concentrations of conducting bonds. Our analysis suggests that a universal algorithm suitable for any problem is hardly possible to offer. Most likely, each particular task needs a specific algorithm.

  8. Graph theory approach to the eigenvalue problem of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graph theory is used to obtain numerical solutions to eigenvalue problems of large space structures (LSS) characterized by a state vector of large dimensions. The LSS are considered as large, flexible systems requiring both orientation and surface shape control. Graphic interpretation of the determinant of a matrix is employed to reduce a higher dimensional matrix into combinations of smaller dimensional sub-matrices. The reduction is implemented by means of a Boolean equivalent of the original matrices formulated to obtain smaller dimensional equivalents of the original numerical matrix. Computation time becomes less and more accurate solutions are possible. An example is provided in the form of a free-free square plate. Linearized system equations and numerical values of a stiffness matrix are presented, featuring a state vector with 16 components.

  9. A graph modification approach for finding core-periphery structures in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Sharon; Hüffner, Falk; Komusiewicz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The core-periphery model for protein interaction (PPI) networks assumes that protein complexes in these networks consist of a dense core and a possibly sparse periphery that is adjacent to vertices in the core of the complex. In this work, we aim at uncovering a global core-periphery structure for a given PPI network. We propose two exact graph-theoretic formulations for this task, which aim to fit the input network to a hypothetical ground truth network by a minimum number of edge modifications. In one model each cluster has its own periphery, and in the other the periphery is shared. We first analyze both models from a theoretical point of view, showing their NP-hardness. Then, we devise efficient exact and heuristic algorithms for both models and finally perform an evaluation on subnetworks of the S. cerevisiae PPI network.

  10. Direct Visual Editing of Node Attributes in Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eichner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many expressive visualization techniques for analyzing graphs. Yet, there is only little research on how existing visual representations can be employed to support data editing. An increasingly relevant task when working with graphs is the editing of node attributes. We propose an integrated visualize-and-edit approach to editing attribute values via direct interaction with the visual representation. The visualize part is based on node-link diagrams paired with attribute-dependent layouts. The edit part is as easy as moving nodes via drag-and-drop gestures. We present dedicated interaction techniques for editing quantitative as well as qualitative attribute data values. The benefit of our novel integrated approach is that one can directly edit the data while the visualization constantly provides feedback on the implications of the data modifications. Preliminary user feedback indicates that our integrated approach can be a useful complement to standard non-visual editing via external tools.

  11. Abnormalities of functional brain networks in pathological gambling: a graph-theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschernegg, Melanie; Crone, Julia S.; Eigenberger, Tina; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Lemènager, Tagrid; Mann, Karl; Thon, Natasha; Wurst, Friedrich M.; Kronbichler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies of pathological gambling (PG) demonstrate alterations in frontal and subcortical regions of the mesolimbic reward system. However, most investigations were performed using tasks involving reward processing or executive functions. Little is known about brain network abnormalities during task-free resting state in PG. In the present study, graph-theoretical methods were used to investigate network properties of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data in PG. We compared 19 patients with PG to 19 healthy controls (HCs) using the Graph Analysis Toolbox (GAT). None of the examined global metrics differed between groups. At the nodal level, pathological gambler showed a reduced clustering coefficient in the left paracingulate cortex and the left juxtapositional lobe (supplementary motor area, SMA), reduced local efficiency in the left SMA, as well as an increased node betweenness for the left and right paracingulate cortex and the left SMA. At an uncorrected threshold level, the node betweenness in the left inferior frontal gyrus was decreased and increased in the caudate. Additionally, increased functional connectivity between fronto-striatal regions and within frontal regions has also been found for the gambling patients. These findings suggest that regions associated with the reward system demonstrate reduced segregation but enhanced integration while regions associated with executive functions demonstrate reduced integration. The present study makes evident that PG is also associated with abnormalities in the topological network structure of the brain during rest. Since alterations in PG cannot be explained by direct effects of abused substances on the brain, these findings will be of relevance for understanding functional connectivity in other addictive disorders. PMID:24098282

  12. A Graph theoretical approach to study the organization of the cortical networks during different mathematical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klados, Manousos A; Kanatsouli, Kassia; Antoniou, Ioannis; Babiloni, Fabio; Tsirka, Vassiliki; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Micheloyannis, Sifis

    2013-01-01

    The two core systems of mathematical processing (subitizing and retrieval) as well as their functionality are already known and published. In this study we have used graph theory to compare the brain network organization of these two core systems in the cortical layer during difficult calculations. We have examined separately all the EEG frequency bands in healthy young individuals and we found that the network organization at rest, as well as during mathematical tasks has the characteristics of Small World Networks for all the bands, which is the optimum organization required for efficient information processing. The different mathematical stimuli provoked changes in the graph parameters of different frequency bands, especially the low frequency bands. More specific, in Delta band the induced network increases it's local and global efficiency during the transition from subitizing to retrieval system, while results suggest that difficult mathematics provoke networks with higher cliquish organization due to more specific demands. The network of the Theta band follows the same pattern as before, having high nodal and remote organization during difficult mathematics. Also the spatial distribution of the network's weights revealed more prominent connections in frontoparietal regions, revealing the working memory load due to the engagement of the retrieval system. The cortical networks of the alpha brainwaves were also more efficient, both locally and globally, during difficult mathematics, while the fact that alpha's network was more dense on the frontparietal regions as well, reveals the engagement of the retrieval system again. Concluding, this study gives more evidences regarding the interaction of the two core systems, exploiting the produced functional networks of the cerebral cortex, especially for the difficult mathematics.

  13. Beyond one-size-fits-all: Tailoring diversity approaches to the representation of social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, Evan P; Stephens, Nicole M; Reagans, Ray E

    2016-10-01

    When and why do organizational diversity approaches that highlight the importance of social group differences (vs. equality) help stigmatized groups succeed? We theorize that social group members' numerical representation in an organization, compared with the majority group, influences concerns about their distinctiveness, and consequently, whether diversity approaches are effective. We combine laboratory and field methods to evaluate this theory in a professional setting, in which White women are moderately represented and Black individuals are represented in very small numbers. We expect that focusing on differences (vs. equality) will lead to greater performance and persistence among White women, yet less among Black individuals. First, we demonstrate that Black individuals report greater representation-based concerns than White women (Study 1). Next, we observe that tailoring diversity approaches to these concerns yields greater performance and persistence (Studies 2 and 3). We then manipulate social groups' perceived representation and find that highlighting differences (vs. equality) is more effective when groups' representation is moderate, but less effective when groups' representation is very low (Study 4). Finally, we content-code the diversity statements of 151 major U.S. law firms and find that firms that emphasize differences have lower attrition rates among White women, whereas firms that emphasize equality have lower attrition rates among racial minorities (Study 5). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Newton’s Cradle Experiment Using Video Tracking Analysis with Multiple Representation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissofira, A.; Latief, F. D. E.; Kholida, L.; Sinaga, P.

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports a Physics lesson using video tracking analysis applied in Newton’s Cradle experiment to train student’s multiple representation skill. This study involved 30 science high school students from class XI. In this case, Tracker software was used to verify energy conservation law, with help from data result such as graphs and tables. Newton’s Cradle is commonly used to demonstrate the law of energy and momentum conservation. It consists of swinging spherical bobs which transfers energy from one to another by means of elastic collisions. From the video analysis, it is found that there is a difference in the velocity of the two bobs of opposite ends. Furthermore, investigation of what might cause it to happen can be done by observing and analysing the recorded video. This paper discusses students’ response and teacher’s reflection after using Tracker video analysis software in the Physics lesson. Since Tracker has the ability to provide us with multiple means of data representation way, we conclude that this method could be a good alternative solution and might also be considered better than performing a hands-on experiment activity in which not every school have suitable laboratory equipment.

  15. A Modal-Logic Based Graph Abstraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, J.; Boneva, I.B.; Kurban, M.E.; Rensink, Arend; Ehrig, H; Heckel, R.; Rozenberg, G.; Taentzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    Infinite or very large state spaces often prohibit the successful verification of graph transformation systems. Abstract graph transformation is an approach that tackles this problem by abstracting graphs to abstract graphs of bounded size and by lifting application of productions to abstract

  16. Text Mining approaches for automated literature knowledge extraction and representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Angelo; Mulas, Francesca; Gabetta, Matteo; Arbustini, Eloisa; Zupan, Blaz; Larizza, Cristiana; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Due to the overwhelming volume of published scientific papers, information tools for automated literature analysis are essential to support current biomedical research. We have developed a knowledge extraction tool to help researcher in discovering useful information which can support their reasoning process. The tool is composed of a search engine based on Text Mining and Natural Language Processing techniques, and an analysis module which process the search results in order to build annotation similarity networks. We tested our approach on the available knowledge about the genetic mechanism of cardiac diseases, where the target is to find both known and possible hypothetical relations between specific candidate genes and the trait of interest. We show that the system i) is able to effectively retrieve medical concepts and genes and ii) plays a relevant role assisting researchers in the formulation and evaluation of novel literature-based hypotheses.

  17. A contribution to queens graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barat, Janos

    A graph $G$ is a queens graph if the vertices of $G$ can be mapped to queens on the chessboard such that two vertices are adjacent if and only if the corresponding queens attack each other, i.e. they are in horizontal, vertical or diagonal position. We prove a conjecture of Beineke, Broere...... and Henning that the Cartesian product of an odd cycle and a path is a queens graph. We show that the same does not hold for two odd cycles. % is not representable in the same way. The representation of the Cartesian product of an odd cycle and an even cycle remains an open problem. We also prove...... constructively that any finite subgraph of the grid or the hexagonal grid is a queens graph....

  18. A Walk-based Semantically Enriched Tree Kernel Over Distributed Word Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Shashank; Hovy, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We propose a walk-based graph kernel that generalizes the notion of tree-kernels to continuous spaces. Our proposed approach subsumes a general framework for word-similarity, and in particular, provides a flexible way to incorporate distributed representations. Using vector representations, such ...... diverse NLP tasks, showing state-of-the-art results....

  19. Interaction Graphs: Exponentials

    OpenAIRE

    Seiller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the fourth of a series exposing a systematic combinatorial approach to Girard's Geometry of Interaction program. This program aims at obtaining particular realizability models for linear logic that accounts for the dynamics of cut-elimination. This fourth paper tackles the complex issue of defining exponential connectives in this framework. In order to succeed in this, we use the notion of graphings, a generalization of graphs which was defined in earlier work. We explain how we...

  20. Graph Sampling for Covariance Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar

    2017-04-25

    In this paper the focus is on subsampling as well as reconstructing the second-order statistics of signals residing on nodes of arbitrary undirected graphs. Second-order stationary graph signals may be obtained by graph filtering zero-mean white noise and they admit a well-defined power spectrum whose shape is determined by the frequency response of the graph filter. Estimating the graph power spectrum forms an important component of stationary graph signal processing and related inference tasks such as Wiener prediction or inpainting on graphs. The central result of this paper is that by sampling a significantly smaller subset of vertices and using simple least squares, we can reconstruct the second-order statistics of the graph signal from the subsampled observations, and more importantly, without any spectral priors. To this end, both a nonparametric approach as well as parametric approaches including moving average and autoregressive models for the graph power spectrum are considered. The results specialize for undirected circulant graphs in that the graph nodes leading to the best compression rates are given by the so-called minimal sparse rulers. A near-optimal greedy algorithm is developed to design the subsampling scheme for the non-parametric and the moving average models, whereas a particular subsampling scheme that allows linear estimation for the autoregressive model is proposed. Numerical experiments on synthetic as well as real datasets related to climatology and processing handwritten digits are provided to demonstrate the developed theory.

  1. Mechatronic modeling of a 750kW fixed-speed wind energy conversion system using the Bond Graph Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaouch, Zakaria; Zekraoui, Mustapha; Bengourram, Jamaa; Kouider, Nourreeddine; Mabrouki, Mustapha

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we would like to focus on modeling main parts of the wind turbines (blades, gearbox, tower, generator and pitching system) from a mechatronics viewpoint using the Bond-Graph Approach (BGA). Then, these parts are combined together in order to simulate the complete system. Moreover, the real dynamic behavior of the wind turbine is taken into account and with the new model; final load simulation is more realistic offering benefits and reliable system performance. This model can be used to develop control algorithms to reduce fatigue loads and enhance power production. Different simulations are carried-out in order to validate the proposed wind turbine model, using real data provided in the open literature (blade profile and gearbox parameters for a 750 kW wind turbine). Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A graph theoretic approach to the analysis of DNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berno, A J

    1996-02-01

    The analysis of data from automated DNA sequencing instruments has been a limiting factor in the development of new sequencing technology. A new base-calling algorithm that is intended to be independent of any particular sequencing technology has been developed and shown to be effective with data from the Applied Biosystems 373 sequencing system. This algorithm makes use of a nonlinear deconvolution filter to detect likely oligomer events and a graph theoretic editing strategy to find the subset of those events that is most likely to correspond to the correct sequence. Metrics evaluating the quality and accuracy of the resulting sequence are also generated and have been shown to be predictive of measured error rates. Compared to the Applied Biosystems Analysis software, this algorithm generates 18% fewer insertion errors, 80% more deletion errors, and 4% fewer mismatches. The tradeoff between different types of errors can be controlled through a secondary editing step that inserts or deletes base calls depending on their associated confidence values.

  3. Modelling of Non-Linear Pilot Disinfection Water System: A Bond Graph Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoufel ZITOUNI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ultraviolet (UV irradiations are used to solve the bacteriological problem of the drinking water quality. A discharge-gas lamp is used to produce this type of irradiation. The UV lamp is fed by photovoltaic (PV energy via electronic ballast composed by an inverter, a transformer and resonant circuit (RLC. The aim of this work is to give a useful global model of the system. In particular, we introduce the complicated UV lamp model and the water disinfection kinetics, where the radiant energy flux emitted by the discharge-gas lamp and the arc voltage are a complex functions of the current and time. This system is intended to be mainly used in rural zones, the photovoltaic modules as source of energy is an adequate solution. To optimise the power transfer from the PV array to ballast and UV lamp, a Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT device may be located between PV array and the loads. In this paper, we developed a bond-graph model which gives the water quality from UV flow, gas type, pressure, lamp current and geometrical characteristic. Finally reliable simulations are established and compared with experimental tests.

  4. A machine learning approach to graph-theoretical cluster expansions of the energy of adsorbate layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignola, Emanuele; Steinmann, Stephan N.; Vandegehuchte, Bart D.; Curulla, Daniel; Stamatakis, Michail; Sautet, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    The accurate description of the energy of adsorbate layers is crucial for the understanding of chemistry at interfaces. For heterogeneous catalysis, not only the interaction of the adsorbate with the surface but also the adsorbate-adsorbate lateral interactions significantly affect the activation energies of reactions. Modeling the interactions of the adsorbates with the catalyst surface and with each other can be efficiently achieved in the cluster expansion Hamiltonian formalism, which has recently been implemented in a graph-theoretical kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) scheme to describe multi-dentate species. Automating the development of the cluster expansion Hamiltonians for catalytic systems is challenging and requires the mapping of adsorbate configurations for extended adsorbates onto a graphical lattice. The current work adopts machine learning methods to reach this goal. Clusters are automatically detected based on formalized, but intuitive chemical concepts. The corresponding energy coefficients for the cluster expansion are calculated by an inversion scheme. The potential of this method is demonstrated for the example of ethylene adsorption on Pd(111), for which we propose several expansions, depending on the graphical lattice. It turns out that for this system, the best description is obtained as a combination of single molecule patterns and a few coupling terms accounting for lateral interactions.

  5. Graph theoretical model of a sensorimotor connectome in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stobb

    Full Text Available Mapping the detailed connectivity patterns (connectomes of neural circuits is a central goal of neuroscience. The best quantitative approach to analyzing connectome data is still unclear but graph theory has been used with success. We present a graph theoretical model of the posterior lateral line sensorimotor pathway in zebrafish. The model includes 2,616 neurons and 167,114 synaptic connections. Model neurons represent known cell types in zebrafish larvae, and connections were set stochastically following rules based on biological literature. Thus, our model is a uniquely detailed computational representation of a vertebrate connectome. The connectome has low overall connection density, with 2.45% of all possible connections, a value within the physiological range. We used graph theoretical tools to compare the zebrafish connectome graph to small-world, random and structured random graphs of the same size. For each type of graph, 100 randomly generated instantiations were considered. Degree distribution (the number of connections per neuron varied more in the zebrafish graph than in same size graphs with less biological detail. There was high local clustering and a short average path length between nodes, implying a small-world structure similar to other neural connectomes and complex networks. The graph was found not to be scale-free, in agreement with some other neural connectomes. An experimental lesion was performed that targeted three model brain neurons, including the Mauthner neuron, known to control fast escape turns. The lesion decreased the number of short paths between sensory and motor neurons analogous to the behavioral effects of the same lesion in zebrafish. This model is expandable and can be used to organize and interpret a growing database of information on the zebrafish connectome.

  6. Practical graph mining with R

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrix, William; Jenkins, John; Padmanabhan, Kanchana; Chakraborty, Arpan

    2014-01-01

    Practical Graph Mining with R presents a "do-it-yourself" approach to extracting interesting patterns from graph data. It covers many basic and advanced techniques for the identification of anomalous or frequently recurring patterns in a graph, the discovery of groups or clusters of nodes that share common patterns of attributes and relationships, the extraction of patterns that distinguish one category of graphs from another, and the use of those patterns to predict the category of new graphs. Hands-On Application of Graph Data Mining Each chapter in the book focuses on a graph mining task, such as link analysis, cluster analysis, and classification. Through applications using real data sets, the book demonstrates how computational techniques can help solve real-world problems. The applications covered include network intrusion detection, tumor cell diagnostics, face recognition, predictive toxicology, mining metabolic and protein-protein interaction networks, and community detection in social networks. De...

  7. Interactive exploration of large-scale time-varying data using dynamic tracking graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Widanagamaachchi, W.

    2012-10-01

    Exploring and analyzing the temporal evolution of features in large-scale time-varying datasets is a common problem in many areas of science and engineering. One natural representation of such data is tracking graphs, i.e., constrained graph layouts that use one spatial dimension to indicate time and show the "tracks" of each feature as it evolves, merges or disappears. However, for practical data sets creating the corresponding optimal graph layouts that minimize the number of intersections can take hours to compute with existing techniques. Furthermore, the resulting graphs are often unmanageably large and complex even with an ideal layout. Finally, due to the cost of the layout, changing the feature definition, e.g. by changing an iso-value, or analyzing properly adjusted sub-graphs is infeasible. To address these challenges, this paper presents a new framework that couples hierarchical feature definitions with progressive graph layout algorithms to provide an interactive exploration of dynamically constructed tracking graphs. Our system enables users to change feature definitions on-the-fly and filter features using arbitrary attributes while providing an interactive view of the resulting tracking graphs. Furthermore, the graph display is integrated into a linked view system that provides a traditional 3D view of the current set of features and allows a cross-linked selection to enable a fully flexible spatio-temporal exploration of data. We demonstrate the utility of our approach with several large-scale scientific simulations from combustion science. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Social representations: affective impregnation and structural approach / Abordagem estrutural e componente afetivo das representações sociais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Humberto Faria Campos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Structural Approach" of social representations defines a social representation as an organization which comprises different dimensions and not as a group of purely cognitive events and processes. In the present state of theory, we propose the principle that the affective dimension maintains a random relationship with the Central Core. Two previous studies are briefly described as well as the results concerning three representations ("street children", "higher education" and "family" in order to present a perspective that seems to indicate that the relationships between "semantic" and "affectively charged" elements are random. The data seem to confirm the principle that the Central Core of social representations equally organizes the distribution of the affective charges on the social representation as a whole. The studies presented here correspond to a first exploratory approach of the relationships between the structure of a representation and the affective impregnation of representation elements.

  9. Using Graph Transformations and Graph Abstractions for Software Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambon, Eduardo; Ehrig, Hartmut; Rensink, Arend; Rozenberg, Grzegorz; Schurr, Andy

    In this abstract we present an overview of our intended approach for the verification of software written in imperative programming languages. This approach is based on model checking of graph transition systems (GTS), where each program state is modeled as a graph and the exploration engine is

  10. On the spectrum of the Laplace operator of metric graphs attached at a vertex-spectral determinant approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Texier, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    We consider a metric graph G made of two graphs G 1 and G 2 attached at one point. We derive a formula relating the spectral determinant of the Laplace operator S G (γ)=det(γ-Δ) in terms of the spectral determinants of the two subgraphs. The result is generalized to describe the attachment of n graphs. The formulae are also valid for the spectral determinant of the Schroedinger operator det(γ-Δ+V(x))

  11. A comparative evaluation of supervised and unsupervised representation learning approaches for anaplastic medulloblastoma differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Arevalo, John; Basavanhally, Ajay; Madabhushi, Anant; González, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Learning data representations directly from the data itself is an approach that has shown great success in different pattern recognition problems, outperforming state-of-the-art feature extraction schemes for different tasks in computer vision, speech recognition and natural language processing. Representation learning applies unsupervised and supervised machine learning methods to large amounts of data to find building-blocks that better represent the information in it. Digitized histopathology images represents a very good testbed for representation learning since it involves large amounts of high complex, visual data. This paper presents a comparative evaluation of different supervised and unsupervised representation learning architectures to specifically address open questions on what type of learning architectures (deep or shallow), type of learning (unsupervised or supervised) is optimal. In this paper we limit ourselves to addressing these questions in the context of distinguishing between anaplastic and non-anaplastic medulloblastomas from routine haematoxylin and eosin stained images. The unsupervised approaches evaluated were sparse autoencoders and topographic reconstruct independent component analysis, and the supervised approach was convolutional neural networks. Experimental results show that shallow architectures with more neurons are better than deeper architectures without taking into account local space invariances and that topographic constraints provide useful invariant features in scale and rotations for efficient tumor differentiation.

  12. Using SVG and XSLT for graphic representation

    OpenAIRE

    Baravalle, Andres; Lanfranchi, Vitaveska; Gribaudo, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Using SVG and XSLT for graphic representation\\ud In this paper we will present an XML based framework that can be used to produce graphical visualisation of scientific data. The approach rather than producing ordinary histogram and function diagaram graphs, tries to represent the information in a more graphical appealing and easy to understand way. For examples the approach will give the ability to represent the temperature as the level of coulored fluid in a thermometer.\\ud \\ud The proposed ...

  13. Planar articulated mechanism design by graph theoretical enumeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawamoto, A; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with design of articulated mechanisms using a truss-based ground-structure representation. By applying a graph theoretical enumeration approach we can perform an exhaustive analysis of all possible topologies for a test example for which we seek a symmetric mechanism....... This guarantees that one can identify the global optimum solution. The result underlines the importance of mechanism topology and gives insight into the issues specific to articulated mechanism designs compared to compliant mechanism designs....

  14. Scheduling of Conditional Process Graphs for the Synthesis of Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eles, Petru; Kuchcinski, Krzysztof; Peng, Zebo

    1998-01-01

    We present an approach to process scheduling based on an abstract graph representation which captures both dataflow and the flow of control. Target architectures consist of several processors, ASICs and shared busses. We have developed a heuristic which generates a schedule table so that the worst...

  15. Towards a category theory approach to analogy: Analyzing re-representation and acquisition of numerical knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo A Navarrete

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Category Theory, a branch of mathematics, has shown promise as a modeling framework for higher-level cognition. We introduce an algebraic model for analogy that uses the language of category theory to explore analogy-related cognitive phenomena. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we use this model to explore three objects of study in cognitive literature. First, (a we use commutative diagrams to analyze an effect of playing particular educational board games on the learning of numbers. Second, (b we employ a notion called coequalizer as a formal model of re-representation that explains a property of computational models of analogy called "flexibility" whereby non-similar representational elements are considered matches and placed in structural correspondence. Finally, (c we build a formal learning model which shows that re-representation, language processing and analogy making can explain the acquisition of knowledge of rational numbers. These objects of study provide a picture of acquisition of numerical knowledge that is compatible with empirical evidence and offers insights on possible connections between notions such as relational knowledge, analogy, learning, conceptual knowledge, re-representation and procedural knowledge. This suggests that the approach presented here facilitates mathematical modeling of cognition and provides novel ways to think about analogy-related cognitive phenomena.

  16. Towards a category theory approach to analogy: Analyzing re-representation and acquisition of numerical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Jairo A; Dartnell, Pablo

    2017-08-01

    Category Theory, a branch of mathematics, has shown promise as a modeling framework for higher-level cognition. We introduce an algebraic model for analogy that uses the language of category theory to explore analogy-related cognitive phenomena. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we use this model to explore three objects of study in cognitive literature. First, (a) we use commutative diagrams to analyze an effect of playing particular educational board games on the learning of numbers. Second, (b) we employ a notion called coequalizer as a formal model of re-representation that explains a property of computational models of analogy called "flexibility" whereby non-similar representational elements are considered matches and placed in structural correspondence. Finally, (c) we build a formal learning model which shows that re-representation, language processing and analogy making can explain the acquisition of knowledge of rational numbers. These objects of study provide a picture of acquisition of numerical knowledge that is compatible with empirical evidence and offers insights on possible connections between notions such as relational knowledge, analogy, learning, conceptual knowledge, re-representation and procedural knowledge. This suggests that the approach presented here facilitates mathematical modeling of cognition and provides novel ways to think about analogy-related cognitive phenomena.

  17. System Response Analysis and Model Order Reduction, Using Conventional Method, Bond Graph Technique and Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Moin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper basically explores and compares the different modeling and analysis techniques and than it also explores the model order reduction approach and significance. The traditional modeling and simulation techniques for dynamic systems are generally adequate for single-domain systems only, but the Bond Graph technique provides new strategies for reliable solutions of multi-domain system. They are also used for analyzing linear and non linear dynamic production system, artificial intelligence, image processing, robotics and industrial automation. This paper describes a unique technique of generating the Genetic design from the tree structured transfer function obtained from Bond Graph. This research work combines bond graphs for model representation with Genetic programming for exploring different ideas on design space tree structured transfer function result from replacing typical bond graph element with their impedance equivalent specifying impedance lows for Bond Graph multiport. This tree structured form thus obtained from Bond Graph is applied for generating the Genetic Tree. Application studies will identify key issues and importance for advancing this approach towards becoming on effective and efficient design tool for synthesizing design for Electrical system. In the first phase, the system is modeled using Bond Graph technique. Its system response and transfer function with conventional and Bond Graph method is analyzed and then a approach towards model order reduction is observed. The suggested algorithm and other known modern model order reduction techniques are applied to a 11th order high pass filter [1], with different approach. The model order reduction technique developed in this paper has least reduction errors and secondly the final model retains structural information. The system response and the stability analysis of the system transfer function taken by conventional and by Bond Graph method is compared and

  18. Mechatronics by bond graphs an object-oriented approach to modelling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Damić, Vjekoslav

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a computer-aided approach to the design of mechatronic systems. Its subject is an integrated modeling and simulation in a visual computer environment. Since the first edition, the simulation software changed enormously, became more user-friendly and easier to use. Therefore, a second edition became necessary taking these improvements into account. The modeling is based on system top-down and bottom-up approach. The mathematical models are generated in a form of differential-algebraic equations and solved using numerical and symbolic algebra methods. The integrated approach developed is applied to mechanical, electrical and control systems, multibody dynamics, and continuous systems. .

  19. An Efficient Monte Carlo Approach to Compute PageRank for Large Graphs on a Single PC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonobe Tomohiro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel Monte Carlo based random walk to compute PageRanks of nodes in a large graph on a single PC. The target graphs of this paper are ones whose size is larger than the physical memory. In such an environment, memory management is a difficult task for simulating the random walk among the nodes. We propose a novel method that partitions the graph into subgraphs in order to make them fit into the physical memory, and conducts the random walk for each subgraph. By evaluating the walks lazily, we can conduct the walks only in a subgraph and approximate the random walk by rotating the subgraphs. In computational experiments, the proposed method exhibits good performance for existing large graphs with several passes of the graph data.

  20. Reorganization in Multi-Agent Architectures: An Active Graph Grammar Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Markus, Schatten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Organizational architecture is a holistic approach to design of humane organizations and studies an organization from five perspectives: structure, culture, processes, strategy and individuals. In this paper the concept of organizational architecture is firstly formalized using the fractal principle and then applied to multi-agent systems’ (MAS) organizations. Objectives: Providing a holistic framework for modelling all aspects of MASreorganization. Methods/Approach: MAS organizat...

  1. Multiple Kernel Learning for adaptive graph regularized nonnegative matrix factorization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been continuously evolving in several areas like pattern recognition and information retrieval methods. It factorizes a matrix into a product of 2 low-rank non-negative matrices that will define parts-based, and linear representation of non-negative data. Recently, Graph regularized NMF (GrNMF) is proposed to find a compact representation, which uncovers the hidden semantics and simultaneously respects the intrinsic geometric structure. In GNMF, an affinity graph is constructed from the original data space to encode the geometrical information. In this paper, we propose a novel idea which engages a Multiple Kernel Learning approach into refining the graph structure that reflects the factorization of the matrix and the new data space. The GrNMF is improved by utilizing the graph refined by the kernel learning, and then a novel kernel learning method is introduced under the GrNMF framework. Our approach shows encouraging results of the proposed algorithm in comparison to the state-of-the-art clustering algorithms like NMF, GrNMF, SVD etc.

  2. Digital Line Graphs (DLG) 24K

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Digital line graph (DLG) data are digital representations of cartographic information. DLG's of map features are converted to digital form from maps and related...

  3. Joint embeddings of scene graphs and images

    OpenAIRE

    Belilovsky, Eugene; Blaschko, Matthew; Kiros, Jamie Ryan; Urtasun, Raquel; Zemel, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Belilovsky E., Blaschko M., Kiros J.R., Urtasun R., Zemel R., ''Joint embeddings of scene graphs and images'', 5th international conference on learning representations workshop track - ICLR 2017, 5 pp., April 24-26, 2017, Toulon, France.

  4. Directed Graph Methodology for Acquisition Path Analysis: a possible tool to support the state-level approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, Arpad; Nemeth, Andras

    2013-01-01

    According to a recent statement, the IAEA seeks to develop a more effective safeguards system to achieve greater deterrence, because deterrence of proliferation is much more effective than detection. To achieve this goal, a less predictive safeguards system is being developed based on the advanced state-level approach that is driven by all available safeguards-relevant information. The 'directed graph analysis' is recommended as a possible methodology to implement acquisition path analysis by the IAEA to support the State evaluation process. The basic methodology is simple, well established, powerful, and its adaptation to the modelling of the nuclear profile of a State requires minimum software development. Based on this methodology the material flow network model has been developed under the Hungarian Support Programme to the IAEA, which is described in detail. In the proposed model, materials in different chemical and physical form can flow through pipes representing declared processes, material transports, diversions or undeclared processes. The nodes of the network are the material types, while the edges of the network are the pipes. A state parameter (p) is assigned to each node and edge representing the probability of their existence in the State. The possible application of this model in the State-level analytical approach will be discussed and outlook for further work will be given. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  5. Features based approach for indexation and representation of unstructured Arabic documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Salim El Bazzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase of textual information published in Arabic language on the internet, public libraries and administrations requires implementing effective techniques for the extraction of relevant information contained in large corpus of texts. The purpose of indexing is to create a document representation that easily find and identify the relevant information in a set of documents. However, mining textual data is becoming a complicated task, especially when taking semantic into consideration. In this paper, we will present an indexation system based on contextual representation that will take the advantage of semantic links given in a document. Our approach is based on the extraction of keyphrases. Then, each document is represented by its relevant keyphrases instead of its simple keywords. The experimental results confirms the effectiveness of our approach.

  6. [Intestinal microbiota and emergence of new representations of the body: a psychosocial approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durif-Bruckert, Christine

    2016-11-01

    In view of the growing importance attached to the gut microbiota in preventive medicine and treatment, it would seem essential to identify and analyse the modalities of its representation in a psychosocial approach. In the first part of this article, we will discuss the renewal of representations of the digestive tract brought about by scientific discourse on the gut microbiota, mainly regarding the anthropological status of the intestines and faeces. Then in the second part we will focus on ways of taking advantage of the variable nature of the microbiota by food choices, and we will also focus on therapeutic approaches that use transplantations of faecal matter, and the ensuing loss of privacy entailed (an anthropological notion of defil). © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  7. Graph abstraction and abstract graph transformations (Amended version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boneva, I.B.; Kreiker, Jörg; Kurban, M.E.; Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many important systems such as concurrent heap-manipulating programs, communication networks, or distributed algorithms, are hard to verify due to their inherent dynamics and unboundedness. Graphs are an intuitive representation for the states of these systems, where transitions can be conveniently

  8. On a fractional representation approach to closed-loop experiment design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Fred R.; Franklin, Gene F.

    1988-01-01

    A plant model, based on a fractional representation of the loop, which is uniquely suited to the closed-loop experiment design problem, is proposed. The advantage of this model is that it substitutes an open-loop problem (for which there has been extensive work) for the original-closed loop problem. The results of Monte Carlo simulations which support the utility of this approach are included.

  9. Fault diagnosis of generation IV nuclear HTGR components – Part II: The area error enthalpy–entropy graph approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, C.P. du; Schoor, G. van

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Different uncorrelated fault signatures are derived for HTGR component faults. ► A multiple classifier ensemble increases confidence in classification accuracy. ► Detailed simulation model of system is not required for fault diagnosis. - Abstract: The second paper in a two part series presents the area error method for generation of representative enthalpy–entropy (h–s) fault signatures to classify malfunctions in generation IV nuclear high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The second classifier is devised to ultimately address the fault diagnosis (FD) problem via the proposed methods in a multiple classifier (MC) ensemble. FD is realized by way of different input feature sets to the classification algorithm based on the area and trajectory of the residual shift between the fault-free and the actual operating h–s graph models. The application of the proposed technique is specifically demonstrated for 24 single fault transients considered in the main power system (MPS) of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). The results show that the area error technique produces different fault signatures with low correlation for all the examined component faults. A brief evaluation of the two fault signature generation techniques is presented and the performance of the area error method is documented using the fault classification index (FCI) presented in Part I of the series. The final part of this work reports the application of the proposed approach for classification of an emulated fault transient in data from the prototype Pebble Bed Micro Model (PBMM) plant. Reference data values are calculated for the plant via a thermo-hydraulic simulation model of the MPS. The results show that the correspondence between the fault signatures, generated via experimental plant data and simulated reference values, are generally good. The work presented in the two part series, related to the classification of component faults in the MPS of different

  10. A Comprehensive Review on Handcrafted and Learning-Based Action Representation Approaches for Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allah Bux Sargano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human activity recognition (HAR is an important research area in the fields of human perception and computer vision due to its wide range of applications. These applications include: intelligent video surveillance, ambient assisted living, human computer interaction, human-robot interaction, entertainment, and intelligent driving. Recently, with the emergence and successful deployment of deep learning techniques for image classification, researchers have migrated from traditional handcrafting to deep learning techniques for HAR. However, handcrafted representation-based approaches are still widely used due to some bottlenecks such as computational complexity of deep learning techniques for activity recognition. However, approaches based on handcrafted representation are not able to handle complex scenarios due to their limitations and incapability; therefore, resorting to deep learning-based techniques is a natural option. This review paper presents a comprehensive survey of both handcrafted and learning-based action representations, offering comparison, analysis, and discussions on these approaches. In addition to this, the well-known public datasets available for experimentations and important applications of HAR are also presented to provide further insight into the field. This is the first review paper of its kind which presents all these aspects of HAR in a single review article with comprehensive coverage of each part. Finally, the paper is concluded with important discussions and research directions in the domain of HAR.

  11. Neural overlap of L1 and L2 semantic representations in speech: A decoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Putte, Eowyn; De Baene, Wouter; Brass, Marcel; Duyck, Wouter

    2017-11-15

    Although research has now converged towards a consensus that both languages of a bilingual are represented in at least partly shared systems for language comprehension, it remains unclear whether both languages are represented in the same neural populations for production. We investigated the neural overlap between L1 and L2 semantic representations of translation equivalents using a production task in which the participants had to name pictures in L1 and L2. Using a decoding approach, we tested whether brain activity during the production of individual nouns in one language allowed predicting the production of the same concepts in the other language. Because both languages only share the underlying semantic representation (sensory and lexical overlap was maximally avoided), this would offer very strong evidence for neural overlap in semantic representations of bilinguals. Based on the brain activation for the individual concepts in one language in the bilateral occipito-temporal cortex and the inferior and the middle temporal gyrus, we could accurately predict the equivalent individual concepts in the other language. This indicates that these regions share semantic representations across L1 and L2 word production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ℓ1/2-norm regularized nonnegative low-rank and sparse affinity graph for remote sensing image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shu; Zhang, Ye; Yan, Yiming; Su, Nan

    2016-10-01

    Segmentation of real-world remote sensing images is a challenge due to the complex texture information with high heterogeneity. Thus, graph-based image segmentation methods have been attracting great attention in the field of remote sensing. However, most of the traditional graph-based approaches fail to capture the intrinsic structure of the feature space and are sensitive to noises. A ℓ-norm regularization-based graph segmentation method is proposed to segment remote sensing images. First, we use the occlusion of the random texture model (ORTM) to extract the local histogram features. Then, a ℓ-norm regularized low-rank and sparse representation (LNNLRS) is implemented to construct a ℓ-regularized nonnegative low-rank and sparse graph (LNNLRS-graph), by the union of feature subspaces. Moreover, the LNNLRS-graph has a high ability to discriminate the manifold intrinsic structure of highly homogeneous texture information. Meanwhile, the LNNLRS representation takes advantage of the low-rank and sparse characteristics to remove the noises and corrupted data. Last, we introduce the LNNLRS-graph into the graph regularization nonnegative matrix factorization to enhance the segmentation accuracy. The experimental results using remote sensing images show that when compared to five state-of-the-art image segmentation methods, the proposed method achieves more accurate segmentation results.

  13. On a programming language for graph algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinboldt, W. C.; Basili, V. R.; Mesztenyi, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    An algorithmic language, GRAAL, is presented for describing and implementing graph algorithms of the type primarily arising in applications. The language is based on a set algebraic model of graph theory which defines the graph structure in terms of morphisms between certain set algebraic structures over the node set and arc set. GRAAL is modular in the sense that the user specifies which of these mappings are available with any graph. This allows flexibility in the selection of the storage representation for different graph structures. In line with its set theoretic foundation, the language introduces sets as a basic data type and provides for the efficient execution of all set and graph operators. At present, GRAAL is defined as an extension of ALGOL 60 (revised) and its formal description is given as a supplement to the syntactic and semantic definition of ALGOL. Several typical graph algorithms are written in GRAAL to illustrate various features of the language and to show its applicability.

  14. [A retrieval method of drug molecules based on graph collapsing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, J W; Lv, X Q; Liu, Z M; Liao, Y; Sun, P H; Wang, B; Tang, Z

    2018-04-18

    .32% higher than WCSE on these metrics for top-10 retrieval results, respectively. Moreover, several retrieval cases were presented to intuitively compare with WCSE. The results of the above comparative study demonstrated that the proposed method outperformed the existing method with regard to accuracy and effectiveness. This paper proposes a graph-similarity-based retrieval approach for medicine information. To obtain satisfactory retrieval results, an isomorphism-based algorithm is proposed for dominant subgraph selection based on the subgraph overlapping analysis, as well as an effective and efficient hypergraph representation of molecules. Experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. Introduction to graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Trudeau, Richard J

    1994-01-01

    Preface1. Pure Mathematics Introduction; Euclidean Geometry as Pure Mathematics; Games; Why Study Pure Mathematics?; What's Coming; Suggested Reading2. Graphs Introduction; Sets; Paradox; Graphs; Graph diagrams; Cautions; Common Graphs; Discovery; Complements and Subgraphs; Isomorphism; Recognizing Isomorphic Graphs; Semantics The Number of Graphs Having a Given nu; Exercises; Suggested Reading3. Planar Graphs Introduction; UG, K subscript 5, and the Jordan Curve Theorem; Are there More Nonplanar Graphs?; Expansions; Kuratowski's Theorem; Determining Whether a Graph is Planar or

  16. Analysis of the Usage of Magnetic Force-directed Approach and Visual Techniques for Interactive Context-based Drawing of Multi-attributed Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabiniako Vitaly

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors perform an analysis in order to assess adaptation of magnetic force-directed algorithms for context-based information extraction from multi-attributed graphs during visualization sessions. Theoretic standings behind magnetic force-directed approach are stated together with review on how particular features of respective algorithms in combination with appropriate visual techniques are especially suitable for improved processing and presenting of knowledge that is captured in form of graphs. The complexity of retrieving multi-attributed information within the proposed approach is handled with dedicated tools, such as selective attraction of nodes to MFE (Magnetic Force Emitter based on search criteria, localization of POI (Point of Interest regions, graph node anchoring, etc. Implicit compatibility of aforementioned tools with interactive nature of data exploration is distinguished. Description of case study, based on bibliometric network analysis is given, which is followed by the review of existing related works in this field. Conclusions are made and further studies in the field of visualization of multi-attributed graphs are defined.

  17. Graph embedding with rich information through heterogeneous graph

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Guolei

    2017-11-12

    Graph embedding, aiming to learn low-dimensional representations for nodes in graphs, has attracted increasing attention due to its critical application including node classification, link prediction and clustering in social network analysis. Most existing algorithms for graph embedding only rely on the topology information and fail to use the copious information in nodes as well as edges. As a result, their performance for many tasks may not be satisfactory. In this thesis, we proposed a novel and general framework for graph embedding with rich text information (GERI) through constructing a heterogeneous network, in which we integrate node and edge content information with graph topology. Specially, we designed a novel biased random walk to explore the constructed heterogeneous network with the notion of flexible neighborhood. Our sampling strategy can compromise between BFS and DFS local search on heterogeneous graph. To further improve our algorithm, we proposed semi-supervised GERI (SGERI), which learns graph embedding in an discriminative manner through heterogeneous network with label information. The efficacy of our method is demonstrated by extensive comparison experiments with 9 baselines over multi-label and multi-class classification on various datasets including Citeseer, Cora, DBLP and Wiki. It shows that GERI improves the Micro-F1 and Macro-F1 of node classification up to 10%, and SGERI improves GERI by 5% in Wiki.

  18. Affect and Graphing Calculator Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Allison W.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study of six high school calculus students designed to build an understanding about the affect associated with graphing calculator use in independent situations. DeBellis and Goldin's (2006) framework for affect as a representational system was used as a lens through which to understand the ways in which…

  19. An Experiment on Graph Analysis Methodologies for Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Wolf, Katherine E.; Kuchar, Olga A.; Chin, George

    2005-09-30

    Visual graph representations are increasingly used to represent, display, and explore scenarios and the structure of organizations. The graph representations of scenarios are readily understood, and commercial software is available to create and manage these representations. The purpose of the research presented in this paper is to explore whether these graph representations support quantitative assessments of the underlying scenarios. The underlying structure of the scenarios is the information that is being targeted in the experiment and the extent to which the scenarios are similar in content. An experiment was designed that incorporated both the contents of the scenarios and analysts’ graph representations of the scenarios. The scenarios’ content was represented graphically by analysts, and both the structure and the semantics of the graph representation were attempted to be used to understand the content. The structure information was not found to be discriminating for the content of the scenarios in this experiment; but, the semantic information was discriminating.

  20. Brain tractography using Q-ball imaging and graph theory: Improved connectivities through fibre crossings via a model-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Bai, Li; Morgan, Paul S; Constantinescu, Cris S; Tench, Christopher R

    2010-02-01

    Brain tractography techniques utilize a set of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images to reconstruct white matter tracts, non-invasively and in-vivo. Streamline tracking techniques propagate curves from a seed to imply connectivity to distal voxels. Alternative approaches have been developed that attempt to quantify connection strength between all voxels and the seed. Tractography based on graph theory is amongst them. Despite its potential, graph-based tracking through complex fibre configurations has not been extensively studied and existing methods have inherent limitations. Anatomically unlikely connections may be identified in fibre crossing regions, by assigning relatively high connection strengths to all crossing populations. In this study, we discuss these limitations and present a new approach for robustly propagating through fibre crossings, as described by the orientation distribution functions (ODFs) derived from Q-ball imaging. Each image voxel is treated as a graph node and graph arcs connect neighbouring voxels. Weights representative of both structural and diffusivity features are assigned to each arc. To account for the existence of crossing fibre populations within a voxel, complex ODFs are decomposed into components representative of single-fibre populations and an image multigraph is created. The multigraph is searched exhaustively, but efficiently, to find the strongest paths and assign connectivity strengths between a seed and all the other image voxels. A comparison with the existing graph-based tractography as well as Q-ball driven front evolution tractography is performed on simulated data, and on human Q-ball imaging data acquired from five healthy volunteers. The new approach improves the connection strengths through fibre crossing regions, reducing the strengths of paths that are less anatomically plausible. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Subtle alterations in cerebrovascular reactivity in mild cognitive impairment detected by graph theoretical analysis and not by the standard approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Sánchez-Catasús

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing support that cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR in response to a vasodilatory challenge, also defined as the cerebrovascular reserve, is reduced in Alzheimer's disease dementia. However, this is less clear in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. The current standard analysis may not reflect subtle abnormalities in CVR. In this study, we aimed to investigate vasodilatory-induced changes in the topology of the cerebral blood flow correlation (CBFcorr network to study possible network-related CVR abnormalities in MCI. For this purpose, four CBFcorr networks were constructed: two using CBF SPECT data at baseline and under the vasodilatory challenge of acetazolamide (ACZ, obtained from a group of 26 MCI patients; and two equivalent networks from a group of 26 matched cognitively normal controls. The mean strength of association (SA and clustering coefficient (C were used to evaluate ACZ-induced changes on the topology of CBFcorr networks. We found that cognitively normal adults and MCI patients show different patterns of C and SA changes. The observed differences included the medial prefrontal cortices and inferior parietal lobe, which represent areas involved in MCI's cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, no substantial differences were detected by standard CVR analysis. These results suggest that graph theoretical analysis of ACZ-induced changes in the topology of the CBFcorr networks allows the identification of subtle network-related CVR alterations in MCI, which couldn't be detected by the standard approach.

  2. Mellin-Barnes meets Method of Brackets: a novel approach to Mellin-Barnes representations of Feynman integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausa, Mario [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    In this paper, we present a new approach to the construction of Mellin-Barnes representations for Feynman integrals inspired by the Method of Brackets. The novel technique is helpful to lower the dimensionality of Mellin-Barnes representations in complicated cases, some examples are given. (orig.)

  3. Trend Motif: A Graph Mining Approach for Analysis of Dynamic Complex Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R; McCallen, S; Almaas, E

    2007-05-28

    Complex networks have been used successfully in scientific disciplines ranging from sociology to microbiology to describe systems of interacting units. Until recently, studies of complex networks have mainly focused on their network topology. However, in many real world applications, the edges and vertices have associated attributes that are frequently represented as vertex or edge weights. Furthermore, these weights are often not static, instead changing with time and forming a time series. Hence, to fully understand the dynamics of the complex network, we have to consider both network topology and related time series data. In this work, we propose a motif mining approach to identify trend motifs for such purposes. Simply stated, a trend motif describes a recurring subgraph where each of its vertices or edges displays similar dynamics over a userdefined period. Given this, each trend motif occurrence can help reveal significant events in a complex system; frequent trend motifs may aid in uncovering dynamic rules of change for the system, and the distribution of trend motifs may characterize the global dynamics of the system. Here, we have developed efficient mining algorithms to extract trend motifs. Our experimental validation using three disparate empirical datasets, ranging from the stock market, world trade, to a protein interaction network, has demonstrated the efficiency and effectiveness of our approach.

  4. Hierarchy of modular graph identities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Hoker, Eric; Kaidi, Justin [Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy,University of California,Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-11-09

    The low energy expansion of Type II superstring amplitudes at genus one is organized in terms of modular graph functions associated with Feynman graphs of a conformal scalar field on the torus. In earlier work, surprising identities between two-loop graphs at all weights, and between higher-loop graphs of weights four and five were constructed. In the present paper, these results are generalized in two complementary directions. First, all identities at weight six and all dihedral identities at weight seven are obtained and proven. Whenever the Laurent polynomial at the cusp is available, the form of these identities confirms the pattern by which the vanishing of the Laurent polynomial governs the full modular identity. Second, the family of modular graph functions is extended to include all graphs with derivative couplings and worldsheet fermions. These extended families of modular graph functions are shown to obey a hierarchy of inhomogeneous Laplace eigenvalue equations. The eigenvalues are calculated analytically for the simplest infinite sub-families and obtained by Maple for successively more complicated sub-families. The spectrum is shown to consist solely of eigenvalues s(s−1) for positive integers s bounded by the weight, with multiplicities which exhibit rich representation-theoretic patterns.

  5. Retrospective 4D MR image construction from free-breathing slice Acquisitions: A novel graph-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C; Wu, Caiyun; McDonough, Joseph M; Mong, David A; Campbell, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic or 4D imaging of the thorax has many applications. Both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed for 4D imaging via CT and MRI. For pediatric imaging, due to radiation concerns, MRI becomes the de facto modality of choice. In thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), patients often suffer from extreme malformations of the chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine with inability of the thorax to support normal respiration or lung growth (Campbell et al., 2003, Campbell and Smith, 2007), as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort and interference with the breathing mechanism itself. Therefore (ventilator-supported) free-breathing MRI acquisition is currently the best choice for imaging these patients. This, however, raises a question of how to create a consistent 4D image from such acquisitions. This paper presents a novel graph-based technique for compiling the best 4D image volume representing the thorax over one respiratory cycle from slice images acquired during unencumbered natural tidal-breathing of pediatric TIS patients. In our approach, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles which yields over 2000 slices. A weighted graph is formed where each acquired slice constitutes a node and the weight of the arc between two nodes defines the degree of contiguity in space and time of the two slices. For each respiratory phase, an optimal 3D spatial image is constructed by finding the best path in the graph in the spatial direction. The set of all such 3D images for a given respiratory cycle constitutes a 4D image. Subsequently, the best 4D image among all such constructed images is found over all imaged respiratory cycles. Two types of evaluation studies are carried out to understand the behavior of this algorithm and in

  6. Belief propagation and loop series on planar graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chertkov, Michael; Teodorescu, Razvan; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2008-01-01

    We discuss a generic model of Bayesian inference with binary variables defined on edges of a planar graph. The Loop Calculus approach of Chertkov and Chernyak (2006 Phys. Rev. E 73 065102(R) [cond-mat/0601487]; 2006 J. Stat. Mech. P06009 [cond-mat/0603189]) is used to evaluate the resulting series expansion for the partition function. We show that, for planar graphs, truncating the series at single-connected loops reduces, via a map reminiscent of the Fisher transformation (Fisher 1961 Phys. Rev. 124 1664), to evaluating the partition function of the dimer-matching model on an auxiliary planar graph. Thus, the truncated series can be easily re-summed, using the Pfaffian formula of Kasteleyn (1961 Physics 27 1209). This allows us to identify a big class of computationally tractable planar models reducible to a dimer model via the Belief Propagation (gauge) transformation. The Pfaffian representation can also be extended to the full Loop Series, in which case the expansion becomes a sum of Pfaffian contributions, each associated with dimer matchings on an extension to a subgraph of the original graph. Algorithmic consequences of the Pfaffian representation, as well as relations to quantum and non-planar models, are discussed

  7. Graphs with few eigenvalues. An interplay between combinatorics and algebra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    Two standard matrix representations of a graph are the adjacency matrix and the Laplace matrix. The eigenvalues of these matrices are interesting parameters of the graph. Graphs with few eigenvalues in general have nice combinatorial properties and a rich structure. A well investigated family of

  8. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Diestel, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    This standard textbook of modern graph theory, now in its fifth edition, combines the authority of a classic with the engaging freshness of style that is the hallmark of active mathematics. It covers the core material of the subject with concise yet reliably complete proofs, while offering glimpses of more advanced methods in each field by one or two deeper results, again with proofs given in full detail. The book can be used as a reliable text for an introductory course, as a graduate text, and for self-study. From the reviews: “This outstanding book cannot be substituted with any other book on the present textbook market. It has every chance of becoming the standard textbook for graph theory.”Acta Scientiarum Mathematiciarum “Deep, clear, wonderful. This is a serious book about the heart of graph theory. It has depth and integrity. ”Persi Diaconis & Ron Graham, SIAM Review “The book has received a very enthusiastic reception, which it amply deserves. A masterly elucidation of modern graph theo...

  9. Tracking and graph-cut based approach for panoramic background construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaeieslam, Mohammad Javad; Soryani, Mohsen; Fathy, Mahmood

    2013-10-01

    An efficient method is presented for extracting motion behaviors and contours of moving objects in a wide view and for creating panoramic background. In the field of making panorama, the main goal of existing methods is to create a pleasing wide view. For this purpose, such methods do not track moving objects. They attempt to find optimal seams so that the result does not contain cut objects or blurring. Hence, moving objects are removed, repeated, or placed in an arbitrary location in the final panoramic image. We expand panorama applications from artistic views to surveillance usages. To investigate moving object behavior, the proposed method attempts to find correspondences between positions of a moving object in different selected frames by using SIFT features. It also presents a new approach to combine various types of information in order to extract the exact boundary of moving objects in moving cameras. The required information is obtained from the moving object's corresponding areas in other frames. Experiments were arranged to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of this method. The results show that this method, which uses fewer frames, is able to create better panoramic background compared with the existing methods.

  10. Developmental psycholinguistics teaches us that we need multi-method, not single-method, approaches to the study of linguistic representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Caroline F; Monaghan, Padraic

    2017-01-01

    In developmental psycholinguistics, we have, for many years, been generating and testing theories that propose both descriptions of adult representations and explanations of how those representations develop. We have learnt that restricting ourselves to any one methodology yields only incomplete data about the nature of linguistic representations. We argue that we need a multi-method approach to the study of representation.

  11. A framework for graph-based synthesis, analysis, and visualization of HPC cluster job data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayo, Jackson R.; Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.; Wong, Matthew H.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Gentile, Ann C.; Thompson, David C.; Roe, Diana C.; De Sapio, Vincent; Brandt, James M.

    2010-08-01

    The monitoring and system analysis of high performance computing (HPC) clusters is of increasing importance to the HPC community. Analysis of HPC job data can be used to characterize system usage and diagnose and examine failure modes and their effects. This analysis is not straightforward, however, due to the complex relationships that exist between jobs. These relationships are based on a number of factors, including shared compute nodes between jobs, proximity of jobs in time, etc. Graph-based techniques represent an approach that is particularly well suited to this problem, and provide an effective technique for discovering important relationships in job queuing and execution data. The efficacy of these techniques is rooted in the use of a semantic graph as a knowledge representation tool. In a semantic graph job data, represented in a combination of numerical and textual forms, can be flexibly processed into edges, with corresponding weights, expressing relationships between jobs, nodes, users, and other relevant entities. This graph-based representation permits formal manipulation by a number of analysis algorithms. This report presents a methodology and software implementation that leverages semantic graph-based techniques for the system-level monitoring and analysis of HPC clusters based on job queuing and execution data. Ontology development and graph synthesis is discussed with respect to the domain of HPC job data. The framework developed automates the synthesis of graphs from a database of job information. It also provides a front end, enabling visualization of the synthesized graphs. Additionally, an analysis engine is incorporated that provides performance analysis, graph-based clustering, and failure prediction capabilities for HPC systems.

  12. AGM: A DSL for mobile cloud computing based on directed graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanković, Nikola; Grbac, Tihana Galinac

    2016-06-01

    This paper summarizes a novel approach for consuming a domain specific language (DSL) by transforming it to a directed graph representation persisted by a graph database. Using such specialized database enables advanced navigation trough the stored model exposing only relevant subsets of meta-data to different involved services and components. We applied this approach in a mobile cloud computing system and used it to model several mobile applications in retail, supply chain management and merchandising domain. These application are distributed in a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) fashion and used by thousands of customers in Croatia. We report on lessons learned and propose further research on this topic.

  13. Visual exploratory search of relationship graphs on smartphones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianquan Ouyang

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel framework for Visual Exploratory Search of Relationship Graphs on Smartphones (VESRGS that is composed of three major components: inference and representation of semantic relationship graphs on the Web via meta-search, visual exploratory search of relationship graphs through both querying and browsing strategies, and human-computer interactions via the multi-touch interface and mobile Internet on smartphones. In comparison with traditional lookup search methodologies, the proposed VESRGS system is characterized with the following perceived advantages. 1 It infers rich semantic relationships between the querying keywords and other related concepts from large-scale meta-search results from Google, Yahoo! and Bing search engines, and represents semantic relationships via graphs; 2 the exploratory search approach empowers users to naturally and effectively explore, adventure and discover knowledge in a rich information world of interlinked relationship graphs in a personalized fashion; 3 it effectively takes the advantages of smartphones' user-friendly interfaces and ubiquitous Internet connection and portability. Our extensive experimental results have demonstrated that the VESRGS framework can significantly improve the users' capability of seeking the most relevant relationship information to their own specific needs. We envision that the VESRGS framework can be a starting point for future exploration of novel, effective search strategies in the mobile Internet era.

  14. Visual exploratory search of relationship graphs on smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jianquan; Zheng, Hao; Kong, Fanbin; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for Visual Exploratory Search of Relationship Graphs on Smartphones (VESRGS) that is composed of three major components: inference and representation of semantic relationship graphs on the Web via meta-search, visual exploratory search of relationship graphs through both querying and browsing strategies, and human-computer interactions via the multi-touch interface and mobile Internet on smartphones. In comparison with traditional lookup search methodologies, the proposed VESRGS system is characterized with the following perceived advantages. 1) It infers rich semantic relationships between the querying keywords and other related concepts from large-scale meta-search results from Google, Yahoo! and Bing search engines, and represents semantic relationships via graphs; 2) the exploratory search approach empowers users to naturally and effectively explore, adventure and discover knowledge in a rich information world of interlinked relationship graphs in a personalized fashion; 3) it effectively takes the advantages of smartphones' user-friendly interfaces and ubiquitous Internet connection and portability. Our extensive experimental results have demonstrated that the VESRGS framework can significantly improve the users' capability of seeking the most relevant relationship information to their own specific needs. We envision that the VESRGS framework can be a starting point for future exploration of novel, effective search strategies in the mobile Internet era.

  15. A MULTISCALE APPROACH TO THE REPRESENTATION OF 3D IMAGES, WITH APPLICATION TO POLYMER SOLAR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Thiedmann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A multiscale approach to the description of geometrically complex 3D image data is proposed which distinguishes between morphological features on a ‘macro-scale’ and a ‘micro-scale’. Since our method is mainly tailored to nanostructures observed in composite materials consisting of two different phases, an appropriate binarization of grayscale images is required first. Then, a morphological smoothing is applied to extract the structural information from binarized image data on the ‘macro-scale’. A stochastic algorithm is developed for the morphologically smoothed images whose goal is to find a suitable representation of the macro-scale structure by unions of overlapping spheres. Such representations can be interpreted as marked point patterns. They lead to an enormous reduction of data and allow the application of well-known tools from point-process theory for their analysis and structural modeling. All those voxels which have been ‘misspecified’ by the morphological smoothing and subsequent representation by unions of overlapping spheres are interpreted as ‘micro-scale’ structure. The exemplary data sets considered in this paper are 3D grayscale images of photoactive layers in hybrid solar cells gained by electron tomography. These composite materials consist of two phases: a polymer phase and a zinc oxide phase. The macro-scale structure of the latter is represented by unions of overlapping spheres.

  16. EliXR: an approach to eligibility criteria extraction and representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoying; Luo, Zhihui; Boland, Mary Regina; Theodoratos, Dimitri; Johnson, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a semantic representation for clinical research eligibility criteria to automate semistructured information extraction from eligibility criteria text. Materials and Methods An analysis pipeline called eligibility criteria extraction and representation (EliXR) was developed that integrates syntactic parsing and tree pattern mining to discover common semantic patterns in 1000 eligibility criteria randomly selected from http://ClinicalTrials.gov. The semantic patterns were aggregated and enriched with unified medical language systems semantic knowledge to form a semantic representation for clinical research eligibility criteria. Results The authors arrived at 175 semantic patterns, which form 12 semantic role labels connected by their frequent semantic relations in a semantic network. Evaluation Three raters independently annotated all the sentence segments (N=396) for 79 test eligibility criteria using the 12 top-level semantic role labels. Eight-six per cent (339) of the sentence segments were unanimously labelled correctly and 13.8% (55) were correctly labelled by two raters. The Fleiss' κ was 0.88, indicating a nearly perfect interrater agreement. Conclusion This study present a semi-automated data-driven approach to developing a semantic network that aligns well with the top-level information structure in clinical research eligibility criteria text and demonstrates the feasibility of using the resulting semantic role labels to generate semistructured eligibility criteria with nearly perfect interrater reliability. PMID:21807647

  17. ARCRANGE AND ARCSEER: PRESENTING A NEW APPROACH TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT AND REPRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lynam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach to archaeological data management and representation. The archaeological discipline has struggled to come to terms with the representational demands imposed by the adoption of post-processualist theoretical methodologies. The traditional canon of representational device that has served the positivist frameworks so well in the past has been found wanting when used to present post-processualism's doubt, multivocality, multisensory experience and general reflexivity. This paper presents a new set of data management and visualisation digital tools that seek to address these shortcomings. ArcRange is a backend data management solution that provides easy and powerful manipulation of the varied forms that make up modern archaeological datasets. ArcSeer is a data visualisation tool which uses 3D technology to represent datasets in a more naturalistic or phenomenological way. ArcSeer accesses its data by interfacing with ArcRange. This paper will present an overview of the combined operation of both of these new systems using the test datasets of the Cretan sites of Petsofa and Priniatikos Pyrgos by way of illustration.

  18. Maximal outerplanar graphs as chordal graphs, path-neighborhood graphs, and triangle graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Laskar (R.C.); H.M. Mulder (Martyn); B. Novick (Beth)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMaximal outerplanar graphs are characterized using three different classes of graphs. A path-neighborhood graph is a connected graph in which every neighborhood induces a path. The triangle graph $T(G)$ has the triangles of the graph $G$ as its vertices, two of these being adjacent

  19. Extending peripersonal space representation without tool-use: evidence from a combined behavioural-computational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eSerino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stimuli from different sensory modalities occurring on or close to the body are integrated in a multisensory representation of the space surrounding the body, i.e. peripersonal space (PPS. PPS dynamically modifies depending on experience, e.g. it extends after using a tool to reach far objects. However, the neural mechanism underlying PPS plasticity after tool use is largely unknown. Here we use a combined computational-behavioural approach to propose and test a possible mechanism accounting for PPS extension. We first present a neural network model simulating audio-tactile representation in the PPS around one hand. Simulation experiments showed that our model reproduced the main property of PPS neurons, i.e. selective multisensory response for stimuli occurring close to the hand. We used the neural network model to simulate the effects of a tool-use training. In terms of sensory inputs, tool use was conceptualized as a concurrent tactile stimulation from the hand, due to holding the tool, and an auditory stimulation from the far space, due to tool-mediated action. Results showed that after exposure to those inputs, PPS neurons responded also to multisensory stimuli far from the hand. The model thus suggests that synchronous pairing of tactile hand stimulation and auditory stimulation from the far space is sufficient to extend PPS, such as after tool-use. Such prediction was confirmed by a behavioural experiment, where we used an audio-tactile interaction paradigm to measure the boundaries of PPS representation. We found that PPS extended after synchronous tactile-hand stimulation and auditory-far stimulation in a group of healthy volunteers. Control experiments both in simulation and behavioural settings showed that asynchronous tactile and auditory inputs did not change PPS. We conclude by proposing a biological-plausible model to explain plasticity in PPS representation after tool-use, supported by computational and behavioural data.

  20. Box graphs and singular fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hirotaka; Lawrie, Craig; Morrison, David R.; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura

    2014-01-01

    We determine the higher codimension fibers of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau fourfolds with section by studying the three-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric gauge theory with matter which describes the low energy effective theory of M-theory compactified on the associated Weierstrass model, a singular model of the fourfold. Each phase of the Coulomb branch of this theory corresponds to a particular resolution of the Weierstrass model, and we show that these have a concise description in terms of decorated box graphs based on the representation graph of the matter multiplets, or alternatively by a class of convex paths on said graph. Transitions between phases have a simple interpretation as “flopping' of the path, and in the geometry correspond to actual flop transitions. This description of the phases enables us to enumerate and determine the entire network between them, with various matter representations for all reductive Lie groups. Furthermore, we observe that each network of phases carries the structure of a (quasi-)minuscule representation of a specific Lie algebra. Interpreted from a geometric point of view, this analysis determines the generators of the cone of effective curves as well as the network of flop transitions between crepant resolutions of singular elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds. From the box graphs we determine all fiber types in codimensions two and three, and we find new, non-Kodaira, fiber types for E 6 , E 7 and E 8

  1. Cutting Materials in Half: A Graph Theory Approach for Generating Crystal Surfaces and Its Prediction of 2D Zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witman, Matthew; Ling, Sanliang; Boyd, Peter; Barthel, Senja; Haranczyk, Maciej; Slater, Ben; Smit, Berend

    2018-02-28

    Scientific interest in two-dimensional (2D) materials, ranging from graphene and other single layer materials to atomically thin crystals, is quickly increasing for a large variety of technological applications. While in silico design approaches have made a large impact in the study of 3D crystals, algorithms designed to discover atomically thin 2D materials from their parent 3D materials are by comparison more sparse. We hypothesize that determining how to cut a 3D material in half (i.e., which Miller surface is formed) by severing a minimal number of bonds or a minimal amount of total bond energy per unit area can yield insight into preferred crystal faces. We answer this question by implementing a graph theory technique to mathematically formalize the enumeration of minimum cut surfaces of crystals. While the algorithm is generally applicable to different classes of materials, we focus on zeolitic materials due to their diverse structural topology and because 2D zeolites have promising catalytic and separation performance compared to their 3D counterparts. We report here a simple descriptor based only on structural information that predicts whether a zeolite is likely to be synthesizable in the 2D form and correctly identifies the expressed surface in known layered 2D zeolites. The discovery of this descriptor allows us to highlight other zeolites that may also be synthesized in the 2D form that have not been experimentally realized yet. Finally, our method is general since the mathematical formalism can be applied to find the minimum cut surfaces of other crystallographic materials such as metal-organic frameworks, covalent-organic frameworks, zeolitic-imidazolate frameworks, metal oxides, etc.

  2. Bond graph modeling of centrifugal compression systems

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Nur; Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to model unsteady fluid dynamics in a compressor network by using a bond graph is presented. The model is intended in particular for compressor control system development. First, we develop a bond graph model of a single compression system. Bond graph modeling offers a different perspective to previous work by modeling the compression system based on energy flow instead of fluid dynamics. Analyzing the bond graph model explains the energy flow during compressor surge. Two pri...

  3. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with…

  4. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    This introduction to graph theory focuses on well-established topics, covering primary techniques and including both algorithmic and theoretical problems. The algorithms are presented with a minimum of advanced data structures and programming details. This thoroughly corrected 1988 edition provides insights to computer scientists as well as advanced undergraduates and graduate students of topology, algebra, and matrix theory. Fundamental concepts and notation and elementary properties and operations are the first subjects, followed by examinations of paths and searching, trees, and networks. S

  5. Graphs & digraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Chartrand, Gary; Zhang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Gary Chartrand has influenced the world of Graph Theory for almost half a century. He has supervised more than a score of Ph.D. dissertations and written several books on the subject. The most widely known of these texts, Graphs and Digraphs, … has much to recommend it, with clear exposition, and numerous challenging examples [that] make it an ideal textbook for the advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate course. The authors have updated their notation to reflect the current practice in this still-growing area of study. By the authors' estimation, the 5th edition is approximately 50% longer than the 4th edition. … the legendary Frank Harary, author of the second graph theory text ever produced, is one of the figures profiled. His book was the standard in the discipline for several decades. Chartrand, Lesniak and Zhang have produced a worthy successor.-John T. Saccoman, MAA Reviews, June 2012 (This book is in the MAA's basic library list.)As with the earlier editions, the current text emphasizes clear...

  6. First Reformulated Zagreb Indices of Some Classes of Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kaladevi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A topological index of a graph is a parameter related to the graph; it does not depend on labeling or pictorial representation of the graph. Graph operations plays a vital role to analyze the structure and properties of a large graph which is derived from the smaller graphs. The Zagreb indices are the important topological indices found to have the applications in Quantitative Structure Property Relationship(QSPR and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship(QSAR studies as well. There are various study of different versions of Zagreb indices. One of the most important Zagreb indices is the reformulated Zagreb index which is used in QSPR study.In this paper, we obtain the first reformulated Zagreb indices of some derived graphs such as double graph, extended double graph, thorn graph, subdivision vertex corona graph, subdivision graph and triangle parallel graph. In addition, we compute the first reformulated Zagreb indices of two important transformation graphs such as the generalized transformation graph and generalized Mycielskian graph.

  7. Large networks and graph limits

    CERN Document Server

    Lovász, László

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it became apparent that a large number of the most interesting structures and phenomena of the world can be described by networks. Developing a mathematical theory of very large networks is an important challenge. This book describes one recent approach to this theory, the limit theory of graphs, which has emerged over the last decade. The theory has rich connections with other approaches to the study of large networks, such as "property testing" in computer science and regularity partition in graph theory. It has several applications in extremal graph theory, including the exact for

  8. Graph theory and combinatorial optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Odile; Avis, David

    2006-01-01

    A current treatment of cutting-edge topics in Graph Theory and Combinatorial Optimization by leading researchersIncludes heuristic advances and novel approaches to solving combinatorial optimization problems.

  9. CHARACTERISATION OF REGULAR GRAPHS AS LOOP GRAPHS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There have been various generalisations of Cayley graphs, prototypes of transitive graphs. The most generalised is the description of graphs on general groupoids. What has clearly emerged in this exercise is that the philosophy of constructing graphs on groupoids offers a fruitful avenue from which we may understand ...

  10. De Bruijn graphs and DNA graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pendavingh, Rudi; Schuurman, Petra; Woeginger, Gerhard; Brandstädt, Andreas; Le, Van Bang

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we prove the NP-hardness of various recognition problems for subgraphs of De Bruijn graphs. In particular, the recognition of DNA graphs is shown to be NP-hard; DNA graphs are the vertex induced subgraphs of De Bruijn graphs over a four letter alphabet. As a consequence, two open

  11. Design-Time Improvement Using a Functional Approach to Specify GraphSLAM with Deterministic Performance on an FPGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel, Robin; Folmer, Hendrik Hendrikus; Kuper, Jan; Wester, Rinse; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2017-01-01

    SLAM is a fundamental problem in robotics that can be solved by a set of algorithms that are known to have large computational complexity. GraphSLAM contains a rapidly growing system of equations which are often solved by sparse evaluation techniques. This paper proposes a technique to evaluate

  12. A Structure-graph Approach to Diagnosis and Control Reconfiguration Design - exemplified by Station-keeping Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the design process of diagnosis and fault-tolerant control when a system should operate despite multiple failures in sensors or actuators. Graph-theory based analysis of system's structure is demonstrated to be a unique design methodology that can cope with the diagnosis desi...

  13. Colored graphs and matrix integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamkin, I.V.

    2007-12-01

    In this article we discuss two different asymptotic expansions of matrix integrals. The original approach using the so-called Feynman diagram techniques leads to sums over isomorphism classes of ribbon graphs. Asymptotic expansions of more general Gaussian integrals are sums over isomorphism classes of colored graphs without ribbon structure. Here we derive the former expansion from the latter one. This provides an independent proof for the expansion used by Kontsevich. It might be very interesting to compare the algebra arising in these two approaches. The asymptotic expansion using ribbon graphs leads to the tau function of the KDV hierarchy while the sums over colored graphs satisfy simple partial differential equations which generalize the Burgers equation. We describe the general approach using colored graphs in the second section. In the third section we specialize the results of the second section for the matrix integral. In this section we also derive the expansion over ribbon graphs. The proof is based on simple topological considerations which are contained in section 5. In the last section we give an explicit calculation of the first term of the expansion using colored graphs

  14. Integrating graph partitioning and matching for trajectory analysis in video surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang; Lu, Yongyi; Pan, Yan; Chen, Xiaowu

    2012-12-01

    In order to track moving objects in long range against occlusion, interruption, and background clutter, this paper proposes a unified approach for global trajectory analysis. Instead of the traditional frame-by-frame tracking, our method recovers target trajectories based on a short sequence of video frames, e.g., 15 frames. We initially calculate a foreground map at each frame obtained from a state-of-the-art background model. An attribute graph is then extracted from the foreground map, where the graph vertices are image primitives represented by the composite features. With this graph representation, we pose trajectory analysis as a joint task of spatial graph partitioning and temporal graph matching. The task can be formulated by maximizing a posteriori under the Bayesian framework, in which we integrate the spatio-temporal contexts and the appearance models. The probabilistic inference is achieved by a data-driven Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Given a period of observed frames, the algorithm simulates an ergodic and aperiodic Markov chain, and it visits a sequence of solution states in the joint space of spatial graph partitioning and temporal graph matching. In the experiments, our method is tested on several challenging videos from the public datasets of visual surveillance, and it outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.

  15. Graphic Symbol Recognition using Graph Based Signature and Bayesian Network Classifier

    OpenAIRE

    Luqman, Muhammad Muzzamil; Brouard, Thierry; Ramel, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    We present a new approach for recognition of complex graphic symbols in technical documents. Graphic symbol recognition is a well known challenge in the field of document image analysis and is at heart of most graphic recognition systems. Our method uses structural approach for symbol representation and statistical classifier for symbol recognition. In our system we represent symbols by their graph based signatures: a graphic symbol is vectorized and is converted to an attributed relational g...

  16. The question of representation in the psychoanalytical and cognitive-behavioural approaches. Some theoretical aspects and therapy considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eDe Timary

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the cognitive-behavioural and psychoanalytical approaches with respect to the way in which each of them conceives of representation and deals with the issues that this involves. In both of them conscious and latent (unconscious representations play a crucial role. Highlighting similarities and differences facilitate communication on a theoretical level but also prove helpful to the clinical practitioners involved. We try to put forward an attempt at comparison, with the idea of going beyond the -- obviously important -- differences in vocabulary. In this attempt at comparison, we have successively compared the definitions of representation and the respective therapeutic interventions proposed by each approach. There are no doubt many overlapping elements in the way in which the workings of the mind are conceived of in these approaches, particularly as regards their links with affects. We next developed the implications of representation deficits in pathology, suggesting the important role played by elements that are avoided, suppressed from memory or repressed, and with respect to the need to treat such material in a specific manner so as to ensure some progress as to the symptoms presented. We finally summarized common and distinct aspects of the two perspectives. The very fact that two approaches that follow very distinct methodologies reach the same conclusion concerning the importance of distortions and failures of representation in generating mental distress strengthens, in our view, the epistemological reliability of the role of representation in psychopathology.

  17. Using Canonical Forms for Isomorphism Reduction in Graph-based Model Checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, Gijs

    Graph isomorphism checking can be used in graph-based model checking to achieve symmetry reduction. Instead of one-to-one comparing the graph representations of states, canonical forms of state graphs can be computed. These canonical forms can be used to store and compare states. However, computing

  18. Profile of Students’ Mental Model Change on Law Concepts Archimedes as Impact of Multi-Representation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, M.; Hamidah, I.; Suwarma, I. R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper outlined the results of an experimental study on the effects of multi-representation approach in learning Archimedes Law on students’ mental model improvement. The multi-representation techniques implemented in the study were verbal, pictorial, mathematical, and graphical representations. Students’ mental model was classified into three levels, i.e. scientific, synthetic, and initial levels, based on the students’ level of understanding. The present study employed the pre-experimental methodology, using one group pretest-posttest design. The subject of the study was 32 eleventh grade students in a Public Senior High School in Riau Province. The research instrument included model mental test on hydrostatic pressure concept, in the form of essay test judged by experts. The findings showed that there was positive change in students’ mental model, indicating that multi-representation approach was effective to improve students’ mental model.

  19. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Diestel, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    HauptbeschreibungThis standard textbook of modern graph theory, now in its fourth edition, combinesthe authority of a classic with the engaging freshness of style that is the hallmarkof active mathematics. It covers the core material of the subject with concise yetreliably complete proofs, while offering glimpses of more advanced methodsin each field by one or two deeper results, again with proofs given in full detail.The book can be used as a reliable text for an introductory course, as a graduatetext, and for self-study. Rezension"Deep, clear, wonderful. This is a serious book about the

  20. [Interest of a mental representation approach to the disclosure of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Saint-Péron, Laurie; Barrelon, Marie-Odile; Richard-Mornas, Aurélie

    2014-09-01

    This paper explores the mental representation of Alzheimer disease (AD) by assessing the number of words given by the subjects when asked to quickly write seven words characterizing AD in three groups of subjects: 22 caregivers, 22 professional informants, and 28 naïve subjects. The generated words were classified into six dimensions: memory, other neuropsychological impairments, behavioral disorders, consequences on caregiver relationships, familial and social changes, and health. AD mental representation was clearly negative in the three groups and did not differ between groups. Memory was the most frequent dimension reported in all groups with 78 quoted words (20.1% of responses). However the hierarchical classification of the dimensions differed in the three groups. The caregivers reported more words related to social and familial changes. Social and familial modifications, and behavioral changes were first reported by the professionals. The naïve subjects firstly quoted words concerning memory and others neuropsychological deficits. However, naïve subjects who had previously be in contact with AD patients mainly reported words about behavior changes. Actually, naïve subjects are not fully naïve because the clinical aspects of the disease are currently well known in the general population. Families and professional informants reported that AD familial and social changes had a deeper impact than cognitive or behavioral aspects. This preliminary study suggests that AD mental representation is the same in the general population, but the weight of the different dimensions affecting AD differed between subjects concerned or not by the disease (family or professional versus naïve subjects). Therefore, the weight of the different dimensions is to be taken into account for a better approach of the disclosure of AD diagnosis.

  1. Mothers' and fathers' attachment and caregiving representations during transition to parenthood: an actor-partner approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana; Nazaré, Bárbara; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2018-03-19

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of one's attachment representations on one's and the partner's caregiving representations. According to attachment theory, individual differences in parenting and caregiving behaviours may be a function of parents' caregiving representations of the self as caregiver, and of others as worthy of care, which are rooted on parents' attachment representations. Furthermore, the care-seeking and caregiving interactions that occur within the couple relationship may also shape individuals' caregiving representations. The sample comprised 286 cohabiting couples who were assessed during pregnancy (attachment representations) and one month post-birth (caregiving representations). Path analyses were used to examine effects among variables. Results showed that for mothers and fathers, their own more insecure attachment representations predicted their less positive caregiving representations of the self as caregiver and of others as worthy of help and more self-focused motivations for caregiving. Moreover, fathers' attachment representations were found to predict mothers' caregiving representations of themselves as caregivers. Secure attachment representations of both members of the couple seem to be an inner resource promoting parents' positive representations of caregiving, and should be assessed and fostered during the transition to parenthood in both members of the couple.

  2. Graph limits and hereditary properties

    OpenAIRE

    Janson, Svante

    2011-01-01

    We collect some general results on graph limits associated to hereditary classes of graphs. As examples, we consider some classes defined by forbidden subgraphs and some classes of intersection graphs, including triangle-free graphs, chordal graphs, cographs, interval graphs, unit interval graphs, threshold graphs, and line graphs.

  3. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  4. Quick Mining of Isomorphic Exact Large Patterns from Large Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Almasri, Islam

    2014-12-01

    The applications of the sub graph isomorphism search are growing with the growing number of areas that model their systems using graphs or networks. Specifically, many biological systems, such as protein interaction networks, molecular structures and protein contact maps, are modeled as graphs. The sub graph isomorphism search is concerned with finding all sub graphs that are isomorphic to a relevant query graph, the existence of such sub graphs can reflect on the characteristics of the modeled system. The most computationally expensive step in the search for isomorphic sub graphs is the backtracking algorithm that traverses the nodes of the target graph. In this paper, we propose a pruning approach that is inspired by the minimum remaining value heuristic that achieves greater scalability over large query and target graphs. Our testing on various biological networks shows that performance enhancement of our approach over existing state-of-the-art approaches varies between 6x and 53x. © 2014 IEEE.

  5. DDR: Efficient computational method to predict drug–target interactions using graph mining and machine learning approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Olayan, Rawan S.

    2017-11-23

    Motivation Finding computationally drug-target interactions (DTIs) is a convenient strategy to identify new DTIs at low cost with reasonable accuracy. However, the current DTI prediction methods suffer the high false positive prediction rate. Results We developed DDR, a novel method that improves the DTI prediction accuracy. DDR is based on the use of a heterogeneous graph that contains known DTIs with multiple similarities between drugs and multiple similarities between target proteins. DDR applies non-linear similarity fusion method to combine different similarities. Before fusion, DDR performs a pre-processing step where a subset of similarities is selected in a heuristic process to obtain an optimized combination of similarities. Then, DDR applies a random forest model using different graph-based features extracted from the DTI heterogeneous graph. Using five repeats of 10-fold cross-validation, three testing setups, and the weighted average of area under the precision-recall curve (AUPR) scores, we show that DDR significantly reduces the AUPR score error relative to the next best start-of-the-art method for predicting DTIs by 34% when the drugs are new, by 23% when targets are new, and by 34% when the drugs and the targets are known but not all DTIs between them are not known. Using independent sources of evidence, we verify as correct 22 out of the top 25 DDR novel predictions. This suggests that DDR can be used as an efficient method to identify correct DTIs.

  6. Distributed representations of action sequences in anterior cingulate cortex: A recurrent neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazian, Danesh; Holroyd, Clay B

    2018-02-01

    Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been the subject of intense debate over the past 2 decades, but its specific computational function remains controversial. Here we present a simple computational model of ACC that incorporates distributed representations across a network of interconnected processing units. Based on the proposal that ACC is concerned with the execution of extended, goal-directed action sequences, we trained a recurrent neural network to predict each successive step of several sequences associated with multiple tasks. In keeping with neurophysiological observations from nonhuman animals, the network yields distributed patterns of activity across ACC neurons that track the progression of each sequence, and in keeping with human neuroimaging data, the network produces discrepancy signals when any step of the sequence deviates from the predicted step. These simulations illustrate a novel approach for investigating ACC function.

  7. Incorporating representation of agricultural ecosystems and management within a dynamic biosphere model: Approach, validation, and significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, C.

    2004-12-01

    At the scale of individual fields, crop models have long been used to examine the interactions between soils, vegetation, the atmosphere and human management, using varied levels of numerical sophistication. While previous efforts have contributed significantly towards the advancement of modeling tools, the models themselves are not typically applied across larger continental scales due to a lack of crucial data. Furthermore, many times crop models are used to study a single quantity, process, or cycle in isolation, limiting their value in considering the important tradeoffs between competing ecosystem services such as food production, water quality, and sequestered carbon. In response to the need for a more integrated agricultural modeling approach across the continental scale, an updated agricultural version of a dynamic biosphere model (IBIS) now integrates representations of land-surface physics and soil physics, canopy physiology, terrestrial carbon and nitrogen balance, crop phenology, solute transport, and farm management into a single framework. This version of the IBIS model (Agro-IBIS) uses a short 20 to 60-minute timestep to simulate the rapid exchange of energy, carbon, water, and momentum between soils, vegetative canopies, and the atmosphere. The model can be driven either by site-specific meteorological data or by gridded climate datasets. Mechanistic crop models for corn, soybean, and wheat use physiologically-based representations of leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and plant respiration. Model validation has been performed using a variety of temporal scale data collected at the following spatial scales: (1) the precision-agriculture scale (5 m), (2) the individual field experiment scale (AmeriFlux), and (3) regional and continental scales using annual USDA county-level yield data and monthly satellite (AVHRR) observations of vegetation characteristics at 0.5 degree resolution. To date, the model has been used with great success to

  8. Chromatic graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chartrand, Gary; Rosen, Kenneth H

    2008-01-01

    Beginning with the origin of the four color problem in 1852, the field of graph colorings has developed into one of the most popular areas of graph theory. Introducing graph theory with a coloring theme, Chromatic Graph Theory explores connections between major topics in graph theory and graph colorings as well as emerging topics. This self-contained book first presents various fundamentals of graph theory that lie outside of graph colorings, including basic terminology and results, trees and connectivity, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, matchings and factorizations, and graph embeddings. The remainder of the text deals exclusively with graph colorings. It covers vertex colorings and bounds for the chromatic number, vertex colorings of graphs embedded on surfaces, and a variety of restricted vertex colorings. The authors also describe edge colorings, monochromatic and rainbow edge colorings, complete vertex colorings, several distinguishing vertex and edge colorings, and many distance-related vertex coloring...

  9. Graph-based clustering and data visualization algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Vathy-Fogarassy, Ágnes

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a data visualization technique that combines graph-based topology representation and dimensionality reduction methods to visualize the intrinsic data structure in a low-dimensional vector space. The application of graphs in clustering and visualization has several advantages. A graph of important edges (where edges characterize relations and weights represent similarities or distances) provides a compact representation of the entire complex data set. This text describes clustering and visualization methods that are able to utilize information hidden in these graphs, based on

  10. Box graphs and resolutions I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas P. Braun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Box graphs succinctly and comprehensively characterize singular fibers of elliptic fibrations in codimension two and three, as well as flop transitions connecting these, in terms of representation theoretic data. We develop a framework that provides a systematic map between a box graph and a crepant algebraic resolution of the singular elliptic fibration, thus allowing an explicit construction of the fibers from a singular Weierstrass or Tate model. The key tool is what we call a fiber face diagram, which shows the relevant information of a (partial toric triangulation and allows the inclusion of more general algebraic blowups. We shown that each such diagram defines a sequence of weighted algebraic blowups, thus providing a realization of the fiber defined by the box graph in terms of an explicit resolution. We show this correspondence explicitly for the case of SU(5 by providing a map between box graphs and fiber faces, and thereby a sequence of algebraic resolutions of the Tate model, which realizes each of the box graphs.

  11. Hierarchical organisation of causal graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziopa, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a supervision system using a hierarchy of models formed by graphs, in which the variables are the nodes and the causal relations between the variables of the arcs. To obtain a representation of the variables evolutions which contains only the relevant features of their real evolutions, the causal relations are completed with qualitative transfer functions (QTFs) which produce roughly the behaviour of the classical transfer functions. Major improvements have been made in the building of the hierarchical organization. First, the basic variables of the uppermost level and the causal relations between them are chosen. The next graph is built by adding intermediary variables to the upper graph. When the undermost graph has been built, the transfer functions parameters corresponding to its causal relations are identified. The second task consists in the upwelling of the information from the undermost graph to the uppermost one. A fusion procedure of the causal relations has been designed to compute the QFTs relevant for each level. This procedure aims to reduce the number of parameters needed to represent an evolution at a high level of abstraction. These techniques have been applied to the hierarchical modelling of nuclear process. (authors). 8 refs., 12 figs

  12. Graph theory and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Jonathan L

    2006-01-01

    Gross and Yellen take a comprehensive approach to graph theory that integrates careful exposition of classical developments with emerging methods, models, and practical needs. Their unparalleled treatment provides a text ideal for a two-semester course and a variety of one-semester classes, from an introductory one-semester course to courses slanted toward classical graph theory, operations research, data structures and algorithms, or algebra and topology.

  13. Analytical Treatment of Higher-Order Graphs: A Path Ordinal Method for Solving Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kamal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Analytical treatment of the composition of higher-order graphs representing linear relations between variables is developed. A path formalism to deal with problems in graph theory is introduced. It is shown how paths in the composed graph representing individual contributions to variables relation can be enumerated and represented by ordinals. The method allows for one to extract partial information and gives an alternative to classical graph approach.

  14. On invariants of graphs related to quantum sl(2) at roots of unity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geer, Nathan; Reshetikhin, Nicolai

    2009-01-01

    We show how to define invariants of graphs related to quantum sl 2 when the graph has more then one connected component and components are colored by blocks of representations with zero quantum dimensions.......We show how to define invariants of graphs related to quantum sl 2 when the graph has more then one connected component and components are colored by blocks of representations with zero quantum dimensions....

  15. Proof-graphs for Minimal Implicational Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Quispe-Cruz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that the size of propositional classical proofs can be huge. Proof theoretical studies discovered exponential gaps between normal or cut free proofs and their respective non-normal proofs. The aim of this work is to study how to reduce the weight of propositional deductions. We present the formalism of proof-graphs for purely implicational logic, which are graphs of a specific shape that are intended to capture the logical structure of a deduction. The advantage of this formalism is that formulas can be shared in the reduced proof. In the present paper we give a precise definition of proof-graphs for the minimal implicational logic, together with a normalization procedure for these proof-graphs. In contrast to standard tree-like formalisms, our normalization does not increase the number of nodes, when applied to the corresponding minimal proof-graph representations.

  16. Disease management research using event graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allore, H G; Schruben, L W

    2000-08-01

    Event Graphs, conditional representations of stochastic relationships between discrete events, simulate disease dynamics. In this paper, we demonstrate how Event Graphs, at an appropriate abstraction level, also extend and organize scientific knowledge about diseases. They can identify promising treatment strategies and directions for further research and provide enough detail for testing combinations of new medicines and interventions. Event Graphs can be enriched to incorporate and validate data and test new theories to reflect an expanding dynamic scientific knowledge base and establish performance criteria for the economic viability of new treatments. To illustrate, an Event Graph is developed for mastitis, a costly dairy cattle disease, for which extensive scientific literature exists. With only a modest amount of imagination, the methodology presented here can be seen to apply modeling to any disease, human, plant, or animal. The Event Graph simulation presented here is currently being used in research and in a new veterinary epidemiology course. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Graph Mining Meets the Semantic Web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangkeun (Matt) [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today, data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. We address that need through implementation of three popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, and PageRank). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts. We evaluate the performance of our implementation on 6 real world data sets and show graph mining algorithms (that have a linear-algebra formulation) can indeed be unleashed on data represented as RDF graphs using the SPARQL query interface.

  18. On the centrality of vertices of molecular graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randić, Milan; Novič, Marjana; Vračko, Marjan; Plavšić, Dejan

    2013-11-05

    For acyclic systems the center of a graph has been known to be either a single vertex of two adjacent vertices, that is, an edge. It has not been quite clear how to extend the concept of graph center to polycyclic systems. Several approaches to the graph center of molecular graphs of polycyclic graphs have been proposed in the literature. In most cases alternative approaches, however, while being apparently equally plausible, gave the same results for many molecules, but occasionally they differ in their characterization of molecular center. In order to reduce the number of vertices that would qualify as forming the center of the graph, a hierarchy of rules have been considered in the search for graph centers. We reconsidered the problem of "the center of a graph" by using a novel concept of graph theory, the vertex "weights," defined by counting the number of pairs of vertices at the same distance from the vertex considered. This approach gives often the same results for graph centers of acyclic graphs as the standard definition of graph center based on vertex eccentricities. However, in some cases when two nonequivalent vertices have been found as graph center, the novel approach can discriminate between the two. The same approach applies to cyclic graphs without additional rules to locate the vertex or vertices forming the center of polycyclic graphs, vertices referred to as central vertices of a graph. In addition, the novel vertex "weights," in the case of acyclic, cyclic, and polycyclic graphs can be interpreted as vertex centralities, a measure for how close or distant vertices are from the center or central vertices of the graph. Besides illustrating the centralities of a number of smaller polycyclic graphs, we also report on several acyclic graphs showing the same centrality values of their vertices. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A clustering-based graph Laplacian framework for value function approximation in reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Huang, Zhenhua; Graves, Daniel; Pedrycz, Witold

    2014-12-01

    In order to deal with the sequential decision problems with large or continuous state spaces, feature representation and function approximation have been a major research topic in reinforcement learning (RL). In this paper, a clustering-based graph Laplacian framework is presented for feature representation and value function approximation (VFA) in RL. By making use of clustering-based techniques, that is, K-means clustering or fuzzy C-means clustering, a graph Laplacian is constructed by subsampling in Markov decision processes (MDPs) with continuous state spaces. The basis functions for VFA can be automatically generated from spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian. The clustering-based graph Laplacian is integrated with a class of approximation policy iteration algorithms called representation policy iteration (RPI) for RL in MDPs with continuous state spaces. Simulation and experimental results show that, compared with previous RPI methods, the proposed approach needs fewer sample points to compute an efficient set of basis functions and the learning control performance can be improved for a variety of parameter settings.

  20. Conceptual graph grammar--a simple formalism for sublanguage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S B

    1998-11-01

    There are a wide variety of computer applications that deal with various aspects of medical language: concept representation, controlled vocabulary, natural language processing, and information retrieval. While technical and theoretical methods appear to differ, all approaches investigate different aspects of the same phenomenon: medical sublanguage. This paper surveys the properties of medical sublanguage from a formal perspective, based on detailed analyses cited in the literature. A review of several computer systems based on sublanguage approaches shows some of the difficulties in addressing the interaction between the syntactic and semantic aspects of sublanguage. A formalism called Conceptual Graph Grammar is presented that attempts to combine both syntax and semantics into a single notation by extending standard Conceptual Graph notation. Examples from the domain of pathology diagnoses are provided to illustrate the use of this formalism in medical language analysis. The strengths and weaknesses of the approach are then considered. Conceptual Graph Grammar is an attempt to synthesize the common properties of different approaches to sublanguage into a single formalism, and to begin to define a common foundation for language-related research in medical informatics.

  1. Software for Graph Analysis and Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kolomeychenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the software for graph storage, analysis and visualization. The article presents a comparative analysis of existing software for analysis and visualization of graphs, describes the overall architecture of application and basic principles of construction and operation of the main modules. Furthermore, a description of the developed graph storage oriented to storage and processing of large-scale graphs is presented. The developed algorithm for finding communities and implemented algorithms of autolayouts of graphs are the main functionality of the product. The main advantage of the developed software is high speed processing of large size networks (up to millions of nodes and links. Moreover, the proposed graph storage architecture is unique and has no analogues. The developed approaches and algorithms are optimized for operating with big graphs and have high productivity.

  2. Triangle Counting in Dynamic Graph Streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulteau, Laurent; Froese, Vincent; Pagh, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the number of triangles in graph streams using a limited amount of memory has become a popular topic in the last decade. Different variations of the problem have been studied, depending on whether the graph edges are provided in an arbitrary order or as incidence lists. However......, with a few exceptions, the algorithms have considered insert-only streams. We present a new algorithm estimating the number of triangles in dynamic graph streams where edges can be both inserted and deleted. We show that our algorithm achieves better time and space complexity than previous solutions...... for various graph classes, for example sparse graphs with a relatively small number of triangles. Also, for graphs with constant transitivity coefficient, a common situation in real graphs, this is the first algorithm achieving constant processing time per edge. The result is achieved by a novel approach...

  3. Grms or graphical representation of model spaces. Vol. I Basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duch, W.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a novel approach to the many-body problem in quantum chemistry, nuclear shell-theory and solid-state theory. Many-particle model spaces are visualized using graphs, each path of a graph labeling a single basis function or a subspace of functions. Spaces of a very high dimension are represented by small graphs. Model spaces have structure that is reflected in the architecture of the corresponding graphs, that in turn is reflected in the structure of the matrices corresponding to operators acting in these spaces. Insight into this structure leads to formulation of very efficient computer algorithms. Calculation of matrix elements is reduced to comparison of paths in a graph, without ever looking at the functions themselves. Using only very rudimentary mathematical tools graphical rules of matrix element calculation in abelian cases are derived, in particular segmentation rules obtained in the unitary group approached are rederived. The graphs are solutions of Diophantine equations of the type appearing in different branches of applied mathematics. Graphical representation of model spaces should find as many applications as has been found for diagramatical methods in perturbation theory

  4. Low-Rank Matrix Factorization With Adaptive Graph Regularizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gui-Fu; Wang, Yong; Zou, Jian

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel low-rank matrix factorization algorithm with adaptive graph regularizer (LMFAGR). We extend the recently proposed low-rank matrix with manifold regularization (MMF) method with an adaptive regularizer. Different from MMF, which constructs an affinity graph in advance, LMFAGR can simultaneously seek graph weight matrix and low-dimensional representations of data. That is, graph construction and low-rank matrix factorization are incorporated into a unified framework, which results in an automatically updated graph rather than a predefined one. The experimental results on some data sets demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art low-rank matrix factorization methods.

  5. Discriminative graph embedding for label propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Canh Hao; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    In many applications, the available information is encoded in graph structures. This is a common problem in biological networks, social networks, web communities and document citations. We investigate the problem of classifying nodes' labels on a similarity graph given only a graph structure on the nodes. Conventional machine learning methods usually require data to reside in some Euclidean spaces or to have a kernel representation. Applying these methods to nodes on graphs would require embedding the graphs into these spaces. By embedding and then learning the nodes on graphs, most methods are either flexible with different learning objectives or efficient enough for large scale applications. We propose a method to embed a graph into a feature space for a discriminative purpose. Our idea is to include label information into the embedding process, making the space representation tailored to the task. We design embedding objective functions that the following learning formulations become spectral transforms. We then reformulate these spectral transforms into multiple kernel learning problems. Our method, while being tailored to the discriminative tasks, is efficient and can scale to massive data sets. We show the need of discriminative embedding on some simulations. Applying to biological network problems, our method is shown to outperform baselines.

  6. DDR: efficient computational method to predict drug-target interactions using graph mining and machine learning approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayan, Rawan S; Ashoor, Haitham; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2018-04-01

    Finding computationally drug-target interactions (DTIs) is a convenient strategy to identify new DTIs at low cost with reasonable accuracy. However, the current DTI prediction methods suffer the high false positive prediction rate. We developed DDR, a novel method that improves the DTI prediction accuracy. DDR is based on the use of a heterogeneous graph that contains known DTIs with multiple similarities between drugs and multiple similarities between target proteins. DDR applies non-linear similarity fusion method to combine different similarities. Before fusion, DDR performs a pre-processing step where a subset of similarities is selected in a heuristic process to obtain an optimized combination of similarities. Then, DDR applies a random forest model using different graph-based features extracted from the DTI heterogeneous graph. Using 5-repeats of 10-fold cross-validation, three testing setups, and the weighted average of area under the precision-recall curve (AUPR) scores, we show that DDR significantly reduces the AUPR score error relative to the next best start-of-the-art method for predicting DTIs by 34% when the drugs are new, by 23% when targets are new and by 34% when the drugs and the targets are known but not all DTIs between them are not known. Using independent sources of evidence, we verify as correct 22 out of the top 25 DDR novel predictions. This suggests that DDR can be used as an efficient method to identify correct DTIs. The data and code are provided at https://bitbucket.org/RSO24/ddr/. vladimir.bajic@kaust.edu.sa. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. External Visual Representations in Science Learning: The Case of Relations among System Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilam, Billie; Poyas, Yael

    2010-01-01

    How do external visual representations (e.g., graph, diagram) promote or constrain students' ability to identify system components and their interrelations, to reinforce a systemic view through the application of the STS approach? University students (N = 150) received information cards describing cellphones' communication system and its subsystem…

  8. "I remember when we stayed still and the computer still made lines": Young children's invented and conventional representations of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jason

    This dissertation concerns kindergarteners' and second graders' invented representations of motion, their interactions with conventional representations of motion built from the child's movement in front of a motion detector and using real-time graphing tools, and any changes in the invented representations that this interaction brings about. We have known for several decades that advanced learners (high school aged and beyond) struggle with physics concepts of motion and sometimes Cartesian graph-based representations of motion. Little has been known about how younger students approach the same concepts. In this study, eighteen children (10 kindergarteners and eight second graders) completed a three-hour clinical interview spread out evenly over three weeks. In the first and last interviews, the child was asked to produce external representations of movement and interpret conventional distance and time graphs of motion. In the second interview the children interacted with a motion detector and real-time graphing tools in a semi-self-directed format. Qualitative and quantitative results are presented and discussed. Qualitative data shows that children are adroit at representing motion and their productions are systematic and purposeful. Children produce drawings that both give context to the physical environment around them and also redescribe the drawn environment, meaning that they provide a potential audience with information otherwise imperceptible, by making certain implicit aspects more explicit. Second graders quickly appropriate the Cartesian graph during the intervention, though at times misinterpret the meaning associated with slope. Children correctly associate slope with direction, but at times misattribute sign of slope (positive or negative) and its corresponding direction (i.e. some children do not ascribe positive slope with motion away from a point of reference, but toward it). Kindergarteners showed a range of experiences during the intervention

  9. Reverse engineering of a railcar prototype via energetic macroscopic representation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agbli, Kréhi Serge; Hissel, Daniel; Sorrentino, Marco; Chauvet, Frédéric; Pouget, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A complex EMR model of a new railcar range has been developed. • A satisfactory assessment of the fuel consumption of the railcar. • The significant potential benefits are attainable by hybridizing the original railcar. • The regenerative braking can provide up to 240 kW h saving. - Abstract: Energetic Macroscopic Representation (EMR) modelling approach is proposed to perform model-based reverse-engineering of a new railcar range, having six propulsion units, each consisting of a diesel engine and a traction motor. Particularly, EMR intrinsic features were exploited to perform phenomenological structuration of power flows, thus allowing proper and comprehensive modelling of complex systems, such as the under-study railcar. Based on some prospective real trips, selected in such a way as to enable realistic evaluation of effective railcar effort, EMR-based prediction of railcar energy consumption is performed. Furthermore, physical consistency of each powertrain component operation was carefully verified. The suitability of EMR approach was thus proven effective to perform reverse-engineering of known specifications and available experimental data, with the final aim of reconstructing a high fidelity computational tool that meets computational burden requirements for subsequent model-based tasks deployment. Finally, specific simulation analyses were performed to evaluate the potential benefits attainable through electric hybridization of the original powertrain.

  10. An approach to the symbolic representation of brain arteriovenous malformations for management and treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowski, Piotr; Noble, Alison [University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); Mahmud, Imran; Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V. [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); Summers, Paul [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, Modena (Italy); Ventikos, Yiannis [University College London, Department of Mechanical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    There is currently no standardised approach to arteriovenous malformation (AVM) reporting. Existing AVM classification systems focuses on angioarchitectural features and omit haemodynamic, anatomical and topological parameters intuitively used by therapists. We introduce a symbolic vocabulary to represent the state of an AVM of the brain at different stages of treatment. The vocabulary encompasses the main anatomic and haemodynamic features of interest in treatment planning and provides shorthand symbols to represent the interventions themselves in a schematic representation. The method was presented to 50 neuroradiologists from14 countries during a workshop and graded 7.34 ± 1.92 out of ten for its usefulness as means of standardising and facilitating communication between clinicians and allowing comparisons between AVM cases. Feedback from the survey was used to revise the method and improve its completeness. For an AVM test case, participants were asked to produce a conventional written report and subsequently a diagrammatic report. The two required, on average, 6.19 ± 2.05 and 5.09 ± 3.01 min, respectively. Eighteen participants said that producing the diagram changed the way they thought about the AVM test case. Introduced into routine practice, the diagrams would represent a step towards a standardised approach to AVM reporting with consequent benefits for comparative analysis and communication as well as for identifying best treatment strategies. (orig.)

  11. Expert interpretation of bar and line graphs: The role of graphicacy in reducing the effect of graph format.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePeebles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between informational and computational equivalence of representations, first articulated by Larkin and Simon (1987 has been a fundamental principle in the analysis of diagrammatic reasoning which has been supported empirically on numerous occasions. We present an experiment that investigates this principle in relation to the performance of expert graph users of 2 x 2 'interaction' bar and line graphs. The study sought to determine whether expert interpretation is affected by graph format in the same way that novice interpretations are. The findings revealed that, unlike novices - and contrary to the assumptions of several graph comprehension models - experts' performance was the same for both graph formats, with their interpretation of bar graphs being no worse than that for line graphs. We discuss the implications of the study for guidelines for presenting such data and for models of expert graph comprehension.

  12. Expert interpretation of bar and line graphs: the role of graphicacy in reducing the effect of graph format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, David; Ali, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between informational and computational equivalence of representations, first articulated by Larkin and Simon (1987) has been a fundamental principle in the analysis of diagrammatic reasoning which has been supported empirically on numerous occasions. We present an experiment that investigates this principle in relation to the performance of expert graph users of 2 × 2 “interaction” bar and line graphs. The study sought to determine whether expert interpretation is affected by graph format in the same way that novice interpretations are. The findings revealed that, unlike novices—and contrary to the assumptions of several graph comprehension models—experts' performance was the same for both graph formats, with their interpretation of bar graphs being no worse than that for line graphs. We discuss the implications of the study for guidelines for presenting such data and for models of expert graph comprehension. PMID:26579052

  13. Graph Model Based Indoor Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Lu, Hua; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    The tracking of the locations of moving objects in large indoor spaces is important, as it enables a range of applications related to, e.g., security and indoor navigation and guidance. This paper presents a graph model based approach to indoor tracking that offers a uniform data management...... infrastructure for different symbolic positioning technologies, e.g., Bluetooth and RFID. More specifically, the paper proposes a model of indoor space that comprises a base graph and mappings that represent the topology of indoor space at different levels. The resulting model can be used for one or several...... indoor positioning technologies. Focusing on RFID-based positioning, an RFID specific reader deployment graph model is built from the base graph model. This model is then used in several algorithms for constructing and refining trajectories from raw RFID readings. Empirical studies with implementations...

  14. Generating random networks and graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Coolen, Ton; Roberts, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This book supports researchers who need to generate random networks, or who are interested in the theoretical study of random graphs. The coverage includes exponential random graphs (where the targeted probability of each network appearing in the ensemble is specified), growth algorithms (i.e. preferential attachment and the stub-joining configuration model), special constructions (e.g. geometric graphs and Watts Strogatz models) and graphs on structured spaces (e.g. multiplex networks). The presentation aims to be a complete starting point, including details of both theory and implementation, as well as discussions of the main strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It includes extensive references for readers wishing to go further. The material is carefully structured to be accessible to researchers from all disciplines while also containing rigorous mathematical analysis (largely based on the techniques of statistical mechanics) to support those wishing to further develop or implement the theory of rand...

  15. Generalized graph manifolds and their effective recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, S V

    1998-01-01

    A generalized graph manifold is a three-dimensional manifold obtained by gluing together elementary blocks, each of which is either a Seifert manifold or contains no essential tori or annuli. By a well-known result on torus decomposition each compact three-dimensional manifold with boundary that is either empty or consists of tori has a canonical representation as a generalized graph manifold. A short simple proof of the existence of a canonical representation is presented and a (partial) algorithm for its construction is described. A simple hyperbolicity test for blocks that are not Seifert manifolds is also presented

  16. Comparison of a traditional with a new approach based on Graph Theory to vulnerability assessment to natural hazards: a study case on a socio-economic complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Marcello; Martina, Mario L. V.

    2017-04-01

    The emergent behaviour of the contemporary complex, socio-technical and interconnected society makes the collective risk greater than the sum of the parts and this requires a holistic, systematic and integrated approach. Although there have been major improvements in recent years, there are still some limitation in term of a holistic approach that is able to include the emergent value hidden in the connections between exposed elements and the interactions between the different spheres of the multi-hazards, vulnerability, exposure and resilience. To deal with these challenges it is necessary to consider the connections between the exposed elements (e.g. populations, schools, hospital, etc.) and to quantify the relative importance of the elements and their interconnections (e.g. the need of injured people to go to hospital or children to school). In a system (e.g. road, hospital and ecological network, etc.), or in a System of System (e.g. socio-technical urban service), there are critical elements that, beyond the intrinsic vulnerability, can be characterized by greater or lower vulnerability because of their physical, geographical, cyber or logical connections. To this aim, we propose in this study a comparative analysis between traditional reductionist approach and a new holistic approach to vulnerability assessment to natural hazards. The analysis considers a study case of a socio-economic complex system through an innovative approach based on the properties of graph G=(N,L). A graph consists of two sets N (nodes) and L (links): the nodes represent the single exposed elements (physical, social, environmental, etc.) to a hazard, while the links (or connections) represent the interaction between the elements. The final goal is to illustrate an application of this innovative approach of integrated collective vulnerability assessment.

  17. Dynamic modelling of the expansion cylinder of an open Joule cycle Ericsson engine: A bond graph approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creyx, M.; Delacourt, E.; Morin, C.; Desmet, B.

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic model using the bond graph formalism of the expansion cylinder of an open Joule cycle Ericsson engine intended for a biomass-fuelled micro-CHP system is presented. Dynamic phenomena, such as the thermodynamic evolution of air, the instantaneous air mass flow rates linked to pressure drops crossing the valves, the heat transferred through the expansion cylinder wall and the mechanical friction losses, are included in the model. The influence on the Ericsson engine performances of the main operating conditions (intake air pressure and temperature, timing of intake and exhaust valve closing, rotational speed, mechanical friction losses and heat transfer at expansion cylinder wall) is studied. The operating conditions maximizing the performances of the Ericsson engine used in the a biomass-fuelled micro-CHP unit are an intake air pressure between 6 and 8 bar, a maximized intake air temperature, an adjustment of the intake and exhaust valve closing corresponding to an expansion cycle close to the theoretical Joule cycle, a rotational speed close to 800 rpm. The heat transfer at the expansion cylinder wall reduces the engine performances. - Highlights: • A bond graph dynamic model of the Ericsson engine expansion cylinder is presented. • Dynamic aspects are modelled: pressure drops, friction losses, wall heat transfer. • Influent factors and phenomena on the engine performances are investigated. • Expansion cycles close to the theoretical Joule cycle maximize the performances. • The heat transfer at the expansion chamber wall reduces the performances.

  18. University Students’ Reflections on Representations in Genetics and Stereochemistry Revealed by a Focus Group Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Edfors

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part of this difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In order to optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure the meaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge. Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representations in introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representations. The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in their problem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiar to the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”. The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways of interpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discussions enhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’ representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a university context to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitful way.

  19. VStops: A Thinking Strategy and Visual Representation Approach in Mathematical Word Problem Solving toward Enhancing STEM Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nasarudin; Halim, Lilia; Zakaria, Effandi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of strategic thinking and visual representation approaches (VStops) on the achievement, conceptual knowledge, metacognitive awareness, awareness of problem-solving strategies, and student attitudes toward mathematical word problem solving among primary school students. The experimental group (N = 96)…

  20. Which attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder children will be improved through neurofeedback therapy? A graph theoretical approach to neocortex neuronal network of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadlou, Mehran; Rostami, Reza; Sadeghi, Vahid

    2012-05-10

    Neurofeedback training is increasingly used for ADHD treatment. However some ADHD patients are not treated through the long-time neurofeedback trainings with common protocols. In this paper a new graph theoretical approach is presented for EEG-based prediction of ADHD patients' responses to a common neurofeedback training: rewarding SMR activity (12-15 Hz) with inhibiting theta activity (4-8 Hz) and beta2 activity (18-25 Hz). Eyes closed EEGs of two groups before and after neurofeedback training were studied: ADHD patients with (15 children) and without (15 children) positive response to neurofeedback training. Employing a recent method to measure synchronization, fuzzy synchronization likelihood, functional connectivity graphs of the patients' brains were constructed in the full-band EEGs and 6 common EEG sub-bands produced by wavelet decomposition. Then, efficiencies of the brain networks in synchronizability and high speed information transmission were computed based on mean path length of the graphs, before and after neurofeedback training. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and showed synchronizability of the neocortex activity network at beta band in ADHDs with positive response is obviously less than that of ADHDs resistant to neurofeedback therapy, before treatment. The accuracy of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) in distinguishing these patients based on this feature is so high (84.2%) that this feature can be considered as reliable characteristics for prediction of responses of ADHDs to the neurofeedback trainings. Also difference between flexibility of the neocortex in beta band before and after treatment is obviously larger in the ADHDs with positive response in comparison to those with negative response which may be a neurophysiologic reason for dissatisfaction of the last group to the neurofeedback therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting helical topologies in RNA junctions as tree graphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Laing

    Full Text Available RNA molecules are important cellular components involved in many fundamental biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms behind their functions requires knowledge of their tertiary structures. Though computational RNA folding approaches exist, they often require manual manipulation and expert intuition; predicting global long-range tertiary contacts remains challenging. Here we develop a computational approach and associated program module (RNAJAG to predict helical arrangements/topologies in RNA junctions. Our method has two components: junction topology prediction and graph modeling. First, junction topologies are determined by a data mining approach from a given secondary structure of the target RNAs; second, the predicted topology is used to construct a tree graph consistent with geometric preferences analyzed from solved RNAs. The predicted graphs, which model the helical arrangements of RNA junctions for a large set of 200 junctions using a cross validation procedure, yield fairly good representations compared to the helical configurations in native RNAs, and can be further used to develop all-atom models as we show for two examples. Because junctions are among the most complex structural elements in RNA, this work advances folding structure prediction methods of large RNAs. The RNAJAG module is available to academic users upon request.

  2. Predicting helical topologies in RNA junctions as tree graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Christian; Jung, Segun; Kim, Namhee; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Zahran, Mai; Schlick, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules are important cellular components involved in many fundamental biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms behind their functions requires knowledge of their tertiary structures. Though computational RNA folding approaches exist, they often require manual manipulation and expert intuition; predicting global long-range tertiary contacts remains challenging. Here we develop a computational approach and associated program module (RNAJAG) to predict helical arrangements/topologies in RNA junctions. Our method has two components: junction topology prediction and graph modeling. First, junction topologies are determined by a data mining approach from a given secondary structure of the target RNAs; second, the predicted topology is used to construct a tree graph consistent with geometric preferences analyzed from solved RNAs. The predicted graphs, which model the helical arrangements of RNA junctions for a large set of 200 junctions using a cross validation procedure, yield fairly good representations compared to the helical configurations in native RNAs, and can be further used to develop all-atom models as we show for two examples. Because junctions are among the most complex structural elements in RNA, this work advances folding structure prediction methods of large RNAs. The RNAJAG module is available to academic users upon request.

  3. Predicting Helical Topologies in RNA Junctions as Tree Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namhee; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Zahran, Mai; Schlick, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules are important cellular components involved in many fundamental biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms behind their functions requires knowledge of their tertiary structures. Though computational RNA folding approaches exist, they often require manual manipulation and expert intuition; predicting global long-range tertiary contacts remains challenging. Here we develop a computational approach and associated program module (RNAJAG) to predict helical arrangements/topologies in RNA junctions. Our method has two components: junction topology prediction and graph modeling. First, junction topologies are determined by a data mining approach from a given secondary structure of the target RNAs; second, the predicted topology is used to construct a tree graph consistent with geometric preferences analyzed from solved RNAs. The predicted graphs, which model the helical arrangements of RNA junctions for a large set of 200 junctions using a cross validation procedure, yield fairly good representations compared to the helical configurations in native RNAs, and can be further used to develop all-atom models as we show for two examples. Because junctions are among the most complex structural elements in RNA, this work advances folding structure prediction methods of large RNAs. The RNAJAG module is available to academic users upon request. PMID:23991010

  4. Locally Embedding Autoencoders: A Semi-Supervised Manifold Learning Approach of Document Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wei

    Full Text Available Topic models and neural networks can discover meaningful low-dimensional latent representations of text corpora; as such, they have become a key technology of document representation. However, such models presume all documents are non-discriminatory, resulting in latent representation dependent upon all other documents and an inability to provide discriminative document representation. To address this problem, we propose a semi-supervised manifold-inspired autoencoder to extract meaningful latent representations of documents, taking the local perspective that the latent representation of nearby documents should be correlative. We first determine the discriminative neighbors set with Euclidean distance in observation spaces. Then, the autoencoder is trained by joint minimization of the Bernoulli cross-entropy error between input and output and the sum of the square error between neighbors of input and output. The results of two widely used corpora show that our method yields at least a 15% improvement in document clustering and a nearly 7% improvement in classification tasks compared to comparative methods. The evidence demonstrates that our method can readily capture more discriminative latent representation of new documents. Moreover, some meaningful combinations of words can be efficiently discovered by activating features that promote the comprehensibility of latent representation.

  5. Locally Embedding Autoencoders: A Semi-Supervised Manifold Learning Approach of Document Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Luo, Senlin; Ma, Xincheng; Ren, Hao; Zhang, Ji; Pan, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Topic models and neural networks can discover meaningful low-dimensional latent representations of text corpora; as such, they have become a key technology of document representation. However, such models presume all documents are non-discriminatory, resulting in latent representation dependent upon all other documents and an inability to provide discriminative document representation. To address this problem, we propose a semi-supervised manifold-inspired autoencoder to extract meaningful latent representations of documents, taking the local perspective that the latent representation of nearby documents should be correlative. We first determine the discriminative neighbors set with Euclidean distance in observation spaces. Then, the autoencoder is trained by joint minimization of the Bernoulli cross-entropy error between input and output and the sum of the square error between neighbors of input and output. The results of two widely used corpora show that our method yields at least a 15% improvement in document clustering and a nearly 7% improvement in classification tasks compared to comparative methods. The evidence demonstrates that our method can readily capture more discriminative latent representation of new documents. Moreover, some meaningful combinations of words can be efficiently discovered by activating features that promote the comprehensibility of latent representation.

  6. Chemical Graph Transformation with Stereo-Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Lykke; Flamm, Christoph; Merkle, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Double Pushout graph transformation naturally facilitates the modelling of chemical reactions: labelled undirected graphs model molecules and direct derivations model chemical reactions. However, the most straightforward modelling approach ignores the relative placement of atoms and their neighbo......Double Pushout graph transformation naturally facilitates the modelling of chemical reactions: labelled undirected graphs model molecules and direct derivations model chemical reactions. However, the most straightforward modelling approach ignores the relative placement of atoms...... and their neighbours in space. Stereoisomers of chemical compounds thus cannot be distinguished, even though their chemical activity may differ substantially. In this contribution we propose an extended chemical graph transformation system with attributes that encode information about local geometry. The modelling...... of graph transformation, but we here propose a framework that also allows for partially specified stereoinformation. While there are several stereochemical configurations to be considered, we focus here on the tetrahedral molecular shape, and suggest general principles for how to treat all other chemically...

  7. Poincaré Embeddings for Learning Hierarchical Representations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Abstracts: Representation learning has become an invaluable approach for learning from symbolic data such as text and graphs. However, while complex symbolic datasets often exhibit a latent hierarchical structure, state-of-the-art methods typically do not account for this property. In this talk, I will discuss a new approach for learning hierarchical representations of symbolic data by embedding them into hyperbolic space -- or more precisely into an n-dimensional Poincaré ball. Due to the underlying hyperbolic geometry, this allows us to learn parsimonious representations of symbolic data by simultaneously capturing hierarchy and similarity. We introduce an efficient algorithm to learn the embeddings based on Riemannian optimization and show experimentally that Poincaré embeddings outperform Euclidean embeddings significantly on data with latent hierarchies, both in terms of representation capacity and in terms of generalization ability.      &...

  8. $\\alpha$-Representation for QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Richard Hong

    1998-01-01

    An $\\alpha$-parameter representation is derived for gauge field theories.It involves, relative to a scalar field theory, only constants and derivatives with respect to the $\\alpha$-parameters. Simple rules are given to obtain the $\\alpha$-representation for a Feynman graph with an arbitrary number of loops in gauge theories in the Feynman gauge.

  9. Quantum information processing with graph states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlingemann, Dirk-Michael

    2005-04-01

    Graph states are multiparticle states which are associated with graphs. Each vertex of the graph corresponds to a single system or particle. The links describe quantum correlations (entanglement) between pairs of connected particles. Graph states were initiated independently by two research groups: On the one hand, graph states were introduced by Briegel and Raussendorf as a resource for a new model of one-way quantum computing, where algorithms are implemented by a sequence of measurements at single particles. On the other hand, graph states were developed by the author of this thesis and ReinhardWerner in Braunschweig, as a tool to build quantum error correcting codes, called graph codes. The connection between the two approaches was fully realized in close cooperation of both research groups. This habilitation thesis provides a survey of the theory of graph codes, focussing mainly, but not exclusively on the author's own research work. We present the theoretical and mathematical background for the analysis of graph codes. The concept of one-way quantum computing for general graph states is discussed. We explicitly show how to realize the encoding and decoding device of a graph code on a one-way quantum computer. This kind of implementation is to be seen as a mathematical description of a quantum memory device. In addition to that, we investigate interaction processes, which enable the creation of graph states on very large systems. Particular graph states can be created, for instance, by an Ising type interaction between next neighbor particles which sits at the points of an infinitely extended cubic lattice. Based on the theory of quantum cellular automata, we give a constructive characterization of general interactions which create a translationally invariant graph state. (orig.)

  10. Tensor representation techniques for full configuration interaction: A Fock space approach using the canonical product format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Karl-Heinz; Auer, Alexander A; Espig, Mike

    2016-06-28

    In this proof-of-principle study, we apply tensor decomposition techniques to the Full Configuration Interaction (FCI) wavefunction in order to approximate the wavefunction parameters efficiently and to reduce the overall computational effort. For this purpose, the wavefunction ansatz is formulated in an occupation number vector representation that ensures antisymmetry. If the canonical product format tensor decomposition is then applied, the Hamiltonian and the wavefunction can be cast into a multilinear product form. As a consequence, the number of wavefunction parameters does not scale to the power of the number of particles (or orbitals) but depends on the rank of the approximation and linearly on the number of particles. The degree of approximation can be controlled by a single threshold for the rank reduction procedure required in the algorithm. We demonstrate that using this approximation, the FCI Hamiltonian matrix can be stored with N(5) scaling. The error of the approximation that is introduced is below Millihartree for a threshold of ϵ = 10(-4) and no convergence problems are observed solving the FCI equations iteratively in the new format. While promising conceptually, all effort of the algorithm is shifted to the required rank reduction procedure after the contraction of the Hamiltonian with the coefficient tensor. At the current state, this crucial step is the bottleneck of our approach and even for an optimistic estimate, the algorithm scales beyond N(10) and future work has to be directed towards reduction-free algorithms.

  11. The representation of nurses in 1950s melodrama: a cross-cultural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babini, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Melodrama is identified as one of the most prolific cinematic genres in terms of the representation of nurses. Its contribution to the overall media depiction of the professional category has therefore been significant. This paper explores melodramatic portrayals of nurses with a specific focus on cinema of the 1950s, the golden age of Western melodrama, and concentrates on two representative case studies: Anna (ITA, 1951), and The Nun's Story (USA, 1959). These films enable a fruitful comparison, sharing several narrative elements, featuring religious nurses as protagonists, and yet eventually conferring on the nursing vocation different values. Such similar nurses' images are examined through a multidisciplinary approach, spanning feminist film theory, gender and cultural studies, cultural history and the social history of nursing. Among the goals of this study is to consider whether different national origins--in these films, Italy and America--have also been influential in the depiction of the respective nurse-character. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solution of the nonrelativistic wave equation using the tridiagonal representation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaidari, A. D.

    2017-07-01

    We choose a complete set of square integrable functions as a basis for the expansion of the wavefunction in configuration space such that the matrix representation of the nonrelativistic time-independent linear wave operator is tridiagonal and symmetric. Consequently, the matrix wave equation becomes a symmetric three-term recursion relation for the expansion coefficients of the wavefunction. The recursion relation is then solved exactly in terms of orthogonal polynomials in the energy. Some of these polynomials are not found in the mathematics literature. The asymptotics of these polynomials give the phase shift for the continuous energy scattering states and the spectrum for the discrete energy bound states. Depending on the space and boundary conditions, the basis functions are written in terms of either the Laguerre or Jacobi polynomials. The tridiagonal requirement limits the number of potential functions that yield exact solutions of the wave equation. Nonetheless, the class of exactly solvable problems in this approach is larger than the conventional class (see, for example, Table XII in the text). We also give very accurate results for cases where the wave operator matrix is not tridiagonal but its elements could be evaluated either exactly or numerically with high precision.

  13. Visibility graphs and landscape visibility analysis

    OpenAIRE

    O Sullivan, D.; Turner, A.

    2001-01-01

    Visibility analysis based on viewsheds is one of the most frequently used GIS analysis tools. In this paper we present an approach to visibility analysis based on the visibility graph. A visibility graph records the pattern of mutual visibility relations in a landscape, and provides a convenient way of storing and further analysing the results of multiple viewshed analyses for a particular landscape region. We describe how a visibility graph may be calculated for a landscape. We then give exa...

  14. Dynamic Programming on Nominal Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicklas Hoch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many optimization problems can be naturally represented as (hyper graphs, where vertices correspond to variables and edges to tasks, whose cost depends on the values of the adjacent variables. Capitalizing on the structure of the graph, suitable dynamic programming strategies can select certain orders of evaluation of the variables which guarantee to reach both an optimal solution and a minimal size of the tables computed in the optimization process. In this paper we introduce a simple algebraic specification with parallel composition and restriction whose terms up to structural axioms are the graphs mentioned above. In addition, free (unrestricted vertices are labelled with variables, and the specification includes operations of name permutation with finite support. We show a correspondence between the well-known tree decompositions of graphs and our terms. If an axiom of scope extension is dropped, several (hierarchical terms actually correspond to the same graph. A suitable graphical structure can be found, corresponding to every hierarchical term. Evaluating such a graphical structure in some target algebra yields a dynamic programming strategy. If the target algebra satisfies the scope extension axiom, then the result does not depend on the particular structure, but only on the original graph. We apply our approach to the parking optimization problem developed in the ASCENS e-mobility case study, in collaboration with Volkswagen. Dynamic programming evaluations are particularly interesting for autonomic systems, where actual behavior often consists of propagating local knowledge to obtain global knowledge and getting it back for local decisions.

  15. Chromatic polynomials of random graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Bussel, Frank; Fliegner, Denny; Timme, Marc; Ehrlich, Christoph; Stolzenberg, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Chromatic polynomials and related graph invariants are central objects in both graph theory and statistical physics. Computational difficulties, however, have so far restricted studies of such polynomials to graphs that were either very small, very sparse or highly structured. Recent algorithmic advances (Timme et al 2009 New J. Phys. 11 023001) now make it possible to compute chromatic polynomials for moderately sized graphs of arbitrary structure and number of edges. Here we present chromatic polynomials of ensembles of random graphs with up to 30 vertices, over the entire range of edge density. We specifically focus on the locations of the zeros of the polynomial in the complex plane. The results indicate that the chromatic zeros of random graphs have a very consistent layout. In particular, the crossing point, the point at which the chromatic zeros with non-zero imaginary part approach the real axis, scales linearly with the average degree over most of the density range. While the scaling laws obtained are purely empirical, if they continue to hold in general there are significant implications: the crossing points of chromatic zeros in the thermodynamic limit separate systems with zero ground state entropy from systems with positive ground state entropy, the latter an exception to the third law of thermodynamics.

  16. Generating loop graphs via Hopf algebra in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestre, Angela; Oeckl, Robert

    2006-01-01

    We use the Hopf algebra structure of the time-ordered algebra of field operators to generate all connected weighted Feynman graphs in a recursive and efficient manner. The algebraic representation of the graphs is such that they can be evaluated directly as contributions to the connected n-point functions. The recursion proceeds by loop order and vertex number

  17. A Term-Graph Syntax for Algebras over Multisets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadducci, Fabio

    Earlier papers argued that term graphs play for the specification of relation-based algebras the same role that standard terms play for total algebras. The present contribution enforces the claim by showing that term graphs are a sound and complete representation for multiset algebras, i.e., algebras whose operators are interpreted over multisets.

  18. Framework for Querying and Analysis of Evolving Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Vera Zaychik

    2017-01-01

    Graph representations underlie many modern computer applications, capturing the structure of such diverse networks as the Internet, personal associations, roads, sensors, and metabolic pathways. While the static structure of graphs is a well-explored field, a new emphasis is being placed on understanding and representing the way these networks…

  19. Multi-Centrality Graph Spectral Decompositions and Their Application to Cyber Intrusion Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pin-Yu; Choudhury, Sutanay; Hero, Alfred

    2016-03-01

    Many modern datasets can be represented as graphs and hence spectral decompositions such as graph principal component analysis (PCA) can be useful. Distinct from previous graph decomposition approaches based on subspace projection of a single topological feature, e.g., the centered graph adjacency matrix (graph Laplacian), we propose spectral decomposition approaches to graph PCA and graph dictionary learning that integrate multiple features, including graph walk statistics, centrality measures and graph distances to reference nodes. In this paper we propose a new PCA method for single graph analysis, called multi-centrality graph PCA (MC-GPCA), and a new dictionary learning method for ensembles of graphs, called multi-centrality graph dictionary learning (MC-GDL), both based on spectral decomposition of multi-centrality matrices. As an application to cyber intrusion detection, MC-GPCA can be an effective indicator of anomalous connectivity pattern and MC-GDL can provide discriminative basis for attack classification.

  20. Multiple graph regularized nonnegative matrix factorization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2013-10-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) has been widely used as a data representation method based on components. To overcome the disadvantage of NMF in failing to consider the manifold structure of a data set, graph regularized NMF (GrNMF) has been proposed by Cai et al. by constructing an affinity graph and searching for a matrix factorization that respects graph structure. Selecting a graph model and its corresponding parameters is critical for this strategy. This process is usually carried out by cross-validation or discrete grid search, which are time consuming and prone to overfitting. In this paper, we propose a GrNMF, called MultiGrNMF, in which the intrinsic manifold is approximated by a linear combination of several graphs with different models and parameters inspired by ensemble manifold regularization. Factorization metrics and linear combination coefficients of graphs are determined simultaneously within a unified object function. They are alternately optimized in an iterative algorithm, thus resulting in a novel data representation algorithm. Extensive experiments on a protein subcellular localization task and an Alzheimer\\'s disease diagnosis task demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. GraphMeta: Managing HPC Rich Metadata in Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Zhang, Wei; Ross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems face increasingly critical metadata management challenges, especially in the approaching exascale era. These challenges arise not only from exploding metadata volumes, but also from increasingly diverse metadata, which contains data provenance and arbitrary user-defined attributes in addition to traditional POSIX metadata. This ‘rich’ metadata is becoming critical to supporting advanced data management functionality such as data auditing and validation. In our prior work, we identified a graph-based model as a promising solution to uniformly manage HPC rich metadata due to its flexibility and generality. However, at the same time, graph-based HPC rich metadata anagement also introduces significant challenges to the underlying infrastructure. In this study, we first identify the challenges on the underlying infrastructure to support scalable, high-performance rich metadata management. Based on that, we introduce GraphMeta, a graphbased engine designed for this use case. It achieves performance scalability by introducing a new graph partitioning algorithm and a write-optimal storage engine. We evaluate GraphMeta under both synthetic and real HPC metadata workloads, compare it with other approaches, and demonstrate its advantages in terms of efficiency and usability for rich metadata management in HPC systems.

  2. Relations between the set-complexity and the structure of graphs and their sub-graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignac, Tomasz M; Sakhanenko, Nikita A; Galas, David J

    2012-09-21

    : We describe some new conceptual tools for the rigorous, mathematical description of the "set-complexity" of graphs. This set-complexity has been shown previously to be a useful measure for analyzing some biological networks, and in discussing biological information in a quantitative fashion. The advances described here allow us to define some significant relationships between the set-complexity measure and the structure of graphs, and of their component sub-graphs. We show here that modular graph structures tend to maximize the set-complexity of graphs. We point out the relationship between modularity and redundancy, and discuss the significance of set-complexity in this regard. We specifically discuss the relationship between complexity and entropy in the case of complete-bipartite graphs, and present a new method for constructing highly complex, binary graphs. These results can be extended to the case of ternary graphs, and to other multi-edge graphs, which are fundamentally more relevant to biological structures and systems. Finally, our results lead us to an approach for extracting high complexity modular graphs from large, noisy graphs with low information content. We illustrate this approach with two examples.

  3. Graphs and matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bapat, Ravindra B

    2014-01-01

    This new edition illustrates the power of linear algebra in the study of graphs. The emphasis on matrix techniques is greater than in other texts on algebraic graph theory. Important matrices associated with graphs (for example, incidence, adjacency and Laplacian matrices) are treated in detail. Presenting a useful overview of selected topics in algebraic graph theory, early chapters of the text focus on regular graphs, algebraic connectivity, the distance matrix of a tree, and its generalized version for arbitrary graphs, known as the resistance matrix. Coverage of later topics include Laplacian eigenvalues of threshold graphs, the positive definite completion problem and matrix games based on a graph. Such an extensive coverage of the subject area provides a welcome prompt for further exploration. The inclusion of exercises enables practical learning throughout the book. In the new edition, a new chapter is added on the line graph of a tree, while some results in Chapter 6 on Perron-Frobenius theory are reo...

  4. Completely Described Undirected Graph Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objects of research are undirected graphs. The paper considers a problem of their isomorphism. A literature analysis of its solution, has shown that there is no way to define a complete graph invariant in the form of unique structural characteristics of each its vertex, which has a computational complexity of definition better than О (n 4 .The work objective is to provide the characteristics of the graph structure, which could be used to solve the problem of their isomorphism for a time better than О (n 4 . As such characteristics, the paper proposes to use the set of codes of tree roots of all the shortest - in terms of the number of edges - paths from each vertex to the others, uniquely defining the structure of each tree. It proves the theorem that it is possible to reduce the problem of isomorphism of the undirected graphs to the isomorphism problem of their splitting into the trees of all the shortest - in terms of the number of edges - paths of each vertex to the others. An algorithm to construct the shortest paths from each vertex to all others and to compute codes of their vertices has been developed. As the latter, are used Aho-codes, which find application in recognising the isomorphism of trees. The computational complexity to obtain structural characteristics of vertices has been estimated to be about О (n 3 .The pilot studies involved the full-scale experiment using the developed complex programmes to generate raw data, i.e. analytic representation of the graph with the number of vertices equal to 1200, and a programme to provide codes of the tree roots. To have an estimate of - "the worst" in terms of time - complexity of expansion algorithm of graphs into trees of the shortest paths and define the codes of their roots has been an experimentally studied how the number of tree vertices depends on the graph density. For the worst case was obtained a dependence of the number of tree vertices on the number of graph vertices

  5. On the mixed symmetry irreducible representations of the Poincare group in the BRST approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdik, C.; Pashnev, A.; Tsulaya, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Lagrangian description of irreducible massless representations of the Poincare group with the corresponding Young tableaux having two rows along with some explicit examples including the notoph and Weyl tensor is given. For this purpose the method of the BRST constructions is used adopted to the systems of the second class constraints by the construction of auxiliary representations of the algebras of constraints in terms of Verma modules

  6. Dynamic graph system for a semantic database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizell, David

    2015-01-27

    A method and system in a computer system for dynamically providing a graphical representation of a data store of entries via a matrix interface is disclosed. A dynamic graph system provides a matrix interface that exposes to an application program a graphical representation of data stored in a data store such as a semantic database storing triples. To the application program, the matrix interface represents the graph as a sparse adjacency matrix that is stored in compressed form. Each entry of the data store is considered to represent a link between nodes of the graph. Each entry has a first field and a second field identifying the nodes connected by the link and a third field with a value for the link that connects the identified nodes. The first, second, and third fields represent the rows, column, and elements of the adjacency matrix.

  7. Graphing Powers and Roots of Complex Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embse, Charles Vonder

    1993-01-01

    Using De Moivre's theorem and a parametric graphing utility, examines powers and roots of complex numbers and allows students to establish connections between the visual and numerical representations of complex numbers. Provides a program to numerically verify the roots of complex numbers. (MDH)

  8. Inferring ontology graph structures using OWL reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Miguel Ángel; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2018-01-05

    Ontologies are representations of a conceptualization of a domain. Traditionally, ontologies in biology were represented as directed acyclic graphs (DAG) which represent the backbone taxonomy and additional relations between classes. These graphs are widely exploited for data analysis in the form of ontology enrichment or computation of semantic similarity. More recently, ontologies are developed in a formal language such as the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and consist of a set of axioms through which classes are defined or constrained. While the taxonomy of an ontology can be inferred directly from the axioms of an ontology as one of the standard OWL reasoning tasks, creating general graph structures from OWL ontologies that exploit the ontologies' semantic content remains a challenge. We developed a method to transform ontologies into graphs using an automated reasoner while taking into account all relations between classes. Searching for (existential) patterns in the deductive closure of ontologies, we can identify relations between classes that are implied but not asserted and generate graph structures that encode for a large part of the ontologies' semantic content. We demonstrate the advantages of our method by applying it to inference of protein-protein interactions through semantic similarity over the Gene Ontology and demonstrate that performance is increased when graph structures are inferred using deductive inference according to our method. Our software and experiment results are available at http://github.com/bio-ontology-research-group/Onto2Graph . Onto2Graph is a method to generate graph structures from OWL ontologies using automated reasoning. The resulting graphs can be used for improved ontology visualization and ontology-based data analysis.

  9. Inferring ontology graph structures using OWL reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2018-01-05

    Ontologies are representations of a conceptualization of a domain. Traditionally, ontologies in biology were represented as directed acyclic graphs (DAG) which represent the backbone taxonomy and additional relations between classes. These graphs are widely exploited for data analysis in the form of ontology enrichment or computation of semantic similarity. More recently, ontologies are developed in a formal language such as the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and consist of a set of axioms through which classes are defined or constrained. While the taxonomy of an ontology can be inferred directly from the axioms of an ontology as one of the standard OWL reasoning tasks, creating general graph structures from OWL ontologies that exploit the ontologies\\' semantic content remains a challenge.We developed a method to transform ontologies into graphs using an automated reasoner while taking into account all relations between classes. Searching for (existential) patterns in the deductive closure of ontologies, we can identify relations between classes that are implied but not asserted and generate graph structures that encode for a large part of the ontologies\\' semantic content. We demonstrate the advantages of our method by applying it to inference of protein-protein interactions through semantic similarity over the Gene Ontology and demonstrate that performance is increased when graph structures are inferred using deductive inference according to our method. Our software and experiment results are available at http://github.com/bio-ontology-research-group/Onto2Graph .Onto2Graph is a method to generate graph structures from OWL ontologies using automated reasoning. The resulting graphs can be used for improved ontology visualization and ontology-based data analysis.

  10. An 00 visual language definition approach supporting multiple views

    OpenAIRE

    Akehurst, David H.; I.E.E.E. Computer Society

    2000-01-01

    The formal approach to visual language definition is to use graph grammars and/or graph transformation techniques. These techniques focus on specifying the syntax and manipulation rules of the concrete representation. This paper presents a constraint and object-oriented approach to defining visual languages that uses UML and OCL as a definition language. Visual language definitions specify a mapping between concrete and abstract models of possible visual sentences, which carl subsequently be ...

  11. Use of Attack Graphs in Security Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Shandilya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attack graphs have been used to model the vulnerabilities of the systems and their potential exploits. The successful exploits leading to the partial/total failure of the systems are subject of keen security interest. Considerable effort has been expended in exhaustive modeling, analyses, detection, and mitigation of attacks. One prominent methodology involves constructing attack graphs of the pertinent system for analysis and response strategies. This not only gives the simplified representation of the system, but also allows prioritizing the security properties whose violations are of greater concern, for both detection and repair. We present a survey and critical study of state-of-the-art technologies in attack graph generation and use in security system. Based on our research, we identify the potential, challenges, and direction of the current research in using attack graphs.

  12. Unraveling protein networks with power graph analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Royer

    Full Text Available Networks play a crucial role in computational biology, yet their analysis and representation is still an open problem. Power Graph Analysis is a lossless transformation of biological networks into a compact, less redundant representation, exploiting the abundance of cliques and bicliques as elementary topological motifs. We demonstrate with five examples the advantages of Power Graph Analysis. Investigating protein-protein interaction networks, we show how the catalytic subunits of the casein kinase II complex are distinguishable from the regulatory subunits, how interaction profiles and sequence phylogeny of SH3 domains correlate, and how false positive interactions among high-throughput interactions are spotted. Additionally, we demonstrate the generality of Power Graph Analysis by applying it to two other types of networks. We show how power graphs induce a clustering of both transcription factors and target genes in bipartite transcription networks, and how the erosion of a phosphatase domain in type 22 non-receptor tyrosine phosphatases is detected. We apply Power Graph Analysis to high-throughput protein interaction networks and show that up to 85% (56% on average of the information is redundant. Experimental networks are more compressible than rewired ones of same degree distribution, indicating that experimental networks are rich in cliques and bicliques. Power Graphs are a novel representation of networks, which reduces network complexity by explicitly representing re-occurring network motifs. Power Graphs compress up to 85% of the edges in protein interaction networks and are applicable to all types of networks such as protein interactions, regulatory networks, or homology networks.

  13. Delta channel networks: 1. A graph-theoretic approach for studying connectivity and steady state transport on deltaic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Zaliapin, Ilya; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2015-06-01

    River deltas are intricate landscapes with complex channel networks that self-organize to deliver water, sediment, and nutrients from the apex to the delta top and eventually to the coastal zone. The natural balance of material and energy fluxes, which maintains a stable hydrologic, geomorphologic, and ecological state of a river delta, is often disrupted by external perturbations causing topological and dynamical changes in the delta structure and function. A formal quantitative framework for studying delta channel network connectivity and transport dynamics and their response to change is lacking. Here we present such a framework based on spectral graph theory and demonstrate its value in computing delta's steady state fluxes and identifying upstream (contributing) and downstream (nourishment) areas and fluxes from any point in the network. We use this framework to construct vulnerability maps that quantify the relative change of sediment and water delivery to the shoreline outlets in response to possible perturbations in hundreds of upstream links. The framework is applied to the Wax Lake delta in the Louisiana coast of the U.S. and the Niger delta in West Africa. In a companion paper, we present a comprehensive suite of metrics that quantify topologic and dynamic complexity of delta channel networks and, via application to seven deltas in diverse environments, demonstrate their potential to reveal delta morphodynamics and relate to notions of vulnerability and robustness.

  14. [Social anthropological approach to tuberculosis in Mopti (Mali): popular representations and use of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthe, A; Maguiraga, F; Traoré, L; Mugisho, E; Drabo, M; Traoré, A K; Dujardin, B; Huygens, P

    2009-01-01

    In Mali, there were 4508 new cases of tuberculosis in 2003, and 5222 in 2006. Tuberculosis (TB) is thus an important public health problem, decreasing the physical, financial and social capital of individuals, their families and society. Because responses to TB have not yet applied a sufficiently integrated approach that can improve patients' access to quality care, this FORESA project advocates a patient-centered approach. Before any intervention, FORESA thus sought to analyse the situation of TB in Mali and responses to it. The study aims to analyse the discourse about and popular representations of TB (its forms, its signs), the situations in which people are exposed to it or transmit it, and popular practices related to its prevention and the experience of having it. This qualitative, descriptive and analytical study includes a literature review, in-depth interviews with opinion leaders, community health workers and TB patients, focus groups, and the observations of practices. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed. Subjects provided informed consent to participation. This study showed that: * the terms for TB in local languages (Bambara, Dogon and Fulfuldé) include white cough, big cough, and long cough; * These communities differentiate between 2 main forms of cough (simple and wet); * TB is perceived as a transmissible disease, a disease of contact with a contaminated body or objects; * TB is seen as a serious, contagious, hereditary, shameful disease that may result from the transgression of social norms; * The prevention of TB consists of avoiding people who have the disease or transmitting factors; * Therapeutic remedies, in order, are self-medication, the use of traditional healers, and finally visits to health centres; * The population wants more information about TB and be involved in the fight against it. This study shows the many points of convergence about TB nosology, etiology and therapy between the Mopti population and other

  15. PRIVATE GRAPHS – ACCESS RIGHTS ON GRAPHS FOR SEAMLESS NAVIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dorner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After the success of GNSS (Global Navigational Satellite Systems and navigation services for public streets, indoor seems to be the next big development in navigational services, relying on RTLS – Real Time Locating Services (e.g. WIFI and allowing seamless navigation. In contrast to navigation and routing services on public streets, seamless navigation will cause an additional challenge: how to make routing data accessible to defined users or restrict access rights for defined areas or only to parts of the graph to a defined user group? The paper will present case studies and data from literature, where seamless and especially indoor navigation solutions are presented (hospitals, industrial complexes, building sites, but the problem of restricted access rights was only touched from a real world, but not a technical perspective. The analysis of case studies will show, that the objective of navigation and the different target groups for navigation solutions will demand well defined access rights and require solutions, how to make only parts of a graph to a user or application available to solve a navigational task. The paper will therefore introduce the concept of private graphs, which is defined as a graph for navigational purposes covering the street, road or floor network of an area behind a public street and suggest different approaches how to make graph data for navigational purposes available considering access rights and data protection, privacy and security issues as well.

  16. Beyond Slopes and Points: Teaching Students How Graphs Describe the Relationships between Scientific Pheomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David; Gomez Zwiep, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Graphs represent complex information. They show relationships and help students see patterns and compare data. Students often do not appreciate the illuminating power of graphs, interpreting them literally rather than as symbolic representations (Leinhardt, Zaslavsky, and Stein 1990). Students often read graphs point by point instead of seeing…

  17. Multi-Label Classification Based on Low Rank Representation for Image Annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyu Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Annotating remote sensing images is a challenging task for its labor demanding annotation process and requirement of expert knowledge, especially when images can be annotated with multiple semantic concepts (or labels. To automatically annotate these multi-label images, we introduce an approach called Multi-Label Classification based on Low Rank Representation (MLC-LRR. MLC-LRR firstly utilizes low rank representation in the feature space of images to compute the low rank constrained coefficient matrix, then it adapts the coefficient matrix to define a feature-based graph and to capture the global relationships between images. Next, it utilizes low rank representation in the label space of labeled images to construct a semantic graph. Finally, these two graphs are exploited to train a graph-based multi-label classifier. To validate the performance of MLC-LRR against other related graph-based multi-label methods in annotating images, we conduct experiments on a public available multi-label remote sensing images (Land Cover. We perform additional experiments on five real-world multi-label image datasets to further investigate the performance of MLC-LRR. Empirical study demonstrates that MLC-LRR achieves better performance on annotating images than these comparing methods across various evaluation criteria; it also can effectively exploit global structure and label correlations of multi-label images.

  18. A Hybrid approach to molecular continuum processes combiningGaussian basis functions and the discrete variable representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, Thomas N.; Horner, Daniel A.; Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy,C. William

    2005-08-29

    Gaussian basis functions, routinely employed in molecular electronic structure calculations, can be combined with numerical grid-based functions in a discrete variable representation to provide an efficient method for computing molecular continuum wave functions. This approach, combined with exterior complex scaling, obviates the need for slowly convergent single-center expansions, and allows one to study a variety of electron-molecule collision problems. The method is illustrated by computation of various bound and continuum properties of H2+.

  19. Searches over graphs representing geospatial-temporal remote sensing data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brost, Randolph; Perkins, David Nikolaus

    2018-03-06

    Various technologies pertaining to identifying objects of interest in remote sensing images by searching over geospatial-temporal graph representations are described herein. Graphs are constructed by representing objects in remote sensing images as nodes, and connecting nodes with undirected edges representing either distance or adjacency relationships between objects and directed edges representing changes in time. Geospatial-temporal graph searches are made computationally efficient by taking advantage of characteristics of geospatial-temporal data in remote sensing images through the application of various graph search techniques.

  20. Integral trees and integral graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ligong

    2005-01-01

    This monograph deals with integral graphs, Laplacian integral regular graphs, cospectral graphs and cospectral integral graphs. The organization of this work, which consists of eight chapters, is as follows.

  1. Distributed Graph Filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loukas, A.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently seen a surge of research focusing on the processing of graph data. The emerging field of signal processing on graphs focuses on the extension of classical discrete signal processing techniques to the graph setting. Arguably, the greatest breakthrough of the field has been the

  2. The Shrikhande Graph

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    graph. We also note before closing this general discus- sion that among the family of regular and connected graphs, the graphs in the family of SRGs are character- ized by having exactly three distinct eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix. The friendship theorem asserts that if friendship in a community is a symmetric relation ...

  3. Spectra of Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.E.; Haemers, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    This book gives an elementary treatment of the basic material about graph spectra, both for ordinary, and Laplace and Seidel spectra. The text progresses systematically, by covering standard topics before presenting some new material on trees, strongly regular graphs, two-graphs, association

  4. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  5. Universal quantum graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhař, Z; Weidenmüller, H A

    2014-04-11

    For time-reversal invariant graphs we prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form: For graphs that are mixing in the classical limit, all spectral correlation functions coincide with those of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. For open graphs, we derive the analogous identities for all S-matrix correlation functions.

  6. Graph bisection revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotirov, Renata

    2017-01-01

    The graph bisection problem is the problem of partitioning the vertex set of a graph into two sets of given sizes such that the sum of weights of edges joining these two sets is optimized. We present a semidefinite programming relaxation for the graph bisection problem with a matrix variable of

  7. Hyperbolicity in median graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    If is hyperbolic, we denote by () the sharp hyperbolicity constant of , i.e., ( X ) = inf { ≥ 0 : X is − hyperbolic } . In this paper we study the hyperbolicity of median graphs and we also obtain some results about general hyperbolic graphs. In particular, we prove that a median graph is hyperbolic if and only if its ...

  8. Analytical Approaches for Identification and Representation of Critical Protection Systems in Transient Stability Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Mojdeh Khorsand

    After a major disturbance, the power system response is highly dependent on protection schemes and system dynamics. Improving power systems situational awareness requires proper and simultaneous modeling of both protection schemes and dynamic characteristics in power systems analysis tools. Historical information and ex-post analysis of blackouts reaffirm the critical role of protective devices in cascading events, thereby confirming the necessity to represent protective functions in transient stability studies. This dissertation is aimed at studying the importance of representing protective relays in power system dynamic studies. Although modeling all of the protective relays within transient stability studies may result in a better estimation of system behavior, representing, updating, and maintaining the protection system data becomes an insurmountable task. Inappropriate or outdated representation of the relays may result in incorrect assessment of the system behavior. This dissertation presents a systematic method to determine essential relays to be modeled in transient stability studies. The desired approach should identify protective relays that are critical for various operating conditions and contingencies. The results of the transient stability studies confirm that modeling only the identified critical protective relays is sufficient to capture system behavior for various operating conditions and precludes the need to model all of the protective relays. Moreover, this dissertation proposes a method that can be implemented to determine the appropriate location of out-of-step blocking relays. During unstable power swings, a generator or group of generators may accelerate or decelerate leading to voltage depression at the electrical center along with generator tripping. This voltage depression may cause protective relay mis-operation and unintentional separation of the system. In order to avoid unintentional islanding, the potentially mis-operating relays

  9. A knowledge representation approach using fuzzy cognitive maps for better navigation support in an adaptive learning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysafiadi, Konstantina; Virvou, Maria

    2013-12-01

    In this paper a knowledge representation approach of an adaptive and/or personalized tutoring system is presented. The domain knowledge should be represented in a more realistic way in order to allow the adaptive and/or personalized tutoring system to deliver the learning material to each individual learner dynamically taking into account her/his learning needs and her/his different learning pace. To succeed this, the domain knowledge representation has to depict the possible increase or decrease of the learner's knowledge. Considering that the domain concepts that constitute the learning material are not independent from each other, the knowledge representation approach has to allow the system to recognize either the domain concepts that are already partly or completely known for a learner, or the domain concepts that s/he has forgotten, taking into account the learner's knowledge level of the related concepts. In other words, the system should be informed about the knowledge dependencies that exist among the domain concepts of the learning material, as well as the strength on impact of each domain concept on others. Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCMs) seem to be an ideal way for representing graphically this kind of information. The suggested knowledge representation approach has been implemented in an e-learning adaptive system for teaching computer programming. The particular system was used by the students of a postgraduate program in the field of Informatics in the University of Piraeus and was compared with a corresponding system, in which the domain knowledge was represented using the most common used technique of network of concepts. The results of the evaluation were very encouraging.

  10. Students' Representational Fluency at University: A Cross-Sectional Measure of How Multiple Representations Are Used by Physics Students Using the Representational Fluency Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Matthew; Sharma, Manjula Devi

    2015-01-01

    To succeed within scientific disciplines, using representations, including those based on words, graphs, equations, and diagrams, is important. Research indicates that the use of discipline specific representations (sometimes referred to as expert generated representations), as well as multi-representational use, is critical for problem solving…

  11. Spectral Approach to Derive the Representation Formulae for Solutions of the Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusein Sh. Guseinov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral properties of the Laplace operator and some structural formula for rapidly decreasing functions of the Laplace operator, we offer a novel method to derive explicit formulae for solutions to the Cauchy problem for classical wave equation in arbitrary dimensions. Among them are the well-known d'Alembert, Poisson, and Kirchhoff representation formulae in low space dimensions.

  12. Incorporating Mental Representations in Discrete Choice Models of Travel Behaviour : Modelling Approach and Empirical Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Arentze (Theo); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); C.G. Chorus (Casper)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe introduce an extension of the discrete choice model to take into account individuals’ mental representation of a choice problem. We argue that, especially in daily activity and travel choices, the activated needs of an individual have an influence on the benefits he or she pursues in

  13. A Bayesian approach to the spatial representation of market structure from consumer choice data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeSarbo, WS; Wedel, M; Fong, DKH

    1998-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the spatial representation of market structure calibrated on actual or intended choice data. Previous models developed for that purpose accommodate consumer heterogeneity by estimating parameters for each consumer, typically using the method of maximum likelihood. This

  14. Joint Graph Layouts for Visualizing Collections of Segmented Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Jing

    2017-09-12

    We present a novel and efficient approach for computing joint graph layouts and then use it to visualize collections of segmented meshes. Our joint graph layout algorithm takes as input the adjacency matrices for a set of graphs along with partial, possibly soft, correspondences between nodes of different graphs. We then use a two stage procedure, where in the first step, we extend spectral graph drawing to include a consistency term so that a collection of graphs can be handled jointly. Our second step extends metric multi-dimensional scaling with stress majorization to the joint layout setting, while using the output of the spectral approach as initialization. Further, we discuss a user interface for exploring a collection of graphs. Finally, we show multiple example visualizations of graphs stemming from collections of segmented meshes and we present qualitative and quantitative comparisons with previous work.

  15. Graphs and Homomorphisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hell, Pavol

    2004-01-01

    This is a book about graph homomorphisms. Graph theory is now an established discipline but the study of graph homomorphisms has only recently begun to gain wide acceptance and interest. The subject gives a useful perspective in areas such as graph reconstruction, products, fractional and circular colourings, and has applications in complexity theory, artificial intelligence, telecommunication, and, most recently, statistical physics.Based on the authors' lecture notes for graduate courses, this book can be used as a textbook for a second course in graph theory at 4th year or master's level an

  16. Methods of visualizing graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, James J.

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  17. A graph kernel approach for alignment-free domain-peptide interaction prediction with an application to human SH3 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Kousik; Costa, Fabrizio; Backofen, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    State-of-the-art experimental data for determining binding specificities of peptide recognition modules (PRMs) is obtained by high-throughput approaches like peptide arrays. Most prediction tools applicable to this kind of data are based on an initial multiple alignment of the peptide ligands. Building an initial alignment can be error-prone, especially in the case of the proline-rich peptides bound by the SH3 domains. Here, we present a machine-learning approach based on an efficient graph-kernel technique to predict the specificity of a large set of 70 human SH3 domains, which are an important class of PRMs. The graph-kernel strategy allows us to (i) integrate several types of physico-chemical information for each amino acid, (ii) consider high-order correlations between these features and (iii) eliminate the need for an initial peptide alignment. We build specialized models for each human SH3 domain and achieve competitive predictive performance of 0.73 area under precision-recall curve, compared with 0.27 area under precision-recall curve for state-of-the-art methods based on position weight matrices. We show that better models can be obtained when we use information on the noninteracting peptides (negative examples), which is currently not used by the state-of-the art approaches based on position weight matrices. To this end, we analyze two strategies to identify subsets of high confidence negative data. The techniques introduced here are more general and hence can also be used for any other protein domains, which interact with short peptides (i.e. other PRMs). The program with the predictive models can be found at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SH3PepInt/SH3PepInt.tar.gz. We also provide a genome-wide prediction for all 70 human SH3 domains, which can be found under http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SH3PepInt/Genome-Wide-Predictions.tar.gz. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. When data representation compromise data security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Eivind Ortind; Dahl, Mads Ronald

    WHEN DATA REPRESENTATION COMPROMISE DATA SECURITY The workflow of transforming data into informative representations makes extensive usage of computers and software. Scientists have a conventional tradition for producing publications that include tables and graphs as data representations. These r...... the software companies having more interest in understanding and solving this type of data security issues.......WHEN DATA REPRESENTATION COMPROMISE DATA SECURITY The workflow of transforming data into informative representations makes extensive usage of computers and software. Scientists have a conventional tradition for producing publications that include tables and graphs as data representations....... These representations can be used for multiple purposes such as publications in journals, teaching and conference material. But when created, stored and distributed in a digital form there is a risk of compromising data security. Data beyond the once used specifically to create the representation can be included...

  19. Mapping Between Semantic Graphs and Sentences in Grammar Induction System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laszlo Kovacs

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The proposed transformation module performs mapping be-
    tween two di®erent knowledge representation forms used in grammar induction systems. The kernel knowledge representation form is a special predicate centered conceptual graph called ECG. The ECG provides a semantic-based, language independent description of the environment. The other base representation form is some kind of language. The sentences of the language should meet the corresponding grammatical rules. The pilot project demonstrates the functionality of a translator module using this transformation engine between the ECG graph and the Hungarian language.

  20. A representation-theoretic approach to the calculation of evolutionary distance in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jeremy G.; Jarvis, Peter D.; Francis, Andrew R.

    2017-08-01

    In the context of bacteria and models of their evolution under genome rearrangement, we explore a novel application of group representation theory to the inference of evolutionary history. Our contribution is to show, in a very general maximum likelihood setting, how to use elementary matrix algebra to sidestep intractable combinatorial computations and convert the problem into one of eigenvalue estimation amenable to standard numerical approximation techniques.

  1. Observing representational practices in art and anthropology – a transdisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Preiser, R

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that anthropology operates in “liminal spaces” which can be defined as “spaces between disciplines”. This study will explore the space where the fields of art and anthropology meet in order to discover the epistemological and representational challenges that arise from this encounter. The common ground on which art and anthropology engage can be defined in terms of their observational and knowledge producing practices. Both art and anthropology rely on observational skil...

  2. Sparse graphs using exchangeable random measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, François; Fox, Emily B

    2017-11-01

    Statistical network modelling has focused on representing the graph as a discrete structure, namely the adjacency matrix. When assuming exchangeability of this array-which can aid in modelling, computations and theoretical analysis-the Aldous-Hoover theorem informs us that the graph is necessarily either dense or empty. We instead consider representing the graph as an exchangeable random measure and appeal to the Kallenberg representation theorem for this object. We explore using completely random measures (CRMs) to define the exchangeable random measure, and we show how our CRM construction enables us to achieve sparse graphs while maintaining the attractive properties of exchangeability. We relate the sparsity of the graph to the Lévy measure defining the CRM. For a specific choice of CRM, our graphs can be tuned from dense to sparse on the basis of a single parameter. We present a scalable Hamiltonian Monte Carlo algorithm for posterior inference, which we use to analyse network properties in a range of real data sets, including networks with hundreds of thousands of nodes and millions of edges.

  3. Cultural identity and internationally adopted children: qualitative approach to parental representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, Aurélie; Skandrani, Sara; Sibeoni, Jordan; Pontvert, Caroline; Revah-Levy, Anne; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30 000 children are adopted across national borders each year. A review of the literature on the cultural belonging of these internationally adopted children shows substantial differences between the literature from English-speaking countries and that from France and Europe in general. The objective of this study is to start from the discourse of French adoptive parents to explore their representations of their child's cultural belonging and their positions (their thoughts and representations) concerning connections with the child's country of birth and its culture. The study includes 51 French parents who adopted one or more children internationally. Each parent participated in a semi-structured interview, focused on the adoption procedure and their current associations with the child's birth country. The interviews were analyzed according to a qualitative phenomenological method, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The principal themes that emerged from our analysis of the interviews made it possible to classify the parents into three different groups. The first group maintained no association with the child's country of birth and refused any multiplicity of cultural identities. The second group actively maintained regular associations with the child's country of birth and culture and affirmed that their family was multicultural. Finally, the third group adapted their associations with the child's birth country and its culture according to the child's questions and interests. Exploring parental representations of the adopted child enables professionals involved in adoption to provide better support to these families and to do preventive work at the level of family interactions.

  4. Cultural Identity and Internationally Adopted Children: Qualitative Approach to Parental Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, Aurélie; Skandrani, Sara; Sibeoni, Jordan; Pontvert, Caroline; Revah-Levy, Anne; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30 000 children are adopted across national borders each year. A review of the literature on the cultural belonging of these internationally adopted children shows substantial differences between the literature from English-speaking countries and that from France and Europe in general. The objective of this study is to start from the discourse of French adoptive parents to explore their representations of their child's cultural belonging and their positions (their thoughts and representations) concerning connections with the child's country of birth and its culture. The study includes 51 French parents who adopted one or more children internationally. Each parent participated in a semi-structured interview, focused on the adoption procedure and their current associations with the child's birth country. The interviews were analyzed according to a qualitative phenomenological method, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The principal themes that emerged from our analysis of the interviews made it possible to classify the parents into three different groups. The first group maintained no association with the child's country of birth and refused any multiplicity of cultural identities. The second group actively maintained regular associations with the child's country of birth and culture and affirmed that their family was multicultural. Finally, the third group adapted their associations with the child's birth country and its culture according to the child's questions and interests. Exploring parental representations of the adopted child enables professionals involved in adoption to provide better support to these families and to do preventive work at the level of family interactions. PMID:25775255

  5. Integer Flows and Circuit Covers of Graphs and Signed Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian

    The work in Chapter 2 is motivated by Tutte and Jaeger's pioneering work on converting modulo flows into integer-valued flows for ordinary graphs. For a signed graphs (G, sigma), we first prove that for each k ∈ {2, 3}, if (G, sigma) is (k - 1)-edge-connected and contains an even number of negative edges when k = 2, then every modulo k-flow of (G, sigma) can be converted into an integer-valued ( k + 1)-ow with a larger or the same support. We also prove that if (G, sigma) is odd-(2p+1)-edge-connected, then (G, sigma) admits a modulo circular (2 + 1/ p)-flows if and only if it admits an integer-valued circular (2 + 1/p)-flows, which improves all previous result by Xu and Zhang (DM2005), Schubert and Steffen (EJC2015), and Zhu (JCTB2015). Shortest circuit cover conjecture is one of the major open problems in graph theory. It states that every bridgeless graph G contains a set of circuits F such that each edge is contained in at least one member of F and the length of F is at most 7/5∥E(G)∥. This concept was recently generalized to signed graphs by Macajova et al. (JGT2015). In Chapter 3, we improve their upper bound from 11∥E( G)∥ to 14/3 ∥E(G)∥, and if G is 2-edgeconnected and has even negativeness, then it can be further reduced to 11/3 ∥E(G)∥. Tutte's 3-flow conjecture has been studied by many graph theorists in the last several decades. As a new approach to this conjecture, DeVos and Thomassen considered the vectors as ow values and found that there is a close relation between vector S1-flows and integer 3-NZFs. Motivated by their observation, in Chapter 4, we prove that if a graph G admits a vector S1-flow with rank at most two, then G admits an integer 3-NZF. The concept of even factors is highly related to the famous Four Color Theorem. We conclude this dissertation in Chapter 5 with an improvement of a recent result by Chen and Fan (JCTB2016) on the upperbound of even factors. We show that if a graph G contains an even factor, then it

  6. Enabling Graph Appliance for Genome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rina [ORNL; Graves, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Lee, Sangkeun (Matt) [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a huge growth in the amount of genomic data available as reads generated from various genome sequencers. The number of reads generated can be huge, ranging from hundreds to billions of nucleotide, each varying in size. Assembling such large amounts of data is one of the challenging computational problems for both biomedical and data scientists. Most of the genome assemblers developed have used de Bruijn graph techniques. A de Bruijn graph represents a collection of read sequences by billions of vertices and edges, which require large amounts of memory and computational power to store and process. This is the major drawback to de Bruijn graph assembly. Massively parallel, multi-threaded, shared memory systems can be leveraged to overcome some of these issues. The objective of our research is to investigate the feasibility and scalability issues of de Bruijn graph assembly on Cray s Urika-GD system; Urika-GD is a high performance graph appliance with a large shared memory and massively multithreaded custom processor designed for executing SPARQL queries over large-scale RDF data sets. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no research on representing a de Bruijn graph as an RDF graph or finding Eulerian paths in RDF graphs using SPARQL for potential genome discovery. In this paper, we address the issues involved in representing a de Bruin graphs as RDF graphs and propose an iterative querying approach for finding Eulerian paths in large RDF graphs. We evaluate the performance of our implementation on real world ebola genome datasets and illustrate how genome assembly can be accomplished with Urika-GD using iterative SPARQL queries.

  7. Approaching Borderlands. Literary Representation of the Border in the Novel Their dogs came with them by Helena María Viramontes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markéta Riebová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using three mutually interwoven theoretical approaches, the article analyses the complexity of the borderlands space in the literary representation of Los Angeles in the novel Their dogs came with them by Helena Maria Viramontes.

  8. Abordagem societal das representações sociais The societal approach of social representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria de Oliveira Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste artigo é apresentar as principais contribuições de Willem Doise para o desenvolvimento da teoria das representações sociais. Nesta direção, foram examinados: a Teoria das Representações Sociais como a grande teoria; a criação do Laboratório de Psicologia Social Experimental na Universidade de Genebra; os estudos experimentais sobre o desenvolvimento social da inteligência; os estudos experimentais das representações sociais; os quatro níveis de análise em Psicologia Social; as relações grupais; o paradigma das três fases; a pesquisa sobre os direitos humanos. Ainda que se considere que a adesão à Teoria das Representações Sociais pressupõe o estudo de indicadores que organizam o campo representacional, a análise dos posicionamentos individuais neste campo e a ancoragem destes posicionamentos nas dinâmicas societais, é preciso reconhecer que esta forma de fazê-lo ainda é pouco difundida nos meios científicos da América Latina.The aim of this paper is to present the main contributions of Willem Doise to the development of the Social Representations Theory. The following topics were examined: the Social Representations Theory as the grand theory; the foundation of Experimental Social Psychology Laboratory in University of Geneva; the experimental studies in social development of intelligence; the experimental studies in Social Representations; the four levels of analysis in Social Psychology; group relationships; the paradigm of three level and the human rights research. The adherence to the Social Representation Theory assumes the study of indicators that organize the representational field, the analysis of the individual positioning in this field and the anchoring of these positioning in the societal dynamics. Nevertheless, it is necessary to admit that this way of analysing is still little diffused in the scientific area of Latin America.

  9. Automatic Generation and Evaluation of Sentence Graphs out of Word Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Priss, U.; Corbett, D.; Angelova, G.

    This paper reports on the development of a system that automatically constructs representations of the meaning of sentences using rules of grammar and a dictionary of word meanings. The meanings of words and sentences are expressed using an extension of knowledge graphs, a semantic network

  10. RGFA: powerful and convenient handling of assembly graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Gonnella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The “Graphical Fragment Assembly” (GFA is an emerging format for the representation of sequence assembly graphs, which can be adopted by both de Bruijn graph- and string graph-based assemblers. Here we present RGFA, an implementation of the proposed GFA specification in Ruby. It allows the user to conveniently parse, edit and write GFA files. Complex operations such as the separation of the implicit instances of repeats and the merging of linear paths can be performed. A typical application of RGFA is the editing of a graph, to finish the assembly of a sequence, using information not available to the assembler. We illustrate a use case, in which the assembly of a repetitive metagenomic fosmid insert was completed using a script based on RGFA. Furthermore, we show how the API provided by RGFA can be employed to design complex graph editing algorithms. As an example, we developed a detection algorithm for CRISPRs in a de Bruijn graph. Finally, RGFA can be used for comparing assembly graphs, e.g., to document the changes in a graph after applying a GUI editor. A program, GFAdiff is provided, which compares the information in two graphs, and generate a report or a Ruby script documenting the transformation steps between the graphs.

  11. RGFA: powerful and convenient handling of assembly graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Giorgio; Kurtz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The "Graphical Fragment Assembly" (GFA) is an emerging format for the representation of sequence assembly graphs, which can be adopted by both de Bruijn graph- and string graph-based assemblers. Here we present RGFA, an implementation of the proposed GFA specification in Ruby. It allows the user to conveniently parse, edit and write GFA files. Complex operations such as the separation of the implicit instances of repeats and the merging of linear paths can be performed. A typical application of RGFA is the editing of a graph, to finish the assembly of a sequence, using information not available to the assembler. We illustrate a use case, in which the assembly of a repetitive metagenomic fosmid insert was completed using a script based on RGFA. Furthermore, we show how the API provided by RGFA can be employed to design complex graph editing algorithms. As an example, we developed a detection algorithm for CRISPRs in a de Bruijn graph. Finally, RGFA can be used for comparing assembly graphs, e.g., to document the changes in a graph after applying a GUI editor. A program, GFAdiff is provided, which compares the information in two graphs, and generate a report or a Ruby script documenting the transformation steps between the graphs.

  12. Representational Learning for Fault Diagnosis of Wind Turbine Equipment: A Multi-Layered Extreme Learning Machines Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and quick response fault diagnosis is crucial for the wind turbine generator system (WTGS to avoid unplanned interruption and to reduce the maintenance cost. However, the conditional data generated from WTGS operating in a tough environment is always dynamical and high-dimensional. To address these challenges, we propose a new fault diagnosis scheme which is composed of multiple extreme learning machines (ELM in a hierarchical structure, where a forwarding list of ELM layers is concatenated and each of them is processed independently for its corresponding role. The framework enables both representational feature learning and fault classification. The multi-layered ELM based representational learning covers functions including data preprocessing, feature extraction and dimension reduction. An ELM based autoencoder is trained to generate a hidden layer output weight matrix, which is then used to transform the input dataset into a new feature representation. Compared with the traditional feature extraction methods which may empirically wipe off some “insignificant’ feature information that in fact conveys certain undiscovered important knowledge, the introduced representational learning method could overcome the loss of information content. The computed output weight matrix projects the high dimensional input vector into a compressed and orthogonally weighted distribution. The last single layer of ELM is applied for fault classification. Unlike the greedy layer wise learning method adopted in back propagation based deep learning (DL, the proposed framework does not need iterative fine-tuning of parameters. To evaluate its experimental performance, comparison tests are carried out on a wind turbine generator simulator. The results show that the proposed diagnostic framework achieves the best performance among the compared approaches in terms of accuracy and efficiency in multiple faults detection of wind turbines.

  13. Label Information Guided Graph Construction for Semi-Supervised Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Liansheng; Zhou, Zihan; Gao, Shenghua; Yin, Jingwen; Lin, Zhouchen; Ma, Yi

    2017-09-01

    In the literature, most existing graph-based semi-supervised learning methods only use the label information of observed samples in the label propagation stage, while ignoring such valuable information when learning the graph. In this paper, we argue that it is beneficial to consider the label information in the graph learning stage. Specifically, by enforcing the weight of edges between labeled samples of different classes to be zero, we explicitly incorporate the label information into the state-of-the-art graph learning methods, such as the low-rank representation (LRR), and propose a novel semi-supervised graph learning method called semi-supervised low-rank representation. This results in a convex optimization problem with linear constraints, which can be solved by the linearized alternating direction method. Though we take LRR as an example, our proposed method is in fact very general and can be applied to any self-representation graph learning methods. Experiment results on both synthetic and real data sets demonstrate that the proposed graph learning method can better capture the global geometric structure of the data, and therefore is more effective for semi-supervised learning tasks.

  14. Incremental View Maintenance for Deductive Graph Databases Using Generalized Discrimination Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Beyhl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, graph databases are employed when relationships between entities are in the scope of database queries to avoid performance-critical join operations of relational databases. Graph queries are used to query and modify graphs stored in graph databases. Graph queries employ graph pattern matching that is NP-complete for subgraph isomorphism. Graph database views can be employed that keep ready answers in terms of precalculated graph pattern matches for often stated and complex graph queries to increase query performance. However, such graph database views must be kept consistent with the graphs stored in the graph database. In this paper, we describe how to use incremental graph pattern matching as technique for maintaining graph database views. We present an incremental maintenance algorithm for graph database views, which works for imperatively and declaratively specified graph queries. The evaluation shows that our maintenance algorithm scales when the number of nodes and edges stored in the graph database increases. Furthermore, our evaluation shows that our approach can outperform existing approaches for the incremental maintenance of graph query results.

  15. Nucleon Isovector Pairing in Nuclei: Microscopic Approach, Boson Representation, and Collective Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolos, R. V.; Kartavenko, V. G.; Kolganova, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    Nucleon pair correlations in atomic nuclei are analyzed within a nuclear microscopic model with residual isovector pairing forces. These are formulated in the boson representation of fermion operators whereby the collective mode of pair excitations can be isolated without restricting the size of the one-particle basis. This method allows one to analyze the fluctuations in the nonsuperfluid phase of nuclear matter, its phase transition to the superfluid phase, and strong pair correlations. The performance of the method is exemplified by numerical results for the nuclei in the vicinity of the doubly magic 56Ni nucleus.

  16. Introductory graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chartrand, Gary

    1984-01-01

    Graph theory is used today in the physical sciences, social sciences, computer science, and other areas. Introductory Graph Theory presents a nontechnical introduction to this exciting field in a clear, lively, and informative style. Author Gary Chartrand covers the important elementary topics of graph theory and its applications. In addition, he presents a large variety of proofs designed to strengthen mathematical techniques and offers challenging opportunities to have fun with mathematics. Ten major topics - profusely illustrated - include: Mathematical Models, Elementary Concepts of Grap

  17. Uncertain Graph Sparsification

    OpenAIRE

    Parchas, Panos; Papailiou, Nikolaos; Papadias, Dimitris; Bonchi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Uncertain graphs are prevalent in several applications including communications systems, biological databases and social networks. The ever increasing size of the underlying data renders both graph storage and query processing extremely expensive. Sparsification has often been used to reduce the size of deterministic graphs by maintaining only the important edges. However, adaptation of deterministic sparsification methods fails in the uncertain setting. To overcome this problem, we introduce...

  18. An analysis of multi-type relational interactions in FMA using graph motifs with disjointness constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Lingyun; Ogbuji, Chime; Joslyn, Cliff; Mejino, Jose; Sahoo, Satya S

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of multiple types of relationships among anatomical classes in the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) can provide inferred information valuable for quality assurance. This paper introduces a method called Motif Checking (MOCH) to study the effects of such multi-relation type interactions for detecting logical inconsistencies as well as other anomalies represented by the motifs. MOCH represents patterns of multi-type interaction as small labeled (with multiple types of edges) sub-graph motifs, whose nodes represent class variables, and labeled edges represent relational types. By representing FMA as an RDF graph and motifs as SPARQL queries, fragments of FMA are automatically obtained as auditing candidates. Leveraging the scalability and reconfigurability of Semantic Web Technology, we performed exhaustive analyses of a variety of labeled sub-graph motifs. The quality assurance feature of MOCH comes from the distinct use of a subset of the edges of the graph motifs as constraints for disjointness, whereby bringing in rule-based flavor to the approach as well. With possible disjointness implied by antonyms, we performed manual inspection of the resulting FMA fragments and tracked down sources of abnormal inferred conclusions (logical inconsistencies), which are amendable for programmatic revision of the FMA. Our results demonstrate that MOCH provides a unique source of valuable information for quality assurance. Since our approach is general, it is applicable to any ontological system with an OWL representation.

  19. Fault diagnosis of air conditioning systems based on qualitative bond graph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiaus, C.

    1999-01-01

    The bond graph method represents a unified approach for modeling engineering systems. The main idea is that power transfer bonds the components of a system. The bond graph model is the same for both quantitative representation, in which parameters have numerical values, and qualitative approach, in which they are classified qualitatively. To infer the cause of faults using a qualitative method, a system of qualitative equations must be solved. However, the characteristics of qualitative operators require specific methods for solving systems of equations having qualitative variables. This paper proposes both a method for recursively solving the qualitative system of equations derived from bond graph, and a bond graph model of a direct-expansion, mechanical vapor-compression air conditioning system. Results from diagnosing two faults in a real air conditioning system are presented and discussed. Occasionally, more than one fault candidate is inferred for the same set of qualitative values derived from measurements. In these cases, additional information is required to localize the fault. Fault diagnosis is initiated by a fault detection mechanism which also classifies the quantitative measurements into qualitative values; the fault detection is not presented here. (author)

  20. Verifying a medical protocol with temporal graphs: the case of a nosocomial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamsu-Foguem, Bernard; Tchuenté-Foguem, Germaine; Foguem, Clovis

    2014-08-01

    Our contribution focuses on the implementation of a formal verification approach for medical protocols with graphical temporal reasoning paths to facilitate the understanding of verification steps. Formal medical guideline specifications and background knowledge are represented through conceptual graphs, and reasoning is based on graph homomorphism. These materials explain the underlying principles or rationale that guide the functioning of verifications. An illustration of this proposal is made using a medical protocol defining guidelines for the monitoring and prevention of nosocomial infections. Such infections, which are acquired in the hospital, increase morbidity and mortality and add noticeably to economic burden. An evaluation of the use of the graphical verification found that this method aids in the improvement of both clinical knowledge and the quality of actions made. As conceptual graphs, representations based on diagrams can be translated into computational tree logic. However, diagrams are much more natural and explicitly human, emphasizing a theoretical and practical consistency. The proposed approach allows for the visual modeling of temporal reasoning and a formalization of knowledge that can assist in the diagnosis and treatment of nosocomial infections and some clinical problems. This is the first time that one emphasizes the temporal situation modeling in conceptual graphs. It will also deliver a formal verification method for clinical guideline analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  2. Loose Graph Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansutti, Alessio; Miculan, Marino; Peressotti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We introduce loose graph simulations (LGS), a new notion about labelled graphs which subsumes in an intuitive and natural way subgraph isomorphism (SGI), regular language pattern matching (RLPM) and graph simulation (GS). Being a unification of all these notions, LGS allows us to express directly...... also problems which are “mixed” instances of previous ones, and hence which would not fit easily in any of them. After the definition and some examples, we show that the problem of finding loose graph simulations is NP-complete, we provide formal translation of SGI, RLPM, and GS into LGSs, and we give...

  3. Graph factors modulo k

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    We prove a general result on graph factors modulo k . A special case says that, for each natural number k , every (12k−7)-edge-connected graph with an even number of vertices contains a spanning subgraph in which each vertex has degree congruent to k modulo 2k.......We prove a general result on graph factors modulo k . A special case says that, for each natural number k , every (12k−7)-edge-connected graph with an even number of vertices contains a spanning subgraph in which each vertex has degree congruent to k modulo 2k....

  4. Functions and graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, I M; Shnol, E E

    1969-01-01

    The second in a series of systematic studies by a celebrated mathematician I. M. Gelfand and colleagues, this volume presents students with a well-illustrated sequence of problems and exercises designed to illuminate the properties of functions and graphs. Since readers do not have the benefit of a blackboard on which a teacher constructs a graph, the authors abandoned the customary use of diagrams in which only the final form of the graph appears; instead, the book's margins feature step-by-step diagrams for the complete construction of each graph. The first part of the book employs simple fu

  5. Graph Generator Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lothian, Joshua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Sarah S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sullivan, Blair D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baker, Matthew B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schrock, Jonathan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poole, Stephen W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of different application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  6. Majorana Representation and Mean Field Approach for Interacting-Boson System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Di; Fang, Jie; Zheng, Tai-Yu

    2017-10-01

    The Majorana representation, which represents a quantum state by stars on the Bloch sphere, provides us an intuitive tool to study the quantum evolution in high dimensional Hilbert space. In this work, we investigate the second quantized model and the mean-field model for the interacting-boson system in the Majorana representation. It is shown that the motions of states in the two models are same in the linear case. Furthermore, the contribution of the nonlinear interaction to the star motions in the second quantized model can be expressed by a single star part which is equal to the nonlinear part of the equation for the star in mean-field model under large boson number limit and an extra part caused by the correlation between stars. These differences and relations can not only be reflected by the population differences between the two boson modes in the two models, but also lie with the differences between the continuous changes of the second quantized evolution with the nonlinear interacting strength and the critical behavior of the mean-field evolution which related to the self-trapping effect. The reason of the difference between the two models is also discussed by an effective Hamiltonian. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11405008, 11175044, and the Plan for Scientific and Technological Development of Jilin Province under Grant No. 20160520173JH

  7. cuRRBS: simple and robust evaluation of enzyme combinations for reduced representation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Herranz, Daniel E; Ribeiro, António J M; Krueger, Felix; Thornton, Janet M; Reik, Wolf; Stubbs, Thomas M

    2017-11-16

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification in many species that is critical for development, and implicated in ageing and many complex diseases, such as cancer. Many cost-effective genome-wide analyses of DNA modifications rely on restriction enzymes capable of digesting genomic DNA at defined sequence motifs. There are hundreds of restriction enzyme families but few are used to date, because no tool is available for the systematic evaluation of restriction enzyme combinations that can enrich for certain sites of interest in a genome. Herein, we present customised Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (cuRRBS), a novel and easy-to-use computational method that solves this problem. By computing the optimal enzymatic digestions and size selection steps required, cuRRBS generalises the traditional MspI-based Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (RRBS) protocol to all restriction enzyme combinations. In addition, cuRRBS estimates the fold-reduction in sequencing costs and provides a robustness value for the personalised RRBS protocol, allowing users to tailor the protocol to their experimental needs. Moreover, we show in silico that cuRRBS-defined restriction enzymes consistently out-perform MspI digestion in many biological systems, considering both CpG and CHG contexts. Finally, we have validated the accuracy of cuRRBS predictions for single and double enzyme digestions using two independent experimental datasets. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. [Quality of life and AIDS from the perspective of persons living with HIV: a preliminary contribution by the structural approach to social representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tadeu Lessa da; Oliveira, Denize Cristina de; Formozo, Gláucia Alexandre

    2015-02-01

    This descriptive qualitative study had the following objectives: identify the content and structure of social representations of quality of life and AIDS for persons living with the disease and analyze the structural relations between such representations. The sample included 103 persons with HIV in a municipality (county) in northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. The methodology used free and hierarchical recall of words for the inductive terms "AIDS" and "quality of life for persons with AIDS", with analysis by the EVOC software. The probable core representation of AIDS was identified as: prejudice, treatment, family, and medications, with the same components identified for quality of life, plus healthy diet and work. We thus elaborated the hypothesis of joint, coordinated representational interaction, fitting the representations together, with implications for the symbolic grasp and quality of life for persons living with HIV. The findings provide backing for collective and individual health approaches to improve quality of life in this group.

  9. Characterisations of Intersection Graphs by Vertex Orderings

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Characterisations of interval graphs, comparability graphs, co-comparability graphs, permutation graphs, and split graphs in terms of linear orderings of the vertex set are presented. As an application, it is proved that interval graphs, co-comparability graphs, AT-free graphs, and split graphs have bandwidth bounded by their maximum degree.

  10. High Dimensional Spectral Graph Theory and Non-backtracking Random Walks on Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Mark

    This thesis has two primary areas of focus. First we study connection graphs, which are weighted graphs in which each edge is associated with a d-dimensional rotation matrix for some fixed dimension d, in addition to a scalar weight. Second, we study non-backtracking random walks on graphs, which are random walks with the additional constraint that they cannot return to the immediately previous state at any given step. Our work in connection graphs is centered on the notion of consistency, that is, the product of rotations moving from one vertex to another is independent of the path taken, and a generalization called epsilon-consistency. We present higher dimensional versions of the combinatorial Laplacian matrix and normalized Laplacian matrix from spectral graph theory, and give results characterizing the consistency of a connection graph in terms of the spectra of these matrices. We generalize several tools from classical spectral graph theory, such as PageRank and effective resistance, to apply to connection graphs. We use these tools to give algorithms for sparsification, clustering, and noise reduction on connection graphs. In non-backtracking random walks, we address the question raised by Alon et. al. concerning how the mixing rate of a non-backtracking random walk to its stationary distribution compares to the mixing rate for an ordinary random walk. Alon et. al. address this question for regular graphs. We take a different approach, and use a generalization of Ihara's Theorem to give a new proof of Alon's result for regular graphs, and to extend the result to biregular graphs. Finally, we give a non-backtracking version of Polya's Random Walk Theorem for 2-dimensional grids.

  11. Graph Embedded Extreme Learning Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosifidis, Alexandros; Tefas, Anastasios; Pitas, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel extension of the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm for single-hidden layer feedforward neural network training that is able to incorporate subspace learning (SL) criteria on the optimization process followed for the calculation of the network's output weights. The proposed graph embedded ELM (GEELM) algorithm is able to naturally exploit both intrinsic and penalty SL criteria that have been (or will be) designed under the graph embedding framework. In addition, we extend the proposed GEELM algorithm in order to be able to exploit SL criteria in arbitrary (even infinite) dimensional ELM spaces. We evaluate the proposed approach on eight standard classification problems and nine publicly available datasets designed for three problems related to human behavior analysis, i.e., the recognition of human face, facial expression, and activity. Experimental results denote the effectiveness of the proposed approach, since it outperforms other ELM-based classification schemes in all the cases.

  12. A first course in graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chartrand, Gary

    2012-01-01

    This comprehensive text offers undergraduates a remarkably student-friendly introduction to graph theory. Written by two of the field's most prominent experts, it takes an engaging approach that emphasizes graph theory's history. Unique examples and lucid proofs provide a sound yet accessible treatment that stimulates interest in an evolving subject and its many applications.Optional sections designated as ""excursion"" and ""exploration"" present interesting sidelights of graph theory and touch upon topics that allow students the opportunity to experiment and use their imaginations. Three app

  13. Crossed products for interactions and graph algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasniewski, Bartosz

    2014-01-01

    . These results cover the case of crossed products by endomorphisms with hereditary ranges and complemented kernels. As model examples of interactions not coming from endomorphisms we introduce and study in detail interactions arising from finite graphs. The interaction (V,H) associated to a graph E acts...... on the core F_E of the graph algebra C*(E). By describing a partial homeomorphism dual to (V,H) we find the fundamental structure theorems for C*(E), such as Cuntz–Krieger uniqueness theorem, as results concerning reversible noncommutative dynamics on F_E . We also provide a new approach to calculation of K...

  14. The partition dimension of cycle books graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Jaya; Darmaji

    2018-03-01

    Let G be a nontrivial and connected graph with vertex set V(G), edge set E(G) and S ⊆ V(G) with v ∈ V(G), the distance between v and S is d(v,S) = min{d(v,x)|x ∈ S}. For an ordered partition ∏ = {S 1, S 2, S 3,…, Sk } of V(G), the representation of v with respect to ∏ is defined by r(v|∏) = (d(v, S 1), d(v, S 2),…, d(v, Sk )). The partition ∏ is called a resolving partition of G if all representations of vertices are distinct. The partition dimension pd(G) is the smallest integer k such that G has a resolving partition set with k members. In this research, we will determine the partition dimension of Cycle Books {B}{Cr,m}. Cycle books graph {B}{Cr,m} is a graph consisting of m copies cycle Cr with the common path P 2. It is shown that the partition dimension of cycle books graph, pd({B}{C3,m}) is 3 for m = 2, 3, and m for m ≥ 4. pd({B}{C4,m}) is 3 + 2k for m = 3k + 2, 4 + 2(k ‑ 1) for m = 3k + 1, and 3 + 2(k ‑ 1) for m = 3k. pd({B}{C5,m}) is m + 1.

  15. How the public engages with global warming: A social representations approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas; Joffe, Helene

    2013-01-01

    The present study utilises social representations theory to explore common sense conceptualisations of global warming risk using an in-depth, qualitative methodology. Fifty-six members of a British, London-based 2008 public were initially asked to draw or write four spontaneous "first thoughts or feelings" about global warming. These were then explored via an open-ended, exploratory interview. The analysis revealed that first thoughts, either drawn or written, often mirrored the images used by the British press to depict global warming visually. Thus in terms of media framings, it was their visual rather than their textual content that was spontaneously available for their audiences. Furthermore, an in-depth exploration of interview data revealed that global warming was structured around three themata: self/other, natural/unnatural and certainty/uncertainty, reflecting the complex and often contradictory nature of common sense thinking in relation to risk issues.

  16. The (nontree-representability of syntactic objects.a graft-theoretical approach to nominal coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Tănase-Dogaru

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with nominal coordination and the way Graft Theory can be applied to this domain. As introduced and defined by van Riemsdijk (1998, 2000 and 2001, Graft Theory was initially applied to the domain of syntactic amalgams (Lakoff 1974 and transparent free relative clauses. The paper claims that Graft Theory can equally apply to the domain of coordination and a range of syntactic phenomena that are associated with coordination. The main idea that this paper advances is that Graft Theory could solve the problem of syntactic representability with coordinate structures, which are known to pose serious difficulties for binary branching. By endorsing the main tenets of Graft Theory, the paper also touches upon an issue with far-reaching implications: the (impossibility of representing certain syntactic objects as syntactic trees.

  17. Using the concrete-representational-abstract approach to support students with intellectual disability to solve change-making problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily; Park, Jiyoon; Nickell, Barb

    2017-01-01

    The Concrete-Representational-Abstract (CRA) instructional approach supports students with disabilities in mathematics. Yet, no research explores the use of the CRA approach to teach functional-based mathematics for this population and limited research explores the CRA approach for students who have a disability different from a learning disability, such as an intellectual disability. This study investigated the effects of using the CRA approach to teach middle school students in a self-contained mathematics class focused on functional-based mathematics to solve making change problems. Researchers used a multiple probe across participants design to determine if a functional relation existed between the CRA strategy and students' ability to solve making change problems. The study of consisted of five-to-eight baseline sessions, 9-11 intervention sessions, and two maintenance sessions for each student. Data were collected on percentage of making change problems students solved correctly. The CRA instructional strategy was effective in teaching all four participants to correctly solve the problems; a functional relation between the CRA approach and solving making change with coins problems across all participants was found. The CRA instructional approach can be used to support students with mild intellectual disability or severe learning disabilities in learning functional-based mathematics, such as purchasing skills (i.e., making change). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards a multilevel cognitive probabilistic representation of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapus, Adriana; Vasudevan, Shrihari; Siegwart, Roland

    2005-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of perception and representation of space for a mobile agent. A probabilistic hierarchical framework is suggested as a solution to this problem. The method proposed is a combination of probabilistic belief with "Object Graph Models" (OGM). The world is viewed from a topological optic, in terms of objects and relationships between them. The hierarchical representation that we propose permits an efficient and reliable modeling of the information that the mobile agent would perceive from its environment. The integration of both navigational and interactional capabilities through efficient representation is also addressed. Experiments on a set of images taken from the real world that validate the approach are reported. This framework draws on the general understanding of human cognition and perception and contributes towards the overall efforts to build cognitive robot companions.

  19. Supporting learning and promoting conceptual change with box and AVOW diagrams. Part 1: Representational design and instructional approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peter C.-H.; Shipstone, David M.

    2003-02-01

    A new approach to the teaching of electricity is described that uses box and AVOW diagrams, novel representations of the properties of the electric circuit which portray current, voltage, resistance and power. The diagrams have been developed as aids to learning, understanding and problem solving. They also have the potential to promote conceptual change by challenging a number of commonly held misconceptions. The diagrams have been incorporated into A-level teaching materials on d.c. circuit theory and the rationale for this approach is contrasted with a number of strategies that have previously been reported. Part 2 of this paper (Cheng and Shipstone, International Journal of Science Education, in press) will present the results of preliminary school-based trials.

  20. Affine Moment Invariants Generated by Graph Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suk, Tomáš; Flusser, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 9 (2011), 2047 – 2056 ISSN 0031-3203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/1593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Image moments * Object recognition * Affine transformation * Affine moment invariants * Pseudoinvariants * Graph representation * Irreducibility * Independence Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 2.292, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/ZOI/suk-0359752.pdf

  1. Representation of Time-Relevant Common Data Elements in the Cancer Data Standards Repository: Statistical Evaluation of an Ontological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Henry W; Du, Jingcheng; Song, Hsing-Yi; Liu, Xiangyu; Jiang, Guoqian; Tao, Cui

    2018-02-22

    Today, there is an increasing need to centralize and standardize electronic health data within clinical research as the volume of data continues to balloon. Domain-specific common data elements (CDEs) are emerging as a standard approach to clinical research data capturing and reporting. Recent efforts to standardize clinical study CDEs have been of great benefit in facilitating data integration and data sharing. The importance of the temporal dimension of clinical research studies has been well recognized; however, very few studies have focused on the formal representation of temporal constraints and temporal relationships within clinical research data in the biomedical research community. In particular, temporal information can be extremely powerful to enable high-quality cancer research. The objective of the study was to develop and evaluate an ontological approach to represent the temporal aspects of cancer study CDEs. We used CDEs recorded in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR) and created a CDE parser to extract time-relevant CDEs from the caDSR. Using the Web Ontology Language (OWL)-based Time Event Ontology (TEO), we manually derived representative patterns to semantically model the temporal components of the CDEs using an observing set of randomly selected time-related CDEs (n=600) to create a set of TEO ontological representation patterns. In evaluating TEO's ability to represent the temporal components of the CDEs, this set of representation patterns was tested against two test sets of randomly selected time-related CDEs (n=425). It was found that 94.2% (801/850) of the CDEs in the test sets could be represented by the TEO representation patterns. In conclusion, TEO is a good ontological model for representing the temporal components of the CDEs recorded in caDSR. Our representative model can harness the Semantic Web reasoning and inferencing functionalities and present a means for temporal CDEs to be machine

  2. Analyzing Social Media Relationships in Context with Discussion Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiciman, Emre; Choudhury, Munmun De; Counts, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We present discussion graphs, a hyper-graph-based representation of social media discussions that captures both the structural features of the relationships among entities as well as the context of the discussions from which they were derived. Building on previous analyses of social media networks....... First, we extend standard hyper-graph representations of networks to include the distribution of contexts surrounding discussions in social media networks. Second, we demonstrate how this context is useful for understanding the results of common graph measures and analyses, such as network centrality...... and pseudo-cliques, when applied to the analysis of textual social media content. We apply our framework across several domains captured in Twitter, including the mining of peoples' statements about their locations and activities and discussions of the U.S. 2012 elections....

  3. Graphs Generated by Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Assari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a graph is assigned to any probability measure on the σ-algebra of Borel sets of a topological space. Using this construction, it is proved that given any number n (finite or infinite there exists a nonregular graph such that its clique, chromatic, and dominating number equals n.

  4. Graphing Electric Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, Marvin L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the powerful graphing ability of computer algebra systems (CAS) to create three-dimensional graphs or surface graphics of electric potentials. Provides equations along with examples of the printouts. Lists the programs Mathematica, Maple, Derive, Theorist, MathCad, and MATLAB as promising CAS systems. (MVL)

  5. Recognition of fractal graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perepelitsa, VA; Sergienko, [No Value; Kochkarov, AM

    1999-01-01

    Definitions of prefractal and fractal graphs are introduced, and they are used to formulate mathematical models in different fields of knowledge. The topicality of fractal-graph recognition from the point of view, of fundamental improvement in the efficiency of the solution of algorithmic problems

  6. Adventures in graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Joyner, W David

    2017-01-01

    This textbook acts as a pathway to higher mathematics by seeking and illuminating the connections between graph theory and diverse fields of mathematics, such as calculus on manifolds, group theory, algebraic curves, Fourier analysis, cryptography and other areas of combinatorics. An overview of graph theory definitions and polynomial invariants for graphs prepares the reader for the subsequent dive into the applications of graph theory. To pique the reader’s interest in areas of possible exploration, recent results in mathematics appear throughout the book, accompanied with examples of related graphs, how they arise, and what their valuable uses are. The consequences of graph theory covered by the authors are complicated and far-reaching, so topics are always exhibited in a user-friendly manner with copious graphs, exercises, and Sage code for the computation of equations. Samples of the book’s source code can be found at github.com/springer-math/adventures-in-graph-theory. The text is geared towards ad...

  7. Packing Degenerate Graphs Greedily

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allen, P.; Böttcher, J.; Hladký, J.; Piguet, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, August (2017), s. 45-51 ISSN 1571-0653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-07822Y Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : tree packing conjecture * graph packing * graph processes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics

  8. Graph Colouring Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husfeldt, Thore

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to graph colouring algorithms. The focus is on vertex-colouring algorithms that work for general classes of graphs with worst-case performance guarantees in a sequential model of computation. The presentation aims to demonstrate the breadth of available...

  9. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  10. IStar: a raster representation for scalable image and volume data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniss, Joe; Hunt, Warren; Potter, Kristin; Sen, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Topology has been an important tool for analyzing scalar data and flow fields in visualization. In this work, we analyze the topology of multivariate image and volume data sets with discontinuities in order to create an efficient, raster-based representation we call IStar. Specifically, the topology information is used to create a dual structure that contains nodes and connectivity information for every segmentable region in the original data set. This graph structure, along with a sampled representation of the segmented data set, is embedded into a standard raster image which can then be substantially downsampled and compressed. During rendering, the raster image is upsampled and the dual graph is used to reconstruct the original function. Unlike traditional raster approaches, our representation can preserve sharp discontinuities at any level of magnification, much like scalable vector graphics. However, because our representation is raster-based, it is well suited to the real-time rendering pipeline. We demonstrate this by reconstructing our data sets on graphics hardware at real-time rates.

  11. Generalized connectivity of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xueliang

    2016-01-01

    Noteworthy results, proof techniques, open problems and conjectures in generalized (edge-) connectivity are discussed in this book. Both theoretical and practical analyses for generalized (edge-) connectivity of graphs are provided. Topics covered in this book include: generalized (edge-) connectivity of graph classes, algorithms, computational complexity, sharp bounds, Nordhaus-Gaddum-type results, maximum generalized local connectivity, extremal problems, random graphs, multigraphs, relations with the Steiner tree packing problem and generalizations of connectivity. This book enables graduate students to understand and master a segment of graph theory and combinatorial optimization. Researchers in graph theory, combinatorics, combinatorial optimization, probability, computer science, discrete algorithms, complexity analysis, network design, and the information transferring models will find this book useful in their studies.

  12. GoFFish: A Sub-Graph Centric Framework for Large-Scale Graph Analytics1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmhan, Yogesh; Kumbhare, Alok; Wickramaarachchi, Charith; Nagarkar, Soonil; Ravi, Santosh; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Prasanna, Viktor

    2014-08-25

    Large scale graph processing is a major research area for Big Data exploration. Vertex centric programming models like Pregel are gaining traction due to their simple abstraction that allows for scalable execution on distributed systems naturally. However, there are limitations to this approach which cause vertex centric algorithms to under-perform due to poor compute to communication overhead ratio and slow convergence of iterative superstep. In this paper we introduce GoFFish a scalable sub-graph centric framework co-designed with a distributed persistent graph storage for large scale graph analytics on commodity clusters. We introduce a sub-graph centric programming abstraction that combines the scalability of a vertex centric approach with the flexibility of shared memory sub-graph computation. We map Connected Components, SSSP and PageRank algorithms to this model to illustrate its flexibility. Further, we empirically analyze GoFFish using several real world graphs and demonstrate its significant performance improvement, orders of magnitude in some cases, compared to Apache Giraph, the leading open source vertex centric implementation. We map Connected Components, SSSP and PageRank algorithms to this model to illustrate its flexibility. Further, we empirically analyze GoFFish using several real world graphs and demonstrate its significant performance improvement, orders of magnitude in some cases, compared to Apache Giraph, the leading open source vertex centric implementation.

  13. A graph model for opportunistic network coding

    KAUST Repository

    Sorour, Sameh

    2015-08-12

    © 2015 IEEE. Recent advancements in graph-based analysis and solutions of instantly decodable network coding (IDNC) trigger the interest to extend them to more complicated opportunistic network coding (ONC) scenarios, with limited increase in complexity. In this paper, we design a simple IDNC-like graph model for a specific subclass of ONC, by introducing a more generalized definition of its vertices and the notion of vertex aggregation in order to represent the storage of non-instantly-decodable packets in ONC. Based on this representation, we determine the set of pairwise vertex adjacency conditions that can populate this graph with edges so as to guarantee decodability or aggregation for the vertices of each clique in this graph. We then develop the algorithmic procedures that can be applied on the designed graph model to optimize any performance metric for this ONC subclass. A case study on reducing the completion time shows that the proposed framework improves on the performance of IDNC and gets very close to the optimal performance.

  14. Graphs for information security control in software defined networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusho, Alexander A.; Abaev, Pavel O.; Shorgin, Sergey Ya.; Timonina, Elena E.

    2017-07-01

    Information security control in software defined networks (SDN) is connected with execution of the security policy rules regulating information accesses and protection against distribution of the malicious code and harmful influences. The paper offers a representation of a security policy in the form of hierarchical structure which in case of distribution of resources for the solution of tasks defines graphs of admissible interactions in a networks. These graphs define commutation tables of switches via the SDN controller.

  15. Block-Diagonal Constrained Low-Rank and Sparse Graph for Discriminant Analysis of Image Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, low-rank and sparse model-based dimensionality reduction (DR methods have aroused lots of interest. In this paper, we propose an effective supervised DR technique named block-diagonal constrained low-rank and sparse-based embedding (BLSE. BLSE has two steps, i.e., block-diagonal constrained low-rank and sparse representation (BLSR and block-diagonal constrained low-rank and sparse graph embedding (BLSGE. Firstly, the BLSR model is developed to reveal the intrinsic intra-class and inter-class adjacent relationships as well as the local neighborhood relations and global structure of data. Particularly, there are mainly three items considered in BLSR. First, a sparse constraint is required to discover the local data structure. Second, a low-rank criterion is incorporated to capture the global structure in data. Third, a block-diagonal regularization is imposed on the representation to promote discrimination between different classes. Based on BLSR, informative and discriminative intra-class and inter-class graphs are constructed. With the graphs, BLSGE seeks a low-dimensional embedding subspace by simultaneously minimizing the intra-class scatter and maximizing the inter-class scatter. Experiments on public benchmark face and object image datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Product of Locally Primitive Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Assari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many large graphs can be constructed from existing smaller graphs by using graph operations, such as the product of two graphs. Many properties of such large graphs are closely related to those of the corresponding smaller ones. In this paper we consider the product of two locally primitive graphs and prove that only tensor product of them will also be locally primitive.

  17. Elementary Students' Generalization and Representation of Functional Relationships: A Learning Progressions Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Ana; Fonger, Nicole L.; Blanton, Maria; Knuth, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our learning progressions approach to early algebra research that involves the coordination of a curricular framework, an instructional sequence, written assessments, and levels of sophistication describing the development of students' thinking. We focus in particular on what we have learning through this approach about…

  18. Spanners for geometric intersection graphs with applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fürer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A ball graph is an intersection graph of a set of balls with arbitrary radii. Given a real numbert>1, we say that a subgraph G' of a graph G is a t-spanner of G, if for every pair of verticesu,v in G, there exists a path in G' of length at most t times the distance between u and v inG. In this paper, we consider the problem of efficiently constructing sparse spanners of ball graphs which supports fast shortest path distance queries.We present the first algorithm for constructing spanners of ball graphs. For a ball graph in Rk, we construct a (1+ε-spanner for any ε>0 with O(nε-k+1 edges in O(n2ℓ+δε-k logℓ S time, using an efficient partitioning of space into hypercubes and solving intersection problems. Here ℓ=1-1/(⌊k/2⌋+2, δ is any positive constant, and S is the ratio between the largest and smallest radius. For the special case when the balls all have unit size, we show that the complexity of constructing a (1+ε-spanner is almost equal to the complexity of constructing a Euclidean minimum spanning tree. The algorithm extends naturally to other disk-likeobjects, also in higher dimensions.The algorithm uses an efficient subdivision of space to construct a sparse graph having many of the same distance properties as the input ball graph. Additionally, the constructed spanners have a small vertex separator decomposition (hereditary. In dimension k=2, the disk graph spanner has an O(n1/2ε-3/2+ε-3log S separator. The presence of a small separator is then exploited to obtain very efficient data structures for approximate distance queries. The results on geometric graph separators might be of independent interest. For example, since complete Euclidean graphs are just a special case of (unit ball graphs, our results also provide a new approach for constructing spanners with small separators in these graphs.

  19. Subgraph detection using graph signals

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar

    2017-03-06

    In this paper we develop statistical detection theory for graph signals. In particular, given two graphs, namely, a background graph that represents an usual activity and an alternative graph that represents some unusual activity, we are interested in answering the following question: To which of the two graphs does the observed graph signal fit the best? To begin with, we assume both the graphs are known, and derive an optimal Neyman-Pearson detector. Next, we derive a suboptimal detector for the case when the alternative graph is not known. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical experiments.

  20. The Cognitive Neuroplasticity of Reading Recovery following Chronic Stroke: A Representational Similarity Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Baum, Simon; Jang, Ava; Kajander, David

    2017-01-01

    Damage to certain left hemisphere regions leads to reading impairments, at least acutely, though some individuals eventually recover reading. Previous neuroimaging studies have shown a relationship between reading recovery and increases in contralesional and perilesional activation during word reading tasks, relative to controls. Questions remain about how to interpret these changes in activation. Do these changes reflect functional take-over, a reorganization of functions in the damaged brain? Or do they reveal compensatory masquerade or the use of alternative neural pathways to reading that are available in both patients and controls? We address these questions by studying a single individual, CH, who has made a partial recovery of reading familiar words following stroke. We use an fMRI analysis technique, representational similarity analysis (RSA), which allows us to decode cognitive function from distributed patterns of neural activity. Relative to controls, we find that CH shows a shift from visual to orthographic processing in contralesional regions, with a marginally significant result in perilesional regions as well. This pattern supports a contralesional reorganization of orthographic processing following stroke. More generally, these analyses demonstrate how powerful RSA can be for mapping the neural plasticity of language function.

  1. Paranoia and the social representation of others: a large-scale game theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raihani, Nichola J; Bell, Vaughan

    2017-07-03

    Current definitions of paranoia include two key components: unfounded ideas of harm and the idea that the harm is intended by others. However, attributions of harmful intent have been poorly studied and mainly using artificial scenarios rather than participation in genuine social interactions where genuine resources are at stake. Using a large non-clinical population (N = 3229) recruited online, we asked people to complete a measure of paranoid ideation before playing a modified Dictator Game, where the 'dictator' can allocate money to the partner (the 'receiver'). Participants were allocated to the role of receiver or of an uninvolved observer; and evaluated to what extent they believed dictator decisions were motivated by (i) self-interest or (ii) harmful intent. All participants attributed more harmful intent to unfair as opposed to fair dictators. Paranoia had a positive effect on harmful intent attribution, for both fair and unfair dictators. Paranoia did not interact with attributions of self-interest. Importantly, highly paranoid participants attributed equally strong harmful intent to the dictator in the observer role as in the receiver role. This challenges the assumption that paranoia is mainly due to an exaggerated sense of personalised threat and suggests instead that paranoia involves a negative social representations of others.

  2. Generalized generating functional for mixed-representation Green's functions: A quantum-mechanical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasone, Massimo; Jizba, Petr; Smaldone, Luca

    2017-11-01

    When one tries to take into account the nontrivial vacuum structure of quantum field theory, the standard functional-integral tools, such as generating functionals or transitional amplitudes, are often quite inadequate for such purposes. Here we propose a generalized generating functional for Green's functions which allows one to easily distinguish among a continuous set of vacua that are mutually connected via unitary canonical transformations. In order to keep our discussion as simple as possible, we limit ourselves to quantum mechanics where the generating functional of Green's functions is constructed by means of phase-space path integrals. The quantum-mechanical setting allows us to accentuate the main logical steps involved without embarking on technical complications such as renormalization or inequivalent representations that should otherwise be addressed in the full-fledged quantum field theory. We illustrate the inner workings of the generating functional obtained by discussing Green's functions among vacua that are mutually connected via translations and dilatations. Salient issues, including connection with quantum field theory, vacuum-to-vacuum transition amplitudes, and perturbation expansion in the vacuum parameter, are also briefly discussed.

  3. Gist Representations and Communication of Risks about HIV-AIDS: A Fuzzy-Trace Theory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelms, Evan A; Reyna, Valerie F; Brust-Renck, Priscila; Weldon, Rebecca B; Corbin, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    As predicted by fuzzy-trace theory, people with a range of training—from untrained adolescents to expert physicians—are susceptible to biases and errors in judgment and perception of HIV-AIDS risk. To explain why this occurs, we introduce fuzzy-trace theory as a theoretical perspective that describes these errors to be a function of knowledge deficits, gist-based representation of risk categories, retrieval failure for risk knowledge, and processing interference (e.g., base-rate neglect) in combining risk estimates. These principles explain how people perceive HIV-AIDS risk and why they take risks with potentially lethal outcomes, often despite rote (verbatim) knowledge.For example, people inappropriately generalize the wrong gist about condoms' effectiveness against fluid-borne disease to diseases that are transferred skin-to-skin, such as HPV. We also describe how variation in processing in adolescence (e.g., more verbatim processing compared to adults) can be a route to risk-taking that explains key aspects of why many people are infected with HIV in youth, as well as how interventions that emphasize bottom-line gists communicate risks effectively.

  4. Probabilistic graphs as a conceptual and computational tool in hydrology and water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoups, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Originally developed in the fields of machine learning and artificial intelligence, probabilistic graphs constitute a general framework for modeling complex systems in the presence of uncertainty. The framework consists of three components: 1. Representation of the model as a graph (or network), with nodes depicting random variables in the model (e.g. parameters, states, etc), which are joined together by factors. Factors are local probabilistic or deterministic relations between subsets of variables, which, when multiplied together, yield the joint distribution over all variables. 2. Consistent use of probability theory for quantifying uncertainty, relying on basic rules of probability for assimilating data into the model and expressing unknown variables as a function of observations (via the posterior distribution). 3. Efficient, distributed approximation of the posterior distribution using general-purpose algorithms that exploit model structure encoded in the graph. These attributes make probabilistic graphs potentially useful as a conceptual and computational tool in hydrology and water management (and beyond). Conceptually, they can provide a common framework for existing and new probabilistic modeling approaches (e.g. by drawing inspiration from other fields of application), while computationally they can make probabilistic inference feasible in larger hydrological models. The presentation explores, via examples, some of these benefits.

  5. On determinant representations of scalar products and form factors in the SoV approach: the XXX case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanine, N.; Maillet, J. M.; Niccoli, G.; Terras, V.

    2016-03-01

    In the present article we study the form factors of quantum integrable lattice models solvable by the separation of variables (SoVs) method. It was recently shown that these models admit universal determinant representations for the scalar products of the so-called separate states (a class which includes in particular all the eigenstates of the transfer matrix). These results permit to obtain simple expressions for the matrix elements of local operators (form factors). However, these representations have been obtained up to now only for the completely inhomogeneous versions of the lattice models considered. In this article we give a simple algebraic procedure to rewrite the scalar products (and hence the form factors) for the SoV related models as Izergin or Slavnov type determinants. This new form leads to simple expressions for the form factors in the homogeneous and thermodynamic limits. To make the presentation of our method clear, we have chosen to explain it first for the simple case of the XXX Heisenberg chain with anti-periodic boundary conditions. We would nevertheless like to stress that the approach presented in this article applies as well to a wide range of models solved in the SoV framework.

  6. On determinant representations of scalar products and form factors in the SoV approach: the XXX case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitanine, N; Maillet, J M; Niccoli, G; Terras, V

    2016-01-01

    In the present article we study the form factors of quantum integrable lattice models solvable by the separation of variables (SoVs) method. It was recently shown that these models admit universal determinant representations for the scalar products of the so-called separate states (a class which includes in particular all the eigenstates of the transfer matrix). These results permit to obtain simple expressions for the matrix elements of local operators (form factors). However, these representations have been obtained up to now only for the completely inhomogeneous versions of the lattice models considered. In this article we give a simple algebraic procedure to rewrite the scalar products (and hence the form factors) for the SoV related models as Izergin or Slavnov type determinants. This new form leads to simple expressions for the form factors in the homogeneous and thermodynamic limits. To make the presentation of our method clear, we have chosen to explain it first for the simple case of the XXX Heisenberg chain with anti-periodic boundary conditions. We would nevertheless like to stress that the approach presented in this article applies as well to a wide range of models solved in the SoV framework. (paper)

  7. Hierarchical graphs for rule-based modeling of biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rule-based modeling, graphs are used to represent molecules: a colored vertex represents a component of a molecule, a vertex attribute represents the internal state of a component, and an edge represents a bond between components. Components of a molecule share the same color. Furthermore, graph-rewriting rules are used to represent molecular interactions. A rule that specifies addition (removal of an edge represents a class of association (dissociation reactions, and a rule that specifies a change of a vertex attribute represents a class of reactions that affect the internal state of a molecular component. A set of rules comprises an executable model that can be used to determine, through various means, the system-level dynamics of molecular interactions in a biochemical system. Results For purposes of model annotation, we propose the use of hierarchical graphs to represent structural relationships among components and subcomponents of molecules. We illustrate how hierarchical graphs can be used to naturally document the structural organization of the functional components and subcomponents of two proteins: the protein tyrosine kinase Lck and the T cell receptor (TCR complex. We also show that computational methods developed for regular graphs can be applied to hierarchical graphs. In particular, we describe a generalization of Nauty, a graph isomorphism and canonical labeling algorithm. The generalized version of the Nauty procedure, which we call HNauty, can be used to assign canonical labels to hierarchical graphs or more generally to graphs with multiple edge types. The difference between the Nauty and HNauty procedures is minor, but for completeness, we provide an explanation of the entire HNauty algorithm. Conclusions Hierarchical graphs provide more intuitive formal representations of proteins and other structured molecules with multiple functional components than do the regular graphs of current languages for

  8. Hierarchical graphs for rule-based modeling of biochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Nathan W; Hu, Bin; Hlavacek, William S

    2011-02-02

    In rule-based modeling, graphs are used to represent molecules: a colored vertex represents a component of a molecule, a vertex attribute represents the internal state of a component, and an edge represents a bond between components. Components of a molecule share the same color. Furthermore, graph-rewriting rules are used to represent molecular interactions. A rule that specifies addition (removal) of an edge represents a class of association (dissociation) reactions, and a rule that specifies a change of a vertex attribute represents a class of reactions that affect the internal state of a molecular component. A set of rules comprises an executable model that can be used to determine, through various means, the system-level dynamics of molecular interactions in a biochemical system. For purposes of model annotation, we propose the use of hierarchical graphs to represent structural relationships among components and subcomponents of molecules. We illustrate how hierarchical graphs can be used to naturally document the structural organization of the functional components and subcomponents of two proteins: the protein tyrosine kinase Lck and the T cell receptor (TCR) complex. We also show that computational methods developed for regular graphs can be applied to hierarchical graphs. In particular, we describe a generalization of Nauty, a graph isomorphism and canonical labeling algorithm. The generalized version of the Nauty procedure, which we call HNauty, can be used to assign canonical labels to hierarchical graphs or more generally to graphs with multiple edge types. The difference between the Nauty and HNauty procedures is minor, but for completeness, we provide an explanation of the entire HNauty algorithm. Hierarchical graphs provide more intuitive formal representations of proteins and other structured molecules with multiple functional components than do the regular graphs of current languages for specifying rule-based models, such as the BioNetGen language

  9. A contribution to queens graphs: A substitution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, G.; Barat, Janos

    2006-01-01

    that the Cartesian product of an odd cycle and a path is a queens graph. We show that the same does not hold for two odd cycles. The representation of the Cartesian product of an odd cycle and an even cycle remains an open problem. We also prove constructively that any finite subgraph of the rectangular grid...... or the hexagonal grid is a queens graph. Using a small computer search we solve another conjecture of the authors mentioned above, saying that K-3,K-4 minus an edge is a minimal non-queens graph....

  10. Common vertex matrix: a novel characterization of molecular graphs by counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randić, Milan; Novič, Marjana; Plavšić, Dejan

    2013-06-15

    We present a novel matrix representation of graphs based on the count of equal-distance common vertices to each pair of vertices in a graph. The element (i, j) of this matrix is defined as the number of vertices at the same distance from vertices (i, j). As illustrated on smaller alkanes, these novel matrices are very sensitive to molecular branching and the distribution of vertices in a graph. In particular, we show that ordered row sums of these novel matrices can facilitate solving graph isomorphism for acyclic graphs. This has been illustrated on all undecane isomers C11H24 having the same path counts (total of 25 molecules), on pair of graphs on 18 vertices having the same distance degree sequences (Slater's graphs), as well as two graphs on 21 vertices having identical several topological indices derived from information on distances between vertices. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Accounting for negative automaintenance in pigeons: a dual learning systems approach and factored representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Lesaint

    Full Text Available Animals, including Humans, are prone to develop persistent maladaptive and suboptimal behaviours. Some of these behaviours have been suggested to arise from interactions between brain systems of Pavlovian conditioning, the acquisition of responses to initially neutral stimuli previously paired with rewards, and instrumental conditioning, the acquisition of active behaviours leading to rewards. However the mechanics of these systems and their interactions are still unclear. While extensively studied independently, few models have been developed to account for these interactions. On some experiment, pigeons have been observed to display a maladaptive behaviour that some suggest to involve conflicts between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. In a procedure referred as negative automaintenance, a key light is paired with the subsequent delivery of food, however any peck towards the key light results in the omission of the reward. Studies showed that in such procedure some pigeons persisted in pecking to a substantial level despite its negative consequence, while others learned to refrain from pecking and maximized their cumulative rewards. Furthermore, the pigeons that were unable to refrain from pecking could nevertheless shift their pecks towards a harmless alternative key light. We confronted a computational model that combines dual-learning systems and factored representations, recently developed to account for sign-tracking and goal-tracking behaviours in rats, to these negative automaintenance experimental data. We show that it can explain the variability of the observed behaviours and the capacity of alternative key lights to distract pigeons from their detrimental behaviours. These results confirm the proposed model as an interesting tool to reproduce experiments that could involve interactions between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. The model allows us to draw predictions that may be experimentally verified, which could help

  12. Accounting for negative automaintenance in pigeons: a dual learning systems approach and factored representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Animals, including Humans, are prone to develop persistent maladaptive and suboptimal behaviours. Some of these behaviours have been suggested to arise from interactions between brain systems of Pavlovian conditioning, the acquisition of responses to initially neutral stimuli previously paired with rewards, and instrumental conditioning, the acquisition of active behaviours leading to rewards. However the mechanics of these systems and their interactions are still unclear. While extensively studied independently, few models have been developed to account for these interactions. On some experiment, pigeons have been observed to display a maladaptive behaviour that some suggest to involve conflicts between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. In a procedure referred as negative automaintenance, a key light is paired with the subsequent delivery of food, however any peck towards the key light results in the omission of the reward. Studies showed that in such procedure some pigeons persisted in pecking to a substantial level despite its negative consequence, while others learned to refrain from pecking and maximized their cumulative rewards. Furthermore, the pigeons that were unable to refrain from pecking could nevertheless shift their pecks towards a harmless alternative key light. We confronted a computational model that combines dual-learning systems and factored representations, recently developed to account for sign-tracking and goal-tracking behaviours in rats, to these negative automaintenance experimental data. We show that it can explain the variability of the observed behaviours and the capacity of alternative key lights to distract pigeons from their detrimental behaviours. These results confirm the proposed model as an interesting tool to reproduce experiments that could involve interactions between Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. The model allows us to draw predictions that may be experimentally verified, which could help further investigate

  13. Two-dimensional reduction PCA: a novel approach for feature extraction, representation, and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutelo, R. M.; Khor, L. C.; Woo, W. L.; Dlay, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a novel image feature extraction and recognition method two-dimensional reduction principal component analysis (2D-RPCA)). A two dimension image matrix contains redundancy information between columns and between rows. Conventional PCA removes redundancy by transforming the 2D image matrices into a vector where dimension reduction is done in one direction (column wise). Unlike 2DPCA, 2D-RPCA eliminates redundancies between image rows and compresses the data in rows, and finally eliminates redundancies between image columns and compress the data in columns. Therefore, 2D-RPCA has two image compression stages: firstly, it eliminates the redundancies between image rows and compresses the information optimally within a few rows. Finally, it eliminates the redundancies between image columns and compresses the information within a few columns. This sequence is selected in such a way that the recognition accuracy is optimized. As a result it has a better representation as the information is more compact in a smaller area. The classification time is reduced significantly (smaller feature matrix). Furthermore, the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is reduced. The result is that 2D-RPCA classifies image faster, less memory storage and yields higher recognition accuracy. The ORL database is used as a benchmark. The new algorithm achieves a recognition rate of 95.0% using 9×5 feature matrix compared to the recognition rate of 93.0% with a 112×7 feature matrix for the 2DPCA method and 90.5% for PCA (Eigenfaces) using 175 principal components.

  14. Extremal graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela

    2004-01-01

    The ever-expanding field of extremal graph theory encompasses a diverse array of problem-solving methods, including applications to economics, computer science, and optimization theory. This volume, based on a series of lectures delivered to graduate students at the University of Cambridge, presents a concise yet comprehensive treatment of extremal graph theory.Unlike most graph theory treatises, this text features complete proofs for almost all of its results. Further insights into theory are provided by the numerous exercises of varying degrees of difficulty that accompany each chapter. A

  15. Non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation and its Markovian representation: Extensions of the continuous-time random-walk approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushin, A I

    2008-03-01

    Some specific features and extensions of the continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) approach are analyzed in detail within the Markovian representation (MR) and CTRW-based non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation (SLE). In the MR, CTRW processes are represented by multidimensional Markovian ones. In this representation the probability density function (PDF) W(t) of fluctuation renewals is associated with that of reoccurrences in a certain jump state of some Markovian controlling process. Within the MR the non-Markovian SLE, which describes the effect of CTRW-like noise on the relaxation of dynamic and stochastic systems, is generalized to take into account the influence of relaxing systems on the statistical properties of noise. Some applications of the generalized non-Markovian SLE are discussed. In particular, it is applied to study two modifications of the CTRW approach. One of them considers cascaded CTRWs in which the controlling process is actually a CTRW-like one controlled by another CTRW process, controlled in turn by a third one, etc. Within the MR a simple expression for the PDF W(t) of the total controlling process is obtained in terms of Markovian variants of controlling PDFs in the cascade. The expression is shown to be especially simple and instructive in the case of anomalous processes determined by the long-time tailed W(t) . The cascaded CTRWs can model the effect of the complexity of a system on the relaxation kinetics (in glasses, fractals, branching media, ultrametric structures, etc.). Another CTRW modification describes the kinetics of processes governed by fluctuating W(t) . Within the MR the problem is analyzed in a general form without restrictive assumptions on the correlations of PDFs of consecutive renewals. The analysis shows that fluctuations of W(t) can strongly affect the kinetics of the process. Possible manifestations of this effect are discussed.

  16. A sparse representation-based approach for copy-move image forgery detection in smooth regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdessamad, Jalila; ElAdel, Asma; Zaied, Mourad

    2017-03-01

    Copy-move image forgery is the act of cloning a restricted region in the image and pasting it once or multiple times within that same image. This procedure intends to cover a certain feature, probably a person or an object, in the processed image or emphasize it through duplication. Consequences of this malicious operation can be unexpectedly harmful. Hence, the present paper proposes a new approach that automatically detects Copy-move Forgery (CMF). In particular, this work broaches a widely common open issue in CMF research literature that is detecting CMF within smooth areas. Indeed, the proposed approach represents the image blocks as a sparse linear combination of pre-learned bases (a mixture of texture and color-wise small patches) which allows a robust description of smooth patches. The reported experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in identifying the forged regions in CM attacks.

  17. Probabilistic Graph Layout for Uncertain Network Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Christoph; Nocaj, Arlind; Goertler, Jochen; Deussen, Oliver; Brandes, Ulrik; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel uncertain network visualization technique based on node-link diagrams. Nodes expand spatially in our probabilistic graph layout, depending on the underlying probability distributions of edges. The visualization is created by computing a two-dimensional graph embedding that combines samples from the probabilistic graph. A Monte Carlo process is used to decompose a probabilistic graph into its possible instances and to continue with our graph layout technique. Splatting and edge bundling are used to visualize point clouds and network topology. The results provide insights into probability distributions for the entire network-not only for individual nodes and edges. We validate our approach using three data sets that represent a wide range of network types: synthetic data, protein-protein interactions from the STRING database, and travel times extracted from Google Maps. Our approach reveals general limitations of the force-directed layout and allows the user to recognize that some nodes of the graph are at a specific position just by chance.

  18. Progress in visual representations of chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osolodkin, Dmitry I; Radchenko, Eugene V; Orlov, Alexey A; Voronkov, Andrey E; Palyulin, Vladimir A; Zefirov, Nikolay S

    2015-01-01

    The concept of 'chemical space' reveals itself in two forms: the discrete set of all possible molecules, and multi-dimensional descriptor space encompassing all the possible molecules. Approaches based on this concept are widely used for the analysis and enumeration of compound databases, library design, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) and landscape studies. Visual representations of chemical space differ in their applicability domains and features and require expert knowledge for choosing the right tool for a particular problem. In this review, the authors present recent advances in visualization of the chemical space in the framework of current general understanding of this topic. Attention is given to such methods as van Krevelen diagrams, descriptor plots, principal components analysis (PCA), self-organizing maps (SOM), generative topographic mapping (GTM), graph and network-based approaches. Notable application examples are provided. With the growth of computational power, representations of large datasets are becoming more and more common instruments in the toolboxes of chemoinformaticians. Every scientist in the field can find the method of choice for a particular task. However, there is no universal reference representation of the chemical space currently available and expert knowledge is required.

  19. An Object-Oriented Approach to Knowledge Representation in a Biomedical Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, M.; Paton, R.; Speel, P.H.W.M.; Speel, P.H.W.M.; Rada, R.

    1994-01-01

    An object-oriented approach has been applied to the different stages involved in developing a knowledge base about insulin metabolism. At an early stage the separation of terminological and assertional knowledge was made. The terminological component was developed by medical experts and represented

  20. Mapping the Demographic Landscape of Characters in Recent Dutch Prose : A Quantitative Approach to Literary Representation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deijl, Lucas; Pieterse, S.A.; Prinse, Marion; Smeets, Roel

    2016-01-01

    The lack of ethnic and gender diversity in the Dutch literary domain has recently been subject to discussions in the public debate. In the academic context, questions regarding diversity are studied either on a literary-sociological level (institutional approaches) or on the level of the individual

  1. MULTISCALE APPROACH TO THE REPRESENTATION OF 3D IMAGES, WITH APPLICATION TO POLYMER SOLAR CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiedmann, Ralf; Hassfeld, Henrik; Stenzel, Ole; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Oosterhout, Stefan D.; van Bavel, Svetlana S.; Wienk, Martijn M.; Loos, Joachim; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Schmidt, Volker

    2011-01-01

    A multiscale approach to the description of geometrically complex 3D image data is proposed which distinguishes between morphological features on a 'macro-scale' and a 'micro-scale'. Since our method is mainly tailored to nanostructures observed in composite materials consisting of two different

  2. Decomposing Oriented Graphs into Six Locally Irregular Oriented Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensmail, Julien; Renault, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    An undirected graph G is locally irregular if every two of its adjacent vertices have distinct degrees. We say that G is decomposable into k locally irregular graphs if there exists a partition E1∪E2∪⋯∪Ek of the edge set E(G) such that each Ei induces a locally irregular graph. It was recently...... conjectured by Baudon et al. that every undirected graph admits a decomposition into at most three locally irregular graphs, except for a well-characterized set of indecomposable graphs. We herein consider an oriented version of this conjecture. Namely, can every oriented graph be decomposed into at most...... three locally irregular oriented graphs, i.e. whose adjacent vertices have distinct outdegrees? We start by supporting this conjecture by verifying it for several classes of oriented graphs. We then prove a weaker version of this conjecture. Namely, we prove that every oriented graph can be decomposed...

  3. A high-throughput screening approach to discovering good forms of biologically inspired visual representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Nicolas; Doukhan, David; DiCarlo, James J; Cox, David D

    2009-11-01

    While many models of biological object recognition share a common set of "broad-stroke" properties, the performance of any one model depends strongly on the choice of parameters in a particular instantiation of that model--e.g., the number of units per layer, the size of pooling kernels, exponents in normalization operations, etc. Since the number of such parameters (explicit or implicit) is typically large and the computational cost of evaluating one particular parameter set is high, the space of possible model instantiations goes largely unexplored. Thus, when a model fails to approach the abilities of biological visual systems, we are left uncertain whether this failure is because we are missing a fundamental idea or because the correct "parts" have not been tuned correctly, assembled at sufficient scale, or provided with enough training. Here, we present a high-throughput approach to the exploration of such parameter sets, leveraging recent advances in stream processing hardware (high-end NVIDIA graphic cards and the PlayStation 3's IBM Cell Processor). In analogy to high-throughput screening approaches in molecular biology and genetics, we explored thousands of potential network architectures and parameter instantiations, screening those that show promising object recognition performance for further analysis. We show that this approach can yield significant, reproducible gains in performance across an array of basic object recognition tasks, consistently outperforming a variety of state-of-the-art purpose-built vision systems from the literature. As the scale of available computational power continues to expand, we argue that this approach has the potential to greatly accelerate progress in both artificial vision and our understanding of the computational underpinning of biological vision.

  4. A high-throughput screening approach to discovering good forms of biologically inspired visual representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pinto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available While many models of biological object recognition share a common set of "broad-stroke" properties, the performance of any one model depends strongly on the choice of parameters in a particular instantiation of that model--e.g., the number of units per layer, the size of pooling kernels, exponents in normalization operations, etc. Since the number of such parameters (explicit or implicit is typically large and the computational cost of evaluating one particular parameter set is high, the space of possible model instantiations goes largely unexplored. Thus, when a model fails to approach the abilities of biological visual systems, we are left uncertain whether this failure is because we are missing a fundamental idea or because the correct "parts" have not been tuned correctly, assembled at sufficient scale, or provided with enough training. Here, we present a high-throughput approach to the exploration of such parameter sets, leveraging recent advances in stream processing hardware (high-end NVIDIA graphic cards and the PlayStation 3's IBM Cell Processor. In analogy to high-throughput screening approaches in molecular biology and genetics, we explored thousands of potential network architectures and parameter instantiations, screening those that show promising object recognition performance for further analysis. We show that this approach can yield significant, reproducible gains in performance across an array of basic object recognition tasks, consistently outperforming a variety of state-of-the-art purpose-built vision systems from the literature. As the scale of available computational power continues to expand, we argue that this approach has the potential to greatly accelerate progress in both artificial vision and our understanding of the computational underpinning of biological vision.

  5. Graph Transformation for Consolidation of Creativity Sessions Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Graph transformation approach for consolidation of creativity sessions results is part of the FP7 EU/IST project idSpace: Tooling of and training for collaborative, distributed product innovation. The goal of graph transformation approach is to provide a tool for merging results of various sessions...

  6. Cycles in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Alspach, BR

    1985-01-01

    This volume deals with a variety of problems involving cycles in graphs and circuits in digraphs. Leading researchers in this area present here 3 survey papers and 42 papers containing new results. There is also a collection of unsolved problems.

  7. Tailored Random Graph Ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, E S; Annibale, A; Coolen, A C C

    2013-01-01

    Tailored graph ensembles are a developing bridge between biological networks and statistical mechanics. The aim is to use this concept to generate a suite of rigorous tools that can be used to quantify and compare the topology of cellular signalling networks, such as protein-protein interaction networks and gene regulation networks. We calculate exact and explicit formulae for the leading orders in the system size of the Shannon entropies of random graph ensembles constrained with degree distribution and degree-degree correlation. We also construct an ergodic detailed balance Markov chain with non-trivial acceptance probabilities which converges to a strictly uniform measure and is based on edge swaps that conserve all degrees. The acceptance probabilities can be generalized to define Markov chains that target any alternative desired measure on the space of directed or undirected graphs, in order to generate graphs with more sophisticated topological features.

  8. Introduction to graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Robin J

    1985-01-01

    Graph Theory has recently emerged as a subject in its own right, as well as being an important mathematical tool in such diverse subjects as operational research, chemistry, sociology and genetics. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject.

  9. Efficiently Controllable Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokler, Can; Lloyd, Seth; Shor, Peter; Thompson, Kevin

    2017-06-30

    We investigate graphs that can be disconnected into small components by removing a vanishingly small fraction of their vertices. We show that, when a controllable quantum network is described by such a graph and the gaps in eigenfrequencies and in transition frequencies are bounded exponentially in the number of vertices, the network is efficiently controllable, in the sense that universal quantum computation can be performed using a control sequence polynomial in the size of the network while controlling a vanishingly small fraction of subsystems. We show that networks corresponding to finite-dimensional lattices are efficiently controllable and explore generalizations to percolation clusters and random graphs. We show that the classical computational complexity of estimating the ground state of Hamiltonians described by controllable graphs is polynomial in the number of subsystems or qubits.

  10. Continuous Yao graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhshesh, Davood; Barba, Luis; Bose, Prosenjit

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a variation of the well-studied Yao graphs. Given a set of points S⊂R2 and an angle 0Yao graph cY(θ) with vertex set S and angle θ as follows. For each p,q∈S, we add an edge from p to q in cY(θ) if there exists a cone with apex p...

  11. Flexibility in data interpretation: Effects of representational format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Braithwaite

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphs and tables differentially support performance on specific tasks. For tasks requiring reading off single data points, tables are as good as or better than graphs, while for tasks involving relationships among data points, graphs often yield better performance. However, the degree to which graphs and tables support flexibility across a range of tasks is not well understood. In two experiments, participants detected main and interaction effects in line graphs and tables of bivariate data. Graphs led to more efficient performance, but also lower flexibility, as indicated by a larger discrepancy in performance across tasks. In particular, detection of main effects of variables represented in the graph legend was facilitated relative to detection of main effects of variables represented in the x-axis. Graphs may be a preferable representational format when the desired task or analytical perspective is known in advance, but may also induce greater interpretive bias than tables, necessitating greater care in their use and design.

  12. Local Interaction on Random Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Haller

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyze dynamic local interaction in population games where the local interaction structure (modeled as a graph can change over time: A stochastic process generates a random sequence of graphs. This contrasts with models where the initial interaction structure (represented by a deterministic graph or the realization of a random graph cannot change over time.

  13. A study on vague graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmanlou, Hossein; Samanta, Sovan; Pal, Madhumangal; Borzooei, R A

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the notion of vague h-morphism on vague graphs and regular vague graphs. The action of vague h-morphism on vague strong regular graphs are studied. Some elegant results on weak and co weak isomorphism are derived. Also, [Formula: see text]-complement of highly irregular vague graphs are defined.

  14. Categorical constructions in graph theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Bumby

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some graph-theoretic questions from the viewpoint of the portion of category theory which has become common knowledge. In particular, the reader is encouraged to consider whether there is only one natural category of graphs and how theories of directed graphs and undirected graphs are related.

  15. Representation and Metrics Extraction from Feature Basis: An Object Oriented Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Neri da Silva Vanin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This tutorial presents an object oriented approach to data reading and metrics extraction from feature basis. Structural issues about basis are discussed first, then the Object Oriented Programming (OOP is aplied to modeling the main elements in this context. The model implementation is then discussed using C++ as programing language. To validate the proposed model, we apply on some feature basis from the University of Carolina, Irvine Machine Learning Database.

  16. Commuting projections on graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Zikatanov, Ludmil T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    2013-02-19

    For a given (connected) graph, we consider vector spaces of (discrete) functions defined on its vertices and its edges. These two spaces are related by a discrete gradient operator, Grad and its adjoint, ₋Div, referred to as (negative) discrete divergence. We also consider a coarse graph obtained by aggregation of vertices of the original one. Then a coarse vertex space is identified with the subspace of piecewise constant functions over the aggregates. We consider the ℓ2-projection QH onto the space of these piecewise constants. In the present paper, our main result is the construction of a projection π H from the original edge-space onto a properly constructed coarse edge-space associated with the edges of the coarse graph. The projections π H and QH commute with the discrete divergence operator, i.e., we have div π H = QH div. The respective pair of coarse edge-space and coarse vertexspace offer the potential to construct two-level, and by recursion, multilevel methods for the mixed formulation of the graph Laplacian which utilizes the discrete divergence operator. The performance of one two-level method with overlapping Schwarz smoothing and correction based on the constructed coarse spaces for solving such mixed graph Laplacian systems is illustrated on a number of graph examples.

  17. Modern graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobás, Béla

    1998-01-01

    The time has now come when graph theory should be part of the education of every serious student of mathematics and computer science, both for its own sake and to enhance the appreciation of mathematics as a whole. This book is an in-depth account of graph theory, written with such a student in mind; it reflects the current state of the subject and emphasizes connections with other branches of pure mathematics. The volume grew out of the author's earlier book, Graph Theory -- An Introductory Course, but its length is well over twice that of its predecessor, allowing it to reveal many exciting new developments in the subject. Recognizing that graph theory is one of several courses competing for the attention of a student, the book contains extensive descriptive passages designed to convey the flavor of the subject and to arouse interest. In addition to a modern treatment of the classical areas of graph theory such as coloring, matching, extremal theory, and algebraic graph theory, the book presents a detailed ...

  18. Realistic representation of grain shapes in CFD-DEM simulations of sediment transport with a bonded-sphere approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Honglei

    2017-09-01

    Development of algorithms and growth of computational resources in the past decades have enabled simulations of sediment transport processes with unprecedented fidelities. The Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method (CFD-DEM) is one of the high-fidelity approaches, where the motions of and collisions among the sediment grains as well as their interactions with surrounding fluids are resolved. In most DEM solvers the particles are modeled as soft spheres due to computational efficiency and implementation complexity considerations, although natural sediments are usually a mixture of non-spherical (e.g., disk-, blade-, and rod-shaped) particles. Previous attempts to extend sphere-based DEM to treat irregular particles neglected fluid-induced torques on particles, and the method lacked flexibility to handle sediments with an arbitrary mixture of particle shapes. In this contribution we proposed a simple, efficient approach to representing common sediment grain shapes with bonded spheres, where the fluid forces are computed and applied on each sphere. The proposed approach overcomes the aforementioned limitations of existing methods and has improved efficiency and flexibility over existing approaches. We use numerical simulations to demonstrate the merits and capability of the proposed method in predicting the falling characteristics, terminal velocity, threshold of incipient motion, and transport rate of natural sediments. The simulations show that the proposed method is a promising approach for faithful representation of natural sediment, which leads to accurate simulations of their transport dynamics. While this work focuses on non-cohesive sediments, the proposed method also opens the possibility for first-principle-based simulations of the flocculation and sedimentation dynamics of cohesive sediments. Elucidation of these physical mechanisms can provide much needed improvement on the prediction capability and physical understanding of muddy coast

  19. A Novel Multi-Purpose Matching Representation of Local 3D Surfaces: A Rotationally Invariant, Efficient, and Highly Discriminative Approach With an Adjustable Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Osaimi, Faisal R

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to local 3D surface matching representation suitable for a range of 3D vision applications is introduced. Local 3D surface patches around key points on the 3D surface are represented by 2D images such that the representing 2D images enjoy certain characteristics which positively impact the matching accuracy, robustness, and speed. First, the proposed representation is complete, in the sense, there is no information loss during their computation. Second, the 3DoF 2D representations are strictly invariant to all the 3DoF rotations. To optimally avail surface information, the sensitivity of the representations to surface information is adjustable. This also provides the proposed matching representation with the means to optimally adjust to a particular class of problems/applications or an acquisition technology. Each 2D matching representation is a sequence of adjustable integral kernels, where each kernel is efficiently computed from a triple of precise 3D curves (profiles) formed by intersecting three concentric spheres with the 3D surface. Robust techniques for sampling the profiles and establishing correspondences among them were devised. Based on the proposed matching representation, two techniques for the detection of key points were presented. The first is suitable for static images, while the second is suitable for 3D videos. The approach was tested on the face recognition grand challenge v2.0, the 3D twins expression challenge, and the Bosphorus data sets, and a superior face recognition performance was achieved. In addition, the proposed approach was used in object class recognition and tested on a Kinect data set.

  20. Local adjacency metric dimension of sun graph and stacked book graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulisda Badri, Alifiah; Darmaji

    2018-03-01

    A graph is a mathematical system consisting of a non-empty set of nodes and a set of empty sides. One of the topics to be studied in graph theory is the metric dimension. Application in the metric dimension is the navigation robot system on a path. Robot moves from one vertex to another vertex in the field by minimizing the errors that occur in translating the instructions (code) obtained from the vertices of that location. To move the robot must give different instructions (code). In order for the robot to move efficiently, the robot must be fast to translate the code of the nodes of the location it passes. so that the location vertex has a minimum distance. However, if the robot must move with the vertex location on a very large field, so the robot can not detect because the distance is too far.[6] In this case, the robot can determine its position by utilizing location vertices based on adjacency. The problem is to find the minimum cardinality of the required location vertex, and where to put, so that the robot can determine its location. The solution to this problem is the dimension of adjacency metric and adjacency metric bases. Rodrguez-Velzquez and Fernau combine the adjacency metric dimensions with local metric dimensions, thus becoming the local adjacency metric dimension. In the local adjacency metric dimension each vertex in the graph may have the same adjacency representation as the terms of the vertices. To obtain the local metric dimension of values in the graph of the Sun and the stacked book graph is used the construction method by considering the representation of each adjacent vertex of the graph.

  1. HYPERSPECTRAL DATA CLASSIFICATION USING FACTOR GRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Makarau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate classification of hyperspectral data is still a competitive task and new classification methods are developed to achieve desired tasks of hyperspectral data use. The objective of this paper is to develop a new method for hyperspectral data classification ensuring the classification model properties like transferability, generalization, probabilistic interpretation, etc. While factor graphs (undirected graphical models are unfortunately not widely employed in remote sensing tasks, these models possess important properties such as representation of complex systems to model estimation/decision making tasks. In this paper we present a new method for hyperspectral data classification using factor graphs. Factor graph (a bipartite graph consisting of variables and factor vertices allows factorization of a more complex function leading to definition of variables (employed to store input data, latent variables (allow to bridge abstract class to data, and factors (defining prior probabilities for spectral features and abstract classes; input data mapping to spectral features mixture and further bridging of the mixture to an abstract class. Latent variables play an important role by defining two-level mapping of the input spectral features to a class. Configuration (learning on training data of the model allows calculating a parameter set for the model to bridge the input data to a class. The classification algorithm is as follows. Spectral bands are separately pre-processed (unsupervised clustering is used to be defined on a finite domain (alphabet leading to a representation of the data on multinomial distribution. The represented hyperspectral data is used as input evidence (evidence vector is selected pixelwise in a configured factor graph and an inference is run resulting in the posterior probability. Variational inference (Mean field allows to obtain plausible results with a low calculation time. Calculating the posterior probability for

  2. Hierarchy of graph matchbox manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Lukina, Olga

    2011-01-01

    We study a class of graph foliated spaces, or graph matchbox manifolds, initially constructed by Kenyon and Ghys. For graph foliated spaces we introduce a quantifier of dynamical complexity which we call its level. We develop the fusion construction, which allows us to associate to every two graph foliated spaces a third one which contains the former two in its closure. Although the underlying idea of the fusion is simple, it gives us a powerful tool to study graph foliated spaces. Using fusi...

  3. Signal Processing for Time-Series Functions on a Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    ARL-TR-8276• FEB 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Signal Processing for Time-Series Functions on a Graph by Humberto Muñoz-Barona, Jean Vettel, and...ARL-TR-8276• FEB 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Signal Processing for Time-Series Functions on a Graph by Humberto Muñoz-Barona Southern University...addison.w.bohannon.civ@mail.mil>. Previous research introduced signal processing on graphs, an approach to generalize signal processing tools such

  4. Evaluating Graph Signal Processing for Neuroimaging Through Classification and Dimensionality Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Ménoret, Mathilde; Farrugia, Nicolas; Pasdeloup, Bastien; Gripon, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Graph Signal Processing (GSP) is a promising framework to analyze multi-dimensional neuroimaging datasets, while taking into account both the spatial and functional dependencies between brain signals. In the present work, we apply dimensionality reduction techniques based on graph representations of the brain to decode brain activity from real and simulated fMRI datasets. We introduce seven graphs obtained from a) geometric structure and/or b) functional connectivity between brain areas at re...

  5. Representation Discovery using Harmonic Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    Representations are at the heart of artificial intelligence (AI). This book is devoted to the problem of representation discovery: how can an intelligent system construct representations from its experience? Representation discovery re-parameterizes the state space - prior to the application of information retrieval, machine learning, or optimization techniques - facilitating later inference processes by constructing new task-specific bases adapted to the state space geometry. This book presents a general approach to representation discovery using the framework of harmonic analysis, in particu

  6. A MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING APPROACH FOR THE REPRESENTATION OF SACCHARIFICATION AND FERMENTATION STAGES OF A BIOETHANOL PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yailet Albernas-Carvajal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The biorefineries concept from renewable sources has gained much attention in recent years because they improve sustainability with regard to fossil fuel refineries that are limited by the depletion of petroleum reserves. In this perspective, the production of ethanol from sugar cane bagasse is highly attractive because it reduces the fossil fuels consumption, the energy costs and the greenhouse gases emission. In this context, this paper aims to develop an optimal model design of an ethanol plant, considering bagasse pretreatment stages for subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF. SSF variant, as its name suggests, has the advantage that enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages are simultaneously carried out on the same equipment, obtaining directly the ethanol as a main product. The proposed approach is based on a mixed integer linear programming model which is optimized by GAMS-CPLEX package.

  7. Novel Approach for the Recognition and Prediction of Multi-Function Radar Behaviours Based on Predictive State Representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jian; Chen, Yongguang; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Jin; Xiao, Shunping

    2017-03-19

    The extensive applications of multi-function radars (MFRs) have presented a great challenge to the technologies of radar countermeasures (RCMs) and electronic intelligence (ELINT). The recently proposed cognitive electronic warfare (CEW) provides a good solution, whose crux is to perceive present and future MFR behaviours, including the operating modes, waveform parameters, scheduling schemes, etc. Due to the variety and complexity of MFR waveforms, the existing approaches have the drawbacks of inefficiency and weak practicability in prediction. A novel method for MFR behaviour recognition and prediction is proposed based on predictive state representation (PSR). With the proposed approach, operating modes of MFR are recognized by accumulating the predictive states, instead of using fixed transition probabilities that are unavailable in the battlefield. It helps to reduce the dependence of MFR on prior information. And MFR signals can be quickly predicted by iteratively using the predicted observation, avoiding the very large computation brought by the uncertainty of future observations. Simulations with a hypothetical MFR signal sequence in a typical scenario are presented, showing that the proposed methods perform well and efficiently, which attests to their validity.

  8. Novel Approach for the Recognition and Prediction of Multi-Function Radar Behaviours Based on Predictive State Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The extensive applications of multi-function radars (MFRs have presented a great challenge to the technologies of radar countermeasures (RCMs and electronic intelligence (ELINT. The recently proposed cognitive electronic warfare (CEW provides a good solution, whose crux is to perceive present and future MFR behaviours, including the operating modes, waveform parameters, scheduling schemes, etc. Due to the variety and complexity of MFR waveforms, the existing approaches have the drawbacks of inefficiency and weak practicability in prediction. A novel method for MFR behaviour recognition and prediction is proposed based on predictive state representation (PSR. With the proposed approach, operating modes of MFR are recognized by accumulating the predictive states, instead of using fixed transition probabilities that are unavailable in the battlefield. It helps to reduce the dependence of MFR on prior information. And MFR signals can be quickly predicted by iteratively using the predicted observation, avoiding the very large computation brought by the uncertainty of future observations. Simulations with a hypothetical MFR signal sequence in a typical scenario are presented, showing that the proposed methods perform well and efficiently, which attests to their validity.

  9. An integrated approach to consumer representation and involvement in a multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Anne L; McCallum, Marilyn; Campbell, Marion K; Robertson, Clare; Ralston, Stuart H

    2005-01-01

    Although, consumer involvement in individual studies is often limited, their involvement in guiding health research is generally considered to be beneficial. This paper outlines our experiences of an integrated relationship between the organisers of a clinical trial and a consumer organisation. The PRISM trial is a UK multicentre, randomized controlled trial comparing treatment strategies for Paget's disease of the bone. The National Association for the Relief of Paget's Disease (NARPD) is the only UK support group for sufferers of Paget's disease and has worked closely with the PRISM team from the outset. NARPD involvement is integral to the conduct of the trial and specific roles have included: peer-review; trial steering committee membership; provision of advice to participants, and promotion of the trial amongst Paget's disease patients. The integrated relationship has yielded benefits to both the trial and the consumer organisation. The benefits for the trial have included: recruitment of participants via NARPD contacts; well-informed participants; unsolicited patient advocacy of the trial; and interested and pro-active collaborators. For the NARPD and Paget's disease sufferers, benefits have included: increased awareness of Paget's disease; increased access to relevant health research; increased awareness of the NARPD services; and wider transfer of diagnosis and management knowledge to/from health care professionals. Our experience has shown that an integrated approach between a trial team and a consumer organisation is worthwhile. Adoption of such an approach in other trials may yield significant improvements in recruitment and quality of participant information flow. There are, however, resource implications for both parties.

  10. Towards Scalable Graph Computation on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiqi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Pienta, Robert; Kahng, Minsuk; Chau, Duen Horng

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly central to our everyday activities, due to their portability, multi-touch capabilities, and ever-improving computational power. Such attractive features have spurred research interest in leveraging mobile devices for computation. We explore a novel approach that aims to use a single mobile device to perform scalable graph computation on large graphs that do not fit in the device's limited main memory, opening up the possibility of performing on-device analysis of large datasets, without relying on the cloud. Based on the familiar memory mapping capability provided by today's mobile operating systems, our approach to scale up computation is powerful and intentionally kept simple to maximize its applicability across the iOS and Android platforms. Our experiments demonstrate that an iPad mini can perform fast computation on large real graphs with as many as 272 million edges (Google+ social graph), at a speed that is only a few times slower than a 13″ Macbook Pro. Through creating a real world iOS app with this technique, we demonstrate the strong potential application for scalable graph computation on a single mobile device using our approach. PMID:25859564

  11. Generating Realistic Labelled, Weighted Random Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Charles Davis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Generative algorithms for random graphs have yielded insights into the structure and evolution of real-world networks. Most networks exhibit a well-known set of properties, such as heavy-tailed degree distributions, clustering and community formation. Usually, random graph models consider only structural information, but many real-world networks also have labelled vertices and weighted edges. In this paper, we present a generative model for random graphs with discrete vertex labels and numeric edge weights. The weights are represented as a set of Beta Mixture Models (BMMs with an arbitrary number of mixtures, which are learned from real-world networks. We propose a Bayesian Variational Inference (VI approach, which yields an accurate estimation while keeping computation times tractable. We compare our approach to state-of-the-art random labelled graph generators and an earlier approach based on Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs. Our results allow us to draw conclusions about the contribution of vertex labels and edge weights to graph structure.

  12. Towards Scalable Graph Computation on Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiqi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Pienta, Robert; Kahng, Minsuk; Chau, Duen Horng

    2014-10-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly central to our everyday activities, due to their portability, multi-touch capabilities, and ever-improving computational power. Such attractive features have spurred research interest in leveraging mobile devices for computation. We explore a novel approach that aims to use a single mobile device to perform scalable graph computation on large graphs that do not fit in the device's limited main memory, opening up the possibility of performing on-device analysis of large datasets, without relying on the cloud. Based on the familiar memory mapping capability provided by today's mobile operating systems, our approach to scale up computation is powerful and intentionally kept simple to maximize its applicability across the iOS and Android platforms. Our experiments demonstrate that an iPad mini can perform fast computation on large real graphs with as many as 272 million edges (Google+ social graph), at a speed that is only a few times slower than a 13″ Macbook Pro. Through creating a real world iOS app with this technique, we demonstrate the strong potential application for scalable graph computation on a single mobile device using our approach.

  13. Extraction of Graph Information Based on Image Contents and the Use of Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanawattana, Sarunya; Kimura, Masaomi

    2016-01-01

    A graph is an effective form of data representation used to summarize complex information. Explicit information such as the relationship between the X- and Y-axes can be easily extracted from a graph by applying human intelligence. However, implicit knowledge such as information obtained from other related concepts in an ontology also resides in…

  14. Probabilistic Decision Graphs - Combining Verification and AI Techniques for Probabilistic Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    We adopt probabilistic decision graphs developed in the field of automated verification as a tool for probabilistic model representation and inference. We show that probabilistic inference has linear time complexity in the size of the probabilistic decision graph, that the smallest probabilistic ...

  15. Tree-type values for cycle-free directed graph games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; Talman, Dolf

    2010-01-01

    For arbitrary cycle-free directed graph games tree-type values are introduced axiomatically and their explicit formula representation is provided. These values may be considered as natural extensions of the tree and sink values as has been defined correspondingly for rooted and sink forest graph

  16. Pseudo-orbit approach to trajectories of resonances in quantum graphs with general vertex coupling: Fermi rule and high-energy asymptotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Lipovský, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 042101. ISSN 0022-2488 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : self-adjoint coupling * high-energy regime * resonances in quantum graphs Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.077, year: 2016

  17. Ringo: Interactive Graph Analytics on Big-Memory Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Yonathan; Sosič, Rok; Banerjee, Arijit; Puttagunta, Rohan; Raison, Martin; Shah, Pararth; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    We present Ringo, a system for analysis of large graphs. Graphs provide a way to represent and analyze systems of interacting objects (people, proteins, webpages) with edges between the objects denoting interactions (friendships, physical interactions, links). Mining graphs provides valuable insights about individual objects as well as the relationships among them. In building Ringo, we take advantage of the fact that machines with large memory and many cores are widely available and also relatively affordable. This allows us to build an easy-to-use interactive high-performance graph analytics system. Graphs also need to be built from input data, which often resides in the form of relational tables. Thus, Ringo provides rich functionality for manipulating raw input data tables into various kinds of graphs. Furthermore, Ringo also provides over 200 graph analytics functions that can then be applied to constructed graphs. We show that a single big-memory machine provides a very attractive platform for performing analytics on all but the largest graphs as it offers excellent performance and ease of use as compared to alternative approaches. With Ringo, we also demonstrate how to integrate graph analytics with an iterative process of trial-and-error data exploration and rapid experimentation, common in data mining workloads. PMID:27081215

  18. Parallel Algorithm for Incremental Betweenness Centrality on Large Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Jamour, Fuad Tarek

    2017-10-17

    Betweenness centrality quantifies the importance of nodes in a graph in many applications, including network analysis, community detection and identification of influential users. Typically, graphs in such applications evolve over time. Thus, the computation of betweenness centrality should be performed incrementally. This is challenging because updating even a single edge may trigger the computation of all-pairs shortest paths in the entire graph. Existing approaches cannot scale to large graphs: they either require excessive memory (i.e., quadratic to the size of the input graph) or perform unnecessary computations rendering them prohibitively slow. We propose iCentral; a novel incremental algorithm for computing betweenness centrality in evolving graphs. We decompose the graph into biconnected components and prove that processing can be localized within the affected components. iCentral is the first algorithm to support incremental betweeness centrality computation within a graph component. This is done efficiently, in linear space; consequently, iCentral scales to large graphs. We demonstrate with real datasets that the serial implementation of iCentral is up to 3.7 times faster than existing serial methods. Our parallel implementation that scales to large graphs, is an order of magnitude faster than the state-of-the-art parallel algorithm, while using an order of magnitude less computational resources.

  19. The STAPL Parallel Graph Library

    KAUST Repository

    Harshvardhan,

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the stapl Parallel Graph Library, a high-level framework that abstracts the user from data-distribution and parallelism details and allows them to concentrate on parallel graph algorithm development. It includes a customizable distributed graph container and a collection of commonly used parallel graph algorithms. The library introduces pGraph pViews that separate algorithm design from the container implementation. It supports three graph processing algorithmic paradigms, level-synchronous, asynchronous and coarse-grained, and provides common graph algorithms based on them. Experimental results demonstrate improved scalability in performance and data size over existing graph libraries on more than 16,000 cores and on internet-scale graphs containing over 16 billion vertices and 250 billion edges. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  20. Graph rewriting using a single pushout: a comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.; Kuper, Jan; Dietz, J.L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Recently two algebraic approaches to graph rewriting have been given which use only single pushouts. Here we compare both approaches. We show that they are almost the same, the only difference being the way dangling arcs are treated.