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Sample records for granule cell axon

  1. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure.

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    LaSarge, Candi L; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C

    2015-03-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offsets the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predict a net increase in granule cell innervation of CA3. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell communication with CA3. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute ethanol exposure inhibits silencing of cerebellar Golgi cell firing induced by granule cell axon input

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    Paolo eBotta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Golgi cells (GoCs are specialized interneurons that provide inhibitory input to granule cells in the cerebellar cortex. GoCs are pacemaker neurons that spontaneously fire action potentials, triggering spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in granule cells and also contributing to the generation tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in granule cells. In turn, granule cell axons provide feedback glutamatergic input to GoCs. It has been shown that high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons induces a transient pause in GoC firing in a type 2-metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2-dependent manner. Here, we investigated the effect ethanol on the pause of GoC firing induced by high frequency stimulation of granule cell axons. GoC electrophysiological recordings were performed in parasagittal cerebellar vermis slices from postnatal day 23 to 26 rats. Loose-patch cell-attached recordings revealed that ethanol (40 mM reversibly decreases the pause duration. An antagonist of mGluR2 reduced the pause duration but did not affect the effect of ethanol. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings showed that currents evoked by an mGluR2 agonist were not significantly affected by ethanol. Perforated-patch experiments in which hyperpolarizing and depolarizing currents were injected into GoCs demonstrated that there is an inverse relationship between spontaneous firing and pause duration. Slight inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump mimicked the effect of ethanol on pause duration. In conclusion, ethanol reduces the granule cell axon-mediated feedback mechanism by reducing the input responsiveness of GoCs. This would result in a transient increase of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of granule cells, limiting information flow at the input stage of the cerebellar cortex.

  3. Influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pathfinding of dentate granule cell axons, the hippocampal mossy fibers

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    Tamura Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mossy fibers, the dentate granule cell axons, are generated throughout an animal's lifetime. Mossy fiber paths and synapses are primarily restricted to the stratum lucidum within the CA3 region. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin family protein that activates Trk neurotrophin receptors, is highly expressed in the stratum lucidum in an activity-dependent manner. The addition of a Trk neurotrophin receptor inhibitor, K252a, to cultured hippocampal slices induced aberrant extension of mossy fibers into ectopic regions. BDNF overexpression in granule cells ameliorated the mossy fiber pathway abnormalities caused by a submaximal dose of K252a. A similar rescue was observed when BDNF was expressed in CA3 pyramidal cells, most notably in mossy fibers distal to the expression site. These findings are the first to clarify the role of BDNF in mossy fiber pathfinding, not as an attractant cue but as a regulator, possibly acting in a paracrine manner. This effect of BDNF may be as a signal for new fibers to fasciculate and extend further to form synapses with neurons that are far from active BDNF-expressing synapses. This mechanism would ensure the emergence of new independent dentate gyrus-CA3 circuits by the axons of new-born granule cells.

  4. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons.

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    Kress, Geraldine J; Dowling, Margaret J; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-04-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the Na(V)1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channels in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Schwann Cell Glycogen Selectively Supports Myelinated Axon Function

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    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined if glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and if it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. Methods We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Results Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient [glucose]. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time-course of glycogen loss. Latency to CAP failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Interpretation Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. PMID:23034913

  6. Cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration

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    Mar, Fernando M; Bonni, Azad; Sousa, Mónica M

    2014-01-01

    Although neurons execute a cell intrinsic program of axonal growth during development, following the establishment of connections, the developmental growth capacity declines. Besides environmental challenges, this switch largely accounts for the failure of adult central nervous system (CNS) axons to regenerate. Here, we discuss the cell intrinsic control of axon regeneration, including not only the regulation of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, but also the modulation of local protein translation, retrograde and anterograde axonal transport, and microtubule dynamics. We further explore the causes underlying the failure of CNS neurons to mount a vigorous regenerative response, and the paradigms demonstrating the activation of cell intrinsic axon growth programs. Finally, we present potential mechanisms to support axon regeneration, as these may represent future therapeutic approaches to promote recovery following CNS injury and disease. PMID:24531721

  7. Expression of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in mature granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus

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    Ohira, Koji

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New granule cells are continuously generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus. During granule cell maturation, the mechanisms that differentiate new cells not only describe the degree of cell differentiation, but also crucially regulate the progression of cell differentiation. Here, we describe a gene, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO, whose expression distinguishes stem cells from more differentiated cells among the granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus. The use of markers for proliferation, neural progenitors, and immature and mature granule cells indicated that TDO was expressed in mature cells and in some immature cells. In mice heterozygous for the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, in which dentate gyrus granule cells fail to mature normally, TDO immunoreactivity was substantially downregulated in the dentate gyrus granule cells. Moreover, a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling experiment revealed that new neurons began to express TDO between 2 and 4 wk after the neurons were generated, when the axons and dendrites of the granule cells developed and synaptogenesis occurred. These findings indicate that TDO might be required at a late-stage of granule cell development, such as during axonal and dendritic growth, synaptogenesis and its maturation.

  8. The effect of myelinating Schwann cells on axons.

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    Martini, R

    2001-04-01

    Myelinating Schwann cells control the number of neurofilaments and elevate the phosphorylation state of neurofilaments in the axon, eventually leading to the typical large axon caliber. Conversely, absence of myelin leads to lower amounts of neurofilaments, reduced phosphorylation levels, and smaller axon diameters. In addition, myelinating Schwann cells mediate the spacing of Na(+) channel clusters during development of the node of Ranvier. When axons are associated with mutant Schwann cells in inherited neuropathies, their calibers are reduced and their neurofilaments are less phosphorylated and more closely spaced. Also, axonal transport is reduced and axons degenerate at the distal ends of long nerves. Myelin-associated glycoprotein may mediate some aspects of Schwann cell-axon communication, but much remains to be learned about the molecular bases of Schwann cell-axon communication. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Fragile X granules are a family of axonal ribonucleoprotein particles with circuit-dependent protein composition and mRNA cargos.

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    Chyung, Eunice; LeBlanc, Hannah F; Fallon, Justin R; Akins, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    Local axonal protein synthesis plays a crucial role in the formation and function of neuronal circuits. Understanding the role of this mechanism in specific circuits requires identifying the protein composition and mRNA cargos of the ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) that form the substrate for axonal translation. FXGs (Fragile X granules) are axonal RNPs present in a stereotyped subset of mature axons in the intact brain that contain one or more of the Fragile X related (FXR) proteins (FMRP, FXR2P, and FXR1P) along with mRNA and ribosomes. Here we performed a systematic survey of the FXR protein composition and mRNA association of FXGs in the brain. We have identified four FXG types that can be categorized based on their FXR protein complement. All FXGs contain FXR2P, with FMRP and/or FXR1P present in circuit-selective subsets. Individual neuronal cell types predominantly express a single FXG type, with FMRP-containing FXGs the most prevalent in forebrain neurons. All FXG types associate with ribosomes and mRNA, but the specific mRNA cargos are a function of FXG type, brain region and neuron class. Transcripts for β-catenin and its regulator APC associate with a subset of forebrain FXGs. Moreover, both these transcripts can colocalize within individual FXGs, suggesting that the axonal translation of functionally related proteins may be coordinately regulated with high spatiotemporal resolution. Cell type-dependent expression of specific RNP types with distinct mRNA cargos, such as FXGs, presents a potential mechanism for regulating local translation and its output in a circuit-dependent manner. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Axon degeneration: make the Schwann cell great again

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    Keit Men Wong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Axonal degeneration is a pivotal feature of many neurodegenerative conditions and substantially accounts for neurological morbidity. A widely used experimental model to study the mechanisms of axonal degeneration is Wallerian degeneration (WD, which occurs after acute axonal injury. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS, WD is characterized by swift dismantling and clearance of injured axons with their myelin sheaths. This is a prerequisite for successful axonal regeneration. In the central nervous system (CNS, WD is much slower, which significantly contributes to failed axonal regeneration. Although it is well-documented that Schwann cells (SCs have a critical role in the regenerative potential of the PNS, to date we have only scarce knowledge as to how SCs 'sense' axonal injury and immediately respond to it. In this regard, it remains unknown as to whether SCs play the role of a passive bystander or an active director during the execution of the highly orchestrated disintegration program of axons. Older reports, together with more recent studies, suggest that SCs mount dynamic injury responses minutes after axonal injury, long before axonal breakdown occurs. The swift SC response to axonal injury could play either a pro-degenerative role, or alternatively a supportive role, to the integrity of distressed axons that have not yet committed to degenerate. Indeed, supporting the latter concept, recent findings in a chronic PNS neurodegeneration model indicate that deactivation of a key molecule promoting SC injury responses exacerbates axonal loss. If this holds true in a broader spectrum of conditions, it may provide the grounds for the development of new glia-centric therapeutic approaches to counteract axonal loss.

  11. Multimodal sensory integration in single cerebellar granule cells in vivo.

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    Ishikawa, Taro; Shimuta, Misa; Häusser, Michael

    2015-12-29

    The mammalian cerebellum is a highly multimodal structure, receiving inputs from multiple sensory modalities and integrating them during complex sensorimotor coordination tasks. Previously, using cell-type-specific anatomical projection mapping, it was shown that multimodal pathways converge onto individual cerebellar granule cells (Huang et al., 2013). Here we directly measure synaptic currents using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and confirm that a subset of single granule cells receive convergent functional multimodal (somatosensory, auditory, and visual) inputs via separate mossy fibers. Furthermore, we show that the integration of multimodal signals by granule cells can enhance action potential output. These recordings directly demonstrate functional convergence of multimodal signals onto single granule cells.

  12. Cerebellar granule cells are predominantly generated by terminal symmetric divisions of granule cell precursors.

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    Nakashima, Kie; Umeshima, Hiroki; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-06-01

    Neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) are generated by symmetric and asymmetric cell division of neural stem cells and their derivative progenitor cells. Cerebellar granule cells are the most abundant neurons in the CNS, and are generated by intensive cell division of granule cell precursors (GCPs) during postnatal development. Dysregulation of GCP cell cycle is causal for some subtypes of medulloblastoma. However, the details and mechanisms underlying neurogenesis from GCPs are not well understood. Using long-term live-cell imaging of proliferating GCPs transfected with a fluorescent newborn-granule cell marker, we found that GCPs underwent predominantly symmetric divisions, generating two GCPs or two neurons, while asymmetric divisions generating a GCP and a neuron were only occasionally observed, in both dissociated culture and within tissues of isolated cerebellar lobules. We found no significant difference in cell cycle length between proliferative and neurogenic divisions, or any consistent changes in cell cycle length during repeated proliferative division. Unlike neural stem cells in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, which generate many neurons by repeated asymmetric division, cerebellar GCPs produce neurons predominantly by terminal symmetric division. These results indicate diverse mechanisms of neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

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    García-Faroldi, Gianni; Rodríguez, Carlos E; Urdiales, José L; Pérez-Pomares, José M; Dávila, José C; Pejler, Gunnar; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Fajardo, Ignacio

    2010-11-30

    Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG) present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules. Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system. Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  14. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

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    Gianni García-Faroldi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules.Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system.Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  15. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

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    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  16. Denervation-induced homeostatic dendritic plasticity in morphological granule cell models

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    Hermann Cuntz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal death and subsequent denervation of target areas are major consequences of several neurological conditions such asischemia or neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease. The denervation-induced axonal loss results in reorganization of the dendritic tree of denervated neurons. The dendritic reorganization has been previously studied using entorhinal cortex lesion (ECL. ECL leads to shortening and loss of dendritic segments in the denervated outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, the functional importance of these long-term dendritic alterations is not yet understood and their impact on neuronal electrical properties remains unclear. Here we analyzed what happens to the electrotonic structure and excitability of dentate granule cells after lesion-induced alterations of their dendritic morphology, assuming all other parameters remain equal. We performed comparative electrotonic analysis in anatomically and biophysically realistic compartmental models of 3D-reconstructed healthy and denervated granule cells. Using the method of morphological modeling based on optimization principles minimizing the amount of wiring and maximizing synaptic democracy, we built artificial granule cells which replicate morphological features of their real counterparts. Our results show that somatofugal and somatopetal voltage attenuation in the passive cable model are strongly reduced in denervated granule cells. In line with these predictions, the attenuation both of simulated backpropagating action potentials and forward propagating EPSPs was significantly reduced in dendrites of denervated neurons. Intriguingly, the enhancement of action potential backpropagation occurred specifically in the denervated dendritic layers. Furthermore, simulations of synaptic f-I curves revealed a homeostatic increase of excitability in denervated granule cells. In summary, our morphological and compartmental modeling indicates that unless modified by changes of

  17. Action Potential Dynamics in Fine Axons Probed with an Axonally Targeted Optical Voltage Sensor.

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    Ma, Yihe; Bayguinov, Peter O; Jackson, Meyer B

    2017-01-01

    The complex and malleable conduction properties of axons determine how action potentials propagate through extensive axonal arbors to reach synaptic terminals. The excitability of axonal membranes plays a major role in neural circuit function, but because most axons are too thin for conventional electrical recording, their properties remain largely unexplored. To overcome this obstacle, we used a genetically encoded hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) harboring an axonal targeting motif. Expressing this probe in transgenic mice enabled us to monitor voltage changes optically in two populations of axons in hippocampal slices, the large axons of dentate granule cells (mossy fibers) in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region and the much finer axons of hilar mossy cells in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Action potentials propagated with distinct velocities in each type of axon. Repetitive firing broadened action potentials in both populations, but at an intermediate frequency the degree of broadening differed. Repetitive firing also attenuated action potential amplitudes in both mossy cell and granule cell axons. These results indicate that the features of use-dependent action potential broadening, and possible failure, observed previously in large nerve terminals also appear in much finer unmyelinated axons. Subtle differences in the frequency dependences could influence the propagation of activity through different pathways to excite different populations of neurons. The axonally targeted hVOS probe used here opens up the diverse repertoire of neuronal processes to detailed biophysical study.

  18. Conditional induction of Math1 specifies embryonic stem cells to cerebellar granule neuron lineage and promotes differentiation into mature granule neurons.

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    Srivastava, Rupali; Kumar, Manoj; Peineau, Stéphane; Csaba, Zsolt; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Directing differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to specific neuronal subtype is critical for modeling disease pathology in vitro. An attractive means of action would be to combine regulatory differentiation factors and extrinsic inductive signals added to the culture medium. In this study, we have generated mature cerebellar granule neurons by combining a temporally controlled transient expression of Math1, a master gene in granule neuron differentiation, with inductive extrinsic factors involved in cerebellar development. Using a Tetracyclin-On transactivation system, we overexpressed Math1 at various stages of ESCs differentiation and found that the yield of progenitors was considerably increased when Math1 was induced during embryonic body stage. Math1 triggered expression of Mbh1 and Mbh2, two target genes directly involved in granule neuron precursor formation and strong expression of early cerebellar territory markers En1 and NeuroD1. Three weeks after induction, we observed a decrease in the number of glial cells and an increase in that of neurons albeit still immature. Combining Math1 induction with extrinsic factors specifically increased the number of neurons that expressed Pde1c, Zic1, and GABAα6R characteristic of mature granule neurons, formed "T-shaped" axons typical of granule neurons, and generated synaptic contacts and action potentials in vitro. Finally, in vivo implantation of Math1-induced progenitors into young adult mice resulted in cell migration and settling of newly generated neurons in the cerebellum. These results show that conditional induction of Math1 drives ESCs toward the cerebellar fate and indicate that acting on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors is a powerful means to modulate ESCs differentiation and maturation into a specific neuronal lineage. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  19. KIF2A regulates the development of dentate granule cells and postnatal hippocampal wiring.

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    Homma, Noriko; Zhou, Ruyun; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2018-01-09

    Kinesin super family protein 2A (KIF2A), an ATP-dependent microtubule (MT) destabilizer, regulates cell migration, axon elongation, and pruning in the developing nervous system. KIF2A mutations have recently been identified in patients with malformed cortical development. However, postnatal KIF2A is continuously expressed in the hippocampus, in which new neurons are generated throughout an individual's life in established neuronal circuits. In this study, we investigated KIF2A function in the postnatal hippocampus by using tamoxifen-inducible Kif2a conditional knockout ( Kif2a -cKO) mice. Despite exhibiting no significant defects in neuronal proliferation or migration, Kif2a -cKO mice showed signs of an epileptic hippocampus. In addition to mossy fiber sprouting, the Kif2a -cKO dentate granule cells (DGCs) showed dendro-axonal conversion , leading to the growth of many aberrant overextended dendrites that eventually developed axonal properties. These results suggested that postnatal KIF2A is a key length regulator of DGC developing neurites and is involved in the establishment of precise postnatal hippocampal wiring. © 2018, Homma et al.

  20. Retinal ganglion cells: Energetics, compartmentation, axonal transport, cytoskeletons and vulnerability.

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    Yu, Dao-Yi; Cringle, Stephen J; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Morgan, William H; Yu, Paula K; Su, Er-Ning

    2013-09-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are specialized projection neurons that relay an immense amount of visual information from the retina to the brain. RGC signal inputs are collected by dendrites and output is distributed from the cell body via very thin (0.5-1 μm) and long (∼50 mm) axons. The RGC cell body is larger than other retinal neurons, but is still only a very small fraction (one ten thousandths) of the length and total surface area of the axon. The total distance traversed by RGCs extends from the retina, starting from synapses with bipolar and amacrine cells, to the brain, to synapses with neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus. This review will focus on the energy demands of RGCs and the relevant tissues that surround them. RGC survival and function unexceptionally depends upon free energy, predominantly adenosine triphosphate (ATP). RGC energy metabolism is vastly different when compared to that of the photoreceptors. Each subcellular component of the RGC is remarkably different in terms of structure, function and extracellular environment. The energy demands and distribution of each component are also distinct as evidenced by the uneven distribution of mitochondria and ATP within the RGC - signifying the presence of intracellular energy gradients. In this review we will describe RGCs as having four subcellular components, (1) Dendrites, (2) Cell body, (3) Non-myelinated axon, including intraocular and optic nerve head portions, and (4) Myelinated axon, including the intra-orbital and intracranial portions. We will also describe how RGCs integrate information from each subcellular component in order achieve intracellular homeostatic stability as well as respond to perturbations in the extracellular environment. The possible cellular mechanisms such as axonal transport and axonal cytoskeleton proteins that are involved in maintaining RGC energy homeostasis during normal and disease conditions will also be discussed in depth. The emphasis of this

  1. Morphology of dentate granule cells in the human epileptogenic hippocampus.

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    von Campe, G; Spencer, D D; de Lanerolle, N C

    1997-01-01

    Hippocampal dentate granule cells in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients with mesial sclerosis (MTLE) are reported to be hyperexcitable compared to those in patients with a mass lesion outside the hippocampus (MaTLE) (Williamson, Clin Neurosci 1994;2: 47-52). To determine if such hyperexcitability is associated with an altered morphology of these neurons, Lucifer Yellow-filled granule cells from MTLE patients were compared with those from MaTLE. The morphology of granule cells in both subject groups resembles closely that of human granule cells described previously by Golgi studies. About 40% of human granule cells have basal dendrites. Additionally their apical dendrites are much more limited in their spread in the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus contributing perhaps to a much more narrow lamellar organization than in rats. Analysis of variance computed on 21 morphometric parameters reveals a significant increase in the length of the portion of the dendrite in the inner molecular layer (IML), and a decrease in length in the outer third of the molecular layer in MTLE, compared to MaTLE. Factor analysis performed on the morphometric features of each group of neurons reveals that in the MaTLE neurons the most distinctive feature is the total dendritic length and the overall distribution of spines on them, whereas in MTLE a lengthening and elaboration of the dendrites in the IML is most distinctive. Previous observations of increased synaptic terminals containing neuropeptides, and neurotransmitter receptors in the IML taken in conjunction with an elaboration of granule cell dendrites in this region, suggest considerable synaptic reorganization within the IML of the MTLE hippocampus which may contribute to its epileptogenicity.

  2. UVC-induced stress granules in mammalian cells.

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    Mohamed Taha Moutaoufik

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are well characterized cytoplasmic RNA bodies that form under various stress conditions. We have observed that exposure of mammalian cells in culture to low doses of UVC induces the formation of discrete cytoplasmic RNA granules that were detected by immunofluorescence staining using antibodies to RNA-binding proteins. UVC-induced cytoplasmic granules are not Processing Bodies (P-bodies and are bone fide SGs as they contain TIA-1, TIA-1/R, Caprin1, FMRP, G3BP1, PABP1, well known markers, and mRNA. Concomitant with the accumulation of the granules in the cytoplasm, cells enter a quiescent state, as they are arrested in G1 phase of the cell cycle in order to repair DNA damages induced by UVC irradiation. This blockage persists as long as the granules are present. A tight correlation between their decay and re-entry into S-phase was observed. However the kinetics of their formation, their low number per cell, their absence of fusion into larger granules, their persistence over 48 hours and their slow decay, all differ from classical SGs induced by arsenite or heat treatment. The induction of these SGs does not correlate with major translation inhibition nor with phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α. We propose that a restricted subset of mRNAs coding for proteins implicated in cell cycling are removed from the translational apparatus and are sequestered in a repressed form in SGs.

  3. Differential Axonal Projection of Mitral and Tufted Cells in the Mouse Main Olfactory System

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    Shin Nagayama

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, much has been elucidated regarding the functional organization of the axonal connection of olfactory sensory neurons to olfactory bulb (OB glomeruli. However, the manner in which projection neurons of the OB process odorant input and send this information to higher brain centers remains unclear. Here, we report long-range, large-scale tracing of the axonal projection patterns of OB neurons using two-photon microscopy. Tracer injection into a single glomerulus demonstrated widely distributed mitral/tufted cell axonal projections on the lateroventral surface of the mouse brain, including the anterior/posterior piriform cortex (PC and olfactory tubercle (OT. We noted two distinct groups of labeled axons: PC-orienting axons and OT-orienting axons. Each group occupied distinct parts of the lateral olfactory tract. PC-orienting axons projected axon collaterals to a wide area of the PC but only a few collaterals to the OT. OT-orienting axons densely projected axon collaterals primarily to the anterolateral OT (alOT. Different colored dye injections into the superficial and deep portions of the OB external plexiform layer revealed that the PC-orienting axon populations originated in presumed mitral cells and the OT-orienting axons in presumed tufted cells. These data suggest that although mitral and tufted cells receive similar odor signals from a shared glomerulus, they process the odor information in different ways and send their output to different higher brain centers via the PC and alOT.

  4. ZnT3 Gene Deletion Reduces Colchicine-Induced Dentate Granule Cell Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Choi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that colchicine-induced dentate granule cell death is caused by blocking axonal flow and the accumulation of intracellular zinc. Zinc is concentrated in the synaptic vesicles via zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3, which facilitates zinc transport from the cytosol into the synaptic vesicles. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of ZnT3 gene deletion on colchicine-induced dentate granule cell death. The present study used young (3–5 months mice of the wild-type (WT or the ZnT3−/− genotype. Colchicine (10 µg/kg was injected into the hippocampus, and then brain sections were evaluated 12 or 24 h later. Cell death was evaluated by Fluoro-Jade B; oxidative stress was analyzed by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal; and dendritic damage was detected by microtubule-associated protein 2. Zinc accumulation was detected by N-(6-methoxy-8-quinolyl-para-toluenesulfonamide (TSQ staining. Here, we found that ZnT3−/− reduced the number of degenerating cells after colchicine injection. The ZnT3−/−-mediated inhibition of cell death was accompanied by suppression of oxidative injury, dendritic damage and zinc accumulation. In addition, ZnT3−/− mice showed more glutathione content than WT mice and inhibited neuronal glutathione depletion by colchicine. These findings suggest that increased neuronal glutathione by ZnT3 gene deletion prevents colchicine-induced dentate granule cell death.

  5. Abnormal ion content, hydration and granule expansion of the secretory granules from cystic fibrosis airway glandular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baconnais, S.; Delavoie, F.; Zahm, J.M.; Milliot, M.; Terryn, C.; Castillon, N.; Banchet, V.; Michel, J.; Danos, O.; Merten, M.; Chinet, T.; Zierold, K.; Bonnet, N.; Puchelle, E.; Balossier, G.

    2005-01-01

    The absence or decreased expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) induces increased Na + absorption and hyperabsorption of the airway surface liquid (ASL) resulting in a dehydrated and hyperviscous ASL. Although the implication of abnormal airway submucosal gland function has been suggested, the ion and water content in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) glandular secretory granules, before exocytosis, is unknown. We analyzed, in non-CF and CF human airway glandular cell lines (MM-39 and KM4, respectively), the ion content in the secretory granules by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and the water content by quantitative dark field imaging on freeze-dried cryosections. We demonstrated that the ion content (Na + , Mg 2+ , P, S and Cl - ) is significantly higher and the water content significantly lower in secretory granules from the CF cell line compared to the non-CF cell line. Using videomicroscopy, we observed that the secretory granule expansion was deficient in CF glandular cells. Transfection of CF cells with CFTR cDNA or inhibition of non-CF cells with CFTR inh -172, respectively restored or decreased the water content and granule expansion, in parallel with changes in ion content. We hypothesize that the decreased water and increased ion content in glandular secretory granules may contribute to the dehydration and increased viscosity of the ASL in CF

  6. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckleberry, Kylie A.; Kane, Gary A.; Mathis, Rita J.; Cook, Sarah G.; Clutton, Jonathan E.; Drew, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG), but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in the DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG) zif268 appears to be an important mediator of these effects, as its expression can be induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Richardson et al., 1992; Veyrac et al., 2013). Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs). We first quantified zif268 expression in doublecortin-positive (DCX+) immature neurons and in the general granule cell population after brief exposure to a novel environment (NE). In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 h after NE exposure and returned to baseline by 8 h post-exposure. However, in the DCX+ cells, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 h post-exposure. We next asked whether suppression of zif268 in DCX+ immature cells occurs in other behavioral paradigms that recruit the hippocampus. Exposure to Morris water maze (MWM) training, an enriched environment, or a NE caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 expression among the general granule cell population. The same behavioral procedures activated zif268 expression in 6-week-old BrdU-labeled adult-born neurons, indicating that zif268 suppression is specific to immature neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. NE exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly

  7. Axon ensheathment and metabolic supply by glial cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmeier, Stefanie; Matzat, Till; Klämbt, Christian

    2016-06-15

    Neuronal function requires constant working conditions and a well-balanced supply of ions and metabolites. The metabolic homeostasis in the nervous system crucially depends on the presence of glial cells, which nurture and isolate neuronal cells. Here we review recent findings on how these tasks are performed by glial cells in the genetically amenable model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Despite the small size of its nervous system, which would allow diffusion of metabolites, a surprising division of labor between glial cells and neurons is evident. Glial cells are glycolytically active and transfer lactate and alanine to neurons. Neurons in turn do not require glycolysis but can use the glially provided compounds for their energy homeostasis. Besides feeding neurons, glial cells also insulate neuronal axons in a way similar to Remak fibers in the mammalian nervous system. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating this insulation require neuregulin signaling and resemble the mechanisms controlling glial differentiation in mammals surprisingly well. We hypothesize that metabolic cross talk and insulation of neurons by glial cells emerged early during evolution as two closely interlinked features in the nervous system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Schwann Cell and Axon: An Interlaced Unit-From Action Potential to Phenotype Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Felipe A; Alvarez, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Here we propose a model of a peripheral axon with a great deal of autonomy from its cell body-the autonomous axon-but with a substantial dependence on its ensheathing Schwann cell (SC), the axon-SC unit. We review evidence in several fields and show that (i) axons can extend sprouts and grow without the concurrence of the cell body, but regulated by SCs; (ii) axons synthesize their proteins assisted by SCs that supply them with ribosomes and, probably, with mRNAs by way of exosomes; (iii) the molecular organization of the axoplasm, i.e., its phenotype, is regulated by the SC, as illustrated by the axonal microtubular content, which is down-regulated by the SC; and (iv) the axon has a program for self-destruction that is boosted by the SC. The main novelty of this model axon-SC unit is that it breaks with the notion that all proteins of the nerve cell are specified by its own nucleus. The notion of a collaborative specification of the axoplasm by more than one nucleus, which we present here, opens a new dimension in the understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and is also a frame of reference to understand other tissues or cell associations.

  9. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells - their osteogenicity and osteoblast in vitro mineralization on titanium granule carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Morten; Syberg, Susanne; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2013-12-01

    Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) may be osteogenic, may generate neoangiogenisis and may be progenitors for differentiated osteoblast mineralization. Titanium granules may be suitable as carriers for these cells. The aim was to demonstrate the osteogenic potential of ADMSCs and the effect of porous non-oxidized (Ti) and oxidized titanium (TiO2) granules as carriers for ADMSCs mineralization in vitro. ADMSCs were isolated, cultivated in osteoblast medium and evaluated for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay, RNA isolation, and ALP staining. Osteoblast in vitro mineralization cells without granules or seeded on Ti or TiO2 granules were evaluated for Alizarin Red assay and RNA isolation for later gene expressing. ADMSCs express osteoblastic lineage genes, CBFA-1 and stain strongly for ALP. Mineralization was significantly higher for cells seeded on TiO2 than on Ti granules or pure cells. Expression of ALPL and RUNX2 was significantly higher for cells seeded on TiO2 granules and expression of COL1α1 for pure cells was significantly higher than for cells seeded on granules. ADMSCs have osteogenic potential. Mineralization was significantly high when cells were seeded on TiO2 granules. TiO2 granules may be used as carriers for adipose derived mesenchymal osteoblastic cells from laboratory bench to the patient. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Segregation of ipsilateral retinal ganglion cell axons at the optic chiasm requires the Shh receptor Boc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Pierre J; Shimogori, Tomomi; Charron, Frédéric

    2010-01-06

    The pattern of contralaterally and ipsilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons at the optic chiasm is essential for the establishment of binocular vision. Contralateral axons cross the chiasm midline as they progress from the optic nerve to the optic tract. In contrast, ipsilateral axons deviate from the chiasm and continue in the ipsilateral optic tract, avoiding the chiasm midline. The molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not completely understood. Here we show that the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptor Boc is enriched in ipsilateral RGCs of the developing retina. Together with the presence of Shh at the midline, this complementary expression pattern led us to hypothesize that Shh might repel ipsilateral RGC axons at the chiasm. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that only Boc-positive RGC axons retract in vitro in response to Shh and that this response is lost in Boc mutant RGCs. In vivo, we show that Boc is required for the normal segregation of ipsilateral axons at the optic chiasm and, conversely, that Boc expression in contralateral RGCs prevents their axons from crossing the optic chiasm. Together, these results suggest that Shh repels ipsilateral RGC axons at the optic chiasm via its receptor Boc. This work identifies a novel molecular pathway required for the segregation of axons at the optic chiasm.

  11. Axonal degeneration stimulates the formation of NG2+ cells and oligodendrocytes in the mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Drøjdahl, Nina

    2006-01-01

    the response of the NG2+ cells to the different components of demyelinating pathology, we investigated the response of adult NG2+ cells to axonal degeneration in the absence of primary myelin or oligodendrocyte pathology. Axonal degeneration was induced in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice...... by transection of the entorhino-dentate perforant path projection. The acutely induced degeneration of axons and terminals resulted in a prompt response of NG2+ cells, consisting of morphological transformation, cellular proliferation, and upregulation of NG2 expression days 2-3 after surgery. This was followed...

  12. High Plasticity of New Granule Cells in the Aging Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela F. Trinchero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: During aging, the brain undergoes changes that impair cognitive capacity and circuit plasticity, including a marked decrease in production of adult-born hippocampal neurons. It is unclear whether development and integration of those new neurons are also affected by age. Here, we show that adult-born granule cells (GCs in aging mice are scarce and exhibit slow development, but they display a remarkable potential for structural plasticity. Retrovirally labeled 3-week-old GCs in middle-aged mice were small, underdeveloped, and disconnected. Neuronal development and integration were accelerated by voluntary exercise or environmental enrichment. Similar effects were observed via knockdown of Lrig1, an endogenous negative modulator of neurotrophin receptors. Consistently, blocking neurotrophin signaling by Lrig1 overexpression abolished the positive effects of exercise. These results demonstrate an unparalleled degree of plasticity in the aging brain mediated by neurotrophins, whereby new GCs remain immature until becoming rapidly recruited to the network by activity. : Trinchero et al. show that development of new granule cells born in the adult hippocampus is strongly influenced by age. In the aging hippocampus, new neurons remain immature for prolonged intervals, yet voluntary exercise triggers their rapid growth and functional synaptogenesis. This extensive structural remodeling is mediated by neurotrophins. Keywords: adult neurogenesis, dentate gyrus, functional integration, neurotrophins, synaptogenesis, exercise

  13. ON Cone Bipolar Cell Axonal Synapses in the OFF Inner Plexiform Layer of the Rabbit Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, J. Scott; Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Mohammed, Shoeb; Hoang, John V.; Marc, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the rabbit retinal connectome RC1 reveals that the division between the ON and OFF inner plexiform layer (IPL) is not structurally absolute. ON cone bipolar cells make non-canonical axonal synapses onto specific targets and receive amacrine cell synapses in the nominal OFF layer, creating novel motifs, including inhibitory crossover networks. Automated transmission electron microscope (ATEM) imaging, molecular tagging, tracing, and rendering of ≈ 400 bipolar cells reveals axonal ribbons in 36% of ON cone bipolar cells, throughout the OFF IPL. The targets include GABA-positive amacrine cells (γACs), glycine-positive amacrine cells (GACs) and ganglion cells. Most ON cone bipolar cell axonal contacts target GACs driven by OFF cone bipolar cells, forming new architectures for generating ON-OFF amacrine cells. Many of these ON-OFF GACs target ON cone bipolar cell axons, ON γACs and/or ON-OFF ganglion cells, representing widespread mechanisms for OFF to ON crossover inhibition. Other targets include OFF γACs presynaptic to OFF bipolar cells, forming γAC-mediated crossover motifs. ON cone bipolar cell axonal ribbons drive bistratified ON-OFF ganglion cells in the OFF layer and provide ON drive to polarity-appropriate targets such as bistratified diving ganglion cells (bsdGCs). The targeting precision of ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses shows that this drive incidence is necessarily a joint distribution of cone bipolar cell axonal frequency and target cell trajectories through a given volume of the OFF layer. Such joint distribution sampling is likely common when targets are sparser than sources and when sources are coupled, as are ON cone bipolar cells. PMID:23042441

  14. Molecular mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell degeneration in glaucoma and future prospects for cell body and axonal protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari eMunemasa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, which affects more than 70 million people worldwide, is a heterogeneous group of disorders with a resultant common denominator; optic neuropathy, eventually leading to irreversible blindness. The clinical manifestations of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, the most common subtype of glaucoma, include excavation of the optic disc and progressive loss of visual field. Axonal degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and apoptotic death of their cell bodies are observed in glaucoma, in which the reduction of intraocular pressure is known to slow progression of the disease. A pattern of localized retinal nerve fiber layer defects in glaucoma patients indicates that axonal degeneration may precede RGC body death in this condition. The mechanisms of degeneration of neuronal cell bodies and their axons may differ. In this review, we addressed the molecular mechanisms of cell body death and axonal degeneration in glaucoma and proposed axonal protection in addition to cell body protection. The concept of axonal protection may become a new therapeutic strategy to prevent further axonal degeneration or revive dying axons in patients with preperimetric glaucoma. Further study will be needed to clarify whether the combination therapy of axonal protection and cell body protection will have greater protective effects in early or progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

  15. GABAB receptor subtypes differentially modulate synaptic inhibition in the dentate gyrus to enhance granule cell output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Joshua D; Kitchen, Ian; Bettler, Bernhard; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    Activation of GABAB receptors in the dentate gyrus (DG) enhances granule cell (GC) activity by reducing synaptic inhibition imposed by hilar interneurons. This disinhibitory action facilitates signal transfer from the perforant path to the hippocampus. However, as the two main molecular subtypes, GABA(B(1a,2)) and GABA(B(1b,2)) receptors, prefer axonal terminal and dendritic compartments, respectively, they may modulate the hilar pathways at different synaptic localizations. We examined their relative expression and functions in the DG. The localization of GABAB subtypes was revealed immunohistochemically using subunit-selective antibodies in GABA(B1a)(-/-) and GABA(B1b)(-/-) mice. Effects of subtype activation by the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, were examined on the perforant path-stimulated GC population activities in brain slices. GABA(B(1a,2)) receptors were concentrated in the inner molecular layer, the neuropil of the hilus and hilar neurons at the border zone; while GABA(B(1b,2)) receptors dominated the outer molecular layer and hilar neurons in the deep layer, showing their differential localization on GC dendrite and in the hilus. Baclofen enhanced the GC population spike to a larger extent in the GABA(B1b)(-/-) mice, demonstrating exclusively disinhibitory roles of the GABA(B(1a,2)) receptors. Conversely, in the GABA(B1a)(-/-) mice baclofen not only enhanced but also inhibited the population spike during GABAA blockade, revealing both disinhibitory and inhibitory effects of GABA(B(1b,2)) receptors. The GABA(B(1a,2)) and GABA(B(1b,2)) receptor subtypes differentially modulate GC outputs via selective axonal terminal and dendritic locations in the hilar pathways. The GABA(B(1a,2)) receptors exclusively mediate disinhibition, thereby playing a greater role in gating signal transfer for hippocampal spatial and pattern learning. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. ► tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. ► tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA Met (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA Met was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  17. Activation of ganglion cells and axon bundles using epiretinal electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosberg, Lauren E; Ganesan, Karthik; Goetz, Georges A; Madugula, Sasidhar S; Bhaskhar, Nandita; Fan, Victoria; Li, Peter; Hottowy, Pawel; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Sher, Alexander; Litke, Alan M; Mitra, Subhasish; Chichilnisky, E J

    2017-09-01

    Epiretinal prostheses for treating blindness activate axon bundles, causing large, arc-shaped visual percepts that limit the quality of artificial vision. Improving the function of epiretinal prostheses therefore requires understanding and avoiding axon bundle activation. This study introduces a method to detect axon bundle activation on the basis of its electrical signature and uses the method to test whether epiretinal stimulation can directly elicit spikes in individual retinal ganglion cells without activating nearby axon bundles. Combined electrical stimulation and recording from isolated primate retina were performed using a custom multielectrode system (512 electrodes, 10-μm diameter, 60-μm pitch). Axon bundle signals were identified by their bidirectional propagation, speed, and increasing amplitude as a function of stimulation current. The threshold for bundle activation varied across electrodes and retinas, and was in the same range as the threshold for activating retinal ganglion cells near their somas. In the peripheral retina, 45% of electrodes that activated individual ganglion cells (17% of all electrodes) did so without activating bundles. This permitted selective activation of 21% of recorded ganglion cells (7% of expected ganglion cells) over the array. In one recording in the central retina, 75% of electrodes that activated individual ganglion cells (16% of all electrodes) did so without activating bundles. The ability to selectively activate a subset of retinal ganglion cells without axon bundles suggests a possible novel architecture for future epiretinal prostheses. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Large-scale multielectrode recording and stimulation were used to test how selectively retinal ganglion cells can be electrically activated without activating axon bundles. A novel method was developed to identify axon activation on the basis of its unique electrical signature and was used to find that a subset of ganglion cells can be activated at single-cell

  18. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Hack, N

    1988-01-01

    Our previous studies on the survival-promoting influence of elevated concentrations of extracellular K+ ([K+]e) on cultured cerebellar granule cells led to the proposal that depolarization in vitro mimics the effect of the earliest afferent inputs received by the granule cells in vivo. This, in t...

  19. Partitioning and Exocytosis of Secretory Granules during Division of PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Vassilev Bukoreshtliev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis, maturation, and exocytosis of secretory granules in interphase cells have been well documented, whereas the distribution and exocytosis of these hormone-storing organelles during cell division have received little attention. By combining ultrastructural analyses and time-lapse microscopy, we here show that, in dividing PC12 cells, the prominent peripheral localization of secretory granules is retained during prophase but clearly reduced during prometaphase, ending up with only few peripherally localized secretory granules in metaphase cells. During anaphase and telophase, secretory granules exhibited a pronounced movement towards the cell midzone and, evidently, their tracks colocalized with spindle microtubules. During cytokinesis, secretory granules were excluded from the midbody and accumulated at the bases of the intercellular bridge. Furthermore, by measuring exocytosis at the single granule level, we showed, that during all stages of cell division, secretory granules were competent for regulated exocytosis. In conclusion, our data shed new light on the complex molecular machinery of secretory granule redistribution during cell division, which facilitates their release from the F-actin-rich cortex and active transport along spindle microtubules.

  20. Appearance of granulated cells in blood films stained by automated aqueous versus methanolic Romanowsky methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Robin W; Velguth, Karen E

    2010-03-01

    Romanowsky stains are used routinely by veterinary clinical pathology laboratories for cytologic and blood film evaluations. Automated stainers are available for both aqueous and methanolic Romanowsky stains. Mast cell granules and canine distemper virus inclusions are known to stain differently by these 2 methods, but we have noticed differences in the staining characteristics of other granulated cells. The aim of this study was to investigate and document the variable appearance of basophils and large granular lymphocytes in blood films stained using aqueous and methanolic Romanowsky methods. Cytologic preparations from 1 canine mast cell tumor and blood films from 8 dogs, 1 cat, 1 rabbit, and 1 ostrich were stained using an automated aqueous stain (Aerospray 7120, with and without a predip fixative) and an automated methanolic stain (Hematek). Staining quality and intensity of the cytoplasmic granules in mast cells, basophils, and large granular lymphocytes was evaluated subjectively. Cytoplasmic granules of mast cells, basophils, and large granular lymphocytes stained poorly or not at all with the automated aqueous stain but stained prominently and were readily identified with the automated methanolic stain. Use of the predip fixative with the Aerospray method improved the visibility of basophil granules but not mast cell granules, and had a variable affect on the visibility of granules in large granular lymphocytes. Clinical pathologists should be aware of the staining methodology used on the slides they evaluate to avoid incorrect interpretation of granulated cell populations.

  1. Dendritic spines form 'collars' in hippocampal granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, D A; Stewart, M G; Sojka, M; Richter-Levin, G; Bliss, T V

    1995-07-31

    A quantitative study of the distribution of dendritic spines was carried out in three orders of dendritic branches of granule cells from the dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus. Golgi-stained preparations (7-19 neurones in each of seven rats) were analysed using computerized microscopy. Identification of spines and quantification of stem-spine geometry was performed using a segmentation algorithm and a line skeleton transformation of dendritic images. Analysis of data using the statistics of point processes revealed that, in all three branch orders, the distribution of visible spines along dendrites was not evenly random, but included dense clusters of spines surrounding the dendritic stem (spine 'collars'). Three-dimensional reconstructions from serial ultrathin sections have confirmed the presence of such spine groups. We speculate the spine collars represent a functional element in which associative synaptic plasticity is fostered by the proximity of individual synapses.

  2. Expression of cell adhesion molecules in normal nerves, chronic axonal neuropathies and Schwann cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, P H; Figarella-Branger, D; Daniel, L; Bianco, N; Pellet, W; Pellissier, J F

    1997-10-22

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a role in the normal development and regeneration of tissues as well as in the biological behaviour of tumors. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of various CAMs, such as neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), its polysialylated isoform (PSA-NCAM), epithelial (E-) cadherin, and beta1 integrins (alpha2beta1, alpha5beta1, alpha6beta1) in a series of frozen specimens of 10 normal nerves, 5 axonal neuropathies, 26 benign Schwannomas and 2 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MNST). NCAM was expressed by non-myelinating Schwann cells from normal nerves and overexpressed by Schwann cells from patients with chronic axonal neuropathies and Schwannomas. The expression was lower in MNST. Expression of PSA-NCAM was heterogeneously displayed by Schwann cells from the various tissues studied. Anti E-cadherin immunoreactivity was present in myelin sheath in normal nerves and axonopathies. It was expressed in some Schwannomas especially in vestibular Schwannomas. Integrins VLA alpha2 and VLA alpha6 were widely expressed by Schwann cells from normal nerves, axonal neuropathies and Schwannomas but their expression was low in MNST. VLA alpha5 was not expressed by Schwann cells from normal nerve and Schwannomas but present in chronic axonal neuropathies and MNST. In addition VLA alpha6 was strongly expressed by perineurial cells. These data show that CAMs have a characteristic pattern of expression in normal nerve. Also, some CAMs are always expressed by Schwann cells but the expression of others differs in normal nerves versus axonopathies or tumors, suggesting a role of the microcellular environment in the regulation of CAM expression. Schwannomas have different pattern of expression than MNST.

  3. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transient developmental Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in healthy and ataxic mouse cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovisa Ljungberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is carried out of the cerebellar cortical microcircuit via action potentials propagated along Purkinje cell axons. In several human neurodegenerative diseases, focal axonal swellings on Purkinje cells – known as torpedoes – have been associated with Purkinje cell loss. Interestingly, torpedoes are also reported to appear transiently during development in rat cerebellum. The function of Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in health as well as in disease is poorly understood. We investigated the properties of developmental torpedoes in the postnatal mouse cerebellum of wildtype and transgenic mice. We found that Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes transiently appeared on axons of Purkinje neurons, with the largest number of torpedoes observed at postnatal day 11 (P11. This was after peak developmental apoptosis had occurred, when Purkinje cell counts in a lobule were static, suggesting that most developmental torpedoes appear on axons of neurons that persist into adulthood. We found that developmental torpedoes were not associated with a presynaptic GABAergic marker, indicating that they are not synapses. They were seldom found at axonal collateral branch points, and lacked microglia enrichment, suggesting that they are unlikely to be involved in axonal refinement. Interestingly, we found several differences between developmental torpedoes and disease-related torpedoes: developmental torpedoes occured largely on myelinated axons, and were not associated with changes in basket cell innervation on their parent soma. Disease-related torpedoes are typically reported to contain neurofilament; while the majority of developmental torpedoes did as well, a fraction of smaller developmental torpedoes did not. These differences indicate that developmental torpedoes may not be functionally identical to disease-related torpedoes. To study this further, we used a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6, and found elevated disease

  5. Glutamate and GABA uptake by cerebellar granule and glial cell enriched populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.L.; Shank, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a study on the uptake of glutamate and GABA by the granule and glial cell enriched populations are reported. They demonstrate that the granule cells vigorously accumulate glutamate but not GABA, whereas the glial cell enriched fraction takes up both amino acids quite rapidly. An unexpected and significant finding is that both cell populations take up glutamate by two distinct high-affinity transport systems as well as a low-affinity system. (Auth.)

  6. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) product localizes to secretory granules and determines granule acidification in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Masayuki; Tanabe, Katsuya; Yanai, Akie; Ohta, Yasuharu; Kondo, Manabu; Akiyama, Masaru; Shinoda, Koh; Oka, Yoshitomo; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident transmembrane protein. The Wfs1-null mouse exhibits progressive insulin deficiency causing diabetes. Previous work suggested that the function of the WFS1 protein is connected to unfolded protein response and to intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. However, its precise molecular function in pancreatic β-cells remains elusive. In our present study, immunofluorescent and electron-microscopic analyses revealed that WFS1 localizes not only to ER but also to secretory granules in pancreatic β-cells. Intragranular acidification was assessed by measuring intracellular fluorescence intensity raised by the acidotrophic agent, 3-[2,4-dinitroanilino]-3'-amino-N-methyldipropyramine. Compared with wild-type β-cells, there was a 32% reduction in the intensity in WFS1-deficient β-cells, indicating the impairment of granular acidification. This phenotype may, at least partly, account for the evidence that Wfs1-null islets have impaired proinsulin processing, resulting in an increased circulating proinsulin level. Morphometric analysis using electron microscopy evidenced that the density of secretory granules attached to the plasma membrane was significantly reduced in Wfs1-null β-cells relative to that in wild-type β-cells. This may be relevant to the recent finding that granular acidification is required for the priming of secretory granules preceding exocytosis and may partly explain the fact that glucose-induced insulin secretion is profoundly impaired in young prediabetic Wfs1-null mice. These results thus provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of β-cell dysfunction in patients with Wolfram syndrome.

  7. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie A. Huckleberry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG, but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG zif268 is an important mediator of these effects, as its expression is induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Veyrac et al., 2013. Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs. In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 hour after novel environment exposure and returned to baseline by 8 hours post-exposure. However, in the doublecortin-positive (DCX+ immature neurons, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 hours post-exposure. We next determined that exposure to water maze training, an enriched environment, or a novel environment caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 in the general DGC population and in 6-week-old adult-born neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. Novel environment exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly suppressed zif268 expression in 3-week-old neurons. In summary, behavioral experience transiently activated expression of zif268 in mature DGCs but caused a more long-lasting suppression of zif268 expression in immature, adult-born DGCs. We hypothesize that zif268 suppression inhibits memory-related synaptic plasticity in immature DGCs or mediates learning-induced apoptosis of immature adult

  8. Granulated peripolar epithelial cells in the renal corpuscle of marine elasmobranch fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, E R; Reale, E

    1989-07-01

    Granulated epithelial cells at the vascular pole of the renal corpuscle, peripolar cells, have been found in the kidneys of five species of elasmobranchs, the little skate (Raja erinacea), the smooth dogfish shark (Mustelus canis), the Atlantic sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae), the scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), and the cow-nosed ray (Rhinoptera bonasus). In a sixth elasmobranch, the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the peripolar cells could not be identified among numerous other granulated epithelial cells. The peripolar cells are located at the transition between the parietal epithelium of Bowman's capsule and the visceral epithelium (podocytes) of the glomerulus, thus forming a cuff-like arrangement surrounding the hilar vessels of the renal corpuscle. These cells may have granules and/or vacuoles. Electron microscopy shows that the granules are membrane-bounded, and contain either a homogeneous material or a paracrystalline structure with a repeating period of about 18 nm. The vacuoles are electron lucent or may contain remnants of a granule. These epithelial cells lie close to the granulated cells of the glomerular afferent arteriole. They correspond to the granular peripolar cells of the mammalian, avian and amphibian kidney. The present study is the first reported occurrence of peripolar cells in a marine organism or in either bony or cartilagenous fish.

  9. Dynamics of degeneration and regeneration in developing zebrafish peripheral axons reveals a requirement for extrinsic cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villegas Rosario

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating axon degeneration and regeneration is crucial for developing treatments for nerve injury and neurodegenerative disease. In neurons, axon degeneration is distinct from cell body death and often precedes or is associated with the onset of disease symptoms. In the peripheral nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates, after degeneration of detached fragments, axons can often regenerate to restore function. Many studies of axonal degeneration and regeneration have used in vitro approaches, but the influence of extrinsic cell types on these processes can only be fully addressed in live animals. Because of its simplicity and superficial location, the larval zebrafish posterior lateral line (pLL nerve is an ideal model system for live studies of axon degeneration and regeneration. Results We used laser axotomy and time-lapse imaging of pLL axons to characterize the roles of leukocytes, Schwann cells and target sensory hair cells in axon degeneration and regeneration in vivo. Immune cells were essential for efficient removal of axonal debris after axotomy. Schwann cells were required for proper fasciculation and pathfinding of regenerating axons to their target cells. Intact target hair cells were not themselves required for regeneration, but chemical ablation of neuromasts caused axons to transiently deviate from their normal paths. Conclusions Macrophages, Schwann cells, and target sensory organs are required for distinct aspects of pLL axon degeneration or regeneration in the zebrafish larva. Our work introduces a powerful vertebrate model for analyzing axonal degeneration and regeneration in the living animal and elucidating the role of extrinsic cell types in these processes.

  10. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  11. Light scattering on PHA granules protects bacterial cells against the harmful effects of UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaninova, Eva; Sedlacek, Petr; Mravec, Filip; Mullerova, Lucie; Samek, Ota; Koller, Martin; Hesko, Ondrej; Kucera, Dan; Marova, Ivana; Obruca, Stanislav

    2018-02-01

    Numerous prokaryotes accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the form of intracellular granules. The primary function of PHA is the storage of carbon and energy. Nevertheless, there are numerous reports that the presence of PHA granules in microbial cells enhances their stress resistance and fitness when exposed to various stress factors. In this work, we studied the protective mechanism of PHA granules against UV irradiation employing Cupriavidus necator as a model bacterial strain. The PHA-accumulating wild type strain showed substantially higher UV radiation resistance than the PHA non-accumulating mutant. Furthermore, the differences in UV-Vis radiation interactions with both cell types were studied using various spectroscopic approaches (turbidimetry, absorption spectroscopy, and nephelometry). Our results clearly demonstrate that intracellular PHA granules efficiently scatter UV radiation, which provides a substantial UV-protective effect for bacterial cells and, moreover, decreases the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species in UV-challenged cells. The protective properties of the PHA granules are enhanced by the fact that granules specifically bind to DNA, which in turn provides shield-like protection of DNA as the most UV-sensitive molecule. To conclude, the UV-protective action of PHA granules adds considerable value to their primary storage function, which can be beneficial in numerous environments.

  12. Rescuing axons from degeneration does not affect retinal ganglion cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. de Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After a traumatic injury to the central nervous system, the distal stumps of axons undergo Wallerian degeneration (WD, an event that comprises cytoskeleton and myelin breakdown, astrocytic gliosis, and overexpression of proteins that inhibit axonal regrowth. By contrast, injured neuronal cell bodies show features characteristic of attempts to initiate the regenerative process of elongating their axons. The main molecular event that leads to WD is an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration, which activates calpains, calcium-dependent proteases that degrade cytoskeleton proteins. The aim of our study was to investigate whether preventing axonal degeneration would impact the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs after crushing the optic nerve. We observed that male Wistar rats (weighing 200-400 g; n=18 treated with an exogenous calpain inhibitor (20 mM administered via direct application of the inhibitor embedded within the copolymer resin Evlax immediately following optic nerve crush showed a delay in the onset of WD. This delayed onset was characterized by a decrease in the number of degenerated fibers (P<0.05 and an increase in the number of preserved fibers (P<0.05 4 days after injury. Additionally, most preserved fibers showed a normal G-ratio. These results indicated that calpain inhibition prevented the degeneration of optic nerve fibers, rescuing axons from the process of axonal degeneration. However, analysis of retinal ganglion cell survival demonstrated no difference between the calpain inhibitor- and vehicle-treated groups, suggesting that although the calpain inhibitor prevented axonal degeneration, it had no effect on RGC survival after optic nerve damage.

  13. Fluorescent labeling of newborn dentate granule cells in GAD67-GFP transgenic mice: a genetic tool for the study of adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Zhao

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus is an important form of structural plasticity in the brain. Here we report a line of BAC transgenic mice (GAD67-GFP mice that selectively and transitorily express GFP in newborn dentate granule cells of the adult hippocampus. These GFP(+ cells show a high degree of colocalization with BrdU-labeled nuclei one week after BrdU injection and express the newborn neuron marker doublecortin and PSA-NCAM. Compared to mature dentate granule cells, these newborn neurons show immature morphological features: dendritic beading, fewer dendritic branches and spines. These GFP(+ newborn neurons also show immature electrophysiological properties: higher input resistance, more depolarized resting membrane potentials, small and non-typical action potentials. The bright labeling of newborn neurons with GFP makes it possible to visualize the details of dendrites, which reach the outer edge of the molecular layer, and their axon (mossy fiber terminals, which project to the CA3 region where they form synaptic boutons. GFP expression covers the whole developmental stage of newborn neurons, beginning within the first week of cell division and disappearing as newborn neurons mature, about 4 weeks postmitotic. Thus, the GAD67-GFP transgenic mice provide a useful genetic tool for studying the development and regulation of newborn dentate granule cells.

  14. Glial progenitor cell migration promotes CNS axon growth on functionalized electroconducting microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazos-Castro, Jorge E; García-Rama, Concepción; Alves-Sampaio, Alexandra

    2016-04-15

    Electroactive systems that promote directional axonal growth and migration of glial progenitor cells (GPC) are needed for the treatment of neurological injuries. We report the functionalization of electroconducting microfibers with multiple biomolecules that synergistically stimulate the proliferation and migration of GPC, which in turn induce axonal elongation from embryonic cerebral cortex neurons. PEDOT doped with poly[(4-styrenesulfonic acid)-co-(maleic acid)] was synthesized on carbon microfibers and used for covalent attachment of molecules to the electroactive surface. The molecular complexes that promoted GPC proliferation and migration, followed by axonal extension, were composed of polylysine, heparin, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and matricellular proteins; the combination of bFGF with vitronectin or fibronectin being indispensable for sustained glial and axonal growth. The rate of glial-induced axonal elongation was about threefold that of axons growing directly on microfibers functionalized with polylysine alone. Electrical stimuli applied through the microfibers released bFGF and fibronectin from the polymer surface, consequently reducing GPC proliferation and promoting their differentiation into astrocytes, without causing cell detachment or toxicity. These results suggest that functionalized electroactive microfibers may provide a multifunctional tool for controlling neuron-glia interactions and enhancing neural repair. We report a multiple surface functionalization strategy for electroconducting microfibers (MFs), in order to promote proliferation and guided migration of glial precursor cells (GPC) and consequently create a permissive substrate for elongation of central nervous system (CNS) axons. GPC divided and migrated extensively on the functionalized MFs, leading to fast elongation of embryonic cerebral cortex axons. The application of electric pulses thorough the MFs controlled glial cell division and differentiation. The

  15. Schwann Cell Exosomes Mediate Neuron-Glia Communication and Enhance Axonal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Leal, Rodrigo; Court, Felipe A

    2016-04-01

    The functional and structural integrity of the nervous system depends on the coordinated action of neurons and glial cells. Phenomena like synaptic activity, conduction of action potentials, and neuronal growth and regeneration, to name a few, are fine tuned by glial cells. Furthermore, the active role of glial cells in the regulation of neuronal functions is underscored by several conditions in which specific mutation affecting the glia results in axonal dysfunction. We have shown that Schwann cells (SCs), the peripheral nervous system glia, supply axons with ribosomes, and since proteins underlie cellular programs or functions, this dependence of axons from glial cells provides a new and unexplored dimension to our understanding of the nervous system. Recent evidence has now established a new modality of intercellular communication through extracellular vesicles. We have already shown that SC-derived extracellular vesicles known as exosomes enhance axonal regeneration, and increase neuronal survival after pro-degenerative stimuli. Therefore, the biology nervous system will have to be reformulated to include that the phenotype of a nerve cell results from the contribution of two nuclei, with enormous significance for the understanding of the nervous system in health and disease.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase co-regulate axonal outgrowth of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaublomme, Djoere; Buyens, Tom; De Groef, Lies

    2014-01-01

    , we were able to show that broad-spectrum MMP inhibition reduces axon outgrowth of mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), implicating MMPs as beneficial factors in axonal regeneration. Additional studies, using more specific MMP inhibitors and MMP-deficient mice, disclosed that both MMP-2 and MT1-MMP......, but not MMP-9, are involved in this process. Furthermore, administration of a novel antibody to MT1-MMP that selectively blocks pro-MMP-2 activation revealed a functional co-involvement of these proteinases in determining RGC axon outgrowth. Subsequent immunostainings showed expression of both MMP-2 and MT1......-MMP in RGC axons and glial cells. Finally, results from combined inhibition of MMP-2 and β1-integrin were suggestive for a functional interaction between these molecules. Overall, our data indicate MMP-2 and MT1-MMP as promising axonal outgrowth-promoting molecules. Axonal regeneration in the central...

  17. Schwann cell to axon transfer of ribosomes: toward a novel understanding of the role of glia in the nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Court, F.A.; Hendriks, W.T.J.; Mac Gillavry, H.D.; Alvarez, J.; van Minnen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Schwann cells play pivotal roles in the development and maintenance of the peripheral nervous system. Here, we show that intact sciatic nerve axons of mice contain a small population of ribosomes, which increases by several orders of magnitude when axons are desomatized (severed from their cell

  18. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  19. Neurogenetics of slow axonal transport: from cells to animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadananda, Aparna; Ray, Krishanu

    2012-09-01

    Slow axonal transport is a multivariate phenomenon implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent reports have unraveled the molecular basis of the transport of certain slow component proteins, such as the neurofilament subunits, tubulin, and certain soluble enzymes such as Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIa (CaM kinase IIa), etc., in tissue cultured neurons. In addition, genetic analyses also implicate microtubule-dependent motors and other housekeeping proteins in this process. However, the biological relevance of this phenomenon is not so well understood. Here, the authors have discussed the possibility of adopting neurogenetic analyses in multiple model organisms to correlate molecular level measurements of the slow transport phenomenon to animal behavior, thus facilitating the investigation of its biological efficacy.

  20. Characterization of the T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Min

    2016-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential involvement of specific T-cell subpopulations in granulation tissue formation in chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Fifteen patients with CSOM were enrolled in this study. Granulation tissues were obtained from the middle ear cavity. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histopathological observation, and different T-cell subpopulations were characterized by immunohistochemistry. No evident association was identified between granulation tissue formation and disease course. The number of cluster of differentiation 8 + (CD8 + ) T cells, forkhead box P3 + (FOXP3 + ) regulatory T (Treg) cells and OX40 + T cells were significantly higher in granulation tissues from patients with ear discharge within the last 6 months compared to those without (Pgranulation tissues had more CD8 + T cells and FOXP3 + Treg cells compared to the mature granulation tissues (Pgranulation tissues in CSOM with different disease courses or with ear discharge, suggesting that T cell-mediated cellular immunity is involved in lesion formation of CSOM.

  1. Balloon cells associated with granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus in hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, M; Martinian, L; Caboclo, L O; McEvoy, A W; Sisodiya, S M

    2008-06-01

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) is a common finding in hippocampal sclerosis in patients with intractable focal epilepsy. It is considered to be an acquired, post-developmental rather than a pre-existing abnormality, involving dispersion of either mature or newborn neurones, but the precise factors regulating it and its relationship to seizures are unknown. We present two cases of GCD with associated CD34-immunopositive balloon cells, a cell phenotype associated with focal cortical dysplasia type IIB, considered to be a developmental cortical lesion promoting epilepsy. This observation opens up the debate regarding the origin of balloon cells and CD34 expression and their temporal relationship to seizures.

  2. Regulated viral BDNF delivery in combination with Schwann cells promotes axonal regeneration through capillary alginate hydrogels after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengwen; Sandner, Beatrice; Schackel, Thomas; Nicholson, LaShae; Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Puttagunta, Radhika; Müller, Rainer; Weidner, Norbert; Blesch, Armin

    2017-09-15

    Grafting of cell-seeded alginate capillary hydrogels into a spinal cord lesion site provides an axonal bridge while physically directing regenerating axonal growth in a linear pattern. However, without an additional growth stimulus, bridging axons fail to extend into the distal host spinal cord. Here we examined whether a combinatory strategy would support regeneration of descending axons across a cervical (C5) lateral hemisection lesion in the rat spinal cord. Following spinal cord transections, Schwann cell (SC)-seeded alginate hydrogels were grafted to the lesion site and AAV5 expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter was injected caudally. In addition, we examined whether SC injection into the caudal spinal parenchyma would further enhance regeneration of descending axons to re-enter the host spinal cord. Our data show that both serotonergic and descending axons traced by biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) extend throughout the scaffolds. The number of regenerating axons is significantly increased when caudal BDNF expression is activated and transient BDNF delivery is able to sustain axons after gene expression is switched off. Descending axons are confined to the caudal graft/host interface even with continuous BDNF expression for 8weeks. Only with a caudal injection of SCs, a pathway facilitating axonal regeneration through the host/graft interface is generated allowing axons to successfully re-enter the caudal spinal cord. Recovery from spinal cord injury is poor due to the limited regeneration observed in the adult mammalian central nervous system. Biomaterials, cell transplantation and growth factors that can guide axons across a lesion site, provide a cellular substrate, stimulate axon growth and have shown some promise in increasing the growth distance of regenerating axons. In the present study, we combined an alginate biomaterial with linear channels with transplantation of Schwann cells within

  3. Brimonidine prevents axonal and somatic degeneration of retinal ganglion cell neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crish Samuel D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brimonidine is a common drug for lowering ocular pressure and may directly protect retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. The disease involves early loss of retinal ganglion cell transport to brain targets followed by axonal and somatic degeneration. We examined whether brimonidine preserves ganglion cell axonal transport and abates degeneration in rats with elevated ocular pressure induced by laser cauterization of the episcleral veins. Results Ocular pressure was elevated unilaterally by 90% for a period of 8 weeks post- cauterization. During this time, brimonidine (1mg/kg/day or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline was delivered systemically and continuously via subcutaneous pump. Animals received bilateral intravitreal injections of fluorescent cholera toxin subunit β (CTB two days before sacrifice to assess anterograde transport. In retinas from the vehicle group, elevated pressure induced a 44% decrease in the fraction of ganglion cells with intact uptake of CTB and a 14-42% reduction in the number of immuno-labelled ganglion cell bodies, with the worst loss occurring nasally. Elevated pressure also caused a 33% loss of ganglion cell axons in vehicle optic nerves and a 70% decrease in CTB transport to the superior colliculus. Each of these components of ganglion cell degeneration was either prevented or significantly reduced in the brimonidine treatment group. Conclusions Continuous and systemic treatment with brimonidine by subcutaneous injection significantly improved retinal ganglion cell survival with exposure to elevated ocular pressure. This effect was most striking in the nasal region of the retina. Brimonidine treatment also preserved ganglion cell axon morphology, sampling density and total number in the optic nerve with elevated pressure. Consistent with improved outcome in the optic projection, brimonidine also significantly reduced the deficits in axonal transport to the superior colliculus associated with

  4. The astrocyte/meningeal cell interface is a barrier to neurite outgrowth which can be overcome by manipulation of inhibitory molecules or axonal signalling pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shearer, Morven C; Niclou, Simone P; Brown, David; Asher, Richard A; Holtmaat, Anthony J D G; Levine, Joel M; Verhaagen, J.; Fawcett, James W

    2003-01-01

    Invading meningeal cells form a barrier to axon regeneration after damage to the spinal cord and other parts of the CNS, axons stopping at the interface between meningeal cells and astrocytes. Axon behavior was examined using an in vitro model of astrocyte/meningeal cell interfaces, created by

  5. The influence of electrospun fibre size on Schwann cell behaviour and axonal outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnavi, S., E-mail: sara.gnavi@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Fornasari, B.E., E-mail: benedettaelena.fornasari@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Tonda-Turo, C., E-mail: chiara.tondaturo@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); Ciardelli, G., E-mail: gianluca.ciardelli@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); CNR-IPCF UOS, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Zanetti, M., E-mail: marco.zanetti@unito.it [Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, University of Torino, Torino 10100 (Italy); Geuna, S., E-mail: stefano.geuna@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Neuroscience Institute of the Cavalieri-Ottolenghi Foundation, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy); Perroteau, I., E-mail: isabelle.perroteau@unito.it [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Orbassano 10043 (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Fibrous substrates functioning as temporary extracellular matrices can be prepared easily by electrospinning, yielding fibrous matrices suitable as internal fillers for nerve guidance channels. In this study, gelatin micro- or nano-fibres were prepared by electrospinning by tuning the gelatin concentration and solution flow rate. The effect of gelatin fibre diameter on cell adhesion and proliferation was tested in vitro using explant cultures of Schwann cells (SC) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Cell adhesion was assessed by quantifying the cell spreading area, actin cytoskeleton organization and focal adhesion complex formation. Nano-fibres promoted cell spreading and actin cytoskeleton organization, increasing cellular adhesion and the proliferation rate. However, both migration rate and motility, quantified by transwell and time lapse assays respectively, were greater in cells cultured on micro-fibres. Finally, there was more DRG axon outgrowth on micro-fibres. These data suggest that the topography of electrospun gelatin fibres can be adjusted to modulate SC and axon organization and that both nano- and micro-fibres are promising fillers for the design of devices for peripheral nerve repair. - Highlights: • Electrospinning used to produce gelatin nano- and micro-fibre matrices. • Nano-fibre matrices promote Schwann cell organization and increase proliferation rate. • Micro-fibre matrices promote Schwann cell migration. • Micro-fibre matrices promote axonal outgrowth.

  6. Effects of p-xylene inhalation on axonal transport in the rat retinal ganglion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, S.S.; Lyerly, D.P. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Although the solvent xylene is suspected of producing nervous system dysfunction in animals and humans, little is known regarding the neurochemical consequences of xylene inhalation. The intent of this study was to determine the effect of intermittent, acute, and subchronic p-xylene exposure on the axonal transport of proteins and glycoproteins within the rat retinofugal tract. A number of different exposure regimens were tested ranging from 50 ppm for a single 6-hr exposure to 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for a total of 8 exposure days. Immediately following removal from the inhalation chambers rats were injected intraocularly with (35S)methionine and (3H)fucose (to label retinal proteins and glycoproteins, respectively) and the axonal transport of labeled macromolecules to axons (optic nerve and optic tract) and nerve endings (lateral geniculate body and superior colliculus) was examined 20 hr after precursor injection. Only relatively severe exposure regimens (i.e., 800 or 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 1.5 weeks) produced significant reductions in axonal transport; there was a moderate reduction in the axonal transport of 35S-labeled proteins in the 800-ppm-treated group which was more widespread in the 1600 ppm-treated group. Transport of 3H-labeled glycoproteins was less affected. Assessment of retinal metabolism immediately after isotope injection indicated that the rate of precursor uptake was not reduced in either treatment group. Furthermore, rapid transport was still substantially reduced in animals exposed to 1600 ppm p-xylene and allowed a 13-day withdrawal period. These data indicate that p-xylene inhalation decreases rapid axonal transport supplied to the projections of the rat retinal ganglion cells immediately after cessation of inhalation exposure and that this decreased transport is still apparent 13 days after the last exposure.

  7. Effects of p-xylene inhalation on axonal transport in the rat retinal ganglion cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, S.S.; Lyerly, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Although the solvent xylene is suspected of producing nervous system dysfunction in animals and humans, little is known regarding the neurochemical consequences of xylene inhalation. The intent of this study was to determine the effect of intermittent, acute, and subchronic p-xylene exposure on the axonal transport of proteins and glycoproteins within the rat retinofugal tract. A number of different exposure regimens were tested ranging from 50 ppm for a single 6-hr exposure to 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for a total of 8 exposure days. Immediately following removal from the inhalation chambers rats were injected intraocularly with [35S]methionine and [3H]fucose (to label retinal proteins and glycoproteins, respectively) and the axonal transport of labeled macromolecules to axons (optic nerve and optic tract) and nerve endings (lateral geniculate body and superior colliculus) was examined 20 hr after precursor injection. Only relatively severe exposure regimens (i.e., 800 or 1600 ppm 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 1.5 weeks) produced significant reductions in axonal transport; there was a moderate reduction in the axonal transport of 35S-labeled proteins in the 800-ppm-treated group which was more widespread in the 1600 ppm-treated group. Transport of 3H-labeled glycoproteins was less affected. Assessment of retinal metabolism immediately after isotope injection indicated that the rate of precursor uptake was not reduced in either treatment group. Furthermore, rapid transport was still substantially reduced in animals exposed to 1600 ppm p-xylene and allowed a 13-day withdrawal period. These data indicate that p-xylene inhalation decreases rapid axonal transport supplied to the projections of the rat retinal ganglion cells immediately after cessation of inhalation exposure and that this decreased transport is still apparent 13 days after the last exposure

  8. Seamless reconstruction of intact adult-born neurons by serial end-block imaging reveals complex axonal guidance and development in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gerald J; Sailor, Kurt A; Mahmood, Qasim A; Chavali, Nikhil; Christian, Kimberly M; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li

    2013-07-10

    In the adult mammalian hippocampus, newborn dentate granule cells are continuously integrated into the existing circuitry and contribute to specific brain functions. Little is known about the axonal development of these newborn neurons in the adult brain due to technological challenges that have prohibited large-scale reconstruction of long, thin, and complex axonal processes within the mature nervous system. Here, using a new serial end-block imaging (SEBI) technique, we seamlessly reconstructed axonal and dendritic processes of intact individual retrovirus-labeled newborn granule cells at different developmental stages in the young adult mouse hippocampus. We found that adult-born dentate granule cells exhibit tortuous, yet highly stereotyped, axonal projections to CA3 hippocampal subregions. Primary axonal projections of cohorts of new neurons born around the same time organize into laminar patterns with staggered terminations that stack along the septo-temporal hippocampal axis. Analysis of individual newborn neuron development further defined an initial phase of rapid axonal and dendritic growth within 21 d after newborn neuron birth, followed by minimal growth of primary axonal and whole dendritic processes through the last time point examined at 77 d. Our results suggest that axonal development and targeting is a highly orchestrated, precise process in the adult brain. These findings demonstrate a striking regenerative capacity of the mature CNS to support long-distance growth and guidance of neuronal axons. Our SEBI approach can be broadly applied for analysis of intact, complex neuronal projections in limitless tissue volume.

  9. Retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury in naked mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kevin K; Luo, Xueting; Mooney, Skyler J; Yungher, Benjamin J; Belin, Stephane; Wang, Chen; Holmes, Melissa M; He, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), axonal damage often triggers neuronal cell death and glial activation, with very limited spontaneous axon regeneration. In this study, we performed optic nerve injury in adult naked mole-rats, the longest living rodent, with a maximum life span exceeding 30 years, and found that injury responses in this species are quite distinct from those in other mammalian species. In contrast to what is seen in other mammals, the majority of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) survive with relatively high spontaneous axon regeneration. Furthermore, injured RGCs display activated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), whereas astrocytes in the optic nerve robustly occupy and fill the lesion area days after injury. These neuron-intrinsic and -extrinsic injury responses are reminiscent of those in "cold-blooded" animals, such as fish and amphibians, suggesting that the naked mole-rat is a powerful model for exploring the mechanisms of neuronal injury responses and axon regeneration in mammals. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:380-388, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Regulation of retinoid receptors by retinoic acid and axonal contact in Schwann cells.

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    Maria-Jesus Latasa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schwann cells (SCs are the cell type responsible for the formation of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system (PNS. As retinoic acid (RA and other retinoids have a profound effect as regulators of the myelination program, we sought to investigate how their nuclear receptors levels were regulated in this cell type. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, by using Schwann cells primary cultures from neonatal Wistar rat pups, as well as myelinating cocultures of Schwann cells with embryonic rat dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, we have found that sustained expression of RXR-γ depends on the continuous presence of a labile activator, while axonal contact mimickers produced an increase in RXR-γ mRNA and protein levels, increment that could be prevented by RA. The upregulation by axonal contact mimickers and the transcriptional downregulation by RA were dependent on de novo protein synthesis and did not involve changes in mRNA stability. On the other hand, RAR-β mRNA levels were only slightly modulated by axonal contact mimickers, while RA produced a strong transcriptional upregulation that was independent of de novo protein synthesis without changes in mRNA stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All together, our results show that retinoid receptors are regulated in a complex manner in Schwann cells, suggesting that they could have a prominent role as regulators of Schwann cell physiology.

  11. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Hack, N

    1988-01-01

    Our previous studies on the survival-promoting influence of elevated concentrations of extracellular K+ ([K+]e) on cultured cerebellar granule cells led to the proposal that depolarization in vitro mimics the effect of the earliest afferent inputs received by the granule cells in vivo. This......M) was similar to its known affinity in binding to cerebral membranes. The effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was blocked by the specific receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, which also reduced the limited survival of cells in cultures grown in 'low' K+ in the absence of N...

  12. A role for mixed lineage kinases in granule cell apoptosis induced by cytoskeletal disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Geist, Marie Aavang; Veng, Lone Merete

    2006-01-01

    Microtubule disruption by colchicine induces apoptosis in selected neuronal populations. However, little is known about the upstream death signalling events mediating the neurotoxicity. We investigated first whether colchicine-induced granule cell apoptosis activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase...... (JNK) pathway. Cultured murine cerebellar granule cells were exposed to 1 microm colchicine for 24 h. Activation of the JNK pathway was detected by western blotting as well as immunocytochemistry using antibodies against phospho-c-Jun (p-c-Jun). Next, adult male rats were injected...... intracerebroventricularly with colchicine (10 microg), and JNK pathway activation in dentate granule cells (DGCs) was detected by antibodies against p-c-Jun. The second part of the study tested the involvement of mixed lineage kinases (MLK) as upstream activators of the JNK pathway in colchicine toxicity, using CEP-1347...

  13. Rab3D is critical for secretory granule maturation in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kögel

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide- and hormone-containing secretory granules (SGs are synthesized at the trans-Golgi network (TGN as immature secretory granules (ISGs and complete their maturation in the F-actin-rich cell cortex. This maturation process is characterized by acidification-dependent processing of cargo proteins, condensation of the SG matrix and removal of membrane and proteins not destined to mature secretory granules (MSGs. Here we addressed a potential role of Rab3 isoforms in these maturation steps by expressing their nucleotide-binding deficient mutants in PC12 cells. Our data show that the presence of Rab3D(N135I decreases the restriction of maturing SGs to the F-actin-rich cell cortex, blocks the removal of the endoprotease furin from SGs and impedes the processing of the luminal SG protein secretogranin II. This strongly suggests that Rab3D is implicated in the subcellular localization and maturation of ISGs.

  14. Maternal dazap2 Regulates Germ Granules by Counteracting Dynein in Zebrafish Primordial Germ Cells

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    Meredyth M. Forbes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGCs are the stem cells of the germline. Generally, germline induction occurs via zygotic factors or the inheritance of maternal determinants called germ plasm (GP. GP is packaged into ribonucleoprotein complexes within oocytes and later promotes the germline fate in embryos. Once PGCs are specified by either mechanism, GP components localize to perinuclear granular-like structures. Although components of zebrafish PGC germ granules have been studied, the maternal factors regulating their assembly and contribution to germ cell development are unknown. Here, we show that the scaffold protein Dazap2 binds to Bucky ball, an essential regulator of oocyte polarity and GP assembly, and colocalizes with the GP in oocytes and in PGCs. Mutational analysis revealed a requirement for maternal Dazap2 (MDazap2 in germ-granule maintenance. Through molecular epistasis analyses, we show that MDazap2 is epistatic to Tdrd7 and maintains germ granules in the embryonic germline by counteracting Dynein activity.

  15. Regulation of granule cell excitability by a low-threshold calcium spike in turtle olfactory bulb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinato, Giulietta; Midtgaard, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Granule cells excitability in the turtle olfactory bulb was analyzed using whole cell recordings in current- and voltage-clamp mode. Low-threshold spikes (LTSs) were evoked at potentials that are subthreshold for Na spikes in normal medium. The LTSs were evoked from rest, but hyperpolarization...

  16. Dependence of structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules on ATP and cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yu

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic granules are dense and compact microbial aggregates with various bacterial species. Recently, aerobic granulation technology has been extensively explored for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. However, little information is currently available with regard to their structure stability and integrity at levels of energy metabolism and cell communication. In the present study, a typical chemical uncoupler, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide with the power to dissipate proton motive force and subsequently inhibit adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, was used to investigate possible roles of ATP and cell communication in maintaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. It was found that inhibited ATP synthesis resulted in the reduced production of autoinducer-2 and N-acylhomoserine lactones essential for cell communication, while lowered extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production was also observed. As a consequence, aerobic granules appeared to break up. This study showed that ATP-dependent quorum sensing and EPS were essential for sustaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules.

  17. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of 125 I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in 14 C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages

  18. Trajectory Analysis Unveils Reelin's Role in the Directed Migration of Granule Cells in the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaobo; Brunne, Bianka; Zhao, Shanting; Chai, Xuejun; Li, Jiawei; Lau, Jeremie; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Zobiak, Bernd; Sibbe, Mirjam; Westbrook, Gary L; Lutz, David; Frotscher, Michael

    2018-01-03

    Reelin controls neuronal migration and layer formation. Previous studies in reeler mice deficient in Reelin focused on the result of the developmental process in fixed tissue sections. It has remained unclear whether Reelin affects the migratory process, migration directionality, or migrating neurons guided by the radial glial scaffold. Moreover, Reelin has been regarded as an attractive signal because newly generated neurons migrate toward the Reelin-containing marginal zone. Conversely, Reelin might be a stop signal because migrating neurons in reeler , but not in wild-type mice, invade the marginal zone. Here, we monitored the migration of newly generated proopiomelanocortin-EGFP -expressing dentate granule cells in slice cultures from reeler , reeler -like mutants and wild-type mice of either sex using real-time microscopy. We discovered that not the actual migratory process and migratory speed, but migration directionality of the granule cells is controlled by Reelin. While wild-type granule cells migrated toward the marginal zone of the dentate gyrus, neurons in cultures from reeler and reeler -like mutants migrated randomly in all directions as revealed by vector analyses of migratory trajectories. Moreover, live imaging of granule cells in reeler slices cocultured to wild-type dentate gyrus showed that the reeler neurons changed their directions and migrated toward the Reelin-containing marginal zone of the wild-type culture, thus forming a compact granule cell layer. In contrast, directed migration was not observed when Reelin was ubiquitously present in the medium of reeler slices. These results indicate that topographically administered Reelin controls the formation of a granule cell layer. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal migration and the various factors controlling its onset, speed, directionality, and arrest are poorly understood. Slice cultures offer a unique model to study the migration of individual neurons in an almost natural environment. In the

  19. Activation and regulation of the granulation tissue derived cells with stemness-related properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zelin; Dai, Tingyu; Chen, Xia; Tan, Li; Shi, Chunmeng

    2015-04-29

    Skin as the largest and easily accessible organ of the body represents an abundant source of adult stem cells. Among them, dermal stem cells hold great promise in tissue repair and the skin granulation tissue has been recently proposed as a promising source of dermal stem cells, but their biological characteristics have not been well investigated. The 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) lineage tracing approach was employed to chase dermal stem cells in vivo. Granulation tissue derived cells (GTCs) were isolated and their in vitro proliferation, self-renewing, migration, and multi-differentiation capabilities were assessed. Combined radiation and skin wound model was used to investigate the therapeutic effects of GTCs. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) antagomir was used to antagonize miR-21 expression. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were scavenged by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). The quiescent dermal stem/progenitor cells were activated to proliferate upon injury and enriched in granulation tissues. GTCs exhibited enhanced proliferation, colony formation and multi-differentiation capacities. Topical transplantation of GTCs into the combined radiation and skin wound mice accelerated wound healing and reduced tissue fibrosis. Blockade of the miR-21 expression in GTCs inhibited cell migration and differentiation, but promoted cell proliferation and self-renewing at least partially via a ROS dependent pathway. The granulation tissue may represent an alternative adult stem cell source in tissue replacement therapy and miR-21 mediated ROS generation negatively regulates the stemness-related properties of granulation tissue derived cells.

  20. The L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian is necessary for maintenance of sensory axon advance in the Drosophila embryo

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    Martin Veronica

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion molecules have long been implicated in the regulation of axon growth, but the precise cellular roles played by individual cell adhesion molecules and the molecular basis for their action are still not well understood. We have used the sensory system of the Drosophila embryo to shed light on the mechanism by which the L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian regulates axon growth. Results We have found a highly penetrant sensory axon stalling phenotype in neuroglian mutant embryos. Axons stalled at a variety of positions along their normal trajectory, but most commonly in the periphery some distance along the peripheral nerve. All lateral and dorsal cluster sensory neurons examined, except for the dorsal cluster neuron dbd, showed stalling. Sensory axons were never seen to project along inappropriate pathways in neuroglian mutants and stalled axons showed normal patterns of fasciculation within nerves. The growth cones of stalled axons possessed a simple morphology, similar to their appearance in wild-type embryos when advancing along nerves. Driving expression of the wild-type form of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone rescued the neuroglian mutant phenotype of both pioneering and follower neurons. A partial rescue was achieved by expressing the Neuroglian extracellular domain. Over/mis-expression of Neuroglian in all neurons, oenocytes or trachea had no apparent effect on sensory axon growth. Conclusion We conclude that Neuroglian is necessary to maintain axon advance along axonal substrates, but is not required for initiation of axon outgrowth, axon fasciculation or recognition of correct growth substrates. Expression of Neuroglian in sensory neurons alone is sufficient to promote axon advance and the intracellular region of the molecule is largely dispensable for this function. It is unlikely, therefore, that Nrg acts as a molecular 'clutch' to couple adhesion of F-actin within the growth cone to the

  1. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leyan; Ryu, Jiwon; Hiel, Hakim; Menon, Adarsh; Aggarwal, Ayushi; Rha, Elizabeth; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Cummings, Brian J; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2015-05-14

    Diffuse axonal injury is an extremely common type of traumatic brain injury encountered in motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, and in combat. Although many cases of diffuse axonal injury result in chronic disability, there are no current treatments for this condition. Its basic lesion, traumatic axonal injury, has been aggressively modeled in primate and rodent animal models. The inexorable axonal and perikaryal degeneration and dysmyelination often encountered in traumatic axonal injury calls for regenerative therapies, including therapies based on stem cells and precursors. Here we explore the proof of concept that treatments based on transplants of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells can replace or remodel myelin and, eventually, contribute to axonal regeneration in traumatic axonal injury. We derived human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from the human embryonic stem cell line H9, purified and characterized them. We then transplanted these human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the deep sensorimotor cortex next to the corpus callosum of nude rats subjected to traumatic axonal injury based on the impact acceleration model of Marmarou. We explored the time course and spatial distribution of differentiation and structural integration of these cells in rat forebrain. At the time of transplantation, over 90 % of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells expressed A2B5, PDGFR, NG2, O4, Olig2 and Sox10, a profile consistent with their progenitor or early oligodendrocyte status. After transplantation, these cells survived well and migrated massively via the corpus callosum in both injured and uninjured brains. Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells displayed a striking preference for white matter tracts and were contained almost exclusively in the corpus callosum and external capsule, the striatopallidal striae, and cortical layer 6. Over 3 months, human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells progressively matured into myelin basic protein(+) and adenomatous

  2. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Evoked release of [ 3 H]-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and [3H]-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP

  3. Glutamate receptor antagonists and growth factors modulate dentate granule cell neurogenesis in organotypic, rat hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten; Montero, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Generation of dentate granule cells and its modulation by glutamate receptor antagonists, growth factors and pilocarpine-induced seizure-like activity was investigated in rat hippocampal slice cultures derived from 1-week-old rats and grown for 2 weeks. Focussing on the dentate granule cell layer...... the number of TUC-4-positive cells, just as combining pilocarpine with the neurogenesis-stimulating compounds, prevented or reduced the increase of TUC-4-positive cells. None of the treatments were found to induce dentate granule cell death within the observed period. Labeling of dividing cells by adding 5...

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells: pharmacological characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1989-01-01

    The survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by chronic exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The effect is due to the stimulation of 'conventional' NMDA receptor-ionophore complex: it is concentration dependent, voltage dependent and blocked by the selective antagonists D-2...

  5. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Annette; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G prote...

  6. Morphology and distribution of chandelier cell axon terminals in the mouse cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, M C; DeFelipe, J; Muñoz, A

    2009-01-01

    Chandelier cells represent a unique type of cortical gamma-aminobutityric acidergic interneuron whose axon terminals (Ch-terminals) only form synapses with the axon initial segments of some pyramidal cells. Here, we have used immunocytochemistry for the high-affinity plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin to analyze the morphology and distribution of Ch-terminals in the mouse cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex. In general, 2 types of Ch-terminals were distinguished on the basis of their size and the density of the axonal boutons that made up the terminal. Simple Ch-terminals were made up of 1 or 2 rows of labeled boutons, each row consisting of only 3-5 boutons. In contrast, complex Ch-terminals were tight cylinder-like structures made up of multiple rows of boutons. Simple Ch-terminals were detected throughout the cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex, the complex type was only occasionally found in certain regions, whereas in others they were very abundant. These results indicate that there are substantial differences in the morphology and distribution of Ch-terminals between different areas and layers of the mouse cerebral cortex. Furthermore, we suggest that the distribution of complex Ch-terminals may be related to the developmental origin of the different brain regions analyzed.

  7. Model cerebellar granule cells can faithfully transmit modulated firing rate signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRössert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A crucial assumption of many high-level system models of the cerebellum is that information in the granular layer is encoded in a linear manner. However, granule cells are known for their non-linear and resonant synaptic and intrinsic properties that could potentially impede linear signal transmission.In this modelling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e. uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode.A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fibre synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR. Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for.The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fibre synaptic inputs could transmit information faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. This was achieved most simply if the model neurons had a firing rate at least twice the highest required frequency of modulation, but lower rates were also adequate provided a population of neurons was utilized, especially in combination with push-pull coding. The exact number of neurons required for faithful transmission depended on the precise values of firing rate and noise. The model neurons were also able to combine excitatory and inhibitory signals linearly, and could be replaced by a simpler (modified integrate-and-fire neuron in the case of high tonic firing rates.These findings suggest that granule cells can in principle code modulated firing-rate inputs in a linear manner, and are thus consistent with the high-level adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit.

  8. Long-range projection neurons of the mouse ventral tegmental area: a single-cell axon tracing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aransay, Ana; Rodríguez-López, Claudia; García-Amado, María; Clascá, Francisco; Prensa, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Pathways arising from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) release dopamine and other neurotransmitters during the expectation and achievement of reward, and are regarded as central links of the brain networks that create drive, pleasure, and addiction. While the global pattern of VTA projections is well-known, the actual axonal wiring of individual VTA neurons had never been investigated. Here, we labeled and analyzed the axons of 30 VTA single neurons by means of single-cell transfection with the Sindbis-pal-eGFP vector in mice. These observations were complemented with those obtained by labeling the axons of small populations of VTA cells with iontophoretic microdeposits of biotinylated dextran amine. In the single-cell labeling experiments, each entire axonal tree was reconstructed from serial sections, the length of terminal axonal arbors was estimated by stereology, and the dopaminergic phenotype was tested by double-labeling for tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence. We observed two main, markedly different VTA cell morphologies: neurons with a single main axon targeting only forebrain structures (FPN cells), and neurons with multibranched axons targeting both the forebrain and the brainstem (F + BSPN cells). Dopaminergic phenotype was observed in FPN cells. Moreover, four "subtypes" could be distinguished among the FPN cells based on their projection targets: (1) "Mesocorticolimbic" FPN projecting to both neocortex and basal forebrain; (2) "Mesocortical" FPN innervating the neocortex almost exclusively; (3) "Mesolimbic" FPN projecting to the basal forebrain, accumbens and caudateputamen; and (4) "Mesostriatal" FPN targeting only the caudateputamen. While the F + BSPN cells were scattered within VTA, the mesolimbic neurons were abundant in the paranigral nucleus. The observed diversity in wiring architectures is consistent with the notion that different VTA cell subpopulations modulate the activity of specific sets of prosencephalic and brainstem structures.

  9. Herpes simplex virus gE/gI extracellular domains promote axonal transport and spread from neurons to epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Paul W; Wright, Catherine C; Howard, Tiffani; Johnson, David C

    2014-10-01

    Following reactivation from latency, there are two distinct steps in the spread of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from infected neurons to epithelial cells: (i) anterograde axonal transport of virus particles from neuron bodies to axon tips and (ii) exocytosis and spread of extracellular virions across cell junctions into adjacent epithelial cells. The HSV heterodimeric glycoprotein gE/gI is important for anterograde axonal transport, and gE/gI cytoplasmic domains play important roles in sorting of virus particles into axons. However, the roles of the large (∼400-residue) gE/gI extracellular (ET) domains in both axonal transport and neuron-to-epithelial cell spread have not been characterized. Two gE mutants, gE-277 and gE-348, contain small insertions in the gE ET domain, fold normally, form gE/gI heterodimers, and are incorporated into virions. Both gE-277 and gE-348 did not function in anterograde axonal transport; there were markedly reduced numbers of viral capsids and glycoproteins compared with wild-type HSV. The defects in axonal transport were manifest in neuronal cell bodies, involving missorting of HSV capsids before entry into proximal axons. Although there were diminished numbers of mutant gE-348 capsids and glycoproteins in distal axons, there was efficient spread to adjacent epithelial cells, similar to wild-type HSV. In contrast, virus particles produced by HSV gE-277 spread poorly to epithelial cells, despite numbers of virus particles similar to those for HSV gE-348. These results genetically separate the two steps in HSV spread from neurons to epithelial cells and demonstrate that the gE/gI ET domains function in both processes. An essential phase of the life cycle of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other alphaherpesviruses is the capacity to reactivate from latency and then spread from infected neurons to epithelial tissues. This spread involves at least two steps: (i) anterograde transport to axon tips followed by (ii) exocytosis and extracellular

  10. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells – Their osteogenicity and osteoblast in vitro mineralization on titanium granule carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Syberg, Susanne; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2013-01-01

    Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) may be osteogenic, may generate neoangiogenisis and may be progenitors for differentiated osteoblast mineralization. Titanium granules may be suitable as carriers for these cells. The aim was to demonstrate the osteogenic potential of ADMSCs...

  11. Schwann cell mitochondria as key regulators in the development and maintenance of peripheral nerve axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Daisuke; Iino, Masamitsu

    2017-03-01

    Formation of myelin sheaths by Schwann cells (SCs) enables rapid and efficient transmission of action potentials in peripheral axons, and disruption of myelination results in disorders that involve decreased sensory and motor functions. Given that construction of SC myelin requires high levels of lipid and protein synthesis, mitochondria, which are pivotal in cellular metabolism, may be potential regulators of the formation and maintenance of SC myelin. Supporting this notion, abnormal mitochondria are found in SCs of neuropathic peripheral nerves in both human patients and the relevant animal models. However, evidence for the importance of SC mitochondria in myelination has been limited, until recently. Several studies have recently used genetic approaches that allow SC-specific ablation of mitochondrial metabolic activity in living animals to show the critical roles of SC mitochondria in the development and maintenance of peripheral nerve axons. Here, we review current knowledge about the involvement of SC mitochondria in the formation and dysfunction of myelinated axons in the peripheral nervous system.

  12. Axon guidance of sympathetic neurons to cardiomyocytes by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Miwa

    Full Text Available Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs and sympathetic neurons (SNs isolated from neonatal rat ventricles and superior cervical ganglia were cultured at a close distance. Then, morphological and functional coupling between SNs and VMs was assessed in response to GDNF (10 ng/ml or nerve growth factor (50 ng/ml. As a result, fractions of neurofilament-M-positive axons and synapsin-I-positive area over the surface of VMs were markedly increased with GDNF by 9-fold and 25-fold, respectively, compared to control without neurotrophic factors. Pre- and post-synaptic stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors (BAR with nicotine and noradrenaline, respectively, resulted in an increase of the spontaneous beating rate of VMs co-cultured with SNs in the presence of GDNF. GDNF overexpressing VMs by adenovirus vector (AdGDNF-VMs attracted more axons from SNs compared with mock-transfected VMs. In vivo, axon outgrowth toward the denervated myocardium in adult rat hearts after cryoinjury was also enhanced significantly by adenovirus-mediated GDNF overexpression. GDNF acts as a potent chemoattractant for sympathetic innervation of ventricular myocytes, and is a promising molecular target for regulation of cardiac function in diseased hearts.

  13. Pasteurella multocida toxin: Targeting mast cell secretory granules during kiss-and-run secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Elisabeth M; Christiansen, Nina; Danielsen, E Michael

    2016-02-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), a virulence factor of the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium P. multocida, is a 146 kDa protein belonging to the A-B class of toxins. Once inside a target cell, the A domain deamidates the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins, thereby activating downstream signaling cascades. However, little is known about how PMT selects and enters its cellular targets. We therefore studied PMT binding and uptake in porcine cultured intestinal mucosal explants to identify susceptible cells in the epithelium and underlying lamina propria. In comparison with Vibrio cholera B-subunit, a well-known enterotoxin taken up by receptor-mediated endocytosis, PMT binding to the epithelial brush border was scarce, and no uptake into enterocytes was detected by 2h, implying that none of the glycolipids in the brush border are a functional receptor for PMT. However, in the lamina propria, PMT distinctly accumulated in the secretory granules of mast cells. This also occurred at 4 °C, ruling out endocytosis, but suggestive of uptake via pores that connect the granules to the cell surface. Mast cell granules are known to secrete their contents by a "kiss-and-run" mechanism, and we propose that PMT may exploit this secretory mechanism to gain entry into this particular cell type. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. KIF20A-Mediated RNA Granule Transport System Promotes the Invasiveness of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Taniuchi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancers are aggressive because they are highly invasive and highly metastatic; moreover, effective treatments for aggressive pancreatic cancers are lacking. Here, we report that the motor kinesin protein KIF20A promoted the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through transporting the RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 and IGF2BP3-bound transcripts toward cell protrusions along microtubules. We previously reported that IGF2BP3 and its target transcripts are assembled into cytoplasmic stress granules of pancreatic cancer cells, and that IGF2BP3 promotes the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through regulation of localized translation of IGF2BP3-bound transcripts in cell protrusions. We show that knockdown of KIF20A inhibited accumulation of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules in cell protrusions and suppressed local protein expression from specific IGF2BP3-bound transcripts, ARF6 and ARHGEF4, in the protrusions. Our results provide insight into the link between regulation of KIF20A-mediated trafficking of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules and modulation of the motility and invasiveness in pancreatic cancers.

  15. Differential calcium signaling mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels in rat retinal ganglion cells and their unmyelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Sargoy

    Full Text Available Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury.

  16. Interaction between axons and specific populations of surrounding cells is indispensable for collateral formation in the mammillary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Nora-Emöke; Zhao, Tianyu; Çankaya, Murat; Stoykova, Anastassia; Zhou, Xunlei; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2011-01-01

    An essential phenomenon during brain development is the extension of long collateral branches by axons. How the local cellular environment contributes to the initial sprouting of these branches in specific points of an axonal shaft remains unclear. The principal mammillary tract (pm) is a landmark axonal bundle connecting ventral diencephalon to brainstem (through the mammillotegmental tract, mtg). Late in development, the axons of the principal mammillary tract sprout collateral branches at a very specific point forming a large bundle whose target is the thalamus. Inspection of this model showed a number of distinct, identified cell populations originated in the dorsal and the ventral diencephalon and migrating during development to arrange themselves into several discrete groups around the branching point. Further analysis of this system in several mouse lines carrying mutant alleles of genes expressed in defined subpopulations (including Pax6, Foxb1, Lrp6 and Gbx2) together with the use of an unambiguous genetic marker of mammillary axons revealed: 1) a specific group of Pax6-expressing cells in close apposition with the prospective branching point is indispensable to elicit axonal branching in this system; and 2) cooperation of transcription factors Foxb1 and Pax6 to differentially regulate navigation and fasciculation of distinct branches of the principal mammillary tract. Our results define for the first time a model system where interaction of the axonal shaft with a specific group of surrounding cells is essential to promote branching. Additionally, we provide insight on the cooperative transcriptional regulation necessary to promote and organize an intricate axonal tree.

  17. Interaction between axons and specific populations of surrounding cells is indispensable for collateral formation in the mammillary system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora-Emöke Szabó

    Full Text Available An essential phenomenon during brain development is the extension of long collateral branches by axons. How the local cellular environment contributes to the initial sprouting of these branches in specific points of an axonal shaft remains unclear.The principal mammillary tract (pm is a landmark axonal bundle connecting ventral diencephalon to brainstem (through the mammillotegmental tract, mtg. Late in development, the axons of the principal mammillary tract sprout collateral branches at a very specific point forming a large bundle whose target is the thalamus. Inspection of this model showed a number of distinct, identified cell populations originated in the dorsal and the ventral diencephalon and migrating during development to arrange themselves into several discrete groups around the branching point. Further analysis of this system in several mouse lines carrying mutant alleles of genes expressed in defined subpopulations (including Pax6, Foxb1, Lrp6 and Gbx2 together with the use of an unambiguous genetic marker of mammillary axons revealed: 1 a specific group of Pax6-expressing cells in close apposition with the prospective branching point is indispensable to elicit axonal branching in this system; and 2 cooperation of transcription factors Foxb1 and Pax6 to differentially regulate navigation and fasciculation of distinct branches of the principal mammillary tract.Our results define for the first time a model system where interaction of the axonal shaft with a specific group of surrounding cells is essential to promote branching. Additionally, we provide insight on the cooperative transcriptional regulation necessary to promote and organize an intricate axonal tree.

  18. An actin cytoskeletal barrier inhibits lytic granule release from natural killer cells in patients with Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Krzewska, Aleksandra; Saeed, Mezida B; Oszmiana, Anna; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Lagrue, Kathryn; Gahl, William A; Introne, Wendy J; Coligan, John E; Davis, Daniel M; Krzewski, Konrad

    2017-12-11

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the lysosomal trafficking regulator gene (LYST), resulting in formation of giant lysosomes or lysosome-related organelles in several cell types. The disease is characterized by immunodeficiency and a fatal hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis caused by impaired function of cytotoxic lymphocytes, including natural killer (NK) cells. We sought to determine the underlying biochemical cause of the impaired cytotoxicity of NK cells in patients with CHS. We generated a human cell model of CHS using Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) technology. We used a combination of classical techniques to evaluate lysosomal function and cell activity in the model system and super-resolution microscopy to visualize F-actin and lytic granules in normal and LYST-deficient NK cells. Loss of LYST function in a human NK cell line, NK92mi, resulted in inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity and reproduced other aspects of the CHS cellular phenotype, including the presence of significantly enlarged lytic granules with defective exocytosis and impaired integrity of endolysosomal compartments. The large granules had an acidic pH and normal activity of lysosomal enzymes and were positive for the proteins essential for lytic granule exocytosis. Visualization of the actin meshwork openings at the immunologic synapse revealed that the cortical actin acts as a barrier for secretion of such large granules at the cell-cell contact site. Decreasing the cortical actin density at the immunologic synapse or decreasing the lytic granule size restored the ability of LYST-deficient NK cells to degranulate and kill target cells. The cortical actin and granule size play significant roles in NK cell cytotoxic function. We present evidence that the periodicity of subsynaptic actin is an important factor limiting the release of large lytic granules from NK cells from patients with CHS and could be a novel

  19. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-03-18

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories.

  20. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Glen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+ showed that (1 the total number of RGC axons projected by the retina and (2 the proportions that are sorted into the ipsilateral and

  1. Septin 7: Actin cross-organization is required for axonal association of Schwann cells

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    Alejandro D Roth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin sheaths present two distinct domains: compacted myelin spirals and flanking non-compacted cytoplasmic channels, where lipid and protein segregation is established by unknown mechanisms. Septins, a conserved family of membrane and cytoskeletal interacting GTPases, form intracellular diffusion barriers during cell division and neurite extension and are expressed in myelinating cells. Septins, particularly septin 7 (Sept7, the central constituent of septin polymers, are associated with the cytoplasmic channels of myelinating cells. Here we show that Schwann cells deprived of Sept7 fail to wrap around axons from dorsal root ganglion neurons and exhibit disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Likewise, Sept7 distribution is dependent on microfilament but not microtubule organization.

  2. Dynamic properties of sensory stimulation evoked responses in mouse cerebellar granule cell layer and molecular layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Sun, Lei; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-01-12

    Sensory information coming from climbing fiber and mossy fiber-granule cell pathways, generates motor-related outputs according to internal rules of integration and computation in the cerebellar cortex. However, the dynamic properties of sensory information processing in mouse cerebellar cortex are less understood. Here, we studied the dynamic properties of sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar granule cell layer (GCL) and molecular layer (ML) by electrophysiological recordings method. Our data showed that air-puff stimulation (5-10 ms in duration) of the ipsilateral whisker pad evoked single-peak responses in the GCL and ML; whereas a duration of stimulation ≥30 ms in GCL and ≥60 ms in ML, evoked double-peak responses that corresponded with stimulation-on and -off responses via mossy fiber pathway. The highest frequency of stimulation train for evoking GCL responses was 33 Hz. In contrast, the highest frequency of stimulation train for evoking ML responses was 4 Hz. These results indicate that the cerebellar granule cells transfer the high-fidelity sensory information from mossy fibers, which is cut-off by molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). Our results suggest that the MLIs network acts as a low-pass filter during the processing of high-frequency sensory information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. GABA agonist promoted formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the GABA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was tested using primary cultures of these neurons. Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 hr after......, respectively, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days in culture. It was found that THIP treatment of 4- and 7-day-old cultures led to formation of low affinity GABA receptors, whereas such receptors could not be detected after THIP treatment in the older cultures (10 and 14 days) in spite of the fact that these cultured granule...... cells expressed a high density of high affinity GABA receptors. It is concluded that the ability of THIP to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to an early developmental period....

  4. Spontaneous calcium waves in granule cells in cerebellar slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apuschkin, Mia; Ougaard, Maria; Rekling, Jens C

    2013-01-01

    with MK-801. Whole-cell recordings during wave formation showed cyclic EPSP barrages with an amplitude of 10-20 mV concurrent with wave activity. Local non-propagating putative transglial waves were also present in the cultures, and could be reproduced by pressure application of ATP. We hypothesize...

  5. Proliferation of granule cell precursors in the dentate gyrus of adult monkeys is diminished by stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elizabeth; Tanapat, Patima; McEwen, Bruce S.; Flügge, Gabriele; Fuchs, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Although granule cells continue to be added to the dentate gyrus of adult rats and tree shrews, this phenomenon has not been demonstrated in the dentate gyrus of adult primates. To determine whether neurons are produced in the dentate gyrus of adult primates, adult marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) were injected with BrdU and perfused 2 hr or 3 weeks later. BrdU is a thymidine analog that is incorporated into proliferating cells during S phase. A substantial number of cells in the dentate gyrus of adult monkeys incorporated BrdU and ≈80% of these cells had morphological characteristics of granule neurons and expressed a neuronal marker by the 3-week time point. Previous studies suggest that the proliferation of granule cell precursors in the adult dentate gyrus can be inhibited by stress in rats and tree shrews. To test whether an aversive experience has a similar effect on cell proliferation in the primate brain, adult marmoset monkeys were exposed to a resident-intruder model of stress. After 1 hr in this condition, the intruder monkeys were injected with BrdU and perfused 2 hr later. The number of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus of the intruder monkeys was compared with that of unstressed control monkeys. We found that a single exposure to this stressful experience resulted in a significant reduction in the number of these proliferating cells. Our results suggest that neurons are produced in the dentate gyrus of adult monkeys and that the rate of precursor cell proliferation can be affected by a stressful experience. PMID:9501234

  6. Three-dimensional configuration of orientated fibers as guidance structures for cell migration and axonal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebel, Andreas; Rumman, Muhammad; Scheld, Miriam; Hodde, Dorothee; Brook, Gary; Mey, Jörg

    2014-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can be surgically repaired by suturing the transected nerve stumps or, in case of larger lesions, by the transplantation of an autologous nerve graft. To avoid donor site morbidity, the development of artificial implants is desired. Clinically, hollow conduits have been used for this purpose but are inferior to the autograft because they lack internal guidance cues for Schwann cells and regenerating axons. In this article, we describe the design of a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold consisting of parallel fibers embedded in a collagen matrix. For this purpose, an electrospinning device was developed to produce and manipulate a 3D array of aligned poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers. This fiber array was then incorporated into biodegradable PCL tubes to serve as artificial nerve bridges. Using primary cultures of embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglia, we show that PCL microfibers in the 3D matrix of our composite scaffold guide the direction of Schwann cell migration and axonal growth. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused...... by entorhinodentate lesions. A population of Mac1/CD11b+ CD45high macrophages (distinct from CD45low microglia) was specifically detected within the lesion-reactive hippocampus by 12 hr after injury. Significant infiltration by CD3+ T cells did not occur in the denervated hippocampus until 24 hr after axotomy...... hr after axotomy, whereas MCP-1/CCL2 was significantly induced before leukocyte infiltration occurred. Neither T cells nor macrophages infiltrated the denervated hippocampus of CCR2-deficient mice, arguing for a critical role for the CCR2 ligand MCP-1/CCL2 in leukocyte migration. Both T cells...

  8. Granule cell potentials in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus: coping behavior and stress ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, P G

    1990-01-01

    Evoked population potentials of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were increased in stress-resistant rats and decreased in stress-susceptible rats, as indexed by restraint-induced gastric ulcers. Inescapable, uncontrollable shock stimulation also suppressed granule cell population spikes and interfered with subsequent coping responses when escape was possible, i.e. the so-called helplessness effect. The data were interpreted to indicate that the hippocampus is part of a coping system in stressful situations.

  9. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  10. High-frequency stimulation induces gradual immediate early gene expression in maturing adult-generated hippocampal granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungenitz, Tassilo; Radic, Tijana; Jedlicka, Peter; Schwarzacher, Stephan W

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence shows that adult neurogenesis of hippocampal granule cells is advantageous for learning and memory. We examined at which stage of structural maturation and age new granule cells can be activated by strong synaptic stimulation. High-frequency stimulation of the perforant pathway in urethane-anesthetized rats elicited expression of the immediate early genes c-fos, Arc, zif268 and pCREB133 in almost 100% of mature, calbindin-positive granule cells. In contrast, it failed to induce immediate early gene expression in immature doublecortin-positive granule cells. Furthermore, doublecortin-positive neurons did not react with c-fos or Arc expression to mild theta-burst stimulation or novel environment exposure. Endogenous expression of pCREB133 was increasingly present in young cells with more elaborated dendrites, revealing a close correlation to structural maturation. Labeling with bromodeoxyuridine revealed cell age dependence of stimulation-induced c-fos, Arc and zif268 expression, with only a few cells reacting at 21 days, but with up to 75% of cells activated at 35-77 days of cell age. Our results indicate an increasing synaptic integration of maturing granule cells, starting at 21 days of cell age, but suggest a lack of ability to respond to activation with synaptic potentiation on the transcriptional level as long as immature cells express doublecortin. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Essential role of axonal VGSC inactivation in time-dependent deceleration and unreliability of spike propagation at cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The output of the neuronal digital spikes is fulfilled by axonal propagation and synaptic transmission to influence postsynaptic cells. Similar to synaptic transmission, spike propagation on the axon is not secure, especially in cerebellar Purkinje cells whose spiking rate is high. The characteristics, mechanisms and physiological impacts of propagation deceleration and infidelity remain elusive. The spike propagation is presumably initiated by local currents that raise membrane potential to the threshold of activating voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Results We have investigated the natures of spike propagation and the role of VGSCs in this process by recording spikes simultaneously on the somata and axonal terminals of Purkinje cells in cerebellar slices. The velocity and fidelity of spike propagation decreased during long-lasting spikes, to which the velocity change was more sensitive than fidelity change. These time-dependent deceleration and infidelity of spike propagation were improved by facilitating axonal VGSC reactivation, and worsen by intensifying VGSC inactivation. Conclusion Our studies indicate that the functional status of axonal VGSCs is essential to influencing the velocity and fidelity of spike propagation. PMID:24382121

  12. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  13. A reinforcing circuit action of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor modulators on cerebellar granule cell inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi Santhakumar

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors (GABARs are the targets of a wide variety of modulatory drugs which enhance chloride flux through GABAR ion channels. Certain GABAR modulators appear to acutely enhance the function of δ subunit-containing GABAR subtypes responsible for tonic forms of inhibition. Here we identify a reinforcing circuit mechanism by which these drugs, in addition to directly enhancing GABAR function, also increase GABA release. Electrophysiological recordings in cerebellar slices from rats homozygous for the ethanol-hypersensitive (α6100Q allele show that modulators and agonists selective for δ-containing GABARs such as THDOC, ethanol and THIP (gaboxadol increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs in granule cells. Ethanol fails to augment granule cell sIPSC frequency in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that circuit mechanisms involving granule cell output contribute to ethanol-enhancement of synaptic inhibition. Additionally, GABAR antagonists decrease ethanol-induced enhancement of Golgi cell firing. Consistent with a role for glutamatergic inputs, THIP-induced increases in Golgi cell firing are abolished by glutamate receptor antagonists. Moreover, THIP enhances the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in Golgi cells. Analyses of knockout mice indicate that δ subunit-containing GABARs are required for enhancing GABA release in the presence of ethanol and THIP. The limited expression of the GABAR δ subunit protein within the cerebellar cortex suggests that an indirect, circuit mechanism is responsible for stimulating Golgi cell GABA release by drugs selective for extrasynaptic isoforms of GABARs. Such circuit effects reinforce direct actions of these positive modulators on tonic GABAergic inhibition and are likely to contribute to the potent effect of these compounds as nervous system depressants.

  14. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) improved functional recovery of spinal cord injury partly by promoting axonal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liya; Lin, Hefeng; Bai, Shi; Zheng, Lianshun; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2018-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts the spinal cord and results in the loss of sensory and motor function below the lesion site. The treatment of SCI became a challenge because the injured neurons fail to axon regenerate and repair after injury. Promoting axonal regeneration plays a key role in the treatment strategies for SCI. It would meet the goal of reconstruction the injured spinal cord and improving the functional recovery. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are attractive therapeutic potential cell sources for SCI, and it could rebuild the injured spinal cord through neuroprotection, neural regeneration and remyelinating. Evidence has demonstrated that BMSCs play important roles in mediating axon regeneration, and glial scar formation after SCI in animal experiments and some clinical trials. We reviewed the role of BMSCs in regulating axon regeneration and glial scar formation after SCI. BMSCs based therapies may provide a therapeutic potential for the injured spinal cord by promoting axonal regeneration and repair. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of Axon Guidance by the Wnt Receptor Ror/CAM-1 in the PVT Guidepost Cell in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jason; Devkota, Ranjan; Yosef, Nebeyu; Mörck, Catarina

    2017-12-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans ventral nerve cord (VNC) consists of two asymmetric bundles of neurons and axons that are separated by the midline. How the axons are guided to stay on the correct sides of the midline remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that the conserved Wnt signaling pathway along with the Netrin and Robo pathways constitute a combinatorial code for midline guidance of PVP and PVQ axons that extend into the VNC. Combined loss of the Wnts CWN-1, CWN-2, and EGL-20 or loss of the Wnt receptor CAM-1 caused >70% of PVP and PVQ axons to inappropriately cross over from the left side to the right side. Loss of the Frizzled receptor LIN-17 or the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein VANG-1 also caused cross over defects that did not enhance those in the cam-1 mutant, indicating that the proteins function together in midline guidance. Strong cam-1 expression can be detected in the PVQs and the guidepost cell PVT that is located on the midline. However, only when cam-1 is expressed in PVT are the crossover defects of PVP and PVQ rescued, showing that CAM-1 functions nonautonomously in PVT to prevent axons from crossing the midline. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Akimoto, Yoshihiro [Department of Anatomy, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Kawakami, Hayato [Department of Anatomy, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Nagamatsu, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2009-12-04

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic {beta} cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  17. Morphological alterations in newly born dentate gyrus granule cells that emerge after status epilepticus contribute to make them less excitable.

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    Julián Tejada

    Full Text Available Computer simulations of external current stimulations of dentate gyrus granule cells of rats with Status Epilepticus induced by pilocarpine and control rats were used to evaluate whether morphological differences alone between these cells have an impact on their electrophysiological behavior. The cell models were constructed using morphological information from tridimensional reconstructions with Neurolucida software. To evaluate the effect of morphology differences alone, ion channel conductances, densities and distributions over the dendritic trees of dentate gyrus granule cells were the same for all models. External simulated currents were injected in randomly chosen dendrites belonging to one of three different areas of dentate gyrus granule cell molecular layer: inner molecular layer, medial molecular layer and outer molecular layer. Somatic membrane potentials were recorded to determine firing frequencies and inter-spike intervals. The results show that morphologically altered granule cells from pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats are less excitable than control cells, especially when they are stimulated in the inner molecular layer, which is the target area for mossy fibers that sprout after pilocarpine-induced cell degeneration. This suggests that morphological alterations may act as a protective mechanism to allow dentate gyrus granule cells to cope with the increase of stimulation caused by mossy fiber sprouting.

  18. Metazoan Scc4 homologs link sister chromatid cohesion to cell and axon migration guidance.

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    Vlad C Seitan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scc2 binds Scc4 to form an essential complex that loads cohesin onto chromosomes. The prevalence of Scc2 orthologs in eukaryotes emphasizes a conserved role in regulating sister chromatid cohesion, but homologs of Scc4 have not hitherto been identified outside certain fungi. Some metazoan orthologs of Scc2 were initially identified as developmental gene regulators, such as Drosophila Nipped-B, a regulator of cut and Ultrabithorax, and delangin, a protein mutant in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. We show that delangin and Nipped-B bind previously unstudied human and fly orthologs of Caenorhabditis elegans MAU-2, a non-axis-specific guidance factor for migrating cells and axons. PSI-BLAST shows that Scc4 is evolutionarily related to metazoan MAU-2 sequences, with the greatest homology evident in a short N-terminal domain, and protein-protein interaction studies map the site of interaction between delangin and human MAU-2 to the N-terminal regions of both proteins. Short interfering RNA knockdown of human MAU-2 in HeLa cells resulted in precocious sister chromatid separation and in impaired loading of cohesin onto chromatin, indicating that it is functionally related to Scc4, and RNAi analyses show that MAU-2 regulates chromosome segregation in C. elegans embryos. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knock down Xenopus tropicalis delangin or MAU-2 in early embryos produced similar patterns of retarded growth and developmental defects. Our data show that sister chromatid cohesion in metazoans involves the formation of a complex similar to the Scc2-Scc4 interaction in the budding yeast. The very high degree of sequence conservation between Scc4 homologs in complex metazoans is consistent with increased selection pressure to conserve additional essential functions, such as regulation of cell and axon migration during development.

  19. IL4I1 augments CNS remyelination and axonal protection by modulating T cell driven inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psachoulia, Konstantina; Chamberlain, Kelly A; Heo, Dongeun; Davis, Stephanie E; Paskus, Jeremiah D; Nanescu, Sonia E; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Wynn, Thomas A; Huang, Jeffrey K

    2016-12-01

    SEE PLUCHINO AND PERUZZOTTI-JAMETTI DOI101093/AWW266 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Myelin regeneration (remyelination) is a spontaneous process that occurs following central nervous system demyelination. However, for reasons that remain poorly understood, remyelination fails in the progressive phase of multiple sclerosis. Emerging evidence indicates that alternatively activated macrophages in central nervous system lesions are required for oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. Here, we show that an alternatively activated macrophage secreted enzyme, interleukin-four induced one (IL4I1), is upregulated at the onset of inflammation resolution and remyelination in mouse central nervous system lesions after lysolecithin-induced focal demyelination. Focal demyelination in mice lacking IL4I1 or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL4Rα) results in increased proinflammatory macrophage density, remyelination impairment, and axonal injury in central nervous system lesions. Conversely, recombinant IL4I1 administration into central nervous system lesions reduces proinflammatory macrophage density, enhances remyelination, and rescues remyelination impairment in IL4Rα deficient mice. We find that IL4I1 does not directly affect oligodendrocyte differentiation, but modulates inflammation by reducing interferon gamma and IL17 expression in lesioned central nervous system tissues, and in activated T cells from splenocyte cultures. Remarkably, intravenous injection of IL4I1 into mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis at disease onset significantly reversed disease severity, resulting in recovery from hindlimb paralysis. Analysis of post-mortem tissues reveals reduced axonal dystrophy in spinal cord, and decreased CD4 + T cell populations in spinal cord and spleen tissues. These results indicate that IL4I1 modulates inflammation by regulating T cell expansion, thereby permitting the formation of a favourable

  20. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Gabriela Huelgas-Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures.

  1. The role of Bax and caspase-3 in doppel-induced apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didonna, Alessandro; Sussman, Joshua; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Doppel (Dpl) protein is a paralog of the prion protein (PrP) that shares 25% sequence similarity with the C-terminus of PrP, a common N-glycosylation site and a C-terminal signal peptide for attachment of a glycosylphophatidyl inositol anchor. Whereas PrP (C) is highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), Dpl is detected mostly in testes and its ectopic expression in the CNS leads to ataxia as well as Purkinje and granule cell degeneration in the cerebellum. The mechanism through which Dpl induces neurotoxicity is still debated. In the present work, primary neuronal cultures derived from postnatal cerebellar granule cells of wild-type and PrP-knockout FVB mice were used in order to investigate the molecular events that occur upon exposure to Dpl. Treatment of cultured cerebellar neurons with recombinant Dpl produced apoptosis that could be prevented by PrP co-incubation. When primary neuronal cultures from Bax-deficient mice were incubated with Dpl, no apoptosis was observed, suggesting an important role of Bax in triggering neurodegeneration. Similarly, cell survival increased when recDpl-treated cells were incubated with an inhibitor of caspase-3, which mediates apoptosis in mammalian cells. Together, our findings raise the possibility that Bax and caspase-3 feature in Dpl-mediated apoptosis.

  2. Calpeptin Attenuated Inflammation, Cell Death, and Axonal Damage in Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, M. Kelly; Das, Arabinda; Samantaray, Supriti; Wallace, Gerald C.; Butler, Jonathan T.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS). Calpain has been implicated in many inflammatory and neurodegenerative events that lead to disability in EAE and MS. Thus, treating EAE animals with calpain inhibitors may block these events and ameliorate disability. To test this hypothesis, acute EAE Lewis rats were treated dose-dependently with the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (50 – 250 µg/kg). Calpain activity, gliosis, loss of myelin, and axonal damage were attenuated by calpeptin therapy, leading to improved clinical scores. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte death were also decreased with down regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins, suggesting that decreases in cell death were due to decreases in the expression or activity of pro-apoptotic proteins. These results indicate that calpain inhibition may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for treating EAE and MS. PMID:20623621

  3. Cdk5 regulates accurate maturation of newborn granule cells in the adult hippocampus.

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    Sebastian Jessberger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Newborn granule cells become functionally integrated into the synaptic circuitry of the adult dentate gyrus after a morphological and electrophysiological maturation process. The molecular mechanisms by which immature neurons and the neurites extending from them find their appropriate position and target area remain largely unknown. Here we show that single-cell-specific knockdown of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5 activity in newborn cells using a retrovirus-based strategy leads to aberrant growth of dendritic processes, which is associated with an altered migration pattern of newborn cells. Even though spine formation and maturation are reduced in cdk5-deficient cells, aberrant dendrites form ectopic synapses onto hilar neurons. These observations identify cdk5 to be critically involved in the maturation and dendrite extension of newborn neurons in the course of adult neurogenesis. The data presented here also suggest a mechanistic dissociation between accurate dendritic targeting and subsequent synapse formation.

  4. Loss of Melanin by Eye Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Is Associated with Its Oxidative Destruction in Melanolipofuscin Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsov, A E; Sakina, N L; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-08-01

    The effect of superoxide radicals on melanin destruction and degradation of melanosomes isolated from cells of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the human eye was studied. We found that potassium superoxide causes destruction of melanin in melanosomes of human and bovine RPE, as well as destruction of melanin from the ink bag of squid, with the formation of fluorescent decay products having an emission maximum at 520-525 nm. The initial kinetics of the accumulation of the fluorescent decay products is linear. Superoxide radicals lead simultaneously to a decrease in the number of melanosomes and to a decrease in concentration of paramagnetic centers in them. Complete degradation of melanosomes leads to the formation of a transparent solution containing dissolved proteins and melanin degradation products that do not exhibit paramagnetic properties. To completely degrade one melanosome of human RPE, 650 ± 100 fmol of superoxide are sufficient. The concentration of paramagnetic centers in a melanolipofuscin granule of human RPE is on average 32.5 ± 10.4% (p < 0.05, 150 eyes) lower than in a melanosome, which indicates melanin undergoing a destruction process in these granules. RPE cells also contain intermediate granules that have an EPR signal with a lower intensity than that of melanolipofuscin granules, but higher than that of lipofuscin granules. This signal is due to the presence of residual melanin in these granules. Irradiation of a mixture of melanosomes with lipofuscin granules with blue light (450 nm), in contrast to irradiation of only melanosomes, results in the appearance of fluorescent melanin degradation products. We suggest that one of the main mechanisms of age-related decrease in melanin concentration in human RPE cells is its destruction in melanolipofuscin granules under the action of superoxide radicals formed during photoinduced oxygen reduction by lipofuscin fluorophores.

  5. Molecular and functional characterization of GAD67-expressing, newborn granule cells in mouse dentate gyrus

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    Carolina eCabezas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs have been suggested to synthesize both GABA and glutamate immediately after birth and under pathological conditions in the adult. Expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67 by GCs during the first few weeks of postnatal development may then allow for transient GABA synthesis and synaptic release from these cells. Here, using the GAD67-EGFP transgenic strain G42, we explored the phenotype of GAD67-expressing GCs in the mouse dentate gyrus. We report a transient, GAD67-driven EGFP expression in differentiating GCs throughout ontogenesis. EGFP expression correlates with the expression of GAD and molecular markers of GABA release and uptake in 2-4 weeks postmitotic GCs. These rather immature cells are able to fire action potentials and are synaptically integrated in the hippocampal network. Yet they show physiological properties that differentiate them from mature GCs. Finally, GAD67-expressing GCs express a specific complement of GABAA receptor subunits as well as distinctive features of synaptic and tonic GABA signaling. Our results reveal that GAD67 expression in dentate gyrus granule cells is a transient marker of late differentiation that persists throughout life and the G42 strain may be used to visualize newborn GCs at a specific, well-defined differentiation stage.

  6. SDF-1 overexpression by mesenchymal stem cells enhances GAP-43-positive axonal growth following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Andrew Nathaniel; Matyas, Jessica Jane; Welchko, Ryan Matthew; Goldsmith, Alison Delanie; Zeiler, Sarah Elizabeth; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Lu, Ming; Nan, Zhenhong; Rossignol, Julien; Dunbar, Gary Leo

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing genetic overexpression of trophic molecules in cell populations has been a promising strategy to develop cell replacement therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI). Over-expressing the chemokine, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1α), which has chemotactic effects on many cells of the nervous system, offers a promising strategy to promote axonal regrowth following SCI. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of human SDF-1α, when overexpressed by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), on axonal growth and motor behavior in a contusive rat model of SCI. Using a transwell migration assay, the paracrine effects of MSCs, which were engineered to secrete human SDF-1α (SDF-1-MSCs), were assessed on cultured neural stem cells (NSCs). For in vivo analyses, the SDF-1-MSCs, unaltered MSCs, or Hanks Buffered Saline Solution (vehicle) were injected into the lesion epicenter of rats at 9-days post-SCI. Behavior was analyzed for 7-weeks post-injury, using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale of locomotor functions. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate major histopathological outcomes, including gliosis, inflammation, white matter sparing, and cavitation. New axonal outgrowth was characterized using immunohistochemistry against the neuron specific growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). The results of these experiments demonstrate that the overexpression of SDF-1α by MSCs can enhance the migration of NSCs in vitro. Although only modest functional improvements were observed following transplantation of SDF-1-MSCs, a significant reduction in cavitation surrounding the lesion, and an increased density of GAP-43-positive axons inside the SCI lesion/graft site were found. The results from these experiments support the potential role for utilizing SDF-1α as a treatment for enhancing growth and regeneration of axons after traumatic SCI.

  7. MMP-13 Regulates Growth of Wound Granulation Tissue and Modulates Gene Expression Signatures Involved in Inflammation, Proteolysis, and Cell Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriseva, Mervi; Laato, Matti; Carpén, Olli; Ruohonen, Suvi T.; Savontaus, Eriika; Inada, Masaki; Krane, Stephen M.; Kähäri, Veli-Matti

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases play a pivotal role in wound healing by regulating cell-matrix interactions and availability of bioactive molecules. The role of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in granulation tissue growth was studied in subcutaneously implanted viscose cellulose sponge in MMP-13 knockout (Mmp13 −/−) and wild type (WT) mice. The tissue samples were harvested at time points day 7, 14 and 21 and subjected to histological analysis and gene expression profiling. Granulation tissue growth was significantly reduced (42%) at day 21 in Mmp13 −/− mice. Granulation tissue in Mmp13 −/− mice showed delayed organization of myofibroblasts, increased microvascular density at day 14, and virtual absence of large vessels at day 21. Gene expression profiling identified differentially expressed genes in Mmp13 −/− mouse granulation tissue involved in biological functions including inflammatory response, angiogenesis, cellular movement, cellular growth and proliferation and proteolysis. Among genes linked to angiogenesis, Adamts4 and Npy were significantly upregulated in early granulation tissue in Mmp13−/− mice, and a set of genes involved in leukocyte motility including Il6 were systematically downregulated at day 14. The expression of Pdgfd was downregulated in Mmp13 −/− granulation tissue in all time points. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases Mmp2, Mmp3, Mmp9 was also significantly downregulated in granulation tissue of Mmp13 −/− mice compared to WT mice. Mmp13 −/− mouse skin fibroblasts displayed altered cell morphology and impaired ability to contract collagen gel and decreased production of MMP-2. These results provide evidence for an important role for MMP-13 in wound healing by coordinating cellular activities important in the growth and maturation of granulation tissue, including myofibroblast function, inflammation, angiogenesis, and proteolysis. PMID:22880047

  8. Activity Dependent Modulation of Granule Cell Survival in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb at Puberty

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    Livio Oboti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The vomeronasal system (VNS is specialized in the detection of salient chemical cues triggering social and neuroendocrine responses. Such responses are not always stereotyped, instead, they vary depending on age, sex, and reproductive state, yet the mechanisms underlying this variability are unclear. Here, by analyzing neuronal survival in the first processing nucleus of the VNS, namely the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB, through multiple bromodeoxyuridine birthdating protocols, we show that exposure of female mice to male soiled bedding material affects the integration of newborn granule interneurons mainly after puberty. This effect is induced by urine compounds produced by mature males, as bedding soiled by younger males was ineffective. The granule cell increase induced by mature male odor exposure is not prevented by pre-pubertal ovariectomy, indicating a lesser role of circulating estrogens in this plasticity. Interestingly, the intake of adult male urine-derived cues by the female vomeronasal organ increases during puberty, suggesting a direct correlation between sensory activity and AOB neuronal plasticity. Thus, as odor exposure increases the responses of newly born cells to the experienced stimuli, the addition of new GABAergic inhibitory cells to the AOB might contribute to the shaping of vomeronasal processing of male cues after puberty. Consistently, only after puberty, female mice are capable to discriminate individual male odors through the VNS.

  9. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays. It was f......The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays....... It was found that the cytoplasmic density of smooth endoplasmic reticulum was decreased, while the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles and coated vesicles was greatly enhanced after exposure of the cells to THIP (150 microM) for only 1 hr. In cerebellar granule cells...

  10. Stimulus-dependent translocation of egg-laying hormone encoding mRNA into the axonal compartment of the neuroendocrine caudodorsal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minnen, J.; Bergman, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    To get insight into the stimulus-dependent translocation of mRNA encoding neuropeptides to the axonal compartment of neurons, we investigated this process in the egg-laying hormone producing caudodorsal cells of the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis. The axonal compartment including the nerve terminals of

  11. Stimulus-independent translocation of egg-laying hormone encoding mRNA into the axonal compartment of the neuroendocrine caudodorsal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minnen, J.; Bergman, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    To get insight into the stimulus-dependent translocation of mRNA encoding neuropeptides to the axonal compartment of neurons, we investigated this process in the egg-laying hormone producing caudodorsal cells of the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis. The axonal compartment including the nerve terminals of

  12. Axonal transmission in the retina introduces a small dispersion of relative timing in the ganglion cell population response.

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    Günther Zeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We 'imaged' the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec. Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion

  13. In vitro atrazine-exposure inhibits human natural killer cell lytic granule release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2007-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a known immunotoxicant and an inhibitor of human natural killer (NK) cell lytic function. The precise changes in NK cell lytic function following atrazine exposure have not been fully elucidated. The current study identifies the point at which atrazine exerts its affect on the stepwise process of human NK cell-mediated lyses of the K562 target cell line. Using intracellular staining of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, it was determined that a 24-h in vitro exposure to atrazine did not decrease the level of NK cell lytic proteins granzyme A, granzyme B or perforin. Thus, it was hypothesized that atrazine exposure was inhibiting the ability of the NK cells to bind to the target cell and subsequently inhibit the release of lytic protein from the NK cell. To test this hypothesis, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were employed to analyze NK cell-target cell co-cultures following atrazine exposure. These assays demonstrated no significant decrease in the level of target cell binding. However, the levels of NK intracellular lytic protein retained and the amount of lytic protein released were assessed following a 4-h incubation with K562 target cells. The relative level of intracellular lytic protein was 25-50% higher, and the amount of lytic protein released was 55-65% less in atrazine-treated cells than vehicle-treated cells following incubation with the target cells. These results indicate that ATR exposure inhibits the ability of NK cells to lyse target cells by blocking lytic granule release without affecting the ability of the NK cell to form stable conjugates with target cells

  14. The survival of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells is not dependent on elevated potassium-ion concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N; Balázs, R

    1994-01-01

    The effects of K(+)-induced membrane depolarization were studied on the survival and biochemical parameters in mouse and rat cerebellar granule cells grown in micro-well cultures. Cell numbers were determined by estimating DNA content using the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome binding assay. DNA from d...

  15. A Novel Growth-Promoting Pathway Formed by GDNF-Overexpressing Schwann Cells Promotes Propriospinal Axonal Regeneration, Synapse formation, and Partial Recovery of Function after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lingxiao; Deng, Ping; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Zao Cheng; Liu, Naikui; Wen, Xuejun; Smith, George M.; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Descending propriospinal neurons (DPSN) are known to establish functional relays for supraspinal signals, and they display a greater growth response after injury than do the long projecting axons. However, their regenerative response is still deficient due to their failure to depart from growth supportive cellular transplants back into the host spinal cord, which contains numerous impediments to axon growth. Here we report the construction of a continuous growth-promoting pathway in adult rats, formed by grafted Schwann cells (SCs) overexpressing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We demonstrate that such a growth-promoting pathway, extending from the axonal cut ends to the site of innervation in the distal spinal cord, promoted regeneration of DPSN axons through and beyond the lesion gap of a spinal cord hemisection. Within the distal host spinal cord, regenerated DPSN axons formed synapses with host neurons leading to the restoration of action potentials and partial recovery of function. PMID:23536080

  16. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays...... exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 3 hr low affinity GABA receptors were induced. These findings show that the effect of THIP on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells may be interrelated and moreover it is likely that the turn-over of GABA receptors...

  17. The Mesoaccumbens Pathway: A Retrograde Labeling and Single-Cell Axon Tracing Analysis in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Claudia; Clascá, Francisco; Prensa, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) that innervate the nucleus accumbens (Acb) constitute the so-called mesoaccumbens system. Increased activity by these neurons is correlated with the expectation and achievement of reward. The mesoaccumbens projection neurons are regarded as a central node in the brain networks that regulate drive and hedonic experience, and their dysregulation is a common pathophysiological step in addictive behaviors as well as major depression. Despite previous anatomical studies that have analyzed the origin of the mesoaccumbens axons within the VTA, regarded as a unit, the exact contributions of the various cytoarchitectural subdivisions of the VTA to this innervation is still unexplored; understanding these contributions would help further our understanding of their precise anatomical organization. With the aim of deciphering the contribution of the various VTA subdivisions to accumbal innervation, the present study has used retrograde tracer microinjections in the Acb to map the location within the various VTA subdivisions of neurons targeting either the shell or core compartments of the Acb in mice. Furthermore, the dopaminergic nature of these projections has also been analyzed using tyrosine-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. We demonstrate here that small territories of the Acb core and shell are innervated simultaneously by many VTA subdivisions, contributing dopaminergic as well as non-dopaminergic axons to the accumbal innervation. In fact, single VTA subdivisions harbor both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neurons that project to the same accumbal territory. The most medial VTA subnuclei, like the caudal linear nucleus, project abundantly to medial aspects of the Acb core, whereas more lateral territories of the Acb are preferentially targeted by neurons located in the parabrachial pigmented and paranigral nuclei. Overall, about half of the mesoaccumbens neurons are putatively dopaminergic in mice. Anterograde single-cell

  18. Revisiting the single cell protein application of Cupriavidus necator H16 and recovering bioplastic granules simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunasundari, Balakrishnan; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Kaur, Gurjeet; Maurer, Frans H J; Sudesh, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly known as Hydrogenomonas eutropha) was famous as a potential single cell protein (SCP) in the 1970s. The drawback however was the undesirably efficient accumulation of non-nutritive polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) storage compound in the cytoplasm of this bacterium. Eventually, competition from soy-based protein resulted in SCP not receiving much attention. Nevertheless, C. necator H16 remained in the limelight as a producer of PHB, which is a material that resembles commodity plastics such as polypropylene. PHB is a 100% biobased and biodegradable polyester. Although tremendous achievements have been attained in the past 3 decades in the efficient production of PHB, this bioplastic is still costly. One of the main problems has been the recovery of PHB from the cell cytoplasm. In this study, we showed for the first time that kilogram quantities of PHB can be easily recovered in the laboratory without the use of any solvents and chemicals, just by using the cells as SCP. In addition, the present study also demonstrated the safety and tolerability of animal model used, Sprague Dawley given lyophilized cells of C. necator H16. The test animals readily produced fecal pellets that were whitish in color, as would be expected of PHB granules. The pellets were determined to contain about 82-97 wt% PHB and possessed molecular mass of around 930 kg/mol. The PHB granules recovered biologically possessed similar molecular mass compared to chloroform extracted PHB [950 kg/mol]. This method now allows the production and purification of substantial quantities of PHB for various experimental trials. The method reported here is easy, does not require expensive instrumentation, scalable and does not involve extensive use of solvents and strong chemicals.

  19. Revisiting the single cell protein application of Cupriavidus necator H16 and recovering bioplastic granules simultaneously.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Kunasundari

    Full Text Available Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly known as Hydrogenomonas eutropha was famous as a potential single cell protein (SCP in the 1970s. The drawback however was the undesirably efficient accumulation of non-nutritive polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB storage compound in the cytoplasm of this bacterium. Eventually, competition from soy-based protein resulted in SCP not receiving much attention. Nevertheless, C. necator H16 remained in the limelight as a producer of PHB, which is a material that resembles commodity plastics such as polypropylene. PHB is a 100% biobased and biodegradable polyester. Although tremendous achievements have been attained in the past 3 decades in the efficient production of PHB, this bioplastic is still costly. One of the main problems has been the recovery of PHB from the cell cytoplasm. In this study, we showed for the first time that kilogram quantities of PHB can be easily recovered in the laboratory without the use of any solvents and chemicals, just by using the cells as SCP. In addition, the present study also demonstrated the safety and tolerability of animal model used, Sprague Dawley given lyophilized cells of C. necator H16. The test animals readily produced fecal pellets that were whitish in color, as would be expected of PHB granules. The pellets were determined to contain about 82-97 wt% PHB and possessed molecular mass of around 930 kg/mol. The PHB granules recovered biologically possessed similar molecular mass compared to chloroform extracted PHB [950 kg/mol]. This method now allows the production and purification of substantial quantities of PHB for various experimental trials. The method reported here is easy, does not require expensive instrumentation, scalable and does not involve extensive use of solvents and strong chemicals.

  20. Differences in Granule Morphology yet Equally Impaired Exocytosis among Cytotoxic T Cells and NK Cells from Chediak-Higashi Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Samuel C C; Wood, Stephanie M; Tesi, Bianca; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Al-Herz, Waleed; Ammann, Sandra; Belen, Fatma Burcu; Caliskan, Umran; Kaya, Zühre; Lehmberg, Kai; Patiroglu, Turkan; Tokgoz, Huseyin; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Introne, Wendy J; Henter, Jan-Inge; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Meeths, Marie; Ehl, Stephan; Krzewski, Konrad; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2017-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in LYST , resulting in enlarged lysosomal compartments in multiple cell types. CHS patients display oculocutaneous albinism and may develop life-threatening hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). While NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been reported to be uniformly defective, variable defects in T cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been observed. The latter has been linked to the degree of HLH susceptibility. Since the discrepancies in NK cell- and T cell-mediated cellular cytotoxicity might result from differences in regulation of cytotoxic granule release, we here evaluated perforin-containing secretory lysosome size and number in freshly isolated lymphocytes from CHS patients and furthermore compared their exocytic capacities. Whereas NK cells from CHS patients generally contained a single, gigantic perforin-containing granule, cytotoxic T cells predominantly contained several smaller granules. Nonetheless, in a cohort of 21 CHS patients, cytotoxic T cell and NK cell granule exocytosis were similarly impaired upon activating receptor stimulation. Mechanistically, polarization of cytotoxic granules was defective in cytotoxic lymphocytes from CHS patients, with EEA1, a marker of early endosomes, mislocalizing to lysosomal structures. The results leads to the conclusion that lysosome enlargement corresponds to loss of distinct organelle identity in the endocytic pathway, which on a subcellular level more adversely affects NK cells than T cells. Hence, vesicular size or numbers do not per se dictate the impairment of lysosomal exocytosis in the two cell types studied.

  1. Differences in Granule Morphology yet Equally Impaired Exocytosis among Cytotoxic T Cells and NK Cells from Chediak–Higashi Syndrome Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Samuel C. C.; Wood, Stephanie M.; Tesi, Bianca; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Al-Herz, Waleed; Ammann, Sandra; Belen, Fatma Burcu; Caliskan, Umran; Kaya, Zühre; Lehmberg, Kai; Patiroglu, Turkan; Tokgoz, Huseyin; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Introne, Wendy J.; Henter, Jan-Inge; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Meeths, Marie; Ehl, Stephan; Krzewski, Konrad; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2017-01-01

    Chediak–Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in LYST, resulting in enlarged lysosomal compartments in multiple cell types. CHS patients display oculocutaneous albinism and may develop life-threatening hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). While NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been reported to be uniformly defective, variable defects in T cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been observed. The latter has been linked to the degree of HLH susceptibility. Since the discrepancies in NK cell- and T cell-mediated cellular cytotoxicity might result from differences in regulation of cytotoxic granule release, we here evaluated perforin-containing secretory lysosome size and number in freshly isolated lymphocytes from CHS patients and furthermore compared their exocytic capacities. Whereas NK cells from CHS patients generally contained a single, gigantic perforin-containing granule, cytotoxic T cells predominantly contained several smaller granules. Nonetheless, in a cohort of 21 CHS patients, cytotoxic T cell and NK cell granule exocytosis were similarly impaired upon activating receptor stimulation. Mechanistically, polarization of cytotoxic granules was defective in cytotoxic lymphocytes from CHS patients, with EEA1, a marker of early endosomes, mislocalizing to lysosomal structures. The results leads to the conclusion that lysosome enlargement corresponds to loss of distinct organelle identity in the endocytic pathway, which on a subcellular level more adversely affects NK cells than T cells. Hence, vesicular size or numbers do not per se dictate the impairment of lysosomal exocytosis in the two cell types studied. PMID:28458669

  2. Impaired retention of spatial memory after transection of longitudinally oriented axons of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffenach, Hill-Aina; Sloviter, Robert S.; Moser, Edvard I.; Moser, May-Britt

    2002-03-01

    Longitudinally oriented axon collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells may be critical for integrating distributed information in the hippocampus. To investigate the possible role of this pathway in the retention of spatial memory, we made a single transversely oriented cut through the dorsal CA3 region of each hippocampus. Although the lesion involved water maze in preoperatively trained rats. New learning in a different water maze was attenuated. No significant impairment occurred in rats with longitudinally oriented cuts, or in animals with ibotenic acid-induced lesions of similar magnitude. To characterize the effect of a focal lesion on the integrity of longitudinally projecting axons, we stained degenerating cells and fibers in rats with unilateral CA3 transections by using FluoroJade-B. Degenerating terminals were seen across a wide region posterior to the cut, and were present in the strata of areas CA3 and CA1 that are innervated by CA3 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the integrity of longitudinally oriented, translamellar axons of CA3 pyramidal cells may be necessary for efficient acquisition and retention of spatial memory.

  3. Side-To-Side Nerve Bridges Support Donor Axon Regeneration Into Chronically Denervated Nerves and Are Associated With Characteristic Changes in Schwann Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, J Michael; Alvarez-Veronesi, M Cecilia; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic denervation resulting from long nerve regeneration times and distances contributes greatly to suboptimal outcomes following nerve injuries. Recent studies showed that multiple nerve grafts inserted between an intact donor nerve and a denervated distal recipient nerve stump (termed "side-to-side nerve bridges") enhanced regeneration after delayed nerve repair. To examine the cellular aspects of axon growth across these bridges to explore the "protective" mechanism of donor axons on chronically denervated Schwann cells. In Sprague Dawley rats, 3 side-to-side nerve bridges were placed over a 10-mm distance between an intact donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) distal nerve stump. Green fluorescent protein-expressing TIB axons grew across the bridges and were counted in cross section after 4 weeks. Immunofluorescent axons and Schwann cells were imaged over a 4-month period. Denervated Schwann cells dedifferentiated to a proliferative, nonmyelinating phenotype within the bridges and the recipient denervated CP nerve stump. As donor TIB axons grew across the 3 side-to-side nerve bridges and into the denervated CP nerve, the Schwann cells redifferentiated to the myelinating phenotype. Bridge placement led to an increased mass of hind limb anterior compartment muscles after 4 months of denervation compared with muscles whose CP nerve was not "protected" by bridges. This study describes patterns of donor axon regeneration and myelination in the denervated recipient nerve stump and supports a mechanism where these donor axons sustain a proregenerative state to prevent deterioration in the face of chronic denervation.

  4. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CNTF to schwann cells within reconstructed peripheral nerve grafts enhances adult retinal ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Ying; Leaver, Simone G; Plant, Giles W; Hendriks, William T J; Niclou, Simone P; Verhaagen, J.; Harvey, Alan R; Cui, Qi

    We recently described a method for reconstituting peripheral nerve (PN) sheaths using adult Schwann cells (SCs). Reconstructed PN tissue grafted onto the cut optic nerve supports the regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. To determine whether genetic manipulation of

  5. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis poststroke: More new granule cells but aberrant morphology and impaired spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, Florus; Ceanga, Mihai; Rudolph, Max; Niv, Fanny; Witte, Otto W; Redecker, Christoph; Kunze, Albrecht; Keiner, Silke

    2017-01-01

    Stroke significantly stimulates neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus, though the functional role of this postlesional response is mostly unclear. Recent findings suggest that newborn neurons generated in the context of stroke may fail to correctly integrate into pre-existing networks. We hypothesized that increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus following stroke is associated with aberrant neurogenesis and impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. To address these questions we used the middle cerebral artery occlusion model (MCAO) in mice. Animals were housed either under standard conditions or with free access to running wheels. Newborn granule cells were labelled with the thymidine analoque EdU and retroviral vectors. To assess memory performance, we employed a modified version of the Morris water maze (MWM) allowing differentiation between hippocampus dependent and independent learning strategies. Newborn neurons were morphologically analyzed using confocal microscopy and Neurolucida system at 7 weeks. We found that neurogenesis was significantly increased following MCAO. Animals with MCAO needed more time to localize the platform and employed less hippocampus-dependent search strategies in MWM versus controls. Confocal studies revealed an aberrant cell morphology with basal dendrites and an ectopic location (e.g. hilus) of new granule cells born in the ischemic brain. Running increased the number of new neurons but also enhanced aberrant neurogenesis. Running, did not improve the general performance in the MWM but slightly promoted the application of precise spatial search strategies. In conclusion, ischemic insults cause hippocampal-dependent memory deficits which are associated with aberrant neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus indicating ischemia-induced maladaptive plasticity in the hippocampus.

  6. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: LYST domains regulate exocytosis of lytic granules, but not cytokine secretion by NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Krzewska, Aleksandra; Wood, Stephanie M.; Murakami, Yousuke; Nguyen, Victoria; Chiang, Samuel Cern Cher; Cullinane, Andrew R.; Giovanna, Peruzzi; Gahl, William A.; Coligan, John E.; Introne, Wendy J.; Bryceson, Yenan T.; Krzewski, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in LYST cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare immunodeficiency with impaired cytotoxic lymphocyte function, mainly that of natural killer (NK) cells. Our understanding of NK cell function deficiency in CHS, and how LYST regulates lytic granule exocytosis is very limited. Objective We sought to delineate cellular defects, associated with LYST mutations, responsible for the impaired NK cell function in CHS. Methods We analyzed NK cells from CHS patients with missense mutations in the LYST ARM/HEAT or BEACH domains. Results CHS NK cells displayed severely reduced cytotoxicity. Mutations in the ARM/HEAT domain led to a reduced number of perforin-containing granules, which were significantly increased in size, but able to polarize to the immunological synapse (IS); however, they were unable to properly fuse with the plasma membrane. Mutations in the BEACH domain resulted in the formation of normal or slightly enlarged granules that had markedly impaired polarization to the immunological synapse, but could be exocytosed upon reaching the IS. Perforin-containing granules in CHS NK cells did not acquire certain lysosomal markers (LAMP1/2), but were positive for markers of transport vesicles (CI-MPR), late endosomes (Rab27a), and to some extent, early endosomes (EEA-1), indicating a lack of integrity in the endo-lysosomal compartments. CHS NK cells had normal cytokine compartments and cytokine secretion. Conclusion LYST is involved in regulation of multiple aspects of NK cell lytic activity ranging from governance of lytic granule size to control of their polarization and exocytosis, as well as the regulation of endo-lysosomal compartment identity. LYST functions in the regulated exocytosis, but not in the constitutive secretion pathway. PMID:26478006

  7. In vivo modeling of neuronal function, axonal impairment and connectivity in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecka, J A; Levy, S; Isacson, O

    2016-06-01

    Modeling neurological diseases using human embryonic or patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) improves the understanding of molecular and cellular changes underlying these diseases and can lead to new, potentially personalized therapies. Changes in expression of axon guidance cues and altered cytoskeletal maintenance have been implicated in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. To date, most of the iPSC patient-derived cellular dysfunction and phenotypic studies have been performed in vitro. To study the intrinsic axonal impairments and neuronal connectivity deficits in human disease iPSC-derived neurons we propose to graft these cells into the physiological three-dimensional multi-structural environment of the central nervous system of rodent models to obtain relevant in vivo data. Such human iPSC in vivo chimeric models can allow for neuronal maturation, capture neuropathological phenotypes of axonal and connectivity impairments, and serve as target engagement and drug validation studies using human cells, thus highly relevant for advancement of the drug development process in the late pre-clinical stages. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Granulator Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, T H; Armantrout, G

    1999-08-02

    Following our detailed review of the granulation reports and additional conversations with process and development personnel, we have reached a consensus position regarding granulator selection. At this time, we recommend going forward with implementation of the tumbling granulator approach (GEMCO) based on our assessment of the tested granulation techniques using the established criteria. The basis for this selection is summarized in the following sections, followed by our recommendations for proceeding with implementation of the tumbling granulation approach. All five granulation technologies produced granulated products that can be made into acceptable sintered pucks. A possible exception is the product from the fluidized bed granulator. This material has been more difficult to press into uniform pucks without subsequent cracking of the puck during the sintering cycle for the pucks in this series of tests. This problem may be an artifact of the conditions of the particular granulation demonstration run involved, but earlier results have also been mixed. All granulators made acceptable granulated feed from the standpoint of transfer and press feeding, though the roller compactor and fluidized bed products were dustier than the rest. There was also differentiation among the granulators in the operational areas of (1) potential for process upset, (2) plant implementation and operational complexity, and (3) maintenance concerns. These considerations will be discussed further in the next section. Note that concerns also exist regarding the extension of the granulation processes to powders containing actinides. Only the method that involves tumbling and moisture addition has been tested with uranium, and in that instance, significant differences were found in the granulation behavior of the powders.

  9. ZnT2-Mediated Zinc Import Into Paneth Cell Granules Is Necessary for Coordinated Secretion and Paneth Cell Function in MiceSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail B. Podany

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Defects in Paneth cell (PC function are associated with microbial dysbiosis and intestinal inflammation. PC granules contain antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and substantial stores of zinc (Zn. We hypothesized that Zn, transported into the granule through the Zn transporter (ZnT2, is critical for signature PC functions. Methods: ZnT2 was localized to PC granules using immunofluorescence and sucrose gradient fractionation in wild-type (wt mice, and consequences of ZnT2 loss were characterized in ZnT2 knockout (ZnT2ko mice. Terminal ilea were harvested for immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and fluorescent imaging with the Zn reporter Zinpyr-1. Alterations in fecal microbiota were characterized using 16s ribosomal RNA sequencing. PC degranulation, bacterial translocation, cytokine response to Escherichia coli endotoxin lipopolysaccharide, crypt viability after exposure to the oxidant monochloramine (NH2Cl, and bactericidal activity of luminal contents of terminal ilea against enteropathogenic E coli were assessed. Results: ZnT2 was localized to the membrane of PC granules. In ZnT2ko mice, spontaneous degranulation was observed more frequently than among wt mice. Secretory granules were hypodense with less active lysozyme, and there was evidence of autophagosome accumulation and granule degradation in PCs from ZnT2ko mice. Gut microbiota of ZnT2ko mice were enriched in Bacteroidales S24-7 and relatively depleted of species commonly found in wt mice. Evidence of PC dysfunction in ZnT2ko mice included impaired granule secretion and increased inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide, less bactericidal activity, and greater susceptibility to cell death from NH2Cl. Conclusions: ZnT2 is critical for Zn import into PC granules, and the inability to import Zn leads to profound defects in PC function and uncoordinated granule secretion. Keywords: Small Intestine, Zinc Transporter, Microbiota

  10. The GABAA Antagonist DPP-4-PIOL Selectively Antagonises Tonic over Phasic GABAergic Currents in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boddum, Kim; Frølund, Bente; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    that phasic and tonic GABAA receptor currents can be selectively inhibited by the antagonists SR 95531 and the 4-PIOL derivative, 4-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol hydrobromide (DPP-4-PIOL), respectively. In dentate gyrus granule cells, SR 95531 was found approximately 4 times as potent...

  11. Stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor has a trophic effect on differentiating cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1988-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) supplementation of cerebellar cultures enriched in granule neurones (about 90%) prevented the extensive cell loss which occurs when cultivation takes place, in serum containing media, in the presence of 'low' K+ (5-15 mM). Estimation of tetanus toxin receptors and N-CA...

  12. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Differentiating granule cells develop survival requirements in culture which can be met by treatment with high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, according to our recent findings, also with low concentrations of kainic acid (KA, 50 microM). We have now attempted to elucidate the mechanism(s) ...

  13. The effect of hydroxylated PCBs on DCF-fluorescence and cell death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnum, F.; Dreiem, A.; Rykken, S. [Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (Norway); Lehmler, H.Y.; Robertson, L. [Univ. of Iowa (United States); Mariussen, E. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research (Norway)

    2004-09-15

    We have previously investigated the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on free radical formation and cell death in cerebellar granule cells. PCBs may be metabolised to hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs) in the body. Therefore, we wanted to expand our study to include also the HO-PCBs. After hydroxylation, many of the PCBs are conjugated to either glucoronic acid or sulphate, which facilitates their excretion. Nevertheless, some of the HO-PCBs are retained in the body. The structures of some of the HO-PCBs show a certain similarity to the structure of the cathecholamines, and PCBs have been shown to affect the level of cathecholamines in the brain. Therefore, we compared the effect of some HO-PCBs with the effects of PCBs on some important physiological parameters in the brain. In the present communication we have compared the effects of PCB and HO-PCB on formation of DCF-fluorescence, which is used as a measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and cell death in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

  14. Midline 1 directs lytic granule exocytosis and cytotoxicity of mouse killer T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Hansen, Ann K; Meroni, Germana

    2014-01-01

    upregulated in murine cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs), and that it controls TCR signaling, centrosome trafficking and exocytosis of lytic granules. In accordance, we find that the killing capacity of MID1(-/-) CTLs is impaired. Transfection of MID1 into MID1(-/-) CTLs completely rescued lytic granule exocytosis......, and vice versa, knock-down of MID1 inhibited exocytosis of lytic granules in wild-type CTLs, cementing a central role for MID1 in the regulation of granule exocytosis. Thus, MID1 orchestrates multiple events in CTL responses, adding a novel level of regulation to CTL activation and cytotoxicity...

  15. Polyamines inhibit the assembly of stress granules in normal intestinal epithelial cells regulating apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tongtong; Rao, Jaladanki N; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Cui, Yu-Hong; Jiang, Zhengran; Ouyang, Miao; Donahue, James M; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Polyamines regulate multiple signaling pathways and are implicated in many aspects of cellular functions, but the exact molecular processes governed by polyamines remain largely unknown. In response to environmental stress, repression of translation is associated with the assembly of stress granules (SGs) that contain a fraction of arrested mRNAs and are thought to function as mRNA storage. Here we show that polyamines modulate the assembly of SGs in normal intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and that induced SGs following polyamine depletion are implicated in the protection of IECs against apoptosis. Increasing the levels of cellular polyamines by ectopic overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase gene decreased cytoplasmic levels of SG-signature constituent proteins eukaryotic initiation factor 3b and T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1)-related protein and repressed the assembly of SGs induced by exposure to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. In contrast, depletion of cellular polyamines by inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase with α-difluoromethylornithine increased cytoplasmic eukaryotic initiation factor 3b and TIA-1 related protein abundance and enhanced arsenite-induced SG assembly. Polyamine-deficient cells also exhibited an increase in resistance to tumor necrosis factor-α/cycloheximide-induced apoptosis, which was prevented by inhibiting SG formation with silencing SG resident proteins Sort1 and TIA-1. These results indicate that the elevation of cellular polyamines represses the assembly of SGs in normal IECs and that increased SGs in polyamine-deficient cells are crucial for increased resistance to apoptosis.

  16. A co-culture microtunnel technique demonstrating a significant contribution of unmyelinated Schwann cells to the acceleration of axonal conduction in Schwann cell-regulated peripheral nerve development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koji; Shimba, Kenta; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-14

    Schwann cells (SCs) contribute to the regulation of axonal conduction in a myelin-dependent and -independent manner. However, due to the lack of investigative techniques that are able to record axonal conduction under conditions that control the proliferation of specific SC types, little is known about the extent to which myelinated SCs (mSCs) and unmyelinated SCs (umSCs) modulate axonal conduction. In this study, a microtunnel-electrode approach was applied to a neuron/SC co-culture technique. Rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and SCs were co-cultured in a microtunnel-electrode device, which enabled recording of the conduction delay in multiple axons passing through microtunnels. Despite the absence of nuclei in the microtunnel when SCs were eliminated, cultured cells were densely packed and expressed S100 beta (an SC marker) at a rate of 96% in neuron/SC co-culture, indicating that SCs migrated into the microtunnel. In addition, supplementation with ascorbic acid after 6 days in vitro (DIV) successfully induced myelination from 22 DIV. Activity recording experiments indicated that the conduction delay decreased with culture length from 17 DIV in the neuron/SC co-culture but not in neuron monoculture. Interestingly, the SC-modulated shortening of conduction delay was attenuated at 17 DIV and 22 DIV by supplementing the culture medium with ascorbic acid and, at the same time, suppressing SC proliferation, suggesting that immature umSCs increased axonal conduction velocity in a cell density-dependent manner before the onset of myelination. These results suggest that this method is an effective tool for investigating the contributions of mSCs or umSCs to the regulation of axonal conduction.

  17. Neuronal PTEN deletion in adult cortical neurons triggers progressive growth of cell bodies, dendrites, and axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallent, Erin A; Steward, Oswald

    2018-05-01

    Deletion of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene in neonatal mice leads to enlargement of the cell bodies of cortical motoneurons (CMNs) in adulthood (Gutilla et al., 2016). Here, we assessed whether PTEN deletion in adult mice would trigger growth of mature neurons. PTEN was deleted by injecting AAV-Cre into the sensorimotor cortex of adult transgenic mice with a lox-P flanked exon 5 of the PTEN gene and Cre-dependent reporter gene tdTomato. PTEN-deleted CMN's identified by tdT expression and retrograde labeling with fluorogold (FG) were significantly enlarged four months following PTEN deletion, and continued to increase in size through the latest time intervals examined (12-15 months post-deletion). Sholl analyses of tdT-positive pyramidal neurons revealed increases in dendritic branches at 6 months following adult PTEN deletion, and greater increases at 12 months. 12 months after adult PTEN deletion, axons in the medullary pyramids were significantly larger and G-ratios were higher. Mice with PTEN deletion exhibited no overt neurological symptoms and no seizures. Assessment of motor function on the rotarod and cylinder test revealed slight impairment of coordination with unilateral deletion; however, mice with bilateral PTEN deletion in the motor cortex performed better than controls on the rotarod at 8 and 10 months post-deletion. Our findings demonstrate that robust neuronal growth can be induced in fully mature cortical neurons long after the developmental period has ended and that this continuous growth occurs without obvious functional impairments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Myelin-specific T cells induce interleukin-1beta expression in lesion-reactive microglial-like cells in zones of axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grebing, Manuela; Nielsen, Helle H; Fenger, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    -reactive microglia. To gain mechanistic insight, we used RNA microarray analysis to compare the transcript profile in hippocampi from perforant pathway axonal-lesioned mice with and without adoptively transferred myelin-specific T cells 2 days postlesion, when microglia are clearly lesion reactive. Pathway analysis...

  19. Silencing the Majority of Cerebellar Granule Cells Uncovers Their Essential Role in Motor Learning and Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Galliano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar granule cells (GCs account for more than half of all neurons in the CNS of vertebrates. Theoretical work has suggested that the abundance of GCs is advantageous for sparse coding during memory formation. Here, we minimized the output of the majority of GCs by selectively eliminating their CaV2.1 (P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, which mediate the bulk of their neurotransmitter release. This resulted in reduced GC output to Purkinje cells (PCs and stellate cells (SCs as well as in impaired long-term plasticity at GC-PC synapses. As a consequence modulation amplitude and regularity of simple spike (SS output were affected. Surprisingly, the overall motor performance was intact, whereas demanding motor learning and memory consolidation tasks were compromised. Our findings indicate that a minority of functionally intact GCs is sufficient for the maintenance of basic motor performance, whereas acquisition and stabilization of sophisticated memories require higher numbers of normal GCs controlling PC firing.

  20. Restricted distribution of mrg-1 mRNA in C. elegans primordial germ cells through germ granule-independent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Takashi; Takasaki, Teruaki; Inoue, Kunio; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The chromodomain protein MRG-1 is an essential maternal factor for proper germline development that protects germ cells from cell death in C. elegans. Unlike germ granules, which are exclusively segregated to the germline blastomeres at each cell division from the first cleavage of the embryo, MRG-1 is abundant in all cells in early embryos and is then gradually restricted to the primordial germ cells (PGCs) by the morphogenesis stage. Here, we show that this characteristic spatiotemporal expression pattern is dictated by the mrg-1 3'UTR and is differentially regulated at the RNA level between germline and somatic cells. Asymmetric segregation of germ granules is not necessary to localize MRG-1 to the PGCs. We found that MES-4, an essential chromatin regulator in germ cells, also accumulates in the PGCs in a germ granule-independent manner. We propose that C.elegans PGCs have a novel mechanism to accumulate at least some chromatin-associated proteins that are essential for germline immortality. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Initiation and spread of action potentials in granule cells maintained in vitro in slices of guinea-pig hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, J G

    1979-04-01

    1. Laminar field potentials due to the synchronous activation of granule cells were studied in slices of guinea-pig hippocampus maintained in vitro. 2. Extracellular recordings confirmed that stimulation of afferent laminae in the molecular layer caused excitatory synaptic current to enter the granule cell dendrites. If large enough this current initiated action potentials at, or near to, the somata 100--200 micrometers away. 3. After a population spike had been initiated via excitatory synapses or via antidromic invasion, the lcoation of inward membrane current (sink) appeared to move from the cell body layer into the dendrites at a velocity of 0.08-0.12 m/sec, for a distance of up to 250 micrometers. 4. The sink movement into the dendrites was blocked by tetrodotoxin and not by agents that blocked synaptic activation. Together with other observations these results led to the conclusion that granule cell dendrites were invaded by action potentials from the cell body region. There was no evidence of dendritic action potentials from the cell body region. There was no evidence of dendritic action potentials preceding the cell body spike initiated by synaptic inputs. Possible functions of this dendritic invasion are discussed.

  2. Erythropoietin Protects Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Microgliosis and Abnormal Granule Cell Development in the Ovine Fetal Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie R. A. McDougall

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO ameliorates inflammation-induced injury in cerebral white matter (WM. However, effects of inflammation on the cerebellum and neuroprotective effects of EPO are unknown. Our aims were to determine: (i whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced intrauterine inflammation causes injury to, and/or impairs development of the cerebellum; and (ii whether recombinant human EPO (rhEPO mitigates these changes. At 107 ± 1 days gestational age (DGA; ~0.7 of term, fetal sheep received LPS (~0.9 μg/kg; i.v. or an equivalent volume of saline, followed 1 h later with 5000 IU/kg rhEPO (i.v. or an equivalent volume of saline (i.v.. This generated the following experimental groups: control (saline + saline; n = 6, LPS (LPS + saline, n = 8 and LPS + rhEPO (n = 8. At necropsy (116 ± 1 DGA; ~0.8 of term the brain was perfusion-fixed and stained histologically (H&E and immunostained to identify granule cells (Neuronal Nuclei, NeuN, granule cell proliferation (Ki67, Bergmann glia (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, astrogliosis (GFAP and microgliosis (Iba-1. In comparison to controls, LPS fetuses had an increased density of Iba-1-positive microglia (p < 0.005 in the lobular WM; rhEPO prevented this increase (p < 0.05. The thickness of both the proliferative (Ki67-positive and post-mitotic zones (Ki67-negative of the EGL were increased in LPS-exposed fetuses compared to controls (p < 0.05, but were not different between controls and LPS + rhEPO fetuses. LPS also increased (p < 0.001 the density of granule cells (NeuN-positive in the internal granule layer (IGL; rhEPO prevented the increase (p < 0.01. There was no difference between groups in the areas of the vermis (total cross-section, molecular layer (ML, IGL or WM, the density of NeuN-positive granule cells in the ML, the linear density of Bergmann glial fibers, the areal density or somal area of the Purkinje cells, the areal coverage of GFAP-positive astrocytes in the lobular and deep WM, the

  3. Decreased intracellular granule movement and glucagon secretion in pancreatic α cells attached to superior cervical ganglion neurites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Kiyoto; Yokawa, Satoru; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takahiro; Furuno, Tadahide

    2018-01-09

    Autonomic neurons innervate pancreatic islets of Langerhans and participate in the maintenance of blood glucose concentrations by controlling hormone levels through attachment with islet cells. We previously found that stimulated superior cervical ganglia (SCG) could induce Ca 2+ oscillation in α cells via neuropeptide substance P using an in vitro co-culture model. In this study, we studied the effect of SCG neurite adhesion on intracellular secretory granule movement and glucagon secretion in α cells stimulated by low glucose concentration. Spinning disk microscopic analysis revealed that the mean velocity of intracellular granules was significantly lower in α cells attached to SCG neurites than that in those without neurites under low (2 mM), middle (10 mM), and high (20 mM) glucose concentrations. Stimulation by a low (2 mM) glucose concentration significantly increased glucagon secretion in α cells lacking neurites but not in those bound to neurites. These results suggest that adhesion to SCG neurites decreases low glucose-induced glucagon secretion in pancreatic α cells by attenuating intracellular granule movement activity.

  4. Urethral Reconstruction Using Mesothelial Cell-Seeded Autogenous Granulation Tissue Tube: An Experimental Study in Male Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shiwei; Xu, Zhonghua; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Lei; Zhou, Zunlin; Gu, Gangli

    2017-01-01

    Objective . This study was to evaluate the utility of the compound graft for tubularized urethroplasty by seeding mesothelial cells onto autogenous granulation tissue. Methods . Silastic tubes were implanted subcutaneously in 18 male rabbits, of which nine underwent omentum biopsies simultaneously for in vitro expansion of mesothelial cells. The granulation tissue covering the tubes was harvested 2 weeks after operation. Mesothelial cells were seeded onto and cocultured with the tissue for 7 days. A pendulous urethral segment of 1.5 cm was totally excised. Urethroplasty was performed with mesothelial cell-seeded tissue tubes in an end-to-end fashion in nine rabbits and with unseeded grafts in others as controls. Serial urethrograms were performed at 1, 2, and 6 months postoperatively. Meanwhile, the neourethra was harvested and analyzed grossly and histologically. Results . Urethrograms showed cell-seeded grafts maintained wide at each time point, while strictures formation was found in unseeded grafts. Histologically, layers of urothelium surrounded by increasingly organized smooth muscles were observed in seeded grafts. In contrast, myofibroblasts accumulation and extensive scarring occurred in unseeded grafts. Conclusions . Mesothelial cell-seeded granulation tissue tube can be successfully used for tubularized urethroplasty in male rabbits.

  5. Characterization of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins expressed by cells cultured from human arachnoid granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Bhavya C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are projections of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses. They function, along with the extracranial lymphatics, to circulate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF to the systemic venous circulation. Disruption of normal CSF dynamics may result in increased intracranial pressures causing many problems including headaches and visual loss, as in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus. To study the role of AGs in CSF egress, we have grown cells from human AG tissue in vitro and have characterized their expression of those cytoskeletal and junctional proteins that may function in the regulation of CSF outflow. Methods Human AG tissue was obtained at autopsy, and explanted to cell culture dishes coated with fibronectin. Typically, cells migrated from the explanted tissue after 7–10 days in vitro. Second or third passage cells were seeded onto fibronectin-coated coverslips at confluent densities and grown to confluency for 7–10 days. Arachnoidal cells were tested using immunocytochemical methods for the expression of several common cytoskeletal and junctional proteins. Second and third passage cultures were also labeled with the common endothelial markers CD-31 or VE-cadherin (CD144 and their expression was quantified using flow cytometry analysis. Results Confluent cultures of arachnoidal cells expressed the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Cytokeratin intermediate filaments were expressed variably in a subpopulation of cells. The cultures also expressed the junctional proteins connexin43, desmoplakin 1 and 2, E-cadherin, and zonula occludens-1. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that second and third passage cultures failed to express the endothelial cell markers CD31 or VE-cadherin in significant quantities, thereby showing that these cultures did not consist of endothelial cells from the venous sinus wall. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of

  6. Transient degradation of NF-κB proteins in macrophages after interaction with mast cell granules

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    Noriko Ito

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of the macrophage cell line, J774 to mast cell granules (MCG led to the form ation of altered nuclear transcription factor proteins (NFκBx, which had faster electrophoretic mobility than the p50 homodimer of NF-κB, but retained comparable DNA binding capacity. Antibodies to N-terminal peptides of p50, p52, p65 or c-Rel supershifted only a fraction of NF-κBx. Western blot analyses revealed that nuclear p65 and c-Rel were progressively degraded after exposure to MCG, whereas nuclear p50 appeared to be unaffected. In contrast, cytoplasmic p50, p65, c-Rel as well as IkBα remained intact after MCG treatment, although p52 was clearly degraded. In comparison to J774 cells, incubation of m ouse peritoneal macrophages with MCG resulted in more extensive alterations to NF-κB proteins. The alterations in NF-κB proteins did not affect the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or TNF-α mRNA in J774 cells. These data indicate that exposure of J774 cells to MCG leads to generation of altered nuclear p52, p65 and c-Rel, which retain intact N-terminal peptides, specific oligonucleotide binding and transactivating activity. On the other hand, in peritoneal macrophages, MCG induce more extensive modifications to NF-κB proteins with associated inhibition of iNOS or TNF-α mRNA expression.

  7. mRNP assembly, axonal transport, and local translation in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Bilal; Morderer, Dmytro; Price, Phillip L; Liu, Feilin; Rossoll, Wilfried

    2018-02-17

    The development, maturation, and maintenance of the mammalian nervous system rely on complex spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression. In neurons, this is achieved by the expression of differentially localized isoforms and specific sets of mRNA-binding proteins (mRBPs) that regulate RNA processing, mRNA trafficking, and local protein synthesis at remote sites within dendrites and axons. There is growing evidence that axons contain a specialized transcriptome and are endowed with the machinery that allows them to rapidly alter their local proteome via local translation and protein degradation. This enables axons to quickly respond to changes in their environment during development, and to facilitate axon regeneration and maintenance in adult organisms. Aside from providing autonomy to neuronal processes, local translation allows axons to send retrograde injury signals to the cell soma. In this review, we discuss evidence that disturbances in mRNP transport, granule assembly, axonal localization, and local translation contribute to pathology in various neurodegenerative diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Migration and distribution of two populations of hippocampal granule cell precursors during the perinatal and postnatal periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, J.; Bayer, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Methacrylate-embedded sections and short-survival thymidine radiograms of the hippocampal dentate gyrus were examined in perinatal and postnatal rats in order to trace the site of origin and migration of the precursors of granule cells and study the morphogenesis of the granular layer. The densely packed, spindle-shaped cells of the secondary dentate matrix (a derivative of the primary dentate neuroepithelium) stream in a subpial position towards the granular layer of the internal dentate limb during the perinatal and early postnatal periods. By an accretionary process, the crest of the granular layer forms on day E21 and on the subsequent days the granular layer of the internal dentate limb expands progressively in a lateral direction. Granule cells differentiation, as judged by the transformation of polymorph, darkly staining small cells into rounder, lightly staining larger granule cells, follows the same gradient from the external dentate limb to the internal dentate limb. The secondary dentate matrix is in a process of dissolution by day P5. This matrix is the source of what will later become the outer shell of the granular layer composed of early generated granule cells. The thicker inner shell of the granular layer, formed during the infantile and juvenile periods, derives from an intrinsic, tertiary germinal matrix. On day E22, the dentate migration of the secondary dentate matrix becomes partitioned into two components: (a) the subpial component of extradentate origin, referred to in this context as the first dentate migration, and (b) the second dentate migration. The latter is distributed in the basal polymorph layer throughout the entire dentate gyrus and is henceforth recognized as the tertiary dentate matrix. The tertiary dentate matrix is prominent between days P3 and P10

  9. Posttraining ablation of adult-generated olfactory granule cells degrades odor-reward memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda-Carvalho, Maithe; Akers, Katherine G; Guskjolen, Axel; Sakaguchi, Masanori; Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2014-11-19

    Proliferation of neural progenitor cells in the subventricular zone leads to the continuous generation of new olfactory granule cells (OGCs) throughout life. These cells synaptically integrate into olfactory bulb circuits after ∼2 weeks and transiently exhibit heightened plasticity and responses to novel odors. Although these observations suggest that adult-generated OGCs play important roles in olfactory-related memories, global suppression of olfactory neurogenesis does not typically prevent the formation of odor-reward memories, perhaps because residual OGCs can compensate. Here, we used a transgenic strategy to selectively ablate large numbers of adult-generated OGCs either before or after learning in mice. Consistent with previous studies, pretraining ablation of adult-generated OGCs did not prevent the formation of an odor-reward memory, presumably because existing OGCs can support memory formation in their absence. However, ablation of a similar cohort of adult-generated OGCs after training impaired subsequent memory expression, indicating that if these cells are available at the time of training, they play an essential role in subsequent expression of odor-reward memories. Memory impairment was associated with the loss of adult-generated OGCs that were >10 d in age and did not depend on the developmental stage in which they were generated, suggesting that, once sufficiently mature, OGCs generated during juvenility and adulthood play similar roles in the expression of odor-reward memories. Finally, ablation of adult-generated OGCs 1 month after training did not produce amnesia, indicating that adult-generated OGCs play a time-limited role in the expression of odor-reward memories. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415793-11$15.00/0.

  10. Early events of secretory granule formation in the rat parotid acinar cell under the influence of isoproterenol. An ultrastructural and lectin cytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F D’Amico

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The events involved in the maturation process of acinar secretory granules of rat parotid gland were investigated ultrastructurally and cytochemically by using a battery of four lectins [Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I, Glycine max agglutinin (SBA, Arachys hypogaea agglutinin (PNA]. In order to facilitate the study, parotid glands were chronically stimulated with isoproterenol to induce secretion. Specimens were embedded in the Lowicryl K4M resin. The trans-Golgi network (TGN derived secretory granules, which we refer to as immature secretory granules, were found to be intermediate structures in the biogenesis process of the secretory granules in the rat parotid acinar cell. These early structures do not seem to be the immediate precursor of the mature secretory granules: in fact, a subsequent interaction process between these early immature granule forms and TGN elements seems to occur, leading, finally, to the mature granules. These findings could explain the origin of the polymorphic subpopulations of the secretory granules in the normal acinar cells of the rat parotid gland. The lectin staining patterns were characteristic of each lectin. Immature and mature secretory gran- ules were labelled with WGA, SBA, PNA, and lightly with UEA-I. Cis and intermediate cisternae of the Golgi apparatus were labelled with WGA, and trans cisternae with WGA and SBA.

  11. The axonal cytoskeleton : from organization to function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevenaar, Josta T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338771042; Hoogenraad, Casper C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/227263502

    The axon is the single long fiber that extends from the neuron and transmits electrical signals away from the cell body. The neuronal cytoskeleton, composed of microtubules (MTs), actin filaments and neurofilaments, is not only required for axon formation and axonal transport but also provides the

  12. Neurite outgrowth of murine cerebellar granule cells can be enhanced by aniracetam with or without alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, S; Matsumoto, K; Nagata, A

    1995-10-27

    To assess the neurotrophic effects of a nootropic drug, aniracetam, we studied neurite extension of mouse cerebellar granule cells in culture with low or with high K+ under different combinations of drugs and then immunohistochemically stained the cells with an antibody against L1, a neural cell adhesion molecule on cerebellar granule cells. Quantitative analyses using parameters of the total neurite length, maximal neurite length and number of branches disclosed that aniracetam, in the presence of high K+ and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA), significantly enhanced neurite extension of cultured granule neurons. Aniracetam alone also stimulated neurite extension of cerebellar granule cells at a longer period of culture with low K+ showing a bell-shaped dose response curve with maximal effects at 10 microM. Aniracetam may influence remodeling of the neural network after injury.

  13. Mathematical modeling and statistical analysis of calcium-regulated insulin granule exocytosis in ß-cells from mice and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Cortese, Giuliana; Eliasson, Lena

    2011-01-01

    on depolarization-evoked Ca2+-currents and corresponding capacitance measurements. Using a statistical mixed-effects model, we show that the data indicate that pool depletion is negligible in response to short depolarizations in mouse ß-cells. We then review mathematical models of granule dynamics and exocytosis...... in rodent ß-cells and present a mathematical description of Ca2+-evoked exocytosis in human ß-cells, which show clear differences to their rodent counterparts. The model suggests that L- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels are involved to a similar degree in exocytosis during electrical activity in human ß-cells....

  14. Phagocytosis of mast cell granules results in decreased macrophage superoxide production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby A. Shah

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism by which phagocytosed mast cell granules (MCGs inhibit macrophage superoxide production has not been defined. In this study, rat peritoneal macrophages were co-incubated with either isolated intact MCGs or MCG-sonicate, and their respiratory burst capacity and morphology were studied. Co-incubation of macrophages with either intact MCGs or MCG-sonicate resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of superoxide- mediated cytochrome c reduction. This inhibitory effect was evident within 5 min of incubation and with MCG-sonicate was completely reversed when macrophages were washed prior to activation with PMA. In the case of intact MCGs, the inhibitory effect was only partially reversed by washing after a prolonged co-incubation time. Electron microscopic analyses revealed that MCGs were rapidly phagocytosed by macrophages and were subsequently disintegrated within the phagolysosomes. Assay of MCGs for superoxide dismutase (SOD revealed the presence of significant activity of this enzyme. A comparison of normal macrophages and those containing phagocytosed MCGs did not reveal a significant difference in total SOD activity. It is speculated that, although there was no significant increase in total SOD activity in macrophages containing phagocytosed MCGs, the phagocytosed MCGs might cause a transient increase in SOD activity within the phagolysosomes. This transient rise in SOD results in scavenging of the newly generated superoxide. Alternatively, MCG inhibition of NADPH oxidase would explain the reported observations.

  15. Granule cell dispersion is associated with memory impairment in right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Rafael Scarpa da Costa; de Souza Silva Tudesco, Ivanda; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Lancellotti, Carmen; Ferrari-Marinho, Taíssa; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-11-01

    We analyzed the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with memory performance, clinical data and surgical outcome in a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Hippocampal specimens from 54 patients with MTLE (27 patients with right MTLE and 27 with left MTLE) and unilateral MTS, who were separated into GCD and no-GCD groups and thirteen controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed using hippocampal sections stained with NeuN. Patients' neuropsychological measures, clinical data, type of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 28 (51.9%) patients. No correlation between GCD and MTS pattern, clinical data or surgical outcome was found. The presence of GCD was correlated with worse visuospatial memory performance in right MTLE, but not with memory performance in left MTLE. GCD may be related to memory impairment in right MTLE-MTS patients. However, the role of GCD in memory function is not precisely defined. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor alpha maintains denervation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity of mouse dentate granule cells

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    Denise eBecker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons which lose part of their input respond with a compensatory increase in excitatory synaptic strength. This observation is of particular interest in the context of neurological diseases, which are accompanied by the loss of neurons and subsequent denervation of connected brain regions. However, while the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pharmacologically induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity have been identified to a certain degree, denervation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity remains not well understood. Here, we employed the entorhinal denervation in vitro model to study the role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα on changes in excitatory synaptic strength of mouse dentate granule cells following partial deafferentation. Our experiments disclose that TNFα is required for the maintenance of a compensatory increase in excitatory synaptic strength at 3/4 days postlesion (dpl, but not for the induction of synaptic scaling at 1 - 2 dpl. Furthermore, laser capture microdissection (LMD combined with quantitative PCR (qPCR demonstrates an increase in TNFα-mRNA levels in the denervated zone, which is consistent with our previous finding on a local, i.e., layer-specific increase in excitatory synaptic strength at 3 - 4 dpl. Immunostainings for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and TNFα suggest that astrocytes are a source of TNFα in our experimental setting. We conclude that TNFα-signaling is a major regulatory system that aims at maintaining the homeostatic synaptic response of denervated neurons.

  17. NG2 cells response to axonal alteration in the spinal cord white matter in mice with genetic disruption of neurofilament light subunit expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (NG2 expressing cells, morphologically characterized by multi-branched processes and small cell bodies, are the 4th commonest cell population of non-neuronal cell type in the central nervous system (CNS. They can interact with nodes of Ranvier, receive synaptic input, generate action potential and respond to some pathological stimuli, but the function of the cells is still unclear. We assumed the NG2 cells may play an active role in neuropathogenesis and aimed to determine if NG2 cells could sense and response to the alterations in the axonal contents caused by disruption of neurofilament light subunit (NFL expression. Results In the early neuropathological development stage, our study showed that the diameter of axons of upper motor neurons of NFL-/- mice decreased significantly while the thickness of their myelin sheath increased remarkably. Although there was an obvious morphological distortion in axons with occasionally partial demyelination, no obvious changes in expression of myelin proteins was detected. Parallel to these changes in the axons and their myelination, the processes of NG2 cells were disconnected from the nodes of Ranvier and extended further, suggesting that these cells in the spinal cord white matter could sense the alteration in axonal contents caused by disruption of NFL expression before astrocytic and microglial activation. Conclusion The structural configuration determined by the NFL gene may be important for maintenance of normal morphology of myelinated axons. The NG2 cells might serve as an early sensor for the delivery of information from impaired neurons to the local environment.

  18. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Jiao

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  19. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jianwei; Nakajima, Akira; Janssen, William G M; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Xiong, Xiaoli; Morrison, John H; Brorson, James R; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2008-02-27

    It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI) plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s) that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  20. Sensorimotor Representations in Cerebellar Granule Cells in Larval Zebrafish Are Dense, Spatially Organized, and Non-temporally Patterned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knogler, Laura D; Markov, Daniil A; Dragomir, Elena I; Štih, Vilim; Portugues, Ruben

    2017-05-08

    A fundamental question in neurobiology is how animals integrate external sensory information from their environment with self-generated motor and sensory signals in order to guide motor behavior and adaptation. The cerebellum is a vertebrate hindbrain region where all of these signals converge and that has been implicated in the acquisition, coordination, and calibration of motor activity. Theories of cerebellar function postulate that granule cells encode a variety of sensorimotor signals in the cerebellar input layer. These models suggest that representations should be high-dimensional, sparse, and temporally patterned. However, in vivo physiological recordings addressing these points have been limited and in particular have been unable to measure the spatiotemporal dynamics of population-wide activity. In this study, we use both calcium imaging and electrophysiology in the awake larval zebrafish to investigate how cerebellar granule cells encode three types of sensory stimuli as well as stimulus-evoked motor behaviors. We find that a large fraction of all granule cells are active in response to these stimuli, such that representations are not sparse at the population level. We find instead that most responses belong to only one of a small number of distinct activity profiles, which are temporally homogeneous and anatomically clustered. We furthermore identify granule cells that are active during swimming behaviors and others that are multimodal for sensory and motor variables. When we pharmacologically change the threshold of a stimulus-evoked behavior, we observe correlated changes in these representations. Finally, electrophysiological data show no evidence for temporal patterning in the coding of different stimulus durations. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Jianwei Jiao; Akira Nakajima; William G M Janssen; Vytautas P Bindokas; Xiaoli Xiong; John H Morrison; James R Brorson; Ya-Ping Tang

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI) plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-spec...

  2. Transplantation of Glial Cells Enhances Action Potential Conduction of Amyelinated Spinal Cord Axons in the Myelin-Deficient Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzschneider, David A.; Archer, David R.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Duncan, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    A central issue in transplantation research is to determine how and when transplantation of neural tissue can influence the development and function of the mammalian central nervous system. Of particular interest is whether electrophysiological function in the traumatized or diseased mammalian central nervous system can be improved by the replacement of cellular elements that are missing or damaged. Although it is known that transplantation of neural tissue can lead to functional improvement in models of neurological disease characterized by neuronal loss, less is known about results of transplantation in disorders of myelin. We report here that transplantation of glial cells into the dorsal columns of neonatal myelin-deficient rat spinal cords leads to myelination and a 3-fold increase in conduction velocity. We also show that impulses can propagate into and out of the transplant region and that axons myelinated by transplanted cells do not have impaired frequency-response properties. These results demonstrate that myelination following central nervous system glial cell transplantation enhances action potential conduction in myelin-deficient axons, with conduction velocity approaching normal values.

  3. Monopolar cell axons in the first optic neuropil of the housefly, Musca domestica L., undergo daily fluctuations in diameter that have a circadian basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyza, E; Meinertzhagen, I A

    1995-01-01

    Two types of monopolar cell interneurons, each with a single representative in every unit cartridge of the first optic neuropil, or lamina, of the housefly's optic lobe, have axons that undergo cyclical changes in diameter. The axons are largest during the beginning of day in a normal LD light cycle and smallest during the middle of the night, changes that were however significant only for one of the cells (L2). The axon cross-sectional area and its cyclical change for both L1 and L2 were both larger in the proximal lamina. The changes are not a simple consequence of relative osmotic change. Dehydration paradoxically increases axon size, and also fails to alter the day/night rhythm of axon size changes. Under conditions of constant darkness, both axons decrease in size, and one of the cells (L2) retains its cyclical size changes, being larger in the subjective day than in the subjective night. Under conditions of constant light, both axons increase in size, and L2 again shows a cyclical size change, just as under conditions of constant darkness. These changes seen under constant conditions are, by definition, circadian in origin. The effects of exposure to light or darkness can partially reset these circadian changes. One extra hour of light during the day increases the size of L1 and L2, whereas 1 hr of extra dark during the night does not decrease their size. It takes 13 hr of light to reverse the rhythm in size. The mechanism for all these changes is unclear but may involve ionic fluxes, possibly that are secondary to osmotic shifts and probably that involve at least two independent processes.

  4. Improved Light Conversion Efficiency Of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell By Dispersing Submicron-Sized Granules Into The Nano-Sized TiO2 Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song S.A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, TiO2 nanoparticles and submicron-sized granules were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and spray pyrolysis, respectively. Submicron-sized granules were dispersed into the nano-sized TiO2 layer to improve the light conversion efficiency. Granules showed better light scattering, but lower in terms of the dye-loading quantity and recombination resistance compared with nanoparticles. Consequently, the nano-sized TiO2 layer had higher cell efficiency than the granulized TiO2 layer. When dispersed granules into the nanoparticle layer, the light scattering was enhanced without the loss of dye-loading quantities. The dispersion of granulized TiO2 led to increase the cell efficiency up to 6.51%, which was about 5.2 % higher than that of the electrode consisting of only TiO2 nanoparticles. Finally, the optimal hydrothermal temperature and dispersing quantity of granules were found to be 200°C and 20 wt%, respectively.

  5. ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels simultaneously activated in nerve cell and axon after facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Tao; Sun, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Hua-Wei; Ma, Jun-Tao; Hu, Min

    2017-12-01

    The in-vitro study indicated that ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels may play an important role in reparative regeneration process after peripheral nerve injury. But, relevant in-vivo study was infrequent. In particular, there has been no report on simultaneous activation of ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels in facial nerve cell and axon after facial nerve injury. The expression of P-ERK enhanced in nerve cells at the injury side on the 1 d after the rat facial nerve was cut and kept on a higher level until 14 d, but decreased on 28 d. The expression of P-AKT enhanced in nerve cells at the injury side on 1 d after injury, and kept on a higher level until 28 d. The expression of P-ERK enhanced at the near and far sections of the injured axon on 1 d, then increased gradually and reached the maximum on 7 d, but decreased on 14 d, until down to the level before the injury on 28 d. The expression of P-AKT obviously enhanced in the injured axon on 1 d, especially in the axon of the rear section, but decreased in the axon of the rear section on 7 d, while the expression of axon in the far section increased to the maximum and kept on till 14 d. On 28 d, the expression of P-AKT decreased in both rear and far sections of the axon. The facial nerve simultaneously activated ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels in facial nerve cells and axons after the cut injury, but the expression levels of P-ERK and P-AKT varied as the function of the time. In particular, they were quite different in axon of the far section. It has been speculated that two signal channels might have different functions after nerve injury. However, their specific regulating effects should still be testified by further studies in regenerative process of peripheral nerve injury.

  6. The Fat-like cadherin CDH-4 controls axon fasciculation, cell migration and hypodermis and pharynx development in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Caroline; Wacker, Irene; Hutter, Harald

    2008-04-15

    Cadherins are one of the major families of adhesion molecules with diverse functions during embryonic development. Fat-like cadherins form an evolutionarily conserved subgroup characterized by an unusually large number of cadherin repeats in the extracellular domain. Here we describe the role of the Fat-like cadherin CDH-4 in Caenorhabditis elegans development. Cdh-4 mutants are characterized by hypodermal defects leading to incompletely penetrant embryonic or larval lethality with variable morphogenetic defects. Independently of the morphogenetic defects cdh-4 mutant animals also exhibit fasciculation defects in the ventral and dorsal cord, the major longitudinal axon tracts, as well as migration defects of the Q neuroblasts. In addition CDH-4 is essential for establishing and maintaining the attachment between the buccal cavity and the pharynx. Cdh-4 is expressed widely in most affected cells and tissues during embryogenesis suggesting that CDH-4 functions to ensure that proper cell contacts are made and maintained during development.

  7. Differential gene expression in dentate granule cells in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Nicole G; Wang, Yu; Hulette, Christine M; Halvorsen, Matt; Cronin, Kenneth D; Walley, Nicole M; Haglund, Michael M; Radtke, Rodney A; Skene, J H Pate; Sinha, Saurabh R; Heinzen, Erin L

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common neuropathologic finding in cases of medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis to show that next-generation sequencing methods can produce interpretable genomic data from RNA collected from small homogenous cell populations, and to shed light on the transcriptional changes associated with hippocampal sclerosis. RNA was extracted, and complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared and amplified from dentate granule cells that had been harvested by laser capture microdissection from surgically resected hippocampi from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Sequencing libraries were sequenced, and the resulting sequencing reads were aligned to the reference genome. Differential expression analysis was used to ascertain expression differences between patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Greater than 90% of the RNA-Seq reads aligned to the reference. There was high concordance between transcriptional profiles obtained for duplicate samples. Principal component analysis revealed that the presence or absence of hippocampal sclerosis was the main determinant of the variance within the data. Among the genes up-regulated in the hippocampal sclerosis samples, there was significant enrichment for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells from surgically resected hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis, we have demonstrated the utility of next-generation sequencing methods for producing biologically relevant results from small populations of homogeneous cells, and have provided insight on the transcriptional changes associated with this pathology. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus Membrane Proteins gE/gI and US9 Act Cooperatively To Promote Transport of Capsids and Glycoproteins from Neuron Cell Bodies into Initial Axon Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Paul W.; Howard, Tiffani L.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other alphaherpesviruses must move from sites of latency in ganglia to peripheral epithelial cells. How HSV navigates in neuronal axons is not well understood. Two HSV membrane proteins, gE/gI and US9, are key to understanding the processes by which viral glycoproteins, unenveloped capsids, and enveloped virions are transported toward axon tips. Whether gE/gI and US9 function to promote the loading of viral proteins onto microtubule motors in neuron cell bodies or to tether viral proteins onto microtubule motors within axons is not clear. One impediment to understanding how HSV gE/gI and US9 function in axonal transport relates to observations that gE−, gI−, or US9− mutants are not absolutely blocked in axonal transport. Mutants are significantly reduced in numbers of capsids and glycoproteins in distal axons, but there are less extensive effects in proximal axons. We constructed HSV recombinants lacking both gE and US9 that transported no detectable capsids and glycoproteins to distal axons and failed to spread from axon tips to adjacent cells. Live-cell imaging of a gE−/US9− double mutant that expressed fluorescent capsids and gB demonstrated >90% diminished capsids and gB in medial axons and no evidence for decreased rates of transport, stalling, or increased retrograde transport. Instead, capsids, gB, and enveloped virions failed to enter proximal axons. We concluded that gE/gI and US9 function in neuron cell bodies, in a cooperative fashion, to promote the loading of HSV capsids and vesicles containing glycoproteins and enveloped virions onto microtubule motors or their transport into proximal axons. PMID:23077321

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-09-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  10. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25374587

  11. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crepel, F.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Dupont, J.L.; Sotelo, C.

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields. (author)

  12. Immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and functional analysis of axonal regeneration through peripheral nerve grafts containing Schwann cells expressing BDNF, CNTF or NT3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Godinho

    Full Text Available We used morphological, immunohistochemical and functional assessments to determine the impact of genetically-modified peripheral nerve (PN grafts on axonal regeneration after injury. Grafts were assembled from acellular nerve sheaths repopulated ex vivo with Schwann cells (SCs modified to express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a secretable form of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, or neurotrophin-3 (NT3. Grafts were used to repair unilateral 1 cm defects in rat peroneal nerves and 10 weeks later outcomes were compared to normal nerves and various controls: autografts, acellular grafts and grafts with unmodified SCs. The number of regenerated βIII-Tubulin positive axons was similar in all grafts with the exception of CNTF, which contained the fewest immunostained axons. There were significantly lower fiber counts in acellular, untransduced SC and NT3 groups using a PanNF antibody, suggesting a paucity of large caliber axons. In addition, NT3 grafts contained the greatest number of sensory fibres, identified with either IB4 or CGRP markers. Examination of semi- and ultra-thin sections revealed heterogeneous graft morphologies, particularly in BDNF and NT3 grafts in which the fascicular organization was pronounced. Unmyelinated axons were loosely organized in numerous Remak bundles in NT3 grafts, while the BDNF graft group displayed the lowest ratio of umyelinated to myelinated axons. Gait analysis revealed that stance width was increased in rats with CNTF and NT3 grafts, and step length involving the injured left hindlimb was significantly greater in NT3 grafted rats, suggesting enhanced sensory sensitivity in these animals. In summary, the selective expression of BDNF, CNTF or NT3 by genetically modified SCs had differential effects on PN graft morphology, the number and type of regenerating axons, myelination, and locomotor function.

  13. Toxoplasma exports dense granule proteins beyond the vacuole to the host cell nucleus and rewires the host genome expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Tardieux, Isabelle; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most widespread apicomplexan parasite and occupies a large spectrum of niches by infecting virtually any warm-blooded animals. As an obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma has evolved a repertoire of strategies to fine-tune the cellular environment in an optimal way to promote growth and persistence in host tissues hence increasing the chance to be transmitted to new hosts. Short and long-term intracellular survival is associated with Toxoplasma ability to both evade the host deleterious immune defences and to stimulate a beneficial immune balance by governing host cell gene expression. It is only recently that parasite proteins responsible for driving these transcriptional changes have been identified. While proteins contained in the apical secretory Rhoptry organelle have already been identified as bona fide secreted effectors that divert host signalling pathways, recent findings revealed that dense granule proteins should be added to the growing list of effectors as they reach the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus and target various host cell pathways in the course of cell infection. Herein, we emphasize on a novel subfamily of dense granule residentproteins, exemplified with the GRA16 and GRA24 members we recently discovered as both are exported beyond the vacuole-containing parasites and reach the host cell nucleus to reshape the host genome expression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The granule cell density of the dentate gyrus following administration of Urtica dioica extract to young diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, S A; Gharravi, A M; Ghafari, S; Jahanshahi, M; Golalipour, M J

    2008-08-01

    Urtica dioica L. Stinging nettle has long been known worldwide as a medicinal plant. To study the benefits of the nettle in diabetic encephalopathy, the granule cell density of the dentate gyrus of diabetic rats was studied following administration of Urtica dioica extract. A total of 24 male albino Wistar rats were allocated equally to normal, diabetic, preventive and treatment groups. Hyperglycaemia was induced by streptozotocin (80 mg/kg) in the animals of the diabetic and treatment groups. One week after injection of the streptozotocin the animals in the treatment group received a hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica (100 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks intraperitoneally. The rats of the preventive group received hydroalcoholic extract of U. dioica (100 mg/kg/day) IP for the first 5 days and an injection of streptozotocin (80 mg/kg) on the 6th day. After 5 weeks of study all the rats were sacrificed and coronal sections were taken from the dorsal hippocampal formation of the right cerebral hemispheres and stained with cresyl violet. The area densities of the granule cells were measured and compared in the four groups. The density was lower in the diabetic rats compared with the controls (p > 0.05). The preventive group showed lower cell density than the controls (p > 0.05). The densities in the treated rats were higher than in the diabetic rats (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the control and treated rats showed similar densities (p > 0.05). It seems that U. dioica extract can help compensate for granule cell loss in the diabetic rat dentate gyrus, which can ameliorate cognitive impairment in diabetes. However, preventive use of the extract showed no significant benefit.

  15. Cytosolic calcium elevation induced by orexin/hypocretin in granule cell domain cells of the rat cochlear nucleus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Miura, Shinya; Yoshida, Takashi; Kim, Juhyon; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2010-08-01

    Using rat brain slice preparations, we examined the effect of orexin on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) in the granule cell domain (GCD) cells of the cochlear nucleus that carry non-auditory information to the dorsal cochlear nucleus. Application of orexin concentration-dependently increased [Ca(2+)](i), and in two thirds of GCD cells these increases persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin. There was no significant difference between the dose-response curve for orexin-A and that for orexin-B. Extracellular Ca(2+) removal abolished the [Ca(2+)](i) elevation induced by orexin-B, whereas depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores had no effect. The orexin-B-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) was not blocked by inhibitors of reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and nonselective cation channel, whereas it was blocked by lowering the extracellular Na(+) or by applying inhibitors of forward-mode NCX and voltage-gated R- and T-type Ca(2+) channels. The ORX-B-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was also blocked by inhibitors of adenylcyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA), but not by inhibitors of phosphatidylcholine-specific and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. In electrophysiological experiments using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, half of GCD cells were depolarized by orexin-B, and the depolarization was abolished by a forward-mode NCX inhibitor. These results suggest that orexin increases [Ca(2+)](i) postsynaptically via orexin 2 receptors, and the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) is induced via the AC-PKA-forward-mode NCX-membrane depolarization-mediated activation of voltage-gated R- and T-type Ca(2+) channels. The results further support the hypothesis that the orexin system participates in integrating neural systems that are involved in arousal, sensory processing, energy homeostasis and autonomic function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effervescent Granules Prepared Using Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. and Moso Bamboo Leaves: Hypoglycemic Activity in HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Zhou Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. (E. ulmoides Oliv. and moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens leaves are used as folk medicines in central-western China to treat diabetes. To investigate the hypoglycemic activity of the effervescent granules prepared using E. ulmoides Oliv. and moso bamboo leaves (EBEG in HepG2 cells, EBEG were prepared with 5% of each of polysaccharides and chlorogenic acids from moso bamboo and E. ulmoides Oliv. leaves, respectively. HepG2 cells cultured in a high-glucose medium were classified into different groups. The results displayed EBEG-treated cells showed better glucose utilization than the negative controls; thus, the hypoglycemic effect of EBEG was much greater than that of granules prepared using either component alone, thereby indicating that this effect was due to a synergistic action of the components. Further, glucose consumption levels in the cells treated with EBEG (156.35% at 200 μg/mL and the positive controls (metformin, 162.29%; insulin, 161.52% were similar. Thus, EBEG exhibited good potential for use as a natural antidiabetic agent. The hypoglycemic effect of EBEG could be due to the synergistic action of polysaccharides from the moso bamboo leaves and chlorogenic acids from E. ulmoides Oliv. leaves via the inhibition of alpha-glucosidase and glucose-6-phosphate displacement enzyme.

  17. Endothelin-1 stimulates the release of preloaded [3H]D-aspartate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.W.; Lee, C.Y.; Chuang, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    We have recently reported that endothelin-1 (ET) induces phosphoinositide hydrolysis in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. Here we found that ET in a dose-dependent manner (1-30 nM) stimulated the release of preloaded [ 3 H]D-aspartate from granule cells. The ET-induced aspartate release was completely blocked in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ , but was unaffected by 1 mM Co 2+ or 1 microM dihydropyridine derivatives (nisoldipine and nimodipine). At higher concentration (10 microM) of nisoldipine and nimodipine, the release was partially inhibited. Short-term pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) potentiated the ET-induced aspartate release, while long-term pretreatment with PDBu attenuated the release. Long-term exposure of cells to pertussis toxin (PTX), on the other hand, potentiated the ET-induced effects. Our results suggest that ET has a neuromodulatory function in the central nervous system

  18. Endothelin-1 stimulates the release of preloaded ( sup 3 H)D-aspartate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.W.; Lee, C.Y.; Chuang, D.M. (NIMH Neuroscience Center, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-03-16

    We have recently reported that endothelin-1 (ET) induces phosphoinositide hydrolysis in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. Here we found that ET in a dose-dependent manner (1-30 nM) stimulated the release of preloaded ({sup 3}H)D-aspartate from granule cells. The ET-induced aspartate release was completely blocked in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}, but was unaffected by 1 mM Co{sup 2+} or 1 microM dihydropyridine derivatives (nisoldipine and nimodipine). At higher concentration (10 microM) of nisoldipine and nimodipine, the release was partially inhibited. Short-term pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) potentiated the ET-induced aspartate release, while long-term pretreatment with PDBu attenuated the release. Long-term exposure of cells to pertussis toxin (PTX), on the other hand, potentiated the ET-induced effects. Our results suggest that ET has a neuromodulatory function in the central nervous system.

  19. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreiem, Anne; Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  20. The distribution of chandelier cell axon terminals that express the GABA plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 in the human neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, M C; Defelipe, J; Muñoz, A

    2007-09-01

    Chandelier cells represent a unique type of cortical GABAergic interneuron whose axon terminals (Ch-terminals) form synapses exclusively with the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells. In this study, we have used immunocytochemistry for the high-affinity plasma membrane transporter-1 (GAT-1) to analyze the distribution and density of Ch-terminals in various cytoarchitectonic and functional areas of the human neocortex. The lowest density of GAT-1-immuoreactive (-ir) Ch-terminals was detected in the primary and secondary visual (areas 17 and 18) and in the somatosensory areas (areas 3b and 1). In contrast, an intermediate density was observed in the motor area 4 and the associative frontolateral areas 45 and 46, whereas the associative frontolateral areas 9 and 10, frontal orbitary areas 11, 12, 13, 14, and 47, associative temporal areas 20, 21, 22, and 38, and cingulate areas 24 and 32 displayed the highest density of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals. Despite these differences, the laminar distribution of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals was similar in most cortical areas. Hence, the highest density of this transporter was observed in layer II, followed by layers III, V, VI, and IV. In most cortical areas, the density of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals was positively correlated with the neuronal density, although a negative correlation was detected in layer III across all cortical areas. These results indicate that there are substantial differences in the distribution and density of GAT-1-ir Ch-terminals between areas and layers of the human neocortex. These differences might be related to the different functional attributes of the cortical regions examined.

  1. Comparative evaluation of different calcium phosphate-based bone graft granules - an in vitro study with osteoblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Peters, Fabian; Gelinsky, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Granule-shaped calcium phosphate-based bone graft materials are often required for bone regeneration especially in implant dentistry. Two newly developed bone graft materials are Ceracell(®) , an open-celled highly porous bioceramic from β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) under addition of bioglass and Osseolive(®) , an open porous glass ceramic with the general formula Ca2 KNa(PO4 )2 . The goal of this study was to characterize different modifications of the two bone graft materials in vitro in comparison to already established ceramic bone grafts Cerasorb M(®) , NanoBone(®) and BONIT Matrix(®) . Adhesion and proliferation of SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells were evaluated quantitatively by determining DNA content and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and qualitatively by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, MTT cell-vitality staining was applied to confirm the attachment of viable cells to the different materials. Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as gene expression analysis of osteogenic markers using reverse transcriptase PCR. DNA content and LDH activity revealed good cell attachment and proliferation for Ceracell and Cerasorb M. When pre-incubated with cell-culture medium, also Osseolive showed good cell attachment and proliferation. Attachment and proliferation of osteoblast-like cells on NanoBone and BONIT Matrix was very low, even after pre-incubation with cell-culture medium. Specific ALP activity on Ceracell(®) , Osseolive (®) and Cerasorb M(®) increased with time and expression of bone-related genes ALP, osteonectin, osteopontin and bone sialoprotein II was demonstrated. Ceracell as well as Osseolive granules support proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and may be promising candidates for in vivo applications. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Voltage-gated ion channels in the axon initial segment of human cortical pyramidal cells and their relationship with chandelier cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria Carmen; DeFelipe, Javier; Muñoz, Alberto

    2006-02-21

    The axon initial segment (AIS) of pyramidal cells is a critical region for the generation of action potentials and for the control of pyramidal cell activity. Here we show that Na+ and K+ voltage-gated channels, together with other molecules involved in the localization of ion channels, are distributed asymmetrically in the AIS of pyramidal cells situated in the human temporal neocortex. There is a high density of Na+ channels distributed along the length of the AIS together with the associated proteins spectrin betaIV and ankyrin G. In contrast, Kv1.2 channels are associated with the adhesion molecule Caspr2, and they are mostly localized to the distal region of the AIS. In general, the distal region of the AIS is targeted by the GABAergic axon terminals of chandelier cells, whereas the proximal region is innervated, mostly by other types of GABAergic interneurons. We suggest that this molecular segregation and the consequent regional specialization of the GABAergic input to the AIS of pyramidal cells may have important functional implications for the control of pyramidal cell activity.

  3. The GAD-given Right of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells to Become GABAergic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Istvan

    2002-01-01

    low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR, perhaps as part of a programmed developmental switch, can convert the phenotype of the sympathetic neuron from noradrenergic to cholinergic 4. Other examples of two fast neurotransmitters released from the same neuron include GABA and glycine in interneurons of the spinal cord 5 and glutamate and dopamine in ventral midbrain dopamine neurons 6. Of all CNS neurons, the granule cells of the dentate gyrus appear to be the champions of neurotransmitter colocalization: glutamate, enkephalin, dynorphin, zinc, and finally GABA 2, 7, 8, 9. With this many transmitters in a single neuron, there are probably different ways in which they can be released. Dynorphin and other opioid peptides can be released directly from the dendrites to inhibit excitatory transmission 8. A similar mechanism may take place for GABA, as described in cortical GABAergic neurons 10. PMID:15309121

  4. Preventing effect of L-type calcium channel blockade on electrophysiological alterations in dentate gyrus granule cells induced by entorhinal amyloid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholami Pourbadie

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD. EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs, nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days, almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Molecular composition of IMP1 ribonucleoprotein granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønson, Lars; Vikesaa, Jonas; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    , and in motile cells IMP-containing granules are dispersed around the nucleus and in cellular protrusions. We isolated the IMP1-containing RNP granules and found that they represent a unique RNP entity distinct from neuronal hStaufen and/or fragile X mental retardation protein granules, processing bodies...

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) tyrosine kinase signaling facilitates granulation tissue formation with recruitment of VEGFR1+cells from bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keiichi; Amano, Hideki; Ito, Yoshiya; Mastui, Yoshio; Kamata, Mariko; Yamazaki, Yasuharu; Takeda, Akira; Shibuya, Masabumi; Majima, Masataka

    2017-12-18

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A facilitates wound healing. VEGF-A binds to VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGFR2 and induces wound healing through the receptor's tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. During blood flow recovery and lung regeneration, expression of VEGFR1 is elevated. However, the precise mechanism of wound healing, especially granulation formation on VEGFR1, is not well understood. We hypothesized that VEGFR1-TK signaling induces wound healing by promoting granulation tissue formation. A surgical sponge implantation model was made by implanting a sponge disk into dorsal subcutaneous tissue of mice. Granulation formation was estimated from the weight of the sponge and the granulation area from the immunohistochemical analysis of collagen I. The expression of fibroblast markers was estimated from the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and cellular fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) using real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and from the immunohistochemical analysis of S100A4. VEGFR1 TK knockout (TK -/- ) mice exhibited suppressed granulation tissue formation compared to that in wild-type (WT) mice. Expression of FGF-2, TGF-β, and VEGF-A was significantly suppressed in VEGFR1 TK -/- mice, and the accumulation of VEGFR1 + cells in granulation tissue was reduced in VEGFR1 TK -/- mice compared to that in WT mice. The numbers of VEGFR1 + cells and S100A4 + cells derived from bone marrow (BM) were higher in WT mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic WT BM than in VEGFR1 TK -/- mice transplanted with GFP transgenic VEGFR1 TK -/- BM. These results indicated that VEGFR1-TK signaling induced the accumulation of BM-derived VEGFR1 + cells expressing F4/80 and S100A4 and contributed to granulation formation around the surgically implanted sponge area in a mouse model.

  7. Mitosis in neurons: Roughex and APC/C maintain cell cycle exit to prevent cytokinetic and axonal defects in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ruggiero

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell cycle exit by neurons remain poorly understood. Through genetic and developmental analysis of Drosophila eye development, we found that the cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitor Roughex maintains G1 cell cycle exit during differentiation of the R8 class of photoreceptor neurons. The roughex mutant neurons re-enter the mitotic cell cycle and progress without executing cytokinesis, unlike non-neuronal cells in the roughex mutant that perform complete cell divisions. After mitosis, the binucleated R8 neurons usually transport one daughter nucleus away from the cell body into the developing axon towards the brain in a kinesin-dependent manner resembling anterograde axonal trafficking. Similar cell cycle and photoreceptor neuron defects occurred in mutants for components of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome. These findings indicate a neuron-specific defect in cytokinesis and demonstrate a critical role for mitotic cyclin downregulation both to maintain cell cycle exit during neuronal differentiation and to prevent axonal defects following failed cytokinesis.

  8. Leptin Enhances NR2B-mediated NMDA Responses Via a MAPK-dependent Process in Cerebellar Granule Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, A. J.; Wallace, L; Durakoglugil, D; Harvey, J.

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that the hormone leptin regulates energy balance via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, evidence is accumulating that leptin plays a key role in numerous CNS functions. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in many extrahypothalamic brain regions, with high levels found in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In the hippocampus, leptin has been shown to facilitate NMDA receptor function and modulate synaptic plasticity. A role for leptin in cerebellar function is also indicated as leptin-deficient rodents display reduced mobility that is unrelated to obesity. Here we show that leptin receptor immunolabeling can be detected in cultured cerebellar granule cells, being expressed at the somatic plasma membrane and also concentrated at synapses. Furthermore, leptin facilitated NR2B NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx in cerebellar granule cells via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway. These findings provide the first direct evidence for a cellular action of leptin in cerebellar neurons. In addition, given that NMDA receptor activity in the cerebellum is crucial for normal locomotor function, these data also have important implications for the potential role of leptin in the control of movement. PMID:16413128

  9. Progressive behavioral changes during the maturation of rats with early radiation-induced hypoplasia of fascia dentata granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Nemeth, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Localized exposure of the neonatal rat brain to X-rays produces neuronal hypoplasia specific to the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This brain damage causes locomotor hyperactivity, slowed acquisition of passive avoidance tasks and long bouts of spontaneous turning (without reversals) in a bowl apparatus. Here we report how these behavioral deficits change as a function of subject aging and behavioral test replications. Portions of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres were X-irradiated in order to selectively damage the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. The brains of experimental animals received a fractionated dose of X rays (13 Gy total) over postnatal days 1 to 16 and control animals were sham-irradiated. Rats between the ages of 71-462 days were tested 3 separate times on each of the following 3 behavioral tests: (1) spontaneous locomotion, (2) passive avoidance acquisition, and (3) spontaneous circling in a large plastic hemisphere. Rats with radiation-induced damage to the fascia dentata exhibited long bouts of slow turns without reversals. Once they began, irradiated subjects perseverated in turning to an extent significantly greater than sham-irradiated control subjects. This irradiation effect was significant during all test series. Moreover, in time, spontaneous perseverative turning was significantly potentiated in rats with hippocampal damage but increased only slightly in controls. Early radiation exposure produced locomotor hyperactivity in young rats. While activity levels of controls remained fairly stable throughout the course of the experiment, the hyperactivity of the irradiated animals decreased significantly as they matured

  10. Glomerular and mitral-granule cell microcircuits coordinate temporal and spatial information processing in the olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cavarretta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory bulb processes inputs from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs through two levels: the glomerular layer at the site of input, and the granule cell level at the site of output to the olfactory cortex. The sequence of action of these two levels has not yet been examined. We analyze this issue using a novel computational framework that is scaled up, in three-dimensions (3D, with realistic representations of the interactions between layers, activated by simulated natural odors, and constrained by experimental and theoretical analyses. We suggest that the postulated functions of glomerular circuits have as their primary role transforming a complex and disorganized input into a contrast-enhanced and normalized representation, but cannot provide for synchronization of the distributed glomerular outputs. By contrast, at the granule cell layer, the dendrodendritic interactions mediate temporal decorrelation, which we show is dependent on the preceding contrast enhancement by the glomerular layer. The results provide the first insights into the successive operations in the olfactory bulb, and demonstrate the significance of the modular organization around glomeruli. This layered organization is especially important for natural odor inputs, because they activate many overlapping glomeruli.

  11. The number of granule cells in rat hippocampus is reduced after chronic mild stress and re-established after chronic escitalopram treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jayatissa, Magdalena N; Bisgaard, Christina; West, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    mild stress and chronic escitalopram treatment. Furthermore, we investigated which classes of immature granule cells are affected by stress and targeted by escitalopram. Rats were initially exposed to 2weeks of CMS and 4weeks of escitalopram treatment with concurrent exposure to stress. The behavioral...... changes, indicating a decrease in sensitivity to a reward, were assessed in terms of sucrose consumption. We found a significant 22.4% decrease in the total number of granule cells in the stressed rats. This decrease was reversed in the stressed escitalopram treated rats that responded to the treatment......, but not in the rats that did not respond to escitalopram treatment. These changes were not followed by alterations in the volume of the granule cell layer. We also showed a differential regulation of dentate neurons, in different stages of development, by chronic stress and chronic escitalopram treatment. Our study...

  12. [Pathology analysis of CD31,CD34 and vWF expression in vascular endothelial cell of granulation tissue of eyelid chalazion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxin; Ding, Yungang; Li, Yongping

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the variable expressions of CD31, CD34, vWF during the vascular development process of growing granulation tissue of eyelid chalazion. The samples of growing granulation tissue were obtained during chalazion removal surgery. Immunohistochemistry staining technique was used to detect the expression of CD31, CD34 and vWF in vascular endothelial cells. CD31 and CD34 were expressed in all vascular endothelial cells, whereas the CD34 was more effectively expressed and strengthened in the capillary sprouts. The vWF was not expressed in capillary sprouts, but the expression was stronger in the tissues from superficial to deeper layers. CD31, CD34 and vWF expression in microvascular endothelial cells of growing granulation tissue is diversified. CD34 may be an import marker for active angiogenesis and vWF is an effective marker for inactive angiogenesis.

  13. Radial glia phagocytose axonal debris from degenerating overextending axons in the developing olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Daniel A; Wegner, Michael; Stolt, C Claus; Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James A

    2015-02-01

    Axon targeting during the development of the olfactory system is not always accurate, and numerous axons overextend past the target layer into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. To date, the fate of the mis-targeted axons has not been determined. We hypothesized that following overextension, the axons degenerate, and cells within the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb phagocytose the axonal debris. We utilized a line of transgenic mice that expresses ZsGreen fluorescent protein in primary olfactory axons. We found that overextending axons closely followed the filaments of radial glia present in the olfactory bulb during embryonic development. Following overextension into deeper layers of the olfactory bulb, axons degenerated and radial glia responded by phagocytosing the resulting debris. We used in vitro analysis to confirm that the radial glia had phagocytosed debris from olfactory axons. We also investigated whether the fate of overextending axons was altered when the development of the olfactory bulb was perturbed. In mice that lacked Sox10, a transcription factor essential for normal olfactory bulb development, we observed a disruption to the morphology and positioning of radial glia and an accumulation of olfactory axon debris within the bulb. Our results demonstrate that during early development of the olfactory system, radial glia play an important role in removing overextended axons from the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bone marrow stromal cell sheets may promote axonal regeneration and functional recovery with suppression of glial scar formation after spinal cord transection injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Akinori; Horii-Hayashi, Noriko; Sasagawa, Takayo; Shimizu, Takamasa; Shigematsu, Hideki; Iwata, Eiichiro; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Koizumi, Munehisa; Akahane, Manabu; Nishi, Mayumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) is a theoretical potential as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although a scaffold is sometimes used for retaining transplanted cells in damaged tissue, it is also known to induce redundant immunoreactions during the degradation processes. In this study, the authors prepared cell sheets made of BMSCs, which are transplantable without a scaffold, and investigated their effects on axonal regeneration, glial scar formation, and functional recovery in a completely transected SCI model in rats. METHODS BMSC sheets were prepared from the bone marrow of female Fischer 344 rats using ascorbic acid and were cryopreserved until the day of transplantation. A gelatin sponge (GS), as a control, or BMSC sheet was transplanted into a 2-mm-sized defect of the spinal cord at the T-8 level. Axonal regeneration and glial scar formation were assessed 2 and 8 weeks after transplantation by immunohistochemical analyses using anti-Tuj1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibodies, respectively. Locomotor function was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale. RESULTS The BMSC sheets promoted axonal regeneration at 2 weeks after transplantation, but there was no significant difference in the number of Tuj1-positive axons between the sheet- and GS-transplanted groups. At 8 weeks after transplantation, Tuj1-positive axons elongated across the sheet, and their numbers were significantly greater in the sheet group than in the GS group. The areas of GFAP-positive glial scars in the sheet group were significantly reduced compared with those of the GS group at both time points. Finally, hindlimb locomotor function was ameliorated in the sheet group at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS The results of the present study indicate that an ascorbic acid-induced BMSC sheet is effective in the treatment of SCI and enables autologous transplantation without requiring a

  15. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  16. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit in cultured cerebellar granule cells is developmentally regulated by activation of GABA(A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, B X; Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1997-01-01

    Da (alpha6 subunit) radioactive peaks in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In contrast, THIP-treated granule cells at 8 DIV demonstrated a small but significant decrease from control cultures in the photoincorporation of [3H]Ro15-4513 in the 51-kDa peak; however...... that the major effect of THIP was to increase alpha6 subunit clustering on granule cell bodies as well as neurites, 15-fold and sixfold, respectively. Using in situ hybridization, a small THIP-induced increase in alpha6 mRNA was detected at 4 DIV; however, no effect was apparent at 8 DIV. These data suggest...

  17. LXR agonist rescued the deficit in the proliferation of the cerebellar granule cells induced by dexamethasone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Xuting; Zhong, Hongyu; Li, Fen; Cai, Yulong; Li, Xin; Wang, Lian; Fan, Xiaotang, E-mail: fanxiaotang2005@163.com

    2016-09-02

    Dexamethasone (DEX) exposure during early postnatal life produces permanent neuromotor and intellectual deficits and stunts cerebellar growth. The liver X receptor (LXR) plays important roles in CNS development. However, the effects of LXR on the DEX-mediated impairment of cerebellar development remain undetermined. Thus, mice were pretreated with LXR agonist TO901317 (TO) and were later exposed to DEX to evaluate its protective effects on DEX-mediated deficit during cerebellar development. The results showed that an acute exposure of DEX on postnatal day 7 resulted in a significant impairment in cerebellar development and decreased the proliferation of granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer of cerebellum. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with TO. We further found that the decrease in the proliferation caused by DEX occurred via up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor and p27kip1, which could be partially prevented by LXR agonist pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that LXR agonist pretreatment could protect against DEX-induced deficits in cerebellar development in postnatal mice and may thus be perspective recruited to counteract such GC side effects.

  18. LXR agonist rescued the deficit in the proliferation of the cerebellar granule cells induced by dexamethasone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian, Xuting; Zhong, Hongyu; Li, Fen; Cai, Yulong; Li, Xin; Wang, Lian; Fan, Xiaotang

    2016-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) exposure during early postnatal life produces permanent neuromotor and intellectual deficits and stunts cerebellar growth. The liver X receptor (LXR) plays important roles in CNS development. However, the effects of LXR on the DEX-mediated impairment of cerebellar development remain undetermined. Thus, mice were pretreated with LXR agonist TO901317 (TO) and were later exposed to DEX to evaluate its protective effects on DEX-mediated deficit during cerebellar development. The results showed that an acute exposure of DEX on postnatal day 7 resulted in a significant impairment in cerebellar development and decreased the proliferation of granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer of cerebellum. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with TO. We further found that the decrease in the proliferation caused by DEX occurred via up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor and p27kip1, which could be partially prevented by LXR agonist pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that LXR agonist pretreatment could protect against DEX-induced deficits in cerebellar development in postnatal mice and may thus be perspective recruited to counteract such GC side effects.

  19. Granule cell dispersion is not a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Lancellotti, Carmen; Marinho, Taissa Ferrari; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Targas Yacubian, Elza Márcia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was to analyze the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with surgical prognosis, patterns of MTS and clinical data. Hippocampal specimens from 66 patients with MTLE and unilateral MTS and from 13 controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patients' clinical data, types of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 45.5% of cases and was not correlated with clinical variable. More severe neuronal loss was observed in patients with GCD. Except for MTS Type 2 - observed only in four no- GCD patients - groups did not differ with respect to the types of MTS. Surgical outcome was similar in both groups. In conclusion, GCD was associated with the degree of hippocampal cell loss, but was not a predictor of surgical outcome.

  20. Identification of chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycans and heparin proteoglycans in the secretory granules of human lung mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA)); Fox, C.C.; Lichtenstein, L.M. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1988-04-01

    The predominant subclasses of mast cells in both the rat and the mouse can be distinguished from one another by their preferential synthesis of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans that contain either heparin or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Although ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans have been isolated from human lung mast cells of 40-70% purity and from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with urticaria pigmentosa, no highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan has been isolated from any enriched or highly purified population of human mast cells. The authors demonstrate that human lung mast cells of 96% purity incorporate ({sup 35}S)sulfate into separate heparin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in an {approx}2:1 ratio. As assessed by HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC digests, the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate proteoglycans isolated from these human lung mast cells contain the same unusual chondroitin sulfate E disaccharide that is present in proteoglycans produced by interleukin 3-dependent mucosal-like mouse mast cells. Both the chondroitin ({sup 35}S)sulfate E proteoglycans and the ({sup 35}S)heparin proteoglycans were exocytosed from the ({sup 35}S)sulfate-labeled cells via perturbation of the IgE receptor, indicating that both types of {sup 35}S-labeled proteoglycans reside in the secretory granules of these human lung mast cells.

  1. Complete Loss of Netrin-1 Results in Embryonic Lethality and Severe Axon Guidance Defects without Increased Neural Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenea M. Bin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Netrin-1 regulates cell migration and adhesion during the development of the nervous system, vasculature, lung, pancreas, muscle, and mammary gland. It is also proposed to function as a dependence ligand that inhibits apoptosis; however, studies disagree regarding whether netrin-1 loss-of-function mice exhibit increased cell death. Furthermore, previously studied netrin-1 loss-of-function gene-trap mice express a netrin-1-β-galactosidase protein chimera with potential for toxic gain-of-function effects, as well as a small amount of wild-type netrin-1 protein. To unambiguously assess loss of function, we generated netrin-1 floxed and netrin-1 null mouse lines. Netrin-1−/− mice die earlier and exhibit more severe axon guidance defects than netrin-1 gene-trap mice, revealing that complete loss of function is more severe than previously reported. Netrin-1−/− embryos also exhibit increased expression of the netrin receptors DCC and neogenin that are proposed dependence receptors; however, increased apoptosis was not detected, inconsistent with netrin-1 being an essential dependence receptor ligand in the embryonic spinal cord.

  2. A coin-like peripheral small cell lung carcinoma associated with acute paraneoplastic axonal Guillain-Barre-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ioan; Gurzu, Simona; Balasa, Rodica; Motataianu, Anca; Contac, Anca Otilia; Halmaciu, Ioana; Popescu, Septimiu; Simu, Iunius

    2015-06-01

    A 65-year-old previously healthy male heavy smoker was hospitalized with a 2-week history of progressive muscle weakness in the lower and upper extremities. After 10 days of hospitalization, urinary sphincter incompetence and fecal incontinence were added and tetraparesis was established. The computer-tomography scan examination revealed a massive right hydrothorax and multifocal solid acinar structures with peripheral localization in the left lung, which suggested pulmonary cancer. Bone marrow metastases were also suspected. Based on the examination results, the final diagnosis was acute paraneoplastic axonal Guillain-Barre-like syndrome. The patient died 3 weeks after hospitalization. At autopsy, bronchopneumonia and a right hydrothorax were confirmed. Several 4 to 5-mm-sized round peripherally located white nodules were identified in the left lung, without any central tumor mass. Under microscope, a coin-shaped peripheral/subpleural small cell carcinoma was diagnosed, with generalized bone metastases. A huge thrombus in the abdominal aorta and acute pancreatitis was also seen at autopsy. This case highlights the difficulty of diagnosis of lung carcinomas and the necessity of a complex differential diagnosis of severe progressive ascending neuropathies. This is the 6th reported case of small cell lung cancer-associated acute Guillain-Barre-like syndrome and the first report about an association with a coin-like peripheral pattern.

  3. Neuroprotective and axon growth-promoting effects following inflammatory stimulation on mature retinal ganglion cells in mice depend on ciliary neurotrophic factor and leukemia inhibitory factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibinger, Marco; Müller, Adrienne; Andreadaki, Anastasia; Hauk, Thomas G; Kirsch, Matthias; Fischer, Dietmar

    2009-11-11

    After optic nerve injury retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) normally fail to regenerate axons in the optic nerve and undergo apoptosis. However, lens injury (LI) or intravitreal application of zymosan switch RGCs into an active regenerative state, enabling these neurons to survive axotomy and to regenerate axons into the injured optic nerve. Several factors have been proposed to mediate the beneficial effects of LI. Here, we investigated the contribution of glial-derived ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) to LI-mediated regeneration and neuroprotection using wild-type and CNTF-deficient mice. In wild-type mice, CNTF expression was strongly upregulated in retinal astrocytes, the JAK/STAT3 pathway was activated in RGCs, and RGCs were transformed into an active regenerative state after LI. Interestingly, retinal LIF expression was correlated with CNTF expression after LI. In CNTF-deficient mice, the neuroprotective and axon growth-promoting effects of LI were significantly reduced compared with wild-type animals, despite an observed compensatory upregulation of LIF expression in CNTF-deficient mice. The positive effects of LI and also zymosan were completely abolished in CNTF/LIF double knock-out mice, whereas LI-induced glial and macrophage activation was not compromised. In culture CNTF and LIF markedly stimulated neurite outgrowth of mature RGCs. These data confirm a key role for CNTF in directly mediating the neuroprotective and axon regenerative effects of inflammatory stimulation in the eye and identify LIF as an additional contributing factor.

  4. Amyloid β-mediated Zn2+ influx into dentate granule cells transiently induces a short-term cognitive deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takeda

    Full Text Available We examined an idea that short-term cognition is transiently affected by a state of confusion in Zn2+ transport system due to a local increase in amyloid-β (Aβ concentration. A single injection of Aβ (25 pmol into the dentate gyrus affected dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP 1 h after the injection, but not 4 h after the injection. Simultaneously, 1-h memory of object recognition was affected when the training was performed 1 h after the injection, but not 4 h after the injection. Aβ-mediated impairments of LTP and memory were rescued in the presence of zinc chelators, suggesting that Zn2+ is involved in Aβ action. When Aβ was injected into the dentate gyrus, intracellular Zn2+ levels were increased only in the injected area in the dentate gyrus, suggesting that Aβ induces the influx of Zn2+ into cells in the injected area. When Aβ was added to hippocampal slices, Aβ did not increase intracellular Zn2+ levels in the dentate granule cell layer in ACSF without Zn2+, but in ACSF containing Zn2+. The increase in intracellular Zn2+ levels was inhibited in the presence of CaEDTA, an extracellular zinc chelator, but not in the presence of CNQX, an AMPA receptor antagonist. The present study indicates that Aβ-mediated Zn2+ influx into dentate granule cells, which may occur without AMPA receptor activation, transiently induces a short-term cognitive deficit. Extracellular Zn2+ may play a key role for transiently Aβ-induced cognition deficits.

  5. Distribution Profile of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor/Ca2+ Channels in α and β Cells of Pancreas: Dominant Localization in Secretory Granules and Common Error in Identification of Secretory Granule Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yong Suk; Yoo, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The α and β cells of pancreatic islet release important hormones in response to intracellular Ca increases that result from Ca releases through the inositol 1,4,5-trisphoshate receptor (IP3R)/Ca channels. Yet no systematic studies on distribution of IP3R/Ca channels have been done, prompting us to investigate the distribution of all 3 IP3R isoforms. Immunogold electron microscopy was performed to determine the presence and the relative concentrations of all 3 IP3R isoforms in 2 major organelles secretory granules (SGs) and the endoplasmic reticulum of α and β cells of rat pancreas. All 3 IP3R isoforms were present in SG membranes of both cells, and the IP3R concentrations in SGs were ∼2-fold higher than those in the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, large halos shown in the electron microscope images of insulin-containing SGs of β cells were gap spaces that resulted from separation of granule membranes from the surrounding cytoplasm. These results strongly suggest the important roles of SGs in IP3-induced, Ca-dependent regulatory secretory pathway in pancreas. Moreover, the accurate location of SG membranes of β cells was further confirmed by the location of another integral membrane protein synaptotagmin V and of membrane phospholipid PI(4,5)P2.

  6. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: Lysosomal trafficking regulator domains regulate exocytosis of lytic granules but not cytokine secretion by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Krzewska, Aleksandra; Wood, Stephanie M; Murakami, Yousuke; Nguyen, Victoria; Chiang, Samuel C C; Cullinane, Andrew R; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Gahl, William A; Coligan, John E; Introne, Wendy J; Bryceson, Yenan T; Krzewski, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare immunodeficiency with impaired cytotoxic lymphocyte function, mainly that of natural killer (NK) cells. Our understanding of NK cell function deficiency in patients with CHS and how LYST regulates lytic granule exocytosis is very limited. We sought to delineate cellular defects associated with LYST mutations responsible for the impaired NK cell function seen in patients with CHS. We analyzed NK cells from patients with CHS with missense mutations in the LYST ARM/HEAT (armadillo/huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, and the yeast kinase TOR1) or BEACH (beige and Chediak-Higashi) domains. NK cells from patients with CHS displayed severely reduced cytotoxicity. Mutations in the ARM/HEAT domain led to a reduced number of perforin-containing granules, which were significantly increased in size but able to polarize to the immunologic synapse; however, they were unable to properly fuse with the plasma membrane. Mutations in the BEACH domain resulted in formation of normal or slightly enlarged granules that had markedly impaired polarization to the IS but could be exocytosed on reaching the immunologic synapse. Perforin-containing granules in NK cells from patients with CHS did not acquire certain lysosomal markers (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1/2) but were positive for markers of transport vesicles (cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor), late endosomes (Ras-associated binding protein 27a), and, to some extent, early endosomes (early endosome antigen 1), indicating a lack of integrity in the endolysosomal compartments. NK cells from patients with CHS had normal cytokine compartments and cytokine secretion. LYST is involved in regulation of multiple aspects of NK cell lytic activity, ranging from governance of lytic granule size to control of their polarization and exocytosis, as well as regulation of endolysosomal compartment identity

  7. Group B vitamins protect murine cerebellar granule cells from glutamate/NMDA toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanpeng; Desbois, Angele; Jiang, Susan; Hou, Sheng T

    2004-10-05

    The role of B group vitamins in preventing neuronal death against excitotoxicity was investigated. Neuronal death of cultured mouse cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) caused by glutamate (50 microM) or NMDA (200 microM) was delayed in CGNs that had been treated with riboflavin (B2), folic acid (B9) or cynocobalamin (B12) for 18 h. Such neuroprotection by B2, B9 and B12 was in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, application of thiamin (B1), nicotinamide (B3), d-pantothenic acid (B5), pyridoxine (B6) or carnitine (BT) did not ameliorate glutamate or NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity to CGCs. These results are the first indication that certain B group vitamins are not only required for the normal brain function, but can also play a protective role against excitotoxicity to the brain.

  8. The Genetics of Axon Guidance and Axon Regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Andrew D.; Hutter, Harald; Jin, Yishi; Wadsworth, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The correct wiring of neuronal circuits depends on outgrowth and guidance of neuronal processes during development. In the past two decades, great progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of axon outgrowth and guidance. Genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans has played a key role in elucidating conserved pathways regulating axon guidance, including Netrin signaling, the slit Slit/Robo pathway, Wnt signaling, and others. Axon guidance factors were first identified by screens for mutations affecting animal behavior, and by direct visual screens for axon guidance defects. Genetic analysis of these pathways has revealed the complex and combinatorial nature of guidance cues, and has delineated how cues guide growth cones via receptor activity and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Several axon guidance pathways also affect directed migrations of non-neuronal cells in C. elegans, with implications for normal and pathological cell migrations in situations such as tumor metastasis. The small number of neurons and highly stereotyped axonal architecture of the C. elegans nervous system allow analysis of axon guidance at the level of single identified axons, and permit in vivo tests of prevailing models of axon guidance. C. elegans axons also have a robust capacity to undergo regenerative regrowth after precise laser injury (axotomy). Although such axon regrowth shares some similarities with developmental axon outgrowth, screens for regrowth mutants have revealed regeneration-specific pathways and factors that were not identified in developmental screens. Several areas remain poorly understood, including how major axon tracts are formed in the embryo, and the function of axon regeneration in the natural environment. PMID:28114100

  9. Acute Putrescine Supplementation with Schwann Cell Implantation Improves Sensory and Serotonergic Axon Growth and Functional Recovery in Spinal Cord Injured Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorgulescu, J Bryan; Patel, Samik P; Louro, Jack; Andrade, Christian M; Sanchez, Andre R; Pearse, Damien D

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) transplantation exhibits significant potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair and its use as a therapeutic modality has now progressed to clinical trials for subacute and chronic human SCI. Although SC implants provide a receptive environment for axonal regrowth and support functional recovery in a number of experimental SCI models, axonal regeneration is largely limited to local systems and the behavioral improvements are modest without additional combinatory approaches. In the current study we investigated whether the concurrent delivery of the polyamine putrescine, started either 30 min or 1 week after SCI, could enhance the efficacy of SCs when implanted subacutely (1 week after injury) into the contused rat spinal cord. Polyamines are ubiquitous organic cations that play an important role in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell division, cytoskeletal organization, and cell differentiation. We show that the combination of putrescine with SCs provides a significant increase in implant size, an enhancement in axonal (sensory and serotonergic) sparing and/or growth, and improved open field locomotion after SCI, as compared to SC implantation alone. These findings demonstrate that polyamine supplementation can augment the effectiveness of SCs when used as a therapeutic approach for subacute SCI repair.

  10. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Form Dysfunctional Immune Synapses with B Cells Characterized by Non-Polarized Lytic Granule Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kabanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of the cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response has been proposed as one mechanism for immune evasion in cancer. In this study, we have explored the underlying basis for CTL suppression in the context of B cell malignancies. We document that human B cells have an intrinsic ability to resist killing by freshly isolated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs, but are susceptible to lysis by IL-2 activated CTL blasts and CTLs isolated from immunotherapy-treated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Impaired killing was associated with the formation of dysfunctional non-lytic immune synapses characterized by the presence of defective linker for activation of T cells (LAT signaling and non-polarized release of the lytic granules transported by ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 8 (Arl8. We propose that non-lytic degranulation of CTLs are a key regulatory mechanism of evasion through which B cells may interfere with the formation of functional immune synapses by CTLs.

  11. Recombinant Escherichia coli produces tailor-made biopolyester granules for applications in fluorescence activated cell sorting: functional display of the mouse interleukin-2 and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockelbank Jane A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS is a powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative detection of biomolecules used widely in both basic research and clinical diagnostic applications. Beads displaying a specific antigen are used to bind antibodies which are then fluorescently labelled using secondary antibodies. As the individual suspension bead passes through the sensing region of the FACS machine, fluorescent signals are acquired and analysed. Currently, antigens are tediously purified and chemically cross-linked to preformed beads. Purification and coupling of proteins often renders them inactive and they will not be displayed in its native configuration. As an alternative, we genetically engineered Escherichia coli to produce biopolyester (polyhdroxyalkanoate=PHA granules displaying diagnostically relevant antigens in their native conformation and suitable for FACS analysis. Results Hybrid genes were constructed, which encode either the mouse interleukin-2 (IL2 or the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG fused via an enterokinase site providing linker region to the C terminus of the PHA granule associated protein PhaP, respectively. The hybrid genes were expressed in PHA-accumulating recombinant E. coli. MOG and IL2 fusion proteins were abundantly attached to PHA granules and were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis and N terminal sequencing. A more abundant second fusion protein of either MOG or IL2 resulted from an additional N terminal fusion, which did surprisingly not interfere with attachment to PHA granule. PHA granules displaying either IL2 or MOG were used for FACS using monoclonal anti-IL2 or anti-MOG antibodies conjugated to a fluorescent dye. FACS analysis showed significant and specific binding of respective antibodies. Enterokinase treatment of IL2 displaying PHA granules enabled removal of IL2 as monitored by FACS analysis. Mice were immunized with either MOG or OVA (ovalbumin and the

  12. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

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    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  13. Miniature IPSCs in hippocampal granule cells are triggered by voltage-gated Ca2+ channels via microdomain coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sarit Pati; Bucurenciu, Iancu; Jonas, Peter

    2012-10-10

    The coupling between presynaptic Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) sensors of exocytosis is a key determinant of synaptic transmission. Evoked release from parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons is triggered by nanodomain coupling of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, whereas release from cholecystokinin (CCK)-containing interneurons is generated by microdomain coupling of N-type channels. Nanodomain coupling has several functional advantages, including speed and efficacy of transmission. One potential disadvantage is that stochastic opening of presynaptic Ca(2+) channels may trigger spontaneous transmitter release. We addressed this possibility in rat hippocampal granule cells, which receive converging inputs from different inhibitory sources. Both reduction of extracellular Ca(2+) concentration and the unselective Ca(2+) channel blocker Cd(2+) reduced the frequency of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in granule cells by ∼50%, suggesting that the opening of presynaptic Ca(2+) channels contributes to spontaneous release. Application of the selective P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVa had no detectable effects, whereas both the N-type blocker ω-conotoxin GVIa and the L-type blocker nimodipine reduced mIPSC frequency. Furthermore, both the fast Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and the slow chelator EGTA-AM reduced the mIPSC frequency, suggesting that Ca(2+)-dependent spontaneous release is triggered by microdomain rather than nanodomain coupling. The CB(1) receptor agonist WIN 55212-2 also decreased spontaneous release; this effect was occluded by prior application of ω-conotoxin GVIa, suggesting that a major fraction of Ca(2+)-dependent spontaneous release was generated at the terminals of CCK-expressing interneurons. Tonic inhibition generated by spontaneous opening of presynaptic N- and L-type Ca(2+) channels may be important for hippocampal information processing.

  14. Effect of sodium butyrate treatment on the granule morphology, histamine level and elemental content of the bone marrow-derived mast cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydzynski, K.; Dalen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Mast cells derived from the bone marrow of BALB/c mice (BMMC) were cultures and their growth ceased with sodium butyrate. Sodium butyrate treatment (1 mM, 4 days) caused maturation of the granules, and increased histamine content from approx. 1 pg/cell to 4 pg/cell. X-ray microanalysis revealed that maturation of the granules was accompanied by the increase in relative weight percent of sodium, phosphorus and sulphur, with concomitant decrease in chloride. The sulphur to potassium ratio increased three-fold in butyrate-treated mast cells. The existence of a different elemental composition during mast cell maturation may provide additional parameter for rapid discrimination of mast cell subpopulations. (author). 28 refs, 6 figs

  15. Characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms. Association with differentiation of hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and macroglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Kjaerulff, Karen M; Pedersen, Hans C

    2002-01-01

    progenitors as well as in differentiated glia. During embryonic development of the murine cerebral cortex, HOF expression is restricted to the hippocampal subdivision. Expression coincides with early differentiation of presumptive CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus granule cells, with a sharp...

  16. Selective stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture: effect of kainic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate. Here we report on the influence of another glutamate analogue, kainic acid, which, in contrast to N-methyl-D-aspartate, is believed to stimulate transmitter rec...

  17. Casein Kinase 1δ Is an APC/CCdh1 Substrate that Regulates Cerebellar Granule Cell Neurogenesis

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    Clara Penas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ is at the center of multiple signaling pathways, its role in the expansion of CNS progenitor cells is unknown. Using mouse cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCPs as a model for brain neurogenesis, we demonstrate that the loss of CK1δ or treatment of GCPs with a highly selective small molecule inhibits GCP expansion. In contrast, CK1δ overexpression increases GCP proliferation. Thus, CK1δ appears to regulate GCP neurogenesis. CK1δ is targeted for proteolysis via the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/CCdh1 ubiquitin ligase, and conditional deletion of the APC/CCdh1 activator Cdh1 in cerebellar GCPs results in higher levels of CK1δ. APC/CCdh1 also downregulates CK1δ during cell-cycle exit. Therefore, we conclude that APC/CCdh1 controls CK1δ levels to balance proliferation and cell-cycle exit in the developing CNS. Similar studies in medulloblastoma cells showed that CK1δ holds promise as a therapeutic target.

  18. Squid Giant Axons Synthesize NF Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Marianna; Chun, Jong Tai; Giuditta, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Squid giant axon has been an excellent model system for studying fundamental topics in neurobiology such as neuronal signaling. It has been also useful in addressing the questions of local protein synthesis in the axons. Incubation of isolated squid giant axons with [ 35 S]methionine followed by immunoprecipitation with a rabbit antibody against all squid neurofilament (NF) proteins demonstrates the local synthesis of a major 180 kDa NF protein and of several NF proteins of lower molecular weights. Their identification as NF proteins is based on their absence in the preimmune precipitates. Immunoprecipitates washed with more stringent buffers confirmed these results. Our data are at variance with a recent study based on the same experimental procedure that failed to visualize the local synthesis of NF proteins by the giant axon and thereby suggested their exclusive derivation from nerve cell bodies (as reported by Gainer et al. in Cell Mol Neurobiol 37:475-486, 2017). By reviewing the pertinent literature, we confute the claims that mRNA translation is absent in mature axons because of a putative translation block and that most proteins of mature axons are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. Given the intrinsic axonal capacity to synthesize proteins, we stress the glial derivation of axonal and presynaptic RNAs and the related proposal that these neuronal domains are endowed with largely independent gene expression systems (as reported by Giuditta et al. in Physiol Rev 88:515-555, 2008).

  19. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using specific muscarinic receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeskey, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In cerebellar granule cell cultures, two muscarinic receptor mediated responses were observed: inhibition of adenylate cyclase (M-AC) and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis (M-PI). These responses were antagonized by three purported specific muscarinic antagonists: pirenzipine and (-)QNX (specific for M-PI) and methoctramine (specific for M-AC). However, the specificity for the three antagonists in blocking these responses is not comparable to the specificity observed in binding studies on these cells or to that quoted in the literature. Two peaks of molecular sizes were found in these cells corresponding to the two molecular sizes of muscarinic receptive proteins reported in the literature. Muscarinic receptive proteins were alkylated with 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pirenzipine and (-)QNX were able to block alkylation of the high molecular size peak, which corresponds to the receptive protein m 3 reported in the literature. Methoctramine was able to block alkylation of a portion of the lower molecular size peak, possibly corresponding to the m 2 and/or m 4 receptive proteins reported in the literature. Studies attempting to show the presence of receptor reserve for either of the two biochemical responses present in these cells by alkylation of the receptive protein with nonradiolabeled propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM) were confounded by specificity of this agent for the lower molecular weight peak of muscarinic receptive protein. Thus the muscarinic receptive proteins coupled to M-AC were alkylated preferentially over the ones coupled to M-PI

  20. Topically Delivered Adipose Derived Stem Cells Show an Activated-Fibroblast Phenotype and Enhance Granulation Tissue Formation in Skin Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Jong; Xu, Wei; Leung, Kai P.; Mustoe, Thomas A.; Galiano, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are found in various tissues and can proliferate extensively in vitro. MSCs have been used in preclinical animal studies and clinical trials in many fields. Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) have several advantages compared to other MSCs for use in cell-based treatments because they are easy to isolate with relative abundance. However, quantitative approaches for wound repair using ASCs have been limited because of lack of animal models which allow for quantification. Here, we addressed the effect of topically delivered ASCs in wound repair by quantitative analysis using the rabbit ear model. We characterized rabbit ASCs, and analyzed their multipotency in comparison to bone marrow derived-MSCs (BM-MSCs) and dermal fibroblasts (DFs) in vitro. Topically delivered ASCs increased granulation tissue formation in wounds when compared to saline controls, whereas BM-MSCs or DFs did not. These studies suggest that ASCs and BM-MSCs are not identical, though they have similar surface markers. We found that topically delivered ASCs are engrafted and proliferate in the wounds. We showed that transplanted ASCs exhibited activated fibroblast phenotype, increased endothelial cell recruitment, and enhanced macrophage recruitment in vivo. PMID:23383253

  1. Axon Guidance of Sympathetic Neurons to Cardiomyocytes by Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Itsuo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) isolated from neonatal

  2. Dicer in Schwann cells is required for myelination and axonal integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Jorge A.; Baumann, Reto; Norrmén, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    Dicer is responsible for the generation of mature micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and loading them into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC functions as a probe that targets mRNAs leading to translational suppression and mRNA degradation. Schwann cells (SCs) in the peripheral nervous system undergo re...

  3. Mitochondrial trafficking through Rhot1 is involved in the aggregation of germinal granule components during primordial germ cell formation in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Haru; Taira, Yuya; Morichika, Keisuke; Kinoshita, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    In many animals, the germ plasm is sufficient and necessary for primordial germ cell (PGC) formation. It contains germinal granules and abundant mitochondria (germline-Mt). However, the role of germline-Mt in germ cell formation remains poorly understood. In Xenopus, the germ plasm is distributed as many small islands at the vegetal pole, which gradually aggregates to form a single large mass in each of the four vegetal pole cells at the early blastula stage. Polymerized microtubules and the adapter protein kinesin are required for the aggregation of germ plasm. However, it remains unknown whether germline-Mt trafficking is important for the cytoplasmic transport of germinal granules during germ plasm aggregation. In this study, we focused on the mitochondrial small GTPase protein Rhot1 to inhibit mitochondrial trafficking during the germ plasm aggregation. Expression of Rhot1ΔC, which lacks the C-terminal mitochondrial transmembrane domain, inhibited the aggregation of germline-Mt during early development. In Rhot1-inhibited embryos, germinal granule components did not aggregate during cleavage stages, which reduced the number of PGCs on the genital ridge at tail-bud stage. These results suggest that mitochondrial trafficking is involved in the aggregation of germinal granule components, which are essential for the formation of PGCs. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  4. Investigation of retinal ganglion cells and axons of normal rats using fluorogold retrograde labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xiaolei; Ye Jian; Chen Chunlin

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) by means of fluorogold retrograde labeling, RGCs were labeled by injecting the fluorogold bilaterally into the superficial superior colliculus and lateral genicutate nucleus in six adult SD rats. One and two weeks (3 rats in each group) after injecting the fluorogold, RGCs FG-labeled were observed and the number of them were counted. The results showed that after a week mean density of fluorogold-labeled RGCs was 2210 ± 128/mm 2 , and it was 2164 ± 117/mm 2 after two weeks. Our conclusion is fluorogold retrograde labeling could be very useful in the research of RGCs. (authors)

  5. ALS mutant FUS proteins are recruited into stress granules in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Lenzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an opportunity to study human diseases mainly in those cases for which no suitable model systems are available. Here, we have taken advantage of in vitro iPSCs derived from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and carrying mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS to study the cellular behavior of the mutant proteins in the appropriate genetic background. Moreover, the ability to differentiate iPSCs into spinal cord neural cells provides an in vitro model mimicking the physiological conditions. iPSCs were derived from FUSR514S and FUSR521C patient fibroblasts, whereas in the case of the severe FUSP525L mutation, in which fibroblasts were not available, a heterozygous and a homozygous iPSC line were raised by TALEN-directed mutagenesis. We show that aberrant localization and recruitment of FUS into stress granules (SGs is a prerogative of the FUS mutant proteins and occurs only upon induction of stress in both undifferentiated iPSCs and spinal cord neural cells. Moreover, we show that the incorporation into SGs is proportional to the amount of cytoplasmic FUS, strongly correlating with the cytoplasmic delocalization phenotype of the different mutants. Therefore, the available iPSCs represent a very powerful system for understanding the correlation between FUS mutations, the molecular mechanisms of SG formation and ALS ethiopathogenesis.

  6. Disruption of the langerin/CD207 Gene Abolishes Birbeck Granules without a Marked Loss of Langerhans Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Aït-Yahia, Smina; Clair-Moninot, Valérie; Stössel, Hella; Badell, Edgar; Bordat, Yann; Pooley, Joanne L.; Lang, Thierry; Prina, Eric; Coste, Isabelle; Gresser, Olivia; Renno, Toufic; Winter, Nathalie; Milon, Geneviève; Shortman, Ken; Romani, Nikolaus; Lebecque, Serge; Malissen, Bernard; Saeland, Sem; Douillard, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin expressed by a subset of dendritic leukocytes, the Langerhans cells (LC). Langerin is a cell surface receptor that induces the formation of an LC-specific organelle, the Birbeck granule (BG). We generated a langerin−/− mouse on a C57BL/6 background which did not display any macroscopic aberrant development. In the absence of langerin, LC were detected in normal numbers in the epidermis but the cells lacked BG. LC of langerin−/− mice did not present other phenotypic alterations compared to wild-type littermates. Functionally, the langerin−/− LC were able to capture antigen, to migrate towards skin draining lymph nodes, and to undergo phenotypic maturation. In addition, langerin−/− mice were not impaired in their capacity to process native OVA protein for I-Ab-restricted presentation to CD4+ T lymphocytes or for H-2Kb-restricted cross-presentation to CD8+ T lymphocytes. langerin−/− mice inoculated with mannosylated or skin-tropic microorganisms did not display an altered pathogen susceptibility. Finally, chemical mutagenesis resulted in a similar rate of skin tumor development in langerin−/− and wild-type mice. Overall, our data indicate that langerin and BG are dispensable for a number of LC functions. The langerin−/− C57BL/6 mouse should be a valuable model for further functional exploration of langerin and the role of BG. PMID:15601833

  7. Herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein E is required for efficient virus spread from epithelial cells to neurons and for targeting viral proteins from the neuron cell body into axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fushan; Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Huang, Jialing; Si, Huaxin; Makaroun, Lena; Friedman, Harvey M

    2010-09-30

    The HSV-2 lifecycle involves virus spread in a circuit from the inoculation site to dorsal root ganglia and return. We evaluated the role of gE-2 in the virus lifecycle by deleting amino acids 124-495 (gE2-del virus). In the mouse retina infection model, gE2-del virus does not spread to nuclei in the brain, indicating a defect in anterograde (pre-synaptic to post-synaptic neurons) and retrograde (post-synaptic to pre-synaptic neurons) spread. Infection of neuronal cells in vitro demonstrates that gE-2 is required for targeting viral proteins from neuron cell bodies into axons, and for efficient virus spread from epithelial cells to axons. The mouse flank model confirms that gE2-del virus is defective in spread from epithelial cells to neurons. Therefore, we defined two steps in the virus lifecycle that involve gE-2, including efficient spread from epithelial cells to axons and targeting viral components from neuron cell bodies into axons. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adverse effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on rat cerebellar granule cell cultures were attenuated by amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, B; Ferri, A; Brusco, A; Rassetto, M; Lopez, L M; Evangelista de Duffard, A M; Duffard, R

    2011-05-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a worldwide-used herbicide, has been shown to produce a wide range of adverse effects in the health--from embryotoxicity and teratogenicity to neurotoxicity--of animals and humans. In this study, neuronal morphology and biochemical events in rat cerebellar granule cell (CGC) cultures have been analyzed to define some of the possible mechanisms involved in 2,4-D-induced cell death. For that purpose, amphetamine (AMPH) that has been shown to accelerate the recovery of several functions in animals with brain injury has been used as a pharmacologycal tool and was also investigated as a possible protecting agent. Addition of 2,4-D to CGC cultures produced a drastic decrease in cell viability, in association with an increased incidence of necrosis and apoptosis, and an increased level of reactive oxygen species, a decrease in glutathione content, and an abnormal activity of some enzymes with respect to the control group. The adverse effects of 2,4-D were partly attenuated in presence of AMPH. Some deleterious effects on several ultrastructural features of the cells, as well as the enhanced incidence of apoptosis, were partially preserved in AMPH-protected cultures as compared with those which were exposed to 2,4-D alone. The collected evidences (1) confirms the previously observed, deleterious effects of 2.4D on the same or a similar model; (2) suggests that the 2,4-D-induced apoptosis could have been mediated by or associated to an oxidative imbalance in the affected cells, and (3) shows some evidence of a protective effect of AMPH on 2,4-D-induced cell death, which could have been exerted through a reduction in the oxidative stress.

  9. Attenuation of excitatory amino acid toxicity by metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists and aniracetam in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, M; Fallacara, C; Arrighi, V; Memo, M; Spano, P F

    1993-08-01

    Activation of glutamate ionotropic receptors represents the primary event in the neurotoxicity process triggered by excitatory amino acids. We demonstrate here that the concentration-dependent stimulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) by the selective agonist trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate or by quisqualate counteracts both glutamate- and kainate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. The mGluR-evoked responses are potentiated by aniracetam, which per se also elicits neuroprotection. Aniracetam concentration-dependently counteracted glutamate-, kainate-, or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-induced cell death and greatly facilitated neuroprotective response achieved by different concentrations of both quisqualate and trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate. In addition, aniracetam potentiated the mGluR-coupled stimulation of phospholipase C, as revealed by the measurement of 3H-inositol phosphate formation. Thus, mGluRs could be a suitable target for novel pharmacological strategies pointing to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Effect of Aggregated β-Amyloid (1-42 on Synaptic Plasticity of Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Babri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a common neurodegenerative disorder in elderly people with an impairment of cognitive decline and memory loss. β-amyloid (Aβ as a potent neurotoxic peptide has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This disease begins with impairment in synaptic functions before developing into later neuro­degeneration and neuronal loss. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synaptic plasticity and electrophysiological function of granule cells in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of aggregated Aβ (1-42 peptide in vivo. Methods: Animals were divided to control and Aβ (1-42 groups. Long-term potentia­tion (LTP in perforant path-DG synapses was assessed in order to investigate the effect of aggregated Aβ (1-42 on synaptic plasticity. Field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP slope and population spike (PS amplitude were measured. Results: Administration of Aβ (1-42 significantly decreased fEPSP slope and PS amplitude in Aβ (1-42 group comparing with the control group and had no effect on baseline activity of neurons. Conclusion: The present study indicates that administration of aggregated form of Aβ (1-42 into the lateral ventricle effectively inhibits LTP in granular cells of the DG in hippocampus in vivo.

  11. Decreased tonic inhibition in cerebellar granule cells causes motor dysfunction in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Kiyoshi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Inoue, Koichi; Takayama, Masakazu; Takayama, Chitoshi; Saitoh, Shinji; Kishino, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2012-12-05

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of function of the UBE3A gene encoding a ubiquitin E3 ligase. Motor dysfunction is a characteristic feature of Angelman syndrome, but neither the mechanisms of action nor effective therapeutic strategies have yet been elucidated. We report that tonic inhibition is specifically decreased in cerebellar granule cells of Ube3a-deficient mice, a model of Angelman syndrome. As a mechanism underlying this decrease in tonic inhibition, we show that Ube3a controls degradation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) and that deficiency of Ube3a induces a surplus of GAT1 that results in a decrease in GABA concentrations in the extrasynaptic space. Administering low doses of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo-[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a selective extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor agonist, improves the abnormal firing properties of a population of Purkinje cells in cerebellar brain slices and reduces cerebellar ataxia in Ube3a-deficient mice in vivo. These results suggest that pharmacologically increasing tonic inhibition may be a useful strategy for alleviating motor dysfunction in Angelman syndrome.

  12. Synchronization in primate cerebellar granule cell layer local field potentials: Basic anisotropy and dynamic changes during active expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Courtemanche

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar cortex is remarkable for its organizational regularity, out of which task-related neural networks should emerge. So, in Purkinje cells, both complex and simple spike network patterns are evident in sensorimotor behavior. However, task-related patterns of activity in the granule cell layer (GCL have been less studied. We recorded local field potential (LFP activity simultaneously in pairs of GCL sites in monkeys performing an active expectancy (lever-press task, in passive expectancy, and at rest. LFP sites were selected when they showed strong 10-25 Hz oscillations; pair orientation was in stereotaxic sagittal and coronal (mainly, and diagonal. As shown previously, LFP oscillations at each site were modulated during the lever-press task. Synchronization across LFP pairs showed an evident basic anisotropy at rest: sagittal pairs of LFPs were better synchronized (more than double the cross-correlation coefficients than coronal pairs, and more than diagonal pairs. On the other hand, this basic anisotropy was modifiable: during the active expectancy condition, where sagittal and coronal orientations were tested, synchronization of LFP pairs would increase just preceding movement, most notably for the coronal pairs. This lateral extension of synchronization was not observed in passive expectancy. The basic pattern of synchronization at rest, favoring sagittal synchrony, thus seemed to adapt in a dynamic fashion, potentially extending laterally to include more cerebellar cortex elements. This dynamic anisotropy in LFP synchronization could underlie GCL network organization in the context of sensorimotor tasks.

  13. Iron and cell death in Parkinson's disease: a nuclear microscopic study into iron-rich granules in the parkinsonian substantia nigra of primate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thong, P.S.P.; Watt, F.; Ponraj, D.; Leong, S.K.; He, Y.; Lee, T.K.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative brain disease characterised by a loss of cells in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain and accompanying biochemical changes such as inhibition of mitochondrial function, increased iron concentrations and decreased glutathione levels in the parkinsonian SN. Though the aetiology of the disease is still unknown, the observed biochemical changes point to the involvement of oxidative stress. In particular, iron is suspected to play a role by promoting free radical production, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. The increase in iron in the parkinsonian SN has been confirmed by several research groups, both in human post-mortem brains and in brain tissue from parkinsonian animal models. However, the question remains as to whether the observed increase in iron is a cause or a consequence of the SN cell death process. Our previous study using unilaterally 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-pyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys in a time sequence experiment has shown that the increase in bulk iron concentrations follow rather than precede dopaminergic cell death. However, changes in the localised iron concentrations, which may play a more direct role in SN cell death, may not be reflected at the bulk level. Indeed, we have observed iron-rich granules in parkinsonian SNs. From this time sequence study into the iron content of iron-rich granules in the SNs of an untreated control and unilaterally MPTP-lesioned parkinsonian models, we present the following observations: (1) Iron-rich granules are found in both control and parkinsonian SNs and are variable in size and iron content in any one model. (2) These iron-rich granules may be associated with neuromelanin granules found in the SN and are known to accumulate transition metal ions such as iron. (3) The early onset of bulk SN cell loss (35%) was accompanied by a significant elevation of iron in granules found in the MPTP-injected SN compared to the contra-lateral SN. This

  14. Axonal cleaved caspase-3 regulates axon targeting and morphogenesis in the developing auditory brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Rotschafer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Caspase-3 is a cysteine protease that is most commonly associated with cell death. Recent studies have shown additional roles in mediating cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and development of cell morphology. We investigated the role of caspase-3 in the development of chick auditory brainstem nuclei during embryogenesis. Immunofluorescence from embryonic days E6-13 revealed that the temporal expression of cleaved caspase-3 follows the ascending anatomical pathway. Expression is first seen in the auditory portion of VIIIth nerve including central axonal regions projecting to nucleus magnocellularis (NM, then later in NM axons projecting to nucleus laminaris (NL, and subsequently in NL dendrites. To examine the function of cleaved caspase-3 in chick auditory brainstem development, we blocked caspase-3 cleavage in developing chick embryos with the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK from E6 to E9, then examined NM and NL morphology and NM axonal targeting on E10. NL lamination in treated embryos was disorganized and the neuropil around NL contained a significant number of glial cells normally excluded from this region. Additionally, NM axons projected into inappropriate portions of NL in Z-DEVD-FMK treated embyros. We found that the presence of misrouted axons was associated with more severe NL disorganization. The effects of axonal caspase-3 inhibition on both NL morphogenesis and NM axon targeting suggest that these developmental processes are coordinated, likely through communication between axons and their targets.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: giant axonal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connect the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to muscles and to sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound. However, axons in the central nervous system are affected as well. The signs and symptoms ...

  16. Melanopsin Ganglion Cells Are the Most Resistant Retinal Ganglion Cell Type to Axonal Injury in the Rat Retina

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Sargoy, Allison; Rodriguez, Allen R.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    We report that the most common retinal ganglion cell type that remains after optic nerve transection is the M1 melanopsin ganglion cell. M1 ganglion cells are members of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell population that mediates non-image-forming vision, comprising ∼2.5% of all ganglion cells in the rat retina. In the present study, M1 ganglion cells comprised 1.7±1%, 28±14%, 55±13% and 82±8% of the surviving ganglion cells 7, 14, 21 and 60 days after optic nerve transect...

  17. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV is sorted to the secretory granules in pancreatic islet A-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mona Dam; Hansen, Gert Helge; Dabelsteen, Erik

    1993-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV:EC 3.4.14.5) was localized in endocrine cells of pig pancreas by immunohistochemical and enzyme histochemical methods. Immunolight microscopy with both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies demonstrated DP IV immunoreactivity in cells located in the peripheral part...

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study...

  19. Polyphenols differentially inhibit degranulation of distinct subsets of vesicles in mast cells by specific interaction with granule-type-dependent SNARE complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yoosoo; Oh, Jung-Mi; Heo, Paul; Shin, Jae Yoon; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Lee, Ji-Chun; Oh, Jeong Su; Park, Kye Won; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Anti-allergic effects of dietary polyphenols were extensively studied in numerous allergic disease models, but the molecular mechanisms of anti-allergic effects by polyphenols remain poorly understood. In the present study, we show that the release of granular cargo molecules, contained in distinct subsets of granules of mast cells, is specifically mediated by two sets of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins, and that various polyphenols differentially inhibit the formation of those SNARE complexes. Expression analysis of RBL-2H3 cells for 11 SNARE genes and a lipid mixing assay of 24 possible combinations of reconstituted SNAREs indicated that the only two active SNARE complexes involved in mast cell degranulation are Syn (syntaxin) 4/SNAP (23 kDa synaptosome-associated protein)-23/VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein) 2 and Syn4/SNAP-23/VAMP8. Various polyphenols selectively or commonly interfered with ternary complex formation of these two SNARE complexes, thereby stopping membrane fusion between granules and plasma membrane. This led to the differential effect of polyphenols on degranulation of three distinct subsets of granules. These results suggest the possibility that formation of a variety of SNARE complexes in numerous cell types is controlled by polyphenols which, in turn, might regulate corresponding membrane trafficking. PMID:23252429

  20. Effects of x-irradiation induced loss of cerebellar granule cells on the synaptosomal levels and the high affinity uptake of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, B.H.; Rea, M.A.; Simon, J.R.; McBride, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Crude synaptosomal (P 2 ) preparations were obtained from the cerebella of rats in which the granule cell population had been selectively reduced by X-irradiation treatment and from the cerebella of control animals. In the P 2 fraction form control cerebella, the level of glutamate was greater than any other of the 5 amino acids measured and was 2-fold higher than taurine. The content of taurine, GABA, glycine, and alanine were not changed by the X-irradiation treatment. The uptake of 1.0 micrometers-L-[ 3 H]glutamate and L-[ 3 H]aspartate was reduced approx 20% by X-irradiation treatment, whereas the uptake of 1.0 micrometers-[ 3 H]GABA and [ 3 H]taurine was unchanged. In a second study, the uptake of L-[ 3 H]glutamate, L-[ 3 H]aspartate and [ 3 H]GABA was measured using P 2 fractions obtained from the cerebella of rats in which the population of granule, stellate and basket cells had been reduced by X-irradiation treatment. The uptake of 1.0 micrometers-L-[ 3 H]glutamate, L-[ 3 H]aspartate and [ 3 H]GABA was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 57.68 and 59% respectively, of control values. The data are discussed in terms of glutamate being the excitatory neurotransmitter released from granule cells and GABA being the inhibitory neurotransmitter released from basket cells. (author)

  1. Aggregation of immobilized activated sludge cells into aerobically grown microbial granules for the aerobic biodegradation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H-L; Tay, J-H; Tay, S T-L

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the utility of aerobically grown microbial granules for the biological treatment of phenol-containing wastewater. A column-type sequential aerobic sludge blanket reactor was inoculated with activated sludge and fed with phenol as the sole carbon source, at a rate of 1.5 g phenol l-1 d-1. Aerobically grown microbial granules first appeared on day 9 of reactor operation and quickly grew to displace the seed flocs as the dominant form of biomass in the reactor. These granules were compact and regular in appearance, and consisted of bacterial rods and cocci and fungi embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix. The granules had a mean size of 0.52 mm, a sludge volume index of 40 ml g-1 and a specific oxygen utilization rate of 110 mg oxygen g VSS-1 h-1 (VSS stands for volatile suspended solids). Specific phenol degradation rates increased with phenol concentration from 0 to 500 mg phenol l-1, peaked at 1.4 g phenol g VSS-1 d-1, and declined with further increases in phenol concentration as substrate inhibition effects became important. Aerobically grown microbial granules were successfully cultivated in a reactor maintained at a loading rate of 1.5 g phenol l-1 d-1. The granules exhibited a high tolerance towards phenol. Significant rates of phenol degradation were attained at phenol concentrations as high as 2 g l-1. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability of aerobically grown microbial granules to degrade phenol. These granules appear to represent an excellent immobilization strategy for microorganisms to biologically remove phenol and other toxic chemicals in high-strength industrial wastewaters.

  2. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections).

  3. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Dario Pinzon Morales

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granule cells (GCs have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to textcolor{red}{support} motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF, an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs, and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs. Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs ($<$ 200 in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs. It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights. Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections.

  4. Naringin attenuates granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hannah; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Morphological abnormalities of the dentate gyrus (DG) are an important phenotype in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We recently reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, exerts beneficial effects in the kainic acid (KA) mouse model of epilepsy. We found that naringin treatment reduced seizure activities and decreased autophagic stress and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus following in vivo lesion with KA. However, it remains unclear whether naringin may also attenuate seizure-induced morphological changes in the DG, collectively known as granule cell dispersion (GCD). To clarify whether naringin treatment reduces GCD, we evaluated the effects of intraperitoneal injection of naringin on GCD and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), an important regulator of GCD, following intrahippocampal injection of KA. Our results showed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which was confirmed by assessing the phosphorylated form of the mTORC1 substrate, 4E-BP1, in the hippocampus. These results suggest that naringin treatment may help prevent epilepsy-induced hippocampal injury by inhibiting mTORC1 activation and thereby reducing GCD in the hippocampus in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mosaic organization of the hippocampal neuroepithelium and the multiple germinal sources of dentate granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, J.; Bayer, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This study deals with the site of origin, migration, and settling of the principal cell constituents of the rat hippocampus during the embryonic period. The results indicate that the hippocampal neuroepithelium consists of three morphogenetically discrete components--the Ammonic neuroepithelium, the primary dentate neuroepithelium, and the fimbrial glioepithelium--and that these are discrete sources of the large neurons of Ammon's horn, the smaller granular neurons of the dentate gyrus, and the glial cells of the fimbria. The putative Ammonic neuroepithelium is marked in short-survival thymidine radiograms by a high level of proliferative activity and evidence of interkinetic nuclear migration from day E16 until day E19. On days E16 and E17 a diffuse band of unlabeled cells forms outside the Ammonic neuroepithelium. These postmitotic cells are considered to be stratum radiatum and stratum oriens neurons, which are produced in large numbers as early as day E15. A cell-dense layer, the incipient stratum pyramidale, begins to form on day E18 and spindle-shaped cells can be traced to it from the Ammonic neuroepithelium. This migratory band increases in size for several days, then declines, and finally disappears by day E22. It is inferred that this migration contains the pyramidal cells of Ammon's horn that are produced mostly on days E17 through E20. The putative primary dentate neuroepithelium is distinguished from the Ammonic neuroepithelium during the early phases of embryonic development by its location, shape, and cellular dynamics. It is located around a ventricular indentation, the dentate notch, contains fewer mitotic cells near the lumen of the ventricle than the Ammonic neuroepithelium, and shows a different labeling pattern both in short-survival and sequential-survival thymidine radiograms

  6. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes long-term survival and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury: comparison with CNTF and BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Kai; Cheung, Anny Wan-Suen; Yu, Sau-Wai; Sha, Ou; Cho, Eric Yu Pang

    2014-10-01

    Different trophic factors are known to promote retinal ganglion cell survival and regeneration, but each had their own limitations. We report that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) confers distinct advantages in supporting ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration, when compared to two well-established trophic factors ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Ganglion cells in adult hamster were injured by cutting the optic nerve. HGF, CNTF, or BDNF was injected at different dosages intravitreally after injury. Ganglion cell survival was quantified at 7, 14, or 28 days postinjury. Peripheral nerve (PN) grafting to the cut optic nerve of the growth factor-injected eye was performed either immediately after injury or delayed until 7 days post-injury. Expression of heat-shock protein 27 and changes in microglia numbers were quantified in different growth factor groups. The cellular distribution of c-Met in the retina was examined by anti-c-Met immunostaining. Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) was equally potent as BDNF in promoting short-term survival (up to 14 days post-injury) and also supported survival at 28 days post-injury when ganglion cells treated by CNTF or BDNF failed to be sustained. When grafting was performed without delay, HGF stimulated twice the number of axons to regenerate compared with control but was less potent than CNTF. However, in PN grafting delayed for 7 days after optic nerve injury, HGF maintained a better propensity of ganglion cells to regenerate than CNTF. Unlike CNTF, HGF application did not increase HSP27 expression in ganglion cells. Microglia proliferation was prolonged in HGF-treated retinas compared with CNTF or BDNF. C-Met was localized to both ganglion cells and Muller cells, suggesting HGF could be neuroprotective via interacting with both neurons and glia. Compared with CNTF or BDNF, HGF is advantageous in sustaining long-term ganglion cell survival and their propensity to respond to

  7. Mitochondria Localize to Injured Axons to Support Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-12-21

    Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo, single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth-cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase 1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell-biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the osteogenic potentials of autologous cultured osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells loaded onto allogeneic cancellous bone granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Jung; Chung, Yang-Guk; Lee, Yun-Kyoung; Oh, Il-Whan; Kim, Yong-Sik; Moon, Young-Seok

    2012-02-01

    We compared the bone regeneration potentials of autologous cultured osteoblasts and of bone-marrow-derived autologous MSCs in combination with allogeneic cancellous bone granules in a rabbit radial defect model. Radial shaft defects over 15 mm were made in 26 New Zealand white rabbits. The animals underwent insertion of allogeneic cancellous bone granules containing autologous osteoblasts into right-side defects (the experimental group) and of allogeneic cancellous bone granules with autologous MSCs into left-side defects (the control group). To quantitatively assess bone regeneration, radiographic evaluations as well as BMD and BMC measurements were performed 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-implantation and histology as well as micro-CT image analysis were performed at 6 and 12 weeks. Radiographic evaluations 3 weeks post-implantation showed that the experimental group had a higher mean bone quantity index (p bone volume and surface area than the control sides (p bone formation in the experimental group. This in vivo study demonstrates that a combination of autologous osteoblasts and small-sized, allogeneic cancellous bone granules leads to more rapid bone regeneration than autologous MSCs and small-sized, allogeneic cancellous bone granules.

  9. The quorum-sensing effect of aerobic granules on bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, and sludge granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ting-ting; Yu, Han-qing; Li, Xiao-yan

    2010-10-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) through signal chemical molecules is known to be essential to bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. In this study, the QS ability of aerobic granules--a special form of biofilms used for biological wastewater treatment--was investigated and compared with that of conventional activated sludge flocs. A novel sectional membrane bioreactor was used together with a flow-cell to evaluate the possible influence of signal chemicals produced by the source sludge on the growth mode of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the apparent production of QS chemicals from granules and its impact on initial cell attachment and granule formation. When granules were used as the signal-producing biomass, the attached-growth mode was dominant for the free cells, and the biofilm formation rate in the flow-cell was about ten times faster than in cases which used activated sludge as the signal source biomass. In addition, the intracellular extract from mature granules significantly accelerated the sludge granulation process. It is argued that the production and expression of QS signal chemicals from granules and granule precursors might have induced the gene expression of bacteria in suspension for attached growth rather than suspended growth, leading to granule formation and its stable structure.

  10. The endocytic pathways of a secretory granule membrane protein in HEK293 cells: PAM and EGF traverse a dynamic multivesicular body network together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Nils; Kanerva, Kristiina; Kurutihalli, Vishwanatha; Yanik, Andrew; Ikonen, Elina; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2017-08-01

    Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) is highly expressed in neurons and endocrine cells, where it catalyzes one of the final steps in the biosynthesis of bioactive peptides. PAM is also expressed in unicellular organisms such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which do not store peptides in secretory granules. As for other granule membrane proteins, PAM is retrieved from the cell surface and returned to the trans-Golgi network. This pathway involves regulated entry of PAM into multivesicular body intralumenal vesicles (ILVs). The aim of this study was defining the endocytic pathways utilized by PAM in cells that do not store secretory products in granules. Using stably transfected HEK293 cells, endocytic trafficking of PAM was compared to that of the mannose 6-phosphate (MPR) and EGF (EGFR) receptors, established markers for the endosome to trans-Golgi network and degradative pathways, respectively. As in neuroendocrine cells, PAM internalized by HEK293 cells accumulated in the trans-Golgi network. Based on surface biotinylation, >70% of the PAM on the cell surface was recovered intact after a 4h chase and soluble, bifunctional PAM was produced. Endosomes containing PAM generally contained both EGFR and MPR and ultrastructural analysis confirmed that all three cargos accumulated in ILVs. PAM containing multivesicular bodies made frequent dynamic tubular contacts with younger and older multivesicular bodies. Frequent dynamic contacts were observed between lysosomes and PAM containing early endosomes and multivesicular bodies. The ancient ability of PAM to localize to ciliary membranes, which release bioactive ectosomes, may be related to its ability to accumulate in ILVs and exosomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  12. The relation between granule size, granule stickiness, and torque in the high-shear granulation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, A.M.; Henstra, M.J.; Hegge, J.J.M.E.; Zhang, Z.; Ingram, A.; Seville, J.P.K.; Frijlink, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the background of the observed relationship between measured torque and granule size in high-shear granulation processes. Methods. Torque was measured during the granulation process; the behavior of individual wet granules during compaction was investigated using

  13. B-RAF kinase drives developmental axon growth and promotes axon regeneration in the injured mature CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donovan, Kevin J.; Ma, Kaijie; Guo, Hengchang; Wang, Chen; Sun, Fang; Han, Seung Baek; Kim, Hyukmin; Wong, Jamie K.; Charron, Jean; Zou, Hongyan; Son, Young-Jin; He, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Activation of intrinsic growth programs that promote developmental axon growth may also facilitate axon regeneration in injured adult neurons. Here, we demonstrate that conditional activation of B-RAF kinase alone in mouse embryonic neurons is sufficient to drive the growth of long-range peripheral sensory axon projections in vivo in the absence of upstream neurotrophin signaling. We further show that activated B-RAF signaling enables robust regenerative growth of sensory axons into the spinal cord after a dorsal root crush as well as substantial axon regrowth in the crush-lesioned optic nerve. Finally, the combination of B-RAF gain-of-function and PTEN loss-of-function promotes optic nerve axon extension beyond what would be predicted for a simple additive effect. We conclude that cell-intrinsic RAF signaling is a crucial pathway promoting developmental and regenerative axon growth in the peripheral and central nervous systems. PMID:24733831

  14. Different NK cell-activating receptors preferentially recruit Rab27a or Munc13-4 to perforin-containing granules for cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Stephanie M; Meeths, Marie; Chiang, Samuel C C

    2009-01-01

    of perforin-containing lytic granules induced by signals for natural and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrate here that these signals fail to induce degranulation in resting NK cells from Rab27a-deficient patients. In resting NK cells from healthy subjects, endogenous Rab27a and Munc13...... functional antigen-1, NKG2D, or 2B4 induced colocalization of Rab27a, but not Munc13-4, with perforin. Conversely, engagement of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity receptor CD16 induced colocalization of Munc13-4, but not Rab27a, with perforin. Furthermore, colocalization of Munc13-4 with perforin...

  15. Granulation of fine powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  16. Label-free distinguishing between neurons and glial cells based on two-photon excited fluorescence signal of neuron perinuclear granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huiping; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Neurons and glial cells are two critical cell types of brain tissue. Their accurate identification is important for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, distinguishing between neurons and glial cells by using the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals of intracellular intrinsic sources was performed. TPEF microscopy combined with TUJ-1 and GFAP immunostaining and quantitative image analysis demonstrated that the perinuclear granules of neurons in the TPEF images of brain tissue and the primary cultured cortical cells were a unique characteristic of neurons compared to glial cells which can become a quantitative feature to distinguish neurons from glial cells. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope (‘two-photon fiberscopes’) imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effective diagnostic and monitoring tool for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

  17. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1 gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy.

  18. The Networks of Genes Encoding Palmitoylated Proteins in Axonal and Synaptic Compartments Are Affected in PPT1 Overexpressing Neuronal-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pezzini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available CLN1 disease (OMIM #256730 is an early childhood ceroid-lipofuscinosis associated with mutated CLN1, whose product Palmitoyl-Protein Thioesterase 1 (PPT1 is a lysosomal enzyme involved in the removal of palmitate residues from S-acylated proteins. In neurons, PPT1 expression is also linked to synaptic compartments. The aim of this study was to unravel molecular signatures connected to CLN1. We utilized SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells overexpressing wild type CLN1 (SH-p.wtCLN1 and five selected CLN1 patients’ mutations. The cellular distribution of wtPPT1 was consistent with regular processing of endogenous protein, partially detected inside Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein 2 (LAMP2 positive vesicles, while the mutants displayed more diffuse cytoplasmic pattern. Transcriptomic profiling revealed 802 differentially expressed genes (DEGs in SH-p.wtCLN1 (as compared to empty-vector transfected cells, whereas the number of DEGs detected in the two mutants (p.L222P and p.M57Nfs*45 was significantly lower. Bioinformatic scrutiny linked DEGs with neurite formation and neuronal transmission. Specifically, neuritogenesis and proliferation of neuronal processes were predicted to be hampered in the wtCLN1 overexpressing cell line, and these findings were corroborated by morphological investigations. Palmitoylation survey identified 113 palmitoylated protein-encoding genes in SH-p.wtCLN1, including 25 ones simultaneously assigned to axonal growth and synaptic compartments. A remarkable decrease in the expression of palmitoylated proteins, functionally related to axonal elongation (GAP43, CRMP1 and NEFM and of the synaptic marker SNAP25, specifically in SH-p.wtCLN1 cells was confirmed by immunoblotting. Subsequent, bioinformatic network survey of DEGs assigned to the synaptic annotations linked 81 DEGs, including 23 ones encoding for palmitoylated proteins. Results obtained in this experimental setting outlined two affected functional modules (connected to

  19. Modeling de novo granulation of anaerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doloman, Anna; Varghese, Honey; Miller, Charles D; Flann, Nicholas S

    2017-07-17

    A unique combination of mechanical, physiochemical and biological forces influences granulation during processes of anaerobic digestion. Understanding this process requires a systems biology approach due to the need to consider not just single-cell metabolic processes, but also the multicellular organization and development of the granule. In this computational experiment, we address the role that physiochemical and biological processes play in granulation and provide a literature-validated working model of anaerobic granule de novo formation. The agent-based model developed in a cDynoMiCs simulation environment successfully demonstrated a de novo granulation in a glucose fed system, with the average specific methanogenic activity of 1.11 ml C H 4 /g biomass and formation of a 0.5 mm mature granule in 33 days. The simulated granules exhibit experimental observations of radial stratification: a central dead core surrounded by methanogens then encased in acidogens. Practical application of the granulation model was assessed on the anaerobic digestion of low-strength wastewater by measuring the changes in methane yield as experimental configuration parameters were systematically searched. In the model, the emergence of multicellular organization of anaerobic granules from randomly mixed population of methanogens and acidogens was observed and validated. The model of anaerobic de novo granulation can be used to predict the morphology of the anaerobic granules in a alternative substrates of interest and to estimate methane potential of the resulting microbial consortia. The study demonstrates a successful integration of a systems biology approach to model multicellular systems with the engineering of an efficient anaerobic digestion system.

  20. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Concepts for regulation of axon integrity by enwrapping glia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan eBeirowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Long axons and their enwrapping glia (Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes form a unique compound structure that serves as conduit for transport of electric and chemical information in the nervous system. The peculiar cytoarchitecture over an enormous length as well as its substantial energetic requirements make this conduit particularly susceptible to detrimental alterations. Degeneration of long axons independent of neuronal cell bodies is observed comparatively early in a range of neurodegenerative conditions as a consequence of abnormalities in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes. This leads to the most relevant disease symptoms and highlights the critical role that these glia have for axon integrity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The quest to understand why and how axons degenerate is now a crucial frontier in disease-oriented research. This challenge is most likely to lead to significant progress if the inextricable link between axons and their flanking glia in pathological situations is recognized. In this review I compile recent advances in our understanding of the molecular programs governing axon degeneration, and mechanisms of enwrapping glia’s non-cell autonomous impact on axon-integrity. A particular focus is placed on emerging evidence suggesting that enwrapping glia nurture long axons by virtue of their intimate association, release of trophic substances, and neurometabolic coupling. The correction of defects in these functions has the potential to stabilize axons in a variety of neuronal diseases in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  2. Statistical Frailty Modeling for Quantitative Analysis of Exocytotic Events Recorded by Live Cell Imaging: Rapid Release of Insulin-Containing Granules Is Impaired in Human Diabetic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Gandasi, Nikhil R; Barg, Sebastian; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-01-01

    Hormones and neurotransmitters are released when secretory granules or synaptic vesicles fuse with the cell membrane, a process denoted exocytosis. Modern imaging techniques, in particular total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, allow the investigator to monitor secretory granules at the plasma membrane before and when they undergo exocytosis. However, rigorous statistical approaches for temporal analysis of such exocytosis data are still lacking. We propose here that statistical methods from time-to-event (also known as survival) analysis are well suited for the problem. These methods are typically used in clinical settings when individuals are followed over time to the occurrence of an event such as death, remission or conception. We model the rate of exocytosis in response to pulses of stimuli in insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cell from healthy and diabetic human donors using piecewise-constant hazard modeling. To study heterogeneity in the granule population we exploit frailty modeling, which describe unobserved differences in the propensity to exocytosis. In particular, we insert a discrete frailty in our statistical model to account for the higher rate of exocytosis in an immediately releasable pool (IRP) of insulin-containing granules. Estimates of parameters are obtained from maximum-likelihood methods. Since granules within the same cell are correlated, i.e., the data are clustered, a modified likelihood function is used for log-likelihood ratio tests in order to perform valid inference. Our approach allows us for example to estimate the size of the IRP in the cells, and we find that the IRP is deficient in diabetic cells. This novel application of time-to-event analysis and frailty modeling should be useful also for the study of other well-defined temporal events at the cellular level.

  3. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs and local calcium signals that they trigger are fundamental for dendritic functions. Here we addressed the question what extent the changes of local dendritic membrane properties can contribute to the shaping of the coupling between dendritic action potentials and the local calcium responses. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiological and confocal imaging techniques we found that activation of dendritic GIRK channels via mGlu2 or GABAB receptors enhanced the bAP¬-triggered calcium signals in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs. The enhancement of calcium signals was significant only in those dendritic regions, where these receptors are predominantly expressed. Similarly to GIRK channel activation, somatic hyperpolarization by DC current injection (from -64 mV to -77 mV, significantly increased bAP-associated calcium signals in the proximal dendrites. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in the input resistance due to the rectification of the membrane potential of GCs. The effect of hyperpolarization on the calcium signals was maintained when T-type calcium currents were blocked but it decreased when GIRK channels were inhibited. Simultaneous dual somato-dendritic recordings from GCs showed that somatic hyperpolarization accelerated the repolarization phase of dendritic bAP in the proximal region whereas the rising phase and peak amplitude was not affected. We hypothesize that the larger driving force for calcium ions during the faster repolarization can contribute to the increasing in calcium signals. Employment of previously recorded dendritic bAP waveforms from hyperpolarized membrane potential as voltage command evoked larger calcium currents in nucleated patches compared to bAP waveform from the same recording at depolarized membrane potential. Furthermore, addition of native, high-voltage activated, inactivating potassium conductance by somatic dynamic clamp

  4. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robin; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialized glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarization followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is...

  5. Axonal branching patterns of nucleus accumbens neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anushree; Prensa, Lucía; Cebrián, Carolina; Mengual, Elisa

    2010-11-15

    The patterns of axonal collateralization of nucleus accumbens (Acb) projection neurons were investigated in the rat by means of single-axon tracing techniques using the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine. Seventy-three axons were fully traced, originating from either the core (AcbC) or shell (AcbSh) compartment, as assessed by differential calbindin D28k-immunoreactivity. Axons from AcbC and AcbSh showed a substantial segregation in their targets; target areas were either exclusively or preferentially innervated from AcbC or AcbSh. Axon collaterals in the subthalamic nucleus were found at higher than expected frequencies; moreover, these originated exclusively in the dorsal AcbC. Intercompartmental collaterals were observed from ventral AcbC axons into AcbSh, and likewise, interconnections at pallidal and mesencephalic levels were also observed, although mostly from AcbC axons toward AcbSh targets, possibly supporting crosstalk between the two subcircuits at several levels. Cell somata giving rise to short-range accumbal axons, projecting to the ventral pallidum (VP), were spatially intermingled with others, giving rise to long-range axons that innervated VP and more caudal targets. This anatomical organization parallels that of the dorsal striatum and provides the basis for possible dual direct and indirect actions from a single axon on either individual or small sets of neurons. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Sniff-Like Patterned Input Results in Long-Term Plasticity at the Rat Olfactory Bulb Mitral and Tufted Cell to Granule Cell Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Chatterjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During odor sensing the activity of principal neurons of the mammalian olfactory bulb, the mitral and tufted cells (MTCs, occurs in repetitive bursts that are synchronized to respiration, reminiscent of hippocampal theta-gamma coupling. Axonless granule cells (GCs mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between the excitatory MTCs via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. We have explored long-term plasticity at this synapse by using a theta burst stimulation (TBS protocol and variations thereof. GCs were excited via glomerular stimulation in acute brain slices. We find that TBS induces exclusively long-term depression in the majority of experiments, whereas single bursts (“single-sniff paradigm” can elicit both long-term potentiation and depression. Statistical analysis predicts that the mechanism underlying this bidirectional plasticity involves the proportional addition or removal of presynaptic release sites. Gamma stimulation with the same number of APs as in TBS was less efficient in inducing plasticity. Both TBS- and “single-sniff paradigm”-induced plasticity depend on NMDA receptor activation. Since the onset of plasticity is very rapid and requires little extra activity, we propose that these forms of plasticity might play a role already during an ongoing search for odor sources. Our results imply that components of both short-term and long-term olfactory memory may be encoded at this synapse.

  7. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    GABA has been shown to exert a neurotrophic like activity by enhancing the morphological and functional maturation of neurons. Mechanisms involved in this effect of GABA are largely unknown but since GABA has been shown to mediate a hyperpolarizing action on neurons it can be assumed...... that this action might be important. In order to investigate this possibility, the ability to mimic the trophic actions of GABA of different agents known to influence the membrane potential or the GABA gated chloride channels was studied. Hence, GABA receptor expression as well as the ultrastructure of cerebellar...... granule cells were monitored after exposure of the cells in culture to either bromide, valinomycin or picrotoxin. It was found that cells which at early developmental stages (4 days in culture) were exposed to bromide or valinomycin expressed low affinity GABA receptors similar to cells treated...

  8. Enhanced Inhibitory Effect of Ultra-Fine Granules of Red Ginseng on LPS-induced Cytokine Expression in the Monocyte-Derived Macrophage THP-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yeoul Kim

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Red ginseng is one of the most popular traditional medicines in Korea because its soluble hot-water extract is known to be very effective on enhancing immunity as well as inhibiting inflammation. Recently, we developed a new technique, called the HACgearshift system, which can pulverize red ginseng into the ultra-fine granules ranging from 0.2 to 7.0 μm in size. In this study, the soluble hot-water extract of those ultra-fine granules of red ginseng (URG was investigated and compared to that of the normal-sized granules of red ginseng (RG. The high pressure liquid chromatographic analyses of the soluble hot-water extracts of both URG and RG revealed that URG had about 2-fold higher amounts of the ginsenosides, the biologically active components in red ginseng, than RG did. Using quantitative RT-PCR, cytokine profiling against the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the monocyte-derived macrophage THP-1 cells demonstrated that the URG-treated cells showed a significant reduction in cytokine expression than the RG-treated ones. Transcription expression of the LPS-induced cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TGF-β was significantly inhibited by URG compared to RG. These results suggest that some biologically active and soluble components in red ginseng can be more effectively extracted from URG than RG by standard hot-water extraction.

  9. Active polysomes in the axoplasm of the squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, A; Menichini, E; Perrone Capano, C; Langella, M; Martin, R; Castigli, E; Kaplan, B B

    1991-01-01

    Axons and axon terminals are widely believed to lack the capacity to synthesize proteins, relying instead on the delivery of proteins made in the perikaryon. In agreement with this view, axoplasmic proteins synthesized by the isolated giant axon of the squid are believed to derive entirely from periaxonal glial cells. However, squid axoplasm is known to contain the requisite components of an extra-mitochondrial protein synthetic system, including protein factors, tRNAs, rRNAs, and a heterogeneous family of mRNAs. Hence, the giant axon could, in principle, maintain an endogenous protein synthetic capacity. Here, we report that the squid giant axon also contains active polysomes and mRNA, which hybridizes to a riboprobe encoding murine neurofilament protein. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence that proteins (including the putative neuron-specific neurofilament protein) are also synthesized de novo in the axonal compartment.

  10. Giant renin secretory granules in beige mouse renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Rasch, Ruth; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    1997-01-01

    The mutant beige mouse (C57BL/6 bg) has a disease characterised by abnormally enlarged cytoplasmic granules in a variety of cells. With the purpose of establishing a suitable cellular model for studying renin secretion, the present study was undertaken to compare renin granule morphology in beige.......5+/-0.3 mGoldblatt units/ml). The total volume of renin granules per afferent arteriole was similar in the two mice strains (1114 microm3 in the controls and 1507 microm3 in the beige mice). The total number of renin granules per arteriole as assessed by stereological techniques was about 1900 in controls...... (average granular volume 0.681 microm3), whereas 1-2 large granules were present per cell in beige mice. The volume of afferent arteriole that contained secretory granules was lower in the beige mice. We conclude that the beige mouse synthesizes, stores and releases active renin. Renin secretory granules...

  11. Sensory axon-derived neuregulin-1 is required for axoglial signaling and normal sensory function but not for long-term axon maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fricker, F.R.; Zhu, N.; Tsantoulas, C.

    2009-01-01

    to represent large-diameter axons that have failed to myelinate. Conditional neuregulin-1 ablation resulted in a reduced sensitivity to noxious mechanical stimuli. These findings emphasize the importance of neuregulin-1 in mediating the signaling between axons and both myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann...... cells required for normal sensory function. Sensory neuronal survival and axonal maintenance, however, are not dependent on axon-derived neuregulin-1 signaling in adulthood Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6/17...

  12. Leptin enhances NR2B-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate responses via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent process in cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, A J; Wallace, L; Durakoglugil, D; Harvey, J

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that the hormone leptin regulates energy balance via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, evidence is accumulating that leptin plays a key role in numerous CNS functions. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in many extrahypothalamic brain regions, with high levels found in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In the hippocampus leptin has been shown to facilitate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function and modulate synaptic plasticity. A role for leptin in cerebellar function is also indicated as leptin-deficient rodents display reduced mobility that is unrelated to obesity. Here we show that leptin receptor immunolabeling can be detected in cultured cerebellar granule cells, being expressed at the somatic plasma membrane and also concentrated at synapses. Furthermore, leptin facilitated NR2B N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx in cerebellar granule cells via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway. These findings provide the first direct evidence for a cellular action of leptin in cerebellar neurons. In addition, given that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity in the cerebellum is crucial for normal locomotor function, these data also have important implications for the potential role of leptin in the control of movement.

  13. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit in cultured cerebellar granule cells is developmentally regulated by activation of GABA(A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, B X; Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1997-01-01

    Da (alpha6 subunit) radioactive peaks in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In contrast, THIP-treated granule cells at 8 DIV demonstrated a small but significant decrease from control cultures in the photoincorporation of [3H]Ro15-4513 in the 51-kDa peak; however...... that the major effect of THIP was to increase alpha6 subunit clustering on granule cell bodies as well as neurites, 15-fold and sixfold, respectively. Using in situ hybridization, a small THIP-induced increase in alpha6 mRNA was detected at 4 DIV; however, no effect was apparent at 8 DIV. These data suggest......(A) receptor subunit. Membranes prepared from these cultures were photolabeled with the imidazobenzodiazepine [3H]Ro15-4513. In THIP-treated cultures at 4 days in vitro (DIV), photolabeled [3H]Ro15-4513 binding in membranes was significantly increased for both the 51 kilodalton, kDa, (alpha1 subunit) and 56-k...

  14. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu eFujitani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representative of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member’s ecophysiology in a variety of habitats.

  15. Ficolin-1 is present in a highly mobilizable subset of human neutrophil granules and associates with the cell surface after stimulation with fMLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvig, Sara; Honoré, Christian Le Fèvre; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2009-01-01

    . Immunohistochemistry and subcellular fractionation demonstrated that ficolin-1 is primarily localized in gelatinase granules but also in highly exocytosable gelatinase-poor granules, not described previously. Ficolin-1 is released from neutrophil granules by stimulation with fMLP or PMA, and the majority becomes...

  16. EAT-2, a SAP-like adaptor, controls NK cell activation through phospholipase Cγ, Ca++, and Erk, leading to granule polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Quintero, Luis-Alberto; Roncagalli, Romain; Guo, Huaijian; Latour, Sylvain; Davidson, Dominique; Veillette, André

    2014-04-07

    Ewing's sarcoma-associated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is an Src homology 2 domain-containing intracellular adaptor related to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP), the X-linked lymphoproliferative gene product. Both EAT-2 and SAP are expressed in natural killer (NK) cells, and their combined expression is essential for NK cells to kill abnormal hematopoietic cells. SAP mediates this function by coupling SLAM family receptors to the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and the exchange factor Vav, thereby promoting conjugate formation between NK cells and target cells. We used a variety of genetic, biochemical, and imaging approaches to define the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which EAT-2 controls NK cell activation. We found that EAT-2 mediates its effects in NK cells by linking SLAM family receptors to phospholipase Cγ, calcium fluxes, and Erk kinase. These signals are triggered by one or two tyrosines located in the carboxyl-terminal tail of EAT-2 but not found in SAP. Unlike SAP, EAT-2 does not enhance conjugate formation. Rather, it accelerates polarization and exocytosis of cytotoxic granules toward hematopoietic target cells. Hence, EAT-2 promotes NK cell activation by molecular and cellular mechanisms distinct from those of SAP. These findings explain the cooperative and essential function of these two adaptors in NK cell activation.

  17. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial

  18. An Extract of Chinpi, the Dried Peel of the Citrus Fruit Unshiu, Enhances Axonal Remyelination via Promoting the Proliferation of Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Tokunaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging-induced decrease in axonal myelination/remyelination is due to impaired recruitment and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Our previous studies have shown that a monoclonal antibody to DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp box polypeptide 54 (Ddx54, a member of the DEAD box family of RNA helicases, (1 specifically labels oligodendrocyte lineages, (2 binds to mRNA and protein isoforms of myelin basic proteins (MBP, and (3 regulates migration of OPCs from ventricular zone to corpus callosum in mice. It has also been demonstrated that specific loss of a 21.5 kDa MBP isoform (MBP21.5 reflects demyelination status, and oral administration of an extract of Chinpi, citrus unshiu peel, reversed the aging-induced demyelination. Here, we report that Chinpi treatment induced a specific increase in the MBP21.5, led to the reappearance of Ddx54-expressing cells in ventricular-subventricular zone and corpus callosum of aged mice, and promoted remyelination. Treatment of in vitro OPC cultures with Chinpi constituents, hesperidin plus narirutin, led to an increase in 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation in Ddx54-expressing OPCs, but not in NG2- or Olig2-expressing cell populations. The present study suggests that Ddx54 plays crucial role in remyelination. Furthermore, Chinpi and Chinpi-containing herbal medicines may be a therapeutic option for the aging-induced demyelination diseases.

  19. Effect of Fu-Zheng-Xiao-Liu Granules on Expression of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER-2) and Proliferation and Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cell Line SKBR-3

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Ting; Yue, Shuangbing; Tian, Huan; Lin, Hong; Zhang, Guanglu; Zhang, Zili

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous research showed that granulized Fu-Zheng-Xiao-Liu has a significant effect on breast cancer. However, it remains unclear whether HER-2 plays a role in this anti-cancer effect. Material/Methods Serum of male SD rats administered Fu-Zheng-Xiao-Liu granules (SF) was prepared and used to treat HER-2 positive breast cancer cell line SKBR-3. PBS and herceptin were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. MTT was used to detect the proliferation of SKBR-3 cells. Flow...

  20. Lipid raft localization of GABA A receptor and Na+, K+-ATPase in discrete microdomain clusters in rat cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Immerdal, Lissi; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte W

    2005-01-01

    and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase were largely soluble in ice cold Triton X-100. This indicates that Brij 98 extraction defines an unusual type of cholesterol-independent lipid rafts that harbour membrane proteins also associated with underlying scaffolding/cytoskeletal proteins such as gephyrin (GABA(A) receptor......The microdomain localization of the GABA(A) receptor in rat cerebellar granule cells was studied by subcellular fractionation and fluorescence- and immunogold electron microscopy. The receptor resided in lipid rafts, prepared at 37 degrees C by extraction with the nonionic detergent Brij 98......, reflecting clustering of the two proteins in separate membrane microdomains. Both proteins were observed in patchy "hot spots" at the cell surface as well as in isolated lipid rafts. Their insolubility in Brij 98 was only marginally affected by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. In contrast, both the GABA(A) receptor...

  1. Residual tumour detection in post-treatment granulation tissue by using advanced diffusion models in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujima, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Daisuke; Sakashita, Tomohiro; Homma, Akihiro; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the detectability of the residual tumour in post-treatment granulation tissue using parameters obtained with an advanced diffusion model in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated by chemoradiation therapy. We retrospectively evaluated 23 patients with HNSCC after the full course of chemoradiation therapy. The diffusion-weighted image (DWI) acquisition used single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging with 11 b-values (0-1000). We calculated 10 DWI parameters using a mono-exponential model, a bi-exponential model, a stretched exponential model (SEM), a diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) model and a statistical diffusion model (SDM) in the region of interest (ROI) placed on the post-treatment granulation tissue. The presence of residual tumour was determined by histological findings or clinical follow-up. Among the 23 patients, seven patients were revealed to have residual tumour. The univariate analysis revealed significant differences in six parameters between the patients with and without residual tumour. From the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the highest area under curve was detected in the center of the Gaussian distribution of diffusion coefficient (D s ) obtained by the SDM. The multivariate analysis revealed that the D s and diffusion heterogeneity (α) obtained by the SEM were predictors for the presence of residual tumour. DWI parameters obtained by advanced fitting models will be one of the diagnostic tools for the detection of residual tumour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Methylmercury disrupts the balance between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated cofilin in primary cultures of mice cerebellar granule cells A proteomic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendrell, Iolanda; Carrascal, Montserrat; Campos, Francisco; Abian, Joaquin; Sunol, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental contaminant that is particularly toxic to the developing central nervous system; cerebellar granule neurons are especially vulnerable. Here, primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were continuously exposed to methylmercury for up to 16 days in vitro (div). LC50 values were 508 ± 199, 345 ± 47, and 243 ± 45 nM after exposure for 6, 11, and 16 div, respectively. Proteins from cultured mouse CGCs were separated by 2DE. Seventy-one protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and MALDI-TOF/TOF sequencing. Prolonged exposure to a subcytotoxic concentration of methylmercury significantly increased non-phosphorylated cofilin both in cell protein extracts (1.4-fold; p < 0.01) and in mitochondrial-enriched fractions (1.7-fold; p < 0.01). The decrease in P-cofilin induced by methylmercury was concentration-dependent and occurred after different exposure times. The percentage of P-cofilin relative to total cofilin significantly decreased to 49 ± 13% vs. control cells after exposure to 300 nM methylmercury for 5 div. The balance between the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated form of cofilin regulates actin dynamics and facilitates actin filament turnover. Filamentous actin dynamics and reorganization are responsible of neuron shape change, migration, polarity formation, regulation of synaptic structures and function, and cell apoptosis. An alteration of the complex regulation of the cofilin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pathway could be envisaged as an underlying mechanism compatible with reported signs of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Uptake of Retrograde Tracers by Intact Optic Nerve Axons: A New Way to Label Retinal Ganglion Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Ti-Fei; So, Kwok-Fai

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde labelling of retinal ganglion cells with optic nerve transection often leads to degeneration of ganglion cells in prolonged experiments. Here we report that an intact optic nerve could uptake retrograde tracers applied onto the surface of the nerve, leading to high efficiency labelling of ganglion cells in the retina with long-term survival of cells. This method labelled a similar number of ganglion cells (2289 +/- 174 at 2 days) as the retrograde labeling technique from the superi...

  4. Guidance of retinal axons in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Eloísa; Erskine, Lynda; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz

    2017-11-26

    In order to navigate through the surrounding environment many mammals, including humans, primarily rely on vision. The eye, composed of the choroid, sclera, retinal pigmented epithelium, cornea, lens, iris and retina, is the structure that receives the light and converts it into electrical impulses. The retina contains six major types of neurons involving in receiving and modifying visual information and passing it onto higher visual processing centres in the brain. Visual information is relayed to the brain via the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a projection known as the optic pathway. The proper formation of this pathway during development is essential for normal vision in the adult individual. Along this pathway there are several points where visual axons face 'choices' in their direction of growth. Understanding how these choices are made has advanced significantly our knowledge of axon guidance mechanisms. Thus, the development of the visual pathway has served as an extremely useful model to reveal general principles of axon pathfinding throughout the nervous system. However, due to its particularities, some cellular and molecular mechanisms are specific for the visual circuit. Here we review both general and specific mechanisms involved in the guidance of mammalian RGC axons when they are traveling from the retina to the brain to establish precise and stereotyped connections that will sustain vision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitotic events in cerebellar granule progenitor cells that expand cerebellar surface area are critical for normal cerebellar cortical lamination in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-03-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereologic principles. We demonstrate that, during the proliferative phase of the external granular layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that, during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β events lie upstream of α events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify intermitotic times for β events on a per-cell basis in postnatal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereologic studies.

  6. Decreased surface expression of the δ subunit of the GABAA receptor contributes to reduced tonic inhibition in dentate granule cells in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianhui; Peng, Zechun; Tong, Xiaoping; Lindemeyer, A Kerstin; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Houser, Carolyn R

    2017-11-01

    While numerous changes in the GABA system have been identified in models of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), alterations in subunits of the GABA A receptors (GABA A Rs) that mediate tonic inhibition are particularly intriguing. Considering the key role of tonic inhibition in controlling neuronal excitability, reduced tonic inhibition could contribute to FXS-associated disorders such as hyperactivity, hypersensitivity, and increased seizure susceptibility. The current study has focused on the expression and function of the δ subunit of the GABA A R, a major subunit involved in tonic inhibition, in granule cells of the dentate gyrus in the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model of FXS. Electrophysiological studies of dentate granule cells revealed a marked, nearly four-fold, decrease in tonic inhibition in the Fmr1 KO mice, as well as reduced effects of two δ subunit-preferring pharmacological agents, THIP and DS2, supporting the suggestion that δ subunit-containing GABA A Rs are compromised in the Fmr1 KO mice. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a small but statistically significant decrease in δ subunit labeling in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus in Fmr1 KO mice compared to wildtype (WT) littermates. The discrepancy between the large deficits in GABA-mediated tonic inhibition in granule cells in the Fmr1 KO mice and only modest reductions in immunolabeling of the δ subunit led to studies of surface expression of the δ subunit. Cross-linking experiments followed by Western blot analysis demonstrated a small, non-significant decrease in total δ subunit protein in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice, but a four-fold decrease in surface expression of the δ subunit in these mice. No significant changes were observed in total or surface expression of the α4 subunit protein, a major partner of the δ subunit in the forebrain. Postembedding immunogold labeling for the δ subunit demonstrated a large, three-fold, decrease in the number of symmetric synapses with

  7. Effect of the granulation process on nitrofurantoin granule characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, P; Brossard, D; Chaumeil, J C

    1998-01-01

    We studied four granulation methods on the same quantitative and qualitative formula: wet massing by forced agglomeration (Lödige) and free agglomeration (Glatt); and dry massing by slugging and roller compaction technique. Three different particle sizes of nitrofurantoin (bioinequivalent drug) were used. The nitrofurantoin particle size has a very low influence on the physical characteristics of the granules. The granulating process influenced the binding of the particles. Granules processed using the wet granulating method were harder than those made by dry process. Lödige granules were more bonded than Glatt granules. Granules prepared by dry massing presented broken particles. The surface area and the porosity of Glatt granules were the most important parameters. Dissolution studies must be effected to make a correlation between the physical results and the dissolution rates. It is necessary to effect a new validation and a comparison of the results when a new granulating apparatus is used.

  8. Protein-synthesizing machinery in the axon compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, E; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-01

    Contrary to the prevailing view that the axon lacks the capacity to synthesize proteins, a substantial body of evidence points to the existence of a metabolically active endogenous translational machinery. The machinery appears to be largely localized in the cortical zone of the axon, where, in vertebrate axons, it is distributed longitudinally as intermittent, discrete domains, called periaxoplasmic plaques. Studies, based on translation assays and probes of RNA transcripts in axon models such as the squid giant axon and selected vertebrate axons, provide evidence of locally synthesized proteins, most of which appear to be constituents of the slow axoplasmic transport rate groups. Metabolic and molecular biological findings are consistent with the view that the synthesis of proteins undergoing local turnover in the axonal compartment of macroneurons depends on the activity of an endogenous translational machinery. The documented presence of a metabolically active machinery in presynaptic terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons is also described. Finally, potential sources of axoplasmic RNAs comprising the machinery, which may include the ensheathing cell of the axon, as well as the cognate cell body, are also discussed.

  9. Mining the granule proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Goetze, Jens P; Johnsen, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of secretory granules is an emerging strategy for identifying secreted proteins, including potentially novel candidate biomarkers and peptide hormones. In addition, proteomics can provide information about the abundance, localization and structure (post-translational modification) of g...

  10. Laquinimod interferes with migratory capacity of T cells and reduces IL-17 levels, inflammatory demyelination and acute axonal damage in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Christiane; Stadelmann, Christine; Pförtner, Ramona; Raymond, Emanuel; Feigelson, Sara; Alon, Ronen; Timan, Bracha; Hayardeny, Liat; Brück, Wolfgang

    2010-10-08

    We investigated the effect of laquinimod on inflammatory demyelination, axonal damage, cytokine profiles and migratory capacities of lymphocytes in C57BL/6 mice with active EAE induced with MOG(35-55) peptide. The mice were treated at disease induction and after disease onset. Spinal cords were assessed histologically. Cytokines and adhesive properties were analyzed in splenocytes. Preventive and therapeutic laquinimod treatment reduced clinical signs, inflammation, and demyelination. VLA-4-mediated adhesiveness and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 were down-regulated in treated animals. Within lesions, treated mice showed similar axonal densities, but less acute axonal damage than controls. Laquinimod might thus protect myelin and axons by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines and impairing the migratory capacity of lymphocytes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficient retrograde transport of pseudorabies virus within neurons requires local protein synthesis in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Orkide O; Perlman, David H; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-01-16

    After replicating in epithelial cells, alphaherpesviruses such as pseudorabies virus (PRV) invade axons of peripheral nervous system neurons and undergo retrograde transport toward the distant cell bodies. Although several viral proteins engage molecular motors to facilitate transport, the initial steps and neuronal responses to infection are poorly understood. Using compartmented neuron cultures to physically separate axon infection from cell bodies, we found that PRV infection induces local protein synthesis in axons, including proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, intracellular trafficking, signaling, and metabolism. This rapid translation of axonal mRNAs is required for efficient PRV retrograde transport and infection of cell bodies. Furthermore, induction of axonal damage, which also induces local protein synthesis, prior to infection reduces virion trafficking, suggesting that host damage signals and virus particles compete for retrograde transport. Thus, similar to axonal damage, virus infection induces local protein translation in axons, and viruses likely exploit this response for invasion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Is Arc mRNA Unique: A Search for mRNAs That Localize to the Distal Dendrites of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells Following Neural Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. de Solis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There have been several attempts to identify which RNAs are localized to dendrites; however, no study has determined which RNAs localize to the dendrites following the induction of synaptic activity. We sought to identify all RNA transcripts that localize to the distal dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells following unilateral high frequency stimulation of the perforant pathway (pp-HFS using Sprague Dawley rats. We then utilized laser microdissection (LMD to very accurately dissect out the distal 2/3rds of the molecular layer (ML, which contains these dendrites, without contamination from the granule cell layer, 2 and 4 h post pp-HFS. Next, we purified and amplified RNA from the ML and performed an unbiased screen for 27,000 RNA transcripts using Affymetrix microarrays. We determined that Activity Regulated Cytoskeletal Protein (Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA, exhibited the greatest fold increase in the ML at both timepoints (2 and 4 h. In total, we identified 31 transcripts that increased their levels within the ML following pp-HFS across the two timepoints. Of particular interest is that one of these identified transcripts was an unprocessed micro-RNA (pri-miR132. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR were used to confirm some of these candidate transcripts. Our data indicate Arc is a unique activity dependent gene, due to the magnitude that its activity dependent transcript localizes to the dendrites. Our study determined other activity dependent transcripts likely localize to the dendrites following neural activity, but do so with lower efficiency compared to Arc.

  13. Arachnoid granulation affected by subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Chopard

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate using light microscopy the fibro-cellular components of arachnoid granulations affected by mild and severe subarachnoid hemorrage. The erythrocytes were in the channels delimitated by collagenous and elastic bundles and arachnoid cells, showing their tortuous and intercommunicating row from the pedicle to the fibrous capsule. The core portion of the pedicle and the center represented a principal route to the bulk outflow of cerebrospinal fluid and erythrocytes. In the severe hemorrhage, the fibrocellular components are desorganized, increasing the extracellular channels. We could see arachnoid granulations without erythrocytes, which cells showed big round nucleous suggesting their transformation into phagocytic cells.

  14. Growth and Localization of Polyhydroxybutyrate Granules in Ralstonia eutropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeby, Morgan; Cho, Mimi

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Ralstonia eutropha forms cytoplasmic granules of polyhydroxybutyrate that are a source of biodegradable thermoplastic. While much is known about the biochemistry of polyhydroxybutyrate production, the cell biology of granule formation and growth remains unclear. Previous studies have suggested that granules form either in the inner membrane, on a central scaffold, or in the cytoplasm. Here we used electron cryotomography to monitor granule genesis and development in 3 dimensions (3-D) in a near-native, “frozen-hydrated” state in intact Ralstonia eutropha cells. Neither nascent granules within the cell membrane nor scaffolds were seen. Instead, granules of all sizes resided toward the center of the cytoplasm along the length of the cell and exhibited a discontinuous surface layer more consistent with a partial protein coating than either a lipid mono- or bilayer. Putatively fusing granules were also seen, suggesting that small granules are continually generated and then grow and merge. Together, these observations support a model of biogenesis wherein granules form in the cytoplasm coated not by phospholipid but by protein. Previous thin-section electron microscopy (EM), fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results to the contrary may reflect both differences in nucleoid condensation and specimen preparation-induced artifacts. PMID:22178974

  15. High Leptin Level Attenuates Embryo Development in Overweight/Obese Infertile Women by Inhibiting Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Granule Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xian-Hua; Wang, Hui; Wu, Dan-Dan; Ullah, Kamran; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ur Rahman, Tanzil; Huang, He-Feng

    2017-07-01

    Obesity appears to be associated with female reproductive dysfunction and infertility. Women with obesity undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) had poor oocyte quality, decreased embryo development, and poor pregnancy outcome. However, the mechanism linking obesity to poor reproductive outcomes is still unclear. Obesity is frequently accompanied with elevated leptin levels. Here we aimed to evaluate the effect of high leptin level in follicular fluid (FF) on the proliferation and apoptosis in granule cells and correlate these findings with poor reproductive outcomes in infertile women with overweight or obesity who underwent IVF treatment. We investigated clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates in 189 infertile women who underwent IVF. Leptin levels were quantified in peripheral blood and FF as well. In vitro cell model was used to explore the potential effect of high leptin on the proliferation and apoptosis in granulosa cells. Results showed reduced clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates in overweight/obesity women who underwent IVF compared to control with normal BMI. On the other hand, leptin levels presented significant increase in peripheral blood and FF in overweight/obese women. Leptin level in FF was negatively correlated to good quality embryo rate. Importantly, in vitro study showed that leptin inhibited cells proliferation and promoted apoptosis by upregulation of caspase-3 and downregulation of Bcl-2 in granulosa cells in a dose dependent manner. These observations suggest that leptin may acts as a local mediator to attenuate embryo development and reduce fertility in obese patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Motor Axonal Regeneration After Partial and Complete Spinal Cord Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Paul; Blesch, Armin; Graham, Lori; Wang, Yaozhi; Samara, Ramsey; Banos, Karla; Haringer, Verena; Havton, Leif; Weishaupt, Nina; Bennett, David; Fouad, Karim; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    We subjected rats to either partial mid-cervical or complete upper thoracic spinal cord transections and examined whether combinatorial treatments support motor axonal regeneration into and beyond the lesion. Subjects received cAMP injections into brainstem reticular motor neurons to stimulate their endogenous growth state, bone marrow stromal cell grafts in lesion sites to provide permissive matrices for axonal growth, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gradients beyond the lesion to stimulate distal growth of motor axons. Findings were compared to several control groups. Combinatorial treatment generated motor axon regeneration beyond both C5 hemisection and complete transection sites. Yet despite formation of synapses with neurons below the lesion, motor outcomes worsened after partial cervical lesions and spasticity worsened after complete transection. These findings highlight the complexity of spinal cord repair, and the need for additional control and shaping of axonal regeneration. PMID:22699902

  17. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  18. Senso-Neuroendocrine Cells Within The Cerebral Ganglion Of The Earthworm Aporrectodea Caliginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Al Yousuf, Shoa'a [شعاع السيد اليوسف

    1992-01-01

    Ciliated neurones of probable endocrine function are present inside and outside the cerebral ganglion of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa. Cell fibers contain clusters ofsynaptoid vesicles in regions adjacent to the brain capsule or muscles. The cell bodies also send axons to terminate within the neuropile, where synapses and exocytosis of their secretory granules occur. Cytochemical studies indicate the presence of catecholamines within these granules. باستخدام المجهر الالكتروني النف...

  19. Signal propagation along the axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2018-03-08

    Axons link distant brain regions and are usually considered as simple transmission cables in which reliable propagation occurs once an action potential has been generated. Safe propagation of action potentials relies on specific ion channel expression at strategic points of the axon such as nodes of Ranvier or axonal branch points. However, while action potentials are generally considered as the quantum of neuronal information, their signaling is not entirely digital. In fact, both their shape and their conduction speed have been shown to be modulated by activity, leading to regulations of synaptic latency and synaptic strength. We report here newly identified mechanisms of (1) safe spike propagation along the axon, (2) compartmentalization of action potential shape in the axon, (3) analog modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission and (4) alteration in conduction time after persistent regulation of axon morphology in central neurons. We discuss the contribution of these regulations in information processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Eosinophil secretion of granule-derived cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Spencer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are tissue-dwelling leukocytes, present in the thymus, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals at baseline, and recruited, often in large numbers, to allergic inflammatory foci and sites of active tissue repair. The biological significance of eosinophils is vast and varied. In health, eosinophils support uterine and mammary gland development, and maintain bone marrow plasma cells and adipose tissue alternatively activated macrophages, while in response to tissue insult eosinophils function as inflammatory effector cells, and, in the wake of an inflammatory response, promote tissue regeneration and wound healing. One common mechanism driving many of the diverse eosinophil functions is the regulated and differential secretion of a vast array of eosinophil-derived cytokines. Eosinophils are distinguished from most other leukocytes in that many, if not all, of the over three dozen eosinophil-derived cytokines are pre-synthesized and stored within intracellular granules, poised for very rapid, stimulus-induced secretion. Eosinophils engaged in cytokine secretion in situ utilize distinct pathways of cytokine release that include: classical exocytosis, whereby granules themselves fuse with the plasma membrane and release their entire contents extracellularly; piecemeal degranulation, whereby granule-derived cytokines are selectively mobilized into vesicles that emerge from granules, traverse the cytoplasm and fuse with the plasma membrane to release discrete packets of cytokines; and eosinophil cytolysis, whereby intact granules are extruded from eosinophils, and deposited within tissues. In this latter scenario, extracellular granules can themselves function as stimulus-responsive secretory-competent organelles within the tissue. Here we review the distinctive processes of differential secretion of eosinophil granule-derived cytokines.

  1. Mitotic motors coregulate microtubule patterns in axons and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shen; Liu, Mei; Mozgova, Olga I; Yu, Wenqian; Baas, Peter W

    2012-10-03

    Microtubules are nearly uniformly oriented in the axons of vertebrate neurons but are non-uniformly oriented in their dendrites. Studies to date suggest a scenario for establishing these microtubule patterns whereby microtubules are transported into the axon and nascent dendrites with plus-ends-leading, and then additional microtubules of the opposite orientation are transported into the developing dendrites. Here, we used contemporary tools to confirm that depletion of kinesin-6 (also called CHO1/MKLP1 or kif23) from rat sympathetic neurons causes a reduction in the appearance of minus-end-distal microtubules in developing dendrites, which in turn causes them to assume an axon-like morphology. Interestingly, we observed a similar phenomenon when we depleted kinesin-12 (also called kif15 or HKLP2). Both motors are best known for their participation in mitosis in other cell types, and both are enriched in the cell body and dendrites of neurons. Unlike kinesin-12, which is present throughout the neuron, kinesin-6 is barely detectable in the axon. Accordingly, depletion of kinesin-6, unlike depletion of kinesin-12, has no effect on axonal branching or navigation. Interestingly, depletion of either motor results in faster growing axons with greater numbers of mobile microtubules. Based on these observations, we posit a model whereby these two motors generate forces that attenuate the transport of microtubules with plus-ends-leading from the cell body into the axon. Some of these microtubules are not only prevented from moving into the axon but are driven with minus-ends-leading into developing dendrites. In this manner, these so-called "mitotic" motors coregulate the microtubule patterns of axons and dendrites.

  2. Isolation of RNP granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønson, Lars; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Christiansen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The post-transcriptional operon provides a means of synexpression of mRNAs encoding interrelated proteins. The coordination of gene expression may be achieved by a trans-acting RNA-binding protein attaching to similar cis-elements in different, yet functionally clustered, mRNAs. The RNP granule can...... be regarded as a supramolecular assembly of RNA and protein, probably representing several overlapping post-transcriptional operons. The present protocol describes how RNP granules may be isolated by the transgenic expression of a 3X FLAG version of an RNA-binding protein under tetracycline control via...

  3. A mouse ocular explant model that enables the study of living optic nerve head events after acute and chronic intraocular pressure elevation: Focusing on retinal ganglion cell axons and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Elizabeth C; Pease, Mary E; Steinhart, Matthew R; Oglesby, Ericka N; Pitha, Ian; Nguyen, Cathy; Quigley, Harry A

    2017-07-01

    We developed an explant model of the mouse eye and optic nerve that facilitates the study of retinal ganglion cell axons and mitochondria in the living optic nerve head (ONH) in an ex vivo environment. Two transgenic mouse strains were used, one expressing yellow fluorescent protein in selected axons and a second strain expressing cyan fluorescent protein in all mitochondria. We viewed an explanted mouse eye and optic nerve by laser scanning microscopy at and behind the ONH, the site of glaucoma injury. Explants from previously untreated mice were studied with the intraocular pressure (IOP) set artificially at normal or elevated levels for several hours. Explants were also studied from eyes that had undergone chronic IOP elevation from 14 h to 6 weeks prior to ex vivo study. Image analysis in static images and video of individual mitochondria or axonal structure determined effects of acute and chronic IOP elevation. At normal IOP, fluorescent axonal structure was stable for up to 3 h under ex vivo conditions. After chronic IOP elevation, axonal integrity index values indicated fragmentation of axon structure in the ONH. In mice with fluorescent mitochondria, the normal density decreased with distance behind the ONH by 45% (p = 0.002, t-test). Density increased with prior chronic IOP elevation to 21,300 ± 4176 mitochondria/mm 2 compared to control 16,110 ± 3159 mitochondria/mm 2 (p = 0.025, t-test), but did not increase significantly after 4 h, acute IOP elevation (1.5% decrease in density, p = 0.83, t-test). Mean normal mitochondrial length of 2.3 ± 1.4 μm became 13% smaller after 4 h of IOP elevation ex vivo compared to baseline (p = 0.015, t-test, N-10). Normal mitochondrial speed of movement was significantly slower in the anterograde direction (towards the brain) than retrograde, but there were more mitochondria in motion and traveling longer lengths in anterograde direction. The percent of mitochondria in motion decreased by >50

  4. Experimental study of urea granulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irshad, U.; Sharif, M.N.; Rabbani, F.; Rauf, A.; Saleem, M.

    2009-01-01

    Urea is a nitrogenous fertilizer available in two commercial forms, prills and granules, in Pakistan. Prills are more common in Pakistan, however, it has some problems associated with it. Those are moisture, biuret contents of urea prills, prill size, hardness of prills, caking of prills and urea dust emission. Due to these problems urea granulation is favoured over prilling. Urea granulation is studied on laboratory scale using pan granulator and effect of different parameters like binders (water and urea solution), quantity of binders, rpm of pan granulator, time of granulation and angle of inclination on granulation yield is studied. Water and urea solutions of different concentrations are used and results reveal that concentration of urea solution is proportional to rate of granulation. A threshold quantity of binder is required for optimum granulation yield. RPM of pan is inversely proportional to rate of granulation. Granulation yield is also proportional to time of granulation however it becomes critical at a certain point. Angle of inclination of pan has no significant effects on granulation yield. (author)

  5. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, Balu, E-mail: Balu.Chakravarthy@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); LaFerla, Frank M. [Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Ito, Shingo [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria [Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Whitfield, James [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  6. The gene encoding the mouse contactin-1 axonal glycoprotein is regulated by the collier/Olf1/EBF family early B-Cell factor 2 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzoca, Antonella; Picocci, Sabrina; Corsi, Patrizia; Arbia, Stefania; Croci, Laura; Consalez, G Giacomo; Gennarini, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    The Contactin-1 axonal glycoprotein (formerly F3/Contactin) plays a relevant role in cerebellar ontogenesis, as shown in Contactin-1 KO-mice and in transgenic mice misexpressing the corresponding cDNA from a heterologous promoter. Likewise, null mutant mice for the Collier/Olf1/Early B-cell family transcription factor EBF2, in which Purkinje neuron development is primarily affected, exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar corticogenesis. Here, to evaluate the contribution to the Ebf2 null phenotype of changes in the profile of Contactin-1, we study its expression in Ebf2 null mice. In addition, we explore the activation profile of the Cntn1 gene promoter upon transferring the Ebf2 mutation to transgenic mice expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter under control of Cntn1 gene regulatory sequences. In Ebf2 null mice, Contactin-1 protein expression and Cntn1 gene promoter activity are both downregulated during embryonic and early postnatal cerebellar development, both in the rostral and caudal folia, while in the latter an upregulation is observed at postnatal day 8. In vitro, vectors driving EBF1,2,3 transcription factors from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter transactivate a Cntn1-Choline acetyltransferse (CAT) promoter-reporter construct in cotransfection assays and, accordingly, by chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that the Cntn1 gene 5' flanking region is bound by the EBF2 transcription factor, consistent with the evidence that this region bears the cognate deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) consensus sequences. These data indicate that Contactin-1 expression is dependent upon EBF factors, suggesting that the Cntn1 gene belongs to the expanding regulatory cascade driven by these transcriptional regulators so that changes in its activation may contribute to the phenotype of Ebf2 null mutant mice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Difference in trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor between axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, revealed by live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohara Keigo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is sorted into a regulated secretory pathway of neurons, is supposed to act retrogradely through dendrites on presynaptic neurons or anterogradely through axons on postsynaptic neurons. Depending on which is the case, the pattern and direction of trafficking of BDNF in dendrites and axons are expected to be different. To address this issue, we analyzed movements of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged BDNF in axons and dendrites of living cortical neurons by time-lapse imaging. In part of the experiments, the expression of BDNF tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was compared with that of nerve growth factor (NGF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, to see whether fluorescent protein-tagged BDNF is expressed in a manner specific to this neurotrophin. Results We found that BDNF tagged with GFP or CFP was expressed in a punctated manner in dendrites and axons in about two-thirds of neurons into which plasmid cDNAs had been injected, while NGF tagged with GFP or YFP was diffusely expressed even in dendrites in about 70% of the plasmid-injected neurons. In neurons in which BDNF-GFP was expressed as vesicular puncta in axons, 59 and 23% of the puncta were moving rapidly in the anterograde and retrograde directions, respectively. On the other hand, 64% of BDNF-GFP puncta in dendrites did not move at all or fluttered back and forth within a short distance. The rest of the puncta in dendrites were moving relatively smoothly in either direction, but their mean velocity of transport, 0.47 ± 0.23 (SD μm/s, was slower than that of the moving puncta in axons (0.73 ± 0.26 μm/s. Conclusion The present results show that the pattern and velocity of the trafficking of fluorescence protein-tagged BDNF are different between axons and dendrites, and suggest that the anterograde transport in axons may be the dominant stream of BDNF to release sites.

  8. Oligodendrocyte Development in the Absence of Their Target Axons In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Almeida

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes form myelin around axons of the central nervous system, enabling saltatory conduction. Recent work has established that axons can regulate certain aspects of oligodendrocyte development and myelination, yet remarkably oligodendrocytes in culture retain the ability to differentiate in the absence of axons and elaborate myelin sheaths around synthetic axon-like substrates. It remains unclear the extent to which the life-course of oligodendrocytes requires the presence of, or signals derived from axons in vivo. In particular, it is unclear whether the specific axons fated for myelination regulate the oligodendrocyte population in a living organism, and if so, which precise steps of oligodendrocyte-cell lineage progression are regulated by target axons. Here, we use live-imaging of zebrafish larvae carrying transgenic reporters that label oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to investigate which aspects of oligodendrocyte development, from specification to differentiation, are affected when we manipulate the target axonal environment. To drastically reduce the number of axons targeted for myelination, we use a previously identified kinesin-binding protein (kbp mutant, in which the first myelinated axons in the spinal cord, reticulospinal axons, do not fully grow in length, creating a region in the posterior spinal cord where most initial targets for myelination are absent. We find that a 73% reduction of reticulospinal axon surface in the posterior spinal cord of kbp mutants results in a 27% reduction in the number of oligodendrocytes. By time-lapse analysis of transgenic OPC reporters, we find that the reduction in oligodendrocyte number is explained by a reduction in OPC proliferation and survival. Interestingly, OPC specification and migration are unaltered in the near absence of normal axonal targets. Finally, we find that timely differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes does not depend at all on the presence of target axons

  9. Squid Giant Axon Contains Neurofilament Protein mRNA but does not Synthesize Neurofilament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Harold; House, Shirley; Kim, Dong Sun; Chin, Hemin; Pant, Harish C

    2017-04-01

    When isolated squid giant axons are incubated in radioactive amino acids, abundant newly synthesized proteins are found in the axoplasm. These proteins are translated in the adaxonal Schwann cells and subsequently transferred into the giant axon. The question as to whether any de novo protein synthesis occurs in the giant axon itself is difficult to resolve because the small contribution of the proteins possibly synthesized intra-axonally is not easily distinguished from the large amounts of the proteins being supplied from the Schwann cells. In this paper, we reexamine this issue by studying the synthesis of endogenous neurofilament (NF) proteins in the axon. Our laboratory previously showed that NF mRNA and protein are present in the squid giant axon, but not in the surrounding adaxonal glia. Therefore, if the isolated squid axon could be shown to contain newly synthesized NF protein de novo, it could not arise from the adaxonal glia. The results of experiments in this paper show that abundant 3H-labeled NF protein is synthesized in the squid giant fiber lobe containing the giant axon's neuronal cell bodies, but despite the presence of NF mRNA in the giant axon no labeled NF protein is detected in the giant axon. This lends support to the glia-axon protein transfer hypothesis which posits that the squid giant axon obtains newly synthesized protein by Schwann cell transfer and not through intra-axonal protein synthesis, and further suggests that the NF mRNA in the axon is in a translationally repressed state.

  10. Neocortical axon arbors trade-off material and conduction delay conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian M L Budd

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The brain contains a complex network of axons rapidly communicating information between billions of synaptically connected neurons. The morphology of individual axons, therefore, defines the course of information flow within the brain. More than a century ago, Ramón y Cajal proposed that conservation laws to save material (wire length and limit conduction delay regulate the design of individual axon arbors in cerebral cortex. Yet the spatial and temporal communication costs of single neocortical axons remain undefined. Here, using reconstructions of in vivo labelled excitatory spiny cell and inhibitory basket cell intracortical axons combined with a variety of graph optimization algorithms, we empirically investigated Cajal's conservation laws in cerebral cortex for whole three-dimensional (3D axon arbors, to our knowledge the first study of its kind. We found intracortical axons were significantly longer than optimal. The temporal cost of cortical axons was also suboptimal though far superior to wire-minimized arbors. We discovered that cortical axon branching appears to promote a low temporal dispersion of axonal latencies and a tight relationship between cortical distance and axonal latency. In addition, inhibitory basket cell axonal latencies may occur within a much narrower temporal window than excitatory spiny cell axons, which may help boost signal detection. Thus, to optimize neuronal network communication we find that a modest excess of axonal wire is traded-off to enhance arbor temporal economy and precision. Our results offer insight into the principles of brain organization and communication in and development of grey matter, where temporal precision is a crucial prerequisite for coincidence detection, synchronization and rapid network oscillations.

  11. Neuroprotection comparison of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites against mechanistically distinct cell death-inducing agents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taram, Faten; Winter, Aimee N; Linseman, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    While the number of patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease is increasing, there are currently no effective treatments that significantly limit the neuronal cell death underlying these diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound found in high concentration in coffee, is known to possess antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of CGA and its major metabolites in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons. We show that CGA and caffeic acid displayed a dramatic protective effect against the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. In marked contrast, ferulic acid and quinic acid had no protective effect against this nitrosative stress. While CGA and quinic acid had no protective effect against glutamate-induced cell death, caffeic acid and ferulic acid significantly protected neurons from excitotoxicity. Finally, caffeic acid was the only compound to display significant protective activity against hydrogen peroxide, proteasome inhibition, caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that caffeic acid displays a much broader profile of neuroprotection against a diverse range of stressors than its parent polyphenol, CGA, or the other major metabolites, ferulic acid and quinic acid. We conclude that caffeic acid is a promising candidate for testing in pre-clinical models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential distribution of GABAA receptor subunits in soma and processes of cerebellar granule cells: effects of maturation and a GABA agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elster, L; Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B

    1995-01-01

    or absence of the GABAA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP). THIP (150 microM) induced a 2-fold increase in the number of alpha 1 and beta 2/3 subunits in both cell bodies and processes in 4-day-old cultures. Extending the culture period to 8 days led to a polarization......Quantitative analysis of the density of alpha 1 and beta 2/3 GABAA receptor subunits was performed at the electron microscope level after indirect pre-embedding immunogold labeling with subunit-specific antibodies of rat cerebellar granule cell cultures grown for 4 or 8 days and in the presence...... of the receptor expression, since the increase in the number of subunits selectively was observed in the processes. Moreover, a general subcellular differentiation of the receptor population was observed in all culture conditions, since the ratio between the two subunits (beta 2/3; alpha 1) was four times higher...

  13. Alterations in the Local Axonal Environment Influence Target Reinnervation and Neuronal Survival after Postnatal Axotomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dainer, Hugh M

    2000-01-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury in adult animals, Schwann cells (SC) proliferate and provide guidance in the local axonal environment by generating the infrastructure along which regenerating nerves grow...

  14. Live Imaging of Kv7.2/7.3 Cell Surface Dynamics at the Axon Initial Segment: High Steady-State Stability and Calpain-Dependent Excitotoxic Downregulation Revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt; Denti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated K(+) channels Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 are located at the axon initial segment (AIS) and exert strong control over action potential generation. Therefore, changes in their localization or cell surface numbers are likely to influence neuronal signaling. However, nothing is known about....... In conclusion, we have, for the first time, characterized the cell surface dynamics of a full-length Kv7 channel using a novel chimeric strategy. This approach is likely also applicable to other Kv channels and thus of value for the additional characterization of this ion channel subfamily. SIGNIFICANCE...

  15. Nuclear receptor 4a3 (nr4a3 regulates murine mast cell responses and granule content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Garcia-Faroldi

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptor 4a3 (Nr4a3 is a transcription factor implicated in various settings such as vascular biology and inflammation. We have recently shown that mast cells dramatically upregulate Nuclear receptor 4a3 upon activation, and here we investigated the functional impact of Nuclear receptor 4a3 on mast cell responses. We show that Nuclear receptor 4a3 is involved in the regulation of cytokine/chemokine secretion in mast cells following activation via the high affinity IgE receptor. Moreover, Nuclear receptor 4a3 negatively affects the transcript and protein levels of mast cell tryptase as well as the mast cell's responsiveness to allergen. Together, these findings identify Nuclear receptor 4a3 as a novel regulator of mast cell function.

  16. Uptake of ascorbic acid by freshly isolated cells and secretory granules from the intermediate lobe of ox hypophyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, A; Matsumoto, T; Farver, O

    1990-01-01

    of uptake occurred when mechanically isolated cells were incubated with increasing ascorbic acid concentrations up to 0.6 mM. But if such cells were purified on a Percoll gradient, a clear saturation of uptake could be observed. Acetylsalicylic acid reduced the uptake markedly. When cells loaded with L-[14C......Mechanically isolated cells from the intermediate lobe of ox hypophyses contained 40.6 +/- 3.7 nmol mg-1 protein (mean +/- SE, n = 5) of ascorbic acid. They accumulated radioactivity time dependently, on incubation with L-[14C]ascorbic acid in ionic medium dominated by NaCl. No definite saturation......]ascorbic acid were homogenized and placed on a Percoll gradient, the radioactivity was recovered in several subcellular fractions. Decrease of the Na+ concentration or presence of ouabain in the medium did not cause noticeable changes in uptake by non-purified cells, whereas uptake by purified cells was clearly...

  17. Stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor has a trophic effect on differentiating cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1988-01-01

    -CAM contents indicated that NMDA rescued primarily nerve cells. The influence of NMDA in promoting cell survival was blocked by the receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate. The effect depended both on the concentration of NMDA and on the degree of depolarization of cells, the affinity in the presence...... of 15 mM K+ being similar to that of NMDA receptor binding. The results attest a new role for excitatory amino acid transmitters by showing that they can exert a stage-dependent trophic action on developing nerve cells....

  18. Axonal and Transynaptic Spread of Prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, Harold

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural transmission of prion diseases depends upon the spread of prions from the nervous system to excretory or secretory tissues, but the mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. Here, we examined the temporal and spatial movement of prions from the brain stem along cranial nerves into skeletal muscle as a model of axonal transport and transynaptic spread. The disease-specific isoform of the prion protein, PrPSc, was observed in nerve fibers of the tongue approximately 2 weeks prior to PrPSc deposition in skeletal muscle. Initially, PrPSc deposits had a small punctate pattern on the edge of muscle cells that colocalized with synaptophysin, a marker for the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), in >50% of the cells. At later time points PrPSc was widely distributed in muscle cells, but PrPSc deposition at the NMJ, suggesting additional prion replication and dissemination within muscle cells. In contrast to the NMJ, PrPSc was not associated with synaptophysin in nerve fibers but was found to colocalize with LAMP-1 and cathepsin D during early stages of axonal spread. We propose that PrPSc-bound endosomes can lead to membrane recycling in which PrPSc is directed to the synapse, where it either moves across the NMJ into the postsynaptic muscle cell or induces PrPSc formation on muscle cells across the NMJ. IMPORTANCE Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative diseases in which prion dissemination to excretory or secretory tissues is necessary for natural disease transmission. Despite the importance of this pathway, the cellular mechanism of prion transport in axons and into peripheral tissue is unresolved. This study demonstrates anterograde spread of prions within nerve fibers prior to infection of peripheral synapses (i.e., neuromuscular junction) and infection of peripheral tissues (i.e., muscle cells). Within nerve fibers prions were associated with the endosomal-lysosomal pathway prior to entry into

  19. A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeber, Jan; Konig, Niclas; Trolle, Carl

    2017-01-01

    restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (Meso......MIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along “bridges” formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of Meso......MIM prevented stem cell migration, “bridges” were not formed, and sensory axons failed to enter the spinal cord. MesoMIM applied alone supported sensory axons ingrowth, but without affecting glial scar formation. In vitro, the presence of MesoMIM significantly impaired migration of hscNSPC without affecting...

  20. Axonal Membranes and Their Domains: Assembly and Function of the Axon Initial Segment and Node of Ranvier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are highly specialized cells of the nervous system that receive, process and transmit electrical signals critical for normal brain function. Here, we review the intricate organization of axonal membrane domains that facilitate rapid action potential conduction underlying communication between complex neuronal circuits. Two critical excitable domains of vertebrate axons are the axon initial segment (AIS and the nodes of Ranvier, which are characterized by the high concentrations of voltage-gated ion channels, cell adhesion molecules and specialized cytoskeletal networks. The AIS is located at the proximal region of the axon and serves as the site of action potential initiation, while nodes of Ranvier, gaps between adjacent myelin sheaths, allow rapid propagation of the action potential through saltatory conduction. The AIS and nodes of Ranvier are assembled by ankyrins, spectrins and their associated binding partners through the clustering of membrane proteins and connection to the underlying cytoskeleton network. Although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier share similar protein composition, their mechanisms of assembly are strikingly different. Here we will cover the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of these axonal excitable membrane domains, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. We will also discuss recent advances in super resolution fluorescence imaging which have elucidated the arrangement of the submembranous axonal cytoskeleton revealing a surprising structural organization necessary to maintain axonal organization and function. Finally, human mutations in axonal domain components have been associated with a growing number of neurological disorders including severe cognitive dysfunction, epilepsy, autism, neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Overall, this review highlights the assembly, maintenance and function of axonal excitable domains, particularly the AIS and nodes of

  1. Pharmacogenetic stimulation of neuronal activity increases myelination in an axon-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitew, Stanislaw; Gobius, Ilan; Fenlon, Laura R; McDougall, Stuart J; Hawkes, David; Xing, Yao Lulu; Bujalka, Helena; Gundlach, Andrew L; Richards, Linda J; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Merson, Tobias D; Emery, Ben

    2018-01-22

    Mounting evidence suggests that neuronal activity influences myelination, potentially allowing for experience-driven modulation of neural circuitry. The degree to which neuronal activity is capable of regulating myelination at the individual axon level is unclear. Here we demonstrate that stimulation of somatosensory axons in the mouse brain increases proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within the underlying white matter. Stimulated axons display an increased probability of being myelinated compared to neighboring non-stimulated axons, in addition to being ensheathed with thicker myelin. Conversely, attenuating neuronal firing reduces axonal myelination in a selective activity-dependent manner. Our findings reveal that the process of selecting axons for myelination is strongly influenced by the relative activity of individual axons within a population. These observed cellular changes are consistent with the emerging concept that adaptive myelination is a key mechanism for the fine-tuning of neuronal circuitry in the mammalian CNS.

  2. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, Ole Steen

    1990-01-01

    (s) underlying the trophic effect of KA. KA rescue of cells was completely suppressed by blockers of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, such as nifedipine in low concentrations (5 x 10(-7) M), indicating that the promotion of cell survival is mediated through the activation of these channels by membrane...... depolarization. Thus the trophic influences of KA and NMDA share a common mechanism, increased Ca2+ influx (albeit through different routes), a conclusion that is supported by the observation that the effects of these agonists at concentrations causing maximal promotion of cell survival were not additive...... on their own failed to promote, but rather reduced cell survival. The potentiation of the KA effect by the competitive NMDA antagonist APV was counteracted by the weak NMDA agonist, quinolinic acid. These observations suggest that KA alone has both trophic and toxic effects, the latter being mediated...

  3. Unscheduled brain DNA synthesis, long-term potentiation, and depression at the perforant path-granule cell synapse in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadile, A G; Neugebauer, A; Giuditta, A

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effect of long-term potentiation (LTP) of the perforant path-granule cell synapse, on the synthesis of DNA in the target area and in polysynaptically stimulated hippocampal (CA3/CA1) and cortical areas (entorhinal, temporal, and occipital cortices) in the rat. The contralateral nonstimulated side was used as a control. The degree of LTP was indexed by the field EPSP and population spike amplitude recorded in the dentate area of the stimulated side before and after high frequency stimulation (250 Hz, 250 ms) every 30 min. DNA synthesis was evaluated in tissue homogenates after a 3-h period of incorporation of 3H-thymidine. DNA synthesis was significantly lower in the stimulated side in the hippocampal cortex CA3/CA1 (-25%), and in the entorhinal cortex (-50%), but not in the dentate area. In addition, the occurrence of preparations without expression of LTP allowed the analysis of unscheduled brain DNA synthesis (UBDS) in a supposedly long-term depression (LTD) subgroup. UBDS was higher in the group without LTP (no-LTP group) than in that with a significant LTP expression (LTP-group) on both sides of the brain. Furthermore, correlative analyses revealed that UBDS covaried with LTP of the EPSP (but not of population spike) in the dentate area and in extratarget hippocampal subregions on both sides and in dorsal cortex on the stimulated side. Further, regional crosscorrelation analyses revealed a high degree of coupling among brain sites following LTP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Differential presynaptic and postsynaptic expression of m1-m4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway/granule cell synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, S T; Gilmor, M L; Levey, A I

    1998-09-01

    A family of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor proteins mediates diverse pre- and postsynaptic functions in the hippocampus. However the roles of individual receptors are not understood. The present study identified the pre- and postsynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway synapses in rat brain using a combination of lesioning, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopic techniques. Entorhinal cortex lesions resulted in lamina-specific reductions of m2, m3, and m4 immunoreactivity in parallel with the degeneration of the medial and lateral perforant pathway terminals in the middle and outer thirds of the molecular layer, respectively. In contrast, granule cell lesions selectively reduced m1 and m3 receptors consistent with degeneration of postsynaptic dendrites. Direct visualization of m1-m4 by electron microscopic immunocytochemistry confirmed their differential pre- and postsynaptic localizations. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for both redundancy and spatial selectivity of presynaptic (m2, m3 and m4) and postsynaptic (m1 and m3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors at the perforant pathway synapse.

  5. Kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to hippocampal dentate granule cells. II. Effects of the NMDA antagonist MK-801.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, G B

    1991-10-18

    The effect of the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 on the early development of kindling-induced potentiation was examined in the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus. MK-801 (0.5 mg\\/kg) was administered 2 h before each daily kindling stimulation was applied to the perforant path. This treatment continued for the first 10 days of kindling. MK-801 depressed the growth of the afterdischarge duration and suppressed development of behavioral seizures. MK-801 did not block kindling-induced potentiation of either the perforant path-dentate granule cell population spike or excitatory postsynaptic potential. Random impulse train stimulation and non-linear systems analytic techniques were used to examine kindling-induced potentiation of presumed GABAergic recurrent inhibitory circuits. Both the magnitude and duration of kindling-induced response inhibition, to the second of each pair of impulses within the train, were reduced in rabbits pretreated with MK-801. These results suggest that MK-801 differentially affects kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory circuits within the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus.

  6. Dentate gyrus and hilus transection blocks seizure propagation and granule cell dispersion in a mouse model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Häussler, Ute; Langlois, Mélanie; Hamelin, Sophie; Devaux, Bertrand; Deransart, Colin; Depaulis, Antoine

    2011-03-01

    Epilepsy-associated changes of the anatomical organization of the dentate gyrus and hilus may play a critical role in the initiation and propagation of seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). This study evaluated the role of longitudinal projections in the propagation of hippocampal paroxysmal discharges (HPD) in dorsal hippocampus by performing a selective transection in a mouse model for MTLE obtained by a single unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA). Full transections of the dentate gyrus and hilus were performed in the transverse axis at 22 days after KA injection when spontaneous HPD were fully developed. They: (i) significantly reduced the occurrence of HPD; (ii) increased their duration at the KA injection site; (iii) abolished their spread along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampal formation and; (iv) limited granule cell dispersion (GCD) of the dentate gyrus posterior to the transection. These data suggest that: (i) longitudinal projections through the dentate gyrus and hilus are involved in HPD spread; (ii) distant hippocampal circuits participate in the generation and cessation of HPD and; (iii) GCD requires continuous HPD to develop, even when seizures are established. Our data reveal a critical role for longitudinal projections in the generation and spread of hippocampal seizures. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. NMDA-receptor inhibition restores Protease-Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1) mediated alterations in homeostatic synaptic plasticity of denervated mouse dentate granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Denise; Ikenberg, Benno; Schiener, Sabine; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    A common feature of neurological diseases is the loss of central neurons, which leads to deafferentation of connected brain regions. In turn, the remodeling of denervated neuronal networks is considered to play an important role for the postlesional recovery, but has also been linked to maladaptive plasticity resulting in disease-related complications such as memory dysfunction or epilepsy. Recent work has indicated that Protease-Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1), which can be activated by thrombin that enters the brain under pathological conditions, alters synaptic plasticity and neuronal excitability. However, the role of PAR1 in lesion-induced synaptic plasticity remains incompletely understood. Here, we used entorhinal denervation of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures to study the effects of PAR1 on denervation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Our results disclose that PAR1 activation counters the ability of denervated dentate granule cells to increase their excitatory synaptic strength in a compensatory, i.e., homeostatic manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this PAR1 effect is rescued by pharmacological inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R). Thus, NMDA-R inhibitors may restore the ability of denervated neurons to express homeostatic synaptic plasticity under conditions of increased PAR1-activity, which may contribute to their beneficial effects seen in the context of neurological diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  9. Evaluation of granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, CaF2:Eu and ZnS:Ag for alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in a flow-cell radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVol, T.A.; Chotoo, S.B.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, and CaF 2 :Eu; CaF 2 :Eu coated with a fluorescent polymer, and combinations of coated and uncoated CaF 2 :Eu with ZnS:Ag were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between alpha and beta particles in a flow-cell radiation detector. The evaluations were based on the analysis of pulse shape spectra. Various granulated scintillators were packed into flow cell detectors that were coils of 3.0 mm ODx1.5 mm ID fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon[reg] tubing positioned between dual photomultiplier tubes for analysis. The best pulse shape discrimination was obtained for a combination of equal masses of uncoated CaF 2 :Eu (63-90 μm) and ZnS:Ag (10 μm), which had a 9% spillover. Additional research is needed to reduce the spillover

  10. Evaluation of granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, CaF sub 2 :Eu and ZnS:Ag for alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination in a flow-cell radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Devol, T A; Fjeld, R A

    1999-01-01

    Granulated BGO, GSO:Ce, YAG:Ce, and CaF sub 2 :Eu; CaF sub 2 :Eu coated with a fluorescent polymer, and combinations of coated and uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu with ZnS:Ag were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between alpha and beta particles in a flow-cell radiation detector. The evaluations were based on the analysis of pulse shape spectra. Various granulated scintillators were packed into flow cell detectors that were coils of 3.0 mm ODx1.5 mm ID fluorinated ethylene propylene Teflon[reg] tubing positioned between dual photomultiplier tubes for analysis. The best pulse shape discrimination was obtained for a combination of equal masses of uncoated CaF sub 2 :Eu (63-90 mu m) and ZnS:Ag (10 mu m), which had a 9% spillover. Additional research is needed to reduce the spillover.

  11. Nos2 inactivation promotes the development of medulloblastoma in Ptch1(+/- mice by deregulation of Gap43-dependent granule cell precursor migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Haag

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. A subset of medulloblastoma originates from granule cell precursors (GCPs of the developing cerebellum and demonstrates aberrant hedgehog signaling, typically due to inactivating mutations in the receptor PTCH1, a pathomechanism recapitulated in Ptch1(+/- mice. As nitric oxide may regulate GCP proliferation and differentiation, we crossed Ptch1(+/- mice with mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2 to investigate a possible influence on tumorigenesis. We observed a two-fold higher medulloblastoma rate in Ptch1(+/- Nos2(-/- mice compared to Ptch1(+/- Nos2(+/+ mice. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this finding, we performed gene expression profiling of medulloblastomas from both genotypes, as well as normal cerebellar tissue samples of different developmental stages and genotypes. Downregulation of hedgehog target genes was observed in postnatal cerebellum from Ptch1(+/+ Nos2(-/- mice but not from Ptch1(+/- Nos2(-/- mice. The most consistent effect of Nos2 deficiency was downregulation of growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43. Functional studies in neuronal progenitor cells demonstrated nitric oxide dependence of Gap43 expression and impaired migration upon Gap43 knock-down. Both effects were confirmed in situ by immunofluorescence analyses on tissue sections of the developing cerebellum. Finally, the number of proliferating GCPs at the cerebellar periphery was decreased in Ptch1(+/+ Nos2(-/- mice but increased in Ptch1(+/- Nos2(-/ (- mice relative to Ptch1(+/- Nos2(+/+ mice. Taken together, these results indicate that Nos2 deficiency promotes medulloblastoma development in Ptch1(+/- mice through retention of proliferating GCPs in the external granular layer due to reduced Gap43 expression. This study illustrates a new role of nitric oxide signaling in cerebellar development and demonstrates that the localization of pre-neoplastic cells during

  12. Adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) and Nasu-Hakola disease: lesion staging and dynamic changes of axons and microglial subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Suzuki-Kouyama, Emi; Inoue, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Asa; Tokiwai, Mika; Arai, Nobutaka; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Aoki, Naoya; Jinnai, Kenji; Yazawa, Ikuru; Arai, Kimihito; Ishihara, Kenji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Yagisita, Saburo; Amano, Naoji; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Terada, Seishi; Yoshida, Mari; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mitsuyama, Yoshio; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-11-01

    The brains of 10 Japanese patients with adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and eight Japanese patients with Nasu-Hakola disease (N-HD) and five age-matched Japanese controls were examined neuropathologically with special reference to lesion staging and dynamic changes of microglial subsets. In both diseases, the pathognomonic neuropathological features included spherically swollen axons (spheroids and globules), axon loss and changes of microglia in the white matter. In ALSP, four lesion stages based on the degree of axon loss were discernible: Stage I, patchy axon loss in the cerebral white matter without atrophy; Stage II, large patchy areas of axon loss with slight atrophy of the cerebral white matter and slight dilatation of the lateral ventricles; Stage III, extensive axon loss in the cerebral white matter and dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles without remarkable axon loss in the brainstem and cerebellum; Stage IV, devastated cerebral white matter with marked dilatation of the ventricles and axon loss in the brainstem and/or cerebellum. Internal capsule and pontine base were relatively well preserved in the N-HD, even at Stage IV, and the swollen axons were larger with a higher density in the ALSP. Microglial cells immunopositive for CD68, CD163 or CD204 were far more obvious in ALSP, than in N-HD, and the shape and density of the cells changed in each stage. With progression of the stage, clinical symptoms became worse to apathetic state, and epilepsy was frequently observed in patients at Stages III and IV in both diseases. From these findings, it is concluded that (i) shape, density and subsets of microglia change dynamically along the passage of stages and (ii) increase of IBA-1-, CD68-, CD163- and CD204-immunopositive cells precedes loss of axons in ALSP. © 2016

  13. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Allan T; Bravo, Jaime J

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation.

  14. CB1 receptors down-regulate a cAMP/Epac2/PLC pathway to silence the nerve terminals of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Beatris; Bartolomé-Martín, David; Ferrero, José Javier; Ramírez-Franco, Jorge; Torres, Magdalena; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2017-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors mediate short-term retrograde inhibition of neurotransmitter release, as well as long-term depression of synaptic transmission at excitatory synapses. The responses of individual nerve terminals in VGLUT1-pHluorin transfected cerebellar granule cells to cannabinoids have shown that prolonged activation of cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) silences a subpopulation of previously active synaptic boutons. Adopting a combined pharmacological and genetic approach to study the molecular mechanisms of CB1R-induced silencing, we found that adenylyl cyclase inhibition decreases cAMP levels while it increases the number of silent synaptic boutons and occludes the induction of further silencing by the cannabinoid agonist HU-210. Guanine nucleotide exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac proteins) mediate some of the presynaptic effects of cAMP in the potentiation of synaptic transmission. ESI05, a selective Epac2 inhibitor, and U-73122, the specific inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), both augment the number of silent synaptic boutons. Moreover, they abolish the capacity of the Epac activator, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate monosodium hydrate, to prevent HU-210-induced silencing consistent with PLC signaling lying downstream of Epac2 proteins. Furthermore, Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM)1α KO cells have many more basally silent synaptic boutons (12.9 ± 3.5%) than wild-type cells (1.1 ± 0.5%). HU-210 induced further silencing in these mutant cells, although 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate monosodium hydrate only awoke the HU-210-induced silence and not the basally silent synaptic boutons. This behavior can be rescued by expressing RIM1α in RIM1α KO cells, these cells behaving very much like wild-type cells. These findings support the hypothesis that a cAMP/Epac/PLC signaling pathway targeting the release machinery appears to mediate cannabinoid

  15. Comparison of PC12 and Cerebellar Granule Cell Cultures for Evaluating Neurite Outgrowth Using High Content Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of high-throughput assays for chemical screening and hazard identification is a pressing priority worldwide. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which recapitulate biological events observed in vivo. Neurite outgrowth is one such critical cellular process un...

  16. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    cells, while other fibers were unmyelinated. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that some of the regenerated fibers were tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-immunoreactive, indicating a central origin. These findings suggest that there is a considerable amount of spontaneous regeneration after spinal cord......Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total...... length of all NF-immunolabeled axons within the lesion cavities was increased 6- to 10-fold at 5, 10, and 15 wk post-lesion compared with 1 wk post-surgery. In ultrastructural studies we found the putatively regenerating axons within the lesion to be associated either with oligodendrocytes or Schwann...

  17. The nigrostriatal pathway: axonal collateralization and compartmental specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensa, L; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Parent, A; Bernácer, J; Cebrián, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews two of the major features of the nigrostriatal pathway, its axonal collateralization, and compartmental specificity, as revealed by single-axon labeling experiments in rodents and immunocytological analysis of human postmortem tissue. The dorsal and ventral tiers of the substantia nigra pars compacta harbor various types of neurons the axons of which branch not only within the striatum but also in other major components of the basal ganglia. Furthermore, some nigrostriatal axons send collaterals both to thalamus and to brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. In humans, the compartmental specificity of the nigrostriatal pathway is revealed by the fact that the matrix compartment is densely innervated by dopaminergic fibers, whereas the striosomes display different densities of dopaminergic terminals depending on their location within the striatum. The nigral neurons most severely affected in Parkinson's disease are the ventral tier cells that project to the matrix and form deep clusters in the substantia nigra pars reticulata.

  18. Syndecan Promotes Axon Regeneration by Stabilizing Growth Cone Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson J. Edwards

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: (1 a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains and (2 an intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair.

  19. Protection by imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine of glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured cerebellar granule cells through blockade of NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, G; DeGregorio-Rocasolano, N; Paz Regalado, M; Gasull, T; Assumpció Boronat, M; Trullas, R; Villarroel, A; Lerma, J; García-Sevilla, J A

    1999-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the potential neuroprotective effect of several imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine on glutamate-induced necrosis and on apoptosis induced by low extracellular K+ in cultured cerebellar granule cells. Exposure (30 min) of energy deprived cells to L-glutamate (1-100 microM) caused a concentration-dependent neurotoxicity, as determined 24 h later by a decrease in the ability of the cells to metabolize 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) into a reduced formazan product. L-glutamate-induced neurotoxicity (EC50=5 microM) was blocked by the specific NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine). Imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine fully prevented neurotoxicity induced by 20 microM (EC100) L-glutamate with the rank order (EC50 in microM): antazoline (13)>cirazoline (44)>LSL 61122 [2-styryl-2-imidazoline] (54)>LSL 60101 [2-(2-benzofuranyl) imidazole] (75)>idazoxan (90)>LSL 60129 [2-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-yl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole](101)>RX82 1002 (2-methoxy idazoxan) (106)>agmatine (196). No neuroprotective effect of these drugs was observed in a model of apoptotic neuronal cell death (reduction of extracellular K+) which does not involve stimulation of NMDA receptors. Imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine fully inhibited [3H]-(+)-MK-801 binding to the phencyclidine site of NMDA receptors in rat brain. The profile of drug potency protecting against L-glutamate neurotoxicity correlated well (r=0.90) with the potency of the same compounds competing against [3H]-(+)-MK-801 binding. In HEK-293 cells transfected to express the NR1-1a and NR2C subunits of the NMDA receptor, antazoline and agmatine produced a voltage- and concentration-dependent block of glutamate-induced currents. Analysis of the voltage dependence of the block was consistent with the presence of a binding site for antazoline located within the NMDA channel pore with an IC50 of 10-12 microM at 0 mV. It is concluded that imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine are

  20. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Min

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals.

  1. Role of Ryanodine and NMDA Receptors in Tetrabromobisphenol A-Induced Calcium Imbalance and Cytotoxicity in Primary Cultures of Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieminska, Elzbieta; Stafiej, Aleksandra; Toczylowska, Beata; Albrecht, Jan; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W

    2015-10-01

    The study assessed the role of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in the Ca(2+) transients and cytotoxicity induced in neurons by the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) were exposed to 7.5, 10, or 25 µM TBBPA for 30 min, and cell viability was assessed after 24 h. Moreover, (45)Ca uptake was measured, and changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were studied using the fluo-3 probe. The involvement of NMDARs and RyRs was verified using the pertinent receptor antagonists, 0.5 µM MK-801 and 2.5 µM bastadin 12, which was co-applied with 200 µM ryanodine, respectively. The results show that TBBPA concentration-dependently induces an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. This effect was partly suppressed by the inhibitors of RyRs and NMDARs when administered separately, and completely abrogated by their combined application. A concentration-dependent activation of (45)Ca uptake by TBBPA was prevented by MK-801 but not by RyR inhibitors. Application of ≥ 10 µM TBBPA concentration-dependently reduced neuronal viability, and this effect was only partially and to an equal degree reduced by NMDAR and RyR antagonists given either separately or in combination. Our results directly demonstrate that both the RyR-mediated release of intracellular Ca(2+) and the NMDAR-mediated influx of Ca(2+) into neurons participate in the mechanism of TBBPA-induced Ca(2+) imbalance in CGC and play a significant, albeit not exclusive, role in the mechanisms of TBBPA cytotoxicity.

  2. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  3. Circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 in the chromatoid body, a RNA processing granule of male germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita L Peruquetti

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process that involves genetic and epigenetic regulation, sophisticated hormonal control, and extensive structural changes in male germ cells. RNA nuclear and cytoplasmic bodies appear to be critical for the progress of spermatogenesis. The chromatoid body (CB is a cytoplasmic organelle playing an important role in RNA post-transcriptional and translation regulation during the late steps of germ cell differentiation. The CB is also important for fertility determination since mutations of genes encoding its components cause infertility by spermatogenesis arrest. Targeted ablation of the Bmal1 and Clock genes, which encode central regulators of the circadian clock also result in fertility defects caused by problems other than spermatogenesis alterations. We show that the circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 are localized in the CB in a stage-specific manner of germ cells. Both BMAL1 and CLOCK proteins physically interact with the ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase MVH (mouse VASA homolog, a hallmark component of the CB. BMAL1 is differentially expressed during the spermatogenic cycle of seminiferous tubules, and Bmal1 and Clock deficient mice display significant CB morphological alterations due to BMAL1 ablation or low expression. These findings suggest that both BMAL1 and CLOCK contribute to CB assembly and physiology, raising questions on the role of the circadian clock in reproduction and on the molecular function that CLOCK and BMAL1 could potentially have in the CB assembly and physiology.

  4. Circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 in the chromatoid body, a RNA processing granule of male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruquetti, Rita L; de Mateo, Sara; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process that involves genetic and epigenetic regulation, sophisticated hormonal control, and extensive structural changes in male germ cells. RNA nuclear and cytoplasmic bodies appear to be critical for the progress of spermatogenesis. The chromatoid body (CB) is a cytoplasmic organelle playing an important role in RNA post-transcriptional and translation regulation during the late steps of germ cell differentiation. The CB is also important for fertility determination since mutations of genes encoding its components cause infertility by spermatogenesis arrest. Targeted ablation of the Bmal1 and Clock genes, which encode central regulators of the circadian clock also result in fertility defects caused by problems other than spermatogenesis alterations. We show that the circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 are localized in the CB in a stage-specific manner of germ cells. Both BMAL1 and CLOCK proteins physically interact with the ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase MVH (mouse VASA homolog), a hallmark component of the CB. BMAL1 is differentially expressed during the spermatogenic cycle of seminiferous tubules, and Bmal1 and Clock deficient mice display significant CB morphological alterations due to BMAL1 ablation or low expression. These findings suggest that both BMAL1 and CLOCK contribute to CB assembly and physiology, raising questions on the role of the circadian clock in reproduction and on the molecular function that CLOCK and BMAL1 could potentially have in the CB assembly and physiology.

  5. A growing field: The regulation of axonal regeneration by Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Armando L; Udeh, Adanna; Kalahasty, Karthik; Hackam, Abigail S

    2018-01-01

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a highly conserved signaling cascade that plays critical roles during embryogenesis. Wnt ligands regulate axonal extension, growth cone guidance and synaptogenesis throughout the developing central nervous system (CNS). Recently, studies in mammalian and fish model systems have demonstrated that Wnt/β-catenin signaling also promotes axonal regeneration in the adult optic nerve and spinal cord after injury, raising the possibility that Wnt could be developed as a therapeutic strategy. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that reveals novel roles for Wnt signaling in the injured CNS, and discuss possible mechanisms by which Wnt ligands could overcome molecular barriers inhibiting axonal growth to promote regeneration. A central challenge in the neuroscience field is developing therapeutic strategies that induce robust axonal regeneration. Although adult axons have the capacity to respond to axonal guidance molecules after injury, there are several major obstacles for axonal growth, including extensive neuronal death, glial scars at the injury site, and lack of axonal guidance signals. Research in rodents demonstrated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in retinal neurons and radial glia induced neuronal survival and axonal growth, but that activation within reactive glia at the injury site promoted proliferation and glial scar formation. Studies in zebrafish spinal cord injury models confirm an axonal regenerative role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and identified the cell types responsible. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt induces axonal and neurite growth through transcription-dependent effects of its central mediator β-catenin, potentially by inducing regeneration-promoting genes. Canonical Wnt signaling may also function through transcription-independent interactions of β-catenin with cytoskeletal elements, which could stabilize growing axons and control growth cone

  6. Effects of maternal thiamine deficiencies on the pyramidal and granule cells of the hippocampus of rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâ, Abdoulaye; N'Douba, Valentin; D'Almeida, Marie-Anne; Seri, Bialli Victor

    2005-01-01

    To understand the implication of thiamine deficiency in the neuronal atrophy and cell death we undertook to induce thiamine (B1 vitamine) deficiency during three essential periods of the ontogenesis of rat central nervous system (CNS). Female rats were fed with a thiamine deprived diet during the gestation and lactation, and the fetuses and pups were alternately exposed to prenatal, perinatal or postnatal thiamine deficiencies. On the 45th postnatal day, histological studies were done on the brains of the pups and the structure of the hippocampus was analyzed. The effects of each treatment were assessed by measuring the size and the density of cell nuclei throughout the dentate gyrus and fields CA4, CA3 and CA1 of the hippocampal formation. The hippocampus showed a regional vulnerability in the pups exposed to maternal thiamine deficiencies. It appears that the thiamine deficiency decreased nuclear density (27.20%) more severely than nuclear size (10.56%) in the fetal hippocampus. Consequently, the major part of the teratogenic effects of thiamine deficiency was cellular death, rather than cellular atrophy.

  7. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  9. Roll compaction/dry granulation: comparison between roll mill and oscillating granulator in dry granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwanichol, Jarunee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Ingenerf, Gernot; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Different experimental factorial designs were employed to evaluate granule properties obtained from oscillating granulator and roll mill. Four oscillating-granulator parameters were varied, i.e. rotor speed, oscillating angle, aperture of mesh screen and rotor type. Six roll-mill parameters that were throughput, speed ratio in both first and second stages, gap between roll pair in both stages and roll-surface texture were also investigated. Afterwards, the granule properties obtained from two milling types with similar median particle size were compared. All milling parameters in both milling types affected significantly the median particle size, size distribution and amount of fine particles (P rotor types of oscillating granulator on fines. Only three milling parameters influenced significantly the flowability (P < 0.05). These were the throughput and the gap size in the first stage of roll mill and the sieve size of oscillating granulator. In comparison between milling types, the differences of granule properties were not practically relevant. However, the roll mill had much higher capacity than the oscillating granulator about seven times, resulting in improving energy savings per unit of product. Consequently, the roll mill can be applied instead of oscillating granulator for roll compaction/dry granulation technique.

  10. A review on granules initiation and development inside UASB Reactor and the main factors affecting granules formation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habeeb, S.A.; Latiff, Ab Aziz Bin Abdul; Daud, Zawawi Bin; Ahmad, Zulkifli Bin [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2011-07-01

    Decades of investigations and explorations in the field of anaerobic wastewater treatment have resulted in significant indications about the role importance of sludge granules in biodegradation anaerobic process. It is believed that the development of anaerobic granules is reflecting an important role on the performance of reactor. An overview on the concept of up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operation as well as the main parts that reactor consists of is briefly explained in this paper, whereas the major theories of anaerobic granules formation are listed by related researchers. The correlations and compositions of such sludge granule have been specifically explained. It is believed that the extracellular polymer (ECP) is totally responsible of bacterial cell correlations and the formation of bacterial communities in the form of granules. In addition, the dependable factors for the performance of anaerobic granules formation process e.g. temperature, organic loading rate, pH, and alkalinity, nutrients, and cations and heavy metals have been discussed in this paper. Strong evidences proved that the process of gas production in the form of biogas is related to the methanogens activities, which are practically found in the core of granules. The aim of this review is to explore and assess the mechanisms of granules initiation and development inside UASB reactor.

  11. Cav2.1 channels control multivesicular release by relying on their distance from exocytotic Ca2+ sensors at rat cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Imoto, Keiji

    2014-01-22

    The concomitant release of multiple numbers of synaptic vesicles [multivesicular release (MVR)] in response to a single presynaptic action potential enhances the flexibility of synaptic transmission. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying MVR at a single CNS synapse remain unclear. Here, we show that the Cav2.1 subtype (P/Q-type) of the voltage-gated calcium channel is specifically responsible for the induction of MVR. In the rat cerebellar cortex, paired-pulse activation of granule cell (GC) ascending fibers leads not only to a facilitation of the peak amplitude (PPFamp) but also to a prolongation of the decay time (PPPdecay) of the EPSCs recorded from molecular layer interneurons. PPFamp is elicited by a transient increase in the number of released vesicles. PPPdecay is highly dependent on MVR and is caused by dual mechanisms: (1) a delayed release and (2) an extrasynaptic spillover of the GC transmitter glutamate and subsequent pooling of the glutamate among active synapses. PPPdecay was specifically suppressed by the Cav2.1 channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA, while PPFamp responded to Cav2.2/Cav2.3 (N-type/R-type) channel blockers. The membrane-permeable slow Ca(2+) chelator EGTA-AM profoundly reduced the decay time constant (τdecay) of the second EPSC; however, it only had a negligible impact on that of the first, thereby eliminating PPPdecay. These results suggest that the distance between presynaptic Cav2.1 channels and exocytotic Ca(2+) sensors is a key determinant of MVR. By transducing presynaptic action potential firings into unique Ca(2+) signals and vesicle release profiles, Cav2.1 channels contribute to the encoding and processing of neural information.

  12. Schwann cell-specific deletion of the endosomal PI 3-kinase Vps34 leads to delayed radial sorting of axons, arrested myelination, and abnormal ErbB2-ErbB3 tyrosine kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Anne M; Mammel, Anna E; Robinson, Danielle C; Chin, Andrea L; Condon, Alec F; Robinson, Fred L

    2017-09-01

    The PI 3-kinase Vps34 (Pik3c3) synthesizes phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P), a lipid critical for both endosomal membrane traffic and macroautophagy. Human genetics have implicated PI3P dysregulation, and endosomal trafficking in general, as a recurring cause of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy. Here, we investigated the role of Vps34, and PI3P, in mouse Schwann cells by selectively deleting Vps34 in this cell type. Vps34-Schwann cell knockout (Vps34 SCKO ) mice show severe hypomyelination in peripheral nerves. Vps34 -/- Schwann cells interact abnormally with axons, and there is a delay in radial sorting, a process by which large axons are selected for myelination. Upon reaching the promyelinating stage, Vps34 -/- Schwann cells are significantly impaired in the elaboration of myelin. Nerves from Vps34 SCKO mice contain elevated levels of the LC3 and p62 proteins, indicating impaired autophagy. However, in the light of recent demonstrations that autophagy is dispensable for myelination, it is unlikely that hypomyelination in Vps34 SCKO mice is caused by impaired autophagy. Endosomal trafficking is also disturbed in Vps34 -/- Schwann cells. We investigated the activation of the ErbB2/3 receptor tyrosine kinases in Vps34 SCKO nerves, as these proteins, which play essential roles in Schwann cell myelination, are known to traffic through endosomes. In Vps34 SCKO nerves, ErbB3 was hyperphosphorylated on a tyrosine known to be phosphorylated in response to neuregulin 1 exposure. ErbB2 protein levels were also decreased during myelination. Our findings suggest that the loss of Vps34 alters the trafficking of ErbB2/3 through endosomes. Abnormal ErbB2/3 signaling to downstream targets may contribute to the hypomyelination observed in Vps34 SCKO mice. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. In vitro study of uptake and synthesis of creatine and its precursors by cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes suggests some hypotheses on the physiopathology of the inherited disorders of creatine metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carducci Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of the inherited disorders of creatine (Cr synthesis and transport in the last few years disclosed the importance of blood Cr supply for the normal functioning of the brain. These putatively rare diseases share a common pathogenetic mechanism (the depletion of brain Cr and similar phenotypes characterized by mental retardation, language disturbances, seizures and movement disorders. In the effort to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating Cr pool inside the nervous tissue, Cr transport and synthesis and related gene transcripts were explored in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes. Methods Cr uptake and synthesis were explored in vitro by incubating monotypic primary cultures of rat type I astrocytes and cerebellar granule cells with: a D3-Creatine (D3Cr and D3Cr plus β-guanidinopropionate (GPA, an inhibitor of Cr transporter, and b labelled precursors of Guanidinoacetate (GAA and Cr (Arginine, Arg; Glycine, Gly. Intracellular D3Cr and labelled GAA and Cr were assessed by ESI-MS/MS. Creatine transporter (CT1, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT, and S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT gene expression was assessed in the same cells by real time PCR. Results D3Cr signal was extremely high in cells incubated with this isotope (labelled/unlabelled Cr ratio reached about 10 and 122, respectively in cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes and was reduced by GPA. Labelled Arg and Gly were taken up by the cells and incorporated in GAA, whose concentration paralleled that of these precursors both in the extracellular medium and inside the cells (astrocytes. In contrast, the increase of labelled Cr was relatively much more limited since labelled Cr after precursors' supplementation did not exceed 2,7% (cerebellar granule cells and 21% (astrocytes of unlabelled Cr. Finally, AGAT, GAMT and SLC6A8 were expressed in both kind of cells. Conclusions Our

  14. Differential compartmentalization of mRNAs in squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1996-11-01

    Previously, we reported that the squid giant axon contains a heterogeneous population of mRNAs that includes beta-actin, beta-tubulin, kinesin, neurofilament proteins, and enolase. To define the absolute levels and relative distribution of these mRNAs, we have used competitive reverse transcription-PCR to quantify the levels of five mRNAs present in the giant axon and giant fiber lobe (GFL), the location of the parental cell soma. In the GFL, the number of transcripts for these mRNAs varied over a fourfold range, with beta-tubulin being the most abundant mRNA species (1.25 x 10(9) molecules per GFL). Based on transcript number, the rank order of mRNA levels in the GFL was beta-tubulin > beta-actin > kinesin > enolase > microtubule-associated protein (MAP) H1. In contrast, kinesin mRNA was most abundant in the axon (4.1 x 10(7) molecules per axon) with individual mRNA levels varying 15-fold. The rank order of mRNA levels in the axon was kinesin > beta-tubulin > MAP H1 > beta-actin > enolase. The relative abundance of the mRNA species in the axon did not correlate with the size of the transcript, nor was it directly related to their corresponding levels in the GFL. Taken together, these findings confirm that significant amounts of mRNA are present in the giant axon and suggest that specific mRNAs are differentially transported into the axonal domain.

  15. Spray granulation for drug formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Zhi Hui; Er, Dawn Z L; Chan, Lai Wah; Liew, Celine V; Heng, Paul W S

    2011-12-01

    Granulation is a key unit process in the production of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms and involves the agglomeration of fine particles with the aid of a binding agent. Fluidized bed granulation, a classic example of spray granulation, is a technique of particle agglomeration brought about by the spray addition of the binding liquid onto a stationary bed of powder particles that is transformed to a fluid-like state by the passage of air through it. The basic working principles, equipment set-up, advantages and challenges of fluidized bed granulation are introduced in this review. This is followed by an overview of the formulation and process-related variables affecting granulation performance. Technological advances, particularly in the application of process analytical tools, in the field of fluidized bed granulation research are also discussed. Fluidized bed granulation is a popular technique for pharmaceutical production, as it is a highly economical and efficient one-pot process. The research and development of process analytical technologies (PAT) has allowed greater process understanding and control to be achieved, even for the lesser known fluidized bed techniques, such as bottom spray and fluidized hot melt granulation. In view of its consistent mixing, as well as continuous and concurrent wetting and drying occurring throughout processing, fluidized bed granulation shows great potential for continuous production although more research is required to fully implement, validate and integrate the PAT tools in a production line.

  16. A Comparison of Granules Produced by High-Shear and Fluidized-Bed Granulation Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Garett; Briens, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Placebo granules were manufactured by both wet high-shear and fluidized-bed techniques. The granules were compared based on size, shape, surface morphology, and a variety of different flowability measurements. This comparison showed that granule formation and growth were different, with induction growth for high-shear granulation and steady growth for fluidized-bed granulation. Final granules from high-shear granulation were more spherical and dense compared with the irregular granules from f...

  17. Axon tension regulates fasciculation/defasciculation through the control of axon shaft zippering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, C.; Pincet, F.; Zápotocký, Martin; Trembleau, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, Apr 19 (2017), č. článku e19907. ISSN 2050-084X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16755S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12FR002 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : biophysics * cell adhesion * coarsening * developmental biology * mathematical model * mechanical tension * axon guidance Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 7.725, year: 2016

  18. Anatomical evidence for direct fiber projections from the cerebellar nucleus interpositus to rubrospinal neurons. A quantitative EM study in the rat combining anterograde and retrograde intra-axonal tracing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekker, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    A quantitative electron microscopic (EM) study combining the anterograde intra-axonal transport of radioactive amino acids and the retrograde intra-axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was performed in the magnocellular red nucleus of the rat to obtain anatomical evidence as to whether there is a direct projection from the cerebellar nucleus interpositus to the cells in the red nucleus that give rise to the rubrospinal tract. Large asymmetrical synaptic terminals were radioactively labeled in the magnocellular red nucleus following injections of [ 3 H]leucine into the cerebellar nucleus interpositus. In these same animals, the postsynaptic target neurons were labeled with HRP granules after injection of this substance in the rubrospinal tract. A quantitative analysis showed that more than 85% of the large and giant neurons in the magnocellular red nucleus were labeled with HRP granules and also received synaptic contacts from radioactively-labeled terminals. Thus, it can be concluded that in the rat, afferents from the cerebellar nucleus interpositus establish asymmetrical synaptic contacts with large and giant rubrospinal neurons, thus confirming and extending the previous physiological evidence of such direct monosynaptic connections. (Auth.)

  19. Correlation between loose density and compactibility of granules prepared by various granulation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Yoneyama, T; Nakajima, K; Kobayashi, M

    2001-03-23

    The objectives of this study were to prepare the lactose granules by various granulation methods using polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) as a binder and to evaluate the effects of granulation methods on the compressibility and compactibility of granules in tabletting. Lactose was granulated by seven granulation methods -- four wet granulations including wet massing granulation, wet high-speed mixer granulation, wet fluidized bed granulation and wet tumbling fluidized bed granulation; and three melt granulations including melt high-speed mixer granulation, melt fluidized bed granulation and melt tumbling fluidized bed granulation. The loose density, angle of repose, granule size distribution, mean diameter of granules, and the tensile strength and porosity of tablets were evaluated. The compactibilities of granules were varied by the granulation methods. However, the difference in compactibility of granules could not be explained due to the difference in compressibility, since there was no difference in Heckel plots due to granulation methods. Among their granule properties, the loose density of granules seemed to have a correlation with the tablet strength regardless of the granulation methods.

  20. Primate Cerebellar Granule Cells Exhibit a Tonic GABAAR Conductance that is not Affected by Alcohol: A Possible Cellular Substrate of the Low Level of Response Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eMohr

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In many rodent brain regions, alcohol increases vesicular release of GABA, resulting in an increase in the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and the magnitude of tonic GABAA receptor (GABAAR currents. A neglected issue in translating the rodent literature to humans is the possibility that phylogenetic differences alter the actions of alcohol. To address this issue we made voltage-clamp recordings from granule cells (GCs in cerebellar slices from the non-human primate, Macaca fascicularis. We found that similar to Sprague Dawley rats (SDRs, non-human primate (NHP GCs exhibit a tonic conductance generated by 6 subunit containing GABAARs, as evidenced by its blockade by the broad spectrum GABAAR antagonist, GABAzine (10M, inhibition by 6 selective antagonist, furosemide (100M, and enhancement by THDOC (10-20nM and THIP (500nM. In contrast to SDR GCs, in most NHP GCs (~60%, application of EtOH (25-105mM did not increase sIPSC frequency or the tonic GABAAR current. In a minority of cells (~40%, EtOH did increase sIPSC frequency and the tonic current. The relative lack of response to EtOH was associated with reduced expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, which we recently reported mediates EtOH-induced enhancement of vesicular GABA release in rats. The EtOH-induced increase in tonic GABAAR current was significantly smaller in NHPs than in SDRs, presumably due to less GABA release, because there were no obvious differences in the density of GABAARs or GABA transporters between SDR and NHP GCs. Thus, EtOH does not directly modulate 6 subunit GABAARs in NHPs. Instead, EtOH enhanced GABAergic transmission is mediated by enhanced GABA release. Further, SDR GC responses to alcohol are only representative of a subpopulation of NHP GCs. This suggests that the impact of EtOH on NHP cerebellar physiology will be reduced compared to SDRs, and will likely have different computational and behavioral

  1. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations.

  2. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Amanda E; Foust, Amanda J; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A

    2015-11-25

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons contain three main

  3. Statistical properties of solar granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topka, K.; Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Shine, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 collected movies of solar granulation completely free from atmospheric blurring, and are not degraded by pointint jitter (the pointing stability was 0.003 sec root mean square). The movies illustrate that the solar five minute oscillation has a major role in the appearance of solar granulation and that exploding granules are a common feature of the granule evolution. Using 3-D Fourier filtering techniques the oscillations were removed and it was demonstrated that the autocorrelation lifetime of granulation is a factor of two greater in magnetic field regions than in field-free quiet sun. Horizontal velocities were measured and flow patterns were observed on the scale of meso- and super granulation. In quiet regions the mean flow velocity is 370 m/s while in the magnetic regions it is about 125 m/s. It was also found that the root mean square (RMS) fluctuating horizonal velocity field is substantially greater in quiet sun than in strong magnetic field regions. By superimposing the location of exploding granules on the average flow maps it was found that they appear almost exclusively in the center of mesogranulation size flow cells. Because of the nonuniformity of the distribution of exploding granules, the evolution of the granulation pattern in mesogranule cell centers and boundaries differs fundamentally. It is clear from this study there is neither a typical granule nor a typical granule evolution.

  4. Isolation and studies of the granules of the amebocytes of Limulus polyphemus, the horseshoe crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürer, E H; Levin, J; Holme, R

    1975-12-01

    Granules were isolated from the cytoplasm of the amebocytes of Limulus polyphemus, the horseshoe crab, by disruption of cells obtained from blood which had been drawn into 2 mM propranolol. The granules subsequently were purified by centrifugation through a sucrose gradient that contained heparin. Extracts of the granules were prepared by freezing and thawing the granule preparations in distilled water. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy of the granules revealed round or ovoid particles. However, only one type of granule appeared to be present. The ultraviolet spectrum of the extract of amebocyte granules demonstrated a peak at 277 nm at pH 7.4, and a shift into two peaks of 281 nm and 290 nm at alkaline pH. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed a pattern similar to that observed with lysates prepared from intact amebocytes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in the presence of urea at pH 4.5, demonstrated patterns similar to those observed with amebocyte lysate. Extracts of the granules were gelled by bacterial endotoxin. The blood of the horseshoe crab contains only one type of cell, the amebocyte. Previous studies have shown that the blood coagulation mechanism of Limulus is contained entirely within amebocytes. The current studies suggest that the granules, which pack the cytoplasm of these cells, contain all of the factors required for the coagulation of blood, including the clottable protein. The intracellularly localized coagulation system is released from amebocytes when their granules rupture during cell aggregation.

  5. Brain RNA synthesis, long-term potentiation and depression at the perforant path-granule cell synapse in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadile, A G; Neugebauer, A; Gessi, T; Marchionni, S; Giuditta, A

    1995-01-01

    The effects of long-term changes in synaptic efficacy at the perforant path-granule cell synapse on the de-novo synthesis of ribonucleic acid (RNA) were investigated in hippocampal and cortical areas in anaesthetized Guinea pig preparations. Two experiments were run with stimulating and recording microelectrodes aimed at the perforant bundle and dentate gyrus hilus on both sides. In Experiment 1, a low-frequency (LFS; 0.02 Hz, 3 h) or high-frequency stimulation (HFS; 400 Hz, 250 ms) was delivered to the left perforant bundle with the contralateral side as control. In Experiment 2, animals received LFS or HFS trains with implanted nonstimulated animals used as controls. The latency and amplitude of the field postsynaptic potentials (FPSP) and population spike (POPS) were monitored under baseline conditions and following stimulation over a 3 h period. In addition, two HFS groups were tested with few (HFS-F: every 15 min) or several test stimuli (HFS-S: every 3 min). In both experiments RNA synthesis was determined by measuring the amount of 3H-5,6-uridine incorporated into the RNA 3 h after bilateral intraventricular injection. In Exp. 1 the LFS group showed a higher synthesis of RNA than both HFS groups. The rate of RNA synthesis did not differ between the stimulated and nonstimulated side. In Exp. 2 the HFS groups showed a decreased RNA synthesis. In the HFS-F group, it pertained to the dorsal dentate area, CA1, subiculum, cingulate and dorsal cortices bilaterally, and to the ventral dentate area and CA3 on the nonstimulated side. In contrast, the HFS-S group showed decreased RNA synthesis at the dorsal dentate area and dorsal cortex on the stimulated side, and at CA1, subiculum, and cingulate cortex bilaterally. The decrease was stronger in the HFS-F than in the HFS-S group. Moreover, the subgroup with a low (0-60%) and that with a high (61-240%) level of long-term potentiation of FPSP revealed lower and higher RNA synthesis, respectively, both in homosynaptic

  6. Distributed changes in rat brain DNA synthesis with long-term habituation and potentiation of the perforant path-granule cell synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadile, A G; Neugebauer, A; Morelli, F; Horvath, Z; Buzsàki, G; Giuditta, A

    1991-12-13

    The involvement of brain deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in adaptive neural events was studied in the adult rat during long-term habituation (LTH) or potentiation (LTP) of the perforant path-granule cell synapse. Male Long-Evans rats were given 50 muCi [3H]thymidine intraventricularly under urethane anesthesia. Soon thereafter, field excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) slope and population spike were monitored from the right dentate gyrus before and at various times (5, 10, 15, 60 min) following the delivery to the ipsilateral perforant bundle of a low frequency (LFS: 1.0 Hz, 160 s) or a high-frequency train (HFS: 400 Hz, 200 ms), repeated once after 5 min. Unstimulated implanted rats served as controls. DNA synthesis was evaluated by the incorporation of the radioactive precursor into DNA of several brain areas at the end of a 1 h incorporation period. In CA1, LTH and LTP increased DNA synthesis by 30% on the stimulated side. In the entorhinal cortex, LTH but not LTP increased DNA synthesis (by 30%) on the stimulated side. Conversely, in the frontal cortex, LTP but not LTH increased DNA synthesis (by 100%) on both sides. Long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy covaried non-linearly with DNA synthesis in mono- and polysynaptically stimulated hippocampal regions, and in functionally associated neocortical areas. The co-variations of population spike amplitude were positive for LTH and negative for LTP in the dentate gyrus and frontal cortex of both sides, and in CA3/CA1 of the stimulated side, indicating higher DNA synthesis at lower values of LTH and LTP, and viceversa. Further, regional cross-correlation analyses revealed a high degree of synchronization among brain sites, following low- or high-frequency train pulses, indicating that (i) extra-target sites participate on the stimulated and on the contralateral side, and (ii) small distributed changes take place across the sampled neural networks. A modulatory role of information flow on brain DNA

  7. A comparison of granules produced by high-shear and fluidized-bed granulation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Garett; Briens, Lauren

    2014-08-01

    Placebo granules were manufactured by both wet high-shear and fluidized-bed techniques. The granules were compared based on size, shape, surface morphology, and a variety of different flowability measurements. This comparison showed that granule formation and growth were different, with induction growth for high-shear granulation and steady growth for fluidized-bed granulation. Final granules from high-shear granulation were more spherical and dense compared with the irregular granules from fluidized-bed granulation. The high-shear granules demonstrated better overall flow properties.

  8. Collages of granulation pictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, R.B.; November, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes two small-area selection schemes that the authors have applied to CCD observations of solar granulation. The first scheme, which the authors call the ''mosaic,'' divides the 128 x 128 array into 64 subarrays each containing 16 x 16 pixels. On each picture in the burst the RMS contrast of the fine structure is measured in each subarray and compared to the corresponding value in a table that contains the highest previous RMS values. The second scheme, which the authors call a ''collage,'' is similar except the RMS value is calculated smoothly within a sliding Gaussian window over the entire scene and the value of an individual pixel is gated into the final collage whenever the RMS contrast at that pixel location exceeds that of all previous frames taken during the burst

  9. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuditta, A.; Kaplan, B.B.; van Minnen, J.; Alvarez, J.; Koenig, E.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal - yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins.

  10. Coupling granule properties and granulation rates in high-shear granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biggs, CA; Sanders, C; Scott, AC; Willemse, AW; Hoffman, AC; Instone, T; Salman, AD; Hounslow, MJ

    2003-01-01

    It is possible to link granulation rates to granule properties. The linkage is by multiple dimension population balance equations that, by means of simplifying assumptions, can be reduced to multiple one-dimensional (1-D) population balance equations (PBES). Using simple physically based models,

  11. Evaluation of the Fertilizer Granules Strength Obtained from Plate Granulation with Different Angle of Granulation Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszczuk Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper was to assess the strength of the fertilizer granules obtained by non-pressure granulation method. The granulation process was carried out in plate granulator, according to the three-level experiment plan. A mixture of raw materials prepared in a Polish factory of agrochemicals for agriculture and horticulture was used as a study material and water was used as a wetting liquid. Granulator design parameters and process parameters were treated as entrance sizes of the experiment. Three different angles of granulation blade were used in experiments. This paper presents: the results of study of equivalent diameter size and the impact of changes in the angle of granulating blade on the strength of obtained granulate. Pfost apparatus and a set of sieves used in granulometric sieve were utilized in this study. A relation was suggested P∞ = f(α, ϰ, n, ww, t. The results were presented in the form of graphs and tables. Conclusions were presented.

  12. Plexin A3 and turnout regulate motor axonal branch morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Sainath

    Full Text Available During embryogenesis motor axons navigate to their target muscles, where individual motor axons develop complex branch morphologies. The mechanisms that control axonal branching morphogenesis have been studied intensively, yet it still remains unclear when branches begin to form or how branch locations are determined. Live cell imaging of individual zebrafish motor axons reveals that the first axonal branches are generated at the ventral extent of the myotome via bifurcation of the growth cone. Subsequent branches are generated by collateral branching restricted to their synaptic target field along the distal portion of the axon. This precisely timed and spatially restricted branching process is disrupted in turnout mutants we identified in a forward genetic screen. Molecular genetic mapping positioned the turnout mutation within a 300 kb region encompassing eight annotated genes, however sequence analysis of all eight open reading frames failed to unambiguously identify the turnout mutation. Chimeric analysis and single cell labeling reveal that turnout function is required cell non-autonomously for intraspinal motor axon guidance and peripheral branch formation. turnout mutant motor axons form the first branch on time via growth cone bifurcation, but unlike wild-type they form collateral branches precociously, when the growth cone is still navigating towards the ventral myotome. These precocious collateral branches emerge along the proximal region of the axon shaft typically devoid of branches, and they develop into stable, permanent branches. Furthermore, we find that null mutants of the guidance receptor plexin A3 display identical motor axon branching defects, and time lapse analysis reveals that precocious branch formation in turnout and plexin A3 mutants is due to increased stability of otherwise short-lived axonal protrusions. Thus, plexin A3 dependent intrinsic and turnout dependent extrinsic mechanisms suppress collateral branch

  13. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The ...

  14. Human-specific subcellular compartmentalization of P-element induced wimpy testis-like (PIWIL) granules during germ cell development and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Fernandes, Maria; He, Nannan; Wang, Fang; Van Iperen, Liesbeth; Eguizabal, Cristina; Matorras, Roberto; Roelen, Bernard A J; Chuva De Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2018-02-01

    What is the dynamics of expression of P-element induced wimpy testis-like (PIWIL) proteins in the germline during human fetal development and spermatogenesis? PIWIL1, PIWIL2, PIWIL3 and PIWIL4 were expressed in a sex-specific fashion in human germ cells (GC) during development and adulthood. PIWILs showed a mutually exclusive pattern of subcellular localization. PIWILs were present in the intermitochondrial cement and a single large granule in meiotic GC and their expression was different from that observed in mice, highlighting species-differences. In mice, PIWIL proteins play prominent roles in male infertility. PIWIL mouse mutants show either post-meiotic arrest at the round spermatid stage (PIWIL1) or arrest at the zygotene-pachytene stage of meiosis I (PIWIL2 and PIWIL4) in males, while females remain fertile. Recent studies have reported a robust piRNA pool in human fetal ovary. This is a qualitative analysis of PIWILs expression in paraffin-embedded fetal human male (N = 8), female gonads (N = 6) and adult testes (N = 5), and bioinformatics analysis of online available single-cell transcriptomics data of human fetal germ cells (n = 242). Human fetal gonads from elective abortion without medical indication and adult testes biopsies were donated for research with informed consent. Samples were fixed, paraffin-embedded and analyzed by immunofluorescence to study the temporal and cellular localization of PIWIL1, PIWIL2, PIWIL3 and PIWIL4. PIWIL1, PIWIL2 and PIWIL4 showed a mutually exclusive pattern of subcellular localization, particularly in female oocytes. To our surprise, PIWIL1 immunostaining revealed the presence of a single dense paranuclear body, resembling the chromatoid body of haploid spermatocytes, in meiotic oocytes. Moreover, in contrast to mice, PIWIL4, but not PIWIL2, localized to the intermitochondrial cement. PIWIL3 was not expressed in GC during development. The upregulation of PIWIL transcripts correlated with the transcription of markers

  15. CSPGs inhibit axon branching by impairing mitochondria-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and axonal translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Rajiv; Ketschek, Andrea; Grandi, Leah; Gallo, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inhibit the formation of axon collateral branches. The regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton and mitochondria are important components of the mechanism of branching. Actin-dependent axonal plasticity, reflected in the dynamics of axonal actin patches and filopodia, is greatest along segments of the axon populated by mitochondria. It is reported that CSPGs partially depolarize the membrane potential of axonal mitochondria, which impairs the dynamics of the axonal actin cytoskeleton and decreases the formation and duration of axonal filopodia, the first steps in the mechanism of branching. The effects of CSPGs on actin cytoskeletal dynamics are specific to axon segments populated by mitochondria. In contrast, CSPGs do not affect the microtubule content of axons, or the localization of microtubules into axonal filopodia, a required step in the mechanism of branch formation. It is also reported that CSPGs decrease the mitochondria-dependent axonal translation of cortactin, an actin associated protein involved in branching. Finally, the inhibitory effects of CSPGs on axon branching, actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the axonal translation of cortactin are reversed by culturing neurons with acetyl-l-carnitine, which promotes mitochondrial respiration. Collectively these data indicate that CSPGs impair mitochondrial function in axons, an effect which contributes to the inhibition of axon branching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Forced notch signaling inhibits commissural axon outgrowth in the developing chick central nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A collection of in vitro evidence has demonstrated that Notch signaling plays a key role in the growth of neurites in differentiated neurons. However, the effects of Notch signaling on axon outgrowth in an in vivo condition remain largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the neural tubes of HH10-11 chick embryos were in ovo electroporated with various Notch transgenes of activating or inhibiting Notch signaling, and then their effects on commissural axon outgrowth across the floor plate midline in the chick developing central nerve system were investigated. Our results showed that forced expression of Notch intracellular domain, constitutively active form of RBPJ, or full-length Hes1 in the rostral hindbrain, diencephalon and spinal cord at stage HH10-11 significantly inhibited commissural axon outgrowth. On the other hand, inhibition of Notch signaling by ectopically expressing a dominant-negative form of RBPJ promoted commissural axonal growth along the circumferential axis. Further results revealed that these Notch signaling-mediated axon outgrowth defects may be not due to the alteration of axon guidance since commissural axon marker TAG1 was present in the axons in floor plate midline, and also not result from the changes in cell fate determination of commissural neurons since the expression of postmitotic neuron marker Tuj1 and specific commissural markers TAG1 and Pax7 was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We first used an in vivo system to provide evidence that forced Notch signaling negatively regulates commissural axon outgrowth.

  17. In vivo and in vitro observations of polyhydroxybutyrate granules formed by Dinoroseobacter sp. JL 1447.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Na; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Yongqin

    2015-03-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules formed by a marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial strain Dinoroseobacter sp. JL 1447 were detected using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. When Dinoroseobacter sp. JL 1447 was inoculated into a medium with glucose as the sole carbon source, the formation of PHB granules occurred and accumulated with incubation time, reaching their maximum in the stationary phase cultures. PHB granules, formed in the cytoplasm at the cell poles or future cell poles, were remobilized and used by the cells in late stationary complex cultures. When PHB granules formed, cell length elongated from 0.5 to 1.5 μm and spherical protrusions appeared on the cell surface. The French press method was used to break the cells and isolate the PHB granules. The freshly prepared and intact PHB granules were spherical with a soft, smooth outer envelope without visible substructures. Upon treating PHB granules with sodium dodecyl sulfate, the envelope was destroyed and nearly parted from the granules, and uniform, spherical structures with a central pore appeared on the granule surface. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Zymophagy: Selective Autophagy of Secretory Granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Vaccaro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing is everything. That's especially true when it comes to the activation of enzymes created by the pancreas to break down food. Pancreatic enzymes are packed in secretory granules as precursor molecules called zymogens. In physiological conditions, those zymogens are activated only when they reach the gut, where they get to work releasing and distributing nutrients that we need to survive. If this process fails and the enzymes are prematurely activated within the pancreatic cell, before they are released from the gland, they break down the pancreas itself causing acute pancreatitis. This is a painful disease that ranges from a mild and autolimited process to a severe and lethal condition. Recently, we demonstrated that the pancreatic acinar cell is able to switch on a refined mechanism that could explain the autolimited form of the disease. This is a novel selective form of autophagy named zymophagy, a cellular process to specifically detect and degrade secretory granules containing activated enzymes before they can digest the organ. In this work, we revise the molecules and mechanisms that mediate zymophagy, a selective autophagy of secretory granules.

  19. Granulation of acetaminophen by a rotating fluidized-bed granulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, T; Sunada, H; Yonezawa, Y; Danjo, K; Hasegawa, M; Makino, T; Sakamoto, H; Fujita, K; Tanino, T; Kokubo, H

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the use of a rotating fluidized-bed granulator to produce acetaminophen granules with sufficient binding force between particles and good plasticity in tablets. Ethenzamide and ascorbic acid were used to compare the relationship between granulation and the sample wetness. It was revealed that a blade rotation rate of 300 rpm, inlet air flow rate of 42 m3/hr, and spraying pressure of 1.5 kg/cm3 produced tablets with the best properties. The granule and tablet properties of ethenzamide and ascorbic acid were compared to those of acetaminophen. These compounds showed different wetting behaviors with water and different compression behaviors. With an increase in medicament content, tablet hardness increased except for the ascorbic acid formulation. Capping and sticking were observed in acetaminophen and in ascorbic acid, respectively, and acetaminophen and ethenzamide showed prolonged disintegration time.

  20. Neurobiology of axonal transport defects in motor neuron diseases: Opportunities for translational research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Kurt J; Hafezparast, Majid

    2017-09-01

    Intracellular trafficking of cargoes is an essential process to maintain the structure and function of all mammalian cell types, but especially of neurons because of their extreme axon/dendrite polarisation. Axonal transport mediates the movement of cargoes such as proteins, mRNA, lipids, membrane-bound vesicles and organelles that are mostly synthesised in the cell body and in doing so is responsible for their correct spatiotemporal distribution in the axon, for example at specialised sites such as nodes of Ranvier and synaptic terminals. In addition, axonal transport maintains the essential long-distance communication between the cell body and synaptic terminals that allows neurons to react to their surroundings via trafficking of for example signalling endosomes. Axonal transport defects are a common observation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, and mutations in components of the axonal transport machinery have unequivocally shown that impaired axonal transport can cause neurodegeneration (reviewed in El-Kadi et al., 2007, De Vos et al., 2008; Millecamps and Julien, 2013). Here we review our current understanding of axonal transport defects and the role they play in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) with a specific focus on the most common form of MND, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain...

  2. Slowing of axonal regeneration is correlated with increased axonal viscosity during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidemann Steven R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As we age, the speed of axonal regeneration declines. At the biophysical level, why this occurs is not well understood. Results To investigate we first measured the rate of axonal elongation of sensory neurons cultured from neonatal and adult rats. We found that neonatal axons grew 40% faster than adult axons (11.5 µm/hour vs. 8.2 µm/hour. To determine how the mechanical properties of axons change during maturation, we used force calibrated towing needles to measure the viscosity (stiffness and strength of substrate adhesion of neonatal and adult sensory axons. We found no significant difference in the strength of adhesions, but did find that adult axons were 3 times intrinsically stiffer than neonatal axons. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest decreasing axonal stiffness may be part of an effective strategy to accelerate the regeneration of axons in the adult peripheral nervous system.

  3. Heterogeneity of secretory granules of silent pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, S; Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1988-01-01

    Silent pituitary adenomas were compared with hormonally active tumors taking into account the size, number, and ultrastructural characteristics of secretory granules (SG). The study group (a total of 79 primary pituitary adenomas) comprised 27 silent, 21 growth hormone (GH)-producing-, 16 prolactin...... (PRL)-producing-, 5 GH-PRL-producing- and 10 adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing adenomas. The SG of silent adenomas were significantly smaller than SG in endocrine active adenomas. All hormonally inactive tumors also contained small (mean, 94 nm) specific cytoplasmic granules, designated...... "silent adenoma granules" (SIG). The fine structural features of the SIG included: a flocculent, granular material occupying an eccentric position in a larger vesicle limited by a double membrane. In the silent adenomas this particular granule was present in up to 90% of the adenoma cells and constituted...

  4. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D

    2000-01-01

    Glial reactivity is implicated in CNS repair and regenerative responses. Microglia, the cells responding earliest to axonal injury, produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), a cytokine with both cytopathic and neuroprotective effects. We have studied activation of hippocampal microglia...... periods. Message for the immune cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) was undetectable, and glial reactivity to axonal lesions occurred as normal in IFNgamma-deficient mice. Microglial responses to lesion-induced neuronal injury were markedly enhanced in myelin basic protein promoter-driven transgenic mice...

  5. N-cadherin regulates primary motor axon growth and branching during zebrafish embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusés, Juan L

    2011-06-15

    N-cadherin is a classical type I cadherin that contributes to the formation of neural circuits by regulating growth cone migration and the formation of synaptic contacts. This study analyzed the role of N-cadherin in primary motor axons growth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. After exiting the spinal cord, primary motor axons migrate ventrally through a common pathway and form the first neuromuscular junction with the muscle pioneer cells located at the horizontal myoseptum, which serves as a choice point for cell-type-specific pathway selection. Analysis of N-cadherin mutants (cdh2(hi3644Tg) ) and embryos injected with N-cadherin antisense morpholinos showed primary motor axons extending aberrant axonal branches at the choice point in ∼40% of the somitic hemisegments and an ∼150% increase in the number of branches per axon length within the ventral myotome. Analysis of individual axons trajectories showed that the caudal (CaP) and rostral (RoP) motor neurons axons formed aberrant branches at the choice point that abnormally extended in the rostrocaudal axis and ventrally to the horizontal myoseptum. Expression of a dominant-interfering N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain in primary motor neurons caused some axons to stall abnormally at the horizontal myoseptum and to impair their migration into the ventral myotome. However, in N-cadherin-depleted embryos, the majority of primary motor axons innervated their appropriate myotomal territories, indicating that N-cadherin regulates motor axon growth and branching without severely affecting the mechanisms that control axonal target selection. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. IFNgamma enhances microglial reactions to hippocampal axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Hegelund, I V; Lomholt, N D

    2000-01-01

    Glial reactivity is implicated in CNS repair and regenerative responses. Microglia, the cells responding earliest to axonal injury, produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), a cytokine with both cytopathic and neuroprotective effects. We have studied activation of hippocampal microglia to p...

  7. Collages of granulation pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R. B.; November, L. J.

    Two small-area selection schemes are applied to CCD observations of solar granulation. One procedure, referred to as mosaic, divides a 128 x 128 array into 64 subarrays of 16 x 16 pixels; the rms contrast of the fine structure is measured and compared in order to develop a mosaic of the subarrays. The second technique, collage, involves calculating rms values within a sliding Gaussian window and gating the pixel into the final image. Methods for assessing seeing quality, which involve the calculation of rms after high-pass filtering, are examined; a simple high-pass filter or an edge-locating function can be utilized for filtering. The rms map is then formed from the convolution of a Gaussian with either the high-pass or the Laplacian filters. The usefulness of the two procedures is demonstrated by applying the mosaic and collage processes to data recorded on July 17, 1983 with a CCD device on the NSO/Sac Peak Vacuum Tower Telescope.

  8. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poblete-Durán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs, which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs, which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs.

  9. P granules phase transition induced by cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Hu, GuoHui

    2017-01-01

    P granules are germ granules contained in Caenorhabditis elegans germ cells. The first germ cell is specified by the one-cell embryo in which P granules localize to the posterior. Previous studies suggested that the mechanism of the localization phenomena is induced by liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT), in which the polarity proteins control the saturation point of P granules. In the present study, we propose that the P granules phase transition can be triggered by the cytoplasmic streaming. A two-phase flow model is employed to simulate the localization of P granules, i.e., the cytoplasm is considered as a liquid phase, and the droplet-like P granules are another liquid phase. With the presence of the cytoplasmic streaming, P granules, initially distributing uniformly in the entire one-cell embryo, eventually condense/dissolve in the cytoplasm phase, regulated by difference between the saturation pressure and the hydrodynamic pressure. The numerical results reveal that the cytoplasmic streaming has significant effects on the localization of P granules, as well as the embryo division.

  10. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  11. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical proper...

  12. Age-related changes in axonal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, V V; Tanin, S A; Gorban, Y N

    1997-01-01

    In rats the rate of axonal transport (AT) or radiolabeled material decreased in the ventral roots of the spinal cord and the vagal and hypoglossal nerves with aging. A maximum AT deceleration in old age was observed in the vagus. The uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, inhibition of glycolysis and hypoxia induced a greater AT deceleration in old rats as compared to adults. Small doses of sodium fluoride accelerated AT, and this correlated with a rise in cAMP levels in ventral roots. High doses of sodium fluoride decelerated AT more markedly in old rats. It was shown that anabolic hormones (sex steroids and thyroxine) accelerated AT in both adult and old rats, whereas insulin induced a rise in AT rate in only adults. The catabolic steroid, hydrocortisone decelerated AT. In old rats castration diminished AT, while thyroidectomy had no effect. It was also shown that hydrocortisone and testosterone were transported along axons, reached fibers of the skeletal muscles, and hyperpolarized the plasma membrane. In old age the latent period was extended. Following 73 to 74 days of irradiation, AT slowed down in all the nerves studied in both adult and old rats. Following irradiation hormonal effects on AT changed, for example, the stimulatory effect of estradiol became weak, especially in old rats. Changes in AT could be an important mechanism of disordering the growth of neurons and innervated cells in old age.

  13. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogberg, Helena T.; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hartung, Thomas; Coecke, Sandra; Bal-Price, Anna K.

    2009-01-01

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABA A receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100β) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABA A receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABA A receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100β) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity

  14. The nanomechanical role of melanin granules in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Michal; Olchawa, Magdalena; Zadlo, Andrzej; Wnuk, Dawid; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2017-04-01

    Nanomechanical properties of cells and tissues, in particular their elasticity, play an important role in different physiological and pathological processes. Recently, we have demonstrated that melanin granules dramatically modify nanomechanical properties of melanoma cells making them very stiff and, as a result, less aggressive. Although the mechanical effect of melanin granules was demonstrated in pathological cells, it was never studied in the case of normal cells. In this work, we analyzed the impact of melanin granules on nanomechanical properties of primary retinal pigment epithelium tissue fragments isolated from porcine eyes. The obtained results clearly show that melanin granules are responsible for the exceptional nanomechanical properties of the tissue. Our findings suggest that melanin granules in the retinal pigment epithelium may play an important role in sustaining the stiffness of this single cell layer, which functions as a natural mechanical barrier separating the retina from the choroid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pseudo chediak-higashi granules in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Pallavi; Kumar, Narender; Sharma, Prashant; Varma, Subhash; Varma, Neelam

    2014-09-01

    Pseudo-Chediak-Highashi granules are giant cytoplasmic inclusions commonly encountered in myeloblasts or other myeloid precursors in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. They derive their name from the inherited Chediak-Higashi syndrome that presents with oculocutaneous albinism, chronic infections and platelet dense granule deficiency. We report possibly the third case in world literature where these granules were seen in the blast cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a 15-year-old male.

  16. Activity-dependent myelination of parvalbumin interneurons mediated by axonal morphological plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedehouder, J; Brizee, D; Shpak, G; Kushner, S A

    2018-03-05

    Axonal myelination of neocortical pyramidal neurons is dynamically modulated by neuronal activity. Recent studies have shown that a substantial proportion of neocortical myelin content is contributed by fast-spiking, parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons. However, it remains unknown whether the myelination of PV + interneurons is also modulated by intrinsic activity. Here, we utilized cell-type specific Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) in adult male and female mice to activate a sparse population of medial prefrontal cortex PV + interneurons. Using single-cell axonal reconstructions, we find that DREADD-stimulated PV + interneurons exhibit a nearly two-fold increase in total length of myelination, predominantly mediated by a parallel increase of axonal arborization and number of internodes. In contrast, the distribution of axonal inter-branch segment distance and myelin internode length were not significantly altered. Topographical analysis revealed that myelination of DREADD-stimulated cells extended to higher axonal branch orders, while retaining a similar inter-branch distance threshold for myelination. Together, our results demonstrate that chemogenetically-induced neuronal activity increases the myelination of neocortical PV + interneurons mediated at least in part by an elaboration of their axonal morphology. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelination is the wrapping of an axon in order to optimize conduction velocity in an energy-efficient manner. Previous studies have shown that myelination of neocortical pyramidal neurons is experience and activity-dependent. We now show that activity-dependent myelin plasticity in the adult neocortex extends to parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking interneurons. Specifically, chemogenetic stimulation of parvalbumin interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex significantly enhanced axonal myelination, which was paralleled by an increase in axonal arborization. This suggests that activity

  17. Gogo receptor contributes to retinotopic map formation and prevents R1-6 photoreceptor axon bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Hein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topographic maps form the basis of neural processing in sensory systems of both vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the Drosophila visual system, neighboring R1-R6 photoreceptor axons innervate adjacent positions in the first optic ganglion, the lamina, and thereby represent visual space as a continuous map in the brain. The mechanisms responsible for the establishment of retinotopic maps remain incompletely understood. RESULTS: Here, we show that the receptor Golden goal (Gogo is required for R axon lamina targeting and cartridge elongation in a partially redundant fashion with local guidance cues provided by neighboring axons. Loss of function of Gogo in large clones of R axons results in aberrant R1-R6 fascicle spacing. Gogo affects target cartridge selection only indirectly as a consequence of the disordered lamina map. Interestingly, small clones of gogo deficient R axons perfectly integrate into a proper retinotopic map suggesting that surrounding R axons of the same or neighboring fascicles provide complementary spatial guidance. Using single photoreceptor type rescue, we show that Gogo expression exclusively in R8 cells is sufficient to mediate targeting of all photoreceptor types in the lamina. Upon lamina targeting and cartridge selection, R axons elongate within their individual cartridges. Interestingly, here Gogo prevents bundling of extending R1-6 axons. CONCLUSION: Taken together, we propose that Gogo contributes to retinotopic map formation in the Drosophila lamina by controlling the distribution of R1-R6 axon fascicles. In a later developmental step, the regular position of R1-R6 axons along the lamina plexus is crucial for target cartridge selection. During cartridge elongation, Gogo allows R1-R6 axons to extend centrally in the lamina cartridge.

  18. Necl-4/SynCAM-4 is expressed in myelinating oligodendrocytes but not required for axonal myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    Full Text Available The timing and progression of axonal myelination are precisely controlled by intercellular interactions between neurons and glia in development. Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that Nectin like 4 (Necl-4, also known as cell adhesion molecule Cadm-4 or SynCAM-4 plays an essential role in axonal myelination by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS. However, the role of Necl-4 protein in axonal myelination in the developing central nervous system (CNS has remained unknown. In this study, we discovered upregulation of Necl-4 expression in mature oligodendrocytes at perinatal stages when axons undergo active myelination. We generated Necl4 gene knockout mice, but found that disruption of Necl-4 gene did not affect oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin formation in the CNS. Surprisingly, disruption of Necl-4 had no significant effect on axonal myelination in the PNS either. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Necl-4 is dispensable for axonal myelination in the developing nervous system.

  19. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  20. Lost in the jungle: new hurdles for optic nerve axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Vincent; Schwab, Martin E

    2014-07-01

    The poor regenerative capacity of injured central nervous system (CNS) axons leads to permanent neurological deficits after brain, spinal cord, or optic nerve lesions. In the optic nerve, recent studies showed that stimulation of the cytokine or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways potently enhances sprouting and regeneration of injured retinal ganglion cell axons in adult mice, but does not allow the majority of axons to reach their main cerebral targets. New analyses have revealed axon navigation defects in the optic nerve and at the optic chiasm under conditions of strong growth stimulation. We propose that a balanced growth stimulatory treatment will have to be combined with guidance factors and suppression of local growth inhibitory factors to obtain the full regeneration of long CNS axonal tracts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition partially mimics the ethanol-induced increase of the Golgi cell-dependent component of the tonic GABAergic current in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin R Diaz

    Full Text Available Cerebellar granule cells (CGNs are one of many neurons that express phasic and tonic GABAergic conductances. Although it is well established that Golgi cells (GoCs mediate phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs, their role in mediating tonic currents in CGNs (CGN-I(tonic is controversial. Earlier studies suggested that GoCs mediate a component of CGN-I(tonic that is present only in preparations from immature rodents. However, more recent studies have detected a GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic in preparations of mature rodents. In addition, acute exposure to ethanol was shown to potentiate the GoC component of CGN-I(tonic and to induce a parallel increase in spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency at CGNs. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these effects of ethanol on GABAergic transmission in CGNs are mediated by inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase. We used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology techniques in cerebellar slices of male rats (postnatal day 23-30. Under these conditions, we reliably detected a GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic that could be blocked with tetrodotoxin. Further analysis revealed a positive correlation between basal sIPSC frequency and the magnitude of the GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic. Inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase with a submaximal concentration of ouabain partially mimicked the ethanol-induced potentiation of both phasic and tonic GABAergic currents in CGNs. Modeling studies suggest that selective inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase in GoCs can, in part, explain these effects of ethanol. These findings establish a novel mechanism of action of ethanol on GABAergic transmission in the central nervous system.

  2. Structure and Function of an Actin-Based Filter in the Proximal Axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuzhan Balasanyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The essential organization of microtubules within neurons has been described; however, less is known about how neuronal actin is arranged and the functional implications of its arrangement. Here, we describe, in live cells, an actin-based structure in the proximal axon that selectively prevents some proteins from entering the axon while allowing the passage of others. Concentrated patches of actin in proximal axons are present shortly after axonal specification in rat and zebrafish neurons imaged live, and they mark positions where anterogradely traveling vesicles carrying dendritic proteins halt and reverse. Patches colocalize with the ARP2/3 complex, and when ARP2/3-mediated nucleation is blocked, a dendritic protein mislocalizes to the axon. Patches are highly dynamic, with few persisting longer than 30 min. In neurons in culture and in vivo, actin appears to form a contiguous, semipermeable barrier, despite its apparently sparse distribution, preventing axonal localization of constitutively active myosin Va but not myosin VI. : Balasanyan et al. find dynamic patches of actin in proximal axons of live neurons, mature and newly differentiated, in culture and in vivo. Patches contribute to a filter that sequesters some proteins within the somatodendritic domain while allowing others to pass into the axon, leading to polarized localization of proteins.

  3. The neuroprotection of cannabidiol against MPP⁺-induced toxicity in PC12 cells involves trkA receptors, upregulation of axonal and synaptic proteins, neuritogenesis, and might be relevant to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; Martins, Nádia Maria; Sisti, Flávia Malvestio; Fernandes, Laís Silva; Ferreira, Rafaela Scalco; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Santos, Antônio Cardozo

    2015-12-25

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with potential to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Its neuroprotection has been mainly associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant events; however, other mechanisms might be involved. We investigated the involvement of neuritogenesis, NGF receptors (trkA), NGF, and neuronal proteins in the mechanism of neuroprotection of CBD against MPP(+) toxicity in PC12 cells. CBD increased cell viability, differentiation, and the expression of axonal (GAP-43) and synaptic (synaptophysin and synapsin I) proteins. Its neuritogenic effect was not dependent or additive to NGF, but it was inhibited by K252a (trkA inhibitor). CBD did not increase the expression of NGF, but protected against its decrease induced by MPP(+), probably by an indirect mechanism. We also evaluated the neuritogenesis in SH-SY5Y cells, which do not express trkA receptors. CBD did not induce neuritogenesis in this cellular model, which supports the involvement of trkA receptors. This is the first study to report the involvement of neuronal proteins and trkA in the neuroprotection of CBD. Our findings suggest that CBD has a neurorestorative potential independent of NGF that might contribute to its neuroprotection against MPP(+), a neurotoxin relevant to Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. OPTIMIZATION OF GRANULATION TECHNIQUES FOR DEVELOPMENT OF TABLET DOSAGE FORM

    OpenAIRE

    V. B. Khot*, D.A. Bhagwat, J. I. D'Souza, S. S. Shelake, S. V. Patil

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the best granulation techniques for development of tablet dosage form. The present study explains comparative study of different wet granulation techniques including Planetary mixer granulation, Rapid mixer granulation, Fluid bed granulation with Direct compression method. Similar formulations were used to evaluate Planetary mixer granulation, Rapid mixer granulation and Fluid bed granulation method. The granules prepared by different techniques were ...

  5. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed...... with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address...... issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules...

  6. Sensory axon-derived neuregulin-1 is required for axoglial signaling and normal sensory function but not for long-term axon maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fricker, F.R.; Zhu, N.; Tsantoulas, C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 has a key role in mediating signaling between axons and Schwann cells during development. A limitation to studying its role in adulthood is the embryonic lethality of global Nrg1 gene deletion. We used the Cre-loxP system to generate transgenic mice in which neuregulin-1 is condition......Neuregulin-1 has a key role in mediating signaling between axons and Schwann cells during development. A limitation to studying its role in adulthood is the embryonic lethality of global Nrg1 gene deletion. We used the Cre-loxP system to generate transgenic mice in which neuregulin-1...... is conditionally ablated in the majority of small-diameter and a proportion of large-diameter sensory neurons that have axons conducting in the C- and Adelta-fiber range, respectively. Sensory neuron-specific neuregulin-1 ablation resulted in abnormally large Remak bundles with axons clustered in "polyaxonal...... cells required for normal sensory function. Sensory neuronal survival and axonal maintenance, however, are not dependent on axon-derived neuregulin-1 signaling in adulthood Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6/17...

  7. An essential role of syntaxin 3 protein for granule exocytosis and secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12b, and CCL4 from differentiated HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegelen, Isabelle; Plançon, Sébastien; Nicot, Nathalie; Kaoma, Tony; Muller, Arnaud; Vallar, Laurent; Tschirhart, Eric J; Bréchard, Sabrina

    2015-03-01

    Besides their roles in the killing of pathogens, neutrophils have the capacity to package a variety of cytokines into cytoplasmic granules for subsequent release upon inflammatory conditions. Because the rapid secretion of cytokines orchestrates the action of other immune cells at the infection site and thus, can contribute to the development and chronicity of inflammatory diseases, we aimed to determine the intracellular SNARE machinery responsible for the regulation of cytokine secretion and degranulation. From a constructed gene-expression network, we first selected relevant cytokines for functional validation by the CBA approach. We established a cytokine-secretion profile for human neutrophils and dHL-60 cells, underlining their similar ability to secrete a broad variety of cytokines within proinflammatory conditions mimicked by LPS stimulation. Secondly, after screening of SNARE genes by microarray experiments, we selected STX3 for further functional studies. With the use of a siRNA strategy, we show that STX3 is clearly required for the maximal release of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12b, and CCL4 without alteration of other cytokine secretion in dHL-60 cells. In addition, we demonstrate that STX3 is involved in MMP-9 exocytosis from gelatinase granules, where STX3 is partly localized. Our results suggest that the secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12b, and CCL4 occurs during gelatinase degranulation, a process controlled by STX3. In summary, these findings provide first evidence that STX3 has an essential role in trafficking pathways of cytokines in neutrophil granulocytes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  8. Sorting of Dendritic and Axonal Vesicles at the Pre-axonal Exclusion Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny G. Farías

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polarized sorting of newly synthesized proteins to the somatodendritic and axonal domains of neurons occurs by selective incorporation into distinct populations of vesicular transport carriers. An unresolved issue is how the vesicles themselves are sorted to their corresponding neuronal domains. Previous studies concluded that the axon initial segment (AIS is an actin-based filter that selectively prevents passage of somatodendritic vesicles into the axon. We find, however, that most somatodendritic vesicles fail to enter the axon at a more proximal region in the axon hillock, herein referred to as the pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ. Forced coupling of a somatodendritic cargo protein to an axonally directed kinesin is sufficient to drive transport of whole somatodendritic vesicles through the PAEZ toward the distal axon. Based on these findings, we propose that polarized sorting of transport vesicles occurs at the PAEZ and depends on the ability of the vesicles to acquire an appropriately directed microtubule motor.

  9. Activated retinal glia mediated axon regeneration in experimental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Barbara; Guidi, Alessandra; Fawcett, James W; Martin, Keith R

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cell axons in the optic nerve and their cell bodies in the retina. Reactive retinal glial changes have been observed in glaucoma but the role of such glial changes in the pathogenesis of the condition remains unclear. In the present study we found that retinal ganglion cells in an experimental animal model of glaucoma have an increased axon regenerative potential. Regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell axons after optic nerve crush was significantly increased in vivo when combined with intraocular pressure-induced experimental glaucoma. This enhanced axon regeneration response was correlated with a significant increase in activation of glial fibrillary acidic protein+retinal glia. Using a dissociated retinal ganglion cell culture model we showed that reducing the number of activated retinal glia with a glial specific toxin, α-Aminoadipic acid, significantly reduced the growth potential of retinal ganglion cells from glaucomatous rat eyes, suggesting that activated retinal glia mediate, at least in part, the growth promoting effect. This was shown to be mediated by both membrane-bound and soluble glial-derived factors. Neurotrophin and ciliary neurotrophic/leukemia inhibitory factor blockers did not affect the regenerative potential, excluding these growth factors as principal mediators of the enhanced growth response occurring in glaucomatous retinal cultures. These observations are the first to reveal that retinal ganglion cells from glaucomatous rat eyes have an enhanced regenerative capacity. Furthermore, our results suggest that activated retinal glia mediate at least part of this response. Further work to understand and enhance the regeneration-promoting effect of activated retinal glia is required to determine if this approach could be useful as part of a therapeutic strategy to encourage optic nerve regeneration in glaucoma

  10. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg.

  11. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  12. Expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by olfactory ensheathing glia promotes axonal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, Diana; Martín-Bermejo, Maria Jesús; Gallego-Hernández, Maria Teresa; Pastrana, Erika; García-Escudero, Vega; García-Gómez, Ana; Lim, Filip; Díaz-Nido, Javier; Avila, Jesús; Moreno-Flores, Maria Teresa

    2011-10-01

    Olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) cells are known to facilitate repair following axotomy of adult neurons, although the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We previously identified plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), and thrombomodulin (TM) as candidates to regulate rat OEG-dependent axonal regeneration. In this study, we have validated the involvement of these proteins in promoting axonal regeneration by immortalized human OEGs. We studied the effect of silencing these proteins in OEGs on their capacity to promote the regeneration of severed adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) axons. Our results support the role of glial PAI-1 as a downstream effector of PAR-1 in promoting axon regeneration. In contrast, we found that TM inhibits OEG induced-axonal regeneration. We also assessed the signaling pathways downstream of PAR-1 that might modulate PAI-1 expression, observing that specifically inhibiting Gα(i), Rho kinase, or PLC and PKC downregulated the expression of PAI-1 in OEGs, with a concomitant reduction in OEG-dependent axon regeneration in adult RGCs. Our findings support an important role for the thrombin system in regulating adult axonal regeneration by OEGs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. The Drosophila HEM-2/NAP1 homolog KETTE controls axonal pathfinding and cytoskeletal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, T; Leifker, K; Klämbt, C

    2000-04-01

    In Drosophila, the correct formation of the segmental commissures depends on neuron-glial interactions at the midline. The VUM midline neurons extend axons along which glial cells migrate in between anterior and posterior commissures. Here, we show that the gene kette is required for the normal projection of the VUM axons and subsequently disrupts glial migration. Axonal projection defects are also found for many other moto- and interneurons. In addition, kette affects the cell morphology of mesodermal and epidermal derivatives, which show an abnormal actin cytoskeleton. The KETTE protein is homologous to the transmembrane protein HEM-2/NAP1 evolutionary conserved from worms to vertebrates. In vitro analysis has shown a specific interaction of the vertebrate HEM-2/NAP1 with the SH2-SH3 adapter protein NCK and the small GTPase RAC1, which both have been implicated in regulating cytoskeleton organization and axonal growth. Hypomorphic kette mutations lead to axonal defects similar to mutations in the Drosophila NCK homolog dreadlocks. Furthermore, we show that kette and dock mutants genetically interact. NCK is thought to interact with the small G proteins RAC1 and CDC42, which play a role in axonal growth. In line with these observations, a kette phenocopy can be obtained following directed expression of mutant DCDC42 or DRAC1 in the CNS midline. In addition, the kette mutant phenotype can be partially rescued by expression of an activated DRAC1 transgene. Our data suggest an important role of the HEM-2 protein in cytoskeletal organization during axonal pathfinding.

  14. Regulating Axonal Responses to Injury: The Intersection between Signaling Pathways Involved in Axon Myelination and The Inhibition of Axon Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sudheendra N. R.; Pearse, Damien D.

    2016-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors adversely affect the gene programs that govern the expression of regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) and the production of a diversity of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM). Insufficient RAG expression in the injured neuron and the presence of inhibitory ECM at the lesion, leads to structural alterations in the axon that perturb the growth machinery, or form an extraneous barrier to axonal regeneration, respectively. Here, the role of myelin, both intact and debris, in antagonizing axon regeneration has been the focus of numerous investigations. These studies have employed antagonizing antibodies and knockout animals to examine how the growth cone of the re-growing axon responds to the presence of myelin and myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs) within the lesion environment and caudal spinal cord. However, less attention has been placed on how the myelination of the axon after SCI, whether by endogenous glia or exogenously implanted glia, may alter axon regeneration. Here, we examine the intersection between intracellular signaling pathways in neurons and glia that are involved in axon myelination and axon growth, to provide greater insight into how interrogating this complex network of molecular interactions may lead to new therapeutics targeting SCI. PMID:27375427

  15. Local gene expression in axons and nerve endings: the glia-neuron unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2008-04-01

    Neurons have complex and often extensively elongated processes. This unique cell morphology raises the problem of how remote neuronal territories are replenished with proteins. For a long time, axonal and presynaptic proteins were thought to be exclusively synthesized in the cell body, which delivered them to peripheral sites by axoplasmic transport. Despite this early belief, protein has been shown to be synthesized in axons and nerve terminals, substantially alleviating the trophic burden of the perikaryon. This observation raised the question of the cellular origin of the peripheral RNAs involved in protein synthesis. The synthesis of these RNAs was initially attributed to the neuron soma almost by default. However, experimental data and theoretical considerations support the alternative view that axonal and presynaptic RNAs are also transcribed in the flanking glial cells and transferred to the axon domain of mature neurons. Altogether, these data suggest that axons and nerve terminals are served by a distinct gene expression system largely independent of the neuron cell body. Such a local system would allow the neuron periphery to respond promptly to environmental stimuli. This view has the theoretical merit of extending to axons and nerve terminals the marginalized concept of a glial supply of RNA (and protein) to the neuron cell body. Most long-term plastic changes requiring de novo gene expression occur in these domains, notably in presynaptic endings, despite their intrinsic lack of transcriptional capacity. This review enlightens novel perspectives on the biology and pathobiology of the neuron by critically reviewing these issues.

  16. Torsional Behavior of Axonal Microtubule Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Carole; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Mofrad, Mohammad R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal microtubule (MT) bundles crosslinked by microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau are responsible for vital biological functions such as maintaining mechanical integrity and shape of the axon as well as facilitating axonal transport. Breaking and twisting of MTs have been previously observed in damaged undulated axons. Such breaking and twisting of MTs is suggested to cause axonal swellings that lead to axonal degeneration, which is known as “diffuse axonal injury”. In particular, overstretching and torsion of axons can potentially damage the axonal cytoskeleton. Following our previous studies on mechanical response of axonal MT bundles under uniaxial tension and compression, this work seeks to characterize the mechanical behavior of MT bundles under pure torsion as well as a combination of torsional and tensile loads using a coarse-grained computational model. In the case of pure torsion, a competition between MAP tau tensile and MT bending energies is observed. After three turns, a transition occurs in the mechanical behavior of the bundle that is characterized by its diameter shrinkage. Furthermore, crosslink spacing is shown to considerably influence the mechanical response, with larger MAP tau spacing resulting in a higher rate of turns. Therefore, MAP tau crosslinking of MT filaments protects the bundle from excessive deformation. Simultaneous application of torsion and tension on MT bundles is shown to accelerate bundle failure, compared to pure tension experiments. MAP tau proteins fail in clusters of 10–100 elements located at the discontinuities or the ends of MT filaments. This failure occurs in a stepwise fashion, implying gradual accumulation of elastic tensile energy in crosslinks followed by rupture. Failure of large groups of interconnecting MAP tau proteins leads to detachment of MT filaments from the bundle near discontinuities. This study highlights the importance of torsional loading in axonal damage after traumatic brain injury

  17. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Kaplan, Barry B; van Minnen, Jan; Alvarez, Jaime; Koenig, Edward

    2002-08-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal -- yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins. To dispel this lingering neglect, we now present the wealth of recent observations bearing on this central idea, and consider their impact on our understanding of the biology of the neuron. We demonstrate that extrasomatic translation sites, which are now well recognized in dendrites, are also present in axonal and presynaptic compartments.

  18. Multidimensional modelling of anaerobic granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picioreanu, C.; Batstone, Damien J.; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    A multispecies, two- and three-dimensional model was developed, based on a previously published planar biofilm model, and the biochemical structure of the ADM1. Several soluble substrates diffuse and react in the granule. Local pH is calculated from acid-base equilibria and charge balance...

  19. Common spectrum of polypeptides occurs in secretion granule membranes of different exocrine glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.S.; Cameron, P.L.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    A highly purified membrane preparation from rat parotid secretion granules has been used as a comparative probe to examine the extent of compositional overlap in granule membranes of three other exocrine secretory tissues - pancreatic, lacrimal, and submandibular - from several standpoints. First, indirect immunofluorescent studies using a polyclonal polyspecific anti-parotid granule membrane antiserum has indicated a selective staining of granule membrane profiles in all acinar cells of all tissues. Second, highly purified granule membrane subfractions have been isolated from each exocrine tissue; comparative two-dimensional (isoelectric focusing; SDS) PAGE of radioiodinated granule membranes has identified 10-15 polypeptides of identical pI and apparent molecular mass. These species are likely to be integral membrane components since they are not extracted by either saponin-sodium sulfate or sodium carbonate (pH 11.5) treatments, and they do not have counterparts in the granule content. Finally, the identity among selected parotid and pancreatic radioiodinated granule membrane polypeptides has been documented using two-dimensional peptide mapping of chymotryptic and tryptic digests. These findings clearly indicate that exocrine secretory granules, irrespective of the nature of stored secretion, comprise a type of vesicular carrier with a common (and probably refined) membrane composition. Conceivably, the polypeptides identified carry out general functions related to exocrine secretion

  20. Improving solid dosage forms with dry granulation

    OpenAIRE

    Boswell, Steve; Smith, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Although tablet manufacture is traditionally a batchbased wet granulation process, there are many advantages to be gained by adopting dry granulation, including lower costs and increased yields. The simplicity of dry granulation could also enable it to become one of the main technologies for continuous processing

  1. Momordica Foetida (cucurbitacea) A Potential Laxative Granule ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been a folklore belief that the plant Momordica foetida has a laxative effect. This paper attempted to investigate this claim. The dried extract was granulated with cornstarch mucilage to produce free flowing granules. Capsules containing 500mg of the granules were hand filled. The capsules were evaluated in ...

  2. Statistical analysis and comparison of a continuous high shear granulator with a twin screw granulator: Effect of process parameters on critical granule attributes and granulation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wei; Kotamarthy, Lalith; Panikar, Savitha; Sen, Maitraye; Pradhan, Shankali; Marc, Michaelis; Litster, James D; Muzzio, Fernando J; Ramachandran, Rohit

    2016-11-20

    This study is concerned with identifying the design space of two different continuous granulators and their respective granulation mechanisms. Performance of a continuous high shear granulator and a twin screw granulator with paracetamol formulations were examined by face-centered cubic design, which focused on investigating key performance metrics, namely, granule size, porosity, flowability and particle morphology of granules as a function of essential input process parameters (liquid content, throughput and rotation speed). Liquid and residence time distribution tests were also performed to gain insights into the liquid-powder mixing and flow behavior. The results indicated that continuous high shear granulation was more sensitive to process variation and produced spherical granules with monomodal size distribution and distinct internal structure and strength variation. Twin screw granulation with such a particular screw configuration showed narrower design space and granules were featured with multimodal size distribution, irregular shape, less detectible porosity difference and tighter range of strength. Granulation mechanisms explored on the basis of nucleation and growth regime maps revealed that for most cases liquid binder was uniformly distributed with fast droplet penetration into the powder bed and that granule consolidation and coalescence mainly took place in the nucleation, steady growth and rapid growth regimes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The mysterious case of the C. elegans gut granule: death fluorescence, anthranilic acid and the kynurenine pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eGems

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research on the nematode C. elegans, it still contains many hidden secrets. One such is the function of the prominent organelles known as gut granules, which are numerous in the intestinal cells of nematodes throughout the suborder Rhabditina. A striking feature of gut granules is the blue fluorescence that they emit under ultraviolet light. Clues to gut granule function include their acidic interior and capacity for endocytosis, both lysosome-like features (though gut granules are much bigger than normal lysosomes. This and the fluorescent material within identify gut granules as lysosome-like organelles (LROs, akin to pigment-containing melanosomes in mammals and eye pigment granules in Drosophila. Thus, the identity of the blue fluorescent substance could provide a key to understanding gut granule function.

  4. IMP2 axonal localization, RNA interactome, and function in the development of axon trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preitner, Nicolas; Quan, Jie; Li, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-based regulatory mechanisms play important roles in the development and plasticity of neural circuits and neurological disease. Developing axons provide a model well suited to the study of RNA-based regulation, and contain specific subsets of mRNAsthat are locally translated and have roles...... to strong defects in commissural axon trajectories at the midline intermediate target. These results reveal a highly distinctive axonal enrichment of IMP2, show that it interacts with a network of axon guidance-related mRNAs, and reveal that it is required for normal axon pathfinding during vertebrate...

  5. RhoA Inactivation Prevents Photoreceptor Axon Retraction in an In Vitro Model of Acute Retinal Detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Fontainhas, Aurora Maria; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Axon retraction by rod cells is an early response to detachment that likely contributes to poor outcomes after reattachment. In mammalian retina, blocking RhoA signaling prevents axon retraction. Effective treatment can occur as much as 6 hours after the detachment.

  6. Overcoming Microalgae Harvesting Barrier by Activated Algae Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiron, Olga; Bumbac, Costel; Manea, Elena; Stefanescu, Mihai; Nita Lazar, Mihai

    2017-07-05

    The economic factor of the microalgae harvesting step acts as a barrier to scaling up microalgae-based technology designed for wastewater treatment. In view of that, this study presents an alternative microalgae-bacteria system, which is proposed for eliminating the economic obstacle. Instead of the microalgae-bacteria (activated algae) flocs, the study aimed to develop activated algae granules comprising the microalgae Chlorella sp. as a target species. The presence of the filamentous microalgae (Phormidium sp.) was necessary for the occurrence of the granulation processes. A progressive decrease in frequency of the free Chlorella sp. cells was achieved once with the development of the activated algae granules as a result of the target microalgae being captured in the dense and tangled network of filaments. The mature activated algae granules ranged between 600 and 2,000 µm, and were characterized by a compact structure and significant settling ability (21.6 ± 0.9 m/h). In relation to the main aim of this study, a microalgae recovery efficiency of higher than 99% was achieved only by fast sedimentation of the granules; this performance highlighted the viability of the granular activated algae system for sustaining a microalgae harvesting procedure with neither cost nor energy inputs.

  7. Phosphatidylserine improves axonal transport by inhibition of HDAC and has potential in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiran Naftelberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial dysautonomia (FD is a rare children neurodegenerative disease caused due to a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene that results in decreased IKK complex-associated protein (IKAP protein production. The disease affects mostly the dorsal root ganglion (DRG and the sympathetic ganglion. Recently, we found that the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in FD patients are defects in axonal transport of nerve growth factors and microtubule stability in the DRG. Neurons are highly polarized cells with very long axons. In order to survive and maintain proper function, neurons depend on transport of proteins and other cellular components from the neuronal body along the axons. We further demonstrated that IKAP is necessary for axon maintenance and showed that phosphatidylserine acts as an HDAC6 inhibitor to rescue neuronal function in FD cells. In this review, we will highlight our latest research findings.

  8. Ascending Midbrain Dopaminergic Axons Require Descending GAD65 Axon Fascicles for Normal Pathfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Garcia-Peña

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nigrostriatal pathway (NSP is formed by dopaminergic axons that project from the ventral midbrain to the dorsolateral striatum as part of the medial forebrain bundle. Previous studies have implicated chemotropic proteins in the formation of the NSP during development but little is known of the role of substrate-anchored signals in this process. We observed in mouse and rat embryos that midbrain dopaminergic axons ascend in close apposition to descending GAD65-positive axon bundles throughout their trajectory to the striatum. To test whether such interaction is important for dopaminergic axon pathfinding, we analyzed transgenic mouse embryos in which the GAD65 axon bundle was reduced by the conditional expression of the diphtheria toxin. In these embryos we observed dopaminergic misprojection into the hypothalamic region and abnormal projection in the striatum. In addition, analysis of Robo1/2 and Slit1/2 knockout embryos revealed that the previously described dopaminergic misprojection in these embryos is accompanied by severe alterations in the GAD65 axon scaffold. Additional studies with cultured dopaminergic neurons and whole embryos suggest that NCAM and Robo proteins are involved in the interaction of GAD65 and dopaminergic axons. These results indicate that the fasciculation between descending GAD65 axon bundles and ascending dopaminergic axons is required for the stereotypical NSP formation during brain development and that known guidance cues may determine this projection indirectly by instructing the pathfinding of the axons that are part of the GAD65 axon scaffold.

  9. New Insights into PhaM-PhaC-Mediated Localization of Polyhydroxybutyrate Granules in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresan, Stephanie; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2017-06-15

    The formation and localization of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules in Ralstonia eutropha are controlled by PhaM, which interacts both with the PHB synthase (PhaC) and with the bacterial nucleoid. Here, we studied the importance of proline and lysine residues of two C-terminal PAKKA motifs in PhaM for their importance in attaching PHB granules to DNA by in vitro and in vivo methods. Substitution of the lysine residues but not of the proline residues resulted in detachment of formed PHB granules from the nucleoid. Instead, formation of PHB granule clusters at polar regions of the rod-shaped cells and an unequal distribution of PHB granules to daughter cells were observed. The formation of PHB granules was studied by the expression of chromosomally anchored gene fusions of fluorescent proteins with PhaM and PhaC in different backgrounds. PhaM and PhaC fusions showed a distinct colocalization at formed PHB granules in the nucleoid region of the wild type. In a ΔphaC background, PhaM and the catalytically inactive PhaC C319A protein were not able to form fluorescent foci, indicating that correct positioning requires the formation of PHB. Furthermore, time-lapse experiments revealed that PhaC and PhaM proteins detach from formed PHB granules at later stages, resulting in a nonhomogeneous population of PHB granules. This could explain why growth of individual PHB granules stops under PHB-permissive conditions at a certain size. IMPORTANCE PHB granules are storage compounds for carbon and energy in many prokaryotes. Equal distribution of accumulated PHB granules during cell division is therefore important for optimal fitness of the daughter cells. In R. eutropha , PhaM is responsible for maximal activity of PHB synthase, for initiation of PHB granule formation at discrete regions in the cells, and for association of formed PHB granules with the nucleoid. Here we found that four lysine residues of C-terminal PhaM sequence motifs are essential for association of PHB

  10. Ephexin1 Is Required for Eph-Mediated Limb Trajectory of Spinal Motor Axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ju; Chang, Ming-Yuan; Chou, Szu-Yi; Huang, Chi-Chen; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hsu, Tsung-I; Chang, Hsing-Fang; Wu, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Chung-Che; Morales, Daniel; Kania, Artur; Kao, Tzu-Jen

    2018-02-21

    The precise assembly of a functional nervous system r