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Sample records for granite sand concrete

  1. Use of Crushed Granite Fine as Replacement to River Sand in Concrete Production

    Manasseh JOEL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of Crushed granite fine (CGF to replace river sand in concrete production for use in rigid pavement was investigated. Slump, compressive and indirect tensile strength tests were performed on fresh and hardened concrete.28 days Peak compressive and indirect tensile strength values of 40.70N/mm2 and 2.30N/mm2 respectively was obtained, with the partial replacement of river sand with 20% CGF, as against values of 35.00N/mm2 and 1.75N/mm2, obtained with the use of river sand as fine aggregate. Based on economic analysis and results of tests, river sand replaced with 20% CGF is recommended for use in the production of concrete for use in rigid pavement. Conservation of river sand in addition to better ways of disposing wastes from the quarry sites are some of the merits of using CGF.

  2. Workability of glass reinforced concrete (GRC) with granite and silica sand aggregates

    Moceikis, R.; Kičaitė, A.; Keturakis, E.

    2017-10-01

    Glass fiber reinforced concrete (GRC) opens the door for lightweight and complex shaped innovative construction, adding architectural value to buildings. With panel thickness down to 15 mm, considerable amount of total loads and materials per square meter of facade can be saved, if compared to conventionally used 80 mm thickness outer layer in insulated precast concrete wall elements. Even though GRC is used for over 50 years in such countries as Great Britain, USA and Japan, there are very few examples and little research done in Eastern Europe with this building material. European Commission propagates sustainable design as commitment to energy efficiency, environmental stewardship and conservation. For this reason, GRC plays important role in mowing toward these goals. In this paper, GRC premix recipes including fine granite and silica sands, reinforced with 13mm length alkali resistant glass fibers are investigated. Two CEM I 52,5R cements with different particle sizes were used and severe water dissociation noticed in one of concrete mixes. Cement particle size distribution determined with laser diffraction particle analyser Cilas 1090LD. To determine modulus of rupture (M.O.R.) and limit of proportionality (L.O.P), plates thickness 15 and 20 mm were produced and tested for flexural resistance according to 4-point bending scheme. Concrete workability tests were made according EN 1170-1.

  3. Quality control chart for crushed granite concrete

    Ewa E. DESMOND

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A chart for assessing in-situ grade (strength of concrete, has been developed in this study. Four grades of concrete after the Nigerian General Specification for Roads and bridges (NGSRB-C20, C25, C30 and C35, is studied at different water-cement ratios for medium and high slump range. The concrete mixes are made from crushed granite rock as coarse aggregate with river sand as fine aggregate. Compression test on specimens are conducted at curing age of 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 days. Results on concrete workability from slump values, and water-cement ratios revealed that specimens with lower water-cement ratio were less workable but had higher strength, compared to mixes with higher water cement ratio. A simple algorithm using nonlinear regression analysis performed on each experimental data set produced Strength-Age (S-A curves which were used to establish a quality control chart. The accuracy of these curves were evaluated by computing average absolute error (AAS, the error of estimate (EoE and the average absolute error of estimate (Abs EoE for each concrete mix. These were done based on the actual average experimental strengths to measure how close the predicted values are to the experimental data set. The absolute average error of estimate (Abs. EoE recorded was less than ±10% tolerance zone for concrete works.

  4. Effect of manufactured sand on the durability characteristics of concrete

    S. S. SARAVANAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most sought after material due to increase in construction activities and infrastructural developments. Availability of natural sand is decreasing thereby increase in the cost of construction. In the present work undertaken, an attempt has been made to give an alternative to natural sand. Optimization of replacement of natural sand with manufactured sand in concrete, durability studies such as water absorption, rapid chloride permeability test, sorptivity, acid resistance, alkaline resistance, impact resistance and abrasion resistance of M40 and M50 grades of concrete have been studied with manufactured sand as fine aggregate and compared the results with the conventional sand concrete. The results shows that there is an increase in the durability properties up to 70 % level of replacements of sand with manufactured sand as fine aggregate and for 100 % use of manufactured sand also gives the better durability than the conventional sand concrete.

  5. Study on strength characteristics of concrete using M-Sand and coconut fibers

    Neeraja, D.; Wani, Amir Iqbal; Kamili, Zainulabideen; Agarwal, Krishnakant

    2017-11-01

    In the current world, concrete has become a very important part of the construction industry and the materials which are used in making concrete have evolved due to better quality of cement and better grade of coarse aggregates. The sand is an important part of concrete. It is mainly procured from natural sources. Thus the grade of sand is not under our control. The methods of removing sand from river beds are causing various environmental issues and river sand is depleting at a faster rate than it is replaced by natural methods. Hence, various replacements for the river sand are being done, one of which is manufactured-sand. It is obtained from various granite quarries. Manufactured-sand or M-sand is slowly replacing the fine aggregate in the concrete as the sand is well graded and gives higher strength of concrete. There are various fibers used for reinforcing concrete which consist mainly of artificial or steel fibers. Some of these fibers are quite costly and sometimes difficult to obtain. So there are many natural fibers which can be used in place of these fibers, one of which is coconut fiber, extracted from the shell of a coconut. Coconut fibers are used in various industries like rope making, coir mattresses etc. Since these fibers are one of the strongest fibers among naturally occuring fibers, they can be used in the concrete mix to increase the resistance in concrete. They are also light weight and easily available and thus can be used in reinforcement of concrete. The studies up till now have tested the use of coconut fibers in normal concrete involving river sand but in this study a particular ratio of M-sand and river sand is used to get the maximum possible strength. Hence, in this project an attempt was made to use M-sand and coconut fiber in concrete. Based on the test results, it can be concluded that combination of M-sand and coconut fibers gave favorable results in strength criteria.

  6. EFFECT OF HCL CONCENTRATION ON NORMAL CONCRETE AND ADMIXTURED CONCRETE MADE WITH AND WITHOUT MANUFACTURED SAND

    K. Pradeep*, K. Ramudu

    2017-01-01

    Concrete is considered to be the most widely used and versatile material of construction all over the world. One of the important ingredients of conventional concrete is natural sand or river sand, which is on the verge of exhausting due to abundant usage. In India, the conventional concrete is produced by using natural sand obtained from riverbeds as fine aggregate. However, due to the increased use of concrete in almost all types of construction works, the demand of natural or river sand ha...

  7. Studies on various characteristics of concrete structures using crushed sand

    Mimatsu, Makoto; Sugita, Hideaki; Yonemura, Masataka.

    1985-01-01

    With the recent advances of construction industry, the demands for concrete, hence for aggregate, are rising. The sand as such is in extreme shortage due to the exhaustion of river sand. Under the situation, the recent trends are for the use of crushed sand, i.e. the artificial sand obtained by crushing rocks, which have advantages of stabilized quality and adequate supplies. In building of nuclear power plants requiring large amounts of concrete, the usage of crushed sand is now unavoidable. The following are described : the situation of aggregate in Kyushu. production method of crushed sand and the quality standards, rocks used for crushed stone and sand and the properties, quality survey on crushed sand and the basic tests, characteristic tests of crushed-stone and -sand mixed concrete, the application of crushed sand in structures of the Sendai Nuclear Power Station. (Mori, K.)

  8. Effect of River Indus Sand on Concrete Tensile Strength

    M. T. Lakhiar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the development of Pakistan construction industry, the utilization of River Indus sand in concrete as fine aggregate has expanded tremendously. The aim of this research is to study the effect of Indus River sand on the tensile strength of various grades of concrete when it is utilized as fine aggregate. Concrete Samples of M15, M20 and M25 grade concrete were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Based on the results, it is found that concrete became less workable when Indus river sand was utilized. It is recorded that tensile strength of concrete is decreased from 5% up to 20% in comparison with hill sand. The results were derived from various concrete grades.

  9. Crushed rock sand – An economical and ecological alternative to natural sand to optimize concrete mix

    Sanjay Mundra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the use of crushed rock sand as viable alternative to Natural River sand that is being conventionally used as fine aggregate in cement concrete. Various mix designs were developed for different grades of concrete based on IS, ACI and British codes using Natural River sand and crushed rock sand. In each case, the cube compressive strength test, and beam flexure tests were conducted. The results of the study show that, the strength properties of concrete using crushed rock sand are nearly similar to the conventional concrete. The study has shown that crushed stone sand can be used as economic and readily available alternative to river sand and can therefore help to arrest the detrimental effects on the environment caused due to excessive mining of river sand.

  10. Properties of dune sand concrete containing coffee waste

    Mohamed Guendouz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, an increase of coffee beverages consumption has been observed all over the world; and its consumption increases the waste coffee grounds which will become an environmental problems. Recycling of this waste to produce new materials like sand concrete appears as one of the best solutions for reduces the problem of pollution. This work aims to study the possibility of recycling waste coffee grounds (Spent Coffee Grounds (SCG as a fine aggregate by replacing the sand in the manufacturing of dune sand concrete. For this; sand concrete mixes were prepared with substitution of sand with the spent coffee grounds waste at different percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% by volume of the sand in order to study the influence of this wastes on physical (Workability, bulk density and porosity, mechanical (compressive and flexural strength and Thermal (Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity properties of dune sand concrete. The results showed that the use of spent coffee grounds waste as partial replacement of natural sand contributes to reduce workability, bulk density and mechanical strength of sand concrete mixes with an increase on its porosity. However, the thermal characteristics are improved and especially for a level of 15% and 20% of substitution. So, it is possible to obtain an insulating material which can be used in the various types of structural components. This study ensures that reusing of waste coffee grounds in dune sand concrete gives a positive approach to reduce the cost of materials and solve some environmental problems.

  11. Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete

    Opara, Hyginus E.; Eziefula, Uchechi G.; Eziefula, Bennett I.

    2018-03-01

    This study compared the physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete. The constituent materials were batched by weight. The water-cement ratio and mix ratio selected for the experimental investigation were 0.55 and 1:2:4, respectively. The specimens were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Slump, density and compressive strength tests were carried out. The results showed that river sand concrete had greater density and compressive strength than quarry dust concrete for all curing ages. At 28 days of curing, river sand concrete exceeded the target compressive strength by 36%, whereas quarry dust concrete was less than the target compressive strength by 12%. Both river sand concrete and quarry dust concrete for the selected water/cement ratio and mix ratio are suitable for non-structural applications and lightly-loaded members where high strength is not a prerequisite.

  12. An investigation of waste foundry sand in asphalt concrete mixtures.

    Bakis, Recep; Koyuncu, Hakan; Demirbas, Ayhan

    2006-06-01

    A laboratory study regarding the reuse of waste foundry sand in asphalt concrete production by replacing a certain portion of aggregate with WFS was undertaken. The results showed that replacement of 10% aggregates with waste foundry sand was found to be the most suitable for asphalt concrete mixtures. Furthermore, the chemical and physical properties of waste foundry sand were analysed in the laboratory to determine the potential effect on the environment. The results indicated that the investigated waste foundry sand did not significantly affect the environment around the deposition

  13. Properties of concrete mixed with sand frozen by liquid nitrogen

    Negami, Yoshiaki; Kurita, Morio; Kuwahara, Takashi; Goto, Sadao.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new precooling method which reduces the temperature of mixed concrete by mixing it with sand frozen by liquid nitrogen. The authors tried to clarify the properties of both the frozen sand and the concrete mixed with the frozen sand. The results of a series of experimental studies indicate that the temperature of mixed concrete can be reduced about 25degC, which is a larger reduction quantity than that achieved by conventional precooling methods; and that this method contributes to improvement of the consistency and the compressive strength of the concrete. Furthermore, the advantageous effect of this precooling method is confirmed from the results of laboratory tests using massive concrete members. (author)

  14. Retempering of Concrete made by using Manufactured Sand

    Pethkar, A. R.; Deshmukh, G.

    2014-06-01

    Retempering is defined as, " Addition of water and remixing of concrete or mortar which has lost enough workability to become unplaceable". Retempering inevitably results in some loss of strength compared with the original concrete [1]. Adding water to a plastic mix to increase slump is an extremely common practice, even though it is not recommended because it increases the porosity of concrete. Concrete often arrives on site more than half an hour after initial mixing. Placement operations can take anywhere from 10 to 60 min, depending on the field conditions and the size of the load. When the slump decreases to an unacceptable level during the operations, water is added to the mix [1]. In this work, an attempt is made to study the strength characteristics of retempered concrete made by using manufactured sand. Usually the retempering process is there with normal and ready mixed concrete; hence an attempt is made to check the compressive and flexural strength of normal retempered concrete with an addition of retarder 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 % at retempering time from 15 to 90 min. There is scarcity of natural sand due to various factors, which is replaced by the manufactured sand. The concept of manufactured sand is nothing but breaking stone into smaller and smaller particles in such way that the gradation of particle will match with zone-II of I.S.

  15. Sea Dredged Gravel versus Crushed Granite as Coarse Aggregate for Self Compacting Concrete in Aggressive Environment

    Sørensen, Eigil V.; Kristensen, Lasse Frølich

    2007-01-01

    Properties of self compacting concrete (SCC) with two types of coarse aggregate - sea dredged gravel with smooth and rounded particles and crushed granite with rough and angular particles - have been studied. Sea gravel allowed a higher aggregate proportion in the concrete leading to a higher...

  16. Experimental Study on Superfine Sand Concrete Mixed by Double Mixing Technology

    yuqing zhao

    2013-01-01

    Traditional concept thought that medium sand and fine sand can be used to mix concrete, superfine sand can not used to mix concrete. This makes the source of superfine sand limited. With the shortage of medium sand and fine sand, it is imperative to exploit the resource of superfine sand. Superfine sand concrete is mixed by means of Double-doped Technology-ultra-fine fly ash and super plasticizer. Primary factor influencing superfine sand concrete strength is studied by orthogonal test, the o...

  17. Effect of Elevated Temperature on the Residual Properties of Quartzite, Granite and Basalt Aggregate Concrete

    Masood, A.; Shariq, M.; Alam, M. Masroor; Ahmad, T.; Beg, A.

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, experimental investigations have been carried out to determine the effect of elevated temperature on the residual properties of quartzite, granite and basalt aggregate concrete mixes. Ultrasonic pulse velocity and unstressed residual compressive strength tests on cube specimens have been conducted at ambient and after single heating-cooling cycle of elevated temperature ranging from 200 to 600 °C. The relationship between ultrasonic pulse velocity and residual compressive strength of all concrete mixes have been developed. Scanning electron microscopy was also carried out to study micro structure of quartzite, granite and basalt aggregate concrete subjected to single heating-cooling cycle of elevated temperature. The results show that the residual compressive strength of quartzite aggregate concrete has been found higher than granite and basalt aggregate concrete at ambient and at all temperatures. It has also been found that the loss of strength in concrete is due to the development of micro-cracks result in failure of cement matrix and coarse aggregate bond. Further, the basalt aggregate concrete has been observed lower strength due to low affinity with Portland cements ascribed to its ferro-magnesium rich mineral composition.

  18. predicting the compressive strength of concretes made with granite

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... computational model based on artificial neural networks for the determination of the compressive strength of concrete ... Strength being the most important property of con- ... to cut corners use low quality concrete materials in .... manner of operation of natural neurons in the human body. ... the output ai.

  19. Assessment of sand quality on concrete performance : examination of acidic and sulfate/sulfide-bearing sands.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine how the presence of sulfide- and sulfate-containing : minerals in acidic aggregates may affect the properties of mortar and concrete. Analyses were : performed to compare two sands from a deposit in the Geor...

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON STRENGTH PARAMETRES OF CONCRETE WITH REPLACMENT OF FINE AGGREGATE BY ROBO SAND

    T.Dilip Kumar *1 & G.Kalyan 2

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is the most widely used composite construction material. Fine aggregate plays a very important role for imparting better properties to concrete in its fresh and hardened state. Generally, river sand was used as fine aggregate for construction. Due to the continuous mining of sand from riverbed led to the depletion of river sand and it became a scarce material. Also, samining from river bed caused a lot of environmental issues. As a substitute to river sand, Robo sand has been used. I...

  1. A study of the effects of LCD glass sand on the properties of concrete.

    Wang, Her-Yung

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the recycling of discarded liquid crystal display (LCD) glass into concrete (LCDGC), a portion of the usual river sand was replaced by sand prepared from discarded LCD glass. Three different mix designs were regulated by the ACI method (fc(28)=21, 28, and 35MPa) with 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% LCD glass sand replacements investigated; their engineering properties were determined. Test results revealed that, when compared to the design slump of 15cm, the 20% glass sand concrete for the three different mix designs kept good slump and slump flow. Furthermore, a slump loss ranging from 7 to 11cm was observed for specimens with 60% and 80% glass sand replacement for the design strengths of 28 and 35MPa. The compressive strengths of the concrete with glass sand replacement were higher than the design strengths. Moreover, the durability of the concrete with 20% glass sand replacement was better than that of the control group. Surface resistivity for specimens with different amounts of LCD glass sand replacement was also higher than that in the control group for mid to long curing ages. The sulfate attack in concrete with different amounts of glass sand replacement caused less weight loss than in the control group. Moderate chloride ion penetration was observed for glass sand concrete. Furthermore, the measured ultrasonic pulse velocities for LCD glass sand concrete specimens were higher than 4100m/s, which qualified these specimens as good concrete. OM and SEM indicate that the dense C-S-H gel hydrate was produced at the interface between the glass sand and cement paste. The test results indicate that the addition of 20% LCD glass sand to concrete satisfies the slump requirements and improves the strength and durability of concrete. This suggests that LCD glass sand can potentially be used as a recycled material in concrete applications.

  2. Effect of crushed sand on mortar and concrete rheology

    Cabrera, O. A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an experimental study conducted on fresh mortars and concretes made with crushed sand. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of aggregate particle shape and surface texture as well as dust content on mortar and concrete rheology. The experimental programme also addressed the impact of angular grains on chemical admixture performance and concrete bleeding. The findings showed that the use of crushed sand induces rheological behaviour that differs from the behaviour observed in natural sand and that superplasticisers can improve this behaviour considerably.

    En el presente trabajo se plantea un estudio experimental del estado fresco de morteros y hormigones con arenas de machaqueo, orientado a la evaluación de la incidencia de la forma y textura superficial de los granos del árido fino y del contenido de polvo sobre la reología de las mezclas. El programa experimental comprendió el estudio del estado fresco de hormigones con arenas con partículas angulares, la influencia de este tipo de partículas sobre la efectividad de los aditivos químicos y la evaluación de la influencia de las características físicas del árido fino sobre la exudación. Los resultados muestran que el empleo de arenas de machaqueo provoca un comportamiento reológico diferente al de hormigones con arenas naturales, y que el efecto de los aditivos superfluidificantes mejora notablemente este comportamiento.

  3. Statistical Analysis of 3-Point Bending Properties of Polymer Concretes Made From Marble Powder Waste, Sand Grains, and Polyester Resin

    Benzannache, N.; Bezazi, A.; Bouchelaghem, H.; Boumaaza, M.; Amziane, S.; Scarpa, F.

    2018-01-01

    The mechanical performance of concrete polymer beams subjected to 3-point bending was investigated. The polymer concrete incorporates marble powder waste and quarry sand. The results obtained showed that the type of sand, and amount of marble powder and sand aggregate affected the resistance of the polymer concrete beams significantly. The marble waste increased their bending strength by reducing the porosity of polymer concrete.

  4. Re-usage of waste foundry sand in high-strength concrete.

    Guney, Yucel; Sari, Yasin Dursun; Yalcin, Muhsin; Tuncan, Ahmet; Donmez, Senayi

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the potential re-use of waste foundry sand in high-strength concrete production was investigated. The natural fine sand is replaced with waste foundry sand (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). The findings from a series of test program has shown reduction in compressive and tensile strengths, and the elasticity modulus which is directly related to waste foundry inclusion in concrete. Nevertheless the concrete with 10% waste foundry sand exhibits almost similar results to that of the control one. The slump and the workability of the fresh concrete decreases with the increase of the waste foundry sand ratio. Although the freezing and thawing significantly reduces the mechanical and physical properties of the concrete. The obtained results satisfies the acceptable limits set by the American Concrete Institute (ACI). 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. PROSPECTS FOR APPLICATION OF COMPLEX-MODIFIED SAND ASPHALT CONCRETE IN ROAD CONSTRUCTION

    D. Yu. Alexandrov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a possibility to use sand asphalt concrete as a material for protection of asphalt concrete and cement concrete road pavements against affection of external destructive factors. Advantages and disadvantages of sand asphalt concrete road pavements have been determined in the paper. The paper provides recommendations on improvement of sand asphalt concrete properties and contains an analysis of possible variants for usage of complex-modified sand asphalt concrete in the road construction. It has been noted that according to its potentially possible physical and mechanical properties activated quartz sand being micro-reinforced by dispersive industrial wastes is considered as an efficient component for creation of constructive layers in road asphalt concrete pavements. The paper reveals only specific aspects of the efficient application of quartz sand in road asphalt concrete. The subject of the paper loоks rather interesting for regions where there are no rock deposits for obtaining broken-stone ballast but there is rather significant spreading of local quarts sand. Its successful application is connected with the necessity to develop special equipment for physical and chemical activation of sand grain surface that permits strongly to increase an adhesive strength in the area of phase separation within the “bitumen–SiO2” system. The considered problem is a topical one and its solution will make it possible to local sand in a maximum way and partially to exclude application of broken stone in road construction.

  6. Determination of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of 20MPa Mass Concrete Using Granite Aggregate

    Chee Siang, GO

    2017-07-01

    Experimental test was carried out to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value of 20MPa mass concrete using granite aggregate. The CTE value was established using procedure proposed by Kada et al. 2002 in determining the magnitude of early-ages CTE through laboratory test which is a rather accurate way by eliminating any possible superimposed effect of others early-age thermal deformation shrinkages such as autogenous, carbonation, plastic and drying shrinkage. This was done by submitting granite concrete block samples instrumented with ST4 vibrating wire extensometers to thermal shocks. The response of the concrete samples to this shock results in a nearly instantaneous deformation, which are measured by the sensor. These deformations, as well as the temperature signal, are used to calculate the CTE. By repeating heat cycles, the variation in the early-ages of concrete CTE over time was monitored and assessed for a period of upto 7 days. The developed CTE value facilitating the verification and validation of actual maximum permissible critical temperature differential limit (rather than arbitrarily follow published value) of cracking potential. For thick sections, internal restraint is dominant and this is governed by differentials mainly. Of the required physical properties for thermal modelling, CTE is of paramount importance that with given appropriate internal restraint factor the condition of cracking due to internal restraint is governs by equation, ΔTmax= 3.663ɛctu / αc. Thus, it can be appreciated that an increase in CTE will lower the maximum allowable differential for cracking avoidance in mass concrete while an increase of tensile strain capacity will increase the maximum allowable temperature differential.

  7. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties of Crushed Sand Concrete containing Rubber Waste

    Mohamed Guendouz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years, the rubber wastes are an important part of municipal solid waste. This work focuses on the recycling of rubber waste, specifically rubber waste of used shoes discharged into the nature and added in the mass of crushed sand concrete with percentage (10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. The physical (workability, fresh density, mechanical (compressive and flexural strength and thermal (thermal conductivity of different crushed sand concrete made are analyzed and compared to the respective controls. The use of rubber waste in crushed sand concrete contributes to reduce the bulk density and performance of sand concrete. Nevertheless, the use of rubber aggregate leads to a significant reduction in thermal conductivity, which improves the thermal insulation of crushed sand concrete.

  8. Mix proportioning and performance of a crushed limestone sand-concrete

    Makhloufi Zoubir; Bouziani Tayeb; Bédérina Madani; Hadjoudja Mourad

    2014-01-01

    Satisfying the ever-growing demand of concrete aggregates poses a problem in many parts of the world due to shortage of natural sand. Moreover, to conserve natural resources and protect civil engineering infrastructures, there is a need to find alternative materials. Crushed stone sand has been identified as a potential substitute material for natural sand in making good quality concrete. The main objective of the present investigation is to determine an adequate mix design method and evaluat...

  9. Behavior of Hollow Thin Welded Tubes Filled with Sand Slag Concrete

    Noureddine Ferhoune

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the axial bearing capacity of thin welded rectangular steel stubs filled with concrete sand. A series of tests was conducted to study the behavior of short composite columns under axial compressive load; the cross section dimensions were 100 × 70 × 2 mm. A total of 20 stubs have been tested, as follows: 4 hollow thin welded tubes were tested to axial and eccentric load compression, 4 were filled with ordinary concrete appointed by BO columns, 6 were filled with concrete whose natural sand was completely substituted by a crystallized sand slag designated in this paper by BSI, and 6 were tucked in concrete whose natural sand was partially replaced by a crystallized sand slag called BSII. The main parameters studied are the height of the specimen (300 mm–500 mm, eccentricity of load and type of filling concrete. Based on test results obtained, it is confirmed that the length of the tubes has a considerable effect on the bearing capacity and the failure mode. In all test tubes, fracture occurred by the convex local buckling of steel section due to the outward thrust of the concrete; it was observed that the sand concrete improves the bearing capacity of tubes compounds compared to those filled with ordinary concrete.

  10. Strength and Microstructure of Concrete with Iron Ore Tailings as Replacement for River Sand

    Umara Shettima, Ali; Ahmad, Yusof; Warid Hussin, Mohd; Zakari Muhammad, Nasiru; Eziekel Babatude, Ogunbode

    2018-03-01

    River Sand is one of the basic ingredients used in the production of concrete. Consequently, continuous consumption of sand in construction industry contributes significantly to depletion of natural resources. To achieve more sustainable construction materials, this paper reports the use of iron ore tailings (IOT) as replacement for river sand in concrete production. IOT is a waste product generated from the production of iron ore and disposed to land fill without any economic value. Concrete mixtures containing different amount of IOT were designed for grade C30 with water to cement ratio of 0.60. The percentage ratios of the river sand replacements by IOT were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. Concrete microstructure test namely, XRD and Field Emission Scanned Electron Microscopic/Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (FESEM/EDX) were conducted for control and IOT concretes in order to determine the interaction and performance of the concrete containing IOT. Test results indicated that the slump values of 130 mm and 80 to 110 mm were recorded for the control and IOT concretes respectively. The concrete sample of 50% IOT recorded the highest compressive strength of 37.7 MPa at 28 days, and the highest flexural strength of 5.5 MPa compared to 4.7 MPa for reference concrete. The texture of the IOT is rough and angular which was able to improve the strength of the concrete.

  11. Strength and Microstructure of Concrete with Iron Ore Tailings as Replacement for River Sand

    Umara Shettima Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available River Sand is one of the basic ingredients used in the production of concrete. Consequently, continuous consumption of sand in construction industry contributes significantly to depletion of natural resources. To achieve more sustainable construction materials, this paper reports the use of iron ore tailings (IOT as replacement for river sand in concrete production. IOT is a waste product generated from the production of iron ore and disposed to land fill without any economic value. Concrete mixtures containing different amount of IOT were designed for grade C30 with water to cement ratio of 0.60. The percentage ratios of the river sand replacements by IOT were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. Concrete microstructure test namely, XRD and Field Emission Scanned Electron Microscopic/Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (FESEM/EDX were conducted for control and IOT concretes in order to determine the interaction and performance of the concrete containing IOT. Test results indicated that the slump values of 130 mm and 80 to 110 mm were recorded for the control and IOT concretes respectively. The concrete sample of 50% IOT recorded the highest compressive strength of 37.7 MPa at 28 days, and the highest flexural strength of 5.5 MPa compared to 4.7 MPa for reference concrete. The texture of the IOT is rough and angular which was able to improve the strength of the concrete.

  12. Influence of limestone waste as partial replacement material for sand and marble powder in concrete properties

    Omar M. Omar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Green concrete are generally composed of recycling materials as hundred or partial percent substitutes for aggregate, cement, and admixture in concrete. Limestone waste is obtained as a by-product during the production of aggregates through the crushing process of rocks in rubble crusher units. Using quarry waste as a substitute of sand in construction materials would resolve the environmental problems caused by the large-scale depletion of the natural sources of river and mining sands. This paper reports the experimental study undertaken to investigate the influence of partial replacement of sand with limestone waste (LSW, with marble powder (M.P as an additive on the concrete properties. The replacement proportion of sand with limestone waste, 25%, 50%, and 75% were practiced in the concrete mixes except in the concrete mix. Besides, proportions of 5%, 10% and 15% marble powder were practiced in the concrete mixes. The effects of limestone waste as fine aggregate on several fresh and hardened properties of the concretes were investigated. The investigation included testing of compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, and permeability. It was found that limestone waste as fine aggregate enhanced the slump test of the fresh concretes. But the unit weight concretes were not affected. However, the good performance was observed when limestone waste as fine aggregate was used in presence of marble powder.

  13. Use of coal ash in production of concrete containing contaminated sand

    Ezeldin, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    There are between 2 to 3.5 million underground storage tanks located throughout the nation. Most of these tanks, which store oils and gasolines, are leaking making them one of the primary sources of soil contamination. Adding coal ash or cement to contaminated soil has been used to obtain stationary and inert wastecrete. By using this procedure, stabilization (limiting the solubility and mobility of the contaminants) and solidification (producing a solid waste block) of contaminated soils are successfully achieved. This paper investigates another re-use option of coal ash and contaminated soils. An experimental study evaluating the effectiveness of using coal ash with oil contaminated sand in concrete production is presented. A control mix made of clean sand was designed to yield 500 psi of compressive strength. Sand, artificially contaminated with 3% by weight of motor oil, was used as clean sand replacement. Six concrete mixtures were tested in compression and flexure. The six mixtures were obtained by increasing the ratio of contaminated sand to clean sand, namely; 10%, 20% and 40% and by introducing coal ash to the concrete mixture, namely; 20% of the cement weight. The test results indicate that the inclusion of oil contaminated sand in concrete reduces the compressive and flexural strengths. However, this decrease in strength is compensated by introducing coal ash in the mixture. Regaining that strength offers the possibility of using such concrete as a construction material in special structural applications. More research is required to establish better understanding of that composite and suggest feasible applications

  14. An Investigation into the Use of Manufactured Sand as a 100% Replacement for Fine Aggregate in Concrete.

    Pilegis, Martins; Gardner, Diane; Lark, Robert

    2016-06-02

    Manufactured sand differs from natural sea and river dredged sand in its physical and mineralogical properties. These can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fresh and hardened properties of concrete. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study in which manufactured sand produced in an industry sized crushing plant was characterised with respect to its physical and mineralogical properties. The influence of these characteristics on concrete workability and strength, when manufactured sand completely replaced natural sand in concrete, was investigated and modelled using artificial neural networks (ANN). The results show that the manufactured sand concrete made in this study generally requires a higher water/cement (w/c) ratio for workability equal to that of natural sand concrete due to the higher angularity of the manufactured sand particles. Water reducing admixtures can be used to compensate for this if the manufactured sand does not contain clay particles. At the same w/c ratio, the compressive and flexural strength of manufactured sand concrete exceeds that of natural sand concrete. ANN proved a valuable and reliable method of predicting concrete strength and workability based on the properties of the fine aggregate (FA) and the concrete mix composition.

  15. An Investigation into the Use of Manufactured Sand as a 100% Replacement for Fine Aggregate in Concrete

    Martins Pilegis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Manufactured sand differs from natural sea and river dredged sand in its physical and mineralogical properties. These can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fresh and hardened properties of concrete. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study in which manufactured sand produced in an industry sized crushing plant was characterised with respect to its physical and mineralogical properties. The influence of these characteristics on concrete workability and strength, when manufactured sand completely replaced natural sand in concrete, was investigated and modelled using artificial neural networks (ANN. The results show that the manufactured sand concrete made in this study generally requires a higher water/cement (w/c ratio for workability equal to that of natural sand concrete due to the higher angularity of the manufactured sand particles. Water reducing admixtures can be used to compensate for this if the manufactured sand does not contain clay particles. At the same w/c ratio, the compressive and flexural strength of manufactured sand concrete exceeds that of natural sand concrete. ANN proved a valuable and reliable method of predicting concrete strength and workability based on the properties of the fine aggregate (FA and the concrete mix composition.

  16. Effect of Natural Sand Percentages on Fatigue Life of Asphalt Concrete Mixture

    Nahla Yassub Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of a flexible pavement requires the knowledge of the material properties which are characterized by stiffness and fatigue resistance. The fatigue resistance relates the number of load cycles to failure with the strain level applied to the asphalt mixture. The main objective of this research is the evaluation of the fatigue life of asphalt mixtures by using two types of fine aggregate having different percentages. In this study, two types of fine aggregate were used natural sand (desert sand and crushed sand. The crushed sand was replaced by natural sand (desert sand with different percentages (0%, 25%, 75% and 100% by the weight of the sand (passing sieve No.8 and retained on sieve No.200 and one type of binder (40/50 penetration from Al-Daurah refinery. The samples of beams were tested by four point bending beam fatigue test at the control strain mode (250, 500 and 750 microstrain while the loading frequency (5Hz and testing temperature (20oC according to (AASHTO T321. The experimental work showed that fatigue life (Nf and initial flexural stiffness increased when control strain decreased for asphalt mixtures. Acceptable fatigue life at 750 microstrain was obtained with asphalt concrete mixtures containing 100% crushed sand as well as asphalt concrete contained 25% natural sand. The asphalt concrete contained 100% and 75% of natural sand exhibited high fatigue life at low level of microstrain (250. The main conclusion of this study found that best proportion of natural sand to be added to an asphaltic concrete mixture is falling within the range (0% and 25% by weight of fraction (passing No.8 and retained on No.200 sieve .

  17. Sand Cement Brick Containing Recycled Concrete Aggregate as Fine-Aggregate Replacement

    Sheikh Khalid Faisal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the usage amount of the concrete is increasing drastically. The construction industry is a huge consumer of natural consumer. It is also producing the huge wastage products. The usage of concrete has been charged to be not environmentally friendly due to depletion of reserve natural resources, high energy consumption and disposal issues. The conservation of natural resources and reduction of disposal site by reuse and recycling waste material was interest possibilites. The aim of this study is to determine the physical and mechanical properties of sand cement brick containing recycled concrete aggregate and to determine the optimum mix ratio containing recycled concrete aggregate. An experiment done by comparing the result of control specimen using 100% natural sand with recycled concrete aggregate replacement specimen by weight for 55%, 65%, and 75%. The sample was tested under density, compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption to study the effect of using recycled concrete aggregate on the physical and mechanical properties of bricks. The result shows that the replacement of natural sand by recycled concrete aggregate at the level of 55% provide the highest compressive and flexural strength compared to other percentage and control specimen. However, if the replacement higher than 55%, the strength of brick was decreased for compressive and flexural strength, respectively. The relationship of compressive-flexural strength is determined from statistical analysis and the predicted result can be obtained by using equation ff,RCA = 0.5375 (fc0.3272.

  18. Engineering properties of concrete with partial utilization of used foundry sand.

    Manoharan, Thiruvenkitam; Laksmanan, Dhamothiran; Mylsamy, Kaliyannan; Sivakumar, Pandian; Sircar, Anirbid

    2018-01-01

    Solid wastes generated from manufacturing industries are increasing at an alarming rate and it is consistently increasing. One such industrial solid waste is Used Foundry Sand (UFS). On the other hand, fine aggregates involved in the concrete are generally river sand, which is scarce, high cost and excavation of the river sand that promote environmental degradation. So, there is an urge to find some alternative solution to dispose UFS and to limit the use of river sand. In this research work, river sand was partially replaced by UFS. The percentage replacements were 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt% respectively. Experimental investigations were carried out to evaluate the mechanical, durability and micro-structural properties of M20 concrete at the age of 7, 28 and 91 day. XRD (X-ray Diffraction), EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) and optical-microscopic imaging analysis were performed to identify the presence of various compounds and micro cracks in the concrete with UFS. Comparative studies on control mix against trial mix were carried out. It was found that compression strength, flexural strength and modulus of elasticity were approximately constant up to 20 wt% UFS and decreased with further addition. Whereas, split tensile strength was increased after 20 wt% addition but it affects the other properties of concrete. The durability test results showed that the resistance of concrete against abrasion and rapid chloride permeability of the concrete mixture containing UFS up to 20 wt% were almost similar to the values of control mix. The findings suggest that UFS can effectively replace river sand. However, it is recommended that the replacement should not exceed 20 wt%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Utilization of fly ash as partial sand replacement in oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete

    Nazrin Akmal, A. Z. Muhammad; Muthusamy, K.; Mat Yahaya, F.; Hanafi, H. Mohd; Nur Azzimah, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Realization on the increasing demand for river sand supply in construction sector has inspired the current research to find alternative material to reduce the use of natural sand in oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete (OPS LWAC) production. The existence of fly ash, a by-product generated from coal power plant, which pose negative impact to the environment when it is disposed as waste, were used in this research. The effect of fly ash content as partial sand replacement towards workability and compressive strength of OPS lightweight aggregate concrete were investigated. Four concrete mixes containing various percentage of fly ash that are 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% by weight of sand were used in the experimental work. All mixes were cast in form of cubes before subjected to water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test were conducted at 1, 3, 7 and 28 days. The finding shows that the workability of the OPS LWAC decreases when more fly ash are used as sand replacement. It was found that adding of 10% fly ash as sand replacement content resulted in better compressive strength of OPS LWAC, which is higher than the control mix.

  20. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Concrete Made with Used Foundry Sand as Fine Aggregate

    G. Ganesh Prabhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the construction industry has been faced with a decline in the availability of natural sand due to the growth of the industry. On the other hand, the metal casting industries are being forced to find ways to safely dispose of waste foundry sand (FS. With the aim of resolving both of these issues, an investigation was carried out on the reuse of waste FS as an alternative material to natural sand in concrete production, satisfied with relevant international standards. The physical and chemical properties of the FS were addressed. The influence of FS on the behaviour of concrete was evaluated through strength and durability properties. The test results revealed that compared to the concrete mixtures with a substitution rate of 30%, the control mixture had a strength value that was only 6.3% higher, and this enhancement is not particularly high. In a similar manner, the durability properties of the concrete mixtures containing FS up to 30% were relatively close to those of control mixture. From the test results, it is suggested that FS with a substitution rate of up to 30% can be effectively used in concrete production without affecting the strength and durability properties of the concrete.

  1. Foamed concrete containing rice husk ash as sand replacement: an experimental study on compressive strength

    Rum, R. H. M.; Jaini, Z. M.; Boon, K. H.; Khairaddin, S. A. A.; Rahman, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    This study presents the utilization of rice husk ash (RHA) as sand replacement in foamed concrete. The study focuses on the effect of RHA on the compressive strength of foamed concrete. RHA contains high pozzolanic material that reacts with cementitious to enhance the strength and durability of foamed concrete. RHA also acts as filler causing the foamed concrete to become denser while retaining its unique low density. A total 243 cube specimens was prepared for the compression test. Two sets of mix design were employed at water-cement (W/C) ratio of 0.55, 0.60 and cement-sand ratio of 0.50, 0.33. The results revealed that the presence of RHA as sand replacement resulted in an increase in the compressive strength of foamed concrete. Moreover, 30% to 40% RHA was the optimum content level, contributing to the compressive strength of 18.1 MPa to 22.4 MPa. The W/C ratio and superplasticiser dosage play small roles in improving workability. In contrast, density governs the compressive strength of foamed concrete.

  2. Rational Rock Physics for Improved Velocity Prediction and Reservoir Properties Estimation for Granite Wash (Tight Sands in Anadarko Basin, Texas

    Muhammad Z. A. Durrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complex nature, deriving elastic properties from seismic data for the prolific Granite Wash reservoir (Pennsylvanian age in the western Anadarko Basin Wheeler County (Texas is quite a challenge. In this paper, we used rock physics tool to describe the diagenesis and accurate estimation of seismic velocities of P and S waves in Granite Wash reservoir. Hertz-Mindlin and Cementation (Dvorkin’s theories are applied to analyze the nature of the reservoir rocks (uncemented and cemented. In the implementation of rock physics diagnostics, three classical rock physics (empirical relations, Kuster-Toksöz, and Berryman models are comparatively analyzed for velocity prediction taking into account the pore shape geometry. An empirical (VP-VS relationship is also generated calibrated with core data for shear wave velocity prediction. Finally, we discussed the advantages of each rock physics model in detail. In addition, cross-plots of unconventional attributes help us in the clear separation of anomalous zone and lithologic properties of sand and shale facies over conventional attributes.

  3. Practical technical solution for clay-contaminated sands used in concrete

    Estephane Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand, whether natural or manufactured, shows in many instances varying degrees of high levels of clay contamination. This fact is encountered in different parts of the globe and can lead to serious problems in adjusting concrete mix proportions and requiring high water to cement ratios and/or high dosages of superplasticizers without necessarily meeting the workability requirements, even when the sand is previously washed with fresh water. In this paper, different types of sand from the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC region are being screened, analysed for their clay contents and consequent effects on plastic concrete quality. A technical solution is being proposed based on engineered superplasticizers. A testing protocol has been established to verify the robustness of optimized mix designs demonstrating the performance of the admixture in terms of initial and extended workability. In particular, it will be demonstrated that the customized concrete admixtures constitute by themselves a stand-alone answer to the usage of clay-contaminated sands in concrete.

  4. The mechanical properties of brick containing recycled concrete aggregate and polyethylene terephthalate waste as sand replacement

    Sheikh Khalid, Faisal; Bazilah Azmi, Nurul; Natasya Mazenan, Puteri; Shahidan, Shahiron; Ali, Noorwirdawati

    2018-03-01

    This research focuses on the performance of composite sand cement brick containing recycle concrete aggregate and waste polyethylene terephthalate. This study aims to determine the mechanical properties such as compressive strength and water absorption of composite brick containing recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste. The bricks specimens were prepared by using 100% natural sand, they were then replaced by RCA at 25%, 50% and 75% with proportions of PET consists of 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% by weight of natural sand. Based on the results of compressive strength, only RCA 25% with 0.5% PET achieve lower strength than normal bricks while others showed a high strength. However, all design mix reaches strength more than 7N/mm2 as expected. Besides that, the most favorable mix design that achieves high compressive strength is 75% of RCA with 0.5% PET.

  5. Influence of Local Sand on the Physicomechanical Comportment and Durability of High Performance Concrete

    Nadia Tebbal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research consists of incorporating the crushed sand (CS in the composition of a concrete and studies the effect of its gradual replacement by the sand dune (SD on sustainability of high performance concrete (HPC in aggressive environments. The experimental study shows that the parameters of workability of HPC are improved when the CS is partially replaced by the SD (1/3 additional quantities of water is needed to meet the workability properties. The mechanical strengths decrease by adding the SD to CS, but they reach acceptable values with CS in moderate dosages. The HPC performances are significantly better than the control concrete made up with the same aggregates. The specification tests of durability show that the water absorbing coefficients by capillarity increase after adding SD to the CS.

  6. Geochemical modelling of the evolution of a granite-concrete-water system around a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    Fritz, B.; Made, B.; Tardy, Y.

    1988-04-01

    The interactions between a granitic rock and concrete due to the natural solutions circulating around a repository for spent nuclear fuel has been simulated considering the dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 as the major source of alkalinity due to the concrete. This study follows a previous one considering the same interaction without concrete at 25, 60 and 100 deg C. The temperature range has been extended to 150 deg C. The results of the modelling are considered as following: - evolution of the water chemistry due to detected pssible chemical reactions. - minerals produced and dissolved. The calculations give mass transfers and volumic consequences (opening or closing tendencies). The conclusions of this yearly report are mainly the following: (1) the extent of the temperature range for the storage (up to 150 deg C) does not change the tendencies previously detected in the same conditions without any particular alkaline effect due to concrete dissolution, the reactions occurring tend to decrease the porosity of the rock by a sealing effect due to calcite precipitation and clays formation. (2) The effect of an alkaline concrete dissolution is clearly important, pH may reach very high values in closed system, and the volumic consequence is found in favour of an opening of the porosity, at the stage of saturation of the portlandite. This is probably an important point considering the security of natural barriers around such a repository. (authors)

  7. Reuse of waste iron as a partial replacement of sand in concrete.

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Al-Hashmi, Enas A

    2008-11-01

    One of the major environmental issues in Iraq is the large quantity of waste iron resulting from the industrial sector which is deposited in domestic waste and in landfills. A series of 109 experiments and 586 tests were carried out in this study to examine the feasibility of reusing this waste iron in concrete. Overall, 130 kg of waste iron were reused to partially replace sand at 10%, 15%, and 20% in a total of 1703 kg concrete mixtures. The tests performed to evaluate waste-iron concrete quality included slump, fresh density, dry density, compressive strength, and flexural strength tests: 115 cubes of concrete were molded for the compressive strength and dry density tests, and 87 prisms were cast for the flexural strength tests. This work applied 3, 7, 14, and 28 days curing ages for the concrete mixes. The results confirm that reuse of solid waste material offers an approach to solving the pollution problems that arise from an accumulation of waste in a production site; in the meantime modified properties are added to the concrete. The results show that the concrete mixes made with waste iron had higher compressive strengths and flexural strengths than the plain concrete mixes.

  8. Analysis of Physical Properties and Mineralogical of Pyrolysis Tires Rubber Ash Compared Natural Sand in Concrete material

    Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Shahidan, Shahiron; Syazani Leman, Alif; Izzati Raihan Ramzi Hannan, Nurul

    2016-11-01

    Waste tires pose significant health and environmental concerns if not recycled or discarded properly. At the same time, natural sand is becoming scarcer and costlier due to its non-availability. Waste tires as fine aggregate can be an economical and sustainable alternative to the natural sand. Recent years, the interest on recycling waste tires into civil engineering applications by the researchers has increased. In this research, the chemical and physical properties of the tires rubber ash and the natural sand have been analysed. The densities of the rubber ash are lower than the natural sand. Rubber ash had finer particle size compared to the natural sand. Almost all chemical in the natural sand had in rubber ash with the additional sulphur trioxide and zinc oxide in the rubber ash, made the rubber ash better than natural sand. Rubber ash seems to be a suitable material to use in concrete as sand replacement.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Lightweight Concrete Using Recycled Cement-Sand Brick as Coarse Aggregates Replacement

    Joohari, Ilya; Farhani Ishak, Nor; Amin, Norliyati Mohd

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the result of replacing natural course aggregate with recycled cement-sand brick (CSB) towards the mechanical properties of concrete. Natural aggregates were used in this study as a control sample to compare with recycled coarse aggregates. This study was also carried to determine the optimum proportion of coarse aggregates replacement to produce lightweight concrete. Besides, this study was conducted to observe the crack and its behaviour development during the mechanical testing. Through this study, four types of concrete mixed were prepared, which were the control sample, 25%, 50% and 75% replacement of CSB. The test conducted to determine the effectiveness of recycled CSB as coarse aggregates replacement in this study were slump test, density measurement, compression test, and flexural test and. The strength of concrete was tested at 7 days and 28 days of curing. From the results obtained, the optimum proportion which produced the highest strength is 25% replacement of recycled CSB. The compressive and flexural strength has decreased by 10%-12% and 4%-34% respectively compared to the control sample. The presence of recycled coarse aggregates in sample has decreased the density of concrete by 0.8%-3% compared to the control sample.

  10. The Effects of Substitution of The Natural Sand by Steel Slag in The Properties of Eco-Friendly Concrete with The 1:2:3 Ratio Mixing Method

    Rahmawati, A.; Saputro, I. N.

    2018-03-01

    This study was motivated by the need for the development of eco-friendly concrete, and the use of large quantities of steel slag as an industrial waste which is generated from the steel manufacturers. This eco-friendly concrete was developed with steel slag as a substitute for natural sand. Properties of concrete which used waste slag as the fine aggregate with the 1 cement: 2 sand : 3 coarse aggregate ratio mixing method were examined. That ratio was in volume. Then a part of natural sand replaced with steel slag sand in six variations percentages that were 0 %, 20 %, 40 %, 60 %, 80 % and 100 %. The compressive strength, tensile strength, and flexural strength of concrete specimens were determined after curing for 28 days. The research results demonstrate that waste steel slag can increase the performance of concrete. The optimal percentage substitution natural sand by steel slag sand reached of slag on the percentage of 20 % which reached strength ratios of steel slag concrete to the strength of conventional concrete with natural sandstone were 1.37 for compressive strength and 1.13 for flexural strength. While the tensile strength reached a higher ratio of concrete with steel slag sand to the concrete with natural sand on the 80% substitution of natural sand with steel slag sand.

  11. HYDRATION PROCESS AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CEMENT PASTE WITH RECYCLED CONCRETE POWDER AND SILICA SAND POWDER

    Jaroslav Topič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete powder (RCP mostly consisting of cement paste could be reused as partial cement replacement. The aim of this paper is to compare hydration and mechanical properties of RCP and two types of silica sand powder (SSP. Comparison of those materials combined with cement can highlight the binder properties of recycled concrete powder. Using of two types of SSP also show an influence of their fines on hydration process and mechanical properties. Particle size analysis and calorimetric measurement were carried out and mechanical properties such as bulk density, dynamic Young’s modulus and compression strength were examine. Calorimetric measurement proves the presence of exposed non-hydrated particles in RCP that can react again. However lower density of old cement paste in RCP overweight the mentioned potential of RCP and mechanical properties are decreasing compared with reference cement paste and cement paste SSP.

  12. Experimental studies in Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity of roller compacted concrete pavement containing fly ash and M-sand

    S. Krishna Rao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental investigation results of Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV tests conducted on roller compacted concrete pavement (RCCP material containing Class F fly ash of as mineral admixture. River sand, M-sand and combination of M-sand and River sand are used as fine aggregate in this experimental work. Three types of fly ash roller compacted concrete mixes are prepared using above three types of fine aggregates and they are designated as Series A (River sand, Series B (manufactured sand and Series C (combination of River sand and M-sand. In each series the fly ash content in place of cement is varied from 0% to 60%. In each series and for different ages of curing (i.e 3, 7, 28 and 90 days forty two cube specimens are cast and tested for compressive strength and UPV. The UPV results of fly ash containing roller compacted concrete pavement (FRCCP show lower values at all ages from 3 days to 90 days in comparison with control mix concrete (0% fly ash in all mixes. However, it is also observed that Series B and C mixes containing fly ash show better results in UPV values, compressive strength and Dynamic Elastic Modulus in comparison to Series A mixes with fly ash. Relationships between compressive strength of FRCCP and UPV and Dynamic Elastic Modulus are proposed for all series mixes. A new empirical equation is proposed to determine the Dynamic Elastic Modulus of FRCCP. Keywords: Compressive strength, Dynamic Elastic Modulus, Fly ash, Roller compacted concrete pavement, Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity

  13. Experimental study of optimal self compacting concrete with spent foundry sand as partial replacement for M-sand using Taguchi approach

    Nirmala D.B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of Taguchi approach to obtain optimal mix proportion for Self Compacting Concrete (SCC containing spent foundry sand and M-sand. Spent foundry sand is used as a partial replacement for M-sand. The SCC mix has seven control factors namely, Coarse aggregate, M-sand with Spent Foundry sand, Cement, Fly ash, Water, Super plasticizer and Viscosity modifying agent. Modified Nan Su method is used to proportion the initial SCC mix. L18 (21×37 Orthogonal Arrays (OA with the seven control factors having 3 levels is used in Taguchi approach which resulted in 18 SCC mix proportions. All mixtures are extensively tested both in fresh and hardened states to verify whether they meet the practical and technical requirements of SCC. The quality characteristics considering “Nominal the better” situation is applied to the test results to arrive at the optimal SCC mix proportion. Test results indicate that the optimal mix satisfies the requirements of fresh and hardened properties of SCC. The study reveals the feasibility of using spent foundry sand as a partial replacement of M-sand in SCC and also that Taguchi method is a reliable tool to arrive at optimal mix proportion of SCC.

  14. Experimental study of optimal self compacting concrete with spent foundry sand as partial replacement for M-sand using Taguchi approach

    Nirmala, D. B.; Raviraj, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the application of Taguchi approach to obtain optimal mix proportion for Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) containing spent foundry sand and M-sand. Spent foundry sand is used as a partial replacement for M-sand. The SCC mix has seven control factors namely, Coarse aggregate, M-sand with Spent Foundry sand, Cement, Fly ash, Water, Super plasticizer and Viscosity modifying agent. Modified Nan Su method is used to proportion the initial SCC mix. L18 (21×37) Orthogonal Arrays (OA) with the seven control factors having 3 levels is used in Taguchi approach which resulted in 18 SCC mix proportions. All mixtures are extensively tested both in fresh and hardened states to verify whether they meet the practical and technical requirements of SCC. The quality characteristics considering "Nominal the better" situation is applied to the test results to arrive at the optimal SCC mix proportion. Test results indicate that the optimal mix satisfies the requirements of fresh and hardened properties of SCC. The study reveals the feasibility of using spent foundry sand as a partial replacement of M-sand in SCC and also that Taguchi method is a reliable tool to arrive at optimal mix proportion of SCC.

  15. Behavior of sulfur mustard in sand, concrete, and asphalt matrices: Evaporation, degradation, and decontamination.

    Jung, Hyunsook; Choi, Seungki

    2017-10-15

    The evaporation, degradation, and decontamination of sulfur mustard on environmental matrices including sand, concrete, and asphalt are described. A specially designed wind tunnel and thermal desorber in combination with gas chromatograph (GC) produced profiles of vapor concentration obtained from samples of the chemical agent deposited as a drop on the surfaces of the matrices. The matrices were exposed to the chemical agent at room temperature, and the degradation reactions were monitored and characterized. A vapor emission test was also performed after a decontamination process. The results showed that on sand, the drop of agent spread laterally while evaporating. On concrete, the drop of the agent was absorbed immediately into the matrix while spreading and evaporating. However, the asphalt surface conserved the agent and slowly released parts of the agent over an extended period of time. The degradation reactions of the agent followed pseudo first order behavior on the matrices. Trace amounts of the residual agent present at the surface were also released as vapor after decontamination, posing a threat to the exposed individual and environment.

  16. A comparison of dimension reduction methods with application to multi-spectral images of sand used in concrete

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Hansen, M. E.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of dimension reduction methods based on a novel machine vision application for estimating moisture content in sand used to make concrete. For the application in question it is very important to know the moisture content of the sand so as to ensure good-quality...... sand types were examined with 20-60 images for each type. To reduce the amount of data, features were extracted from the multi-spectral images; the features were summary statistics on single bands and pairs of bands as well as morphological summaries. The number of features (2,016) is high in relation...

  17. A proposal for the maximum use of recycled concrete sand in masonry mortar design

    Fernández-Ledesma, E.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural sand mining from rivers and seashores is causing serious environmental problems in many parts of the world, whereas the fine fraction from recycling concrete waste is underutilized as a construction material. The aim of this paper is to determine the maximum replacement level of natural sand by recycled sand in the manufacturing of masonry mortar (M-10. For this purpose, five replacement levels were tested: 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by volume. The mixes were made using cement CEM II/BL 32.5 N in a volumetric proportion of cement-to-aggregate of 1:5. A commercial admixture was used at a constant content. The amount of water was variable to achieve a consistency of 175±10 mm. The short- and long-term mortar properties were evaluated. The data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA. In conclusion, a maximum percentage of 50% recycled concrete sand can be used in an indoor environment.La extracción de arena natural de ríos y costas está provocando graves problemas ambientales en muchas partes del mundo, mientras que la fracción fina de los áridos reciclados de residuos de hormigón está infrautilizada como material de construcción. El objetivo de este artículo es determinar el máximo porcentaje de sustitución de arena natural por arena reciclada en la fabricación de morteros M-10. Cinco niveles de sustitución en volumen fueron ensayados: 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% y 100%. Las mezclas fueron hechas con cemento CEM II/BL 32,5 N en una relación volumétrica cemento-árido de 1:5. Se utilizó un aditivo comercial a dosis constante. El agua se ajustó experimentalmente para conseguir una consistencia de 175±10 mm. Se evaluaron las propiedades de los morteros a corto y largo plazo. Los datos se analizaron mediante una ANOVA-simple. En conclusión, un porcentaje máximo del 50% de arena reciclada de hormigón puede usarse en interiores.

  18. Feasibility Assessment of Incorporating Copper Slag as a Sand Substitute to Attain Sustainable Production Perspective in Concrete

    Akshaykumar M. Bhoi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the sustainable production perspective, a laboratory testing program is exercised to ascertain the feasibility of utilizing copper slag in place of the natural fine aggregate in concrete. Totally, fifteen concrete mixtures were prepared to incorporate copper slag in place of the fine aggregate in concrete. The attributes of concrete specimens made with varying proportions of copper slag were compared (ranging from 0% to 100% substitution at a w/c ratio of 0.44, and the optimum percentage of copper slag was decided. The w/c ratio in the mix containing optimum copper slag percentage was then varied (from 0.42 to 0.36 to examine the influence of the change in the quantity of available water on the strength attributes of concrete. Concrete specimens were assessed for workability, density, compressive strength, flexural strength, and split tensile strength. SEM images and X-ray diffractograms of concrete specimens were also studied. The results obtained indicated a significant increase in workability and a small rise in the bulk density of concrete. The study concludes that substituting 60% sand with copper slag results in better compressive strength compared to control concrete and can be improved further by reducing the w/c ratio in the mix.

  19. Experimental Study on Rise Husk Ash & Fly Ash Based Geo-Polymer Concrete Using M-Sand

    Nanda Kishore, G.; Gayathri, B.

    2017-08-01

    Serious environmental problems by means of increasing the production of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which is conventionally used as the primary binder to produce cement concrete. An attempt has been made to reduce the use of ordinary Portland cement in cement concrete. There is no standard mix design of geo-polymer concrete, an effort has been made to know the physical, chemical properties and optimum mix of geo-polymer concrete mix design. Concrete cubes of 100 x 100 x 100 mm were prepared and cured under steam curing for about 24 hours at temperature range of 40°C to 60°C. Fly ash is replaced partially with rice husk ash at percentage of 10%, 15% and 25%. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate are of used as alkaline activators with 5 Molar and 10 Molar NaOH solutions. Natural sand is replaced with manufacture sand. Test results were compared with controlled concrete mix of grade M30. The results shows that as the percentage of rice husk ash and water content increases, compressive strength will be decreases and as molarity of the alkaline solution increases, strength will be increases.

  20. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF ALUMINUM CONTENT AND C / S RATIO ON THE PHYSICO-MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF A LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE MADE FROM SAND DUNE

    Z. Damene

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is a contribution to the development of local materials especially in the development of a cellular concrete with dunes sand. This is an experimental study whose objective is to see the influence of the C/S (dosage of cement compared to sand and the dosage of aluminum on the physico- mechanical and thermal performance of lightweight concrete cellular type. The results showed that the cement compared to the sand has a remarkable effect on the reaction and that on expansion the mechanical behavior as well as the dosage of aluminum in the composition of cellular concrete has a certain threshold Aluminium beyond which provides no relief benefits. Based on these results, the cellular concrete made from sand dune can be classified as light structural concrete with insulation suitable for very hot and arid environment of our region power.

  1. Investigation into the Heat of Hydration and Alkali Silica Reactivity of Sustainable Ultrahigh Strength Concrete with Foundry Sand

    Federico Aguayo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the hydration reactivity and alkali silica reaction (ASR of ultrahigh strength concrete (UHSC that has been made more sustainable by using spent foundry sand. Spent foundry sand not only is sustainable but has supplementary cementitious material (SCM characteristics. Two series of UHSC mixtures were prepared using a nonreactive and reactive sand (in terms of ASR to investigate both the impact of a more reactive aggregate and the use of spent foundry sand. Conduction calorimetry was used to monitor the heat of hydration maintained under isothermal conditions, while ASR was investigated using the accelerated mortar bar test (AMBT. Additionally, the compressive strengths were measured for both series of mixtures at 7, 14, and 28 days to confirm high strength requirements. The compressive strengths ranged from 85 MPa (12,345 psi to 181.78 MPa (26,365 psi. This result demonstrates that a UHSC mixture was produced. The calorimetry results revealed a slight acceleration in the heat of hydration flow curve compared to the control from both aggregates indicating increased hydration reactivity from the addition of foundry waste. The combination of foundry sand and reactive sand was found to increase ASR reactivity with increasing additions of foundry sand up to 30% replacement.

  2. Mechanical and toxicological evaluation of concrete artifacts containing waste foundry sand.

    Mastella, Miguel Angelo; Gislon, Edivelton Soratto; Pelisser, Fernando; Ricken, Cláudio; da Silva, Luciano; Angioletto, Elídio; Montedo, Oscar Rubem Klegues

    2014-08-01

    The creation of metal parts via casting uses molds that are generally made from sand and phenolic resin. The waste generated after the casting process is called waste foundry sand (WFS). Depending on the mold composition and the casting process, WFS can contain substances that prevent its direct emission to the environment. In Brazil, this waste is classified according to the Standard ABNT NBR 10004:2004 as a waste Class II (Non-Inert). The recycling of this waste is limited because its characteristics change significantly after use. Although the use (or reuse) of this byproduct in civil construction is a technically feasible alternative, its effects must be evaluated, especially from mechanical and environmental points of view. Thus, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of WFS in the manufacture of cement artifacts, such as masonry blocks for walls, structural masonry blocks, and paving blocks. Blocks containing different concentrations of WFS (up to 75% by weight) were produced and evaluated using compressive strength tests (35 MPa at 28 days) and toxicity tests on Daphnia magna, Allium cepa (onion root), and Eisenia foetida (earthworm). The results showed that there was not a considerable reduction in the compressive strength, with values of 35 ± 2 MPa at 28 days. The toxicity study with the material obtained from leaching did not significantly interfere with the development of D. magna and E. foetida, but the growth of the A. cepa species was reduced. The study showed that the use of this waste in the production of concrete blocks is feasible from both mechanical and environmental points of view. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Performance of composite sand cement brick containing recycle concrete aggregate and waste polyethylene terephthalate with different mix design ratio

    Azmi, N. B.; Khalid, F. S.; Irwan, J. M.; Mazenan, P. N.; Zahir, Z.; Shahidan, S.

    2018-04-01

    This study is focuses to the performance of composite sand cement brick containing recycle concrete aggregate and waste polyethylene terephthalate. The objective is to determine the mechanical properties such as compressive strength and water absorption of composite brick containing recycled concrete aggregate and polyethylene terephthalate waste and to determine the optimum mix ratio of bricks containing recycled concrete aggregate and polyethylene terephthalate waste. The bricks specimens were prepared by using 100% natural sand, they were then replaced by RCA at 25%, 50% and 75% with proportions of PET consists of 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0% and 2.5% by weight of natural sand. Based on the results of compressive strength, it indicates that the replacement of RCA shows an increasing strength as the strength starts to increase from 25% to 50% for both mix design ratio. The strength for RCA 75% volume of replacement started to decrease as the volume of PET increase. However, the result of water absorption with 50% RCA and 1.0% PET show less permeable compared to control brick at both mix design ratio. Thus, one would expect the density of brick decrease and the water absorption to increase as the RCA and PET content is increased.

  4. Strength Properties of Foamed Concrete Containing Crushed Steel Slag as Partial Replacement of Sand with Specific Gradation

    Tiong Hock Yong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight construction material, notably foamed concrete, had become more favourable to reduce building weight and cost, accelerate construction process, and ease handling of precast segment. Simultaneously, rapid development had result in price rising of conventional material and environmental issue due to abundant wastes, for instance steel slag. As a consequence, feasibility of steel slag to be incorporated in lightweight foamed concrete for both structural and nonstructural purpose is worth to be investigated. This paper is aimed to evaluate the effects of crushed steel slag, as partial replacement of sand with specific gradation, on performance of lightweight foamed concrete (LFC with density of 1600 kg/m3 to 1700 kg/m3 in terms of compressive and tensile strengths. Different steel slag based LFCs were developed by replacing 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of steel slag for sand. Different water to cement ratios (w/c and dosages of super-plasticizer (sp were adopted to confirm certain workability, strength properties was then studied for ages of 7 and 28 days. The laboratory results showed that lightweight foamed concrete with incorporation of crushed steel slag has decreased strength; however it still achieves structural strength of 17 MPa when replacement level is less than 25% at density of 1600 kg/m3 to 1700 kg/m3.

  5. Recycling of End of Life Concrete Fines into Hardened Cement and Clean Sand

    Lotfi, S.; Rem, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the massive by-products of concrete to concrete recycling is the crushed concrete fines, that is often 0 - 4mm. Although the construction sector is to some extent familiar with the utilization of the recycled coarse fraction (>4 mm), at present there is no high-quality application for

  6. Chloride Diffusion and Acid Resistance of Concrete Containing Zeolite and Tuff as Partial Replacements of Cement and Sand.

    Mohseni, Ehsan; Tang, Waiching; Cui, Hongzhi

    2017-03-31

    In this paper, the properties of concrete containing zeolite and tuff as partial replacements of cement and sand were studied. The compressive strength, water absorption, chloride ion diffusion and resistance to acid environments of concretes made with zeolite at proportions of 10% and 15% of binder and tuff at ratios of 5%, 10% and 15% of fine aggregate were investigated. The results showed that the compressive strength of samples with zeolite and tuff increased considerably. In general, the concrete strength increased with increasing tuff content, and the strength was further improved when cement was replaced by zeolite. According to the water absorption results, specimens with zeolite showed the lowest water absorption values. With the incorporation of tuff and zeolite, the chloride resistance of specimens was enhanced significantly. In terms of the water absorption and chloride diffusion results, the most favorable replacement of cement and sand was 10% zeolite and 15% tuff, respectively. However, the resistance to acid attack reduced due to the absorbing characteristic and calcareous nature of the tuff.

  7. Study of strength kinetics of sand concrete system of accelerated hardening

    Sharanova, A. V.; Lenkova, D. A.; Panfilova, A. D.

    2018-04-01

    Methods of calorimetric analysis are used to study the dynamics of the hydration processes of concretes with different accelerator contents. The efficiency of the isothermal calorimetry method is shown for study of strength kinetics of concrete mixtures of accelerated hardening, promising for additive technologies in civil engineering.

  8. Combined Non-destructive Testing (NDT) methods for evaluating concrete quality

    Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Suhairy Sani; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    This paper described the results of combining Non-destructive measurements on concrete. Local crushed granite and hematite were used as coarse aggregates; mining sand and river sand were used as fine aggregates to produce various density and strength of concrete. Concrete samples (150 mm cubes and interlocked blocks) were prepared by changing mix ratio, water to cement ratio (w/c) and types of aggregates. Density, rebound number(N) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of the samples were taken before compressed to failure. The measurement results are explained and discussed. (author)

  9. Development of a low-cost cement free polymer concrete using industrial by-products and dune sand

    Ismail Najif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkali-activated polymer concrete (APC can potentially reduce CO2 emissions associated to concrete production by 84%. The binder in APC herein was synthesized using a combined sodium silicate-sodium hydroxide solution (i.e., alkali activator, alumino-silicate rich precursor (fly ash and slag. Light weight expanded clay and desert dune sand were used as aggregates. An overview of an experimental program was presented, which involved evaluation of fresh and mechanical properties of the produced APC and counterpart mortar (APM. Variables investigated were the fly ash to slag ratio and curing conditions. The curing regimes adopted herein included 24 hours of curing at ambient conditions, 30°C, and 60°C. The experimental program was undertaken in two stages, of these the first stage involved physical and chemical testing of constituent materials and the second stage involved testing or produced APM/APC. Reported were the setting times, workability, compression strength, strength development, flexural strength, tensile splitting strength, and plastic shrinkage strains. Relationship between strength results were investigated and effectiveness of codified predictive equations was evaluated.

  10. Self-consolidating concretes containing waste PET bottles as sand replacement

    Khalid, Faisal Sheikh; Azmi, Nurul Bazilah; Mazenan, Puteri Natasya; Shahidan, Shahiron; Othman, Nor hazurina; Guntor, Nickholas Anting Anak

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluates the effect of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) containing waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) granules on the fresh, mechanical and water absorption properties. Fine aggregates were replaced from 0% to 8% by PET granules. The fresh properties of SCC containing PET granules were determined using slump flow and V-funnel flow time tests. The compressive and splitting tensile strength were evaluated. The results indicated that utilization of waste PET granules in production of SCC could be an effective way for recycling purpose. The maximum amount of PET replacement should be limited to 5%. Exceeding 5% of PET content may result in an increase of V-funnel flow time to overpass the limiting value, decrease in strength. The production of high performance SCC containing 5% PET granules satisfies all the requirements for SCC with satisfactory outputs.

  11. Concrete

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities. Through tangible experiments the project...... specific for this to happen. And the knowledge and intention behind the drawing becomes specialised through the understanding of the fabrication processes and their affect on the materials.The structure Concrete is a result of a multi-angled kerf series in ash wood and a concrete base. The ash wood is cut...... using a 5-axis CNC router with a thin saw blade attached. The programming of the machining results in variations of kerfs that lets the ash wood twist into unique shapes.The shapes of the revolving ash ribbons continue into the concrete creating a cohesive shape. The form for the concrete itself is made...

  12. Concrete

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities.Through tangible experiments the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrications tools as direct expansions of the architect’s digital drawing and workflow. The project sees this expansion as an opportunity to connect th...

  13. Effect of mix proportion of high density concrete on compressive strength, density and radiation absorption

    Noor Azreen Masenwat; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Suhairy Sani; Ismail Mustapha; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud; Mohammad Shahrizan Samsu

    2014-01-01

    To prevent radiation leaks at nuclear reactors, high-density concrete is used as an absorbent material for radiation from spreading into the environment. High-density concrete is a mixture of cement, sand, aggregate (usually high-density minerals) and water. In this research, hematite stone is used because of its mineral density higher than the granite used in conventional concrete mixing. Mix concrete in this study were divided into part 1 and part 2. In part 1, the concrete mixture is designed with the same ratio of 1: 2: 4 but differentiated in terms of water-cement ratio (0.60, 0.65, 0.70, 0.75, 0.80 ). Whereas, in part 2, the concrete mixture is designed to vary the ratio of 1: 1: 2, 1: 1.5: 3, 1: 2: 3, 1: 3: 6, 1: 2: 6 with water-cement ratio (0.7, 0.8, 0.85, 0.9). In each section, the division has also performed in a mixture of sand and fine sand hematite. Then, the physical characteristics of the density and the compressive strength of the mixture of part 1 and part 2 is measured. Comparisons were also made in terms of absorption of radiation by Cs-137 and Co-60 source for each mix. This paper describes and discusses the relationship between the concrete mixture ratio, the relationship with the water-cement ratio, compressive strength, density, different mixture of sand and fine sand hematite. (author)

  14. Sand for concrete

    Editorial, Equipo

    1959-08-01

    Full Text Available Not availableEn este trabajo considera el autor sólo las arenas de origen natural, sin tener en cuenta los áridos finos procedentes de piedra machacada, ladrillo o cualquier otro material usado con este fin. Como sabemos, la arena, juntamente con los ladrillos y la grava, es uno de los materiales más utiliza4dos, principalmente en la fabricación de hormigones.

  15. Influence of sand to coarse aggregate ratio on the interfacial bond strength of steel fibers in concrete for nuclear power plant

    Kim, Jung Jin; Kim, Dong Joo; Kang, Su Tae; Lee, Jang Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The final goal is to develop a fiber reinforced concrete for containment buildings. ► We investigated the effect of S/a on the bond strength of steel fibers. ► Deformed steel fibers produced much higher interfacial bond strength. ► As S/a increased, twisted fiber showed a significant enhancement in bond strength. ► Smooth and hooked fiber showed no clear difference as S/a increased. - Abstract: The interfacial bond strength of three high strength steel fibers (smooth, hooked, and twisted fiber) in concrete of nuclear power plants was investigated to develop fiber reinforced concrete for containment building. Sand to aggregate ratio (S/a) was adjusted to compensate reduction in the workability due to adding fibers; the influence of S/a ratio on the interfacial bond strength was investigated. As the S/a ratio increased from 0.444 to 0.615, the bond strength of twisted steel fiber was significantly improved while smooth and hooked steel fiber showed no clear difference. The different sensitivity according to the S/a ratio results from the different pullout mechanism: twisted steel fiber generates more mechanical interaction during fiber pullout at the interface between fiber and matrix than smooth and hooked fibers. The microscopic observation by scanning electron microscope back-scattered electrons images discovered lower porosity at the interfacial transition zone between fiber and concrete with higher S/a ratio.

  16. Technical viability of self-compacting concretes with by-products from crushed coarse aggregate production

    Edgar Bacarji

    Full Text Available Abstract The main objective of this work is to present the technical viability of Self Compacting Concretes (SCC containing by-products from crushed coarse aggregate production. For this purpose, a vast characterization of these by-products was made; six mixtures of SCC were produced using two different aggregates: granite and mica schist. The binder/dry aggregate (b/agg ratio by mass was 1:3. The following properties were analyzed: compressive strength, direct tensile strength, flexural tensile strength and splitting tensile strength. Granite presented the best mechanical performance. The replacement of natural sand by granite sand generated concretes with the same level of compressive strength and caused an increase in tensile strength values. The incorporation of silica fume into concrete with granite produced an increase of 17% in compressive strength. So, the use of these by-product materials can provide a technically feasible solution that is also consistent with the aims of sustainable development and preservation of the environment.

  17. A preliminary study on using manufactured sand from Jelsa Quarry for the production of plastic concrete mixes. FA 2 Competitive constructions. SP 2.3 High quality manufactured sand for concrete

    Cepuritis, Rolands

    2012-01-01

    This study has been carried out within COIN - Concrete Innovation Centre - one of presently 14 Centres for Research based Innovation (CRI), which is an initiative by the Research Council of Norway. 3D005940

  18. Effect of Aggregate Mineralogy and Concrete Microstructure on Thermal Expansion and Strength Properties of Concrete

    Jinwoo An

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate type and mineralogy are critical factors that influence the engineering properties of concrete. Temperature variations result in internal volume changes could potentially cause a network of micro-cracks leading to a reduction in the concrete’s compressive strength. The study specifically studied the effect of the type and mineralogy of fine and coarse aggregates in the normal strength concrete properties. As performance measures, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and compressive strength were tested with concrete specimens containing different types of fine aggregates (manufactured and natural sands and coarse aggregates (dolomite and granite. Petrographic examinations were then performed to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the aggregate and to examine the aggregate and concrete microstructure. The test results indicate the concrete CTE increases with the silicon (Si volume content in the aggregate. For the concrete specimens with higher CTE, the micro-crack density in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ tended to be higher. The width of ITZ in one of the concrete specimens with a high CTE displayed the widest core ITZ (approx. 11 µm while the concrete specimens with a low CTE showed the narrowest core ITZ (approx. 3.5 µm. This was attributed to early-age thermal cracking. Specimens with higher CTE are more susceptible to thermal stress.

  19. Influence of sand to coarse aggregate ratio on the interfacial bond strength of steel fibers in concrete for nuclear power plant

    Kim, Jung Jin, E-mail: jjinslow@nate.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, SeJong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Joo, E-mail: djkim75@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, SeJong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Su Tae, E-mail: stkang@daegu.ac.kr [Department of Civil Engineering, Daegu University, 201 Daegudae-ro, Jillyang, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jang Hwa, E-mail: jhlee@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 2311 Daewha-Dong, Ilsan-Gu, Goyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 411-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final goal is to develop a fiber reinforced concrete for containment buildings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of S/a on the bond strength of steel fibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deformed steel fibers produced much higher interfacial bond strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As S/a increased, twisted fiber showed a significant enhancement in bond strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth and hooked fiber showed no clear difference as S/a increased. - Abstract: The interfacial bond strength of three high strength steel fibers (smooth, hooked, and twisted fiber) in concrete of nuclear power plants was investigated to develop fiber reinforced concrete for containment building. Sand to aggregate ratio (S/a) was adjusted to compensate reduction in the workability due to adding fibers; the influence of S/a ratio on the interfacial bond strength was investigated. As the S/a ratio increased from 0.444 to 0.615, the bond strength of twisted steel fiber was significantly improved while smooth and hooked steel fiber showed no clear difference. The different sensitivity according to the S/a ratio results from the different pullout mechanism: twisted steel fiber generates more mechanical interaction during fiber pullout at the interface between fiber and matrix than smooth and hooked fibers. The microscopic observation by scanning electron microscope back-scattered electrons images discovered lower porosity at the interfacial transition zone between fiber and concrete with higher S/a ratio.

  20. Uranium in granites

    Maurice, Y.T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research activities of the Canadian Uranium in Granites Study are presented in 18 papers and 3 abstracts. 'Granites' is used as a generic term for granitoids, granitic rocks, and plutonic rocks

  1. Analysis of fine-dispersed chalk usage as mineral additive in the composition of sand aggrerate concrete

    Светлана Николаевна Чепурная

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research results of fine-disperse chalk addition on physical and mechanical properties of the cement stone and concrete are shown. It is determined that fine-disperse chalk addition in the binder composition increases the content of ultrafine particles. The chalk particles fill the pore space between the cement particles, increasing the packing density, which leads to a density increase, which consequently leads to improved physical and mechanical properties of the concrete: water tightness, cold resistance, corrosion resistance, crack resistance and other properties

  2. 2005 dossier: granite; Dossier 2005: granite

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in granite formations. Content: 1 - advantage of granitic formations for the geologic disposal; 2 - containers; 3 - design study of a disposal facility in granitic environment; 4 - understanding and modelling of granite; 5 - description of disposal concepts in granitic environment; 6 - long-term and safety aspects; 7 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  3. Modeling the Effect of Crude Oil Impacted Sand on the Properties of Concrete Using Artificial Neural Networks

    W. O. Ajagbe; A. A. Ganiyu; M. O. Owoyele; J. O. Labiran

    2013-01-01

    A network of the feedforward-type artificial neural networks (ANNs) was used to predict the compressive strength of concrete made from crude oil contaminated soil samples at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 days at different degrees of contamination of 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25%. A total of 49 samples were used in the training, testing, and prediction phase of the modeling in the ratio 32 : 11 : 7. The TANH activation function was used and the maximum number of iterations was limited to 20,...

  4. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase I : concrete temperature study.

    1968-08-01

    This report describes a study conducted to determine the temperature gradient throughout the depth of a six inch concrete bridge deck. The bridge deck selected for study was constructed using lightweight concrete for the center spans and sand and gra...

  5. 2005 dossier: granite

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in granite formations. Content: 1 - advantage of granitic formations for the geologic disposal; 2 - containers; 3 - design study of a disposal facility in granitic environment; 4 - understanding and modelling of granite; 5 - description of disposal concepts in granitic environment; 6 - long-term and safety aspects; 7 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  6. FEATURES OF ASH OF THERMAL POWER PLANTS AS AGGREGATE FOR CONCRETES

    M. A. Storozhuk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The scientific work is dedicated to development of scientific-technical bases of production and application of concrete on the basis of ashes of thermal power plants (TPP. Methodology. The properties of TPP ash, as well as the peculiarities of its behavior in a concrete mix as a fine aggregate, have been studied. It is shown that the hydrolysis and hydration of cement occur in the active environment of ash, which has a huge specific surface area. This significantly affects the course of these processes and the quality of the concrete produced. A new technology of application of ash of TPP for preparation of concrete mixes is offered. Vibrated and vibrovacuumized concretes of optimum composition from slag and ash, as well as from granite crushed stone and ash, are tested. The chara-cteristics of ordinary concrete (from granite crushed stone and quartz sand are given to compare. Findings. The results of the tests showed the possibility of obtaining concretes of class C20/25…C25/30 on the basis of slag and ash of TPP at a limited consumption of cement. It is shown that the concrete with traditional aggregates has a lower strength than the concrete, which has ash as fine aggregate. This research results contribute to the increased use of ash in construction that solves the problem of aggregates as well as thermal power plants waste recycling. Originality. New method and technology of application of TPP ashes in concrete are developed. Ash concrete mix has rational flowability, which produces the greatest strength of ash vacuum concrete. This strength is twice or more as large as the strength of vibrated ash concrete mix with flowability S1. Practical value. The physico-chemical properties of TPP ash as aggregate for concrete are presented. Significant difference of ash from ordinary aggregates is shown. Chemical activity of the ash is justified. The special conditions of cement hardening in the case of using ash as aggregate for concrete

  7. Laboratory freeze-thaw durability of pervious concrete with respect to curing time and addition of sand, slag, silica fume, and saltguard.

    2016-11-22

    Concerns persist regarding pervious concrete durability in cold climates related to freeze-thaw : and exposure to salt. This study was conducted as an extension to previous work regarding pervious : concrete in Vermont, to further investigate freeze-...

  8. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    Mingyue, Feng; Debao, He [CNNC Key Laboratory of Uranium Resource Exploration and Evaluation Technology, Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (China)

    2012-07-15

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  9. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    Feng Mingyue; He Debao

    2012-01-01

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  10. EXPLOITATION OF GRANITE BOULDER

    Ivan Cotman

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of forming, petrography, features, properties and exploitation of granite boulders are described. The directional drilling and black powder blasting is the succesful method in exploitation of granite boulders (boulder technology (the paper is published in Croatian.

  11. Urban heritage, building maintenance : Concrete

    Verhoef, L.G.W.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete as a conglomerate of sand, stone and a binder, is a very old material indeed. In the Roman period earth from Puozzoli, together with lime and water could bind the sand and the stones to form a conglomerate that has an affmity to our modem concrete. Later, in the more northem areas of

  12. Effect of Crushed Sandstone Sand on the Properties of High ...

    This paper presents results of the laboratory investigation on high performance concrete (HPC) using crushed sandstone sand as 20%, 40%, and 60% replacement of river sand together with superplastisizer and silica fume (SF). The fresh concrete properties such as slump, air content and fresh concrete density have been ...

  13. Concrete produced with recycled aggregates

    J. J. L. Tenório

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the mechanical and durable properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC for using in concrete. The porosity of recycled coarse aggregates is known to influence the fresh and hardened concrete properties and these properties are related to the specific mass of the recycled coarse aggregates, which directly influences the mechanical properties of the concrete. The recycled aggregates were obtained from construction and demolition wastes (CDW, which were divided into recycled sand (fine and coarse aggregates. Besides this, a recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density was obtained by mixing the recycled aggregates of the CDW with the recycled aggregates of concrete wastes (CW. The concrete was produced in laboratory by combining three water-cement ratios, the ratios were used in agreement with NBR 6118 for structural concretes, with each recycled coarse aggregates and recycled sand or river sand, and the reference concrete was produced with natural aggregates. It was observed that recycled aggregates can be used in concrete with properties for structural concrete. In general, the use of recycled coarse aggregate in combination with recycled sand did not provide good results; but when the less porous was used, or the recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density, the properties of the concrete showed better results. Some RAC reached bigger strengths than the reference concrete.

  14. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite

  15. Valorisation du sable de concassage et du sable du désert dans la composition des bétons autoplaçants Valorization of the crushed sand and of the desert sand in the composition of the self compacting concrete

    R’mili A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Les bétons autopla÷ants (BAP sont des bétons très fluides qui demandent des dosages élevés en sables et en éléments fins par rapport au béton ordinaire (BO. Le sable de concassage (SC, à granularité étalée, est un sous-produit de concassage des roches massives. Le sable du désert (SD est un sable extra-fin, caractérisé par une distribution serrée de grosseur des grains. Renfermant des teneurs importantes en fines, ces deux sables peuvent êtres des composants intéressants des BAP. Cette recherché consiste à incorporer le SC dans la composition des bétons et étudier l’effet de son remplacement progressif par le SD sur le comportement à l’état frais et durci des BAP. L’étude expérimentale montre que les paramètres d’ouvrabilité des BAP sont améliorés lorsque le SC est partiellement remplacé par le SD ( 30%, des quantités supplémentaires en eau et en superplastifiant sont nécessaires, pour répondre aux propriétés autopla÷antes. Les résistances mécaniques diminuent en ajoutant le SD au SC, mais elles atteignent des valeurs acceptables pour des dosages modérés en SD. Les performances des BAP sont nettement meilleures que celles des BO confectionnées avec les mêmes granulats. Les essais de spécification de la durabilité montrent que les coefficients d’absorption d’eau par capillarité et par immersion augmentent en ajoutant le SD au SC alors que le coefficient de perméabilité diminue. Self-compacting concretes (SCC are highly fluid concretes that require high proportions in sand and fine particles with respect to the ordinary concrete (OC. The crushed sand (CS, spread granulometry, is a by-product of crushing rock mass. The desert sand (DS is an extra fine sand, characterized by a tight distribution of grain size. Containing significant levels of fine sand, these two sands can be both interesting components of the SCC. This research is to incorporate the CS in the composition of concrete and

  16. Properties of concrete containing foamed concrete block waste as fine aggregate replacement

    Muthusamy, K.; Budiea, A. M. A.; Zaidan, A. L. F.; Rasid, M. H.; Hazimmah, D. S.

    2017-11-01

    Environmental degradation due to excessive sand mining dumping at certain places and disposal of foamed concrete block waste from lightweight concrete producing industry are issues that should be resolved for a better and cleaner environment of the community. Thus, the main intention of this study is to investigate the potential of foamed concrete block waste as partial sand replacement in concrete production. The foamed concrete waste (FCW) used in this research that were supplied by a local lightweight concrete producing industry. The workability and compressive strength of concrete containing various percentage of foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement has been investigated. Prior to the use, the foamed concrete waste were crushed to produce finer particles. Six concrete mixes containing various content of crushed foamed concrete waste that are 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% were used in this experimental work. Then the prepared specimens were placed in water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test and flexural strength tests were conducted at 7, 14 and 28 days. The result shows that integration of crushed foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement in concrete reduces the mix workability. It is interesting to note that both compressive strength and flexural strength of concrete improves when 30% crushed foamed concrete waste is added as partial sand replacement.

  17. Fontainebleau Sand

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  18. Granit, Prof. Ragnar Arthur

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Granit, Prof. Ragnar Arthur Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1967. Date of birth: 30 October 1900. Date of death: 11 March 1991. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  19. Warren Hunt to test granite well

    Harvie, W.

    1996-01-01

    Various theories which purport to explain the existence of the Alberta oil sands, were discussed briefly. One theory, held among others by Warren Hunt, speculates that oil is formed deep in the Precambrian basement and not in the higher sedimentary rock. According to this theory, methane in the crust is the abiogenic product that results from hydrogen reacting with silicon carbide in the lower mantle. As it rises through the fractures, it encounters the microbiota, and hydrogen is stripped away making larger molecules until only bitumen remains. Hunt and other adherents of this theory believe that hydrocarbon reservoirs are replenished as oil is produced, hence there is no end to the world's oil supply. This theory is about to be tested by retesting a granite well near Fort McMurray, which was suspended in September 1994, when funding dried up. Kaleeda Enterprises, owners of the well, believe that the well bottom is currently in a granite pool, and oil will be found by deepening the well to 2,150 metres from the current 1,650 metres. While this is not universally accepted, if true, the abiogenic theory would go a long way towards explaining the origin of the oil sands

  20. Characteristics of SCC with Fly Ash and Manufactured Sand

    Praveen Kumar, K.; Radhakrishna

    2016-09-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) of M40 grade was designed. The binder in SCC consists of OPC and fly ash in the ratio of 65:35. River sand was replaced by manufactured sand (M-sand) at replacement levels of 20,40,60,80 and 100%. An attempt was made to evaluate the workability and strength characteristics of self compacting concrete with river sand and manufactured sand as fine aggregates. For each replacement level, constant workability was maintained by varying the dosage of superplasticizer. T50 flow time, V Funnel time, V-funnel T5 time as well as compressive, split tensile and flexural strength of SCC were found at each replacement level of M-sand. They were compared to SCC with river sand. Results indicate favourable use of M-sand in preparation of Self Compacting Concrete.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF CEMENT CONCRETE CONGLOMERATE SOLIDIFICATION PROCESS BY IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY METHOD

    S. N. Bandarenka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most prospective directions in preservation  and increase of service live of  road pavements is a construction of  automobile roads with cement concrete surface. Modern tendencies for provision of road construction quality presuppose a necessity to control processes of solidification and subsequent destruction of the material while forming and using cement concrete conglomerate being considered as a basic element of the road surface.  Multiyear practical experience of  automobile road operation using cement concrete pavements reveals an importance for monitoring  such processes as formation and destruction of cement concrete materials. An impedance spectroscopy method has been tried out and proposed as a tool for solution of the given problem.Experimental samples of cement concrete have been prepared for execution of tests, graded silica sand and granite chippings with particle size from 0.63 to 2.5 mm have been used as a fine aggregate in the samples. Dependencies of resistance (impedance on AC-current frequency  have been studied for samples of various nature and granulometric composition. The Gamry  G300 potentiostat has been used for measurement of complex impedance value. A spectrum analysis and calculation of equivalent circuit parameters calculation have been carried out while using EIS Spectrum Analyzer program.Comparison of impedance spectra for the prepared cement concrete samples have made it possible to reveal tendencies in changing spectrum parameters during solidification and subsequent contact with moisture in respect of every type of the sample. An equivalent electrical circuit has been developed that  characterizes physical and chemical processes which are accompanied by charge transfer in cement concrete conglomerate. The paper demonstrates a possibility to use an impedance spectroscopy for solution of a number of actual problems in the field of cement concrete technology problems. Particularly, the problems

  2. HIGH-QUALITY SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE WITH COAL BURNING WASTE

    Voronin Viktor Valerianovich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject: nowadays self-compacting concretes (SCC, the use of which requires no additional compaction, have become widespread for use in densely-reinforced structures and hard-to-reach places. In self-compacting concretes, finely-ground admixtures-microfillers are widely used for controlling technological properties. Their introduction into the concrete mix allows us to obtain more dense structure of concrete. The influence of micro-fillers on water consumption and plasticity of concrete mix, on kinetics of strength gain rate, heat release and corrosion resistance is also noticeable. Research objectives: the work focuses on the development of composition of self-compacting concrete with assigned properties with the use of fly ash based on coal burning waste, optimized with the help of experimental design method in order to clarify the influence of ash and cement quantity, sand size on strength properties. Materials and methods: pure Portland cement CEM I 42.5 N was used as a binder. Crushed granite of fraction 5…20 mm was used as coarse aggregate, coarse quartz sand with the fineness modulus of 2.6 and fine sand with the fineness modulus of 1.4 were used as fillers. A superplasticizer BASF-Master Glenium 115 was used as a plasticizing admixture. The fly ash from Cherepetskaya thermal power plant was used as a filler. The study of strength and technological properties of self-compacting concrete was performed by using standard methods. Results: we obtained three-factor quadratic dependence of strength properties on the content of ash, cement and fraction of fine filler in the mix of fine fillers. Conclusions: introduction of micro-filler admixture based on the fly ash allowed us to obtain a concrete mix with high mobility, fluidity and self-compaction property. The obtained concrete has high strength characteristics, delayed strength gain rate due to replacement of part of the binder with ash. Introduction of the fly ash increases degree of

  3. 1.5. The concrete mix properties

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    Different properties of concrete mix, including connectivity, mobility and water demand were considered in this work. The steps of water demand of concrete mix obtained from Portland cement, sand and gravel are presented in this work. The classification of concrete mixes is presented as well.

  4. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  5. A study of concrete properties using phyllite as coarse aggregates

    Adom-Asamoah, Mark; Afrifa, Russell Owusu

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, industrial activities generate a huge amount of waste. One such activity is underground mining which generates phyllite wastes that are recycled as coarse aggregates for use in concrete production. Aggregate use in concrete is dependent on availability. This paper reports of an experimental study on some of the physical and mechanical properties of phyllite aggregate concrete as compared to granite (conventional) aggregate concrete. The obtained physical and mechanical properties of both aggregates for specific gravity, water absorption (%), dry density, aggregate impact value (%), aggregate crushing value (%), 10% fines, elongation index (%), flakiness index (%) and Los Angeles abrasion values satisfied minimum requirements for aggregates suitable for concrete production. Five mixes of concrete mix proportions designated M1, M2, M3, M4 and M5 were cast using phyllite and granite aggregates. A total of 400 concrete cubes and 210 modulus of rupture beams were cast and cured by total submerging in water for ages 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, 90, 180 and 360 days before compression and bending tests were performed. The results show that the trends in the development of compressive and bending strengths of plain phyllite concrete were similar to those in granite (conventional) aggregate concrete. However the compressive and bending strengths of phyllite concrete mixes were on the average 15-20% lower than those of the corresponding granite concrete mixes at all ages. The same concrete mix proportions gave lower concrete classes for phyllite compared to granite with the exception of the lowest grade. This was probably because the flakiness and elongation properties coupled with reactive materials in phyllite aggregates affect the absorption and bond characteristics of its concrete.

  6. Heat production in granitic rocks

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Jakobsen, Kiki

    2017-01-01

    Granitic rocks play special role in the dynamics and evolution of the Earth and its thermal regime. First, their compositional variability, reflected in the distribution of concentrations of radiogenic elements, provides constraints on global differentiation processes and large scale planetary...... evolution, where emplacement of granites is considered a particularly important process for the formation of continental crust. Second, heat production by radioactive decay is among the main heat sources in the Earth. Therefore knowledge of heat production in granitic rocks is pivotal for thermal modelling...... of the continental lithosphere, given that most radiogenic elements are concentrated in granitic rocks of the upper continental crust whereas heat production in rocks of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle is negligible. We present and analyze a new global database GRANITE2017 (with about 500 entries...

  7. Concrete mixtures with high-workability for ballastless slab tracks

    Olga Smirnova

    2017-01-01

    The concrete track-supporting layer and the monolithic concrete slab of ballastless track systems are made in-situ. For this reason the concrete mixtures of high workability should be used. Influence of the sand kind, the quartz microfiller fineness and quantity as well as quantity of superplasticizer on workability of fresh concrete and durability of hardened concrete is shown. The compositions of the high-workability concrete mixtures with lower consumption of superplasticizer are developed...

  8. Application of backpropagation neural networks to evaluate residual properties of thermally damaged concrete

    Vasconcelos, W.L.; Shigaki, Y.; Tolentino, E.

    2009-01-01

    In this work it was analyzed the residual performance of Portland cement concretes, when cold after heat-treated up to 600 deg C. Granite-gneiss was used in the three concrete mix proportions as the coarse aggregate, and river sand with finesses modulus of 2.7 as the fine aggregate. Ultrasonic pulse tests were performed on all the specimens and ultrasonic dynamic modulus were obtained. An artificial neural network of the backpropagation type was trained to evaluate and apply models in predicting residual properties of Portland cement concretes. The input layer for both models consists of an external layer input vector of the temperature. The hidden layer has two processing units with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid transfer functions (tansig for short), and the output layer contains one processing unit that represents the network's output (ultrasonic pulse velocity or modulus of elasticity) for each input vector. The training phase of the network converged for reasonable results after 5.000 epochs approximately, resulting in mean squared errors less than 0.02 for the normalized data. The neural network developed for modeling residual properties of Portland cement concretes was shown to be efficient in both the training phase and the test. From the results reasonable predictions could be made for the ultrasonic pulse velocity or dynamic modulus of elasticity by using temperature. (author)

  9. Excavated rock materials from tunnels for sprayed concrete

    Luong, Judy Yuen Wah; Aarstad, Kari; De Weerdt, Klaartje; Bjøntegaard, Øyvind

    2017-01-01

    Sand extracted from natural resources is widely used in concrete production nowadays. The increase in demand for concrete production has resulted in shortage of natural sand resources, especially in terms of suitable materials for concrete production. At the same time, large amounts of excavated rock materials are and have been generated from tunnelling projects and discarded. Hence, there is an opportunity to use these excavated rock materials as aggregates for concrete production. The chall...

  10. Climax granite test results

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-15

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

  11. Uranium enriched granites in Sweden

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by (1) the anatexis of continental crust (2) processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichement in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (Authors)

  12. Influence of Al-W-B Recycled Composite Material on the Properties of High Performance Concrete

    Baronins Janis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to obtain high performance boron containing material with sufficient carrying capacity with increased porosity and lower density at the same time. The influence of the different concentrations of Al-W-B powder on the properties of the fresh and hardened HPC was investigated. In the concrete mix design, the allite containing White Portland cement CEM I 52,5 R, granite stone, sand, microsilica, on polycarboxylates based super plasticizer and Al-W-B powder were used. As a source of boron composite material (CM, previously grinded powder containing boron-tungsten fiber and aluminium matrix (CM Al-W-B was used. Grinding was used for processing of CM Al-W-B powder.

  13. Granites and granitoids of the southern region - Granite molybdenite system

    Issler, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Economic concentrations of molybdenum are genetically closely associated with acidic and moderately acid granitoids-granites, granodiorites, monzonites and diorites, and are located in two geotectonic settings: subduction-related and rift-related. The aim of this paper is twofold, first succinctly approach the geology, tectonic setting and chemical parameters of the 'granite molybdenite system' as defined by Mutschler and/or alcali granite porphyry bodies emplaced in the North American continent for occasion of a Mesozoic-Fanerozoic extensile event; second to relate the computer-assisted evaluation of 422 major element chemical analysis of granites and granitoids of southern region of Brazil, using chemical fingerprints (SiO 2 ≥ 74. Owt%, Na 2 O ≤ 3.6wt%, K 2 O ≥ 4.5wt%), and K 2 O/Na 2 O ratio > 1.5 developed and testified from North American and Finnish occurrences, may locate molybdenite-bearing granite bodies with high exploration potential. These techniques suggest that some late Precambrian to early Paleozoic granite-rhyolite assemblages inserted at domains of the SG. 22/23 Curitiba/Iguape, SH. 21/22 Uruguaiana/Porto Alegre and SI.22 Lagoa Mirim Sheets, have exploration potential for molybdenum. (author) [pt

  14. Artificial weathering of granite

    Silva Hermo, B.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes a series of artificial weathering tests run on granite designed to: simulate the action of weathering agents on buildings and identify the underlying mechanisms, determine the salt resistance of different types of rock; evaluate consolidation and water-repellent treatment durability; and confirm hypotheses about the origin of salts such as gypsum that are often found in granite buildings. Salt crystallization tests were also conducted, using sodium chloride, sodium sulphate, calcium sulphate and seawater solutions. One of these tests was conducted in a chamber specifically designed to simulate salt spray weathering and another in an SO2 chamber to ascertain whether granite is subject to sulphation. The test results are analyzed and discussed, along with the shortcomings of each type of trial as a method for simulating the decay observed in monuments. The effect of factors such as wet-dry conditions, type of saline solution and the position of the planes of weakness on the type of decay is also addressed.En este trabajo se hace una síntesis de varios ensayos de alteración artificial realizados con rocas graníticas. Estos ensayos tenían distintos objetivos: reproducir las formas de alteración encontradas en los edificios para llegar a conocer los mecanismos que las generan, determinar la resistencia de las diferentes rocas a la acción de las sales, evaluar la durabilidad de tratamientos de consolidación e hidrofugación y constatar hipótesis acerca del origen de algunas sales, como el yeso, que aparecen frecuentemente en edificios graníticos. En los ensayos de cristalización de sales se utilizaron disoluciones de cloruro de sodio, sulfato de sodio, sulfato de calcio y agua de mar. Uno de estos ensayos se llevó a cabo en una cámara especialmente diseñada para reproducir la alteración por aerosol marino y otro se realizó en una cámara de SO2, con el objeto de comprobar si en rocas graníticas se puede producir

  15. Utilization of Construction Waste Tiles as a Replacement for Fine Aggregates in Concrete

    A. A. Adekunle

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic wastes are found to be suitable for usage as substitution for fine and coarse aggregates in concrete production. This study is an investigation into the utilization of waste tiles as partial replacement for fine and coarse aggregates in concrete. The control mix and other mixes containing cement, water, granite and partial replacement for sand with crushed tiles (in 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% proportions were cast, cubed, cured and crushed. Also, another mix containing cement, water, sand and partial replacement of granite with crushed tiles (in 25%, 50% and 75% proportions were cast, cubed, cured and crushed. The specimens were tested for their respective compressive strengths using the Universal Testing Machine (UTM on the 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th days of curing. At 28 days, the compressive strength value of 5% of fine-waste tiles replacement was 20.12 N/mm2 while that of 10%, 15% and 20% were 14.24 N/mm2, 11.04 N/mm2 and 10.12 N/mm2 respectively. Moreover, at 28 days, the compressive strength of 25% of coarse-waste tiles replacement shows an increase to 22.45 N/mm2 while that of 50% and 75% were 18.4 N/mm2 and 12.2 N/mm2 respectively. Thus it can be concluded that fine aggregates can be substituted at 5% waste tiles while coarse aggregates can be substituted at 25% waste tiles.>/p>

  16. TRANSPARENT CONCRETE

    Sandeep Sharma*, Dr. O.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Transparent concrete is the new type of concrete introduced in todays world which carries special property of light transmitting due to presence of light Optical fibres. Which is also known as translucent concrete or light transmitting concrete, it is achieved by replacing coarse aggregates with transparent alternate materials (Optical fibres). The binding material in transparent concrete may be able to transmit light by using clear resins the concrete mix. The concrete used in industry in pr...

  17. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    Zarime, Nur'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z. W.

    2014-09-01

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%-63% and 46%-54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50-2.59 and 2.45-2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35-5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32-5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%-0.34% and 0.39%- 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m2/g-21.93 m2/g and 25.76 m2/g-26.83 m2/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g-1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  18. LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE BASED GRANSHLAK

    NETESA M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Concrete advisable to obtain a low strength with local secondary resources for recycling and reduce the environmental burden on the environment. But it is important to design such concrete compositions with a reduced flow of cement. It is known that the coefficient of efficiency of use of cement in the concrete of the heavy and B10 is less than about 0.5, which is almost two times smaller than in class B15 concrete and above. Even lower coefficient of efficiency in light concrete cement low strength. Therefore, it is important to find patterns determining the composition of lightweight concrete based on local-products industry with more efficient use of cement in them. Purpose.. Based on the analysis of earlier research results, including with the use of methods of mathematical planning of experiments to determine the concrete contents, which can provide the requirements for the underlying layers of the floor, the compressive strength of which should correspond to the class B5. It is important to provide the required strength at minimum flow of the cement, which is the most expensive and energy-intensive part of concrete. Conclusion. Analysis of the test results of control samples of concrete in 28-day-old, the following laws. The required tensile strength of concrete compressive strength of 7.0 MPa can be obtained in the test range when used in formulations as a filler as the Dnieper hydroelectric power station fly ash and tailings Krivoy Rog iron ore YuGOK. To ensure providing the required characteristic strength of the concrete in the underlying layers of the floor is advisable to use a nominal composition per cubic meter of concrete: cement 160 kg granshlaka Plant named after Petrovsky, 675 kg of fly ash Dnieper HPP 390 kg, 400 kg of sand, 230 liters of water. Thus, while ensuring rational grain composition components can obtain the desired strength lightweight concrete based granshlaka plant Petrovsky, using as fillers

  19. Pyrite-coated granite cobbles at Lee Bay, Stewart Island

    Brathwaite, R.L.; Skinner, D.N.B.; Faure, K.; Edwards, E.

    2014-01-01

    On the west side of Lee Bay on the northeast coast of Stewart Island, ventifact cobbles of pyrite-coated granite occur on the beach near the high tide mark and appear to be derived from a sand-cemented gravel deposit that forms a low bank at the back of the beach. The pyrite coat (up to 1 mm thick) completely covers the granitic cobbles and is zoned, with an inner zone of fine-grained colloform pyrite and an outer framboidal zone. Framboidal pyrite is typically formed in anoxic sedimentary environments. Subrounded grains of hematite, ilmenite with hematite blebs, magnetite, feldspar, biotite, quartz and zircon are present in the outer framboidal zone, with some ilmenite and hematite grains being partially replaced by pyrite. The assemblage of ilmenite-hematite-magnetite-biotite-zircon is similar both in mineralogy and size range to that found in heavy mineral beach sands. Sulphur isotope values of the pyrite coat are consistent with formation of the pyrite by microbial sulphate reduction of seawater sulphate. The framboidal texture together with the presence of grains of beach sand in the pyrite coating indicate that it was deposited in a low-temperature sedimentary environment. (author)

  20. How Concrete is Concrete

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two diff...

  1. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Mathews, S.; Wilson, K.

    1998-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchased by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in a concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved

  2. Uranium deposits in granitic rocks

    Nishimori, R.K.; Ragland, P.C.; Rogers, J.J.W.; Greenberg, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a review of published data bearing on the geology and origin of uranium deposits in granitic, pegmatitic and migmatitic rocks with the aim of assisting in the development of predictive criteria for the search for similar deposits in the U.S. Efforts were concentrated on the so-called ''porphyry'' uranium deposits. Two types of uranium deposits are primarily considered: deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in gneiss terrains, and disseminations of uranium in high-level granites. In Chapter 1 of this report, the general data on the distribution of uranium in igneous and metamorphic rocks are reviewed. Chapter 2 contains some comments on the classification of uranium deposits associated with igneous rocks and a summary of the main features of the geology of uranium deposits in granites. General concepts of the behavior of uranium in granites during crustal evolution are reviewed in Chapter 3. Also included is a discussion of the relationship of uranium mineralization in granites to the general evolution of mobile belts, plus the influence of magmatic and post-magmatic processes on the distribution of uranium in igneous rocks and related ore deposits. Chapter 4 relates the results of experimental studies on the crystallization of granites to some of the geologic features of uranium deposits in pegmatites and alaskites in high-grade metamorphic terrains. Potential or favorable areas for igneous uranium deposits in the U.S.A. are delineated in Chapter 5. Data on the geology of specific uranium deposits in granitic rocks are contained in Appendix 1. A compilation of igneous rock formations containing greater than 10 ppM uranium is included in Appendix 2. Appendix 3 is a report on the results of a visit to the Roessing area. Appendix 4 is a report on a field excursion to eastern Canada

  3. Porous Structure of Road Concrete

    Пшембаев, М. К.; Гиринский, В. В.; Ковалев, Я. Н.; Яглов, В. Н.; Будниченко, С. С.

    2016-01-01

    Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such st...

  4. How Concrete is Concrete

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics

  5. 2005 dossier: granite. Tome: architecture and management of the geologic disposal; Dossier 2005: granite. Tome architecture et gestion du stockage geologique

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in granite formations. Content: 1 - Approach of the study: main steps since the December 30, 1991 law, ANDRA's research program on disposal in granitic formations; 2 - high-level and long-lived (HLLL) wastes: production scenarios, waste categories, inventory model; 3 - disposal facility design in granitic environment: definition of the geologic disposal functions, the granitic material, general facility design options; 4 - general architecture of a disposal facility in granitic environment: surface facilities, underground facilities, disposal process, operational safety; 5 - B-type wastes disposal area: primary containers of B-type wastes, safety options, concrete containers, disposal alveoles, architecture of the B-type wastes disposal area, disposal process and feasibility aspects, functions of disposal components with time; 6 - C-type wastes disposal area: C-type wastes primary containers, safety options, super-containers, disposal alveoles, architecture of the C-type wastes disposal area, disposal process in a reversibility logics, functions of disposal components with time; 7 - spent fuels disposal area: spent fuel assemblies, safety options, spent fuel containers, disposal alveoles, architecture of the spent fuel disposal area, disposal process in a reversibility logics, functions of disposal components with time; 8 - conclusions: suitability of the architecture with various types of French granites, strong design, reversibility taken into consideration. (J.S.)

  6. Sand consolidation

    Spain, H H

    1965-01-21

    In a sand consolidation method in which there is injected a mixture of resin-forming liquids comprising an aryl-hydroxy low molecular weight compound, a water- soluble aldehyde, and a catalyst, an improvement is claimed which comprises diluting the resin-forming liquids with a diluent and with water so that the yield of the resin is sufficient to consolidate the sand particles with the minimum desirable pressure. The diluent may be mutually soluble in water and in the resin-forming liquids, and does not affect the setting time of the polymer. The aldehyde and the aryl-hydroxy compound may be in ratio of 5:1, and the diluent, methyl alcohol, is present in a ratio of 2:1 with reference to the water.

  7. Fibre-concrete container

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the fibre-concrete container for radioactive wastes is described. The fibre container is made of fibre-concrete that contains cement, aggregate, sand, filter, flame-silica, super-plastificator, water and scattered metal fibres. The fibre-concrete container has a dice shape with outer dimension 1.7 x 1.7 x 1.7 m. It is mounted of a container body, a container cover and two caps. Total weight of container is 4,240 kg, maximum weight of loaded container do not must exceed 15,000 kg. The physical and mechanical properties of the fibre-concrete container are described in detail. The fibre-concrete container manufactured for storing of low and intermediate radioactive wastes. A fibre-concrete container utilization to store of radioactive wastes solves these problems: increase of stability of stored packages of radioactive waste; watertightness within 300 years at least; static stability of bearing space; better utilization of bearing spaces; insulation of radioactive waste in a case of seismic and geological event; increase of fire resistance; and transport of radioactive waste

  8. Status of LLNL granite projects

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    The status of LLNL Projects dealing with nuclear waste disposal in granitic rocks is reviewed. This review covers work done subsequent to the June 1979 Workshop on Thermomechanical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository and is prepared for the July 1980 Workshop on Thermomechanical-Hydrochemical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository. Topics reviewed include laboratory determination of thermal, mechanical, and transport properties of rocks at conditions simulating a deep geologic repository, and field testing at the Climax granitic stock at the USDOE Nevada Test Site

  9. Granites petrology, structure, geological setting, and metallogeny

    Nédélec, Anne; Bowden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Granites are emblematic rocks developed from a magma that crystallized in the Earth’s crust. They ultimately outcrop at the surface worldwide. This book, translated and updated from the original French edition Pétrologie des Granites (2011) is a modern presentation of granitic rocks from magma genesis to their crystallization at a higher level into the crust. Segregation from the source, magma ascent and shapes of granitic intrusions are also discussed, as well as the eventual formation of hybrid rocks by mingling/mixing processes and the thermomechanical aspects in country rocks around granite plutons. Modern techniques for structural studies of granites are detailed extensively. Granites are considered in their geological spatial and temporal frame, in relation with plate tectonics and Earth history from the Archaean eon. A chapter on granite metallogeny explains how elements of economic interest are concentrated during magma crystallization, and examples of Sn, Cu, F and U ore deposits are presented. Mi...

  10. The Mechanism of Disintegration of Cement Concrete at High Temperatures

    Jocius Vytautas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a composite material composed of a binder, aggregates, water and additives. Mixing of cement with water results in a number of chemical reactions known as cement hydration. Heating of concrete results in dehydration processes of cement minerals and new hydration products, which disintegrate the microstructure of concrete. This article reviews results of research conducted with Portland and alumina cement with conventional and refractory concrete aggregates. In civic buildings such common fillers as gravel, granite, dolomite or expanded clay are usually used. It is important to point out the differences between fillers because they constitute the majority of the concrete volume.

  11. 1 1 2 3 Effect of basalt, silica sand and fly ash on the mechanical ...

    21

    The purpose of this paper is to manufacture quaternary polymer concretes and ... Keywords: Polymer concrete, Mechanical strength, Mixture design, Fly ash, Silica .... The silica foundry sand used was 101TM from the Silica Sand MFG .... To reduce the production cost of PCs, it is necessary to minimize the epoxy content in.

  12. Mineral sands

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an outlook of the Australian mineral sand industry and covers the major operators. It is shown that conscious of an environmentally minded public, the Australian miners have led the way in the rehabilitation of mined areas. Moreover the advanced ceramic industry is generating exciting new perspectives for zircon producers and there is a noticeable growth in the electronic market for rare earths, but in long term the success may depend as much on environmental management and communication skills as on mining and processing skills

  13. Concrete mixtures with high-workability for ballastless slab tracks

    Olga Smirnova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The concrete track-supporting layer and the monolithic concrete slab of ballastless track systems are made in-situ. For this reason the concrete mixtures of high workability should be used. Influence of the sand kind, the quartz microfiller fineness and quantity as well as quantity of superplasticizer on workability of fresh concrete and durability of hardened concrete is shown. The compositions of the high-workability concrete mixtures with lower consumption of superplasticizer are developed. The results of the research can be recommended for high performance concrete of ballastless slab track.

  14. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina; Denyak, Valeriy

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ( 238 U and 235 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), thoron ( 220 Rn), radium ( 226 Ra), thorium ( 232 Th) and potassium ( 40 K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the 222 Rn and 220 Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The 222 Rn and 220 Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m 3 to 2087±19 Bq/m 3 , which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  15. Modulus of elasticity, creep and shrinkage of concrete, phase II : part 1, creep study, final report.

    2009-10-01

    A laboratory testing program was performed to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of typical Class II, IV, V, and VI concrete mixtures made with a Miami Oolite limestone, a Georgia granite, and a lightweight aggregate Stalite, including c...

  16. Release of uranium through cataclastic deformation of Mansehra granite gneiss and its precipitation in the overlying intramontane basin in northern Pakistan

    Butt, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Mansehra pluton belongs to a discontinuous belt of two mica granites of the Lesser Himalayas. The Mansehra granite is generally foliated except in the area around Mansehra. Several phases of granitic activity have been reported from the Mansehra Complex. Shams and Rahman have demonstrated that the younger phases tend to be enriched in Na 2 O. Ashraf extensively studied minor bodies ranging from albitites through aplites to pegmatites and suggested a late stage albitization event. The northern edge of this sheet-like granitic mass has undergone extensive cataclastic deformation, resulting in the formation of shear zones, mylonites and cataclasites. A chemical comparison of crushed granite with granite outside the shear zone suggests little chemical reconstitution in terms of major elements during cataclastic deformation. A huge shear zone in albitized granite gneiss has yielded secondary uranium minerals at water seepages, suggesting a liberation of uranium. Hydrogeochemical surveys of the crushed granite and adjoining areas suggest that uranium from crushed granite was easily leachable in comparison with rocks outside the shear zone. The uranium thus liberated was trapped in a Pleistocene sequence of clays and unsorted fluviatile sand overlying the granite and country rock metamorphics. (author). 17 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  17. How Concrete is Concrete?

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics.Key words:  Conceret Learning Materials, School Math, Common Sense, Scaffolding, Communication DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.780.1-14

  18. Factors affecting neutron measurements and calculations. Part E. Hydrogen content in granite

    Komatsubara, Tetsuro; Sasa, Kimikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    For evaluation of radiation doses from the atomic bomb at Hiroshima, many systematic measurements have been made of the residual activities of activation products in rocks and concrete. For the Motoyasu Bridge, which is located close to the bomb hypocenter, the depth profile of 152 Eu was measured in a granite core (Hasai et al. 1987; Shizuma et al. 1997). In order to reproduce the depth profile of the activities, it is important to calculate the neutron scattering and absorption (Endo et al. 1999). In this section, the first result of hydrogen analysis by proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry for the granite samples is described. (author)

  19. 2005 dossier: granite. Tome: architecture and management of the geologic disposal

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in granite formations. Content: 1 - Approach of the study: main steps since the December 30, 1991 law, ANDRA's research program on disposal in granitic formations; 2 - high-level and long-lived (HLLL) wastes: production scenarios, waste categories, inventory model; 3 - disposal facility design in granitic environment: definition of the geologic disposal functions, the granitic material, general facility design options; 4 - general architecture of a disposal facility in granitic environment: surface facilities, underground facilities, disposal process, operational safety; 5 - B-type wastes disposal area: primary containers of B-type wastes, safety options, concrete containers, disposal alveoles, architecture of the B-type wastes disposal area, disposal process and feasibility aspects, functions of disposal components with time; 6 - C-type wastes disposal area: C-type wastes primary containers, safety options, super-containers, disposal alveoles, architecture of the C-type wastes disposal area, disposal process in a reversibility logics, functions of disposal components with time; 7 - spent fuels disposal area: spent fuel assemblies, safety options, spent fuel containers, disposal alveoles, architecture of the spent fuel disposal area, disposal process in a reversibility logics, functions of disposal components with time; 8 - conclusions: suitability of the architecture with various types of French granites, strong design, reversibility taken into consideration. (J.S.)

  20. STUDY ON IMPACT AND TENSILE PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE WITH COCONUT SHELL AS COARSE AGGREGATE

    R. Ranjith*

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of coconut shell aggregate concrete (CSAC) namely splitting tensile strength, impact strength have been determined and a comparison is made with conventional granite aggregate concrete (CGAC) in the 30 days short-term experimental investigation. From the test results it is observed that coconut shell aggregate concrete has considerably sufficient strength. But the splitting tensile strength of coconut shell aggregate concrete is 50 % less than that of conventional gr...

  1. Mechanical properties of Stripa granite

    Stephansson, O.; Swan, G.; Leijon, B.

    1978-01-01

    For the determination of the mechanical properties of Stripa Granite samples were taken from the boreholes in the vicinity of the test site. The granite type taken from these different sources is of variable character. For the purpose of numerical calculations performed in projects related to the waste storage research program the following parameters have been determined: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, compressive fracture stress and expansion coefficient as a function of temperature 20< T<200C; Young's modulus and compressive fracture stress as a function of confining pressure; Brazilian tensile fracture stress; residual shear stress as a function of normal stress; anisotropy ratio for Young's modulus and compressive fracture stress; dilatational wave velocity and deduced dynamic Young's modulus. A brief description of the test methods and the results for each test are presented

  2. High radioactive heat-producing, economically potential granites around Jodhpur city, Malani Igneous Suite, Northwestern India

    Shrivastava, K.L.; Prajapat, Tina; Mathur, Anju; Gaur, Virendra; Dadhich; Mamta Chauhan, C.P.; Tripathi, Beena

    2013-01-01

    In the south and southeast periphery of the desert city of Jodhpur, there are pink and grey granite islands in the desert sand at Fitkasni-Rasida and Salawas-Nandanvan areas of Malani Igneous Suite (Neoproterozoic). We are reporting the average heat generation value of 15.33 HGU for first and 8.83 HGU for the second area that is much higher than the average (3.8 HGU) known for the continental crust. The concentration of uranium determined is two to four times higher than the average continental crust and thorium is still higher than U and K. The radioelement concentration (Ur) varies from 25.06 to 27 in the Salawas-Nandanvan granites and 43.73 to 75.81 in Fitkasni-Rasida granites. It clearly indicates a 'hot crust', hence favourable for the formation of mineralization of HFS elements, Nb, Ce, REE, U and Th, which need yet to be explored. (author)

  3. The Effect of the Kind of Sands and Additions on the Mechanical Behaviour of S.C.C

    Zeghichi, L.; Benghazi, Z.; Baali, L.

    The sand is an inert element essential in the composition of concrete; its use ensures granular continuity between the cement and gravel for better cohesion of concrete. This paper presents the results of a study that investigated the influence of sand quality on the properties of fresh and hardened self-compacting concrete (SCC). The dune sands are very fine materials characterized by a high intergranular porosity, high surface area and low fineness modulus; on the other hand crushed (manufactured) sand has a high rate into thin and irregular shapes which are influencing the workability of concrete. The amount of dune sand varies from (0% 50%, to 100%) by weight of fine aggregates. The effect of additions is also treated (blast furnace slag and lime stone) The results show that the rheological properties favour the use of dune sands; however the mechanical properties support the use of crushed sand.

  4. Thermal expansion behaviour of granites

    Plevová, Eva; Vaculíková, Lenka; Kožušníková, Alena; Ritz, M.; Simha Martynková, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 2 (2016), s. 1555-1561 ISSN 1388-6150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : thermomechanical analysis * differential thermal analysis * granites Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10973-015-4996-z

  5. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: flaviadelclaro@gmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pelé Pequeno Príncipe (IPPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ({sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) and thorium ({sup 232}Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn), radium ({sup 226}Ra), thorium ({sup 232}Th) and potassium ({sup 40}K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m{sup 3} to 2087±19 Bq/m{sup 3}, which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  6. Pervious Concrete

    Torsvik, Øyvind André Hoff

    2012-01-01

    Pervious concrete is a material with a high degree of permeability but generally low strength. The material is primarily used for paving applications but has shown promise in many other areas of usage. This thesis investigates the properties of pervious concrete using normal Norwegian aggregates and practices. An overview of important factors when it comes to designing and producing pervious concrete is the result of this investigation. Several experiments have been performed in the concrete ...

  7. Structural Precast Concrete Handbook

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly.......Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly....

  8. Natural radionuclide distribution in Brazilian commercial granites

    Anjos, R.M.; Veiga, R.; Soares, T.; Santos, A.M.A.; Aguiar, J.G.; Frasca, M.H.B.O.; Brage, J.A.P.; Uzeda, D.; Mangia, L.; Facure, A.; Mosquera, B.; Carvalho, C.; Gomes, P.R.S.

    2005-01-01

    The dimension stones sector in Brazil produces several varieties of granites, marbles, slates and basalts. More than half of this production corresponds to around 200 different commercial types of granites with specific names, geographical and geological origins and mineral compositions. The well-known natural radioactivity present in rocks, where high radiation levels are associated with igneous rocks such as granite, can be used to determine their general petrologic features. This subject is important in environmental radiological protection, since granites are widely used as building and ornamental stones. In this paper, it is applied to correlate the petrographic characteristics of commercial granites with their corresponding dose rates for natural radioactivity. Amounts of thorium, uranium and potassium concentrations have been reported in several Brazilian commercial granite samples

  9. Glazed Concrete

    Bache, Anja Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    Why glazed concrete? Concrete hardens and finds its strength at room temperature whereas clay products must first be fired before they achieve this strength. They are stronger and three times as durable as clay products, which is a weighty reason for choosing concrete.5 Another reason, which....... If this succeeds, it will be possible to manufacture thin, large-scale glazed concrete panels comparable in size to concrete sandwich construction and larger which, with or without back-casting, can work as load-bearing construction elements....

  10. Fracture patterns and stresses in granite

    Price, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    If granite bodies are to be used as receptacles for toxic waste materials, the presence or absence of barren fractures and the virgin stresses in the granite are of fundamental importance. Unfortunately, very little is known regarding the incidence of fractures, or stresses, which exist at depths (of about 1 km) in granite bodies. A simple analysis is presented of a hypothetical intrusion which indicates the magnitudes of stresses and the possible fracture development which may be expected in such bodies. (auth)

  11. Drilling waste makes concrete

    Rosfjord, A.

    1993-01-01

    The article deals with a method of drilling waste reclamation by utilizing the converted oil-containing cuttings from the North Sea in the concrete production in Norway. The oil content is to be removed in an incineration process by heating the cuttings to about 800 o C. The output capacity from the exhaust gas water cooling system is 7500 kW/hour, and is to be used in different industrial heating processes. The remaining content of pollutants in the cleaned exhaust gas outlet corresponds to the required limits with the exception of SO 2 and HCl. In addition, an exhaust gas washing plant is to be installed in the near future designed for the further reduction of pollutants by 90%. The converted raw materials are used as a supplement for lessening the demand of sand and cement in the production of concrete-made pipes. 1 fig

  12. Concrete Hinges

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research...... in concrete hinges was more common different designs were proposed for the geometry and reinforcement. Previous research focused on fatigue, multi-axial stresses around the hinge throat, and the relation between rotation- and moment. But many different test-setups were proposed by different researchers...

  13. Concrete structures

    Setareh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This revised, fully updated second edition covers the analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structures from a real-world perspective. It examines different reinforced concrete elements such as slabs, beams, columns, foundations, basement and retaining walls and pre-stressed concrete incorporating the most up-to-date edition of the American Concrete Institute Code (ACI 318-14) requirements for the design of concrete structures. It includes a chapter on metric system in reinforced concrete design and construction. A new chapter on the design of formworks has been added which is of great value to students in the construction engineering programs along with practicing engineers and architects. This second edition also includes a new appendix with color images illustrating various concrete construction practices, and well-designed buildings. The ACI 318-14 constitutes the most extensive reorganization of the code in the past 40 years. References to the various sections of the ACI 318-14 are pro...

  14. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete.

    Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2010-06-01

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete

    Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2010-01-01

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365 days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility.

  16. Concretes with high mechanical resistance

    Mauny, Pierre.

    1973-01-01

    Description is given of a method for manufacturing concretes with high mechanical resistance in compression, obtained by mixing gravels highly resistant to compression, sand and cement in an aqueous medium. Use is made of sands of porous ceramics, such as terra-cotta, of a grain size from 0,1 to 5mm, the pore diameter of which is from 0.5 to 15 microns, chosen so as to be slighty bigger than the crystals of the cement used. This can be applied to the pre-stressed structures used in the nuclear field [fr

  17. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    Zarime, Nur 'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z.W.

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%–63% and 46%–54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50–2.59 and 2.45–2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35–5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32–5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%–0.34% and 0.39%– 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m 2 /g–21.93 m 2 /g and 25.76 m 2 /g–26.83 m 2 /g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes

  18. POROUS STRUCTURE OF ROAD CONCRETE

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such structural components as crystal intergrowth, tobermorite gel, incompletely hydrated cement grains and porous space. The most important technological factors that influence on formation of cement stone microstructure are chemical and mineralogical cement composition, its grinding fineness, water-cement ratio and curing condition. Specific cement stone microstructure is formed due to interrelation of these factors. Cement stone is a capillary-porous body that consists of various solid phases represented predominantly by sub-microcrystals of colloidal dispersion. The sub-microcrystals are able adsorptively, osmotically and structurally to withhold (to bind some amount of moisture. Protection of road concrete as a capillary-porous body is considered as one of the topical issues. The problem is solved with the help of primary and secondary protection methods. Methods of primary protection are used at the stage of designing, preparation and placing of concrete. Methods of secondary protection are applied at the operational stage of road concrete pavement. The paper considers structures of concrete solid phase and characteristics of its porous space. Causes of pore initiation, their shapes, dimensions and arrangement in the concrete are presented in the paper. The highest hazard for road concrete lies in penetration of aggressive liquid in it and moisture transfer in the cured concrete. Water permeability of concrete characterizes its filtration factor which

  19. Concrete Fibrations

    Pagnan, Ruggero

    2017-01-01

    As far as we know, no notion of concrete fibration is available. We provide one such notion in adherence to the foundational attitude that characterizes the adoption of the fibrational perspective in approaching fundamental subjects in category theory and discuss it in connection with the notion of concrete category and the notions of locally small and small fibrations. We also discuss the appropriateness of our notion of concrete fibration for fibrations of small maps, which is relevant to a...

  20. The Improvement of Thermal Insulating Concrete Panel

    Mohammed Ali Nasser Ali

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Iraqi houses flattening the roof by a concrete panel, and because of the panels on the top directly exposed to the solar radiation become unbearably hot and cold during the summer and winter. The traditional concrete panel components are cement, sand, and aggregate, which have a poor thermal property. The usage of materials with low thermal conductivity with no negative reflects on its mechanical properties gives good improvements to the thermal properties of the concrete panel. The practical part of this work was built on a multi-stage mixing plan. In the first stage the mixing ratio based on the ratios of the sand to cement. The second stage mixing ratios based on replacing the coarse aggregate quantities with the Alabaster aggregates, and the third stage the mixing ratios based on the replacement of wood ash instead of the sand. While the fourth stage mixing ratios based on decreasing the thermal conductivity and increasing mechanical properties by adding a multilayer of a plastic net. The result shows that using a concrete panel with components (cement, sand, coarse aggregate, wood ash, and Alabaster aggregates with a mass ratio of (1:1:2:1:1 and 3-plastic layers, gives the best improvement of the thermal properties. Where, the thermal conductivity is reduced by 42% and the specific heat increased by 41.2% as compared to the traditional concrete panel mixing ratio, with mechanical properties are agreed with the Iraqi standards.

  1. Production and construction technology of C100 high strength concrete filled steel tube

    Wu, Yanli; Sun, Jinlin; Yin, Suhua; Liu, Yu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of the amount of cement, water cement ratio and sand ratio on compressive strength of C100 concrete was studied. The optimum mix ratio was applied to the concrete filled steel tube for the construction of Shenyang Huangchao Wanxin mansion. The results show that the increase of amount of cement, water cement ratio can improve the compressive strength of C100 concrete but increased first and then decreased with the increase of sand ratio. The compressive strength of C100 concrete can reach 110MPa with the amount of cement 600kg/m3, sand ratio 40% and water cement ratio 0.25.

  2. NANOMODIFIED CONCRETE

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in construction material science is the development of  next generation concrete that is ultra-dense, high-strength, ultra-porous, high heat efficient, extra corrosion-resistant. Selection of such direction is caused by extreme operational impacts on the concrete, namely: continuously increasing load on the concrete and various dynamics of such loads; the necessity in operation of concrete products in a wide temperature range and their exposure to various chemical and physical effects.The next generation concrete represents high-tech concrete mixtures with additives that takes on and retain the required properties when hardening and being used under any operational conditions. A differential characteristic of the next generation concrete is its complexity that presumes usage of various mineral dispersed components, two- and three fractional fine and coarse aggregates, complex chemical additives, combinations of polymer and iron reinforcement.Design strength and performance properties level of the next generation concrete is achieved by high-quality selection of the composition, proper selection of manufacturing techniques, concrete curing, bringing the quality of concrete items to the required level of technical condition during the operational phase. However, directed formation of its structure is necessary in order to obtain high-tech concrete.Along with the traditional methods for regulation of the next generation concrete structure, modification of concrete while using silica nanoparticles is also considered as a perspective one because the concrete patterning occurs due to introduction of a binder in a mineral matrix. Due to this it is possible to obtain nano-modified materials with completely new properties.The main problem with the creation of nano-modified concrete is a uniform distribution of nano-materials in the volume of the cement matrix which is particularly important in the cases of adding a modifier in

  3. The research frontier and beyond: granitic terrains

    Twidale, C. R.

    1993-07-01

    Investigations of granite forms and landscapes over the past two centuries suggest that many features, major and minor, are shaped by fracture-controlled subsurface weathering, and particularly moisture-driven alteration: in other words etch forms are especially well represented in granitic terrains. Commonly referred to as two stage forms, many are in reality multistage in origin, for the structural contrasts exploited by weathering and erosion that are essential to the mechanism originated as magmatic, thermal or tectonic events in the distant geological past. Fracture patterns are critical to landform and landscape development in granitic terrains, but other structural factors also come into play. Location with respect to water table and moisture contact are also important. Once exposed and comparatively dry, granite forms tend to stability; they are developed and diversified, and many are gradually destroyed as new, epigene, forms evolve, but many granite forms persist over long ages. Reinforcement effects frequently play a part in landform development. Several granite forms are convergent, i.e. features of similar morphology evolve under the influence of different processes, frequently in contrasted environments. On the other hand many landforms considered to be typical of granitic terrains are also developed in bedrock that is petrologically different but physically similar to granite; and in particular is subdivided by fractures of similar pattern and density. To date, most of the general statements concerning the evolution of granitic terrains have been based in work in the tropics but other climatic settings, and notably those of cold land, are now yielding significant results. Future research will extend and develop these avenues, but biotic factors, and particularly the role of bacteria, in such areas as weathering, will take on a new importance. Structural variations inherited from the magnetic, thermal and tectonic events to which granite bodies have

  4. Recycled construction and demolition concrete waste as aggregate for structural concrete

    Ashraf M. Wagih

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In major Egyptian cities there is a surge in construction and demolition waste (CDW quantities causing an adverse effect on the environment. The use of such waste as recycled aggregate in concrete can be useful for both environmental and economical aspects in the construction industry. This study discusses the possibility to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA in structural concrete. An investigation into the properties of RCA is made using crushing and grading of concrete rubble collected from different demolition sites and landfill locations around Cairo. Aggregates used in the study were: natural sand, dolomite and crushed concretes obtained from different sources. A total of 50 concrete mixes forming eight groups were cast. Groups were designed to study the effect of recycled coarse aggregates quality/content, cement dosage, use of superplasticizer and silica fume. Tests were carried out for: compressive strength, splitting strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the concrete rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate and used in concrete production with properties suitable for most structural concrete applications in Egypt. A significant reduction in the properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC made of 100% RCA was seen when compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC, while the properties of RAC made of a blend of 75% NA and 25% RCA showed no significant change in concrete properties.

  5. Thermal expansion of granite rocks

    Stephansson, O.

    1978-04-01

    The thermal expansion of rocks is strongly controlled by the thermal expansion of the minerals. The theoretical thermal expansion of the Stripa Granite is gound to be 21 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 25 deg C and 38 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 400 deg C. The difference in expansion for the rock forming minerals causes micro cracking at heating. The expansion due to micro cracks is found to be of the same order as the mineral expansion. Most of the micro cracks will close at pressures of the order of 10 - 20 MPa. The thermal expansion of a rock mass including the effect of joints is determined in the pilot heater test in the Stripa Mine

  6. Automated tone grading of granite

    Catalina Hernández, J.C.; Fernández Ramón, G.

    2017-01-01

    The production of a natural stone processing plant is subject to the intrinsic variability of the stone blocks that constitute its raw material, which may cause problems of lack of uniformity in the visual appearance of the produced material that often triggers complaints from customers. The best way to tackle this problem is to classify the product according to its visual features, which is traditionally done by hand: an operator observes each and every piece that comes out of the production line and assigns it to the closest match among a number of predefined classes, taking into account visual features of the material such as colour, texture, grain, veins, etc. However, this manual procedure presents significant consistency problems, due to the inherent subjectivity of the classification performed by each operator, and the errors caused by their progressive fatigue. Attempts to employ automated sorting systems like the ones used in the ceramic tile industry have not been successful, as natural stone presents much higher variability than ceramic tiles. Therefore, it has been necessary to develop classification systems specifically designed for the treatment of the visual parameters that distinguish the different types of natural stone. This paper describes the details of a computer vision system developed by AITEMIN for the automatic classification of granite pieces according to their tone, which provides an integral solution to tone grading problems in the granite processing and marketing industry. The system has been designed to be easily trained by the end user, through the learning of the samples established as tone patterns by the user. [es

  7. Maintenance and preservation of concrete structures. Report 3: Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete

    Liu, T. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory test program on abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete, including the development of a new underwater abrasion-erosion test method. This program was designed to evaluate the relative abrasion-erosion resistance of various materials considered for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures. The test program encompassed three concrete types (conventional concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, and polymer concrete); seven aggregate types (limestone, chert, trap rock, quartzite, granite, siliceous gravel, and slag); three principal water-cement rations (0.72, 0.54, and 0.40); and six types of surface treatment (vacuum, polyurethane coating, acrylic mortar coating, epoxy mortar coating, furan resin mortar coating, and iron aggregate topping). A total of 114 specimens made from 41 batches of concrete was tested. Based on the test data obtained, a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of various parameters on the abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete was presented. Materials suitable for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures were recommended. Additional work to correlate the reported findings with field performance was formulated.

  8. Shear transfer in concrete reinforced with carbon fibers

    El-Mokadem, Khaled Mounir

    2001-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The research started with preliminary tests and studies on the behavior and effect of carbon fibers in different water solutions and mortar/concrete mixes. The research work investigated the use of CF in the production of concrete pipes and prestressed concrete double-tee sections. The research then focused on studying the effect of using carbon fibers on the direct shear transfer of sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens. Findings and conclusions. In general, adding carbon fibers to concrete improved its tensile characteristics but decreased its compressive strength. The decrease in compressive strength was due to the decrease in concrete density as fibers act as three-dimensional mesh that entrapped air. The decrease in compressive strength was also due to the increase in the total surface area of non-cementitious material in the concrete. Sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens with carbon fibers had lower shear carrying capacity than those without carbon fibers for the same cement content in the concrete. Current building codes and specifications estimate the shear strength of concrete as a ratio of the compressive strength. If applying the same principals then the ratio of shear strength to compressive strength for concrete reinforced with carbon fibers is higher than that for concrete without carbon fibers.

  9. Experimental research on the residual mechanical properties of an ordinary concretes after fire

    Santos, C.C.; Rodrigues, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental research to assess the residual mechanical properties of an ordinary concrete after fire. It was studied the influence of the cooling process, the maximum temperature that the concrete was subjected to and the loading level on the residual mechanical properties of calcareous and granite aggregate concretes. The properties studied were the residual compressive, tensile, splitting and flexural strengths and modulus of elasticit...

  10. Two-mica granites of northeastern Nevada.

    Lee, D.E.; Kistler, R.W.; Friedman, I.; Van Loenen, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The field settings are described and analytical data are presented for six two-mica granites from NE Nevada. High delta 18O and 87Sr/86Sr values indicate that all are S-type granite, derived from continental crust. The major element chemistry and accessory mineral contents of these rocks also are characteristic of S-type granites. Chemical, X ray, and other data are presented for the micas recovered from these granites. The muscovites are notably high in Fe2O3, FeO, and MgO. Except for one hydrobiotite, each of the biotites has an MgO content near 6.0 wt%. Two different types of two-mica granites are recognized in the area of this study. One type is distinguished by the presence of many biotite euhedra within muscovite phenocrysts and by an unusual suite of accessory minerals completely devoid of opaque oxides. This type probably resulted from anatexis of late Precambrian argillites under conditions of relatively low oxygen fugacity, along a line that roughly coincides with the westward disappearance of continental basement. In the other textural type of two-mica granite the micas are equigranular and there is a greater variety of accessory minerals. The magmatic evolution of this type also appears to reflect the influence of late Precambrian argillites; there may be age differences between the two types of two-mica granites.-Author

  11. Radiation resistance of concrete of nuclear reactor vessel

    Belyakov, V.V.; Denisov, A.V.; Korenevskij, V.V.; Muzalevskij, L.P.; Dubrovskij, V.B.; Ivanov, D.A.; Nazarov, I.L.; Sashin, N.L.

    1992-01-01

    Results of calculational-experimental determination of radiation resistance for concrete bases on limestone gravel and quartz sand, which are the most perspective materials for manufacturing prestressed concrete of the VG-400 reactor vessel are considered. Material samples under investigation were irradiated in the channels of the IBR-2 research reactor for the purpose of the calcultional result verification

  12. Engineering properties of scoria concrete as a construction material ...

    The weight and cost of plain concrete are part of the setbacks in its use for construction purposes especially in low-cost housing delivery. This paper reports the experimental results of samples of concrete produced from a mix combination of cement, fine aggregate (sand) and volcanic scoria as coarse aggregate. The scoria ...

  13. Utilization of crushed clay brick in cellular concrete production

    Ali A. Aliabdo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research program is to study the effect of using crushed clay brick as an alternative aggregate in aerated concrete. Two series of mixtures were designed to investigate the physico-mechanical properties and micro-structural analysis of autoclave aerated concrete and foamed concrete, respectively. In each series, natural sand was replaced with crushed clay brick aggregate. In both series results showed a significant reduction in unit weight, thermal conductivity and sound attenuation coefficient while porosity has increased. Improvement on compressive strength of autoclave aerated concrete was observed at a percentage of 25% and 50% replacement, while in foamed concrete compressive strength gradually decreased by increasing crushed clay brick aggregate content. A comparatively uniform distribution of pore in case of foamed concrete with natural sand was observed by scanning electron microscope, while the pores were connected mostly and irregularly for mixes containing a percentage higher than 25% clay brick aggregate.

  14. Uranium-enriched granites in Sweden

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by the anatexis of continental crust or processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichment in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (author)

  15. Assessment of the Alteration of Granitic Rocks and its Influence on Alkalis Release

    Ferraz, Ana Rita; Fernandes, Isabel; Soares, Dora; Santos Silva, António; Quinta-Ferreira, Mário

    2017-12-01

    Several concrete structures had shown signs of degradation some years after construction due to internal expansive reactions. Among these reactions there are the alkali-aggregate reactions (AAR) that occur between the aggregates and the concrete interstitial fluids which can be divided in two types: the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR). The more common is the ASR which occurs when certain types of reactive silica are present in the aggregates. In consequence, an expansive alkali-silica gel is formed leading to the concrete cracking and degradation. Granites are rocks composed essentially of quartz, micas and feldspars, the latter being the minerals which contain more alkalis in their structure and thus, able to release them in conditions of high alkalinity. Although these aggregates are of slow reaction, some structures where they were applied show evidence of deterioration due to ASR some years or decades after the construction. In the present work, the possible contribution of granitic aggregates to the interstitial fluids of concrete by alkalis release was studied by performing chemical attack with NaOH and KOH solutions. Due to the heterogeneity of the quarries in what concerns the degree of alteration and/or fracturing, rock samples with different alteration were analysed. The alteration degree was characterized both under optical microscope and image analysis and compared with the results obtained from the chemical tests. It was concluded that natural alteration reduces dramatically the releasable alkalis available in the rocks.

  16. Strength Characteristics of Quarry Dust in Replacement of Sand

    Shyam Prakash, K.; Hanumantha Rao, Ch, Dr

    2017-08-01

    The replacement of natural fine aggregate by using quarry dust leads to consumption of generated quarry dust, the requirement of land fill area can be reduced and solves the natural sand scarcity problem. The sand availability as a fine aggregate at low cost which needs the reason to search as a alternative material. Even it causes saddle to dump the crusher dust at one place which causes environmental pollution. The chemical analysis, specific gravity, sieve analysis and compressive strength is identified for various percentage and grades of concrete by replacement of sand with quarry dust.

  17. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...... will described. In this connection, the procedure for preparation of the soil specimens will be presented, and the actual performance of the tests will be briefly outlined. Finally, the procedure for processing of the measurements from the laboratory in order to obtain usable data will be described. The final...

  18. Determination of dispersity of crushed granite

    Liu Dejun; Fan Xianhua; Zhang Yingjie; Yao Jun; Zhou Duo; Wang Yong

    2004-01-01

    The experimental crushed granite column breakthrough curves, using 99 Tc as spike tracer and 3 H as invariant tracer, are analyzed by different linear regression techniques. Dispersity of crushed granite and retardation factor of 99 TcO 4 - on the crushed granite are determined simultaneously by one linear regression technique. Dispersity of crushed granite is also obtained with 3 H as invariant tracer by the other linear regression technique. The dispersities found by spike source and invariant source methods are compared. The experimental results show that the dispersity found by spike source method is close to that found by invariant source method. It indicates that dispersity is only the characteristic of dispersion medium

  19. Determination of dispersity of crushed granite

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental crushed granite column breakthrough curves, using 99 Tc as spike tracer and 3 H as invariant tracer, were analyzed by different linear regression techniques. Dispersity of crushed granite and the retardation factor of 99 TcO 4 - on the crushed granite were determined simultaneously by one linear regression. Dispersity of crushed granite was also obtained with 3 H as invariant tracer by the other linear regression. The dispersities found by spike source and invariant source methods are compared. Experimental results show that the dispersity found by the spike source method is close to that found by the invariant source method. This indicates that dispersity is only a characteristic of the dispersion medium. (author)

  20. AMS studies in Portuguese variscan granites

    Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Martins, Helena; Noronha, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    A large volume of Variscan granitic rocks outcrop in Central Iberian Zone which are well documented concerning geological mapping, petrography and geochemistry but whose magnetic characteristics and fabric remain unknown. In this study we summarize the available AMS data from approximately 644 sampling stations (5152 samples) on different massifs of Variscan Portuguese granites. Despite their different geological, petrographic and geochemical characteristics, magnetic susceptibility (K) values obtained for the majority of the studied granites range from 15 to 300 × 10-6 SI. The dominant paramagnetic behaviour of the granite bodies reflects the presence of ilmenite as the main iron oxide. This feature indicates the reduced conditions involved in the granite melt formation during the Variscan orogeny. The two-mica granites show K values ranging between 15 to 70 × 10-6 SI which are lower than values displayed by the biotite-rich facies scattered within the interval of 70 and 300 × 10-6 SI. The magnetite-bearing granites are scarce but represented in Lavadores, Gerês and Manteigas. Even so, only the Lavadores body could be considered as a true magnetite-type granite (K >3.0 × 10-3 SI) in face of its K, comprised between 1550 and 19303 × 10-6 SI. Magnetic anisotropy can be used as a "marker" for the deformation experienced by granite mushes during their crustal emplacement and further cooling. Magnetic anisotropy can thus be correlated with the finite deformation of a rock, as record by mineral fabrics. Post-tectonic granites, such as those from Vila Pouca de Aguiar, Pedras Salgadas, Caria, Vila da Ponte, Chaves and Lamas de Olo, have a magnetic anisotropy <2.5% which corresponds to a deformation hardly visible to the naked eye. Nevertheless, at microscopic scale, these granites display almost ubiquitous magmatic to submagmatic microstructures (rare wavy extinction in quartz, erratic subgrain boundaries in quartz and, eventually, folded or kinked biotites). For

  1. Gamma ray attenuation studies in concrete reinforced with coconut shells

    Vishnu, C.V.; Joseph, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Gamma ray absorption studies on wood in general is an area of interest. In Kerala, though coconut tree is a common plantation, a systematic study of gamma ray attenuation in coconut shell has not been reported. In the present study, we have made an attempt to carry out such measurements on coconut shells collected from Trichur district. Coconut shells in to the size of 4cm × 4cm was used in these studies and 662 KeV gamma ray counts were measured using 8K channel NaI(Tl) detector. Subsequently we extended these studies by reinforcing concrete with crushed coconut shells, arranged in a layer by layer fashion. Concrete is usually a choice for shielding nuclear radiations. The effect of reinforcing them with coconut shell is also an area of interest. We have carried out absorption studies by using two types of sand also in the concrete mixture. Common sand is not amply available and people use M-sand (Manufactured sand) instead. In the concrete blocks we selectively used common sand and m-sand and its effects on gamma absorption were also investigated. We have estimated both linear and mass attenuation coefficients and the half value layer (HVL) parameter was determined from them. We have noticed an increase in µ/ρ with increase in density of concrete, achieved through the reinforcement. (author)

  2. The potential use of silica sand as nanomaterials for mortar

    Setiati, N. Retno

    2017-11-01

    The development of nanotechnology is currently experiencing rapid growth. The use of the term nanotechnology is widely applied in areas such as healthcare, industrial, pharmaceutical, informatics, or construction. By the nanotechnology in the field of concrete construction, especially the mechanical properties of concrete are expected to be better than conventional concrete. This study aims to determine the effect of the potential of silica sand as a nanomaterial that is added into the concrete mix The methodology used consist of nanomaterial synthesis process of silica sand using Liquid Polishing Milling Technology (PLMT). The XRF and XRD testing were conducted to determine the composition of silica contained in the silica sand and the level of reactivity of the compound when added into the concrete mix. To determine the effect of nano silica on mortar, then made the specimen with size 50 mm x 50 mm x 50 mm. The composition of mortar is made in two variations, ie by the addition of 3% nano silica and without the addition of nanosilica. To know the mechanical properties of mortar, it is done testing of mortar compressive strength at the age of 28 days. Based on the analysis and evaluation, it is shown that compounds of silica sand in Indonesia, especially Papua reached more than 99% SiO2 and so that the amorphous character of silica sand can be used as a nanomaterial for concrete construction. The results of mechanical tests show that there is an increase of 12% compressive strength of mortar that is added with 3% nano silica.

  3. Influence of granitic aggregates from Northeast Brazil on the alkali-aggregate reaction

    Gomes Neto, David de Paiva; Santana, Rodrigo Soares de; Barreto, Ledjane Silva, E-mail: pvgomes@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias dos Materiais e Engenharia; Conceicao, Herbert; Lisboa, Vinicios Anselmo Carvalho [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia

    2014-08-15

    The alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in concrete structures is a problem that has concerned engineers and researchers for decades. This reaction occurs when silicates in the aggregates react with the alkalis, forming an expanded gel that can cause cracks in the concrete and reduce its lifespan. The aim of this study was to characterize three coarse granitic aggregates employed in concrete production in northeastern Brazil, correlating petrographic analysis with the kinetics of silica dissolution and the evolution of expansions in mortar bars, assisted by SEM/EDS, XRD, and EDX. The presence of grains showing recrystallization into individual microcrystalline quartz subgrains was associated with faster dissolution of silica and greater expansion in mortar bars. Aggregates showing substantial deformation, such as stretched grains of quartz with strong undulatory extinction, experienced slower dissolution, with reaction and expansion occurring over longer periods that could not be detected using accelerated tests with mortar bars. (author)

  4. Limit of the radionuclides in granite

    Wang Shaling; Jiang Rangrong

    2003-01-01

    Granite is an important sort of building materials. Their radionuclide contents are limited by the national standard GB6566-2001 just as other building materials. This standard divides them into main materials and decorative materials, and relaxes the limit of the latter obviously. Owing to the consideration of public dose limit and environment protection, this method needs discussion. Otherwise, red granite contains high radionuclide contents relatively, especially the sort of Indian Red, and need be paid more attention

  5. Granite Exfoliation, Cosumnes River Watershed, Somerset, California

    Crockett, I. Q.; Neiss-Cortez, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Sierra Nevada foothills of California there are many exposed granite plutons within the greater Sierra Nevada batholith. As with most exposed parts of the batholith, these granite slabs exfoliate. It is important to understand exfoliation for issues of public safety as it can cause rock slides near homes, roads, and recreation areas. Through observation, measuring, and mapping we characterize exfoliation in our Cosumnes River watershed community.

  6. Concrete domains

    Kahn, G.; Plotkin, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the theory of a particular kind of computation domains called concrete domains. The purpose of this theory is to find a satisfactory framework for the notions of coroutine computation and sequentiality of evaluation.

  7. Laboratory studies of dune sand for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali; Wijesuriya, Roshan; Abayaweera, Gayan; Viduranga, Tharaka

    2015-04-01

    With the increase of the annual sand demand for the construction industry the excessive excavation of river sand is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the possibility for an alternative to stop or at least to minimize river sand mining activities. Dune sand is one of the available alternative materials to be considered instead of river sand in the country. Large quantities of sand dunes occur mainly along the NW and SE coastal belt which belong to very low rainfall Dry Zone coasts. The height of dune deposits, vary from 1m to about 30 meters above sea level. The objective of this paper is to indicate some studies and facts on the dune sand deposits of Sri Lanka. Laboratory studies were carried out for visual observations and physical properties at the initial stage and then a number of tests were carried out according to ASTM standards to obtain the compressive strength of concrete cylinders and mortar cubes mixing dune sand and river sand in different percentages keeping a constant water cement ratio. Next the water cement ratio was changed for constant dune sand and river sand proportion. Microscopic analysis shows that the dune sand consist of 95 % of quartz and 5 % of garnet, feldspar, illmenite and other heavy minerals with clay, fine dust, fine shell fragments and organic matters. Grains are sub-rounded to angular and tabular shapes. The grain sizes vary from fine to medium size of sand with silt. The degree of sorting and particle size observed with dune sands are more suited with the requirement of fine aggregates in the construction industry. The test result indicates that dune sand could be effectively used in construction work without sieving and it is ideal for wall plastering due to its'-uniformity. It could also be effectively used in concrete and in mortars mixing with river sand. The best mixing ratio is 75% dune sand and 25% river sand as the fine aggregate of concrete. For mortar the mixing

  8. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna; Fraynt Mikhail Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year) and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in t...

  9. Effect of Ground Waste Concrete Powder on Cement Properties

    Xianwei Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste/mortar attached to the recycled aggregate decreases the quality of the aggregate and needs to be stripped. The stripped paste/mortar is roughly 20% to 50% in waste concrete, but relevant research is very limited. In this paper, the effects of ground waste concrete (GWC powder, coming from the attached paste/mortar, on water demand for normal consistency, setting time, fluidity, and compressive strength of cement were analyzed. The results show that the 20% of GWC powder (by the mass of binder has little effect on the above properties and can prepare C20 concrete; when the sand made by waste red clay brick (WRB replaces 20% of river sand, the strength of the concrete is increased by 17% compared with that without WRB sand.

  10. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in the paper according to the US Environmental Protection Agency materials. As an alternative, one can use cement-concrete pavement, which is in many ways more efficient than the bituminous concrete. It is proposed to enhance environmental performance of the cement-concrete pavement via usage of photocatalysis. The mechanism of different photocatalytic reactions is described in the paper, namely heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysis, photo-induces, photoactivated catalysis and catalytical photoreactions. It is pro-posed to use heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst. The mechanism of photo oxidation of air contaminants, with the usage of titanium dioxide is2described. The paper sets problems, connected with the sensibilization of TiOto thevisible light (it is proposed to use titanium dioxide, doped with the atoms of certain elements to increase its sensibility to the visible light and with the development of a new photocatalytic paving concrete, which will meet the requirements, specified for paving in the climatic and traffic conditions of the Russian Federation.

  11. Industrial waste utilization for foam concrete

    Krishnan, Gokul; Anand, K. B.

    2018-02-01

    Foam concrete is an emerging and useful construction material - basically a cement based slurry with at least 10% of mix volume as foam. The mix usually containing cement, filler (usually sand) and foam, have fresh densities ranging from 400kg/m3 to 1600kg/m3. One of the main drawbacks of foam concrete is the large consumption of fine sand as filler material. Usage of different solid industrial wastes as fillers in foam concrete can reduce the usage of fine river sand significantly and make the work economic and eco-friendly. This paper aims to investigate to what extent industrial wastes such as bottom ash and quarry dust can be utilized for making foam concrete. Foam generated using protein based agent was used for preparing and optimizing (fresh state properties). Investigation to find the influence of design density and air-void characteristics on the foam concrete strength shows higher strength for bottom ash mixes due to finer air void distribution. Setting characteristics of various mix compositions are also studied and adoption of Class C flyash as filler demonstrated capability of faster setting.

  12. Self-Placing Concrete

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Certain concrete pours have areas where the congestion of reinforcing bars make placement of concrete almost impossible. Using conventional placing and vibration techniques, the resulting concrete can have considerable honeycombing due to the development of voids. Self-placing concrete is a possible solution to the problem. Also known as self-compactable concrete, self-consolidating concrete, flowable concrete, and non-vibration concrete. These concretes eliminate the need for vibration in a ...

  13. Investigation into relations between physical and electrical properties of rocks and concretes

    Sertçelik, İbrahim; Kurtuluş, Cengiz; Sertçelik, Fadime; Pekşen, Ertan; Aşçı, Metin

    2018-02-01

    The physical and electrical properties of natural rocks, namely limestone, sandstone, amphibolite, arkose, schist, granite, basalt, and concrete were investigated in order to characterize the relationships between these properties. The measurements were conducted on 96 cylindrical specimens of limestone, sandstone, amphibolite, arkose, schist, granite, basalt, and 14 cubic concrete samples. Strong correlations between ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), electrical resistivity, and chargeability were confirmed. High correlation coefficients were observed among the properties, varying between 0.53 and 0.92 for all the rocks and concrete. Test results show the following relations among the corresponding parameters: the UPV increases with the increase in UCS, resistivity decreases with the decrease in chargeability for all rocks and concrete, and the electrical resistivities of rock and concrete decrease with the increase in chargeability.

  14. Rn-222 release to the environment: comparison between different granite sources

    Mamoon, M.; Kamal, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work three different types of granites were studied, namely: pure granite, alkali granite and altered (hydrated) alkali granite. General radioactivity of the granites was studied along with the potential for 222 Rn emanation. The study indicated that altered alkali granite releases, relatively, the highest 222 Rn emanation to the surrounding air while alkali granite emits the more intense gamma radiation of the three granites. Hence, altered alkali granite can be used as a laboratory source for 222 Rn.

  15. Provenance analyses of the heavy mineral beach sands of the ...

    18

    Annaba displays an average temperature of 18.4 °C throughout the year. Rain fall averages 712 mm .... Concrete slabs cover the back of the shoreline. Only a ..... The rare earth element behavior of whole sand and rock. In order to identify the ...

  16. Engineering Geological Properties of Oil-Contaminated Granitic and Meta sedimentary Soils

    Zulfahmi Ali Rahman; Umar Hamzah; Noorulakma Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbon is a light-non aqueous phase liquid or known as LNAPL. It poses environmental hazard if accidentally spilled out into the soil and water systems as a result of its insoluble nature in water. LNAPL component infiltrates into soil through pore spaces and afloat at the top of groundwater level. Some of this hydrocarbon would trap and clog within the voids, difficult to remove and costly to clean. The occurrence of hydrocarbon in the soil definitely degraded the behaviour of soils in terms of engineering properties. This study aimed to investigate the engineering properties of oil-contaminated soil for two different residual soils originally developed from in-situ weathering of granitic and meta sedimentary rocks. The physical characterisations of the soil were determined including particle size distribution, specific gravity test and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The engineering parameters for the contaminated and uncontaminated soils were Atterberg limits, compaction and soil shear strength (UU tests). The amounts of hydrocarbon added to soil were varied at 0 %, 4 %, 8 %, 12 % and 16 % of dried weight of soil samples. The results from the particle size distribution analysis showed that residual soil from granitic rock comprises of 38 % sand, 33 % silt and 4 % clay while meta sedimentary soil consists of 4 % sand, 43 % silt dan 29 % clay. The mean values of specific gravity for the granitic and meta sedimentary soils were 2.56 and 2.61, respectively. The types of minerals present in granitic soil sample were quartz, kaolinite and gibbsite while meta sedimentary soil consists of quartz and kaolinite. The Atterberg limits value decreased as a result of increasing amount of added hydrocarbon into the soil. A similar behavior was observed with the values of maximum dry density and optimum water content with increasing hydrocarbon content. The overall unconsolidated undrained shear strength, C u showed a decreasing trend with the increase in hydrocarbon content

  17. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  18. Influence of uncoated and coated plastic waste coarse aggregates to concrete compressive strength

    Purnomo Heru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of plastic waste as coarse aggregates in concrete is part of efforts to reduce environmental pollution. In one hand the use of plastic as aggregates can provide lighter weight of the concrete than concrete using natural aggregates, but on the other hand bond between plastic coarse aggregates and hard matrix give low concrete compressive strength. Improvement of the bond between plastic coarse aggregate and hard matrix through a sand coating to plastic coarse aggregate whole surface is studied. Sand used to coat the plastic aggregates are Merapi volcanic sand which are taken in Magelang. Three mixtures of polypropylene (PP coarse plastic aggregates, Cimangkok river sand as fine aggregates, water and Portland Cement Composite with a water-cement ratio of 0.28, 0.3 and 0.35 are conducted. Compression test are performed on concrete cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 10 cm and a height of 20 cm. The results in general show that concrete specimens using plastic aggregates coated with sand have higher compressive strength compared to those of concrete specimens using plastic aggregates without sand coating. The bond improvement is indirectly indicated by the betterment of concrete compressive strength.

  19. Age of Pedra Branca granite (Goias) and possible geotectonic implications

    Marini, O.J.; Botelho, N.F.; Macambira, M.J.B.; Provost, A.

    1986-01-01

    Rb-Sr geochronologic dating of granites from the Pedra Branca Granite Massif (Nova Roma, Goias) shown an age of 1405 ± 21My. and a questionable initial Sr 87 /Sr 86 ratio of 0,7004 ± 0,006. Rhyolite from the base of the Arai Group is probably of the same age as the granitic intrusion. The 475 ± 19 My. age for the granitic intrusion is evidence of the Brasiliano Cycle imprint in Pedra Branca region. The age attributed to the Pedra Branca Granite is lower than known ages of the Goias tin granites giving rise to new geotectonic interpretations. It is possible that the Pedra Branca Granite represents a low-level intrusion emplaced at the beginning of structuration and deposition of the Arai basin. It may be correlated with granitic intrusions related to a rift stage above mantle hot spots, like the Nigerian tin younger granites. (author)

  20. Impact of recycled gravel obtained from low or medium concrete grade on concrete properties

    Yasser Abdelghany Fawzy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of recycled gravel obtained from low (Gl or medium (Gm concrete grade on fresh property of concrete (slump, mechanical properties (compressive-splitting tensile strength and mass transport properties (ISAT-sorptivity of concrete containing dolomite as a natural coarse aggregate. Concrete specimens were prepared with cement, water, sand and dolomite admixed with recycled gravel. The percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite was 0:100, 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at w/c = 0.50, 0.55 and 0.60. The effect of silica fume and bonding admixture at w/c = 0.55 on concrete properties were also considered. The results indicated that, increasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite led to decreasing the slump. All mechanical properties of concrete discussed were inversely affected by increasing percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite from low and medium concrete. Adding 10% SF or bonding admixture increased the mechanical properties of concrete. Mass transport properties of concrete (ISAT-sorptivity were enhanced by decreasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite. The optimum percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite = 25%. Keywords: Recycled gravel, Concrete, Silica fume, Compressive strength, Mass transport

  1. Rare metal granites and related rocks of the Ukrainian shield

    Esipchuk, K.Ye.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Two rare metal leucocratic granites, Perga and Kamennaya complexes, can be distinquished on the Ukrainian shield. The Perga complex consists of medium- and coarse grained, mainly porphyric, biotite, riebeckite and aegirine granites, granite porphyries, microclinites and albitites with rare metal mineralization (genthelvite, phenacite, tantalite, cassiterite and wolframite etc.. Granites from several stocks (up to 30 km2 in the northwestern part of the shield, situated along the fracture zone, restricted the large Korosten pluton of rapakivi granites to the northwest. The age of these granites (Pb-Pb and U-Pb methods on zircon and monazite practically coincide with the age of rapakivi granites being 1750 Ma. Within the Korosten complex of rapakivi granites we consider that zinnwaldite granites, which are characterized by fluorite and topazine mineralization, represent the final phase of pluton. These granites differ from the Perga ones by their low content of rare metals. The Kamennaya Mogila complex lies in the southeastern part of the Ukrainian shield. It consists of biotite and muscovite-biotite, medium- and coarse-grained (also porphyric, and occasionally greisining granites with rare metal mineralization (cassiterite, columbite, molybdenite, wolframite and beryl. Granites form several stocks (5-30 km2 situated 10-30 km to the west-northwest of the South-Kalchik gabbro-syenite-granite pluton. Granitoids in both of these complexes have similar isotopic ages (1800 Ma. Leucocratic subalkaline granites (the Novoyanisol type are known within the pluton itself, occupying an intermediate position between the above mentioned in terms of mineral and geochemical composition. The gabbro-syenite-granite formation of the Nearazov region has a substantial similarity to the anorthosite-rapakivi-granite formation. In this respect the relation of each of them to rare metal granites is rather remarkable. This relation is, most probably, not only spatial, but

  2. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  3. PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN GRANITE WORKERS

    Srilakshmi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS has significantly increased over the last few decades and has become a main health challenge worldwide. Prevalence of MS is quickly rising in developing countries due to changing lifestyle. It was considered worthwhile to study MS and its components in granite workers since granite factories are situated in and around Khammam area. Moreover, no studies of MS in granite workers have been reported in literature. OBJECTIVES: Aim of our study is to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in granite workers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 210 male workers in the age group of 20 - 50 working in granite industries located in and around the Khammam town of Telangana State are selected for the present study. Blood pressures (BP, waist circumference (WC were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected for the estimation of glucose and lipids. RESULTS: 69 subjects out of 210 were identified as having MS based on updated National cholesterol education programme - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP - ATP III guidelines. CONCLUSION: MS should be identified and remedial measures may be suggested, so that the risk of hypertension, cardiovascular risk, diabetes and the resultant morbidity is minimized and can be delayed

  4. Radiometric analysis of Chinese commercial granites

    Xinwei, L.; Lingqing, W.; Xiaodan, J.

    2006-01-01

    Due to the widespread use of granites as building and ornamental materials, measurements of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K activities in commercial granites have been carried out using a NaI(Tl) γ-ray spectrometer with a matrix-inversion-based spectral stripping technique. The concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in Chinese commercial granite range from 14.5 to 204.7 Bq x kg -1 , 16.7 to 186.7 Bq x kg -1 and 185.7 to 1745.6 Bq x kg -1 , respectively. The mean values of the activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in red and pink commercial granites are all higher than those in black and gray commercial ones. The radium equivalent activity (Ra eq ), the external hazard index (H ex ), the internal hazard index (H in ) and the annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) were also calculated and compared to the international recommended values. Six types of red commercial granites (CBR, MLR, QXR, PBR, JXR, LQR, YDR and TSR) of China do not satisfy the universal standards. (author)

  5. Influence of uncoated and coated plastic waste coarse aggregates to concrete compressive strength

    Purnomo Heru; Pamudji Gandjar; Satim Madsuri

    2017-01-01

    The use of plastic waste as coarse aggregates in concrete is part of efforts to reduce environmental pollution. In one hand the use of plastic as aggregates can provide lighter weight of the concrete than concrete using natural aggregates, but on the other hand bond between plastic coarse aggregates and hard matrix give low concrete compressive strength. Improvement of the bond between plastic coarse aggregate and hard matrix through a sand coating to plastic coarse aggregate whole surface is...

  6. Investigation and assessment of lead slag concrete as nuclear shields

    Zaghloul, Y.R.

    2009-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the efficiency of heavy weight concrete as a shielding material in constructing nuclear installations as well as for radioactive wastes disposal facilities.In this context, lead slag was used as a replacement for fine aggregates in heavy concrete shields that include local heavy weight aggregates (namely; barite and ilmenite) as well as normal concrete includes dolomite and sand as coarse and fine aggregates, as a reference. The effect of different percentages of lead slag was investigated to assess the produced lead slag concrete as a nuclear shielding material. The different properties (physical, mechanical and nuclear) of the produced lead slag concrete were investigated. The results obtained showed that increasing the lead slag percentage improving the investigated properties of the different concrete mixes. In addition, ilmenite concrete with 20% lead slag showed the best results for all the investigated properties.

  7. Influence of wollastonite on mechanical properties of concrete

    Renu Mathur; A.K. Misra; Pankaj Goel

    2007-12-15

    Studies were made on cement concrete and cement-fly ash concrete mixes incorporating wollastonite as partial substitute of cementitious material and sand respectively. Improvements in compressive (28-35%) and flexural strength (36-42%) at 28 and 56 days respectively were observed by incorporation of wollastonite (10%) in concrete mixes. By incorporation of wollastonite, reduction in water absorption, drying-shrinkage and abrasion loss of concrete, and enhancement in durability against alternate freezing-thawing and sulphate attack were observed. Because of high concrete strength and abrasion resistance, a better utilization of concrete cross section is possible. Alternatively, thickness of pavement slab can be reduced by incorporation of wollastonite micro-fibres in concrete mixes.

  8. Concrete durability

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-01-01

    The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of rese...

  9. Singing Sand Dunes

    ble low-frequency (s. 75–105 Hz), that can some- times be heard up to 10 km away. Scientific in- vestigations suggest that the sustained low fre- quency sound of sand dunes that resembles a pure note from a musical instrument, is due to the synchronized motion of well-sorted dry sand grains when they spontaneously ...

  10. Historic Concrete : From Concrete Repair to Concrete Conservation

    Heinemann, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete like materials were already applied during the Roman Empire. After the decline of the Roman Empire, a wide scale application of concrete only reappeared in the 19th century. Here lies also the origin of modern (reinforced) concrete. Since then, both concrete application and composition have

  11. New generation expandable sand screens

    Syltøy, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering This thesis aims to give a general insight into sand control and various sorts of sand control measures and applications of sand control tools. Special focus will be given to expandable sand screens – a technology which came about in the late 1990’s through the use of flexible, expandable tubulars as base pipe in sand screens. More specifically Darcy’s Hydraulic Endurance Screens, a compliant sand screen system using hydraulic activation, and the fu...

  12. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic rocks from ...

    Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic ... This study presents the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks located on the northern ... Frost and Frost 2013). ...... King P L, White A J R, Chappell B W and Allen C M 1997.

  13. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    Fontana, Jack J.; Reams, Walter

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  14. The optimum content of rubber ash in concrete: flexural strength

    Senin, M. S.; Shahidan, S.; Shamsuddin, S. M.; Ariffin, S. F. A.; Othman, N. H.; Rahman, R.; Khalid, F. S.; Nazri, F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Discarded scrap tyres have become one of the major environmental problems nowadays. Several studies have been carried out to reuse waste tires as an additive or sand replacement in concrete with appropriate percentages of tire rubber, called as rubberized concrete to solve this problem. The main objectives of this study are to investigate the flexural strength performance of concrete when adding the rubber ash and also to analyse the optimum content of rubber ash in concrete prisms. The performance total of 30 number of concrete prisms in size of 100mm x 100mm x 500 mm were investigated, by partially replacement of rubber ash with percentage of 0%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9% from the volume of the sand. The flexural strength is increased when percentage of rubber ash is added 3% from control concrete prism, RA 0 for both concrete prism age, 7 days and 28 days with value 1.21% and 0.976% respectively. However, for RA 5, RA 7 and RA 9, the flexural strength was decreased compared to the control for both age, 7 days and 28 days. In conclusion, 3% is the optimum content of rubber ash in concrete prism for both concrete age

  15. Tasmanian tin and tungsten granites - their radiometric characteristics

    Yeates, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    A radiometric survey of Tasmanian granites has shown, with one exception, that tin and tungsten-bearing granites have high radioactivity, largely owing to increased uranium. Many have a high uranium/thorium ratio as well. Radiometric measurements can also delineate different granite types within composite bodies

  16. Research for the development of the crushed sand (II)

    Park, Chul Whan; Kang, Sun Duck; Min, Jeong Sik; Synn, Joong Ho; Park, Chan [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    The sand obtained from river is not sufficient in amount for the demand of construction industry. The production of sand from sea and mountain is rapidly increasing for the substitution of the river sand. The industry of the crushed sand has recently been bricked for the above. Crushing, classification and dewatering are the main processes in the crushed sand production. This report concentrates the improvement of classification technology and the quality of ready mixed concrete. Air separator with testing size for the classification in the process of dry system was developed by the Yeung Nam university. This plant has the excellent efficiency for the collection of fine powder, but needs the improvement for separating function. The collection efficiency of the testing size air separator is reached to 99% in the condition of high revolution and low feeding speed. The classification efficiency is checked about 50% maximum in the condition of 200 rpm and dry sample. Energy saving test was carried out in the production process of the dry system with the rock samples of 14-17% of water content. The classification efficiency for dewatering sample passed the heating process was analysed 91.5%. But that for high water content sample skipped the heating process was analysed more or less 77%. Even though the heating process causes the classification efficiency being high, the energy consumption can also cause the price of the crushed sand high. Water content of sample as the effective element for the optimization of classification efficiency and energy saving should be studied next year. The quality of crushed sand in the mixing design. The test was carried out with the various content in mixing, the strength of ready mixed concrete has the maximum for the mould with 50-60% content of crushed sand. This strength is higher by 5-30% than 30% content and by 20-32% than 0% content, which means that the industry has the possibility of progress. (author). 10 refs., 31 tabs., 49

  17. Processing and finishing of granite surfaces

    Klich, J. (Jiří); Hlaváček, P. (Petr); Ščučka, J. (Jiří); Sitek, L. (Libor); Foldyna, J. (Josef); Georgiovská, L. (Lucie); Souček, K. (Kamil); Staš, L. (Lubomír); Bortolussi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with granite surface processing and finishing by various methods including bush hammering, flaming, polishing, continuous and pulsating water jetting. Both optical and CT X-ray methods are used for analysis of surface and subsurface areas of tested samples. Advantages of pulsating water jetting compared to other techniques are discussed.

  18. High Performance Concrete

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  19. Retention and radionuclide migration mechanisms in the environment of a radioactive waste repository in granitic formation

    Rancon, D.; Miara, P; Vinson, J.M.; Petronin, J.C.; Dozol, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    A laboratory pre-determination of retention mechanisms of radionuclides migrating outside the primary waste containers in repository surroundings was started up. Backfillings materials (clay and sand) as well as granite and its weathering products are concerned here. A method allowing the evaluation of the sorption and desorption of radionuclides of the surfaces of fractures by measuring surface retention coefficients, had initially been started up as well as a laboratory device developed for experiments in a reducing environment. The experiments have consisted of studying the sorbing properties of granite minerals of Auriat and its weathering products and of determining the retention of Np, Pu, AM, CS and Sr on the surface fractures of this granite. The influence of a reducing environment on the behaviour of activities has been studied. Complementary percolation tests have also been carried out on clays, at raised temperature and under irradiation. These experiments have enabled a deeper knowledge of retention mechanisms, the taking of parametric sensitivity measurements and the preparation of elaborating more performing experimental devices which included the parameters needed for a realistic simulation of transfer phenomena

  20. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  1. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  2. Concrete spirituality

    Kritzinger, Johannes N.J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on a number of liturgical innovations in the worship of Melodi ya Tshwane, an inner-city congregation of the Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa (URCSA). The focus of the innovations was to implement the understanding of justice in Article 4 of the Confession of Belhar, a confessional standard of the URCSA. The basic contention of the article is that well designed liturgies that facilitate experiences of beauty can nurture a concrete spirituality to mobilise urba...

  3. Review of coal bottom ash and coconut shell in the production of concrete

    Faisal, S. K.; Mazenan, P. N.; Shahidan, S.; Irwan, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    Concrete is the main construction material in the worldwide construction industry. High demand of sand in the concrete production have been increased which become the problems in industry. Natural sand is the most common material used in the construction industry as natural fine aggregate and it caused the availability of good quality of natural sand keep decreasing. The need for a sustainable and green construction building material is required in the construction industry. Hence, this paper presents utilization of coal bottom ash and coconut shell as partial sand replacement in production of concrete. It is able to save cost and energy other than protecting the environment. In summary, 30% usage of coal bottom ash and 25% replacement of coconut shell as aggregate replacement show the acceptable and satisfactory strength of concrete.

  4. Screening of mine dirt as addition to concrete. Description of testing plant. Results

    Gnodtke, M

    1977-08-01

    An experimental facility for screening mine dirt during haulage operations is described. The screening material, adding sand and a binder, can be made into a concrete aggregate at low costs and used as backfilling material.

  5. Retorting of bituminous sands

    Chaney, P E; Ince, R W; Mason, C M

    1872-09-26

    This method of recovering oil from mined tar sands involves forming compacted tar sands pieces by special conditioning treatment that provides low internal permeability. The compacted pieces are then retorted in fixed bed form. The conditioning treatment can involve rolling of preformed pellets, compaction in a mold or pressure extrusion. Substantial collapsing of the bed during retorting is avoided. (9 claims) (Abstract only - original article not available from T.U.)

  6. Durability of heavyweight concrete containing barite

    Binici, Hanifi

    2010-01-01

    The supplementary waste barite aggregates deposit in Osmaniye, southern Turkey, has been estimated at around 500 000 000 tons based on 2007 records. The aim of the present study is to investigate the durability of concrete incorporating waste barite as coarse and river sand (RS), granule blast furnace slag (GBFS), granule basaltic pumice (GBP) and ≤ 4 mm granule barite (B) as fine aggregates. The properties of the fresh concrete determined included the air content, slump, slump loss and setting time. They also included the compressive strength, flexural and splitting tensile strengths and Young's modulus of elasticity, resistance to abrasion and sulphate resistance of hardened concrete. Besides these, control mortars were prepared with crushed limestone aggregates. The influence of waste barite as coarse aggregates and RS, GBFS, GBP and B as fine aggregates on the durability of the concretes was evaluated. The mass attenuation coefficients were calculated at photon energies of 1 keV to 100 GeV using XCOM and the obtained results were compared with the measurements at 0.66 and 1.25 MeV. The results showed the possibility of using these waste barite aggregates in the production of heavy concretes. In several cases, some of these properties have been improved. Durability of the concrete made with these waste aggregates was improved. Thus, these materials should be preferably used as aggregates in heavyweight concrete production. (orig.)

  7. Engineering Behavior of Concrete with Recycled Aggregate

    Ayob Afizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is extensively used as construction materials in Malaysia. Concrete contributes suitable feature for construction industry for instance durability, adequate compressive strength, fire resistance, availability and is economic as compared to other construction materials. Depletion of natural resources and disposal of construction and demolition waste remarkably claim environmental threat. In this paper, the engineering behavior, durability, and concrete microstructure of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA on short-term concrete properties were investigated. The studied concrete at design mix proportion of 1:0.55:2.14:2.61 (weight of cement :coarse aggregates :sand :water used to obtain medium-high compressive strength with 20%, 50%, and 100% of RCA. Results show that for the same water/cement ratio, RCA replacement up to 50% still achieved the targeted compressive strength of 25 MPa at 28 curing days. Addition, at similar RCA replacement, the highest carbonation depth value was found at 1.03 mm which could be attributed to the pozzolanic reaction, thus led to lower carbonation resistance. Scanning electron microscopy microstructure shows that the RCA surface was porous and covered with loose particles. Moreover, the interfacial transition zone was composed of numerous small pores, micro cracks, and fissures that surround the mortar matrix. On the basis of the obtained results, recommendable mineral admixtures of RCA are necessary to enhance the quality of concrete construction.

  8. Experimental study of a foam concrete based on local Tunisian materials

    Ellouze Dorra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The building sector in Tunisia is very energy-intensive, the largest share of energy consumption comes from factories of building materials namely brick and cement plants. This work is part of the reduction of the energy bill in the building envelope. Indeed, the foam concrete can be walls in single or double wall with better insulating power. This paper presents an experimental study on the technical problems related to the formulation and manufacture of a new cellular concrete in Tunisia, called "foam" concrete, from Tunisian local materials. Indeed, six varieties of sand of different provenance and grain size will be analyzed, the "good" sand is the one that is best suited for the manufacture of foam concrete. Two clean, fine-grained (0/2mm rolled grain sands were retained. Then four foam concretes were formulated using each time a single type of sand and varying the density namely 0.8 and 1. These four formulations were tested mechanically and thermally. The results found showed that compressive strengths do not exceed 1.5 MPa at 28 days. Thus, the foam concrete can be used only as a filling concrete in non-load bearing elements such as partition walls. The guarded hot plate method was used to determine the thermal conductivities of the four foamed concretes studied. A low thermal conductivity was found of the order of 0.22 W/m°K which prove the insulating power of foam concrete.

  9. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  10. Absorption de l’eau et son effet sur la durabilité des bétons de sable allégés par ajout de copeaux de bois Water absorption and its effect on the durability of sand concrete lightened by the addition of wood shavings

    Quéneudec M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available L’objectif principal de ce travail est d’étudier l’effet de l’eau sur les bétons de sable léger à base de matériaux et de déchets locaux. Les matériaux utilisés sont un sable de dune et un sable d’oued et les déchets sont des fillers calcaires (déchets de concassage et des copeaux de bois (déchets de la menuiserie [1, 2]. En général, on a remarqué que dans le cas de copeaux de bois non traités, plus le taux de bois est élevé, plus l’absorption d’eau est importante, que ce soit par immersion ou par capillarité. En soumettant le matériau à une série de cycles “mouillage – séchage” accélérés, une légère diminution dans la résistance à la compression a été enregistrée. Par ailleurs, le traitement des copeaux de bois avant leur utilisation [3] a considérablement amélioré la résistance vis à vis de ces cycles “mouillage-séchage”. De même, l’absorption d’eau, par immersion et par capillarité, a été considérablement diminuée. Il convient de noter enfin, que ces résultats viennent confirmer la possibilité d’utilisation de ce matériau montrée par les résultats encourageants trouvés dans les travaux précédents, telles que les propriétés mécaniques et thermiques. The main objective of this work is to study the effect of water on lightweight sand concrete based on local materials and wastes The materials used are dune sand and river sand and the wastes are limestone fillers (aggregates crushing waste and wood shavings (wood work activities wastes [1, 2]. It was generally noted that in the case of untreated wood shavings, the higher the wood content, more important the water absorption, whether by immersion or by capillarity. By subjecting the material to a series of accelerated "wet – dry cycling", a slight decrease in compressive strength was recorded. Moreover, the treatment of wood shavings before their use [3] had greatly improved the resistance with respect to these

  11. Identification of granite varieties from colour spectrum data.

    Araújo, María; Martínez, Javier; Ordóñez, Celestino; Vilán, José Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The granite processing sector of the northwest of Spain handles many varieties of granite with specific technical and aesthetic properties that command different prices in the natural stone market. Hence, correct granite identification and classification from the outset of processing to the end-product stage optimizes the management and control of stocks of granite slabs and tiles and facilitates the operation of traceability systems. We describe a methodology for automatically identifying granite varieties by processing spectral information captured by a spectrophotometer at various stages of processing using functional machine learning techniques.

  12. Portuguese granites associated with Sn-W and Au mineralizations

    Ana M.R. Neiva

    2002-01-01

    In northern and central Portugal, there are different tin-bearing granites. Most of them are of S-type, others have mixed characteristics of I-type and S-type granites and a few are of I-type. Tin-tungsten deposits are commonly associated with Hercynian tin-bearing S-type granites. Some quartz veins with wolframite are associated with an I-type granite, which has a low Sn content. In suites of tin-bearing S-type granitic rocks, Sn content increases as a function of the degree of fractional cr...

  13. Achieving Mixtures of Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Mircea POPA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC is a relatively new concrete. According to [11] UHPC is that concrete which features compressive strength over C100/115 class. Up to this point standards for this type of concrete were not adopted, although its characteristic strength exceeds those specified in [33]. Its main property is high compressive strength. This provides the possibility of reducing the section of elements (beams or columns made of this type of concrete, while the load capacity remains high. The study consists in blending mixtures of UHPC made of varying proportions of materials. The authors have obtained strengths of up to 160 MPa. The materials used are: Portland cement, silica fume, quartz powder, steel fibers, superplasticiser, sand and crushed aggregate for concrete - andesite.

  14. Development of treatment technology for radioactive concrete wastes

    Min, B. Y.; Choi, W. K.; Lee, K. W., E-mail: bymin@kaeri.re.k [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 Republic of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this study was the separation of clean aggregates from contaminated dismantling concrete wastes by thermal and mechanical processes. In Korea, the decontamination and decommissioning of the retired Korea research reactor (KRR) and a uranium conversion plant (UCP) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been under way. Hundreds of tons of concrete wastes are expected from these facilities. The KAERI has developed volume reduction technology applicable to an activated heavy concrete waste generated by dismantling KRR-2 and a uranium contaminated light weight concrete produced from a UCP. Contamination level of the gravel and sand aggregates was remarkably decreased by thermal and mechanical process. The volume reduction rate could be achieved above 70% for KRR-2 concrete waste and above to 80% for the UCP concrete waste. (Author)

  15. PCE and BNS admixture adsorption in sands with different composition and particle size distribution

    Alonso, M.M.; Martínez-Gaitero, R.; Gismera-Diez, S.; Puertas, F.

    2017-01-01

    The choice of a superplasticiser (SP) for concrete is of great complexity, as it is well known that properties of the end product are related to admixture and its compatibility with concrete components. Very few studies have been conducted on the compatibility between SPs and the sand of mortars and concretes, however. Practical experience has shown that sand fineness and mineralogical composition affect water demand and admixture consumption. Clay-containing sand has been found also to adsorb SPs, reducing the amount available in solution for adsorption by the cement. This study analysed the isotherms for PCE and BNS superplasticiser adsorption on four sands with different fineness and compositions commonly used to prepare mortars and concretes. BNS-based SP did not adsorb on sands, while PCE-based admixtures exhibited variable adsorption depending on different factors. The adsorption curves obtained revealed that the higher the sand fineness, the finer the particle size distribution and the higher the clay material, the greater was PCE admixture adsorption/ consumption. [es

  16. PCE and BNS admixture adsorption in sands with different composition and particle size distribution

    M. M. Alonso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a superplasticiser (SP for concrete is of great complexity, as it is well known that properties of the end product are related to admixture and its compatibility with concrete components. Very few studies have been conducted on the compatibility between SPs and the sand of mortars and concretes, however. Practical experience has shown that sand fineness and mineralogical composition affect water demand and admixture consumption. Clay-containing sand has been found also to adsorb SPs, reducing the amount available in solution for adsorption by the cement. This study analysed the isotherms for PCE and BNS superplasticiser adsorption on four sands with different fineness and compositions commonly used to prepare mortars and concretes. BNS-based SP did not adsorb on sands, while PCE-based admixtures exhibited variable adsorption depending on different factors. The adsorption curves obtained revealed that the higher the sand fineness, the finer the particle size distribution and the higher the clay material, the greater was PCE admixture adsorption/ consumption.

  17. Effect of Bacillus subtilis on Granite Weathering: A Laboratory Experiment

    Song, W.; Ogawa, N.; Oguchi, C. T.; Hatta, T.; Matsukura, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We performed a comparative experiment to investigate how the ubiquitous soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis weathers granite and which granite-forming minerals weather more rapidly via biological processes. Batch type experiments (granite specimen in a 500 ml solution including NaCl, glucose, yeast extract and bacteria Bacillus subtilis at 27°E C) were carried out for 30 days. Granite surfaces were observed by SEM before and after the experiment. Bacillus subtilis had a strong influence on granite weathering by forming pits. There were 2.4 times as many pits and micropores were 2.3 times wider in granite exposed to Bacillus subtilis when compared with bacteria-free samples. Bacillus subtilis appear to preferentially select an optimum place to adhere to the mineral and dissolve essential elements from the mineral to live. Plagioclase was more vulnerable to bacterial weathering than biotite among the granite composing minerals.

  18. 2005 dossier: granite. Tome: phenomenological evolution of the geologic disposal

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the phenomenological aspects of the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes (HLLL) in granite formations. Content: 1 - introduction: ANDRA's research program on disposal in granitic formation; 2 - the granitic environment: geologic history, French granites; 3 - HLLL wastes and disposal design concepts; 4 - identification, characterization and modeling of a granitic site: approach, geologic modeling, hydrologic and hydro-geochemical modeling, geomechanical and thermal modeling, long-term geologic evolution of a site; 5 - phenomenological evolution of a disposal: main aspects of the evolution of a repository with time, disposal infrastructures, B-type wastes disposal area, C-type wastes disposal area; spent fuels disposal area, radionuclides transfer and retention in the granitic environment; 6 - conclusions: available knowledge, methods and tools for the understanding and modeling of the phenomenological evolution of a granitic disposal site. (J.S.)

  19. Mud concrete paving block for pedestrian pavements

    Chameera Udawattha

    2017-12-01

    This is an attempt to search for alternative eco-friendly earth paving material for public walkways with both the strength and durable properties of concrete while ensuring pedestrian comfort. Approaches were made to change the fine particle percentage while keeping the sand and gravel constant, once the optimum most practical mixture was known, the standard tests were done. The results obtained revealed that the proposed self-compacting block can be produced by using soil with less than 5% fine particles, 55% of 65% sand particles and 18% of 22% cement by weight together with the moisture content between 14% and 15%The tested mud concrete paving blocks were already used in practical application in Sri Lankan urban context.

  20. SHAPE ANALYSIS OF FINE AGGREGATES USED FOR CONCRETE

    HE, Huan; Courard, Luc; Pirard, Eric; Michel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Fine aggregate is one of the essential components in concrete and significantly influences the material properties. As parts of natures, physical characteristics of fine aggregate are highly relevant to its behaviors in concrete. The most of previous studies are mainly focused on the physical properties of coarse aggregate due to the equipment limitations. In this paper, two typical fine aggregates, i.e. river sand and crushed rock, are selected for shape characterization. The new developed d...

  1. Polymer concrete reinforced with recycled-tire fibers: Mechanical properties

    Martínez-Cruz, E.; Martínez-Barrera, G.; Martínez-López, M.

    2013-06-01

    Polymer Concrete was reinforced with recycled-tire fibers in order to improve the compressive and flexural strength. Polymer concrete specimens were prepared with 70% of silicious sand, 30% of polyester resin and various fiber concentrations (0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 vol%). The results show increment of 50% in average of the compressive and flexural strength as well as on the deformation when adding 1.2 vol% of recycled-fibers.

  2. Polymer concrete reinforced with recycled-tire fibers: Mechanical properties

    Martínez-Cruz, E; Martínez-López, M; Martínez-Barrera, G

    2013-01-01

    Polymer Concrete was reinforced with recycled-tire fibers in order to improve the compressive and flexural strength. Polymer concrete specimens were prepared with 70% of silicious sand, 30% of polyester resin and various fiber concentrations (0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 vol%). The results show increment of 50% in average of the compressive and flexural strength as well as on the deformation when adding 1.2 vol% of recycled-fibers.

  3. Hydrothermal alteration of Hercynian granites, its significance to the evolution of geothermal systems in granitic rocks

    Marques, Jose M.; Matias, Maria J.; Basto, Maria J.; Aires-Barros, Luis A. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Centro de Petrologia e Geoquimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Carreira, Paula M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional n 10, 2686 - 953 Sacavem (Portugal); Goff, Fraser E. [Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We discuss geochemical and isotopic ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) data recording the hydrothermal alteration of northern Portuguese Hercynian granites by Na-HCO{sub 3}-CO{sub 2}-rich mineral waters. Whole-rock samples from drill cores of Vilarelho da Raia granite have {delta}{sup 18}O values in the +11.47 to +10.10 permille range. The lower values correspond to highly fractured granite samples displaying vein and pervasive alteration. In the pervasive alteration stage, which probably results from a convective hydrothermal system set up by the intrusion of the granites, the metamorphic waters are in equilibrium with hydrous minerals. In contrast, the vein alteration of these granitic rocks was caused by water of meteoric origin. The oxygen ratios between water (W) and rock (R), the so-called W/R ratios, obtained for the open system (where the heated water is lost from the system by escape to the surface) range between 0.05 and 0.11, suggesting that the recrystallization of the veins was influenced by a small flux of meteoric water. Stable isotope analyses performed on the cores show that the vein alteration stage relates to post-emplacement tectonic stresses acting on the granite, probably of late Hercynian age. Our results are consistent with the existence of two separate alteration events (pervasive and vein) caused by hydrothermal waters of different isotopic characteristics. The studies presented in this paper should be viewed as a natural analogue that uses the alteration features observed in a fossil geothermal system at Vilarelho da Raia to assess possible water-rock reactions presently occurring at depth in granitic rocks of the nearby Chaves area. (author)

  4. Refractory concretes

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 , Nd 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 and Gd 2 O 3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH 4 HO 3 , NH 4 Cl, YCl 3 and Mg(NO 3 ) 2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden

  5. Experimental study on the strength parameter of Quarry Dust mixed Coconut Shell Concrete adding Coconut Fibre

    Matangulu Shrestha, Victor; Anandh, S.; Sindhu Nachiar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous mixture constitute of cement as the main ingredient with a different mix of fine and coarse aggregate. The massive use of conventional concrete has a shortfall in its key ingredients, natural sand and coarse aggregate, due to increased industrialisation and globalisation. To overcome the shortage of material, an alternate material with similar mechanical properties and composition has to be studied, as replacement of conventional concrete. Coconut shell concrete is a prime option as replacement of key ingredients of conventional concrete as coconut is produced in massive quantity in south East Asia. Coconut shell concrete is lightweight concrete and different research is still ongoing concerning about its mix design and composition in the construction industry. Concrete is weak in tension as compared to compression, hence the fibre is used to refrain the crack in the concrete. Coconut fibre is one of many fibres which can be used in concrete. The main aim of this project is to analyse the use of natural by-products in the construction industry, make light weight concrete and eco-friendly construction. This project concerns with the comparison of the mechanical properties of coconut shell concrete and conventional concrete, replacing fine aggregate with quarry dust using coconut fibre. M25 grade of concrete was adopted and testing of concrete was done at the age of 3, 7 and 28 days. In this concrete mix, sand was replaced completely in volumetric measurement by quarry dust. The result was analysed and compared with addition of coconut fibre at varying percentage of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5%. From the test conducted, coconut shell concrete with quarry dust has the maximum value at 4% of coconut fibre while conventional concrete showed the maximum value at 2% of coconut fibre.

  6. 2005 dossier: granite. Tome: phenomenological evolution of the geologic disposal; Dossier 2005: Granite. Tome evolution phenomenologique du stockage geologique

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the phenomenological aspects of the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes (HLLL) in granite formations. Content: 1 - introduction: ANDRA's research program on disposal in granitic formation; 2 - the granitic environment: geologic history, French granites; 3 - HLLL wastes and disposal design concepts; 4 - identification, characterization and modeling of a granitic site: approach, geologic modeling, hydrologic and hydro-geochemical modeling, geomechanical and thermal modeling, long-term geologic evolution of a site; 5 - phenomenological evolution of a disposal: main aspects of the evolution of a repository with time, disposal infrastructures, B-type wastes disposal area, C-type wastes disposal area; spent fuels disposal area, radionuclides transfer and retention in the granitic environment; 6 - conclusions: available knowledge, methods and tools for the understanding and modeling of the phenomenological evolution of a granitic disposal site. (J.S.)

  7. Oil sands tax expenditures

    Ketchum, K; Lavigne, R.; Plummer, R.

    2001-01-01

    The oil sands are a strategic Canadian resource for which federal and provincial governments provide financial incentives to develop and exploit. This report describes the Oil Sands Tax Expenditure Model (OSTEM) developed to estimate the size of the federal income tax expenditure attributed to the oil sands industry. Tax expenditures are tax concessions which are used as alternatives to direct government spending for achieving government policy objectives. The OSTEM was developed within the business Income Tax Division of Canada's Department of Finance. Data inputs for the model were obtained from oil sands developers and Natural Resources Canada. OSTEM calculates annual revenues, royalties and federal taxes at project levels using project-level projections of capital investment, operating expenses and production. OSTEM calculates tax expenditures by comparing taxes paid under different tax regimes. The model also estimates the foregone revenue as a percentage of capital investment. Total tax expenditures associated with investment in the oil sands are projected to total $820 million for the period from 1986 to 2030, representing 4.6 per cent of the total investment. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  8. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Patel, B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs

  9. Concrete construction engineering handbook

    Nawy, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    Provides coverage of concrete construction engineering and technology. This work features discussions focusing on: the advances in engineered concrete materials; reinforced concrete construction; specialized construction techniques; and, design recommendations for high performance.

  10. Effect of filler types on physical, mechanical and microstructure of self compacting concrete and Flow-able concrete

    Hafez E. Elyamany

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of various filler types on the fresh and hardened properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC and Flow-able concrete. For this purpose, two groups of fillers were selected. The first group was pozzolanic fillers (silica fume and metakaolin while the second group was non-pozzolanic fillers (limestone powder, granite dust and marble dust. Cement contents of 400 kg/m3 and 500 kg/m3 were considered while the used filler material was 7.5%, 10% and 15%. Slump and slump flow, T50, sieve stability and bleeding tests were performed on fresh concrete. The studied hardened properties included unit weight, voids ratio, porosity, and water absorption and cube compressive strength. In addition, thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electronic microscope were performed. The test results showed that filler type and content have significant effect on fresh concrete properties where non-pozzolanic fillers improve segregation and bleeding resistance. Generally, filler type and content have significant effect on unit weight, water absorption and voids ratio. In addition, non-pozzolanic fillers have insignificant negative effect on concrete compressive strength. Finally, there was a good correlation between fresh concrete properties and hardened concrete properties for SCC and Flow-able concrete.

  11. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in rocks and beach sands from Ezine region (Canakkale), Western Anatolia, Turkey

    Orguen, Y. [Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Ayazaga Kampusu, 34469-Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: orgun@itu.edu.tr; Altinsoy, N. [Institute of Energy, Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Ayazaga Kampusu, 34469-Istanbul (Turkey); Sahin, S.Y. [Department of Geophysics, Engineering Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Guengoer, Y. [Department of Geophysics, Engineering Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Gueltekin, A.H. [Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Ayazaga Kampusu, 34469-Istanbul (Turkey); Karahan, G. [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, P.O. Box 1, Atatuerk Airport, 34149-Istanbul (Turkey); Karacik, Z. [Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Ayazaga Kampusu, 34469-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-06-15

    This paper represents the first reports on the natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in Kestanbol granitic pluton and surrounding rocks, and coastal region of the Ezine town. To assess the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, the radium equivalent activity, the absorbed dose rate and the external hazard index were calculated, and in situ gamma dose rates were measured. The high-activity concentrations were measured in the pluton and sands, which was originated mainly from the pluton, due to the presence of zircon, allanite, monazite, thorite, uranothorite and apatite. The average activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K are 174.78, 204.69 and 1171.95 Bq kg{sup -1} for pluton, and 290.36, 532.04 and 1160.75 Bq kg{sup -1} for sands, respectively. {sup 137}Cs in Ezine region ranged from 0-6.57 Bq kg{sup -1}. The average absorbed dose rate for the granitic and sand samples were calculated to be 251.6 and 527.92 nGy h{sup -1}, respectively. The maximum contribution to the total absorbed gamma dose rate in air was due to the {sup 232}Th (52.3% for pluton and 67.1% for sands). The Raeq activities of the pluton and sands are higher than the recommended maximum value of 370 Bq kg{sup -1} criterion limit of Raeq activity for building materials.

  12. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  13. Sand Dunes with Frost

    2004-01-01

    9 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of frost-covered sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars in early spring, 2004. The dunes indicate wind transport of sand from left to right (west to east). These landforms are located near 78.1oN, 220.8oW. This picture is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  14. Red and blue colouration of thermoluminescence from natural quartz sands

    Hashimoto, T; Hayashi, Y; Koyanagi, A; Yokosaka, K; Kimura, K

    1986-01-01

    Quartz extracts, from a pegmatite rock, volcanic ashes and beach sands, were exposed to X-rays or gamma-rays upto 8.8kGy. The irradiated sands were observed through a thermoluminescence colour image technique (abbreviated to TLCI by the authors) using highly sensitive colour photographic system. The quartz sands from volcanic ash layers, containing ..beta..-quartz (mineralized at high temperature), always indicate a red TLCI, whereas the quartz rocks from pegmatite origin and granite strata, containing ..cap alpha..-quartz (mineralized at low temperature), gave a typical blue TLCI, being consistent with the well known quartz TL colour. Quartz fractions from the beach sands showed a mixture of both red and blue TLCI, probably reflecting the respective mixtures of ..beta..-(in their origin) and ..cap alpha..-quartz fractions along the riverside area. The search using X-ray diffractometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis proved that the cause of distinctly different colourations was attributable to the impurity atoms: light rare earth elements (Eu and/or Sm) bringing on red TLCI, while structural defects yielding the blue TLCI).

  15. suitability of broken bottles as fine aggregate for production of concrete

    user

    The maximum mean compressive strength of 19.0N/mm2 was obtained at 28days when sand and broken bottles were used in equal proportions. Density did not appear to have a discernible trend. For structural concrete, the proportion of broken bottles should be limited to 30% for early strength concrete and 40% when ...

  16. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    Liana Iureş

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  17. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    Iureş, Liana; Bob, Corneliu

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  18. Experimental investigation on high performance RC column with manufactured sand and silica fume

    Shanmuga Priya, T.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, the use High Performance Concrete (HPC) has increased in construction industry. The ingredients of HPC depend on the availability and characteristics of suitable alternative materials. Those alternative materials are silica fume and manufactured sand, a by products from ferro silicon and quarry industries respectively. HPC made with silica fume as partial replacement of cement and manufactured sand as replacement of natural sand is considered as sustainable high performance concrete. In this present study the concrete was designed to get target strength of 60 MPa as per guide lines given by ACI 211- 4R (2008). The laboratory study was carried out experimentally to analyse the axial behavior of reinforced cement HPC column of size 100×100×1000mm and square in cross section. 10% of silica fume was preferred over ordinary portland cement. The natural sand was replaced by 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% with Manufactured Sand (M-Sand). In this investigation, totally 6 column specimens were cast for mixes M1 to M6 and were tested in 1000kN loading frame at 28 days. From this, Load-Mid height deflection curves were drawn and compared. Maximum ultimate load carrying capacity and the least deflection is obtained for the mix prepared by partial replacement of cement with 10% silica fume & natural sand by 100% M-Sand. The fine, amorphous and pozzalonic nature of silica fume and fine mineral particles in M- Sand increased the stiffness of HPC column. The test results revealed that HPC can be produced by using M-Sand with silica fume.

  19. Reduced labor and condensed schedules with cellular concrete solutions

    Lavis, D. [CEMATRIX Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the use of cellular concrete materials in oil sands tank base foundation systems, shallow buried utility insulation systems, roadways, slabs, and buried modules. The concrete is formed from Portland cement, water, specialized pre-formed foaming agents, and air mixed in controlled proportions. Fly ash and polypropylene or glass fibers can also be used as additions. Cellular concrete can often be used to speed up construction and minimize labour requirements. Cellular concrete can be cast-in-place, and has soil-stabilizing and self-compacting features. The concrete can be produced and placed on-site at rates exceeding 120 cubic meters per hour. Cellular concrete can be pumped into place over long distances through flexible hoses. A case study comparing the cellular concrete to traditional plastic foam insulation was used to demonstrate the equivalency and adequacy of insulation, structural properties and installation costs. The study showed that although the cellular concrete had a high installation cost, greater compressive strength was gained. The concrete was self-levelling and did not require compaction or vibration. The use of the cellular concrete resulted in an accelerated construction schedule. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  20. Concrete durability

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of researchers and industries related with this material. Moreover, the new laboratory techniques are allowing to understand old problems and even to open again the discussion on reaction mechanisms which were believed to be completely understood. The article finalizes with a brief description of the numerous studies carried out at the Institute Eduardo Torroja on concrete durability, mainly those related with the resistance against gypsum attack (so abundant in our country land and against sea water attack.

    La realidad de que el hormigón no es un material eterno y es susceptible de sufrir ataques por agentes químicos, fue constatada desde el comienzo mismo de su uso industrial. En el presente trabajo el autor enumera los estudios realizados el siglo pasado y a comienzos del presente sobre la durabilidad del hormigón en agua de mar. En la actualidad y a pesar de los numerosos trabajos desarrollados desde entonces, el estudio de la durabilidad del hormigón sigue centrando la atención prioritaria y los recursos económicos de los investigadores e industrias relacionadas con este material. Además las nuevas técnicas de estudio están permitiendo comprender antiguos problemas e incluso reabrir la discusión sobre mecanismos de reacción que se creían completamente explicados. Finaliza el artículo con una descripción somera de los múltiples trabajos realizados en el Instituto Eduardo Torreja sobre la materia, en especial los estudios realizados sobre

  1. Concrete Memories

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the presence of Atlantikwall bunkers in amateur holiday snapshots and discusses the ambiguous role of the bunker site in visual cultural memory. Departing from my family’s private photo collection from twenty years of vacationing at the Danish West coast, the different mundane...... and poetic appropriations and inscriptions of the bunker site are depicted. Ranging between overlooked side presences and an overwhelming visibility, the concrete remains of fascist war architecture are involved in and motivate different sensuous experiences and mnemonic appropriations. The article meets...... the bunkers’ changing visuality and the cultural topography they both actively transform and are being transformed by through juxtaposing different acts and objects of memory over time and in different visual articulations....

  2. Attenuation of Gamma Rays by Concrete . Lead Slag Composites

    Ismail, I.M.; Sweelam, M.H.; Zaghloul, Y.R.; Aly, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Using of wastes and industrial by-products as concrete aggregate to be used as structural and radiation shielded material has increased in the recent years. Concrete was mixed with different amounts of lead slag extracted from recycling of the spent automotive batteries as fine aggregates. The lead slag was used as partial replacement of sand in the studied composites. The concrete composites obtained were characterized in terms of density, water absorption, porosity, compressive strength and attenuation of γ- rays with different energies. The attenuation coefficient and the half value thickness of the different matrices were calculated and discussed

  3. Sand (CSW4)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  4. Inland drift sand landscapes

    Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Man has had a complex relationship with inland drift sands through the ages. For some centuries these landscapes were seen as a threat to society, especially agriculture and housing. At present we conserve these landscapes as important Natura 2000 priority habitats. In this book you may find these

  5. Measurements of transient electromagnetic propagation through concrete and sand

    Aurand, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). If a beam-chopping system could be developed for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility low-energy beam line, there would be potential to operate the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at much higher power and duty factor and enable such operation with a radio-frequency quadrapole (RFQ) injector. This would greatly extend the capability of the facility. To accommodate LANSCE operation in the new configuration, a chopped beam must be created in the low-energy transport line before the RFQ. Chopping in this region has never been demonstrated and constitutes the major uncertainty of the proposal and determines the critical path for project completion. This study produces a better understanding of the physics involved in chopping an H-beam in a dilute plasma background, and in transporting a chopped H-beam through a neutralized or partially neutralized plasma channel, as well as an estimate for the optimum neutralization strategy for the beam chopping and transport between the ion source and the RFQ.

  6. Sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials

    Jiang Tao; Wang Bo; Bao Liangjin; Zhou Duo; Long Haoqi; Song Zhixin; Chen Xi

    2012-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of Np (Ⅴ) on the granite fracture filling materials were studied by batch experiments under anaerobic in Beishan groundwater. The impact of pH of groundwater, CO 3 2- , humic acid and different components of granite fracture filling materials on sorption of Np (Ⅴ) was investigated. The results show that the granite fracture filling materials have strong capacity of Np (Ⅴ) adsorption. The value of K d , for Np (Ⅴ) sorption on the granite fracture filling materials is 843 mL/g. With the increase of pH, the value of K d increases at first and then decreases. K d of Np sorption on granite fracture filling materials in the presence of CO 3 2- and humic acid decreases. The chlorite and feldspar are major contributors to the sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials. (authors)

  7. Increased Durability of Concrete Made with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates Using Superplasticizers.

    Cartuxo, Francisco; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luis; Jiménez, José Ramón; Ledesma, Enrique F

    2016-02-08

    This paper evaluates the influence of two superplasticizers (SP) on the durability properties of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregate (FRCA). For this purpose, three families of concrete were tested: concrete without SP, concrete made with a regular superplasticizer and concrete made with a high-performance superplasticizer. Five volumetric replacement ratios of natural sand by FRCA were tested: 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 100%. Two natural gravels were used as coarse aggregates. All mixes had the same particle size distribution, cement content and amount of superplasticizer. The w/c ratio was calibrated to obtain similar slump. The results showed that the incorporation of FRCA increased the water absorption by immersion, the water absorption by capillary action, the carbonation depth and the chloride migration coefficient, while the use of superplasticizers highly improved these properties. The incorporation of FRCA jeopardized the SP's effectiveness. This research demonstrated that, from a durability point of view, the simultaneous incorporation of FRCA and high-performance SP is a viable sustainable solution for structural concrete production.

  8. The Effect of High Temperatures on the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Concrete

    Weidenfeld, G.; Aharon, G.; Hochbaum, I.

    2002-01-01

    Concrete thermal conductivity is an important property for thermal analysis of nuclear accidents.Concrete compositions include water,sand,cement and aggregates of various kinds and combinations.Values of concrete's thermal conductivity for some different compositions can be found in the literature[1]but since the material composition and its temperature significantly affect this property,the exact value of a specific composition should be measured

  9. Rare-earth elements in granites: concentration and distribution pattern

    Galindo, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    The geochemistry of rare earth elements in granites is studied. The rare earth element (REE) distribution pattern in granites is characterized by a smooth curve with decreasing concentrations from La to Lu, and frequently a marked Eu negative anomaly. It seems to exist relationship between granite genesis and its REE pattern, in that bodies of primary (magmatic differentiation) origin always show this negative Eu anomaly, while those bodies generated by crustal anatexis do not show this anomaly. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Comparison of different forms of gravel as aggregate in concrete

    Sikiru ORITOLA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gradation plays an important role in the workability, segregation, and pump ability of concrete. Uniformly distributed aggregates require less paste which will also decrease bleeding, creep and shrinkage while producing better workability, more durable concrete and higher packing. This attempt looks at the effect of particle size distribution pattern for five types of gravel aggregate forms, angular, elongated, smooth rounded, irregular and flaky as related to the strength of concrete produced. Different forms of naturally existing gravel aggregate were collected from a particular location and tests were carried out on them to determine their gradation. Based on the gradation the aggregates were used to prepare different samples of grade 20 concrete with water-cement ratio of 0.5. The particle size distribution resulted in coefficients of uniformity ranging from 1.24 to 1.44. The granite aggregate, which serves as a reference, had a coefficient of uniformity of 1.47. Tests were conducted on fresh and hardened concrete cube samples. The concrete sample CT5 recorded a slump of 32mm and highest compressive strength value of 21.7 N/mm2, among the concrete produced from different forms of gravel.

  11. Portuguese granites associated with Sn-W and Au mineralizations

    Ana M.R. Neiva

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In northern and central Portugal, there are different tin-bearing granites. Most of them are of S-type, others have mixed characteristics of I-type and S-type granites and a few are of I-type. Tin-tungsten deposits are commonly associated with Hercynian tin-bearing S-type granites. Some quartz veins with wolframite are associated with an I-type granite, which has a low Sn content. In suites of tin-bearing S-type granitic rocks, Sn content increases as a function of the degree of fractional crystallization. Greisenizations of two-mica S-type granites associated with tin-tungsten mineralizations are accompanied by an increase in SiO2, H2O+, Sn, W, Nb, Ta, Rb, Zn, and Pb and decrease in MgO, Na2O, V, Sc,Zr, and Sr. The granite associated with the Jales gold deposit is of S-type and strongly differentiated like the tin-bearing S-type granites, but it has a very low Sn content. During fractional crystallization, Si, Rb, Sn, Pb, Au, As, Sb, and S increase. During increasing degree of hydrothermal alteration of this granite at the gold-quartz vein walls, there are progressive increases in K2O, H2O+, Sn, Cs, Cu, Pb, Au, Sb, As, and S.

  12. Hydrothermal alkaline stability of bentonite barrier by concrete interstitial wastes

    Leguey Jimenez, S.; Cuevas Rodriguez, J.; Ramirez Martin, S.; Vigil de la villa Mencia, R.; Martin Barca, M.

    2002-01-01

    At present, the main source of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is the electrical energy production during all the steps of developing. In almost all the countries with nuclear programs, the option for the final management of HLW is the Deep Geological Repository (DGR) based on the concept of multi barrier. According to this concept, the waste is isolated from biosphere by the interposition of confinement barriers. Two of the engineering barriers in the Spanish design of DGR in granitic rock are compacted bentonite and concrete. The bentonite barrier is the backfilling and sealing material for the repository gallery, because of its mechanical and physico-chemical properties. The main qualities of concrete as a component of a multi barrier system are its low permeability, mechanical resistance and chemical properties. With regard to chemical composition of concrete, the alkaline nature of cement pore water lowers the solubility of many radioactive elements. However, structural transformation in smectite, dissolution or precipitation of minerals and, consequently, changes in the bentonite properties could occurs in the alkaline conditions generated by the cement degradation. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the effect of concrete in the stability of Spanish reference bentonite (La Serrata of Nijar, Almeria, Spain) in conditions similar to those estimated in a DGR in granitic rock. Because of the main role of bentonite barrier in the global performance of the repository, the present study is essential to guarantee its security. (Author)

  13. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  14. Mechanical Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced all Lightweight Aggregate Concrete

    Yang, Y. M.; Li, J. Y.; Zhen, Y.; Nie, Y. N.; Dong, W. L.

    2018-05-01

    In order to study the basic mechanical properties and failure characteristics of all lightweight aggregate concrete with different volume of steel fiber (0%, 1%, 2%), shale ceramsite is used as light coarse aggregate. The shale sand is made of light fine aggregate and mixed with different volume of steel fiber, and the mix proportion design of all lightweight aggregate concrete is carried out. The cubic compressive strength, axial compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting strength and modulus of elasticity of steel fiber all lightweight aggregate concrete were studied. Test results show that the incorporation of steel fiber can restrict the cracking of concrete, improve crack resistance; at the same time, it shows good plastic deformation ability and failure morphology. It lays a theoretical foundation for further research on the application of all lightweight aggregate concrete in structural systems.

  15. Biofuel Combustion Fly Ash Influence on the Properties of Concrete

    Aurelijus Daugėla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cement as the binding agent in the production of concrete can be replaced with active mineral admixtures. Biofuel combustion fly ash is one of such admixtures. Materials used for the study: Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R, sand of 0/4 fraction, gravel of 4/16 fraction, biofuel fly ash, superplasticizer, water. Six compositions of concrete were designed by replacing 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% 20%, and 25% of cement with biofuel fly ash. The article analyses the effect of biofuel fly ash content on the properties of concrete. The tests revealed that the increase of biofuel fly ash content up to 20% increases concrete density and compressive strength after 7 and 28 days of curing and decreases water absorption, with corrected water content by using plasticizing admixture. It was found that concrete where 20% of cement is replaced by biofuel ash has higher frost resistance.

  16. Simulation of bentonite colloid migration through granite

    Rosicka, Dana; Hokr, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloidal bentonite particles generate at the interface of buffer and host rock in spent nuclear fuel repository due to an erosion process and migrate through granite by the water flow. Stability of these colloids and their migration possibilities have been studied on account of radionuclide transport possibility as colloid could carry adsorbed radionuclides in groundwater through granite. That is why a simulation of bentonite colloid migration in the surrounding of a repository might be requested. According to chemical condition as ionic strength and pH, the colloidal particles coagulate into clusters and that influence the migration of particles. The coagulation kinetics of natural bentonite colloids were experimentally studied in many articles, for example by light scattering techniques. We created a model of coagulation of bentonite colloids and simulation of a chosen experiment with use of the multicomponent reactive transport equation. The coagulation model describes clustering of particles due to attractive van der Waals forces as result of collision of particles due to heat fluctuation and different velocity of particles during sedimentation and velocity gradient of water flow. Next, the model includes influence of repulsive electrostatic forces among colloidal particles leading to stability of particles provided high surface charge of colloids. In the model, each group of clusters is transported as one solution component and the kinetics of coagulation are implemented as reactions between the components: a shift of particles among groups of particles with similar migration properties, according to size of the clusters of colloids. The simulation of migration of bentonite colloid through granite using the coagulation model was calibrated according to experiment results. On the basis of the simulation, one can estimate the basic processes that occur during bentonite colloid

  17. Contribution to uranium geochemistry in intrusive granites

    Coulomb, R.

    1959-01-01

    This work aims to define the position of a certain number of French granitic deposits within the field of the geochemistry of granites in general, and of the geochemistry of uranium in particular. The regions concerned are: - 3 French Hercynian ranges, in the Vendee, in Brittany and in the Morvan, - 1 African range, probably precambrian, of the Hoggar. For each range, the petrochemical framework is first of all determined and then the degree of chemical homogeneity of the rocks is evaluated. In the petrochemical groups thus obtained the geochemical behaviour of the uranium is studied. From a point of view of the geochemistry of the granites under investigation, a comparison of the laws of distribution of the major elements in the 4 ranges shows up a convergence of average composition which was not anticipated by geological and petrographic considerations alone. The statistical and geochemical distribution laws of the total uranium as a function of the petrochemical variations are established. A study of the chemical forms of uranium in the rocks has drawn an attention to the qualitative and quantitative importance of the fraction of this uranium soluble in dilute acids. We have therefore reconsidered on the one hand, the laws of distribution of the insoluble uranium, which represents essentially the uranium fixed in crystalline structures (zircon, allanite...), and we have justified on the other hand the interest presented by the soluble uranium: this, although more complex in character, presents a geochemical unity in post magmatic phenomena which makes possible to find a genetic connection between the uraniferous deposits and the intrusive massifs. Finally we have given a plan of the geochemical cycle of uranium, in which we hope to have provided some more accurate data on the igneous phase. (author) [fr

  18. Environmental Impacts of Sand Exploitation. Analysis of Sand Market

    Marius Dan Gavriletea

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sand is an indispensable natural resource for any society. Despite society’s increasing dependence on sand, there are major challenges that this industry needs to deal with: limited sand resources, illegal mining, and environmental impact of sand mining. The purpose of this paper is twofold: to present an overview of the sand market, highlighting the main trends and actors for production, export and import, and to review the main environmental impacts associated with sand exploitation process. Based on these findings, we recommend different measures to be followed to reduce negative impacts. Sand mining should be done in a way that limits environmental damage during exploitation and restores the land after mining operations are completed.

  19. Self-Compacting Concrete

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  20. The influence of the coarse aggregates from different mineralogy on the mechanical properties of the high-performance concrete

    Magalhaes, A.G.; Calixto, J.M.; Franca, E.P.; Aguilar, M.T.P.; Vasconcelos, W.L.

    2006-01-01

    Concrete in normal conditions is a versatile and strong construction material. However under certain environmental conditions it may deteriorate in a short period of time. This fact has led researchers in recent times to develop the high-performance concrete. In this scenario, the aim of this paper is to present the effects of the different types of coarse aggregate on the mechanical properties of high performance concrete. Limestone, granite, gneiss and basalt were used as coarse aggregates. Their characterization consisted of chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. The compressive strength and the modulus of elasticity were the investigated mechanical properties. The test results indicate expressively the better performance of the concretes fabricated with basalt, granite and gneiss aggregates. (author)

  1. Microstructural modeling of Vienne granite damage

    Homand, F.; Hoxha, D.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructural approach in damage modeling, which is presented in this paper describes the evolution of micro-crack geometry as a function of history loading. If the crack geometry is known, the effective properties could then be calculated foe any cracked rock by the mean of a micro-mechanical model. The P L evolution law which is necessary in the describing of crack geometry evolution is hardly based on the crack microscope observation as well as on the theory of fabric tensors. This approach is applied in the modeling of mechanical behaviour of Vienne granite. The result of model simulations are compared with laboratory tests. (author)

  2. Deep fracturation of granitic rock mass

    Bles, J.L.; Blanchin, R.; Bonijoly, D.; Dutartre, P.; Feybesse, J.L.; Gros, Y.; Landry, J.; Martin, P.

    1986-01-01

    This documentary study realized with the financial support of the European Communities and the CEA aims at the utilization of available data for the understanding of the evolution of natural fractures in granitic rocks from the surface to deep underground, in various feasibility studies dealing with radioactive wastes disposal. The Mont Blanc road tunnel, the EDF Arc-Isere gallerie, the Auriat deep borehole and the Pyrenean rock mass of Bassies are studied. In this study are more particularly analyzed the relationship between small fractures and large faults, evolution with depth of fracture density and direction, consequences of rock decompression and relationship between fracturation and groundwater [fr

  3. GRANITE- A steroscopic imaging Chernkov telescope system

    Shubnell, M.; Akerlof, C.W.; Cawley, M.F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D.J.; Fennell, S.; O'Flaherty, K.S.; Freeman, S.; Frishman, D.; Gaidos, J.A.; Hagan, J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A.M.; Kerrick, A.D.; Lamb, R.C.; Lappin, T.; Lawrence, M.A.; Levy, H.; Lewis, D.A.; Meyer, D.I.; Mohanty, G.; Punch, M.; Reynolds, P.T.; Rovero, A.C.; Sembroski, G.; Weaverdyck, C.; Weekes, T.C.; Whitaker, T.; Wilson, C.

    1993-01-01

    A second 10 meter class imaging telescope was constructed on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, the site of the original 10 meter Whipple Cherenkov telescope. The twin telescope system with a 140 meter base line will allow both a reduction in the energy threshold and an improvement in the rejection of the hardonic background. The new telescope started operation in December 1991. With the final completion of the first installation stage (GRANITE I) during spring 92, it is now operating simultaneously with the orginal reflector. We describe in this paper design and construction of the new instrument and demonstrate the capability of the experiment to record coincident events

  4. Optimization of superplasticizer in portland pozzolana cement mortar and concrete

    Sathyan, Dhanya; Anand, K. B.; Mini, K. M.; Aparna, S.

    2018-02-01

    Chemical Admixtures are added to concrete at the time of mixing of its constituents to impart workability. The requirement of right workability is the essence of good concrete. It has been found that the use of optimum use of admixtures is very important since low dosage may result in loss of fluidity and over dosage could lead to segregation, bleeding, excessive air entrainment etc in concrete. Hence it is essential to find optimum dosage of superplasticizer for getting good strength and workability. But large number of trial tests are required in the field to find the saturation dosage of superplasticizer in concrete which requires more materials and consume more time. The paper deals with developing a co-relation between the quantity requirements of superplasticiser in mortar to that of cement concrete to get good workability. In this work for preparing mortar and concrete 4 brands of locally available Portland pozzolana cement (PPC) and superplasticizer (SP) belonging to 4 different families namely Polycarboxylate Ether (PCE), Lignosulphate (LS), Sulfonated Naphthalene Formaldehyde (SNF) and Sulfonated Melamine Formaldehyde (SMF) are used. Two different brands of SP’s are taken from each family. Workability study on the superplasticized mortar with cement to sand ratio 1:1.5 and water cement ratio of 0.4 was performed using marsh cone and flow table test and workability study on the concrete with same cement/sand ratio and water cement ratio was done using slump cone and flow table test. Saturation dosage of superplasticizer in mortar and concrete determined experimentally was compared to study the correlation between two. Compressive strength study on concrete cubes were done on concrete mixes with a superplasticizer dosage corresponding to the saturation dosage and a comparative study were done to analyse the improvement in the compressive strength with addition of superplasticizer from different family.

  5. Value-added utilisation of recycled concrete in hot-mix asphalt.

    Wong, Yiik Diew; Sun, Darren Delai; Lai, Dickson

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of partial substitution of granite aggregate in hot-mix asphalt (HMA) with waste concrete aggregate was investigated. Three hybrid HMA mixes incorporating substitutions of granite fillers/fines with 6%, 45% untreated, and 45% heat-treated concrete were evaluated by the Marshall mix design method; the optimum binder contents were found to be 5.3%, 6.5% and 7.0% of grade Pen 60/70 bitumen, respectively. All three hybrid mixes satisfied the Marshall criteria of the Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) W3B wearing course specification. The hybrid mix with 6% concrete fillers gave comparable resilient modulus and creep resistance as the conventional W3B mix, while hybrid mixes with higher concrete substitutions achieved better performance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the distinct presence of free lime in the heat-treated concrete, while the scanning electron microscope (SEM) provided an in-depth perspective of the concrete grains in the HMA matrix. The results suggest feasible use of waste concrete as partial aggregate substitution in HMA.

  6. Orientation of Steel Fibers in Magnetically Driven Concrete and Mortar.

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Ju; Xie, Fang; Feng, Bing

    2018-01-22

    The orientation of steel fibers in magnetically driven concrete and magnetically driven mortar was experimentally studied in this paper using a magnetic method. In the magnetically driven concrete, a steel slag was used to replace the coarse aggregate. In the magnetically driven mortar, steel slag and iron sand were used to replace the fine aggregate. A device was established to provide the magnetic force. The magnetic force was used to rotate the steel fibers. In addition, the magnetic force was also used to vibrate the concrete and mortar. The effect of magnetic force on the orientation of steel fibers was examined by comparing the direction of fibers before and after vibration. The effect of magnetically driven concrete and mortar on the orientation of steel fibers was also examined by comparing specimens to normal concrete and mortar. It is shown that the fibers could rotate about 90° in magnetically driven concrete. It is also shown that the number of fibers rotated in magnetically driven mortar was much more than in mortar vibrated using a shaking table. A splitting test was performed on concrete specimens to investigate the effect of fiber orientation. In addition, a flexural test was also performed on mortar test specimens. It is shown that the orientation of the steel fibers in magnetically driven concrete and mortar affects the strength of the concrete and mortar specimens.

  7. Improved technology for spun-cast concrete poles

    Dilger, W H; Ghali, A

    1984-07-01

    Different types of concrete were investigated with the goal of developing concrete suitable for the production of spun-cast concrete poles. A total of 65 different concrete mixes were investigated, with the suitability criteria defined as: compactability, no segregation of the mix components during the spinning operation, no shrinkage cracking, high strength, and durability. High strength normal weight concretes and semi-lightweight concretes, both with and without fly ash and/or silica fume and with different types of admixtures were used to produce spun-cast concrete pole segments. Of the 35 lightweight concretes only 3 were considered successful, as in all other specimens the inner layer of coarse aggregate was not well embedded in the mortar, and many mixes could not be compacted properly because they were too stiff, too wet, or started to set before spinning commenced. The three successful specimens contained fly ash and one contained silica fume, and had low water/cement ratios (0.26 to 0.29). Of the 23 normal weight concretes tested, only 5 were considered suitable, and all these had a sand/coarse aggregate ratio of 0.25 or smaller and a cement content between 350 and 400 kg/m{sup 3}. A theoretical study of the stresses in the end zones of pretensioned poles is presented. 10 refs., 53 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Application of orthogonal test method in mix proportion design of recycled lightweight aggregate concrete

    Zhao, Zhanshan; An, Le; Zhang, Yijing; Yuan, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Recycled lightweight aggregate concrete was made with construction waste and ceramsite brick mainly including brick. Using the orthogonal test method, the mix proportion of recycled lightweight aggregate concrete was studied, and the Influence regularity and significance of water binder ratio, fly ash, sand ratio, the amount of recycled aggregate proportion on the compressive strength of concrete, the strong influence of mass ratio, slump expansion degree was studied. Through the mean and range analysis of the test results, the results show that the water binder ratio has the greatest influence on the 28d intensity of recycled lightweight aggregate concrete. Secondly, the fly ash content, the recycled aggregate replacement rate and the sand ratio have little influence. For the factors of expansion: the proportion of fly ash = water binder ratio sand >sand rate> recycled aggregate replacement rate. When the content of fly ash is about 30%, the expanded degree of recycled lightweight aggregate concrete is the highest, and the workability of that is better and the strength of concrete with 28d and 56d are the highest. When the content of brickbat is about 40% brick particles, the strength of concrete reaches the highest.

  9. Oil sands supply outlook

    Dunbar, R.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2004, The Canadian Energy Research Institute released a report on the expected future supply from Alberta's oil sands. The report indicates that the future for the already well-established oil sands industry is promising, particularly given the outlook for oil prices. The challenges facing the industry include higher industry supply costs and the need for innovative commercial and technological solutions to address the risks of irregularities and changes in crude oil prices. In 2003, the industry produced 874 thousand barrels per day of synthetic crude oil and unprocessed crude bitumen. This represents 35 per cent of Canada's total oil production. Current production capacity has increased to 1.0 million barrels per day (mbpd) due to new projects. This number may increase to 3.5 mbpd by 2017. Some new projects may be deferred due to the higher raw bitumen and synthetic crude oil supply costs. This presentation provided supply costs for a range of oil sands recovery technologies and production projections under various business scenarios. tabs., figs

  10. Liquefaction resistance of calcareous sands

    Sandoval Vallejo, Eimar

    2012-01-01

    Calcareous sands are unique in terms of their origin, mineralogy, shape, fragility and intra particle porosity. This article presents results from an experimental program carried out to study the liquefaction resistance of a calcareous sand retrieved from Cabo Rojo at Puerto Rico. The experimental program included mineralogical characterization, index properties, and undrained cyclic triaxial tests on isotropically consolidated reconstituted samples. Due to the large variation in the calcareous sand properties, results are compared with previous researches carried out on other calcareous sands around the world. Results showed a wide range in the liquefaction resistance of the studied calcareous sands. Cabo Rojo sand experienced greater liquefaction resistance than most of the calcareous sands used for comparison. Important differences in the excess pore pressure generation characteristics were also found.

  11. STRENGTH AND SHORT-TERM DURABILITY OF 6M, 8M, 10M GEO-POLYMERS CONCRETE

    Gladwin Vimal Raj.P*, Tamilvanan.K, Jose Ravindra Raj.B

    2017-01-01

    India is a developing country concentrated to develop the infrastructure and implement new construction techniques. Concrete is a main source of developing structure. It makes a great demand second only after water. So need an alternative to prevent this demand. Concrete is the mixture of cement, river sand and coarse aggregate. Cement manufacture produce carbon-di oxide and make ozone layer depletion cause global warming. Scarcity of river sand makes a demand in construction. So need an alte...

  12. Study on reinforced lightweight coconut shell concrete beam behavior under flexure

    Gunasekaran, K.; Annadurai, R.; Kumar, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Use of coconut shell as aggregate in concrete. ► Behavior of coconut shell concrete under flexure. ► SEM images of cement, sand, coconut shell and coconut shell aggregate concrete. ► Coconut shell hollow blocks and precast slabs are used in practice. - Abstract: Coconut shell has been used as coarse aggregate in the production of concrete. The flexural behavior of reinforced concrete beam made with coconut shell is analyzed and compared with the normal control concrete. Twelve beams, six with coconut shell concrete and six with normal control concrete, were fabricated and tested. This study includes the moment capacity, deflection, cracking, ductility, corresponding strains in both compression and tension, and end rotation. It was found that the flexural behavior of coconut shell concrete is comparable to that of other lightweight concretes. The results of concrete compression strain and steel tension strain showed that coconut shell concrete is able to achieve its full strain capacity under flexural loadings. Under serviceability condition, deflection and cracking characteristics of coconut shell concrete are comparable with control concrete. However, the failure zones of coconut shell concrete were larger than for control concrete beams. The end rotations of the coconut shell concrete beams just prior to failure values are comparable to other lightweight concretes. Coconut shell concrete was used to produce hollow blocks and precast slab in 2007 and they are being subjected to some practical loading till today without any problems such as deflection, bending, cracks, and damages for the past five years

  13. Enhanced sealing project (ESP): evolution of a full-sized concrete and bentonite shaft seal

    Dixon, D.A.; Priyanto, D.G.; Martino, J.B.; De Combarieu, M.; Johansson, R.; Korkeakoski, P.; Villagran, J.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A full-scale shaft seal was designed and installed in the 5-m-diameter access shaft at Atomic Energy of Canada's (AECL's) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at the point where he shaft intersects an ancient water-bearing, low-angle thrust fault in granitic rock. The seal, part of the permanent closure of the URL, consists of a 6-m-thick bentonite-based component sandwiched between 3-m-thick upper and lower, 3-m-thick concrete components. The bentonite-based component spans the fracture zone and extends approximately 1 m beyond the maximum identified extent of the fracture. This design was adopted in order to limit water from the deeper, saline regions mixing with the fresher, near-surface groundwater regime. The concrete components provide the mechanical confinement and an in situ compacted 40/60 mixture of bentonite clay and quartz sand provides the sealing component. Construction of the shaft seal was done as part of Canada's Nuclear Legacies Liability Program. However, monitoring the seal evolution was not part of the decommissioning program's mandate. In addition to accomplishing the permanent closure of the URL, this seal's construction provides a unique opportunity to instrument and monitor the evolution of a full-scale shaft seal as well as the recovery of the regional groundwater regime as the facility passively floods above the seal. A jointly funded monitoring project was developed by NWMO (Canada), SKB (Sweden), Posiva (Finland) and ANDRA (France) and since mid 2009 the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical evolution of the seal has been constantly monitored. The evolution of the type of seal being monitored in the ESP is of relevance to repository closure planning, gaining confidence in the functionality of shaft seals. Although constructed in a crystalline rock medium, the results of the ESP are expected to be relevant to the performance of seals in a variety of host rock types. The shaft seal has been

  14. The 'Granite' collegial mission of dialogue. Report

    Boisson, P.; Huet, Ph.; Mingasson, J.

    2000-06-01

    The aim of the 'Granite' collegial mission of dialogue is to inform the French authorities, associations and population about the project of construction of an underground laboratory for the study of the disposal of high level and long-life radioactive wastes in a granitic environment. The aim of the dialogue was not to select a site but to collect the public reactions and advices about such a project. However, such a dialogue has partially failed because of a misunderstanding of the population about the aims of the mission. However, the mission has collected many point of views and questions which are developed in this report. The first and second chapters recall the process of the mission and its progress, while a third chapter stresses on the questions asked by the public and which concern the fear of nuclear wastes and the incompatibility between the disposal of wastes and the socio-economical development of the region concerned. Thanks to the lessons drawn from this experience, the mission has formulated some recommendations (chapter 4) concerning the need for a better information of the population about any topic in relation with the radioactive wastes. Some complementary information is provided in appendixes. (J.S.)

  15. Aqueous phase transport through granitic rocks

    Bradbury, M.H.; Green, A.

    1984-03-01

    Using Scottish granites of UK origin it has been established that : (1) pore connectivity exists over metre distances and does not vary significantly with distance. (2) The formation factor may show an increase by a factor of approx. 2 for thin samples (approx. 1 cm). Since diffusion samples are of this order of thickness, laboratory measurements may be overestimating the diffusion coefficient appropriate for use in migration model calculations by a factor of approx. 2. (3) The effect of confining pressures up to approx. 16 MPa is to reduce diffusion coefficients by 50 to 60%. This implies that diffusion coefficients appropriate to granite at depths of approx. 500 m are approximately a factor of two lower than those obtained in the laboratory. (4) Diffusion rates through weathered fissure surfaces can be significantly greater (up to approx. 200 times) than through 'good' rock and are strongly dependent on the severity of the weathering. No evidence for pore blocking by weathering products was found. (5) Latex colloids having a diameter of 0.312 μm neither cause pore blocking nor do they penetrate the pore structure. (author)

  16. Booming Sand Dunes

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  17. Preliminary study of tin slag concrete mixture

    Hashim, Mohd Jamil; Mansor, Ishak; Pauzi Ismail, Mohamad; Sani, Suhairy; Azmi, Azhar; Sayuti, Shaharudin; Zaidi Ibrahim, Mohd; Adli Anuar, Abul; Rahim, Abdul Adha Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The study focuses on practices to facilitate tin smelting industry to reduce radioactive waste product (Tin Slag) by diluting its radioactivity to a safe level and turning it to a safer infrastructural building product. In the process the concrete mix which include Portland cement, sand, tin slag, water and plasticizer are used to produce interlocking brick pavements, piles and other infrastructural products. The mixing method follows DOE (UK) standard method of mixing targeted at in selected compressive strength suitable for its function and durability. A batching machine is used in the mixing and six test cubes are produced for the test. The testing equipment used are a compressional machine, ultrasonic measurement and a Geiger Muller counter to evaluate of the concrete mix to find the lowest emission of radiation surface dose without compromising the strength of concrete mix. The result obtained indicated the radioactivity of tin slag in the mixing process has reduced to background level that is 0.5μSv/h while the strength and workability of the concrete has not been severely affected. In conclusion, the concrete mix with tin slag has shown the potential it can be turned into a safe beneficial infrastructural product with good strength.

  18. Optimizing the use of natural gravel Brantas river as normal concrete mixed with quality fc = 19.3 Mpa

    Limantara, A. D.; Widodo, A.; Winarto, S.; Krisnawati, L. D.; Mudjanarko, S. W.

    2018-04-01

    The use of natural gravel (rivers) as concrete mixtures is rarely encountered after days of demands for a higher strength of concrete. Moreover, today people have found High-Performance Concrete which, when viewed from the rough aggregate consisted mostly of broken stone, although the fine grain material still used natural sand. Is it possible that a mixture of concrete using natural gravel as a coarse aggregate is capable of producing concrete with compressive strength equivalent to a concrete mixture using crushed stone? To obtain information on this, a series of tests on concrete mixes with crude aggregates of Kalitelu Crusher, Gondang, Tulungagung and natural stone (river gravel) from the Brantas River, Ngujang, Tulungagung in the Materials Testing Laboratory Tugu Dam Construction Project, Kab. Trenggalek. From concrete strength test results using coarse material obtained value 19.47 Mpa, while the compressive strength of concrete with a mixture of crushed stone obtained the value of 21.12 Mpa.

  19. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks.

  20. The Serra do Carambei Granite - PR and the uraniferous anomalism

    Pinto-Coelho, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    The Serra do Carambei Granite forms a pluton relatively homogeneous, covering about 33 km 2 , cropping out as an elongate retangular body trending NE-SW, being emplaced in the Cunhaporanga Granitoid Complex. Its characteristics indicates a kind of hololeucocratic granite, equigranular, medium to coarse-grained, consisting predominantly of microperthitic alkali-feldspar, quartz and a small amount of biotite (less than 1%), thus being classified as an alaskite. Chemical data allows a classification in the group of granite with high contents of silica (74-76% Wt. SiO 2 ), dominantly alkaline chemism and hypersolvus character, derived from a parental magma under saturated in water with distinguished features of granitoids from the magnetite series and types I and A granites. The pluton shows important chemical variations due to weathering processes. However detailed chemical studies reveal the presence of anomalous concentrations of trace elements such as U, Sn, Nb, Y, Zr, the Serra do Carambei Granite lacks economically important mineralizations because of the absence of well-developed tardi/pos-magmatic processes that could concentrate them. The SW side of the granite is cut by leucocratic rhyolite dykes that show some radiometric anomalies. These rocks, which are highly diferentiated, were emplaced contemporaneously to the Serra do Carambei Granite. Although petrographic and chronological similarities are found between the uraniferous alaskite of Roessing (Namibia) and the Serra do Carambei Granite anyhow it was not possible to establish any lateral continuity with the uranifeous Pan-African Province. (Author) [pt

  1. Soil Radon In The Nigerian Younger Granites | Dewu | Nigerian ...

    ... not had enough time to attain equilibrium with its daughters. In general, the results suggest that with proper control, soil radon measurements over the Younger Granite can be used for uranium exploration in the region. Keywords: Radon, younger granite, soil uranium, half-lifeand thorium. Nigerian Journal of Physics Vol.

  2. Recycling of petroleum-contaminated sand.

    Taha, R; Ba-Omar, M; Pillay, A E; Roos, G; al-Hamdi, A

    2001-08-01

    The environmental impact of using petroleum-contaminated sand (PCS) as a substitute in asphalt paving mixtures was examined. An appreciable component of PCS is oily sludge, which is found as the dregs in oil storage tanks and is also produced as a result of oil spills on clean sand. The current method for the disposal of oily sludge is land farming. However, this method has not been successful as an oil content of reuse of the sludge in asphalt paving mixtures was therefore considered as an alternative. Standard tests and environmental studies were conducted to establish the integrity of the materials containing the recycled sludge. These included physical and chemical characterization of the sludge itself, and an assessment of the mechanical properties of materials containing 0%, 5%, 22% and 50% oily sludge. The blended mixtures were subjected to special tests, such as Marshall testing and the determination of stability and flow properties. The experimental results indicated that mixtures containing up to 22% oily sludge could meet the necessary criteria for a specific asphalt concrete wearing course or bituminous base course. To maximize the assay from the recycled material, the environmental assessment was restricted to the 50% oily sludge mixture. Leachates associated with this particular mixture were assayed for total organic residue and certain hazardous metal contaminants. The results revealed that the organics were negligible, and the concentrations of the metals were not significant. Thus, no adverse environmental impact should be anticipated from the use of the recycled product. Our research showed that the disposal of oily sludge in asphalt paving mixtures could possibly yield considerable savings per tonne of asphalt concrete, and concurrently minimize any direct impact on the environment.

  3. Adsorption behavior of Am(III) on granite

    Zhang Yingjie; Feng Xiaogui; Liang Junfu; Chen Jing; Su Rui; Wang Ju; Liu Chunli

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Am(III) on granite (sampled from drilling well BS01 at Beishan (BS) area--a potential candidate site for China's high-level radioactive waste repository, the granite sample's depth about 300 m) was studied in BS03 well groundwater by a batch technique at (25±1) degree C. The influences of pH, sulphate ion, total carbonate ion, humic acid, and concentration of the Am(III) on the adsorption behavior were also studied, and the possible adsorption mechanism was discussed. Experimental results show that the adsorption distribution rate of Am(III) on granite increases with increasing pH of aqueous phase. The chemical composition of the groundwater is the main factor which influences the species of Am(III) and adsorption behavior. The adsorption mechanism of Am(III) on granite is surface complexation. The adsorption isotherm of Am(III) on granite can be described by Freundlich's equation. (authors)

  4. Utilising Fine and Coarse Recycled Aggregates from the Gulf Region in Concrete

    Jones, M. Rod; Halliday, Judith E.; Csetenyi, Laszlo; Zheng, Li; Strompinis, N.

    This paper explores the feasibility in utilising materials generated from C&DW to produce a `green' concrete. The two materials that are considered here are, (i) up-sizing silt-size material generated from recycled aggregates to produce a synthetic silt-sand and (ii) processed recycled coarse aggregates (RA) sourced from a Gulf Region landfill site. The work has demonstrated that there is potential for utilising silt wastes into foamed concrete, which can then be crushed to a sand-sized material suitable for use in concrete, however the porous nature of the material has highlighted that the water demand of this RA is high. RAs were characterised to BS EN 12620 and found suitable for use in concrete. The effect of RA on concrete properties is minimal when used up to 35% replacement levels, provided that they are pre-soaked.

  5. Study on the durability of concrete using granulated blast furnace slag as fine aggregate

    Shi, Dongsheng; Liu, Qiang; Xue, Xinxin; He, Peiyuan

    2018-03-01

    In order to assessing the durability of concrete using granulated blastfurnace slag (GBS) as fine aggregate and compare it with natural river sand concrete, three different size of specimen were produced by using the same mix proportion with 3 different water cement ratios and 3 replacement ratios, and using it to measure the three aspects on the durability of concrete including freeze-thaw performance, dry-shrinkage performance and anti-chloride-permeability performance. In this paper. The test results show that using GBS as fine aggregate can slightly improve anti-chloride-permeability performance and dry-shrinkage performance of concrete in the condition of low water cement ratio, on the other hand, using GBS or natural river sand as fine aggregate has almost similar durability of concrete.

  6. Properties of lightweight aggregate concrete prepared with PVC granules derived from scraped PVC pipes.

    Kou, S C; Lee, G; Poon, C S; Lai, W L

    2009-02-01

    This paper aims to investigate the fresh and hardened properties of lightweight aggregate concretes that are prepared with the use of recycled plastic waste sourced from scraped PVC pipes to replace river sand as fine aggregates. A number of laboratory prepared concrete mixes were tested, in which river sand was partially replaced by PVC plastic waste granules in percentages of 0%, 5%, 15%, 30% and 45% by volume. Two major findings are identified. The positive side shows that the concrete prepared with a partial replacement by PVC was lighter (lower density), was more ductile (greater Poisson's ratios and reduced modulus of elasticity), and had lower drying shrinkage and higher resistance to chloride ion penetration. The negative side reveals that the workability, compressive strength and tensile splitting strength of the concretes were reduced. The results gathered would form a part of useful information for recycling PVC plastic waste in lightweight concrete mixes.

  7. Reuse of thermosetting plastic waste for lightweight concrete.

    Panyakapo, Phaiboon; Panyakapo, Mallika

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the utilization of thermosetting plastic as an admixture in the mix proportion of lightweight concrete. Since this type of plastic cannot be melted in the recycling process, its waste is expected to be more valuable by using as an admixture for the production of non-structural lightweight concrete. Experimental tests for the variation of mix proportion were carried out to determine the suitable proportion to achieve the required properties of lightweight concrete, which are: low dry density and acceptable compressive strength. The mix design in this research is the proportion of plastic, sand, water-cement ratio, aluminum powder, and lignite fly ash. The experimental results show that the plastic not only leads to a low dry density concrete, but also a low strength. It was found that the ratio of cement, sand, fly ash, and plastic equal to 1.0:0.8:0.3:0.9 is an appropriate mix proportion. The results of compressive strength and dry density are 4.14N/mm2 and 1395 kg/m3, respectively. This type of concrete meets most of the requirements for non-load-bearing lightweight concrete according to ASTM C129 Type II standard.

  8. Effect of Hand Mixing on the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    James Isiwu AGUWA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of hand mixing on the compressive strength of concrete. Before designing the concrete mix, sieve analysis of sharp sand and chippings was carried out and their fineness moduli were determined. Also the dry weight of chippings and the specific gravities of both sand and chippings were determined. A designed concrete mix of 1:2:4 was used and the number of turnings of the mixture over from one end to another by hand mixing was varying from one time up to and including seven times. The strengths were measured at the curing ages of 7, 14, 21 and 28 days respectively using 150mm concrete cubes cast, cured and crushed. The results revealed that the compressive strengths of concrete cubes appreciably increased with increase in number of turnings from one to four times but remained almost constant beyond four times of turning for all the ages tested. For example, at 1, 2, and 3 times turning; the compressive strengths at 28 days were 4.67, 13.37 and 20.28N/mm2 respectively while at 4, 5 and 6 times turning; the compressive strengths at 28 days were 21.15, 21.34 and 21.69N/mm2. From the data, adequate strengths were not developed at turnings below three times of hand mixing, concluding that a minimum of three times turning is required to produce concrete with satisfactory strength.

  9. Chemical characteristics of zircon from A-type granites and comparison to zircon of S-type granites

    Breiter, Karel; Lamarão, C. N.; Krás Borges, R. M.; Dall'Agnol, R.

    1192/195, April (2014), s. 208-225 ISSN 0024-4937 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : zircon * A-type granites * S-type granites * Wiborg batholith * Brazil * Krušné hory/Erzgebirge Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 4.482, year: 2014

  10. Defining clogging potential for permeable concrete.

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2018-08-15

    Permeable concrete is used to reduce urban flooding as it allows water to flow through normally impermeable infrastructure. It is prone to clogging by particulate matter and predicting the long-term performance of permeable concrete is challenging as there is currently no reliable means of characterising clogging potential. This paper reports on the performance of a range of laboratory-prepared and commercial permeable concretes, close packed glass spheres and aggregate particles of varying size, exposed to different clogging methods to understand this phenomena. New methods were developed to study clogging and define clogging potential. The tests involved applying flowing water containing sand and/or clay in cycles, and measuring the change in permeability. Substantial permeability reductions were observed in all samples, particularly when exposed to sand and clay simultaneously. Three methods were used to define clogging potential based on measuring the initial permeability decay, half-life cycle and number of cycles to full clogging. We show for the first time strong linear correlations between these parameters for a wide range of samples, indicating their use for service-life prediction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fibre Concrete 2017

    2017-09-01

    9th international conference on fibre reinforced concretes (FRC), textile reinforced concretes (TRC) and ultra-high performance concretes (UHPC) Preface The Fibre Concrete Conference series is held biennially to provide a platform to share knowledge on fibre reinforced concretes, textile concretes and ultra-high performance concretes regarding material properties and behaviour, technology procedures, topics of long-term behaviour, creep, durability; sustainable aspects of concrete including utilisation of waste materials in concrete production and recycling of concrete. The tradition of Fibre Concrete Conferences started in eighties of the last century. Nowadays the conference is organized by the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The 9th International Conference Fibre Concrete 2017 had 109 participants from 27 countries all over the world. 55 papers were presented including keynote lectures of Professor Bažant, Professor Bartoš and Dr. Broukalová. The conference program covered wide range of topics from scientific research to practical applications. The presented contributions related to performance and behaviour of cement based composites, their long-term behaviour and durability, sustainable aspects, advanced analyses of structures from these composites and successful applications. This conference was organized also to honour Professor Zděnek P. Bažant on the occasion of his jubilee and to appreciate his merits and discoveries in the field of fibre reinforced composites, structural mechanics and engineering.

  12. Mechanics of Granular Materials: Experimentation and Simulations for Determining the Compressive and Shear Behaviors of Sand at Granular and Meso Scales

    2011-09-30

    successfully applied to characterize polymers [47], ceramics [15], borosilicate glass [14] and concrete [21]. 3.2 Experimental Procedure A self-aligning...respectively. 54 4.1 Results 4.1.1 Sand Specimen Assembly The color of individual Eglin sand grains are yellow (either transparent or translucent ) under an

  13. Application of granulated lead–zinc slag in concrete as an opportunity to save natural resources

    Alwaeli, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The last decades marked a period of growth and prosperity in construction industry which involves the use of natural resources. This growth is jeopardized by the lack of natural resources that are available. On the other hand there has been rapid increase in the industrial waste production. Most of the waste do not find any effective use and cause a waste disposal crisis, thereby contributing to health and environmental problems. Recycling of industrial waste as aggregate is thus a logical option to manage this problem. The paper reports on some experimental results obtained from the production of concretes containing granulated slag of lead and zinc industry as sand replacement mixed in different proportions. Granulated slag is substituted for raw sand, partly or totally. Ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight of sand are used. The effects of granulated lead–zinc slag (GLZS) as sand replacement material on the compressive strength and gamma radiation attenuation properties of concrete are investigated and analyzed. Then, these properties are compared with those of ordinary concrete. The results showed that replacement material have some effects on the compressive strength and gamma radiation properties of the concrete. The experimental results indicate that, the concrete mixed with GLZS as a sand replacement have better strength. Concerning the absorption properties for gamma radiation the data show that the addition of GLZS resulted in an increase of the attenuation of gamma radiation. Consequently, these concretes could be used for construction of shields protecting personnel who work in laboratories where radiation is used. Additionally, the thickness of the concrete with GLZS was calculated and compared with ordinary concrete. - Highlights: ► Utilization of granulated lead–zinc slag as sand replacement in concrete was investigated. ► Compressive strength and gamma attenuation of concrete included granulated slag was examined. ► The tests results

  14. Questioning the Sedimentary Paradigm for Granites

    Glazner, A. F.; Bartley, J. M.; Coleman, D. S.; Boudreau, A.; Walker, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    A critical question regarding volcano-pluton links is whether plutons are samples of magma that passed through on its way to eruption, or residues left behind after volcanic rocks were extracted. A persistent theme of recent work on granites sensu lato is that many are sedimentary accumulations of crystals that lost significant volumes of magmatic liquid. This view is based on observations of structures that clearly seem to reflect deposition on a magma chamber floor (e.g., flows of chilled mafic magma into silicic magma) and on the inference that many other structures, such as modal layering, truncated layering, and crystal accumulations, reflect crystal sedimentation on such chamber floors. There are significant physical and geochemical reasons to question this view, based on observations in the Sierra Nevada of California and similar results from other batholiths. First, few granites show the enrichments in Ba, Sr, and relative Eu that feldspar accumulation should produce. Second, sedimentary features such as graded bedding and cross-bedding form in highly turbulent flows, but turbulence is unachievable in viscous silicic liquids, where velocities on the order of 104 m/s would be required to induce turbulence in a liquid with η=104 Pa s. Third, tabular modally layered domains commonly cut surrounding modal layering on both sides, and orientations of modal layering and of the troughs of "ladder dikes" commonly scatter widely within hectare-sized areas; it is difficult to reconcile these features with gravity-driven settling. Fourth, accumulations of K-feldspar megacrysts are typically inferred to be depositional, but this is precluded by crystallization of most K- feldspar after rheologic lock-up occurs. Finally, accumulations of K-feldspar and hornblende are typically packed too tightly to be depositional. With analogy to layered mafic intrusions, many features attributed to crystal sedimentation in granites may be better explained by crystal aging and other in

  15. Total exploitation of an ornamental granite quarry

    Taboada, J.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a methodology to estimate the recovery percentage for each of the products which can be obtained from the exploitation of an ornamental granite quarry: block, semiblock, masonry-transverse stone, and the smaller materials that can be used to obtain construction aggregates. This methodology ensures that quarry exploitation is exhaustive, thereby minimising the production of spoils and the consequent negative impact on the environment. The analysis is based on a detailed and exhaustive compilation of discontinuity data from the research fronts, which are then interpreted statistically and projected over the three weakness planes that are a particular feature of ornamental granite deposits. Using this information, and bearing in mind the minimum commercially viable sizes for each kind of granite, the corresponding recovery rates are calculated for each material in each plane. The results are then integrated using spatial techniques, and the result is an evaluation of quarry contents with a view to total exploitation. This methodology was applied to a quarry in the opening phase in order to carry out an a priori assessment of the economic feasibility of the quarry.

    En este trabajo se propone una metodología para estimar el porcentaje de recuperación de cada uno de los productos que se pueden obtener en la explotación de una cantera de granito ornamental: bloque, semibloque, manpostería y per piaños, y material restante destinado a la obtención de áridos. De esta manera se logra un aprovechamiento integral de la cantera, evitándose la generación de estériles y el subsiguiente impacto ambiental producido por éstos. La metodología de análisis se basa en la recopilación detallada y exhaustiva de datos de discontinuidades en los frentes de investigación, que se interpretan estadísticamente y se proyectan sobre los tres planos de debilidad propios del granito ornamental. Con esta información, y las

  16. Western Gas Sands Project status report

    Atkinson, C.H.

    1978-11-30

    Progress of government-sponsored projects directed toward increasing gas production from the low-permeability gas sands of the western United States is summarized. A Technology Implementation Plan (TIP) meeting was held at the CER office in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 16--19 to initiate the implementation phase of the Enhanced Gas Recovery (EGR) working group activities. A WGSP Logging Program meeting was conducted on October 24, 1978, at CER offices to define the problems associated with logs in tight gas sands. CER personnel and the project manager attended a two-day course on the fundamentals of core and reservoir analysis in Denver, Colorado, and met with USGS personnel to discuss USGS work on the WGSP. A meeting was held to discuss a contract for coring a Twin Arrow well on the Douglas Creek Arch, Colorado. CER Corporation personnel attended the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting held in Toronto, Canada, October 23--27 and a Gas Stimulation Workshop at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 11 and 12 to discuss recent mineback experiments conducted at the Nevada Test Site. Fiscal year 1979 projects initiated by USGS and the Energy Technology Centers and National Laboratories are progressing as scheduled. Mobil Research and Development Corporation fractured zone 8 of the F-31-13G well in Rio Blanco County, Colorado. Colorado Interstate Gas Company poured the concrete pad for the compresser expected to be delivered in December and were laying pipeline between the wells at month end. The Mitchell Energy well, Muse Duke No. 1 was flowing on test at a rate of 2,100 Mcfd and preparations proceeded to fracture the well on November 15 with approximately 1,000,000 gal of fluid and 3,000,000 lb of sand. Terra Tek completed laboratory analyses of cores taken from the Mitchell Energy well.

  17. Oil sands development update

    1999-01-01

    A detailed review and update of oil sands development in Alberta are provided covering every aspect of the production and economic aspects of the industry. It is pointed out that at present oil sands account for 28 per cent of Canadian crude oil production, expected to reach 50 per cent by 2005. Based on recent announcements, a total of 26 billion dollars worth of projects are in progress or planned; 20 billion dollars worth of this development is in the Athabasca area, the remainder in Cold Lake and other areas. The current update envisages up to 1,800,000 barrels per day by 2008, creating 47,000 new jobs and total government revenues through direct and indirect taxes of 118 billion dollars. Provinces other than Alberta also benefit from these development, since 60 per cent of all employment and income created by oil sands production is in other parts of Canada. Up to 60 per cent of the expansion is for goods and services and of this, 50 to 55 per cent will be purchased from Canadian sources. The remaining 40 per cent of the new investment is for engineering and construction of which 95 per cent is Canadian content. Aboriginal workforce by common consent of existing operators matches regional representation (about 13 per cent), and new developers are expected to match these standards. Planned or ongoing development in environmental protection through improved technologies and optimization, energy efficiency and improved tailings management, and active support of flexibility mechanisms such as emission credits trading, joint implementation and carbon sinks are very high on the industry's agenda. The importance of offsets are discussed extensively along with key considerations for international negotiations, as well as further research of other options such as sequestration, environmentally benign disposal of waste, and enhanced voluntary action

  18. Jarosite added concrete along with fly ash: Properties and characteristics in fresh state

    Priyansha Mehra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of different properties and characteristics of jarosite added concrete along with fly ash during its fresh state. Jarosite is an industrial by product from zinc manufacturing industry obtained through hydrometallurgical process from its sulphide ore. It has been tried to incorporate jarosite in concrete as sand replacement. Different concrete mixtures have been prepared for three water–cement ratios (0.40, 0.45 and 0.50 and 5 jarosite replacement levels (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%. Cement has been partially replaced (25% by fly ash in all the concrete mixtures. Density, workability and setting & hardening of fresh concrete has been evaluated and analyzed. Keeping the environmental suitability of concrete in mind, toxicity leaching characteristic potential test has been performed on raw jarosite and concrete samples.

  19. Vibration behaviour of foamed concrete floor with polypropylene and rise husk ash fibre

    Azaman, N. A. Mohd; Ghafar, N. H. Abd; Ayub, N.; Ibrahim, M. Z.

    2017-11-01

    In the history of the construction industry, lightweight concrete or foamed concrete is a special concrete which can very useful in the construction sector because it is very lightweight and it can compact by itself at each angle of foamwork. Foamed concrete is one of lightweight concrete which widely used for floor construction due to its light weight and economic. The significant challenges in the floor design process are considering the vibration that needs improvements for the poor dynamic behaviour insulation. An alternative material to replace sand with certain amount of rice husk ash (RHA) and polypropylene was introduced. Research was determine the dynamic behavior of foam-polypropylene and foam-RHA concrete by using impact hammer test. The natural frequency for normal foamed concrete, 0.5 % of Polypropylene and 15% of RHA is 29.8 Hz, 29.3 Hz and 29.5 Hz respectively.

  20. Aggregate effects on γ-ray shielding characteristics and compressive strength on concrete

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Choi, Soo Seok; Mun, Young Bun; Lee, Jae Hyung; Choi, Hyun Kook

    2016-01-01

    We observed the γ-ray shielding characteristics and compressive strength of five types of concrete using general aggregates and high-weight aggregates. The aggregates were classified into fine aggregate and coarse aggregate according to the average size. The experimental results obtained an attenuation coefficient of 0.371 cm-1 from a concrete with the oxidizing slag sand (OSS) and oxidizing slag gravel (OSG) for a γ-ray of "1"3"7Cs, which is improved by 2% compared with a concrete with typical aggregates of sand and gravel. In the unit weight measurement, a concrete prepared by iron ore sand (IOS) and OSG had the highest value of 3,175 kg·m"-"3. Although the unit weight of the concrete with OSS and OSG was 3,052 kg·m"-"3, which was lower than the maximum unit weight condition by 123 kg·m"-"3, its attenuation coefficient was improved by 0.012 cm-1. The results of chemical analysis of aggregates revealed that the magnesium content in oxidizing slag was lower than that in iron ore, while the calcium content was higher. The concrete with oxidizing slag aggregates demonstrated enhanced γ-ray shielding performance due to a relatively high calcium content compared with the concrete with OSS and OSG in spite of a low unit weight. All sample concretes mixed with high-weight aggregates had higher compressive strength than the concrete with typical sand and gravel. When OSS and IOS were used, the highest compressive strength was 50.2 MPa, which was an improvement by 45% over general concrete, which was achieved after four weeks of curing

  1. Aggregate effects on γ-ray shielding characteristics and compressive strength on concrete

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Choi, Soo Seok [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Young Bun; Lee, Jae Hyung; Choi, Hyun Kook [Sungshin Cement Co., Ltd, Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We observed the γ-ray shielding characteristics and compressive strength of five types of concrete using general aggregates and high-weight aggregates. The aggregates were classified into fine aggregate and coarse aggregate according to the average size. The experimental results obtained an attenuation coefficient of 0.371 cm-1 from a concrete with the oxidizing slag sand (OSS) and oxidizing slag gravel (OSG) for a γ-ray of {sup 137}Cs, which is improved by 2% compared with a concrete with typical aggregates of sand and gravel. In the unit weight measurement, a concrete prepared by iron ore sand (IOS) and OSG had the highest value of 3,175 kg·m{sup -3}. Although the unit weight of the concrete with OSS and OSG was 3,052 kg·m{sup -3}, which was lower than the maximum unit weight condition by 123 kg·m{sup -3}, its attenuation coefficient was improved by 0.012 cm-1. The results of chemical analysis of aggregates revealed that the magnesium content in oxidizing slag was lower than that in iron ore, while the calcium content was higher. The concrete with oxidizing slag aggregates demonstrated enhanced γ-ray shielding performance due to a relatively high calcium content compared with the concrete with OSS and OSG in spite of a low unit weight. All sample concretes mixed with high-weight aggregates had higher compressive strength than the concrete with typical sand and gravel. When OSS and IOS were used, the highest compressive strength was 50.2 MPa, which was an improvement by 45% over general concrete, which was achieved after four weeks of curing.

  2. Passivation condition of carbon steel in bentonite/sand mixture

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawakami, Susumu

    2002-03-01

    It is essential to understand the corrosion type of carbon steel under the repository conditions for the lifetime assessment of carbon steel overpack used for geological isolation of high-level radioactive waste. According to the previous study, carbon steel is hard to passivate in buffer material assuming a chemical condition range of groundwater in Japan. However, concrete support will be constructed around the overpack in the case of repository in the soft rock system and groundwater having a higher pH may infiltrate to buffer material. There is a possibility that the corrosion type of carbon steel will be influenced by the rise of the pH in groundwater. In this study, anodic polarization experiments were performed to understand the passivation condition of carbon steel in buffer material saturated with water contacted with concrete. An ordinary concrete an a low-alkalinity concrete were used in the experiment. The results of the experiments showed that the carbon steel can passivate under the condition that water having pH > 13 infiltrate to the buffer material assuming present property of buffer material. If the low-alkalinity concrete is selected as the support material, passivation can not occur on carbon steel overpack. The effect of the factors of buffer material such as dry density and mixing ratio of sand on the passivation of carbon steel was also studied. The results of the study showed that the present property of buffer material is enough to prevent passivation of carbon steel. (author)

  3. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  4. Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Sim J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern over global warming and significant ecological changes requires sustainable development in all fields of science and technology. Concrete not only consumes huge amount of energy and natural sources, but also emits large amount of CO2, mainly due to the production of cement. It is evident that such large amount of concrete production has put significant impact on the energy, resource, environment, and ecology of the society. Hence, how to develop the concrete technology in a sustainable way has become a significant issue. In this paper, some of Korean researches for sustainable development of concrete are presented. These are sustainable strengthening for deteriorated concrete structure, sustainable reinforcement of new concrete structure, sustainable concrete using recycled aggregate and supplementary cementing materials and finally application of each technique to precast concrete.

  5. Concrete pavement joint deterioration.

    2015-12-01

    Concrete pavements are an important part of our national infrastructure. In recent years the relatively small number of reported joints deteriorating prematurely in concrete pavements around Indiana has increased. Changes over the past 45 years in IN...

  6. Concrete aggregate durability study.

    2009-06-01

    There are many factors that affect the durability of Portland cement concrete (PCC), including the mix design and the : materials used, the quality of construction, and the environment. Durability is not an intrinsic property of the concrete, but : i...

  7. The Oldest Granites of Russia: Paleoarchean (3343 Ma) Subalkali Granites of the Okhotsk Massif

    Kuzmin, V. K.; Bogomolov, E. S.; Glebovitskii, V. A.; Rodionov, N. V.

    2018-02-01

    The Paleoarchean age (3.34 Ga) of subalkali granite magmatism first established for the Kukhtui uplift of the Okhotsk Massif suggests a formation time of the mature continental K-rich crust in this region as early as the Paleoarchean. According to the geological structural, mineralogical-geochemical, geochronological, and isotopic-geochemical data, the Kukhtui uplift can be considered as the most ancient Paleoarchean province in Russia: the ancient consolidation core of the sialic protocrust of the Okhotsk-Omolon Craton.

  8. Alkaline lixiviation of uranium in granitic pegmatite

    Jambor, S.

    1980-06-01

    The work described herein concerns the determination of the experimental optimum conditions for the alkaline lixiviation of uranium based on the following parameters: time, pH, temperature, density and grane size. The samples were obtained from the Supamo complex, near the Currupia river in the Piar District of the Bolivar State in Venezuela. They have a granitic composition and graphitic texture. The uranium was found in them as a secondary oxidized mineral of green-yellow colour localized in fractures fissures, intergranular spaces and also in the mica as. Secondary uranitite. The lixiviation process was carried out using Na 2 CO 3 /NaHCO 3 buffer solution and for 100 gr. samples the best values for an efficient process were found by using 170 mesh grane size and 500 ml of pH buffer at 70 0 C for a 24 hour time period. (author)

  9. Sorption of actinides in granitic rock

    Allard, B

    1982-11-01

    The sorption of americium (III), neptunium(V) and plutonium on geologic media under oxic conditions has been measured by a batch technique. The aqueous phase was a synthetic groundwater or 4M NaCl solution. The solid phase was a pure mineral, representative of igneous rocks, or granite. Altogether 40 different minerals and rocks were used. The effects of pH and the ionic strength of the aqueous phase as well as of the cation exchange capacity and the surface/mass ratio of the solid sorbent are discussed. Empirical equations giving the distribution coefficient as a function of pH in the environmental pH-range 7-9 are suggested. Some observations and conclusions concerning sorption mechanisms are given. (author)

  10. Example of fracture characterization in granitic rock

    Thorpe, R.K.

    1981-03-01

    A detailed study of geologic discontinuities for an underground heater test in highly fractured granitic rock is reported. Several prominent shear fractures were delineated within a 6 x 30 x 15 m rock mass by correlating surface mapping and borehole fracture logs. Oblique-reverse faulting is suspected on at least one of the surfaces, and its inferred borehole intercepts appear to be collinear in the direction of slickensiding observed in the field. Four distinct joint sets were identified, one of which coincides with the shear fractures. Another lies nearly horizontal, and two others are steeply inclined and orthogonal. Fracture lengths and spacings for the four joint sets are represented by lognormal probability distributions

  11. Paleo-redox boundaries in fractured granite

    Dideriksen, K.; Christiansen, B. C.; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2010-01-01

    dissolved iron to the groundwater. During such cycling, the Fe isotopes fractionate to an extent that is expected to depend on temperature. In this study, we report on the use of Fe-oxides as paleoredox indicators, using their structure, morphology and Fe-composition as a clue for formation conditions....... In samples taken from similar to 120 m drill cores in granite from SE Sweden, X-ray amorphous, superparamagnetic, nanometre-sized Fe-oxides are confined to fractures of the upper,-,50 m, whereas well-crystalline Fe-oxides, with particle sizes typical for soils, occur down to similar to 110 m. We also...... identified hematite with a particle size of 100 nm, similar to hematite of hydrothermal origin. The Fe isotope composition of the fine-grained Fe-oxides (-1 parts per thousand

  12. Radionuclide sorption on granitic drill core material

    Eriksen, T.E.; Locklund, B.

    1987-11-01

    Distribution ratios were determined for Sr-85, Cs-134 and Eu-152 on crushed granite and fissure coating/filling material from Stripa mines. Measurements were also carried out on intact fissure surfaces. The experimental data for Sr-85, Cs-134 on crushed material can be accomodated by a sorption model based on the assumption that the crushed material consists of porous spheres with outer and inner surfaces available for sorption. In the case of Eu-152 only sorption on the outer surfaces of the crushed material was observed. The absence of sorption on inner surfaces is most probably due to high depletion of the more strongly sorbed Eu-152 in the water phase and very low diffusivity of Eu-152 in the sorbed state. (orig./HP)

  13. Distribution of radioactive minerals in a granite

    Coppens, R

    1949-04-04

    The study, by means of a photographic plate, of the radioactivity of a Brittany granite, both of a pulverized sample and of a polished sample, has resulted in a complete determination of the radioactivity present. The ratio of the concentration of Th to that of U i.e., C/sub Th/C/sub U/, was determined as approximately 2.8 using the relationship between the concentration of these elements and the number of ..beta.. particles in a particular range which were detected. Using this ratio and measuring the average number of ..cap alpha.. particles emitted/cm/sup 2//sec, the average activities were found to correspond to concentrations of the order of 10/sup -5/ of both metals. The lack of uniformity in the distribution of the radioactivity within the crystal is noted.

  14. BH5047 type depth sand moisture-meter of high sensitivity

    Ji Changsong; Xie Liangnian; Zhang Shulan; Zhang Shuheng

    2000-01-01

    A new depth neutron moisture meter BH5047 has been developed. BH5047 neutron moisture meter is characterised by it is high sensitivity and used for sand water content measurement at concrete mixer. Calibration function is obtained by the Method of Least Squares. Linear correlation efficiency is as good as 0.9977

  15. Effect of basalt, silica sand and fly ash on the mechanical properties ...

    2018-05-17

    May 17, 2018 ... For this, we first manufactured binary PCs of epoxy/basalt ... Keywords. Polymer concrete; mechanical strength; mixture design; fly ash; silica sand; basalt. 1. .... To reduce the production cost of PCs, it is necessary to minimize ...

  16. Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining

    Young, R.; Griffith, A.

    2009-04-01

    For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of beach (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of beach sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of beach have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by beach sand mining include: destruction of natural beaches and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a

  17. Lunar concrete for construction

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  18. Life cycle uses of concrete for more sustainable construction

    Horvath, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2001-07-01

    This paper examined ways in which the environmental burdens of construction in general and concrete production in particular can be reduced. Aggregates for concrete production include sand, gravel and stone. They account for most (80 per cent) of the materials used in the United States. This paper argued that given the fact that environmental concerns are an important social issue, the issue of natural resource conservation should be addressed. Some of the life-cycle assessments and comparative design issues associated with concrete construction were summarized. The author presented the example that often the initial cost of a new pavement application may indicate a lower environmental impact than an equivalent design when asphalt is used over reinforced concrete. However, annualized impacts may result in comparable environmental assessments. The same is true for bridge girders, reinforced concrete also seems to be a better environmental choice than steel. This paper also described end-of-life options that involve the use of waste products and recycled products in concrete and other materials to reduce the overall environmental impacts of a product or facility. This paper was divided into several sections entitled: life cycle assessments; life cycle inventory assessment of concretes and asphalt pavements; and, life cycle inventory assessment of concrete and steel bridge girders. 16 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Use of recycled fine aggregate in concretes with durable requirements.

    Zega, Claudio Javier; Di Maio, Angel Antonio

    2011-11-01

    The use of construction waste materials as aggregates for concrete production is highly attractive compared to the use of non-renewable natural resources, promoting environmental protection and allowing the development of a new raw material. Several countries have recommendations for the use of recycled coarse aggregate in structural concrete, whereas the use of the fine fraction is limited because it may produce significant changes in some properties of concrete. However, during the last decade the use of recycled fine aggregates (RFA) has achieved a great international interest, mainly because of economic implications related to the shortage of natural sands suitable for the production of concrete, besides to allow an integral use of this type of waste. In this study, the durable behaviour of structural concretes made with different percentage of RFA (0%, 20%, and 30%) is evaluated. Different properties related to the durability of concretes such as absorption, sorptivity, water penetration under pressure, and carbonation are determined. In addition, the results of compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage are presented. The obtained results indicate that the recycled concretes have a suitable resistant and durable behaviour, according to the limits indicated by different international codes for structural concrete. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical Properties of High Strength Concrete Containing Coal Bottom Ash and Oil-Palm Boiler Clinker as Fine Aggregates

    Soofinajafi Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to utilize Coal Furnace Bottom ash (CBA and Oil-Palm Boiler Clinker (OPBC as fine aggregate in concrete mix proportions. They are solid wastes from power plant and Oil Palm industry, respectively. Since these by-products do not have any primary use and are pure waste, an opportunity to use them as aggregate in concrete industry not only is economical but also will be an environmental friendly opportunity leading towards a more sustainable production chain. CBA and OPBC sands had similar grading to normal sand but have lower density and higher water absorption. In a high strength concrete, normal sand was replaced up to 25% with either CBA or OPBC. Test results showed that although water absorption of these wastes was more than normal sand but the slump value of concrete containing each of these wastes showed that these concretes had good workability. All mixes containing these wastes had slightly lower compressive strength at early ages and equivalent or higher compressive strength at later ages compared to control mix. The 28-day compressive strength of these concretes was in the range of 69–76 MPa which can be categorized as high strength concrete. In general, the performance of OPBC was better than CBA at 25% replacement level. However, it is recommended that at least 12.5% of total volume of fine aggregate in a high strength concrete is used of CBA or OPBC.

  1. Effect of Pelletized Coconut Fibre on the Compressive Strength of Foamed Concrete

    Mohd Jaini Zainorizuan; Mokhatar Shahrul Niza; Mohd Yusof Ammar Saifuddin; Zulkiply Syurafarina; Abd Rahman Mohd Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Foamed concrete is a controlled low density ranging from 400kg/m3 to 1800kg/m3, and hence suitable for the construction of buildings and infrastructures. The uniqueness of foamed concrete is does not use aggregates in order to retain low density. Foamed concrete contains only cement, sand, water and foam agent. Therefore, the consumption of cement is higher in producing a good quality and strength of foamed concrete. Without the present of aggregates, the compressive strength of foamed concre...

  2. Study on Chloride Ion Penetration Resistance of Rubberized Concrete Under Steady State Condition

    Md Noor Nurazuwa; Yamamoto Daisuke; Hamada Hidenori; Sagawa Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Foamed concrete is a controlled low density ranging from 400kg/m3 to 1800kg/m3, and hence suitable for the construction of buildings and infrastructures. The uniqueness of foamed concrete is does not use aggregates in order to retain low density. Foamed concrete contains only cement, sand, water and foam agent. Therefore, the consumption of cement is higher in producing a good quality and strength of foamed concrete. Without the present of aggregates, the compressive strength of foamed concre...

  3. Reinforced sulphur concrete

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced sulphur concrete wherein one or more metal reinforcing members are in contact with sulphur concrete is disclosed. The reinforced sulphur concrete comprises an adhesion promoter that enhances the interaction between the sulphur and the one or more metal reinforcing members.

  4. Deterioration of Concrete Structures

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Chloride ingress is a common cause of deterioration of reinforced concrete bridges. Concrete may be exposed to chloride by seawater or de-icing salts. The chloride initiates corrosion of the reinforcement, which through expansion disrupts the concrete. In addition, the corrosion reduces the cross...

  5. concrete5 for developers

    Uzayr, Sufyan bin

    2014-01-01

    Whether you have had some previous experience with concrete5 or are entirely new to it, this book will help you understand all that you need to know in order to get started with concrete5 development. A background in PHP is required; some knowledge of HTML/CSS is needed in order to fully grasp the concepts underlying concrete5 theme development.

  6. Assessment of Fine Aggregates from Different Sources in Ibadan and Environs for Concrete Production

    W. O. Ajagbe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of natural sand being used as fine aggregate for concrete production in Ibadan and its environs was carried out. Ten sources (F1 – F10 were selected for the study; four (F5, F6, F7, F8 were river sand sources while six (F1, F2, F3, F4, F9, F10 were burrow pit sand sources. Samples from each source were subjected to sieve analysis, atterberg limit, bulk density, specific gravity, water absorption, sand equivalent, clay lumps and friable particles, amount of materials passing 75μm and organic impurities adopting ASTM standard procedures. Results revealed that sand from river sources met all the criteria for concrete production stated in ASTM standard while sand from burrow pits deviated from limits of the standard in some respects. F10 had water absorption of 2.6% which exceeded maximum 2% specified, F9 was not free from clay lumps and friable particles with a significant value of 6% as against 3% maximum specification. F1, F2, F3, F4, F9 and F10 have more amounts of materials passing the 75μm sieve ranging from 10.8% for F9 to 20.1% for F10 than maximum of 5% in standard specification while F1, F9 and F10 showed an indication of having organic impurities. It is recommended that performance test be conducted on concrete made from burrow pits sand before use for concrete production. The knowledge of this study can be used as a prospecting tool for selecting suitable sand for the production of quality concrete.

  7. Granitic rocks from the southern Gyeongsang basin, southeastern Korea, (1)

    Lee, Yoon-Jong

    1980-01-01

    In southern Gyeongsang basin, southeastern Korea, there are many granitic rock masses. They were divided into 7 groups according to their geological evidences. K-Ar age was determined on 36 samples obtained from the respective groups. Group A: pre-Gyeongsang granitic rock (Pre-Cretaceous), A 1 220 m.y., A 2 166 m.y.; group B: outer zone granitic rock (Cretaceous), 115-72 m.y.; group C: ditto (ditto), 97-70 m.y.; group D: ditto (ditto), 89-68 m.y.; group E: ditto (ditto), 82-68 m.y.; group F: inner zone granitic rock (Cretaceous), 75-74 m.y.; group G: Tertiary granitic rock, 63-41 m.y. The large part of the Cretaceous granitic masses show the double elongated ring form. Most of the Tertiary granitic rocks were probably emplaced in close relation with the Eonyang fault line and Ulsan fault line/or their extension line of the area. (J.P.N.)

  8. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Pulverized Granitic Rock Adjacent to the San Andreas, Garlock and San Jacinto Faults: Implications for Earthquake Physics

    Rockwell, T. K.; Sisk, M.; Stillings, M.; Girty, G.; Dor, O.; Wechsler, N.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We present new detailed analyses of pulverized granitic rocks from sections adjacent to the San Andreas, Garlock and San Jacinto faults in southern California. Along the San Andreas and Garlock faults, the Tejon Lookout Granite is pulverized in all exposures within about 100 m of both faults. Along the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault in Horse Canyon, the pulverization of granitic rocks is highly asymmetric, with a much broader zone of pulverization along the southwest side of the Clark fault. In areas where the granite is injected as dyke rock into schist, only the granitic rock shows pulverization, demonstrating the control of rock type on the pulverization process. Chemical analyses indicate little or no weathering in the bulk of the rock, although XRD analysis shows the presence of smectite, illite, and minor kaolinite in the clay-sized fraction. Weathering products may dominate in the less than 1 micron fraction. The average grain size in all samples of pulverized granitic rock range between about 20 and 200 microns (silt to fine sand), with the size distribution in part a function of proximity to the primary slip zone. The San Andreas fault samples are generally finer than those collected from along the Garlock or San Jacinto faults. The particle size distribution for all samples is non-fractal, with a distinct slope break in the 60-100 micron range, which suggests that pulverization is not a consequence of direct shear. This average particle size is quite coarser than previous reports, which we attribute to possible measurement errors in the prior work. Our data and observations suggest that dynamic fracturing in the wall rock of these three major faults only accounts for 1% or less of the earthquake energy budget.

  9. Application of granulated lead-zinc slag in concrete as an opportunity to save natural resources

    Alwaeli, Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    The last decades marked a period of growth and prosperity in construction industry which involves the use of natural resources. This growth is jeopardized by the lack of natural resources that are available. On the other hand there has been rapid increase in the industrial waste production. Most of the waste do not find any effective use and cause a waste disposal crisis, thereby contributing to health and environmental problems. Recycling of industrial waste as aggregate is thus a logical option to manage this problem. The paper reports on some experimental results obtained from the production of concretes containing granulated slag of lead and zinc industry as sand replacement mixed in different proportions. Granulated slag is substituted for raw sand, partly or totally. Ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight of sand are used. The effects of granulated lead-zinc slag (GLZS) as sand replacement material on the compressive strength and gamma radiation attenuation properties of concrete are investigated and analyzed. Then, these properties are compared with those of ordinary concrete. The results showed that replacement material have some effects on the compressive strength and gamma radiation properties of the concrete. The experimental results indicate that, the concrete mixed with GLZS as a sand replacement have better strength. Concerning the absorption properties for gamma radiation the data show that the addition of GLZS resulted in an increase of the attenuation of gamma radiation. Consequently, these concretes could be used for construction of shields protecting personnel who work in laboratories where radiation is used. Additionally, the thickness of the concrete with GLZS was calculated and compared with ordinary concrete.

  10. The source rock characters of U-rich granite

    Mingyue, Feng; Debao, He [CNNC Key Laboratory of Uranium Resources Exploration and Evaluation Technology, Beijing Research Institute of Uranium Geology (China)

    2012-03-15

    This paper discusses the stratum composition, lithological association, uranium content of crust and the activation, migration, concentration of uranium at each tectonic cycle in South China. The authors point out that the source rock of U-rich granite is U-rich continental crust which is rich in Si, Al and K. The lithological association is mainly composed of terrestrial clastic rocks formation of mudstone and sandstone, mingled with intermediate-acidic, mafic pyroclastic rocks and carbonate rocks formation. During tectonic movements, the rocks had undergone regional metamorphism, migmatitization, granitization, and formed U-rich granites finally. (authors)

  11. The source rock characters of U-rich granite

    Feng Mingyue; He Debao

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the stratum composition, lithological association, uranium content of crust and the activation, migration, concentration of uranium at each tectonic cycle in South China. The authors point out that the source rock of U-rich granite is U-rich continental crust which is rich in Si, Al and K. The lithological association is mainly composed of terrestrial clastic rocks formation of mudstone and sandstone, mingled with intermediate-acidic, mafic pyroclastic rocks and carbonate rocks formation. During tectonic movements, the rocks had undergone regional metamorphism, migmatitization, granitization, and formed U-rich granites finally. (authors)

  12. Design of a dosimetric evaluation protocol workers granite quarries

    Guillen, J.; Tejado, J. J.; Baeza, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Autonomous Community of Extremadura is one of the major regions of Spain as far as the extraction of granite and further processing of products derived from it are concerned. One of the most industrialized areas of the sector presents a serious problem for non-radiological occupational health of workers, particularly silicosis. Since in this area of activity levels of granites can be classified as medium-high within the precipitates ranges, the question is whether in addition to this occupational disease, there is a radiological impact associated with the activity NORM extraction and manufacturing of granite.

  13. Recycling of fresh concrete exceeding and wash water in concrete mixing plants

    Férriz Papí, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The exceeding concrete and washing equipment water are a matter to solve in concrete production. This paper explains several possibilities for recycling and analyses the products obtained with one recycling equipment. The objective of this work is to study the possibility to increase the percentage of recycling in new mixes. The developed study relates wash water density and fine particles content. Besides, mortar and concrete samples were tested introducing different quantities of these fine particles, substituting cement, sand or only as an addition. Consistency, compressive strength, setting time, absorption, and capillarity were tested. The results indicated an improvement of the studied properties in some percentages when substituting sand. It confirms the possibility to introduce larger quantities of wash water in new concrete mixes, with corrections in sand quantity depending on water density.Los hormigones frescos sobrantes y aguas procedentes de la limpieza de equipos son un inconveniente a resolver en las plantas de hormigón. Este artículo explica varias posibilidades de reciclado y analiza los productos obtenidos en un equipo reciclador concreto, con el objetivo de estudiar el incremento del porcentaje de reciclaje en nuevas amasadas. El estudio realizado relaciona la densidad del agua de lavado y el contenido de partículas finas. Además, ensaya muestras de mortero y hormigón realizando sustituciones de estas partículas finas por cemento, arena o simplemente como adición. Determina consistencia, resistencia a compresión, principio y fin de fraguado, absorción y capilaridad. Los resultados indicaron un incremento general de las propiedades estudiadas en algunos porcentajes de sustitución por arena. Ello confirma la posibilidad de introducir mayores cantidades de agua de lavado en nuevas amasadas de hormigón, mediante correcciones en la dosificación de arena en función de la densidad del agua.

  14. Rheological Characterization of Green Sand Flow

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hovad, Emil

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to characterize experimentally the flow behaviour of the green sand that is used for casting of sand moulds. After the sand casting process is performed, the sand moulds are used for metal castings. The rheological properties of the green sand is important to quantif...

  15. The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries

    Fernandes, V.A.; Purnell, P.; Still, G.T.; Thomas, T.H.

    2007-01-01

    The cost of building materials in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs) is one of the single largest contributing factors to housing costs. They are often transported over relatively large distances at considerable expense. Local sands may contain significant amounts of clay, considered by local artisans to be detrimental to concrete strength; however, in an LEDC context, there is little evidence to support this. In this study, the compressive strength and workability of representative LEDC clay-contaminated concrete was determined. Clay-cement interactions were studied using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Different clays appeared to have fundamentally different effects on both workability and strength. No chemical interactions were detected. It was concluded that satisfactory concrete could be made from clay-contaminated sand

  16. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  17. Material properties characterization - concrete

    England, G.L.; MacLeod, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the six contributions in the SMiRT 4 conference to Session H5 on structural analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels. These relate to short term stress-strain aspects of concrete loaded beyond the linear range in uniaxial and biaxial stress fields, to some time and temperature dependent properties of concrete at working stress levels, and to a programme of strain-gauge testing for the assessment of concrete properties. From the information discussed, it is clear that there are difficulties in determining material properties for concrete, and these are summarised. (UK)

  18. 2005 dossier: granite. Tome: phenomenological evolution of the geologic disposal; Dossier 2005: Granite. Tome evolution phenomenologique du stockage geologique

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the phenomenological aspects of the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes (HLLL) in granite formations. Content: 1 - introduction: ANDRA's research program on disposal in granitic formation; 2 - the granitic environment: geologic history, French granites; 3 - HLLL wastes and disposal design concepts; 4 - identification, characterization and modeling of a granitic site: approach, geologic modeling, hydrologic and hydro-geochemical modeling, geomechanical and thermal modeling, long-term geologic evolution of a site; 5 - phenomenological evolution of a disposal: main aspects of the evolution of a repository with time, disposal infrastructures, B-type wastes disposal area, C-type wastes disposal area; spent fuels disposal area, radionuclides transfer and retention in the granitic environment; 6 - conclusions: available knowledge, methods and tools for the understanding and modeling of the phenomenological evolution of a granitic disposal site. (J.S.)

  19. Microencapsulated phase change materials for enhancing the thermal performance of Portland cement concrete and geopolymer concrete for passive building applications

    Cao, Vinh Duy; Pilehvar, Shima; Salas-Bringas, Carlos; Szczotok, Anna M.; Rodriguez, Juan F.; Carmona, Manuel; Al-Manasir, Nodar; Kjøniksen, Anna-Lena

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Microencapsulated phase change materials give high energy storage capacity concrete. • Microcapsule addition increases the porosity of concrete. • Thermal and mechanical properties are linked to the enhanced concrete porosity. • Agglomerated microcapsules have strong impact on the concrete properties. • Microcapsules caused geopolymer to become more energy efficient than Portland cement. - Abstract: Concretes with a high thermal energy storage capacity were fabricated by mixing microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) into Portland cement concrete (PCC) and geopolymer concrete (GPC). The effect of MPCM on thermal performance and compressive strength of PCC and GPC were investigated. It was found that the replacement of sand by MPCM resulted in lower thermal conductivity and higher thermal energy storage, while the specific heat capacity of concrete remained practically stable when the phase change material (PCM) was in the liquid or solid phase. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity of GPC as function of MPCM concentration was reduced at a higher rate than that of PCC. The power consumption needed to stabilize a simulated indoor temperature of 23 °C was reduced after the addition of MPCM. GPC exhibited better energy saving properties than PCC at the same conditions. A significant loss in compressive strength was observed due to the addition of MPCM to concrete. However, the compressive strength still satisfies the mechanical European regulation (EN 206-1, compressive strength class C20/25) for concrete applications. Finally, MPCM-concrete provided a good thermal stability after subjecting the samples to 100 thermal cycles at high heating/cooling rates.

  20. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  1. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    Mirjana Malešev; Vlastimir Radonjanin; Snežana Marinković

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC) as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycle...

  2. Sand, jams and jets

    Jaeger, H. [James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago (United States)]. E-mail: h-jaeger@uchicago.edu

    2005-12-01

    Granular media are offering new insights into problems in condensed-matter physics and materials science, as Heinrich Jaeger explains. The remarkable properties of granular materials are so familiar that most of us do not even notice them. It is clear, for example, that we cannot walk on water unless the temperature has dropped below freezing. However, we take it for granted that sand will support our weight as if it were a solid, even though it can also be poured like a liquid under the same ambient conditions. From breakfast cereal, sugar and flour to construction materials, mining products and pharmaceuticals, granular media are present everywhere in our daily lives. (U.K.)

  3. Riddle of the sands

    Rolheiser, P

    1998-09-01

    A geological model of the Alberta landscape during the period stretching from about 110 million to 100 million years ago during the Cretaceous period when dinosaurs roamed the earth, was sketched. Today, the region contains the Cold Lake oil sands deposit. Imperial Oil began large-scale production at Cold Lake in 1985. The formations within the area are the source of almost half of Imperial Oil`s daily crude oil production and account for one in every 20 barrels of oil produced daily in Canada. The bitumen is produced using cyclic steam stimulation where steam is injected at high pressure into the underground reservoir, fracturing the sandstone and heating the bitumen it holds to thin it so that it can then flow through well bores to the surface. Conventional geological theory suggested that the Cold Lake reservoir was the remains of a prehistoric river delta. In 1994, Imperial Oil established a Cold Lake sequence stratigraphy project to verify this theory. This highly complex project involves volumes of geophysical well-log data from the 2,500 wells at Cold Lake, core samples cut from more than 600 of these wells and microscopic fossilized remains of 100-million-year-old flora extracted from the core samples, and seismic information. The interpreted data helps to create a three-dimensional model of the reservoir`s structure and help define its boundaries. Results have shown that the Cold Lake deposit was created from at least 13 intersecting river beds. Each of the rivers flowed for a few hundred thousand years and deposited sands of varying quality in different layers and patterns. The oil came about 40 million years later after the plant and animal materials containing hydrogen and carbon were broken down by heat and pressure to form oil. 1 fig.

  4. Liquid concrete mixes for V-2 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice

    Valenta, D.; Oravec, J.

    1983-01-01

    The liquid concrete mixes consist of aggregates, cement, water and plastifiers. The main component of aggregates is redeposited dolomite from the Dolinka locality and sand. Cement of the SPC-325 type is used while mixing water is taken from the service water pump station for the V-1 nuclear power plant. All concretes used for the V-2 nuclear power plant construction are treated using plastifier Plastifikator S. In concrete mix development, care was primarily taken to select sand with sufficient amounts of grain of a size up to 0.25 mm. Granularity curves of the sands and the resulting curve of the aggregates granularity of the concrete mix are shown graphically. The method of manufacture and conveying of concrete mixes are briefly described. The mathematical statistical analysis of the quality of the concrete mixes produced showed that the proposed concrete mixes meet the requirements for homogeneity in the controlled parameters and that they can be manufactured in the situation of building production provided suitable components are selected, suitable aggregates are available and the quality of production is systematically checked. (J.P.)

  5. Tectonic imprints within a granite exposed near Srinagar, Rajasthan ...

    Partial melting in the middle to lower crustal level produces melts of granitic composition ..... of D1G generations with a steep easterly dipping limb and gently westerly ..... The great circles represent the average fracture orientation for each set.

  6. On the sources of uranium in some Scottish Caledonian granites

    Halliday, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The lead isotope systematics, zircon uranium concentrations and whole-rock rubidium concentrations of 11 Scottish Caledonian granites are examined for clues to the origin of their uranium. A positive correlation between U in zircon and initial lead isotope ratios suggests that U and Pb were derived from the same source which, as some of these granites contain their U in inherited zircons, is likely to have been within the crust. It is argued, therefore, that most of the uranium in these granites had a crustal derivation but lead isotope ratios indicate that any Lewisian contribution was minor in comparison with those from postulated Grenville, Morarian or Caledonian metamorphic reservoirs. However, additional data are required before this conclusion can be extended to include uraniferous Caledonian granites such as Cairngorm. (author)

  7. Characteristics of pegmatoidal granite exposed near Bayalan, Ajmer ...

    near Bayalan, Ajmer district, Rajasthan. Nilanjan ... eastern flank of the South Delhi Fold Belt (Sinha. Roy 1984 .... gneisses in a lit-par-lit manner producing alternate layers of granite and ... shows a point concentration (table 1) with a mean.

  8. Mechanical properties of granitic rocks from Gideaa, Sweden

    Ljunggren, C.; Stephansson, O.; Alm, O.; Hakami, H.; Mattila, U.

    1985-10-01

    The elastic and mechanical properties were determined for two rock types from the Gideaa study area. Gideaa is located approximately 30 km north-east of Oernskoeldsvik, Northern Sweden. The rock types that were tested were migmatitic gneiss and migmatitic granite. The following tests were conducted: - sound velocity measurements; - uniaxial compression tests with acoustic emission recording; - brazilian disc tests; - triaxial tests; - three point bending tests. All together, 12 rock samples were tested with each test method. Six samples of these were migmatic gneiss and six samples were migmatitic granite. The result shows that the migmatitic gneiss has varying strength properties with low compressive strength in comparison with its high tensile strength. The migmatitic granite, on the other hand, is found to have parameter values similar to other granitic rocks. With 15 refs. (Author)

  9. The Alberta oil sands story

    1974-01-01

    This report serves as a detailed introduction to the Alberta oil sands and their development. It includes a description of the oil sands deposits, an outline of crude bitumen recovery and upgrading processes, the role of Alberta Energy Company in oil sands development, environmental aspects, manpower requirements for oil sands development, research needs, and further oil sands projects. Presently proven recoverable reserves in the oil sands amount to 26.5 billion bbl of synthetic crude. Production from the Syncrude plant (125,000 bbl/d capacity) is expected to begin in 1977, followed by a Shell Canada operation around 1980. The provincial government will participate in the oil sand industry through its joint venture participation in Syncrude and its 50% share in Alberta Energy Company; the latter company participates in related aspects of the Syncrude project, such as pipelines. The result of Alberta's participation in the industry will mean that, directly or indirectly, the province will realize 60% of the total profits. The job creation potential of oil sands projects is estimated to be extensive, with a direct and indirect work force supported by oil sands activities possibly reaching 180,000 persons by the year 2000. Research needs have been identified, particularly in the area of in-situ thermal recovery technology, and the creation of the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority has been authorized in order to meet these needs. Although current reserves are sufficient to support 20-30 synthetic crude plants, a number of factors will limit expansion of the industry. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Durability of recycled aggregate concrete using pozzolanic materials.

    Ann, K Y; Moon, H Y; Kim, Y B; Ryou, J

    2008-01-01

    In this study, pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) were used to compensate for the loss of strength and durability of concrete containing recycled aggregate. As a result, 30% PFA and 65% GGBS concretes increased the compressive strength to the level of control specimens cast with natural granite gravel, but the tensile strength was still lowered at 28 days. Replacement with PFA and GGBS was effective in raising the resistance to chloride ion penetrability into the concrete body, measured by a rapid chloride ion penetration test based on ASTM C 1202-91. It was found that the corrosion rate of 30% PFA and 65% GGBS concretes was kept at a lower level after corrosion initiation, compared to the control specimens, presumably due to the restriction of oxygen and water access. However, it was less effective in increasing the chloride threshold level for steel corrosion. Hence, it is expected that the corrosion time for 30% PFA and 65% GGBS concrete containing recycled aggregate mostly equates to the corrosion-free life of control specimens.

  11. Granite-related hypothermal uranium mineralization in South China

    Liu, X.; Wu, J.; Pan, J.; Zhu, M.

    2014-01-01

    As one of the important geological types, granite-related uranium deposits account for about 29% of the total discovered natural uranium resources in China. Most of the granite-related uranium deposits located in Taoshan - Zhuguang uranium metallogenic belt, South China. In addition to the typical pitchblende vein-type uranium mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, a new type of granite-related uranium mineralization with characteristics of hypothermal matallogenic system was discovered in South China by current studies. However, hypothermal is contact thermal to epithermal mineralization, and not the conventional intrusive high temperature mineralization. Hypothermal uranium mineralization is presented by disseminated uraninite or pitchblende stockwork in fissures in granites normally with extensive alkaline alteration. The high temperature mineral assemblage of uraninite associate with scheelite and tourmaline was identified in hypothermal uranium mineralization. Fluid inclusion studies on this type mineralization indicated the middle to high temperature (>250℃) mineralization with the mixing evidence of ore forming solution derived from deep level, and the boiling and mixing of ore forming solution are regarded as the dominant mineralization mechanism for the precipitating of uranium. In contrast to the mineralization ages of 67 Ma to 87 Ma for typical pitchblende vein mineralization of epithermal metallogenic system, the mineralization age is older than 100 Ma for hypothermal uranium mineralization in granite. In the Shituling deposit, Xiazhuang uranium ore field, uraninite and pitchblende micro veins with extensive potassic alteration, chloritization and sericitization are hosted in fissures of Indo-Chinese epoch granites with the uranium mineralization age of 130 Ma to 138 Ma with a mineralization temperature of 290℃ to 330℃ indicated. Other examples sharing the similar characters of hypothermal uranium mineralization have been recognized in

  12. Concrete laying laboratory

    Bastlova, K.

    1986-01-01

    The task of the concrete laying laboratory established within a special department for quality control and assurance at the Dukovany nuclear power plant, is to check the composition of concrete mixes produced by the central concrete production plant on the site, and the shipment, laying and processing of concrete. The composition is given of special barite and serpentinite concretes designed for biological shields. The system of checks and of filing the results is briefly described. Esperience is summed up from the operation of the concrete laying laboratory, and conclusions are formulated which should be observed on similar large construction sites. They include the precise definition of the designer's requirements for the quality of concrete, the surface finish of concrete surfaces, the method of concreting specific structures around bushings, increased density reinforcements and various technological elements, and requirements for shipment to poorly accessible or remote places. As for the equipment of the laboratory, it should be completed with an instrument for the analysis of fresh concrete mixes, a large capacity drying kiln, etc. (Z.M.)

  13. Special protective concretes

    Bouniol, P.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete is the most convenient material when large-scale radiation protection is needed. Thus, special concretes for nuclear purposes are used in various facilities like reactors, reprocessing centers, storage sites, accelerators, hospitals with nuclear medicine equipment, food ionization centers etc.. The recent advances made in civil engineering for the improvement of concrete durability and compactness are for a large part transposable to protection concretes. This article presents the basic knowledge about protection concretes with the associated typological and technological aspects. A large part is devoted to the intrinsic properties of concretes and to their behaviour in irradiation and temperature conditions: 1 - definition and field of application of special protective concretes; 2 - evolution of concepts and technologies (durability of structures, techniques of formulation, new additives, market evolution); 3 - design of protective structures (preliminary study, radiation characteristics, thermal constraints, damping and dimensioning, mechanical criteria); 4 - formulation of special concretes (general principles, granulates, hydraulic binders, pulverulent additives, water/cement ratio, reference composition of some special concretes); 5 - properties of special concretes (damping and thermo-mechanical properties); 6 - induced-irradiation and temperature phenomena (activation, radiolysis, mineralogical transformations, drying, shrinking, creep, corrosion of reinforcement). (J.S.)

  14. Movement of fossil pore fluids in granite basement, Illinois

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The compositions of pore fluids in granite cores from the Precambrian basement in northern Illinois were determined. The estimated chloride concentration in the aqueous phase increases from near zero at the upper contact with sandstone to 2.7 M at 624 m below the contact. Traces of aliphatic oil are present in the overlying sandstone and the upper 516 m of granite, and oil occupies most of the pore space in one sample of unaltered granite 176 m below the contact. The oil has a Δ 13 C of -25%, about the same as average petroleum. The high concentrations of salt more than 500 m below the contact imply that little or no fresh water has reached these levels of the granite by flow. Lower concentrations near the contact are consistent with replacement of brine in the sandstone by fresh water at least 11 m.y. ago and subsequent upward diffusion of salt from the granite. Geologic data suggest that the time of replacement was about 130 Ma. The purpose of the investigation is to study the record of movement of intergranular fluids within a granite pluton. The composition and movement of ground waters can determine the extent that hazardous or radioactive wastes disposed in igneous rock will remain isolated

  15. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  16. Electrical conductivity of sandstone, limestone, and granite

    Duba, A.; Piwinskii, A.J.; Santor, M.; Weed, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of cylindrical cores of Westerly granite, Indiana limestone and Nugget, St Peter and Kayenta sandstones was measured at about 25/sup 0/C in vacuo, in air, and after saturation in distilled water, tap water, and 0.1 M NaCl solution. The three-electrode technique with a guard ring and the two-electrode technique without a guard ring were used. Core aspect ratio over the range of 2.00 to 0.25, as well as frequency over the range of 50 Hz to 10 kHz, influences the conductivity of all rocks, especially those measured in vacuo. Measurements from water-saturated samples using a guard ring are not appreciably different from those obtained without a guard ring. The conductivity of rocks saturated in 0.1 M NaCl solution changes least with a change in aspect ratio; for these rocks a linear relationship, known as Archie's Law, exists between log porosity and log conductivity. No simple correlation was found between those factors in rocks saturated with tap or distilled water. Thus, it appears Archie's Law is of questionable value for correlating laboratory data from rocks saturated with low-conductivity fluids.

  17. Heat transfer studies in salt and granite

    Just, R.A.

    1978-10-01

    Results are presented of a scoping study on the feasibility of using a multi-layer terminal repository design in both salt and granite formations to store either high-level waste or spent fuel. Calculations have been made to determine temperature profiles within the repository and to provide an estimate of the thermal uplift that can be expected. Near-field models developed to compare temperature profiles in the regions close to the waste canisters indicated that maximum thermal gradients and maximum temperature increases could be significantly reduced by changing from a single to a multi-layer repository design. For both high-level waste and for spent fuel, the maximum temperature increase in the multi-level repositories was reduced to approximately 60 percent of the temperature increase predicted for the single-level repositories at the same areal loading. After the near-field models had verified that maximum thermal gradients and temperature increases could be reduced by using a multilevel repository design, a series of far-field models was developed. The far-field models used to provide qualitative comparisons of the maximum thermal uplift indicate that the thermal uplift is roughly proportional to the energy supplied to the formation. Changing from a single- to a multi-layer repository but keeping the areal loading constant results in increased thermal uplifts

  18. Groundwater evolution of the granite area, Korea

    Kim, C.S.; Bae, D.S.; Koh, Y.K.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, G.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The geochemistry and environmental isotopes of groundwater in the Cretaceous granite of the Yeongcheon area has been investigated. The hydrochemistry of groundwater belongs to the Ca-HCO 3 type. The oxygen-18 and deuterium data are clustered along the meteoric water line, indicating that the groundwater is of meteoric water origin. Tritium data show that the groundwaters were mostly recharged before pre-thermonuclear period and have been mixed with younger surface water flowing rapidly along fractured zones. Based on the mass balance and reaction simulation approaches using both the hydrochemistry of groundwater and the secondary mineralogy of fracture-filling materials, the low-temperature hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwater in the area has been modeled. The results of geochemical simulation show that the concentrations of Ca, Na and HCO 3 and pH of waters increase progressively owing to the dissolution of reactive minerals in flow paths. The concentrations of Mg and K first increase with the dissolution of reactant minerals, but later decrease when montmorillonite and illitic material are precipitated respectively. The continuous adding of reactive minerals, i. e. the progressively larger degrees of water/rock interaction, causes the formation of secondary minerals with the following sequence: hematite > gibbsite > kaolinite > montmorillonite > illitic material > microcline. The results of reaction simulation agree well with the observed water chemistry and secondary mineralogy, indicating the successful applicability of this simulation technique to delineate the complex hydrogeochemistry of bedrock groundwaters. (author)

  19. Uranium occurrences in the Granite Zone

    Nyegaard, P.; Armour-Brown, A.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the work and results of the South Greenland Exploration Programme (Sydex) during the 1984 field season in the Granite Zone, and discusses the results and conclusions that can be drawn from them. It also contains a structural analysis of the Ivigtut-Julianehaab region, which will help in future exploration by indicating the likely directions of uraniferous faults and fractures. It also includes suggestions for future work with both exploration and scientific aspects. The project was carried out by the Geological Survey Greenland (GGU) in co-operation with Risoe National Laboratory. It was financed by the Danish Ministry of Energy. The structural analysis was carried out using previous geological maps, our own field observations and an analysis of lineament frequencies taken from aerial photographs and satellite images. Major lineaments in the region are due to E-W sinistral wrench faults and NE-SW normal faults. Analysis of the minor lineaments showed that the region could be divided into three blocks which have each reacted differently to the same regional stress field which was active throughout the Gardar period. A northern block which has been influenced by an older system of faults in the Archaean gneiss, a central block dominated by a graben, and a southern block where there is a change to a less intensively faulted area. 2 maps, 27 refs. (EG)

  20. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash.

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-08-21

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  1. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-01-01

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability. PMID:28793518

  2. Studying of Compressive, Tensile and Flexural Strength of Concrete by Using Steel Fibers

    Muslim Abdul-Ameer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the effect of adding steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete. Steel fiber has a very significant effect on concrete because it delays the propagation of micro cracks that generate due to loading on concrete members such as beams and slabs, therefore ,it increases the strength of concrete. The steel fiber was used in this study as a percentage of the volume of concrete. Mix proportion was 1: 2:4 (cement: sand: gravel by volume for all mixes and using 0% as (control mix,0.1 %,0.2%,0.5 % and 1.0% of steel fibers, these ratios leads to increase the compressive, tensile ,and flexural strength of concrete, where the improvement in flexural strength was significant

  3. Evaluation of the shrinkage and creep of medium strength self compacting concrete

    De La Cruz, C. J.; Ramos, G.; Hurtado, W. A.

    2017-02-01

    The difference between self compacting concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete (CC) is in fresh state, is the high fluidity at first and the need for vibration at second, but in hardened state, both concretes must comply with the resistance specified, in addition to securing the safety and functionality for which it was designed. This article describes the tests and results for shrinkage and creep at some medium strength Self Compacting Concrete with added sand (SCC-MSs) and two types of cement. The research was conducted at the Laboratorio de Tecnología de Estructuras (LTE) of the Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC), in dosages of 200 liters; with the idea of evaluating the effectiveness of implementation of these new concretes at elements designed with conventional concrete (CCs).

  4. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  5. The Acoustical Properties of the Polyurethane Concrete Made of Oyster Shell Waste Comparing Other Concretes as Architectural Design Components

    Setyowati, Erni; Hardiman, Gagoek; Purwanto

    2018-02-01

    This research aims to determine the acoustical properties of concrete material made of polyurethane and oyster shell waste as both fine aggregate and coarse aggregate comparing to other concrete mortar. Architecture needs aesthetics materials, so the innovation in architectural material should be driven through the efforts of research on materials for building designs. The DOE methods was used by mixing cement, oyster shell, sands, and polyurethane by composition of 160 ml:40 ml:100 ml: 120 ml respectively. Refer to the results of previous research, then cement consumption is reduced up to 20% to keep the concept of green material. This study compared three different compositions of mortars, namely portland cement concrete with gravel (PCG), polyurethane concrete of oyster shell (PCO) and concrete with plastics aggregate (PCP). The methods of acoustical tests were conducted refer to the ASTM E413-04 standard. The research results showed that polyurethane concrete with oyster shell waste aggregate has absorption coefficient 0.52 and STL 63 dB and has a more beautiful appearance when it was pressed into moulding. It can be concluded that polyurethane concrete with oyster shell aggregate (PCO) is well implemented in architectural acoustics-components.

  6. Direct Chlorination of Zircon Sand

    Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Budi Sulistyo; Pristi Hartati; Sunardjo

    2002-01-01

    It was investigated the direct chlorination of zircon sand in a unit chlorination equipment. The process was in semi batch. The product gas was scrubbed in aqueous NaOH. It was search the influence of time, ratio of reactant and size of particle sand to the concentration of Zr and Si in the product. From these research it was found that as the times, ratio of reactant increased, the concentration of Zr increased, but the concentration of Si decreased, while as grain size of zircon sand decreased the concentration of Zr decreased, but the concentration of Si increased. (author)

  7. Oil sands and the environment

    Seeley, R. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada). Calgary Research Centre

    2004-07-01

    Oil sands are a significant resource for Alberta and Canada with continuing growth opportunity. There is a need to ensure sustainable development of the oil sands resources from a social, economic and environmental perspective. The industry has succeeded in terms of proven reserves, technology advancements, reduced operating costs, reliability and market accessibility. Some of the major challenges facing the industry include high capital cost, infrastructure, social services and keeping pace with growth. This presentation outlined the proactive measures that the oil sands industry has taken to manage environmental issues such as sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions, greenhouse gases, water management and land reclamation. tabs., figs.

  8. Alberta oil sands royalty regime

    Asgarpour, S.

    2004-01-01

    The long term objective of the Oil Sands Business Unit of Alberta Energy is to pave the way for Alberta's bitumen production to reach 3 million barrels per day by 2020. This presentation described the national government's role in resource development. It was emphasized that since the Crown is the owner of the oil sands resource, it would benefit by providing strategic leadership and by generating a larger royalty base. The oil sands fiscal regime was described with reference to generic royalty, risk sharing, investment, and project economics. Business rule principles were also outlined along with criteria for project expansions. Both upstream and downstream challenges and opportunities were listed. 4 figs

  9. Neutron radiation shielding properties of polymer incorporated self compacting concrete mixes.

    Malkapur, Santhosh M; Divakar, L; Narasimhan, Mattur C; Karkera, Narayana B; Goverdhan, P; Sathian, V; Prasad, N K

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the neutron radiation shielding characteristics of a class of novel polymer-incorporated self-compacting concrete (PISCC) mixes are evaluated. Pulverized high density polyethylene (HDPE) material was used, at three different reference volumes, as a partial replacement to river sand in conventional concrete mixes. By such partial replacement of sand with polymer, additional hydrogen contents are incorporated in these concrete mixes and their effect on the neutron radiation shielding properties are studied. It has been observed from the initial set of experiments that there is a definite trend of reductions in the neutron flux and dose transmission factor values in these PISCC mixes vis-à-vis ordinary concrete mix. Also, the fact that quite similar enhanced shielding results are recorded even when reprocessed HDPE material is used in lieu of the virgin HDPE attracts further attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Increasing the compressive strength of portland cement concrete using flat glass powder

    Miranda Junior, Edson Jansen Pedrosa de; Bezerra, Helton de Jesus Costa Leite; Politi, Flavio Salgado; Paiva, Antonio Ernandes Macedo, E-mail: edson.jansen@ifma.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranha (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Dept. de Mecanica e Materiais

    2014-08-15

    This paper analyzes the compressive strength of Portland cement concrete in response to the incorporation of 5%, 10% and 20% of flat glass powder in place of sand, at w/c (water/cement) ratios of 0.50, 0.55 and 0.58. A statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed after 7, 14 and 28 days of curing. The compressive strength test results indicate that the concrete containing a w/c ratio of 0.50 can be used for structural applications, regardless of the waste glass content, as can that with a w/c ratio of 0.55 containing 20% of waste glass. We suggest that the use of flat glass powder in place of sand in the above mentioned percentages is feasible for the production of an environmentally appropriate and structurally applicable concrete. However, the concrete's fluidity and void content must be taken into account. (author)

  11. HEAT INSULATING LIME DRY MORTARS FOR FINISHING OF WALLS MADE OF FOAM CONCRETE

    Loganina Valentina Ivanovna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different aerated mortars are used for pargeting of walls made of aerated concrete. Though the regulatory documents don’t specify the dependence of plaster density from the density grade of gas-concrete blocks. In case of facing of gas-concrete blocks with the grade D500 using plaster mortars with the density 1400…1600 km/m3 there occurs a dismatch in the values of thermal insulation and vapor permeability of the plaster and base. The authors suggest using dry mortars for finishing of gas-concrete block of the grades D500 и D600, which allow obtaining facing thermal insulating coatings. The efficiency of using four different high-porous additives in the lime dry mortar was compared. They were: hollow glass microspheres, aluminosilicate ash microspheres, expanded vermiculite sand, expanded pearlitic sand. The high efficiency of hollow glass microspheres in heat insulating finishing mortars compared to other fillers is proved.

  12. Effect of textile waste on the mechanical properties of polymer concrete

    João Marciano Laredo dos Reis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior of polymer concrete reinforced with textile trimming waste was investigated. Two series of polymer concrete formulations were studied, with different resin/sand (i.e. binder/fine aggregate weight ratios. In each series, recycled textile chopped fibers at 1 and 2% of the total weight was used. Flexural and compressive tests were performed at room temperature and load vs. displacement curves were plotted up to failure. In the study, both the influence of fiber content and resin/sand weight ratio were considered relative to the behavior of polymer concrete reinforced with textile fibers. A decrease in properties was observed as function of textile fibers content. When specific properties were considered, this tendency was kept. However, higher textile fibers content lead to a smoother failure, unlike brittleness failure behavior of unreinforced polymer concrete.

  13. School playground surfacing and arm fractures in children: a cluster randomized trial comparing sand to wood chip surfaces.

    Andrew W Howard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The risk of playground injuries, especially fractures, is prevalent in children, and can result in emergency room treatment and hospital admissions. Fall height and surface area are major determinants of playground fall injury risk. The primary objective was to determine if there was a difference in playground upper extremity fracture rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing versus granite sand surfacing. Secondary objectives were to determine if there were differences in overall playground injury rates or in head injury rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing compared to school playgrounds with granite sand surfacing.The cluster randomized trial comprised 37 elementary schools in the Toronto District School Board in Toronto, Canada with a total of 15,074 students. Each school received qualified funding for installation of new playground equipment and surfacing. The risk of arm fracture from playground falls onto granitic sand versus onto engineered wood fibre surfaces was compared, with an outcome measure of estimated arm fracture rate per 100,000 student-months. Schools were randomly assigned by computer generated list to receive either a granitic sand or an engineered wood fibre playground surface (Fibar, and were not blinded. Schools were visited to ascertain details of the playground and surface actually installed and to observe the exposure to play and to periodically monitor the depth of the surfacing material. Injury data, including details of circumstance and diagnosis, were collected at each school by a prospective surveillance system with confirmation of injury details through a validated telephone interview with parents and also through collection (with consent of medical reports regarding treated injuries. All schools were recruited together at the beginning of the trial, which is now closed after 2.5 years of injury data collection. Compliant schools included 12 schools randomized to Fibar that installed

  14. Effect of monomer composition on the properties of high temperature polymer concretes

    Zeldin, A.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of organic monomer composition on the thermomechanical properties of polymer concrete (PC) containing sand-cement mixtures as an agregate filler were investigated. The effects of various monomer mixtures on compressive strength and hydrolytic stability are discussed. Composites were fabricated in the same way as ordinary concrete, with monomer solutions of various compositions and concentrations used to bind the sand-cement mixture. The compressive strengths of th composites before and after exposure to air and to brine solutions at 240/sup 0/C are discussed.

  15. The 'Granite' collegial mission of dialogue. Report; Mission collegiale de concertation Granite. Rapport

    Boisson, P; Huet, Ph; Mingasson, J

    2000-06-01

    The aim of the 'Granite' collegial mission of dialogue is to inform the French authorities, associations and population about the project of construction of an underground laboratory for the study of the disposal of high level and long-life radioactive wastes in a granitic environment. The aim of the dialogue was not to select a site but to collect the public reactions and advices about such a project. However, such a dialogue has partially failed because of a misunderstanding of the population about the aims of the mission. However, the mission has collected many point of views and questions which are developed in this report. The first and second chapters recall the process of the mission and its progress, while a third chapter stresses on the questions asked by the public and which concern the fear of nuclear wastes and the incompatibility between the disposal of wastes and the socio-economical development of the region concerned. Thanks to the lessons drawn from this experience, the mission has formulated some recommendations (chapter 4) concerning the need for a better information of the population about any topic in relation with the radioactive wastes. Some complementary information is provided in appendixes. (J.S.)

  16. The 'Granite' collegial mission of dialogue. Report; Mission collegiale de concertation Granite. Rapport

    Boisson, P.; Huet, Ph.; Mingasson, J

    2000-06-01

    The aim of the 'Granite' collegial mission of dialogue is to inform the French authorities, associations and population about the project of construction of an underground laboratory for the study of the disposal of high level and long-life radioactive wastes in a granitic environment. The aim of the dialogue was not to select a site but to collect the public reactions and advices about such a project. However, such a dialogue has partially failed because of a misunderstanding of the population about the aims of the mission. However, the mission has collected many point of views and questions which are developed in this report. The first and second chapters recall the process of the mission and its progress, while a third chapter stresses on the questions asked by the public and which concern the fear of nuclear wastes and the incompatibility between the disposal of wastes and the socio-economical development of the region concerned. Thanks to the lessons drawn from this experience, the mission has formulated some recommendations (chapter 4) concerning the need for a better information of the population about any topic in relation with the radioactive wastes. Some complementary information is provided in appendixes. (J.S.)

  17. Determination of gamma ray shielding parameters of rocks and concrete

    Obaid, Shamsan S.; Gaikwad, Dhammajyot K.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2018-03-01

    Gamma shielding parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Neff) have been measured and calculated for rocks and concrete in the energy range 122-1330 keV. The measurements have been carried out at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275, 1330 keV gamma ray energies using a gamma spectrometer includes a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and MCA card. The atomic and electronic cross sections have also been investigated. Experimental and calculated (WinXCom) values were compared, and good agreement has been observed within the experimental error. The obtained results showed that feldspathic basalt, compact basalt, volcanic rock, dolerite and pink granite are more efficient than the sandstone and concrete for gamma ray shielding applications.

  18. Evaluation of recycled concrete as aggregate in new concrete pavements.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the use of recycled concrete as coarse aggregate in new concrete pavements. : Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) produced from demolished pavements in three geographically dispersed locations in Washington state were used to perfo...

  19. Concrete portable handbook

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2011-01-01

    Whether or not, you are on the job site or back in the office, this book will help you to avoid mistakes, code violations, and wasted time and money. The book's four part treatment begins with constituent materials followed by self contained parts on Concrete Properties, Processes, and Concrete Repair and Rehabilitation. Designed to be an ""all in one"" reference, the author includes a wealth information for the most popular types of testing. This includes: Analysis of Fresh Concrete; Testing Machines; Accelerated Testing Methods; Analysis of Hardened Concrete and Mortar; Core Sampl

  20. Saltation of non-spherical sand particles.

    Zhengshi Wang

    Full Text Available Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement.

  1. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  2. Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite

    Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina; Poteri, Antti

    2007-01-01

    Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, 36 Cl, 131 I, 22 Na and 85 Sr at flow rates of 1-50 μL.min -1 . Rock matrix was characterized using 14 C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 μL.min -1 . The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

  3. Thermomechanical studies in granite at Stripa, Sweden

    Cook, N.G.W.; Myer, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    Media other than rock salt are being considered for the deep, geologic disposal of nuclear wastes. The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a deep, underground repository will subject the rock to a thermal pulse that will induce displacements, strains, and stresses in the rock. Thermomechanical experiments, with electrical heaters simulating the thermal output of waste canisters, were carried out in granite at a depth of 340 m below surface adjacent to a defunct iron ore mine at Stripa, Sweden. Changes in temperature, displacement, and stress in the rock around these heaters were measured, and the measurements were compared with predictions calculated from the theory of linear thermoelasticity. Measured temperature changes agreed well with predictions, but measured displacements and stresses were consistently less than those predicted with constant values for the coefficient of thermal expansion and elastic properties of the rock. A laboratory test program to measure these coefficients over ranges of stress and temperature representing those in the field experiment has been initiated. Test specimens were taken from cores recovered from the instrumentation holes in the Stripa experiments. Preliminary results from laboratory tests on specimens free of joints indicate that the values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increase from about 60 to 80 MPa and from 0.15 to 0.22, respectively, as the confining stress is increased from 2 to 55 MPa; these values decrease with increasing temperature, more so at 2 MPa than at 55 MPa. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion at a confining stress of 30 MPa increases from about 10 x 10 - 6 / 0 C at 40 0 C to about 14 x 10 - 6 / 0 C. The magnitudes of these changes are not sufficient to resolve the disparity between measured and predicted results. Perhaps the properties of test specimens containing joints will show greater variations in the values of the thermomechanical coefficients with temperature and pressure

  4. U(VI) sorption on granite: prediction and experiments

    Nebelung, C.; Brendler, V.

    2010-01-01

    One widely accepted approach - component additivity (CA) - to describe the sorption of contaminants onto complex materials such as rocks or soils is based on the assumption that the surface of a complex mineral assemblage is composed of a mixture of mineral constituents whose surface properties are known from independent studies. An internally consistent SCM (surface complexation model) database can be developed that describes the adsorption reactions of solutes to each phase. Here, the capability of such a methodology was tested, using the code MINTEQA2 including thermodynamic data of the NEA-TDB, and literature data for SCM, namely the DDL model. The sorption characteristics of U(VI) on granite (from Eibenstock, Saxony, Germany, with the main components quartz, albite, orthoclase, and muscovite) was predicted and then compared to batch experiments. Granite plays an important role in the remediation of former uranium ore mining and milling sites, but is also one of the host rocks considered for final disposal of nuclear materials. Safety assessment requires a detailed understanding of this system and its retention potential with regard to hazardous components. Namely the sorption of uranium in this complex rock is not fully understood yet. The experiments thus also provided a better understanding of the far-field behaviour in granitic geological nuclear repositories. The robustness of the prediction was tested by variation of the granite composition and the variation of the specific surface area (SSA) - first all components were predicted with a uniform granite SSA, second with a distinct SSA for each granite component (determined on pure minerals for the same grain size fractions). Changes in compositions yielded only marginal differences in the prediction. Different approaches to SSA showed somewhat larger deviations. In conclusion, the CA methodology is a valid and robust approach to U(VI) sorption onto complex substrates such as granite, provided sufficient

  5. Petrographic and mineralogical features of the uraniferous pink granites in the north eastern desert of egypt

    Atawiya, M.Y.; Salman, A.B.; El-Bayyomi, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of some uranium bearing younger granites in the north eastern desert of egypt particularly Gebel Gattar area. The area around Gebel Gattar comprises the following rock units (starting from the oldest): meta volcanic, diorite-grano-diorite complex- Dokhan volcanics- Hammamat sediments, younger granites and dykes. The most significant structural features are represented by NNE-ENE dominantly trending faults and joints. Petrographicaly, the pink granites are divided into normal and mineralized (uraniferous) granites. Normal granites are classified into three types; a) leucocratic perthitic granite, b) hornblende- biotite perthitic granite and c) two feldspars perthitic granite. Mineralized granites are sheared, deformed, pinkish brown in colour and strongly altered. A remarkable secondary uranium mineralization has been recorded along fault and fracture zones

  6. The transition from granite to banded aplite-pegmatite sheet complexes: An example from Megiliggar Rocks, Tregonning topaz granite, Cornwall

    Breiter, K.; Ďurišová, J.; Hrstka, T.; Korbelová, Z.; Vašinová Galiová, M.; Müller, A.; Simons, B.; Shail, R. K.; Williamson, B. J.; Davies, J. A.

    2018-03-01

    The genetic relationship between a granite pluton and adjacent complex of rare-metal pegmatite-aplite-banded sheets (Megiliggar Sheet Complex - MSC) has been studied at the border of the Tregonning topaz granite at Megiliggar Rocks, Cornwall, SW England. Similarities in whole-rock chemical and mineralogical compositions, together with a gradual change in textures away from the granite margin, provide strong evidence for a genetic link between the Tregonning Granite and MSC. The sheets are likely to represent apophyses of residual melt which escaped from the largely crystallized roof of the granite pluton. The escaping melt was peraluminous, had a composition near the F, B, Li slightly enriched granite minimum, and, in comparison with other Cornish granites, was enriched in F, Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, W, Nb, Ta, and U, and depleted in Fe, Mg, Ca, Sr, Th, Zr, and REE. With increasing distance from the Tregonning Granite, the silicate melt crystallized as homogeneous leucogranite sheets and banded complex sheets (i.e. combinations of bands with granitic, aplitic and pegmatitic textures), then layered aplite-pegmatites; this sequence becoming progressively more depleted in the fluxing and volatile elements F, Li, Rb, and Cs, but showing no change in Zr/Hf ratios. The fixed Zr/Hf ratio is interpreted as indicating a direct genetic link (parental melt) between all rock types, however the melt progressively lost fluxing and volatile elements with distance from the granite pluton, probably due to wall-rock reaction or fluid exsolution and migration via fractures. Differentiation of the primary melt into Na-Li-F-rich and separate K-B-rich domains was the dominant chemical process responsible for the textural and mineral diversity of the MSC. On a large (cliff-section) scale, the proximal Na-Li-F-rich leucogranite passes through complex sheets into K-B-rich aplite-pegmatites, whilst at a smaller (<1 m) scale, the K-B-rich bands are interspersed (largely overlain) by Na

  7. Geology of Muntok area and the potency of menumbang granite as source of Uranium and Thorium

    Kurniawan Dwi Saksama; Ngadenin

    2013-01-01

    In the West Bangka there are some granites namely Menumbing, Pelangas, Tempilang, and Jebus granite. The granites is granite tin belt that stretches from Thailand-Malaysia-Bangka Belitung. Granite tin belt or granite source of tin (cassiterite) can act as a source of U and Th. Aims of the study is to find out the information on the geology of Muntok area and its surrounding and to determine the potency of Menumbing granite as a source of U and Th. The methods used is surface geological mapping in Muntok areas and its surrounding with scale 1 : 25.000, measurement grade of uranium and thorium in Menumbing granite areas and petrographic and grain size analysis of sample of Menumbing granite. Determination of granites a source of U and Th is based on content of radioactive mineral, anomaly of U and Th, megascopic and microscopic observation of granite. Morphology of Muntok areas and its surrounding is denudasional undulating plains to hills with an elevation ranging from 0 to 455 meters. Stratigraphy of research areas from old to young is meta sandstone units, granite intrusion of Menumbing and alluvial. Evolving fault is a fault trending West-East. Based on the presence of radioactive minerals, grade of U and Th as well as the type of granite, it was concluded that the Menumbing granite is a source of Th and not sources of U. (author)

  8. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...... of two CID, isotropically consolidated, drained triaxial tests carried out according to the instructions in DG1 letter dated 13 March 1998....

  9. Technology unlocks tar sands energy

    Law, C

    1967-09-25

    Tar sand processing technology has been developed primarily in the categories of extraction techniques and in-situ processing. In October, a $235 million venture into tar sand processing will be inspected by visitors from many points on the globe. A synthetic crude of premium quality will be flowing through a 16-in. pipeline from the Tar Island plant site of Great Canadian Oil Sands to Edmonton. This processing plant uses an extractive mining technique. The tar sand pay zone in this area averages approximately 150 ft in thickness with a 50-ft overburden. It has been estimated that the tar sands cannot be exploited when the formation thickness is less than 100 ft and overburden exceeds the same amount. This indicates that extraction techniques can only be used to recover approximately 15% of the tar sand deposits. An in-situ recovery technique developed by Shell of Canada is discussed in detail. In essence it is selective hydraulic fracturing, followed by the injection of emulsifying chemicals and steam.

  10. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The

  11. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high

  12. Effect of fly ash content towards Sulphate resistance of oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete

    Muthusamy, K.; Fadzil, M. Y.; Nazrin Akmal, A. Z. Muhammad; Ahmad, S. Wan; Nur Azzimah, Z.; Hanafi, H. Mohd; Mohamad Hafizuddin, R.

    2018-04-01

    Both oil palm shell (OPS) and fly ash are by-product generated from the industries. Disposal of these by-product as wastes cause negative impact to the environment. The use of both oil palm shell and fly ash in concrete is seen as an economical solution for making green and denser concrete. The primary aim of this research is to determine the effects of FA utilization as sand replacement in oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete (OPS LWAC) towards sulphate resistance. Five concrete mixes containing fly ash as sand replacement namely 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% were prepared in these experimental work. All mixes were cast in form of cubes before subjected to sulphate solution for the period of 5 months. It was found that addition of 10% fly ash as sand replacement content resulted in better sulphate resistance of OPS LWAC. The occurrence of pozzolanic reaction due to the presence of FA in concrete has consumed the vulnerable Calcium hydroxide to be secondary C-S-H gel making the concrete denser and more durable.

  13. The utilization of stone ash on cellular lightweight concrete

    Karolina, R.; Sianipar, Y. G. C.

    2018-02-01

    Lightweight concrete brick is a brick which made of cement, sand, water, and foam as the basic composition. This brick are divided into 2, based on the foam used such as AAC (Autoclave Aerated Concrete) that use aluminium paste and CLC(Cellular Lightweight Concrete) that use foaming agent from BASF as its foaming material. In this trial, the lightweight brick that are ging to be use are the CLC with foaming agent as its foaming material with the mixture of stone ash that are produced by the Stone Crusher with spesific gravity 2666 kg/m3 as their partly sand substitution . In this research, the stone ash variant that are used are 10%, 15%, and 20% from the amount of sand that planned before. After casting, the result of the 10% will receive a reduction of compressive strength while an increasing in absorption as 25.07% and 39.005% and the 15% variant will recieve a reduction of compressive strength as much as 65.8% and a reduction of absorption as much as 17.441% and the 20% variant will recieve a reduction of compressive strength as much as 67.4% while an increasing of absorption as much as 17.956%.

  14. Compressive and tensile strength for concrete containing coal bottom ash

    Maliki, A. I. F. Ahmad; Shahidan, S.; Ali, N.; Ramzi Hannan, N. I. R.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd; Ibrahim, M. H. W.; Azmi, M. A. Mohammad; Rahim, M. Abdul

    2017-11-01

    The increasing demand in the construction industry will lead to the depletion of materials used in construction sites such as sand. Due to this situation, coal bottom ash (CBA) was selected as a replacement for sand. CBA is a by-product of coal combustion from power plants. CBA has particles which are angular, irregular and porous with a rough surface texture. CBA also has the appearance and particle size distribution similar to river sand. Therefore, these properties of CBA make it attractive to be used as fine aggregate replacement in concrete. The objectives of this study were to determine the properties of CBA concrete and to evaluate the optimum percentage of CBA to be used in concrete as fine aggregate replacement. The CBA was collected at Tanjung Bin power plant. The mechanical experiment (compressive and tensile strength test) was conducted on CBA concrete. Before starting the mechanical experiment, cubic and cylindrical specimens with dimensions measuring 100 × 100 × 100 mm and 150 × 300 mm were produced based on the percentage of coal bottom ash in this study which is 0% as the control specimen. Meanwhile 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90% and 100% of CBA were used to replace the fine aggregates. The CBA concrete samples were cured for 7 days and 28 days respectively to maintain the rate of hydration and moisture. After the experimental work was done, it can be concluded that the optimum percentage of CBA as fine aggregate is 60% for a curing period of both 7 days and 28 days with the total compressive strength of 36.4 Mpa and 46.2 Mpa respectively. However, the optimum percentage for tensile strength is at 70% CBA for a curing period of both 7 days and 28 days with a tensile strength of 3.03 MPa and 3.63 MPa respectively.

  15. Uranium distribution in Brazilian granitic rocks. Identification of uranium provinces

    Tassinari, C.G.G.

    1993-01-01

    The research characterized and described uranium enriched granitoids in Brazil. They occur in a variety of tectonic environments and are represented by a variety granite types of distinct ages. It may be deduced that in general they have been generated by partial melting process of continental crust. However, some of them, those with tonality composition, indicate a contribution from mantle derived materials, thus suggesting primary uranium enrichment from the upper mantle. Through this study, the identification and characterization of uranium enriched granite or uranium provinces in Brazil can be made. This may also help identify areas with potential for uranium mineralization although it has been note that uranium mineralization in Brazil are not related to the uranium enrichment process. In general the U-anomalous granitoids are composed of granites with alkaline composition and granite ''sensu strictu'' which comprise mainly of syenites, quartz-syenites and biotite-hornblende granites, with ages between 1,800 - 1,300 M.a. The U-anomalous belongings to this period present high Sr initial ratios values, above 0.706, and high Rb contents. Most of the U-enriched granitoids occur within ancient cratonic areas, or within Early to Mid-Proterozoic mobile belts, but after their cratonization. Generally, these granitoids are related to the border zones of the mobile belts or deep crustal discontinuity. Refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Distribution of monazite in granite and alluvial of South Bangka

    Ngadenin

    2011-01-01

    Monazite is one source of thorium (Th), which has significant economic value and potential as an alternative fuel of nuclear power plants. The aims of research is to find out the distribution monazite alternative fuel of nuclear power plants. The aims of research is to find out the distribution monazite and its potential as a resource of radioactive minerals on the Bangka Island, then the data will be used and its potential as a resource of radioactive minerals on the Bangka Island, then the data will be used as a reference in the development of radioactive minerals exploration areas in the coming year. The research location is in the Bencah and Gadung villages, South Bangka Regency. The method used is the geological mapping, sampling of rock for petrographic, mineragraphic and autoradiographic analysis and heavy mineral for grains counting analysis. The results showed that lithologic area of Bencah Village composed of clay stone and alluvial deposits, while the Gadung Village composed by granite and alluvial deposits. Granite Gadung is predicted as the ilmenite series granite and tend to be of S type, while the material of Bencah alluvial is predicted come from the Klabat granite groups. In general, distribution of monazite in the alluvial slightly more potent of monazite than in the granite so that the development of radioactive minerals exploration will be prioritized in the alluvial areas. (author)

  17. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    The durability of MOC concrete compositions against extreme environmental conditions viz. heating–cooling, freezing–thawing, wetting–drying and penetration and deposition of salts etc were investigated. The results reveal that MOC concrete has high compressive strength associated with high flexural strength and the ...

  18. Radiographic testing of concrete

    Porter, James F.

    1997-01-01

    The increase in construction activity in the Philippines, reinforced concrete building is still a favorite among designers, because it is much cheaper to build and it requires qualified welders, etc. and extensive nondestructive testing and inspection of metals, welds and castings. Of all the techniques radiography is widely used for concrete

  19. Concrete deck material properties.

    2009-01-01

    The two-fold focus of this study was (a) to develop an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for causing : cracking in the concrete; and (b) to study the influence of the local materials on the performance of NYSDOTs HP : concrete mixture. R...

  20. Concrete-Design

    Leczovics Péter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Present paper introduces a new interpretation of concrete, demonstrating some extreme possibilities of this rigid material such as a design element. In the first part a brief overview of the previous achievements are shown. The second part of this paper focuses on the relationship between concrete and fashion.

  1. Danish High Performance Concretes

    Nielsen, M. P.; Christoffersen, J.; Frederiksen, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the main results obtained in the research program High Performance Concretes in the 90's are presented. This program was financed by the Danish government and was carried out in cooperation between The Technical University of Denmark, several private companies, and Aalborg University...... concretes, workability, ductility, and confinement problems....

  2. Concrete, hardened: Self desiccation

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Persson, Bertil

    1999-01-01

    The test method covers the determination of internal relative humidity (RH) in hardened concrete and cement mortar using RH instruments. The determination of RH is done on crushed samples of concrete or cement motar. This test method is only for measuring equipment which gives off or takes up...

  3. concrete5 Beginner's Guide

    Laubacher, Remo

    2011-01-01

    This book is part of Packt's Beginner's Guide series. You will be guided through the set up of a Concrete5 site with step-by-step practical examples. This book is ideal for developers who would like to build their first site with Concrete5. Some k

  4. Mechanical properties of self-curing concrete (SCUC

    Magda I. Mousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of concrete containing self-curing agents are investigated in this paper. In this study, two materials were selected as self-curing agents with different amounts, and the addition of silica fume was studied. The self-curing agents were, pre-soaked lightweight aggregate (Leca; 0.0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of volume of sand; or polyethylene-glycol (Ch.; 1%, 2%, and 3% by weight of cement. To carry out this study the cement content of 300, 400, 500 kg/m3, water/cement ratio of 0.5, 0.4, 0.3 and 0.0%, 15% silica fume of weight of cement as an additive were used in concrete mixes. The mechanical properties were evaluated while the concrete specimens were subjected to air curing regime (in the laboratory environment with 25 °C, 65% R.H. during the experiment. The results show that, the use of self-curing agents in concrete effectively improved the mechanical properties. The concrete used polyethylene-glycol as self-curing agent, attained higher values of mechanical properties than concrete with saturated Leca. In all cases, either 2% Ch. or 15% Leca was the optimum ratio compared with the other ratios. Higher cement content and/or lower water/cement ratio lead(s to more efficient performance of self-curing agents in concrete. Incorporation of silica fume into self-curing concrete mixture enhanced all mechanical properties, not only due to its pozzolanic reaction, but also due to its ability to retain water inside concrete.

  5. Quality control of concretes for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    Gonzalez N, M.

    2015-01-01

    The spent sealed radioactive sources are considered as a specific type of radioactive wastes and should be properly stored to ensure their integrity and prevent or limit the release of radionuclides in the geosphere. For this, these sources can be put up in concrete matrices. This research presents the evaluation and characterization of five concretes prepared with 4 brands of commercial cements: CPC Extra RS, CPC 30R Impercem of Cemex, Cruz Azul CPC 30R and CPC 30R of Apasco; three sizes of coarse aggregate (<30 mm, 29-11 mm and <10 mm) and fine aggregate (0.0797 mm) used as matrices for conditioning of spent sealed radioactive sources, in order to verify if these specific concretes accredit the standard NOM-019-Nucl-1995. After hardening for 28 days the concrete specimens were subjected to the tests: compressive strength; thermal cycles, irradiation, leaching and permeability, later to be characterized by: 1) X-ray diffraction in order to meet their crystalline phases; 2) scanning electron microscopy, to determine changes in morphology; 3) infrared spectroscopy, to determine the structural changes of concrete from its functional groups; 4) Raman spectroscopy to determine their structural changes and 5) Moessbauer spectroscopy, which determines changes in the oxidation state of iron in the concrete. According to the results and the changes presented by each concrete after applying the tests set by NOM-019-Nucl-1995, is concluded that the concrete made with cement Cemex brand (CPC 30-RS Extra), gravel of particle size 11-29 mm and sieved sand (0.0797 mm) can be used as matrices of spent sealed sources conditioning. Is remarkable a morphological and structural change of the concrete due to gamma irradiation and heat treatment. (Author)

  6. The instrumental neutron-activation analysis of granites from the Bushveld Complex

    Watterson, J.I.W.

    1978-01-01

    Three methods of instrumental neutron-activation analysis, 14MeV, reactor thermal, and reactor epithermal, are compared for the analysis of granites form the Bushveld Complex. A total of 34 elements can be determined in the granites by these methods. Samples from the Zaaiplaats area were analysed by thermal neutron activation, and 22 elements were determined in all of them. These elements were used to distinguish between the mineralized Bobbejaankop and Lease granites and the Main granite by the use of multivariate statistics. The Bobbejaankop granite appears as a more-differentaited rock carrying greater amounts of the incompatible elements than does the Main granite [af

  7. Radiation shielding concrete

    Kunishima, Shigeru.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation shielding concretes comprise water, cement, fine aggregates consisting of serpentines and blown mist slags, coarse aggregates consisting of serpentines and kneading materials. Since serpentines containing a relatively great amount of water of crystallization in rocks as coarse aggregates and fine aggregates, the hydrogen content in the radiation shielding concretes is increased and the neutron shielding effect is improved. In addition, since serpentines are added as the fine aggregates and blown mists slags of a great specific gravity are used, the specific gravity of the shielding concretes is increased to improve the γ-ray shielding effect. Further, by the use of the kneading material having a water reducing effect and fluidizing effect, and by the bearing effect of the spherical blown mist slags used as the fine aggregates, concrete fluidity can be increased. Accordingly, workability of the radiation shielding concretes can be improved. (T.M.)

  8. Concrete quality assurance

    Holz, N. [Harza Engineering Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2000-08-01

    This short article reports on progress at the world's largest civil construction project, namely China's Three Gorges hydro project. Work goes on around the clock to put in place nearly 28 M m{sup 3} of concrete. At every stage of the work there is strong emphasis on quality assurance (QA) and concrete is no exception. The US company Harza Engineering has been providing QA since the mid-1980s and concrete QA has been based on international standards. Harza personnel work in the field with supervisors developing educational tools for supervising concrete construction and quality, as well as providing training courses in concrete technology. Some details on flood control, capacity, water quality and environmental aspects are given..

  9. Earth's youngest exposed granite and its tectonic implications: the 10-0.8 Ma Kurobegawa Granite.

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Yamada, Ryuji; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu

    2013-01-01

    Although the quest for Earth's oldest rock is of great importance, identifying the youngest exposed pluton on Earth is also of interest. A pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock that crystallized from slowly cooling magma at depths of several kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth. Therefore, the youngest exposed pluton represents the most recent tectonic uplift and highest exhumation. The youngest exposed pluton reported to date is the Takidani Granodiorite (~ 1.4 Ma) in the Hida Mountain Range of central Japan. Using LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating methods, this study demonstrates that the Kurobegawa Granite, also situated in the Hida Mountain Range, is as young as ~ 0.8 Ma. In addition, data indicate multiple intrusion episodes in this pluton since 10 Ma with a ~ 2-million-year period of quiescence; hence, a future intrusion event is likely within 1 million years.

  10. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1994 Annual Report.

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

    1994-10-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss smolts during the 1994 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake River, Clearwater River, and Salmon River. The 1994 snowpack was among the lowest since the beginning of the present drought, and the subsequent runoff was very poor. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam were marked with a fin clip in 1994. Total annual (hatchery + wild) chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.5 times greater than in 1993. Hatchery and wild steelhead trout catches were similar to 1993. The Snake River trap collected 30 age 0 chinook salmon. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Clearwater River trap was 3.5 times higher than in 1993, and wild chinook salmon catch was 4.2 times higher. Hatchery steelhead trout trap catch was less than half of 1993 numbers because the trap was fishing near the north shore during the majority of the hatchery steelhead movement due to flow augmentations from Dworshak. Wild steelhead trout trap catch was 2 times higher than in 1993. The Salmon River trap was operated for about a month longer in 1994 than in 1993 due to extremely low flows. Hatchery chinook salmon catch was 1.4 times greater in 1994 than the previous year. Wild chinook salmon catch was slightly less in 1994. The 1994 hatchery steelhead trout collection did not change significantly from 1993 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1994 was 59% of the 1993 catch. Fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992).

  11. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes.

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures.

  12. Heat transfer in reactor cavity during core-concrete interaction

    Adroguer, B.; Cenerino, G.

    1989-08-01

    In the unlikely event of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the core may melt through the vessel and slump into the concrete reactor cavity. The hot mixture of the core material called corium interacts thermally with the concrete basemat. The WECHSL code, developed at K.f.K. Karlsruhe in Germany is used at the Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute (I.P.S.N.) of CEA to compute this molten corium concrete interaction (MCCI). Some uncertainties remain in the partition of heat from the corium between the basemat and the upper surrounding structures in the cavity where the thermal conditions are not computer. The CALTHER code, under development to perform a more mechanistic evaluation of the upward heat flux has been linked to WECHSL-MOD2 code. This new version enables the modelling of the feedback effects from the conditions in the cavity to the MCCI and the computation of the fraction of upward flux directly added to the cavity atmosphere. The present status is given in the paper. Preliminary calculations of the reactor case for silicate and limestone common sand (L.C.S.) concretes are presented. Significant effects are found on concrete erosion, gases release and temperature of the upper part of corium, particularly for L.C.S. concrete

  13. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures

  14. Processed wastewater sludge for improvement of mechanical properties of concretes

    Barrera-Diaz, Carlos, E-mail: cbd0044@yahoo.com [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico - Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UAEM-UNAM), Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Martinez-Barrera, Gonzalo [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA), Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Km.12, San Cayetano C.P. 50200, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Gencel, Osman [Civil Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Bartin University, 74100 Bartin (Turkey); Bernal-Martinez, Lina A. [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico - Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UAEM-UNAM), Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Brostow, Witold [Laboratory of Advanced Polymers and Optimized Materials (LAPOM), Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART), University of North Texas, 1150 Union Circle 305310, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Electrochemical methods produce less amount of residual sludge as compared with chemical procedures. {yields} Wastewater sludge contains a large amount of water. {yields} The residual sludge is used to prepare cylinder specimen concrete. {yields} There are improvements in the elastic modulus of the concrete when is prepared with residual sludge. - Abstract: Two problems are addressed simultaneously. One is the utilisation of sludge from the treatment of wastewater. The other is the modification of the mechanical properties of concrete. The sludge was subjected to two series of treatments. In one series, coagulants were used, including ferrous sulphate, aluminium sulphate or aluminium polyhydroxychloride. In the other series, an electrochemical treatment was applied with several starting values of pH. Then, concretes consisting of a cement matrix, silica sand, marble and one of the sludges were developed. Specimens without sludge were prepared for comparison. Curing times and aggregate concentrations were varied. The compressive strength, compressive strain at yield point, and static and dynamic elastic moduli were determined. Diagrams of the compressive strength and compressive strain at the yield point as a function of time passed through the minima as a function of time for concretes containing sludge; therefore, the presence of sludge has beneficial effects on the long term properties. Some morphological changes caused by the presence of sludge are seen in scanning electron microscopy. A way of utilising sludge is thus provided together with a way to improve the compressive strain at yield point of concrete.

  15. Differences between silica and limestone concretes that may affect their interaction with corium

    Journeau, C.; Haquet, J. F.; Piluso, P.; Bonnet, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent Molten Core Concrete Interaction tests performed at Argonne National Laboratory and at CEA Cadarache have shown that, whereas the ablation of limestone-rich concretes is almost isotropic, the ablation of silica-rich concretes is much faster towards the sides than towards the bottom of the cavity. The following differences exists between limestone-rich and silica-rich concretes: limestone concretes liberate about twice as much gas, at a given ablation rate than siliceous concretes (more than 50% more at constant heat flux) and this can affect pool hydraulics and crust stability: limestone concrete has a higher liquidus temperature than siliceous concrete and molten limestone concrete has a larger diffusion coefficient and can more easily dissolve a corium crust than siliceous melt; limestone aggregates are destroyed by de-carbonation at around 1000 K while silica aggregates melt only above 2000 K, so that floating silica aggregates can form cold spots increasing corium solidification near the interface; de-carbonation of limestone leads to a significant shrinkage of concrete melt volume compared to the cold solid that hampers the mechanical stability of overlying crusts; the chemical composition of molten mortar (sand + cement) and concrete (sand + gravel + cement) is close for limestone-rich concretes while it is different for siliceous concretes, so that the melt composition may vary significantly in case of non-simultaneous melting of the siliceous concrete constituents; molten silicates have a large viscosity, so that transport properties are different for the two types of concretes. The small range of plant concrete compositions that have been considered for MCCI experiments has not yet been found sufficient to determine which of the above-mentioned differences is paramount to explain the observed difference in ablation patterns. Separate Effect Tests using specially-designed 'artificial concretes' and prototypic corium would provide the necessary

  16. Radiatives elements distribution in Serra do Carambei granite, Parana, Brazil

    Pinto-Coelho, C.V.; Siedlecki, K.N.

    1988-01-01

    In the Serra do Carambei Granite, the uranium present in the rock in anomalous concentration is hosted, preferentially, in accessory mineralogical phases-zircon, xenotime, magnetite and ilmenite, and, in lesser proportion, in the essential minerals of the rock-potassium feldspar and also iron oxydes/hydroxydes and alterated biotite. Optical petrography, autorradiomicrography, scanning electronic microscopy, and the utilization of correlation matrixes and the respective dendrograms revealed a distribution of radioactive elements basically controlled by autometassomatic, tardi/pos-magmatic or supergene processes. Intrusive felsic dikes in the Serra do Carambei Granite have radioelement concentration level approximately four times higher than the enclosing granite, where uranium as well as thorium is preferentially found in metamictized accessory minerals-zircon and allanite. (author) [pt

  17. Figure-Ground Processing: A Reassessment of Gelb and Granit.

    Nelson, Rolf; Hebda, Nicholas

    2018-03-01

    In 1923, Adhemar Gelb and Ragnar Granit, two prominent researchers in early Gestalt perceptual theory, reported a lower threshold for detection of a target (a small colored dot) on the ground region of an image than on an adjacent figural region. Although their results had a wide influence on the understanding of figure-ground perception, they are at odds with more recent investigations in which figural regions appear to have a processing advantage over ground regions. The two present studies replicated Gelb and Granit's experiment using a similar figure-ground stimulus albeit with a two-alternative forced choice procedure rather than their original method of adjustment. Experiment 1 found that, contrary to Gelb and Granit's findings, a detection advantage was found for the figural over the ground region. Experiment 2 indicated that explicit contours might have played a role in detection.

  18. Analysis of Shield Construction in Spherical Weathered Granite Development Area

    Cao, Quan; Li, Peigang; Gong, Shuhua

    2018-01-01

    The distribution of spherical weathered bodies (commonly known as "boulder") in the granite development area directly affects the shield construction of urban rail transit engineering. This paper is based on the case of shield construction of granite globular development area in Southern China area, the parameter control in shield machine selection and shield advancing during the shield tunneling in this special geological environment is analyzed. And it is suggested that shield machine should be selected for shield construction of granite spherical weathered zone. Driving speed, cutter torque, shield machine thrust, the amount of penetration and the speed of the cutter head of shield machine should be controlled when driving the boulder formation, in order to achieve smooth excavation and reduce the disturbance to the formation.

  19. Laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured Climax granite

    Failor, R.; Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Vandergraaf, T.

    1982-06-01

    This report documents our laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured granite cores. To simulate natural conditions, our laboratory studies used naturally fractured cores and natural ground water from the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test Site. For comparison, additional tests used artificially fractured granite cores or distilled water. Relative to the flow of tritiated water, 85 Sr and /sup 95m/Tc showed little or no retardation, whereas 137 Cs was retarded. After the transport runs the cores retained varying amounts of the injected radionuclides along the fracture. Autoradiography revealed some correlation between sorption and the fracture fill material. Strontium and cesium retention increased when the change was made from natural ground water to distilled water. Artificial fractures retained less 137 Cs than most natural fractures. Estimated fracture apertures from 18 to 60 μm and hydraulic conductivities from 1.7 to 26 x 10 -3 m/s were calculated from the core measurements

  20. Transpressional granite-emplacement model: Structural and magnetic study of the Pan-African Bandja granitic pluton (West Cameroon)

    Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Njanko, T.; Njonfang, E.; Errami, E.; Rochette, P.; Fozing, E.

    2016-02-01

    The Pan-African NE-SW elongated Bandja granitic pluton, located at the western part of the Pan-African belt in Cameroon, is a K-feldspar megacryst granite. It is emplaced in banded gneiss and its NW border underwent mylonitization. The magmatic foliation shows NE-SW and NNE-SSW strike directions with moderate to strong dip respectively in its northern and central parts. This mostly, ferromagnetic granite displays magnetic fabrics carried by magnetite and characterized by (i) magnetic foliation with best poles at 295/34, 283/33 and 35/59 respectively in its northern, central and southern parts and (ii) a subhorizontal magnetic lineation with best line at 37/8, 191/9 and 267/22 respectively in the northern, central and southern parts. Magnetic lineation shows an `S' shape trend that allows to (1) consider the complete emplacement and deformation of the pluton during the Pan-African D 2 and D 3 events which occurred in the Pan-African belt in Cameroon and (2) reorganize Pan-African ages from Nguiessi Tchakam et al. (1997) compared with those of the other granitic plutons in the belt as: 686 ±17 Ma (Rb/Sr) for D 1 age of metamorphism recorded in gneiss; and the period between 604-557 Ma for D 2-D 3 emplacement and deformation age of the granitic pluton in a dextral ENE-WSW shear movement.

  1. DETERMINATION OF ADHESIVE STRENGTH LAYER’S ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE THE METHOD AXIAL EXTENSION

    Tang Van Lam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Roller compacted concrete for the construction of hydraulic and hydroelectric buildings is a composite material, which consists of a binder, fine aggregate (sand, coarse aggregate (gravel or crushed stone, water and special additives that provide the desired concrete workability and impart the required concrete performance properties. Concrete mixture is prepared at from concrete mixing plants strictly metered quantities of cement, water, additives and graded aggregates, whereupon they are delivered to the site laying Mixer Truck and sealing layers with each stack layer. The advantages of roller compaction technology should include the reduction of construction time, which allows fast commissioning construction projects, as well as reduce the amount of investment required. One of the main problems encountered in the process of roller compaction of the concrete mix is the need to provide the required adhesion strength between layers of concrete. This paper presents a method for determining the strength of adhesion between the concrete layers of different ages roller compacted concrete using axial tension. This method makes it possible to obtain objective and accurate results with a total thickness of layers of compacted concrete of up to 300…400 mm. Results from this method, studies have shown that the value of strength between the concrete layers in addition to the composition of the concrete and adhesion depends on the quality and the parallel end surfaces of the cylinder-models, which are mounted steel plates for axial tension, as well as the state of the contact surfaces of the concrete layer. The method can be used to determine the strength of interlayer adhesion in roller compacted concrete, which are used in the construction of dams and other hydraulic structures.

  2. Concrete sample point: 304 Concretion Facility

    Rollison, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains information concerning the analysis of concretes for volatile organic compounds. Included are the raw data for these analysis and the quality control data, the standards data, and all of the accompanying chains-of-custody records and requests for special analysis

  3. The uniform design experimental research of a large amount of fly ash self-compaction concrete

    Zhou, M.; Ji, C.; Xiao, J. [Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin (China)

    2005-08-15

    The paper studied the effect of quantity of cementing material and fly ash, W/B (water-binder) ratio, admixture and sand percentage to the performance of super fly-ash self-compaction concrete. It also utilized the step-by-step regression analysis method in SPSS software to found regression equation, which uses the flow rate of concrete mixture and strength of concrete as objective function, and obtained the optimum mix proportion of super fly ash self-compaction by the optimization technology in the Matlab software.

  4. Oil sands tailings management project

    Godwalt, C. [Alberta WaterSMART, Calgary, AB (Canada); Kotecha, P. [Suncor Energy Inc, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aumann, C. [Alberta Innovates - Technology Futures, Alberta Governement, AB (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  5. Oil sands tailings management project

    Godwalt, C.; Kotecha, P.; Aumann, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  6. Leaching of gallium from gaiter granite, eastern desert, Egypt

    Zahran, M.A.; Mahmoud, KH.F.; Mahdy, M.A.; Abd El-Hamid, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary leaching tests of gallium from some Egyptian granite rocks such as those of Gabal Gattar area was investigated by using 8 M HCl acid and sodium perchlorate as oxidant. To achieve the optimum leaching conditions, the factors affecting the leaching efficiency as the acid type and concentration, oxidant type and amount, leaching temperature, agitation time, solid / liquid ratio and the effect of grain size were studied. The complete chemical analysis of the collected samples was firstly carried out to determine the chemical features of the Gattarian granite. More than 97% of gallium content was leached when applying these optimum leaching conditions

  7. The Swedish Bohus granite - a stone with a fascinating history

    Schouenborg, Björn; Eliasson, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    One of the most well-known and well spread Swedish stone types used as building stones is the Bonus granite. It outcrops in an area north of Gothenburgh (SW Sweden), along the coastline, approximately 35 km wide and 85 km long. The granite continues into Norway as the Iddefjord granite. The Bohus granite is one of Sweden's youngest granites. Isotopic dating shows that the magma cooled at about 920 M years ago and thus marking the end of the Sveconorwegian orogoney. It is a composite granite massif area with several granitic intrusions but with rather homogeneous mineralogy. However, colour and texture varies quite a lot and the colour ranges from red to reddish grey although some pure grey varieties occur sparsely. The grain size ranges from medium grained to coarse grained and even with some porphyric parts. Quarrying in an industrial scale started 1842. The merchant A C Kullgren opened the first quarry and produced stones for the construction of the 86 km long Trollhättan channel connecting lake Vänern and the Atlantic ocean in the SW Sweden The stone was used for constructing harbors and wharves along the channel. Several quarries opened in the late 1800 around 1870 - 1890 and the export increased steadily with deliveries to Germany, Denmark, Holland, England and even to South America. The stone industries in Bohuslän (Bohus county), at its peak in 1929, engaged around 7 000 employees. During the depression in 1930 almost all of them became unemployed. However, as a curiosity, production and export continued to Germany for construction of Germania, the future World capital city ("Welthauptstadt Germania"), planned by Adolf Hitler and Albert Speer. About 500 stone workers were kept employed for this project during the late thirties. Today several varieties are still produced: Evja/Ävja, Tossene, Brastad, Näsinge, Broberg, Nolby, Allemarken and Skarstad. However, the number of stone workers is far from that of the early 1900. The Swedish production is mainly

  8. Threshold Differences on Figure and Ground: Gelb and Granit (1923).

    Kinateder, Max; Nelson, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    In 1923, Gelb and Granit, using a method of adjustment for a small red light, reported a lower threshold for the target when presented on a ground region than on an adjacent figural region. More recent work in perceptual organization has found precisely the opposite-a processing advantage seems to go to items presented on the figure, not the ground. Although Gelb and Granit continue to be cited for their finding, it has not previously been available as an English translation. Understanding their methodology and results is important for integrating early Gestalt theory with more recent investigations.

  9. Threshold Differences on Figure and Ground: Gelb and Granit (1923)

    Kinateder, Max

    2017-01-01

    In 1923, Gelb and Granit, using a method of adjustment for a small red light, reported a lower threshold for the target when presented on a ground region than on an adjacent figural region. More recent work in perceptual organization has found precisely the opposite—a processing advantage seems to go to items presented on the figure, not the ground. Although Gelb and Granit continue to be cited for their finding, it has not previously been available as an English translation. Understanding their methodology and results is important for integrating early Gestalt theory with more recent investigations. PMID:28286640

  10. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  11. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Lomasney, H.L.; SenGupta, A.K.; Yachmenev, V.

    1996-01-01

    ELECTROSORB Electrokinetic Extraction Technology, developed by ISOTRON Corp., offers a cost-effective approach to treating contaminated concrete. Heavy metals/radionuclides trapped in concrete can be extracted using this process if they are chemically solubilized; solubilizers used are citric acid alone and a mixture of citric and nitric acids. A DC electric field is applied across the contaminated concrete to electrokinetically transport the solubilized contaminants from the concrete pores to a collector on the concrete surface. The collector is an extraction pad laid on the surface. The pad provides confinement for a planar electrode and solubilizer solution; it is operated under a vacuum to hold the pad against the concrete surface. Operation requires little attendance, reducing the workers' health hazards. The process incorporates a mechanism for recycling the solubilizer solution. A field demonstration of the process took place in Building 21 of DOE's Mound facility in Miamisburg, OH, over 12 days in June 1996. The thorium species present in this building's concrete floors included ThO 2 and thorium oxalate. The nitric acid was found to facilitate Th extraction

  12. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  13. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  14. Concrete and criticality

    Carter, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Concrete is a widely used structural material which occurs frequently in systems requiring criticality analyses. Ordinarily, we give little thought to what its actual composition is (as compared to reference compositions), yet in criticality safety, differences in composition can cause large changes in k-effective and it may not be easy to predict in which direction the change will occur. Concrete composition is quite variable with differences in the aggregate used in the concrete in various parts of the country providing relative large differences in k-effective. The water content of concrete can also strongly affect the reactivity of a system in which it acts as a reflector or is interspersed between fissile units. Because concrete is so common and is often (but not always) a better reflector than water, one must know the concrete compositions or be prepared to use a ''worst case'' composition. It may be a problem, however, to determine just what is the worst case. At the Hanford Plant, the aggregate normally used is basalt, which gives a composition very low in carbon as opposed to those areas (e.g., Oak Ridge) where the use of limestone aggregate will result in concrete with a high carbon content. The data presented show some of the effects found in situations using ''Hanford'' concrete, but similar effects might be found with other compositions. In some cases, the use of concrete may be incidental to the effects shown. While the numbers shown are those for actual systems, the primary intent is to alert the reader that these effects can occur. In applying this information, the analyst should use material specific to the systems being analyzed

  15. Biodecontamination of concrete

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Benson, J.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technology for biologically decontaminating concrete is being jointly developed by scientists at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The technology exploits a naturally occurring phenomenon referred to as microbially influenced degradation (MID) in which bacteria produce acids that dissolve the cement matrix of concrete. Most radionuclide contamination of concrete is fixed in the outer few mm of the concrete surface. By capturing and controlling this natural process, a biological method of removing the surface of concrete to depths up to several mm is being developed. Three types of bacteria are known to be important in MID of concrete: nitrifying bacteria that produce nitric acid, sulfur oxidizing bacteria that produce sulfuric acid, and certain heterotrophic bacteria that produce organic acids. An investigation of natural environments demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy the presence of bacteria on concrete surfaces of a variety of structures, such as bridges and dams, where corrosion is evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing and nitrifying bacteria revealed their presence and activity on structures to varying degrees in different environments. Under ideal conditions, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, a sulfur oxidizing bacteria, attached to and colonized the surface of concrete specimens. Over 1mm depth of material from a 10 cm x 10 cm square surface was removed in 68 days in the Thiobacillus treated specimen compared to a sterile control. Laboratory and field demonstrations are currently being conducted using experimental chambers designed to be mounted directly to concrete surfaces where radionuclide contamination exists. Data is being obtained in order to determine actual rates of surface removal and limitations to the system. This information will be used to develop a full scale decontamination technology

  16. Separability studies of construction and demolition waste recycled sand.

    Ulsen, Carina; Kahn, Henrique; Hawlitschek, Gustav; Masini, Eldon A; Angulo, Sérgio C

    2013-03-01

    The quality of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) is strictly related to the content of porous and low strength phases, and specifically to the patches of cement that remain attached to the surface of natural aggregates. This phase increases water absorption and compromises the consistency and strength of concrete made from recycled aggregates. Mineral processing has been applied to CDW recycling to remove the patches of adhered cement paste on coarse recycled aggregates. The recycled fine fraction is usually disregarded due to its high content of porous phases despite representing around 50% of the total waste. This paper focus on laboratory mineral separability studies for removing particles with a high content of cement paste from natural fine aggregate particles (quartz/feldspars). The procedure achieved processing of CDW by tertiary impact crushing to produce sand, followed by sieving and density and magnetic separability studies. The attained results confirmed that both methods were effective in reducing cement paste content and producing significant mass recovery (80% for density concentration and 60% for magnetic separation). The production of recycled sand contributes to the sustainability of the construction environment by reducing both the consumption of raw materials and disposal of CDW, particularly in large Brazilian centers with a low quantity of sand and increasing costs of this material due to long transportation distances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. concrete5 cookbook

    Strack, David

    2013-01-01

    The Cookbook-style recipes allow you to go both directly to your topic of interest or follow topics throughout a chapter to gain in-depth knowledge. This practical Cookbook will cater to the needs of both intermediate and advanced concrete5 developers.This book is geared towards intermediate to advanced PHP developers who would like to learn more about the concrete5 content management system. Developers already familiar with concrete5 will learn new time-saving tricks and will find the book to be a great reference tool.

  18. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  19. Leaching studies of heavy concrete material for nuclear fuel waste immobilization containers

    Onofrei, M.; Raine, D.; Brown, L.; Hooton, R.D.

    1989-08-01

    The leaching behaviour of a high-density concrete was studied as part of a program to evaluate its potential use as a container material for nuclear fuel waste under conditions of deep geologic disposal. Samples of concrete material were leached in deionized distilled water, Standard Canadian Shield Saline Solution (SCSSS), SCSSS plus 20% Na-bentonite, and SCSSS plus granite and 20% Na-bentonite under static conditions at 100 degrees celsius for periods up to 365 days. The results of these leaching experiments suggest that the stability of concrete depends on the possible internal structural changes due to hydration reactions of unhydrated components, leading to the formation of C-S-H gel plus portlandite (Ca(OH) 2 ). The factors controlling the concrete leaching process were the composition of the leachant and the concentration of elements in solution capable of forming precipitates on the concrete surface, e.g., silicon, Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ . The main effect observed during leaching was an increase in groundwater pH (from 7 to 9). However, the addition of Na-bentonite suppressed the normal tendency of the pH of the groundwater in contact with concrete to rise rapidly. It was shown that the solution concentration of elements released from the concrete, particularly potassium, increased in the presence of Na-bentonite

  20. Properties of high-workability concrete with recycled concrete aggregate

    Safiuddin,; Alengaram,Ubagaram Johnson; Salam,Abdus; Jumaat,Mohd Zamin; Jaafar,Fahrol Fadhli; Saad,Hawa Binti

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the effects of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) on the key fresh and hardened properties of concrete. RCA was used to produce high-workability concrete substituting 0-100% natural coarse aggregate (NCA) by weight. The slump and slump flow of fresh concretes were determined to ensure high workability. In addition, the compressive, flexural and splitting tensile strengths, modulus of elasticity, and permeable voids of hardened concretes were determined. The test results rev...

  1. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GLASS FIBRE CONCRETE AND NORMAL CONCRETE

    Mr.Yogesh S.Lanjewar*

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is basically the most important material concerning with the construction and infrastructural procedures, for which it should be of good strength and durability. Many researches are being conducted to make concrete more sustainable and of more strength and durability. Therefore keeping this in mind i have chosen to do the comparative study regarding the strength of normal concrete with the glass fibre added concrete using mix design procedure as per IS 10262-2009 for concrete. As w...

  2. Investigation of the existence of self compacting properties in high performance concrete through experimental tests

    Heitor H. Yoshida

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The self compacting concrete is characterized by its capacity to flow inside the formwork filling it exclusively by the force of the gravity with adequate cohesion and viscosity in such a way that segregation does not occur. One of its characteristic is the presence of fines which provide the necessary cohesion,and grains with maximum diameter of 20 mm. This work presents some procedures and experimental methods that make it possible to evaluate self compacting properties of high performance concrete. First, a bibliographical review on the subject was carried out, and later, the equipment used for the accomplishment of the assays were manufactured, in order to verify the properties related to the self compacting concrete: cohesion, viscosity and segregation. As for the work, two concretes were produced with Portland ARI Cement, thick sand, stone powder, sand 0, superplasticizer made of ether-carboxilate chains that differentiate from each other for the presence of active silica in one of them and fly ash in the other. Based on the results, it was verified whether the high performance concrete had self compacting characteristics. In this case, both were considered positive. It was also analyzed the behavior of these concretes in their hardened state by means of the compressive strength test. The Self Compacting Concrete has many advantages such as: reduction in the number of employees, shorter construction period, the non-use of the vibrator and the filling of formworks with high density of… or of complex geometry.

  3. Pervious concrete using fly ash aggregate as coarse aggregate-an experimental study

    Dash, Subhakanta; Kar, Biswabandita; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2018-05-01

    The present study deals with the fabrication of pervious concrete from fly ash aggregates. The pervious concrete were obtained by the mixture of three different size fly ash aggregates (4.75 mm,9.5 mm,12.5 mm), Portland cement, water with little amount of sand or without sand. Admixtures like Silica fume(SF) and Super plasticizer are added to the mixture to enhance the strength of concrete. Trial being taken on preparation of Fly ash based pervious concrete (FPC) with different w/c ratio i.e. 0.30, 0.35 and 0.40 respectively. Tests such as porosity, permeability and compressive, strength are studied for this concrete material and the result concluded that the concrete when cured for 28 days its compressive strength falls in between 7.15 - 15.74 MPa and permeability 9.38 - 16.07 mm/s with porosity 27.59 - 34.05% and these are suited to be used as for use as an environment friendly concrete.

  4. Depositional features and stratigraphic sections in granitic plutons: implications for the emplacement and crystallization of granitic magma

    Wiebe, R. A.; Collins, W. J.

    1998-09-01

    Many granitic plutons contain sheet-like masses of dioritic to gabbroic rocks or swarms of mafic to intermediate enclaves which represent the input of higher temperature, more mafic magma during crystallization of the granitic plutons. Small-scale structures associated with these bodies (e.g. load-cast and compaction features, silicic pipes extending from granitic layers into adjacent gabbroic sheets) indicate that the sheets and enclave swarms were deposited on a floor of the magma chamber (on granitic crystal mush and beneath crystal-poor magma) while the mafic magma was incompletely crystallized. These structures indicate 'way up', typically toward the interior of the intrusions, and appear to indicate that packages of mafic sheets and enclave concentrations in these plutons are a record of sequential deposition. Hence, these plutons preserve a stratigraphic history of events involved in the construction (filling, replenishment) and crystallization of the magma chamber. The distinctive features of these depositional portions of plutons allow them to be distinguished from sheeted intrusions, which usually preserve mutual intrusive contacts and 'dike-sill' relations of different magma types. The considerable thickness of material that can be interpreted as depositional, and the evidence for replenishment, suggest that magma chamber volumes at any one time were probably much less than the final size of the pluton. Thus, magma chambers may be constructed much more slowly than presently envisaged. The present steep attitudes of these structures in many plutons may have developed gradually as the floor of the chamber (along with the underlying solidified granite and country rock) sank during continuing episodes of magma chamber replenishment. These internal magmatic structures support recent suggestions that the room problem for granites could be largely accommodated by downward movement of country rock beneath the magma chamber.

  5. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of uranium-rich fluoriteinEl-Missikat mineralized granite,Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Mohamed Fahmy Raslan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A unique, highly radioactive variety of fluor it emineral has been recorded in the uranium occurrence of El-Missikat sheared granite pluton. In this occurrence, the uranium assumes different forms, including its presence as discrete, visible, secondary minerals, rare uraninite and its association with the jasperoid and silica veinlets. However,in some other parts of the sheared zone, the uranium was found to be solely incorporated with fluorite crystals,filling veinlet sand fractures with out any other manife station.This paper focuses ont her elevant mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of this unique fluorite variety.In addition to an investigation with binocular and polarizing microscopes, the separated fluorite grains were analyzed usingan environmental scanning electronmicroscope(ESEM and a field-emission scanning electron microscope.In addition to this,some fluorite crystals were subjected to electron microprobe analyses. While the fluorite accounted for as much as 20% of the sheared granite samples studied, it was found to range from 82 to 96 % in the different size fractions of the separated heavy mineral content. In some parts of the separated fluorite crystals,uranium inquantities of up to 2200 ppm was found to be heterogeneously distributed in the fluoritelattice,regardless of its coloration.

  6. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  7. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  8. Shrinkage Reducing Admixture for Concrete

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Concrete shrinkage cracking is a common problem in all types of concrete structures, especially for structures and environments where the cracks are prevalent and the repercussions are most severe. A liquid shrinkage reducing admixture for concrete, developed by GRACE Construction Products and ARCO Chemical Company, that reduces significantly the shrinkage during concrete drying and potentially reduces overall cracking over time.

  9. Late Triassic granites from Bangka, Indonesia: A continuation of the Main Range granite province of the South-East Asian Tin Belt

    Ng, Samuel Wai-Pan; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Roselee, Muhammad H.; Teschner, Claudia; Murtadha, Sayed; Oliver, Grahame J. H.; Ghani, Azman A.; Chang, Su-Chin

    2017-05-01

    The South-East Asian Tin Belt is one of the most tin-productive regions in the world. It comprises three north-south oriented granite provinces, of which the arc-related Eastern granite province and the collision-related Main Range granite province run across Thailand, Singapore, and Indonesia. These tin-producing granite provinces with different mineral assemblages are separated by Paleo-Tethyan sutures exposed in Thailand and Malaysia. The Eastern Province is usually characterised by granites with biotite ± hornblende. Main Range granites are sometimes characterised by the presence of biotite ± muscovite. However, the physical boundary between the two types of granite is not well-defined on the Indonesian Tin Islands, because the Paleo-Tethyan suture is not exposed on land there. Both hornblende-bearing (previously interpreted as I-type) and hornblende-barren (previously interpreted as S-type) granites are apparently randomly distributed on the Indonesian Tin Islands. Granites exposed on Bangka, the largest and southernmost Tin Island, no matter whether they are hornblende-bearing or hornblende-barren, are geochemically similar to Malaysian Main Range granites. The average ɛNd(t) value obtained from the granites from Bangka (average ɛNd(t) = -8.2) falls within the range of the Main Range Province (-9.6 to -5.4). These granites have SIMS zircon U-Pb ages of ca. 225 Ma and ca. 220 Ma, respectively that are both within the period of Main Range magmatism (∼226-201 Ma) in the Peninsular Malaysia. We suggest that the granites exposed on Bangka represent the continuation of the Main Range Province, and that the Paleo-Tethyan suture lies to the east of the island.

  10. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  11. A historical examination of concrete

    Mallinson, L.G.; Li Davies, I.

    1987-01-01

    The requirement that concrete in radioactive waste repositories be stable physically and chemically for very long times has initiated studies of ancient and old concretes. This report is a contribution to this effort. After a description of the history of cement and concrete, the published literature relating to the analysis of old and ancient concrete is reviewed. A series of samples spanning the history of concrete has been obtained; a variety of physical and chemical techniques have been employed to characterize these samples. Reasons for survival of ancient concretes, and for durability of early, reinforced concretes are identified. Recommendations for further studies are given. 132 refs

  12. Palm-Kernel Shell Concrete For Structural Use – A Preliminary ...

    The paper reports on the results of an investigation into the physical and strength characteristics of concrete (norminal mixes), which contains crushed palm-kernel shell as fine aggregates instead of normal river sand. 66 No beams of 100mm x 100mm x 500mm sizes and 396 No 100mm cubes as well were tested with ...

  13. The spatial impact of building in concrete versus building in wood

    Ike, P.; van der Moolen, B.; Voogd, H.; Richardson, A.

    1998-01-01

    In order to be able to meet the Dutch demand for cement concrete, 110 to 215 ha must be excavated annually to quarry the aggregates - coarse sand, gravel and limestone - in The Netherlands as well as abroad. If alternative and secondary raw materials are used, the demand for the aggregates mentioned

  14. Flexural Behaviour Of Reinforced Concrete Beams Containing Expanded Glass As Lightweight Aggregates

    Khatib Jamal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The flexural properties of reinforced concrete beams containing expanded glass as a partial fine aggregate (sand replacement are investigated. Four concrete mixes were employed to conduct this study. The fine aggregate was replaced with 0%, 25%, 50% and 100% (by volume expanded glass. The results suggest that the incorporation of 50% expanded glass increased the workability of the concrete. The compressive strength was decreasing linearly with the increasing amount of expanded glass. The ductility of the concrete beam significantly improved with the incorporation of the expanded glass. However, the load-carrying capacity of the beam and load at which the first crack occurs was reduced. It was concluded that the inclusion of expanded glass in structural concrete applications is feasible.

  15. Khnifiss Beach's Black Sand: Provenance and Transport Pathways Investigation Using Heavy Minerals' Characterization

    Adnani, M.; Elbelrhiti, H.; Ahmamou, M.; Masmoudi, L.

    2014-12-01

    Arid areas in south of Morocco suffer from silting problem causing destruction of villages infrastructure, roads, agriculture land and oasis heritage. Black sand on Khnifiss beach near Tarfaya city (S-W Morocco) is marked by enrichment of heavy minerals. This later is an important fraction that could help to assess the provenance and transport pathways of sediment. The sand's origin investigation could be useful to fight against erosion and silting problems from the source of supply, to this end, mineralogical analysis was carried out in Khnifiss beach's sand using Optic Microscope and Scanning Electronic Microscope with dispersive energy (SEM- EDS), in addition to physico-chemical analysis provided by Electronic Microprobe. The results revealed: (i) a high grade of oxides (Rutile, Ilmenite, Magnetite, Ulvöspinel) in samples, (ii) silicates (Quartz, Clinopyroxene, feldspar, Zircon), (iii) phosphate (apatite) and (iv) carbonate (calcite). The dominance of iron oxides justifies the black sand's colour. Then, the mineral composition supposes interference between different origins: proximal source (Calcareous cliff) for calcite, distal sources of oxides and silicates are supposed to be eroded and carried by Drâa valley from granite and igneous rocks in Anti-Atlasic field. Another source supposed might be a proximal volcanic island (Canaries island).

  16. Indoor radon in houses built on gravel and sand deposits in southern Finland

    Hutri, K.-L.

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK have shown that, in Finland, indoor radon concentrations are almost twice as high in houses built on sand or gravel as in houses built on other soil types. The aim of this study was to assess the radon risk on eskers, ice-marginal formations, and other gravel and sand deposits on the basis of factors that can be determined from geological maps. Altogether, 514 houses built on gravel and sand deposits were selected for the study from the indoor radon database of STUK. Several geological parameters were determined. Empirical statistical models were used to assess the significance of factors affecting indoor radon in glaciofluvial deposits and the sand-dominant littoral deposits occurring in association with them. A relationship was found between increased indoor radon concentrations and the location of a house on a steep-sided esker, in the southeastern rapakivi granite area and on the upper slope or top of an esker. The steepness of the slope also increased the radon concentration in houses on steep-sided eskers. The effect of the topographic features is due to subterranean air-flows. As estimated from the very sparse till sampling, the elevated uranium concentration increased the indoor radon concentration only in houses built on littoral deposits around eskers and ice-marginal formations.

  17. Smolt monitoring at the head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1998.; ANNUAL

    2000-01-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka, during the 1998 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake and Salmon rivers. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam 19 1998 were marked with a fin-clip. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 226% of the 1997 number and 110% of the 1996 catch. The wild chinook catch was 120% of the 1997 catch but was only 93% of 1996. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 501% of 1997 numbers but only 90% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 569% of 1997 and 125% of the 1996 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 106 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998, for the first time, the Snake River trap captured a significant number of hatchery sockeye salmon (1,552) and hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch (166). Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 8 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 12. The trap was out of operation for 34 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 476% and wild chinook salmon catch was 137% of 1997 numbers and 175% and 82% of 1996 catch, respectively. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 96% of the 1997 catch and 13% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 170% of the 1997 catch and 37% of the 1996 numbers. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 1998 detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and

  18. 76 FR 62758 - Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla National Forests, Oregon Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans

    2011-10-11

    ... environmental analyses for proposed mining Plans in the portions of the Granite Creek Watershed under their... Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans analysis area that meets the Purpose of and Need for Action. It is... Granite Creek Watershed Mining Plans AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an...

  19. Granites of Zoz area, Baroda district, Gujarat and its economic significance

    Maithani, P.B.; Rathaiah, Y.V.; Varughese, Siby K.; Singh, Rajendra

    1998-01-01

    The granites around Zoz represent a differentiated, calc-alkaline, subaluminous, A-type granite with higher uranium content. The A-type affinity points to the possibility of encountering Sn, Mo, Bi, Nb, Ta and F mineralization in the area. The low Th/U ratio also favours vein type U-deposits within granites or in adjacent metasediments. (author)

  20. Anchorage in concrete construction

    Eligehausen, Rolf; Silva, John F

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of current fastening technology using inserts (anchor channels, headed stud), anchors (metal expansion anchor, undercut anchor, bonded anchor, concrete screw and plastic anchor) as well as power actuated fasteners in concrete. It describes in detail the fastening elements as well as their effects and load-bearing capacities in cracked and non-cracked concrete. It further focuses on corrosion behaviour, fire resistance and characteristics with earthquakes and shocks. It finishes off with the design of fastenings according to the European Technical Approval Guideline (ETAG 001), the Final Draft of the CEN Technical Specification 'Design of fastenings for use in concrete' and the American Standards ACI 318-05, Appendix D and ACI 349-01, Appendix B.

  1. Concrete Research Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is a 20,000-sq ft laboratory that supports research on all aspects of concrete and materials technology. The staff of this facility offer wide-ranging expertise...

  2. Prestressed concrete design

    Hurst, MK

    1998-01-01

    This edition provides up-to-date guidance on the detailed design of prestressed concrete structures. All major topics are dealt with, including prestressed flat slabs, an important and growing application in the design of buildings.

  3. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    TECS

    exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution ... Having tremendous load bearing capacity, it can withstand .... retention coefficients for similar concrete compositions.

  4. Improving concrete overlay construction.

    2010-03-01

    Several road construction projects involving concrete overlays at the state and county levels in Iowa in 2009 were studied for : construction techniques and methods. The projects that were evaluated consisted of sites in four Iowa counties: Osceola, ...

  5. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  6. Modeling reinforced concrete durability.

    2014-06-01

    This project developed a next-generation modeling approach for projecting the extent of : reinforced concrete corrosion-related damage, customized for new and existing Florida Department of : Transportation bridges and suitable for adapting to broade...

  7. The Landforms of Granitic Rocks: An Annotated Bibliography

    1990-05-01

    vertical joints are dominant. Duricrust and rock basins are common. The latter are independent of jointing and are associated with the older, thicker... duricrust . 15 Davis, W. M. 1933. Granitic domes of the Mohave Desert, California. Transactions of the San Diego Society of Natural History, vol. 7, pp

  8. Monte Carlo simulations for generic granite repository studies

    Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Joon H [SNL; Wang, Yifeng [SNL

    2010-12-08

    In a collaborative study between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the DOE-NE Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign project, we have conducted preliminary system-level analyses to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. A general modeling framework consisting of a near- and a far-field submodel for a granite GDSE was developed. A representative far-field transport model for a generic granite repository was merged with an integrated systems (GoldSim) near-field model. Integrated Monte Carlo model runs with the combined near- and farfield transport models were performed, and the parameter sensitivities were evaluated for the combined system. In addition, a sub-set of radionuclides that are potentially important to repository performance were identified and evaluated for a series of model runs. The analyses were conducted with different waste inventory scenarios. Analyses were also conducted for different repository radionuelide release scenarios. While the results to date are for a generic granite repository, the work establishes the method to be used in the future to provide guidance on the development of strategy for long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in a granite repository.

  9. Chemical Variations in a Granitic Pluton and Its Surrounding Rocks.

    Baird, A K; McIntyre, D B; Welday, E E; Madlem, K W

    1964-10-09

    New techniques of x-ray fluorescence spectrography have provided, for the first time, abundant data regarding chemical variability of granitic rocks on different scales. The results suggest that current designs of sampling plans for trend surface analysis should be modified; in particular several specimens, preferably drillcores, may be required at each locality.

  10. Assessment of radioactivity in building material(granite) in Sudan

    Osman, Z. A; Salih, I; Albadwai, K. A; Salih, A. M; Salih, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work radioactivity in building materials (granite) central Sudan was evaluated. In general the building materials used in Sudan are derived either from rocks or soil. These contain trace amounts of naturally occurring radioactive materials(NORMs), so it contains radionuclides from uranium and thorium series and natural potassium. The levels of these radionuclides vary according to the geology of their site of origin. High levels increase the risk of radiation exposure in homes(especially exposure due to radon). Investigation of radioactivity in granite used of the building materials in Sudan is carried out, a total of 18 major samples of granite have been collected and measured using X- ray fluorescence system (30 mci). The activity concentrations have been determined for uranium ("2"3"8U), thorium ('2"3"2Th) and potassium("4"0K) in each sample. The concentrations of uranium have been found to range from 14.81 Bq/kg to 24.572 Bq/kg, thorium between 10.02 Bq/kg and 10.020-84.79 Bq/kg and the potassium concentration varies between 13.33 Bq/kg to 82.13 Bq/kg. Limits of radioactivity in the granite are based on dose criteria for controls. This study can be used as a reference for more extensive studies of the same subject in future. (Author)

  11. Granite-related Hypothermal Uranium Mineralization in South China

    Liu Xiaodong; Wu Jianhua; Pan Jiangyong; Zhu Mingqian

    2014-01-01

    Moer and more evidence indicates that there are multi-stages uranium mineralization in many granite-related uranium deposits in south China. The early stage mineralization shares the characters of hypothermal U mineralization and had close relations to alkaline alterations.

  12. Geochemical trends in the weathered profiles above granite gneiss ...

    Geochemical trends in the weathered profiles above granite gneiss and schist of Abeokuta area, southwestern Nigeria. Anthony T Bolarinwa, Anthony A Elueze. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Mining and Geology 2005, Vol. 41(1): 19-31. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  13. Extraction of Th and U from Swiss granites

    Bajo, C.

    1980-12-01

    The extraction, at the laboratory level, of U and Th from Swiss granites is discussed. The Mittagfluh, Bergell and Rotondo granites and the Giuv syenite offered a wide range of U and Th concentrations; 7.7 to 20.0 ppm U and 25.5 to 67.0 ppm Th. U and Th were determined in the leach solutions by the fission track method and by spectrophotometry, respectively. Samples containing less than 0.3 μg U and 4 μg Th, could be measured with an accuracy of 10% for U and 5% for Th. Leach tests were performed during which the following parameters were varied: granite-type, grain size, acid-type, acid concentration, temperature and time. There were very great leaching differences between the granites studied. Temperature was the most important parameter. Sharp differences in extraction occurred between 20 0 C, 50 0 C and 80 0 C. At 80 0 C, more than 85% U and Th were extracted. The extraction curve (percent extracted as a function of time) of aliquots sampled after 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours showed a plateau after 8 hours. The half life of the reaction was between one and two hours. As a general rule, Th was better extracted than U. (Auth.)

  14. Preliminary study of radioactive waste disposal in granitic underground caves

    Carvalho, J.F. de; Carajilescov, P.

    1984-01-01

    To date, the disposal of radioactive wastes is one of the major problems faced by the nuclear industry. The utilization of granitic underground caves surrounded by a clay envelope is suggested as a safe alternative for such disposal. A preliminary analysis of the dimensions of those deposits is done. (Author) [pt

  15. The influence of the coarse aggregates from different mineralogy on the mechanical properties of the high-performance concrete; A influencia de agregados graudos de diferentes mineralogias nas propriedades mecanicas do concreto de alto desempenho

    Magalhaes, A.G.; Calixto, J.M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Estruturas], e-mail: aldo@dees.ufmg.br; Franca, E.P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais de Construcao; Aguilar, M.T.P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais de Construcao; Vasconcelos, W.L. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2006-07-01

    Concrete in normal conditions is a versatile and strong construction material. However under certain environmental conditions it may deteriorate in a short period of time. This fact has led researchers in recent times to develop the high-performance concrete. In this scenario, the aim of this paper is to present the effects of the different types of coarse aggregate on the mechanical properties of high performance concrete. Limestone, granite, gneiss and basalt were used as coarse aggregates. Their characterization consisted of chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. The compressive strength and the modulus of elasticity were the investigated mechanical properties. The test results indicate expressively the better performance of the concretes fabricated with basalt, granite and gneiss aggregates. (author)

  16. Recycling of concrete

    Halaszovich, S.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reviews potentials and problems of disposal or recycling of concrete removed from nuclear installations. Due to the difficulties in determining radioactivity limits that are compatible with utilization of recycled material in practice, a method is proposed that takes into account inhalation of dusts, as occurring during the reprocessing or recycling of the concrete, for instance in road building. This method is based on the maximum permissible radioactivity uptake by inhalation of a nuclide mixture of unknown composition. (RB) [de

  17. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  18. ADVANCEMENTS IN CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY

    Shri Purvansh B. Shah; Shri Prakash D. Gohil; Shri Hiren J. Chavda; Shri Tejas D. Khediya

    2015-01-01

    Developing and maintaining world’s infrastructure to meet the future needs of industrialized and developing countries is necessary to economically grow and improve the quality of life. The quality and performance of concrete plays a key role for most of infrastructure including commercial, industrial, residential and military structures, dams, power plants. Concrete is the single largest manufactured material in the world and accounts for more than 6 billion metric tons of materials annual...

  19. Properties of Shredded Roof Membrane–Sand Mixture and Its Application as Retaining Wall Backfill under Static and Earthquake Loads

    Bennett Livingston

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available About 20 billion square feet of Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM rubber is installed on roofs in the United States and most of them will be reaching the end of their lifespan soon. The purpose of this study is to investigate potential reuses of this rubber in Civil Engineering projects rather than disposing it into landfills. First, laboratory tests were performed on various shredded rubber-sand mixtures to quantify the basic geotechnical engineering properties. The laboratory test results show that the shredded rubber-sand mixture is lightweight with good drainage properties and has shear strength parameters comparable to sand. This indicates that the rubber-sand mixture has potential to be used for retaining wall backfill and many other projects. To assess the economic advantage of using shredded rubber-sand mixtures as a lightweight backfill for retaining walls subjected to static and earthquake loadings, geotechnical designs of a 6 m tall gravity cantilever retaining wall were performed. The computed volume of concrete to build the structural components and volume of backfill material were compared with those of conventional sand backfill. Results show significant reductions in the volume of concrete and backfill material in both static and earthquake loading conditions when the portion of shredded rubber increased in the mixture.

  20. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.